WorldWideScience

Sample records for ageing population worries

  1. Gender, Age, and Behavior Differences in Early Adolescent Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen L.; Teufel, James A.; Birch, David A.; Kancherla, Vijaya

    2006-01-01

    Early adolescents in the United States are increasingly exposed to a culture of worrisome messages. A degree of adolescent worry is normal, but the likelihood of a young person being anxious or depressed increases with the perceived number of worries. This study examined the effect of age, gender, and worry behavior on frequency of 8 adolescent…

  2. Age-Related Differences in Worry and Related Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basevitz, Paul; Pushkar, Dolores; Chaikelson, June; Conway, Michael; Dalton, Connie

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that older adults would show age-related reductions in the tendency to worry in both their retrospective accounts and through cross-sectional age comparisons with a sample of younger adults. We also sought to determine whether age differences would be evident in psychological processes associated with a…

  3. Relating Worry and Executive Functioning During Childhood: The Moderating Role of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronimi, Elena M C; Patterson, Heather L; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2016-06-01

    The associations between worry and executive functioning across development have not been previously explored. Examining the interrelationships between these variables in childhood may further elucidate the cognitive nature of worry as well as its developmental course. Hypotheses predicted that difficulties with executive functioning would correlate with child worry; based on extant literature, age-related hypotheses were proposed for particular aspects of executive functioning. Children (N = 130) participated in the present study. Difficulties with executive functioning and child worry were assessed. Results demonstrated that each executive functioning subscale correlated with worry. The relations between worry and several facets of executive functioning were no longer significant at older ages, while the relations between worry and the facets of inhibition, shifting, and emotional control did not demonstrate age-related interaction effects. Overall, the findings suggest that worry is associated with executive functioning at young ages and that this association takes distinct forms during different childhood stages.

  4. On worries, concerns and dangers among spanish population: a qualitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, R.; Cebrian, A.L.; Menard, M. [Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sola, R.; Prades, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Technologicas, Madrid (Spain)

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents qualitative findings on the principal worries, concerns and dangers surrounding risk perception extracted from the Cross-cultural Survey carried out within RISKPERCOM' research project (Risk Perception and Communication). A questionnaire was mailed to arandom sample of the Spanish population allowing a study of amplification/attenuation with regard to the tenth anniversary as well as investigating management and communication issues related to radiological matters. The questionnaires were mailed to the adult population from 18 to 75 years of age, where 48.9% males and 51.1 % females. The number of questionnaires obtained for each wave were 490. The response rate was around 69%. At this paper we present the principal concerns, worries and dangers perceived by the Spanish population as identified through three open questions. The items were grouped in different categories; national political situation, economical concern, personal/social concerns, environmental concerns, global concerns... These categories are associated through correspondence analysis to socio-demographical variables as sex, age, education, political orientation an environmental attitude. (authors)

  5. Do not worry, be mindful: effects of induced worry and mindfulness on respiratory variability in a nonanxious population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlemincx, Elke; Vigo, Daniel; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-02-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by chronic worry. Mindfulness-based stress reduction is thought to remediate excessive worry, because it counteracts a permanent defense state of enhanced vigilance to potential threats. The present study aimed to compare respiratory variability (RV) during worry and mindfulness. Following an 8-minute baseline, 37 healthy participants underwent 11-min worry and mindfulness inductions, in randomized order, using auditory scripts. Respiration was measured by chest and abdominal inductance belts. RV was quantified by (1) autocorrelation to assess linear breathing variability and (2) sample entropy to assess nonlinear breathing variability. Compared to baseline and mindfulness, worry showed decreased autocorrelation in all respiratory parameters and compared to mindfulness, worry showed decreased entropy in respiratory rate. These results suggest that, in contrast to mindfulness, worry is characterized by decreased respiratory stability and flexibility, and therefore worry and mindfulness seem to have countering effects on RV and respiratory regulation.

  6. Population aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of population aging in China, the most densely populated country in the world. Statistics indicate that by the end of 1998, 83.75 million out of the 1.248 billion Chinese people will be over 65 years old. According to the UN standards, China will soon become an aging society. The aging population poses several challenges to the country with the greatest challenge being the increasing social responsibility to care for the aged. With the undeveloped legislative framework to protect the interests of the aged and the serious drawbacks in the pension system to cater only to the income part and not the service part of the aged, China is not yet ready for the advent of aging. Violation of the rights of senior citizens is still very rampant despite enactment of the law on Protection of the Rights of the Elderly in 1996. Moreover, China is not economically ready to become an aging society. China faces this challenge by adopting a three-pronged approach to solve the problem namely: family support, establishment of nursing homes, and creating a social security framework that addresses the needs of the society suited to the Chinese condition. It is believed that with the growing economy of the country and the rising income of its people, a comprehensive social security net will be created to take care of the aged.

  7. Nuclear War as a Source of Adolescent Worry: Relationships with Age, Gender, Trait Emotionality, and Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Scott B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compares the extent to which adolescents worry about nuclear war to their frequency of worry about other issues. Looks at the empirical relationships among worry and grade level, gender, trait emotionality, and drug use. Results indicate that adolescents worry more often about school performance and social interactions than about nuclear war.…

  8. Transport mode preferences, risk perception and worry in a Norwegian urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche-Cerasi, Isabelle; Rundmo, Torbjørn; Sigurdson, Johannes Foss; Moe, Dagfinn

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to compare risk perception among Norwegians (n=512) living in the region of Oslo. This study was part of an ERANET 13 project entitled PETRIS, Perception of transport risk in France and Norway. The data collection was carried out in January 2011. The response rate was 51 percent. The results showed that respondents, divided in two groups according to their transport mode preferences, assessed differently risk perception in public and private transportation. Respondents who preferred collective transportation assessed the probability of experiencing criminality in collective transport modes as higher than those who preferred private modes. They were also more worried of experiencing accidents, criminality, and terror attacks in collective transportation. The relationship between transport mode preferences and use, risk perception and worry are discussed.

  9. [Trends in population aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovics, E

    1990-11-01

    The age structure of the world population between 1950 and 1985 is analyzed according to changes in fertility, mortality, and international migration in developing and developed countries. "Relying on the results of the medium scenario of the population forecasts prepared by the U.N. Division of International Economic and Social Affairs, the author demonstrates that aging of the world population will become a global phenomenon, characteristic of every region and county of the world, between 1985 and 2025." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND RUS)

  10. Meta-worry, worry, and anxiety in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Lønfeldt, Nicole Nadine; Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya

    2015-01-01

    to children, but empirical support is lacking. The aim of the 2 presented studies was to explore the applicability of the model in a childhood sample. The first study employed a Danish community sample of youth (n = 587) ages 7 to 17 and investigated the relationship between metacognitions, worry and anxiety....... Two multiple regression analyses were performed using worry and metacognitive processes as outcome variables. The second study sampled Danish children ages 7 to 12, and compared the metacognitions of children with a GAD diagnosis (n = 22) to children with a non-GAD anxiety diagnosis (n = 19......) and nonanxious children (n = 14). In Study 1, metacognitive processes accounted for an additional 14% of the variance in worry, beyond age, gender, and anxiety, and an extra 11% of the variance in anxiety beyond age, gender, and worry. The Negative Beliefs about Worry scale emerged as the strongest predictor...

  11. Wheezing, Sleeping, and Worrying: The Hidden Risks of Asthma and Obesity in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H.; Everhart, Robin S.; Wildenger, Leah

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the co-occurrence of asthma and obesity in a sample of 193 children (mean age = 7.76 years). Specifically, this study was interested in delineating the associated comorbidities of internalizing symptoms and sleep disruptions among younger (younger than 7 years) and older elementary age children with asthma who were…

  12. Food for the ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, M.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2008-01-01

    The world’s ageing population is increasing and food professionals will have to address the needs of older generations more closely in the future. This unique volume reviews the characteristics of the ageing population as food consumers, the role of nutrition in healthy ageing and the design of food

  13. Mobility Device Use Among Older Adults and Incidence of Falls and Worry About Falling: Findings From the 2011–2012 National Health and Aging Trends Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Nancy M.; Wallace, Robert B.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mroz, Tracy M.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine mobility device use prevalence among community-dwelling older adults in the U.S. and to investigate the incidence of falls and worry about falling by the type and number of mobility devices used. DESIGN Analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the 2011–2012 National Health and Aging Trends Study SETTING In-person interviews in the homes of study participants PARTICIPANTS Nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries(N=7609). MEASUREMENTS Participants were asked about mobility device use (e.g., canes, walkers, wheelchairs and scooters) in the last month, one-year fall history and worry about falling. RESULTS Twenty-four percent of adults age ≥65 reported mobility device use in 2011 and 9.3% reported using multiple devices within the last month. Mobility device use increased with advancing age and was associated with non-White race/ethnicity, female sex, lower education level, greater multi-morbidity, and obesity (all P-values < 0.001). Adjusting for demographic, health characteristics, and physical function, the incidence of falls and recurrent falls were not associated with the use of multiple devices or any one particular type of mobility device. Activity-limiting worry about falling was significantly higher in cane-only users, compared with non-users. CONCLUSION The percentage of older adults reporting mobility device use is higher compared to results from previous national surveys and multiple device use is common among those who use any device. Mobility device use is not associated with increased incidence of falls compared to non-device users. Cane-only users may compensate for worry about falling by limiting activity. PMID:25953070

  14. The intolerance of uncertainty scale: measurement invariance, population heterogeneity, and its relation with worry among self-identifying White and Black respondents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Thomas A; Wu, Kevin D

    2013-10-01

    Although it is understood that assessment tools require evaluation using diverse samples, such evaluations are relatively rare. There are obstacles to such work, but it remains important to pursue psychometric data in broad samples. As such, we evaluated measurement invariance and population heterogeneity of two versions of a widely used measure in the anxiety literature--the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS)--among self-identifying White (N = 1,185) and Black (N = 301) students. Data from multiple-groups confirmatory factor analysis supported the equivalence of the equal form and factor loadings of both IUS versions in White and Black respondents. However, specific IUS items functioned differently in the two groups, with more IUS items appearing biased in the full-length relative to the short-form version. Correlations between IUS factors and worry were equivalent among White and Black respondents. We discuss the implications of these results for future research.

  15. Psychosocial, clinical and demographic features related to worry in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zoe; Elliott, Faye; Kasparian, Nadine A; Bishop, D Timothy; Barrett, Jennifer H; Newton-Bishop, Julia

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate clinical, demographic and psychosocial predictors of melanoma-related worry. A questionnaire-based study in a population-ascertained cohort of individuals diagnosed with melanoma in the previous 3-6 months was carried out to identify factors associated with worry about melanoma shortly after diagnosis. A total of 520 patients felt worried about their future with respect to melanoma and 1568 patients felt confident about their future with respect to melanoma. Worry was less likely in men with partners than women with partners [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.39-0.67)], and increasing age was protective against worry [adjusted OR=0.96 per year, 95% CI (0.95-0.97)]. Worry was more likely for patients with stage III/IV melanoma [adjusted OR=1.90, 95% CI (1.41-2.56) compared with stages IB-IIC], melanoma arising in sun-protected sites (compared with a limb), no occupation (compared with workers), those who reported insufficient emotional support from healthcare providers [adjusted OR=2.20, 95% CI (1.56-3.09) compared with sufficient support], lower knowledge of melanoma [adjusted OR=4.50, 95% CI (2.82-7.18) compared with well informed], perceived financial hardship compared with no financial hardship and over three previous negative life events compared with none/one. Worry about melanoma outcomes after diagnosis is multifactorial in origin.

  16. Fiscal implications of population ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P

    1997-12-29

    In all developed countries the fiscal ties of the tax and benefit system serve to complement, and sometimes substitute for, traditional family bonds between young and old. Older people are major recipients of public pensions and public health care systems. Since these public transfers and services are financed primarily from the taxes paid by people of working age, the welfare system in effect transfers resources from young to old. But rather than see the fiscal interdependency between young and old as being analogous to the ties that bind children, parents and grandparents together in familial networks, it is often interpreted as an oppressive burden that the old place on the young. This paper examines arguments that population ageing will exacerbate this burden, and may lead to the collapse of public welfare systems. It shows that the financial problems currently associated with public pensions are a function of system design rather than demographic change, and that wholesale privatization of pension systems will do little to solve the major dilemma--of persuading people to transfer a larger part of their lifetime income to their later years in order to sustain a reasonable standard of living throughout an ever lengthening period of retirement.

  17. Meta-worry, worry, and anxiety in children and adolescents: relationships and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjørn, B H; Lønfeldt, N N; Nielsen, S K; Reinholdt-Dunne, M L; Sømhovd, M J; Cartwright-Hatton, S

    2015-01-01

    The metacognitive model has increased our understanding of the development and maintenance of generalized anxiety disorders in adults. It states that the combination of positive and negative beliefs about worry creates and sustains anxiety. A recent review argues that the model can be applied to children, but empirical support is lacking. The aim of the 2 presented studies was to explore the applicability of the model in a childhood sample. The first study employed a Danish community sample of youth (n = 587) ages 7 to 17 and investigated the relationship between metacognitions, worry and anxiety. Two multiple regression analyses were performed using worry and metacognitive processes as outcome variables. The second study sampled Danish children ages 7 to 12, and compared the metacognitions of children with a GAD diagnosis (n = 22) to children with a non-GAD anxiety diagnosis (n = 19) and nonanxious children (n = 14). In Study 1, metacognitive processes accounted for an additional 14% of the variance in worry, beyond age, gender, and anxiety, and an extra 11% of the variance in anxiety beyond age, gender, and worry. The Negative Beliefs about Worry scale emerged as the strongest predictor of worry and a stronger predictor of anxiety than the other metacognitive processes and age. In Study 2, children with GAD have significantly higher levels of deleterious metacognitions than anxious children without GAD and nonanxious children. The results offer partial support for the downward extension of the metacognitive model of generalized anxiety disorders to children.

  18. Aging-From molecules to populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Miriam; Avlund, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin;

    2008-01-01

    -From Molecules to Populations. The following questions about human aging were discussed at the workshop: What is the limit of human life expectancy? What are the key indicators of human aging? What are the key drivers of human aging? Which genes have the greatest impact on human aging? How similar is aging...

  19. Women's work, worry and fear: the portrayal of sexuality and sexual health in US magazines for teenage and middle-aged women, 2000-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on an exploratory content analysis of the portrayal of sexuality, sexual health and disease in select magazines designed for two groups of women: teenagers and women in the 40-50-year-old age category in the USA. The analysis found that magazine portrayal was both similar for the two groups of women and distinctly different. Neither group of magazines focused on women's sexual desire. Both kinds of magazines emphasized that it was women's work and worry to control sexual expression. Teenagers were described as responsible for avoiding sex in order to prevent pregnancy, fearsomely described STIs and untrustworthy male sexual partners. Abstinence was presented as the only viable option for young women. Women in the 40-50-year-old age group were portrayed as responsible for the emotion work and sexual relations linked to their responsibility for maintaining their marriages and fulfilling their tasks of motherhood, especially through the monitoring of the sexuality of their female children. Sex was characterized in terms akin to women's work within the home. Possible explanations for, and consequences of, these presentations of sexuality are discussed.

  20. New Age Indicators for Stellar Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Xu; CHENG Fu-Zhen

    2000-01-01

    We apply the method of principal component analysis to a sample of simple stellar populations to select some age sensitive spectral indices. Besides the well-known age sensitive index Hβ, we also find some new age sensitive indices, G4300 and Fe4383, C24668, and Mgb. In addition, we find that these spectral indices sensitive to age depend on the metallicity of stellar population, Hβ and G4300 are more suitable to determine the age of loy metallicity stellar population, while C24668 and Mgb are more suitable to the high metallicity stellar population.

  1. World Population Ageing, 1950-2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations, New York, NY. Dept. of Economic and Social Affairs.

    Population aging was one of the most distinctive events of the 20th century and will remain important throughout the 21st century. Initially, a phenomenon of more developed countries, the process has recently become apparent in much of the developing world as well. The shift in age structure associated with population aging has a profound impact…

  2. Oral medicine and the ageing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, T; McCullough, M

    2015-03-01

    The oral cavity is subject to age related processes such as cellular ageing and immunosenescence. The ageing population bears an increased burden of intraoral pathology. In oral medicine, the majority of presenting patients are in their fifth to seventh decade of life. In this review, we discuss the ageing population's susceptibility to mucosal disorders and the increased prevalence of potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma, as well as dermatoses including oral lichen planus and immunobullous conditions. We also address the ageing population's susceptibility to oral discomfort and explore salivary secretion, ulceration and the symptoms of oral burning. Finally, we will describe orofacial pain conditions which are more likely encountered in an older population. This update highlights clinical presentations which are more likely to be encountered in the ageing population in a general practice setting and the importance of screening both new and long-term patients.

  3. Estimating population age structure using otolith morphometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doering-Arjes, P.; Cardinale, M.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    known-age fish individuals. Here we used known-age Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from the Faroe Bank and Faroe Plateau stocks. Cod populations usually show quite large variation in growth rates and otolith shape. We showed that including otolith morphometrics into ageing processes has the potential...... to make ageing objective, accurate, and fast. Calibration analysis indicated that a known-age sample from the same population and environment is needed to obtain robust calibration; using a sample from a different stock more than doubles the error rate, even in the case of genetically highly related...... populations. The intercalibration method was successful but generalization from one stock to another remains problematic. The development of an otolith growth model is needed for generalization if an operational method for different populations is required in the future....

  4. The challenges of human population ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Miriam; Oxlund, Bjarke; Jespersen, Astrid;

    2015-01-01

    The 20th century saw an unprecedented increase in average human lifespan as well as a rapid decline in human fertility in many countries of the world. The accompanying worldwide change in demographics of human populations is linked to unanticipated and unprecedented economic, cultural, medical...... of Copenhagen (UCPH) and the Center for Healthy Ageing at UCPH, which took place on 20-21 June 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questions discussed here include the following: what is driving age-structural change in human populations? how can we create 'age-friendly' societies and promote 'ageing...

  5. The worried mind: autonomic and prefrontal activation during worrying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Moscovitch, David A; Litz, Brett T; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Davis, Lissa L; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2005-12-01

    To study the psychophysiological correlates of worrying, the authors recorded heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), skin conductance level, and alpha electroencephalographic asymmetry in healthy males during baseline, relaxation, worry induction, and anticipation of an impromptu speech task. Compared with baseline, relaxation, and anticipation, worrying was associated with greater heart rate and lower RSA. Worrying was further characterized by higher skin conductance levels compared with baseline but lower levels than during anticipation. Finally, worrying was associated with relatively greater left frontal activity compared with anticipation. Trait public speaking anxiety was positively correlated with left frontal activity during worrying. These results support the notion that worrying is a unique emotional state that is different from fearful anticipation.

  6. Planning for an ageing population: strategic considerations

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Dr Eamon

    2005-01-01

    This report presents both the proceedings of the Council’s conference, Planning for an Ageing Population: Strategic Considerations, and the Council’s discussion paper, ‘The Older Population: Information Issues and Deficits’, which was introduced at that conference.\\r\

  7. Population ageing and public finance targets

    OpenAIRE

    Heikki Oksanen

    2003-01-01

    The paper incorporates intergenerational fairness into a framework to analyse long-term sustainability of public finances under population ageing. It establishes a link between ageing-related public expenditure projections and public finance targets, thereby clarifying the connection between pension reforms and general government budget balance and debt targets.

  8. The challenges of human population ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Miriam; Oxlund, Bjarke; Jespersen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    The 20th century saw an unprecedented increase in average human lifespan as well as a rapid decline in human fertility in many countries of the world. The accompanying worldwide change in demographics of human populations is linked to unanticipated and unprecedented economic, cultural, medical...... of Copenhagen (UCPH) and the Center for Healthy Ageing at UCPH, which took place on 20-21 June 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questions discussed here include the following: what is driving age-structural change in human populations? how can we create 'age-friendly' societies and promote 'ageing......-in-community'? what tools will effectively promote social engagement and prevent social detachment among older individuals? is there a risk that further extension of human lifespan would be a greater burden to the individual and to society than is warranted by the potential benefit of longer life?...

  9. Penn State Worry Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise; Caspersen, Ida Dyhr

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric disturbances in childhood. Nonetheless, they often go unrecognized and untreated, which puts the child at risk for developing additional difficulties, such as academic difficulties, depression, and substance abuse. Further knowledge...... and valid assessment tools are essential to identify at-risk children. The present study investigates (i) the factor structure of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C) using a large Danish community sample (N¿=¿933), and (ii) its treatment sensitivity in clinically anxious children (N...

  10. Quantifying policy tradeoffs to support aging populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Scherbov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coping with aging populations is a challenge for most developed countries. Supporting non-working adults can create an unsustainable burden on those working. One way of dealing with this is to raise the normal pension age, but this has proven unpopular. A complementary approach is to raise the average labor force participation rate. These policies are generally more politically palatable because they often remove barriers, allowing people who would like to work to do so. Objective: To conceptualize and estimate the trade-off between pension age and labor force participation rate policies. Methods: We project the populations of European countries and apply different levels of labor force participation rates to the projected populations. We introduce the notion of a relative burden, which is the ratio of the fraction of the income of people in the labor market in 2050 that they transfer to adults out of the labor market to the same fraction in 2009. We use this indicator to investigate the trade-offs between changes in normal pension ages and the general level of labor force participation rates. Results: We show that, in most European countries, a difference in policies that results in an increase in average labor force participation rates by an additional one to two percentage points by 2050 can substitute for a one-year increase in the normal pension age. This is important because, in many European countries, without additional increases in labor force participation rates, normal pension ages would have to be raised well above 68 by 2050 to keep the burden on those working manageable. Conclusions: Because of anticipated increases in life expectancy and health at older ages as well as because of financial necessity, some mix of increases in pension ages and in labor force participation rates will be needed. Pension age changes by themselves will not be sufficient.

  11. Chronic kidney Disease and the Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Marcello; Riellae, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing. George Bernard Shaw The proportion of older people in the general population is steadily increasing worldwide, with the most rapid growth in low-and middle-income countries [1]. This demographic change is to be celebrated, because it is the consequence of socioeconomic development and better life expectancy. However, population aging also has important implications for society - in diverse areas including health systems, labor markets, public policy, social programs, and family dynamics [2]. A successful response to the aging population will require capitalizing on the opportunities that this transition offers, as well as effectively addressing its challenges. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem that is characterized by poor health outcomes and very high health care costs. CKD is a major risk multiplier in patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke - all of which are key causes of death and disability in older people [3]. Since the prevalence of CKD is higher in older people, the health impact of population aging will depend in part on how the kidney community responds. March 13, 2014 will mark the celebration of the 9th World Kidney Day (WKD), an annual event jointly sponsored by the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. The topic for WKD 2014 is "CKD in older people". This article reviews the key links between kidney function, age, health and illness - and discusses the implications of the aging population for the care of people with CKD.

  12. Designing New Meals for an Ageing Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, A.I.A.; Jongen, W.M.F.

    2010-01-01

    Today's ageing population is an ever-increasing, highly diverse group of people wanting to live a healthy and enjoyable life. Seniors increasingly see the importance of eating healthy and delicious food in a pleasant environment in achieving happiness and well-being. Up until now, the food industry

  13. The economics of population aging in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X

    1996-01-01

    This article relies on a Marxist framework for discussing the relationship between economic development and population aging in China. China places value on correctly understanding the causes, processes, trends, and socioeconomic consequences of population aging during the development of its socialist market economy. Many policies have an impact on the aged. Marxist theories of economic operations identify four key features--production, distribution, exchange, and consumption--which are affected by human activity. The age structure of population affects socioeconomic operations. An increase in accumulated capital means a decrease in consumption capital. China must maintain its high level of annual economic growth (6.0%-6.5%). 30% of China's national income must be used for accumulation of capital and investment, but the increase in the aged has led to growth in consumption capital. By 2050, it is expected that there will be over 100 million retirees needing about 800 billion RMB in pensions (20 times the amount in 1993). As the number of elderly grows, savings decline. The growth of the elderly will place demands on social security funds, which will in turn rely on an increased proportion of consumption capital. The increased labor force and the increased number of aged will both vie for a share in the national economy until about 2020, and then the problem will be declines in productivity in some areas. It is generally believed that support of the elderly should not rise above 10% of national income. In 1993, the elderly's share was 3.7%, and at the present rate of growth, it is expected that the share will be above 10% by 2030. Working families will have to carry a heavy domestic burden of care for their aged. Productivity will have to increase in order to offset the decline in per capita consumption capital due to aging. The author offers countermeasures at the macro- and microlevel for dealing with the demographic changes.

  14. Energy implications of an aging population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This study provides various demographic, medical, and economic information relative to energy usage on a segment of the population, the elderly, which is growing in absolute numbers and relative population percentage. This growth is expected to continue well into the twenty-first century. The US aging population numbered 3.1 million in 1900, and by 1977 it had climbed to 23.5 million. It can be stated with reasonable certainty that this figure will rise to 31 million in the year 2000 and 43 million in the year 2020. These figures, corresponding to more than 10% of our population, are by no means insignificant. As our fossil-fuel reserves are being depleted and the cost of energy mounts, it becomes apparent that the elderly will become increasingly vulnerable to the energy crisis, primarily beause of their physical tendency to infirmity, their economic and social situation, and their susceptibility to psychological depression. This white paper concentrates on those aspects of aging and the nation's energy problem which are not usually related in our everyday consideration of these as separable problems. It seeks to identify the peculiar energy problems of the aged and to consider alternatives in the solution of these problems in light of modern technology.

  15. Population genomics of Bronze Age Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allentoft, Morten E; Sikora, Martin; Sjögren, Karl-Göran; Rasmussen, Simon; Rasmussen, Morten; Stenderup, Jesper; Damgaard, Peter B; Schroeder, Hannes; Ahlström, Torbjörn; Vinner, Lasse; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Margaryan, Ashot; Higham, Tom; Chivall, David; Lynnerup, Niels; Harvig, Lise; Baron, Justyna; Della Casa, Philippe; Dąbrowski, Paweł; Duffy, Paul R; Ebel, Alexander V; Epimakhov, Andrey; Frei, Karin; Furmanek, Mirosław; Gralak, Tomasz; Gromov, Andrey; Gronkiewicz, Stanisław; Grupe, Gisela; Hajdu, Tamás; Jarysz, Radosław; Khartanovich, Valeri; Khokhlov, Alexandr; Kiss, Viktória; Kolář, Jan; Kriiska, Aivar; Lasak, Irena; Longhi, Cristina; McGlynn, George; Merkevicius, Algimantas; Merkyte, Inga; Metspalu, Mait; Mkrtchyan, Ruzan; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Paja, László; Pálfi, György; Pokutta, Dalia; Pospieszny, Łukasz; Price, T Douglas; Saag, Lehti; Sablin, Mikhail; Shishlina, Natalia; Smrčka, Václav; Soenov, Vasilii I; Szeverényi, Vajk; Tóth, Gusztáv; Trifanova, Synaru V; Varul, Liivi; Vicze, Magdolna; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Zhitenev, Vladislav; Orlando, Ludovic; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, Rasmus; Kristiansen, Kristian; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-06-11

    The Bronze Age of Eurasia (around 3000-1000 BC) was a period of major cultural changes. However, there is debate about whether these changes resulted from the circulation of ideas or from human migrations, potentially also facilitating the spread of languages and certain phenotypic traits. We investigated this by using new, improved methods to sequence low-coverage genomes from 101 ancient humans from across Eurasia. We show that the Bronze Age was a highly dynamic period involving large-scale population migrations and replacements, responsible for shaping major parts of present-day demographic structure in both Europe and Asia. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesized spread of Indo-European languages during the Early Bronze Age. We also demonstrate that light skin pigmentation in Europeans was already present at high frequency in the Bronze Age, but not lactose tolerance, indicating a more recent onset of positive selection on lactose tolerance than previously thought.

  16. Designing new meals for an ageing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana I A; Jongen, Wim M F

    2010-06-01

    Today's ageing population is an ever-increasing, highly diverse group of people wanting to live a healthy and enjoyable life. Seniors increasingly see the importance of eating healthy and delicious food in a pleasant environment in achieving happiness and well-being. Up until now, the food industry has been rather slow in transforming the wealth of available knowledge regarding the nutritional needs and sensory perception of the ageing into new food products. Based on our own and the published research of others, we discuss here how the design of new meals for an ageing population can be tackled by a consumer-led approach to food product development. After a brief overview of the underlying concepts and practices, a detailed description is given of how this approach could be used in the design of Home Meal Replacements for senior households. This description includes also a comprehensive review of the major determinants of food preference and meal choice behavior in a later age. Finally, relevant implications are derived from the work presented and future trends in the technological development of foods for the ageing highlighted.

  17. Population genomics of Bronze Age Eurasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allentoft, Morten E.; Sikora, Martin; Sjögren, Karl-Göran

    2015-01-01

    investigated this by using new, improved methods to sequence low-coverage genomes from 101 ancient humans from across Eurasia. We show that the Bronze Age was a highly dynamic period involving large-scale population migrations and replacements, responsible for shaping major parts of present-day demographic......The Bronze Age of Eurasia (around 3000-1000 BC) was a period of major cultural changes. However, there is debate about whether these changes resulted from the circulation of ideas or from human migrations, potentially also facilitating the spread of languages and certain phenotypic traits. We...

  18. A population dynamics approach to biological aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, R. M. C.

    A dynamical model for aging in biological population is discussed where asexual reproduction is considered. The maximum life span is inherited from parent to offspring with some random mutations described by a transition matrix, and the fertile period begins at a defined age R. The intra species competition is modeled through a Verhulst-like factor. Discrete time evolution equations are iterated and the transient and asymptotic solutions are obtained. When only bad mutations are taken into account, the stationary solutions are obtained analytically. The results are applied to the Penna model.

  19. The Developmental Psychopathology of Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz, Sarah J.; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Although childhood generalized anxiety disorder is generally understudied, worry, the cardinal feature of GAD, appears to be relatively common in youth. Despite its prevalence, there are few conceptual models of the development of clinical worry in children. The current review provides a framework for integrating the developmental psychopathology…

  20. Studying disability trends in aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Danan; Gomez-Redondo, Rosa; Dupre, Matthew E

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the current literature on disability trends in aging populations and proposes a framework for studying disability trends built upon existing models of disablement. In addition to considering disablement and its associated factors, our framework also includes factors at population level and the interplays among personal resources and health behaviors, intervention programs, technological advances, and the consequences of disability trends in the context of life course and socio-ecological perspective. The framework is abbreviated FE-BRIT-SE to denote individual-level (F)ixed attributes, including genetic factors, personality, age, sex, and earlier life conditions, and the (E)nvironment; individual (B)ehaviors, (R)esources, (I)nterventions, (T)echnology; and (S)ocioeconomic and (E)cological consequences of disability trends. The overview offers an integrated framework for understanding the disablement process, trends and their complex milieu of causes and consequences.

  1. Population aging and endogenous economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettner, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the consequences of population aging for long-run economic growth perspectives. Our framework incorporates endogenous growth models and semi-endogenous growth models as special cases. We show that (1) increases in longevity have a positive impact on per capita output growth, (2) decreases in fertility have a negative impact on per capita output growth, (3) the positive longevity effect dominates the negative fertility effect in case of the endogenous growth framework, and (4) population aging fosters long-run growth in the endogenous growth framework, while its effect depends on the relative change between fertility and mortality in the semi-endogenous growth framework.Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00148-012-0441-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  2. Christianity Facing the Ageing of Global Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sanecka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ageing population is a great challenge for the whole world including churches, Christian communities, Christian families and the so-called “Christian countries”. The respect and support for elderly people is almost a common rule of social life in developed countries regardless of religious views. But in the Christian world this obligation has very strong religious justification – obligation enshrined in the Commandments of Old (the fourth/fifth Commandment and New (the second one of The Greatest Commandments of Love Testaments. Therefore between the Christianity – understood as a set of different communities sharing their beliefs in Jesus Christ – and aging population there are many very different connections including among others: honour and respect, privilege, obligations, giving – receiving relations, duty, charity, solidarity, dependency. They are present both in the teaching and the practice of different Christian communities starting with Churches, through NGOs and Christian societies, ending with Christian families. The paper shows some of these connections. It also tries – based on a case of Poland – to answer the question whether the Christianity is ready to face the aging of global population

  3. Ageing Populations in Post-Industrial Democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhuysse, Pieter; Goerres, Achim

    Most advanced democracies are currently experiencing accelerated population ageing, which fundamentally changes not just their demographic composition; it can also be expected to have far-reaching political and policy consequences.This volume brings together an expert set of scholars from Europe...... of the state against the interests of a growing elderly voting bloc to safeguard fiscal viability, and looks at highly-topical responses such as pension cuts and increasing retirement age. It also examines the rise of ‘grey parties’, and asks what, if anything, makes such pensioner parties persist over time...... for graduate students and researchers working on this topic.’ - Ageing & Society  ‘a wide-ranging collection of comparative essays, covering pension politics and regimes, spending patterns, pensioner parties, family policy and intergenerational justice. … (this) volume formulates a number of questions whose...

  4. Perioperative Cognitive Decline in the Aging Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrando, Niccolò; Brzezinski, Marek; Degos, Vincent; Eriksson, Lars I.; Kramer, Joel H.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.; Vacas, Susana; Weiner, Michael W.; Yaffe, Kristine; Young, William L.; Xie, Zhongcong; Maze, Mervyn

    2011-01-01

    Elderly patients who have an acute illness or who undergo surgery often experience cognitive decline. The pathophysiologic mechanisms that cause neurodegeneration resulting in cognitive decline, including protein deposition and neuroinflammation, also play a role in animal models of surgery-induced cognitive decline. With the aging of the population, surgical candidates of advanced age with underlying neurodegeneration are encountered more often, raising concerns that, in patients with this combination, cognitive function will precipitously decline postoperatively. This special article is based on a symposium that the University of California, San Francisco, convened to explore the contributions of surgery and anesthesia to the development of cognitive decline in the aged patient. A road map to further elucidate the mechanisms, diagnosis, risk factors, mitigation, and treatment of postoperative cognitive decline in the elderly is provided. PMID:21878601

  5. Worry, Worry Attacks, and PTSD among Cambodian Refugees: A Path Analysis Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Hinton, Devon E.; Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Among traumatized Cambodian refugees, this article investigates worry (e.g., the types of current life concerns) and how worry worsens posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To explore how worry worsens PTSD, we examine a path model of worry to see whether certain key variables (e.g., worry-induced somatic arousal and worry-induced trauma recall) mediate the relationship between worry and PTSD. Survey data were collected from March 2010 until May 2010 in a convenience sample of 201 adult Cambo...

  6. Stool Color: When to Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stool color: When to worry Yesterday, my stool color was bright green. Should I be concerned? Answers from Michael ... M.D. Stool comes in a range of colors. All shades of brown and even green are ...

  7. How will Population Aging Affect Economic Growth?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡昉; 王美艳

    2007-01-01

    Not long ago,the problem of an aging population only emerged in developed countries once per capita GDP had reached a relatively high level.However,in today’s China,although the per capita GDP has remained low,the problem of growing old before becoming rich is looming.As China is not yet prosperous,economic development needs to be persistently upheld;however,will the aging problem cause economic growth to be challenged by labour shortages in the future? From a structural perspective,although continuous rural labour transfer can ease demand for urban labour,the problem now is that rural labourers are not always qualified to take on positions requiring ever-advancing skills,resulting in a skills drought.It could be claimed that this skills drought is due to a lack of education on the part of rural workers,yet university students with a formal education also encounter difficulties when hunting for a job.Does this indicate that the current education structure should be revised? The above questions suggest that China is currently facing a complicated and delicate situation with regard to the interrelated problems of economy,population,employment and education,and will continue to do so for a long period in the future.These problems require the cautious planning of overall and sustainable policies.The two"Domestic Column"articles this issue offer in-depth analyses of these problems and provide valuable policy suggestions.

  8. Worry about health in smoking behaviour change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A; Brosschot, J

    2003-01-01

    Many smokers and ex-smokers worry about their health. Given that worry keeps attention focused on the threat, it was expected that worrying about health in smokers would motivate them to quit and in ex-smokers may prevent relapse. Furthermore, worry was expected to influence the process of smoking c

  9. 11 CFR 110.18 - Voting age population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting age population. 110.18 Section 110.18... PROHIBITIONS § 110.18 Voting age population. There is annually published by the Department of Commerce in the Federal Register an estimate of the voting age population based on an estimate of the voting...

  10. Successful Aging: Multiple Trajectories and Population Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Fengyan Tang

    2014-01-01

    Following Rowe and Kahn¡¯s successful aging model, this study identified successful aging as a distinctive aging trajectory and examined gender differences in the aging process. Using the Health and Retirement Study data (2000-2008), this study applied group-based trajectory analysis to identify multiple aging trajectories in a sample of older Americans aged 65 and over (N=9,226). Six dimensions were analyzed in the multi-trajectory model: chronic disease, physical functional limitation, disa...

  11. The language of worry: examining linguistic elements of worry models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronimi, Elena M C; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong evidence that worry is a verbal process, studies examining linguistic features in individuals with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) are lacking. The aim of the present study is to investigate language use in individuals with GAD and controls based on GAD and worry theoretical models. More specifically, the degree to which linguistic elements of the avoidance and intolerance of uncertainty worry models can predict diagnostic status was analysed. Participants were 19 women diagnosed with GAD and 22 control women and their children. After participating in a diagnostic semi-structured interview, dyads engaged in a free-play interaction where mothers' language sample was collected. Overall, the findings provided evidence for distinctive linguistic features of individuals with GAD. That is, after controlling for the effect of demographic variables, present tense, future tense, prepositions and number of questions correctly classified those with GAD and controls such that a considerable amount of the variance in diagnostic status was explained uniquely by language use. Linguistic confirmation of worry models is discussed.

  12. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women’s daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women.

  13. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Forough; Akaberi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women's daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women.

  14. Acceptance of Genetic Testing in a General Population: Age, Education and Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, A. R.; Hakonen, A.; Hietala, M.; Lonnqvist, J.; Niemela, P.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of age, education, and gender on acceptance of genetic testing were studied. Finnish participants responded to a questionnaire presenting reasons for and against genetic testing (N=1,967). Intentions to take genetic tests, worries, and experience of genetic test or hereditary disease were also assessed. Results are presented and discussed.…

  15. Behavioural activation: a pilot trial of transdiagnostic treatment for excessive worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Liu, Xi; Rapee, Ronald M; Pillay, Pallavi

    2013-09-01

    Transdiagnostic interventions present pragmatic benefits in treatment dissemination and training of mental health professionals when faced with emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression. Excessive worry is a common feature across emotional disorders and represents an ideal candidate target for transdiagnostic intervention. The current pilot trial examined the efficacy of a behavioural activation treatment for worry (BAW) in a community population. 49 individuals experiencing excessive worry were randomised to waitlist or BAW receiving an 8 week group based intervention. Results demonstrated that BAW was successful in reducing excessive worry, depressive symptoms, cognitive avoidance, Intolerance of Uncertainty and improving problem solving orientation. Twice as many individuals showed clinically significant reductions in excessive worry after treatment compared to the waitlist control. Despite limitations to sample size and power, this study presents promising support for BAW as a practical transdiagnostic treatment for worry.

  16. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  17. Population ageing, labour markets and the outlook for public finances

    OpenAIRE

    Helvi Kinnunen

    2002-01-01

    Keeping public finances on a sustainable foundation while the population ages is clearly a problem in Finland, as in many other western countries. The shrinking of the working-age population, ageing of the labour force, and growth in the number of very old persons form a difficult combination vis-à-vis sustainable public finances. An age structure that is changing in unfavourable ways has long-run consequences for balance of public finances and room for fiscal policy. With structural unemploy...

  18. Health Worry, Physical Activity Participation, and Walking Difficulty among Older Adults: A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kin-Kit; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Vuchinich, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of health worry (i.e., cognitive aspect of anxiety resulting from concern for health) on walking difficulty in a nationally representative sample (N = 7,527) of older adults (M age = 76.83 years). The study further tested whether physical activity mediates the effect of health worry on walking difficulty in a 6-year…

  19. Fear, Worry, and Ritualistic Behaviour in Childhood: Developmental Trends and Interrelations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Sarah V.; Fernyhough, Charles; Turner, Michelle; Freeston, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of childhood fear, worry, and ritualistic behaviour have been limited by restricted age ranges, narrow ranges of anxiety phenomena, non-comparable methodologies, and assessment of typical behaviour within a pathological context. Content and intensity of fear, worry, and ritualistic behaviour, and associations among these…

  20. Worry about Terror in Israel: Differences between Jewish and Arab Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ora

    2010-01-01

    The current study examines group differences in (1) levels of worry about terror and (2) trait anxiety among a sample of high-school and university students, where groups are defined by cultural affiliation, religious commitment, place of residence, gender and age. The revealed group differences in levels of worry about terror point to the ability…

  1. [Health care expenditures and the aging population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, S

    2012-05-01

    The impact of a longer life on future health care expenditures will be quite moderate because of the high costs of dying and the compression of mortality in old age. If not age per se but proximity to death determines the bulk of expenditures, a shift in the mortality risk to higher ages will not significantly affect lifetime health care expenditures, as death occurs only once in every life. A calculation of the demographic effect on health care expenditures in Germany up until 2050 that explicitly accounts for costs in the last years of life leads to a significantly lower demographic impact on per-capita expenditures than a calculation based on crude age-specific health expenditures.

  2. Green sea turtle age, growth, population characteristics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Morphology, sex ratio, body condition, disease status, age structure, and growth patterns were characterized for 448 green sea turtles cold stunned in St. Joseph...

  3. Worry and its correlates onboard cruise ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Katharina; Larsen, Svein; Marnburg, Einar; Øgaard, Torvald

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined job-specific worry, as well as possible predictors of such worry, namely job-specific self-efficacy and supervisor dispositionism. 133 non-supervising crew members at different departments onboard upmarket cruise ships filled in a questionnaire during one of their journeys. Findings show that employees report moderate amounts of job-specific worry and the galley crew reports significantly greater amounts of worry than the other departments. Results also indicate that cruise ship crews worry somewhat more than workers in the land based service sector. Furthermore it was found that supervisor dispositionism, i.e. supervisors with fixed mindsets, was related to greater amounts of worry among the crew. Surprisingly, job-specific self-efficacy was unrelated to job-specific worry.

  4. China: Awakening Giant Developing Solutions to Population Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Guo, Man; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2012-01-01

    As the world's most populous country with the largest aging population and a rapidly growing economy, China is receiving increased attention from both the Chinese government and the governments of other countries that face low fertility and aging problems. This unprecedented shift of demographic structure has repercussions for many aspects of…

  5. Dementia worry and its relationship to dementia exposure, psychological factors, and subjective memory concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzer, Adrianna; Suhr, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    With increased societal awareness of dementia, older adults show increased concern about developing dementia, leading to misidentification of aging-related cognitive glitches as signs of dementia. While some researchers have suggested self-reported cognitive concerns accurately identify older adults with early signs of dementia, there is evidence that subjective cognitive decline is not associated with objective cognitive performance and instead reflects psychological factors consistent with models of health anxiety, including dementia worry. We examined the construct of dementia worry and its relationship to subjective memory concerns in 100 older adults (Mage = 69 years) without signs of dementia, using a recently developed measure of dementia worry. Consistent with hypotheses, dementia worry was related to exposure to dementia, having a high number of depressive or general worry symptoms, and having more memory concerns. Exposure to dementia moderated the relationship of dementia worry to depression and general worry. Furthermore, dementia worry moderated the relationship of objective memory impairment to subjective memory ratings. The results provide further evidence of the role of psychological factors such as dementia worry in subjective memory report and emphasize the need for objective cognitive testing before making determinations about dementia in older adults expressing memory concerns.

  6. Environmental worry: a concept to explain differences in environmentally conscious behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheider, B; Hodapp, V

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the validity of a scale for measuring environmental worry. The environmental worry scale was used in a study with employees at three medium-sized companies in East Germany who were exposed to environmental problems (N = 74). Additionally, questionnaires were used to investigate the influence of environmental worry on environmentally conscious behaviour. The assumption was that a higher amount of environmental worry would induce a more careful use of resources. Furthermore, it was investigated which predicting factors may determine environmentally conscious behaviour. Following the Theory of Reasoned Action, we assessed attitude towards the environment, social identity, social norms, and environmentally conscious behaviour as well as environmental worry. Environmentally conscious behaviour was investigated as relating to avoidance of creating waste, separation of waste, environmental protection activities, saving of resources and use of toxic substances. The structure of factors determining the anxiety scale was confirmed; however, sex or age seemed to have no effects. A higher level of education correlated to less environmental worry in a significant way. A correlation between environmental worry and environmentally conscious behaviour could not be proven. However, the relationship between environmental worry, attitudes towards the environment, and social norms was significant. Our data suggest that for a modification of environmentally conscious behaviour, measures aimed at changing the social norm are more successful than those aimed at changing individual attitudes. Moreover, increased environmental worry does not seem to increase environmentally friendly behaviour.

  7. The Flynn Effect and Population Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Vegard; Stonawski, Marcin; Bonsang, Eric; Staudinger, Ursula M.

    2013-01-01

    Although lifespan changes in cognitive performance and Flynn effects have both been well documented, there has been little scientific focus to date on the net effect of these forces on cognition at the population level. Two major questions moving beyond this finding guided this study: (1) Does the Flynn effect indeed continue in the 2000s for…

  8. On Population Kinetics of an Aging Society: Aging and Scurvy

    CERN Document Server

    Ely, J T A

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from skeletal remains and pictorial records for the past several millennia established that humans have had a very inadequate ascorbic acid intake and commonly exhibited signs of frank scurvy, as well as the invisible signs of subclinical scurvy (absence of AA in scorbutic urine is universal). They suffered scurvy's mortality, being a major cause of death especially in times of stress due to dietary fluctuations, climate, migrations, voyages, battles, etc. Rapid aging and death by acute scurvy, and infectious and degenerative diseases related to chronic scurvy added to the toll. In this era, the loss of function and changes in appearance that we see in humans in the second 50 years of life are theoretically simple to avoid. However, this is very rare because there is almost no one who does not eat the refined diet of the affluent societies. We present here an overview of a vast array of evidence on the connections between aging and scurvy.

  9. Correlates and outcomes of worries about hypoglycemia in family members of adults with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, Francois; Holt, Richard I G;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined (a) the demographic and clinical correlates of worries about hypoglycemia in adult family members of adults with diabetes, and (b) the association of these worries with measures of diabetes support. METHODS: The second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2......) study cross-sectionally surveyed 2057 family members from 17 countries. Participants completed questions about demographics, diabetes, and psychosocial functioning, including worry about overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Analyses included hierarchical ordinal and linear regression. RESULTS: Eighty......-five percent of family members (n=1661) were at least occasionally very worried about the risk of hypoglycemic events overall. Correlates of worries about hypoglycemia included female gender, higher age and lower education in the family member, younger age of the person with diabetes and this person being...

  10. On Constructing Ageing Rural Populations: "Capturing" the Grey Nomad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The world's population is ageing, with forecasts predicting this ageing is likely to be particularly severe in the rural areas of more developed countries. These forecasts are developed from nationally aggregated census and survey data and assume spatial homogeneity in ageing. They also draw on narrow understandings of older people and construct…

  11. AGEING POPULATION: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS AMONG EUROPEAN UNION STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura DIACONU (MAXIM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aging population is a global phenomenon, which has affected almost all the EU states. The consequences are very important since it affects the socio-economic environment usually on the long run. Some of them could consist in increasing the public expenditure on pensions, social security and health services, which will raise the overall burden on the working population. Sometimes, a significant reduction of the labour force will even diminish the growth rate of an economy. Considering these aspects, the present paper intends to analyse the demographic situation from the EU states, the factors that have generated it and to identify the possible future trends. To determine the evolution of the ageing population phenomenon, we have analysed some demographic indicators included in various statistical reports and databases, such as the fertility rate, the median age, the percentage of population over a certain age and the age dependency ratio.

  12. Aging in Mexico: Population Trends and Emerging Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Jacqueline L; Vega, William; López-Ortega, Mariana

    2016-12-07

    Although all nations in the America's face a common demographic reality of longevity, declining fertility rates and changes in family roles a growing body of research points to a dramatic demographic transformation in Mexico. Although Mexico's population is relatively young, with a median age of 27.9 in 2015, it will age rapidly in coming years, increasing to 42 years by 2050. The rapid median age in the nation also reflects the growing proportion of people 65 or older, and is expected to triple to 20.2% by 2050. This article examines how the age and gender structure of Mexico offers important insights about current and future political and social stability, as well as economic development. Mexico is the world's eleventh largest country in terms of population size and the "demographic dividend" of a large youthful population is giving way to a growing older population that will inevitably place demands on health care and social security. The shift in age structure will result in increased dependency of retirees on the working-age population in the next 20 years. Mexico does not provide universal coverage of social security benefits and less than half of the labor force is covered by any pension or retirement plan. As a result, elderly Mexicans often continue working into old age. The high total poverty rate in the country, especially among the older population magnifies the problem of the potential dependency burden. The article ends with a discussion of key public policy issues related to aging in Mexico.

  13. Economic security in an aging Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert L

    2011-09-01

    Recent research indicates that today's retirees are doing very well in terms of their replacement ratios and that Canadian poverty rates among the elderly are low relative to other Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. Government-sponsored plans have been strengthened either through explicit expansion - for example, the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) - or through the reform of the Canada/Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPP). Also important is the maturation of employer-sponsored pension plans, although coverage rates are down. Future generations of retirees may not achieve the standard of living that exists today, however, which is a concern. The author argues that today's economic security programs are affordable and that their costs could be stabilized if the retirement age were raised.

  14. Penn State Worry Questionnaire: structure and psychometric properties of the Chinese version

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie ZHONG; Chun WANG; Jie LI; Jun LIU

    2009-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a measure of worry phenomena and has been demonstrated valid in cross-cultural populations. The present study examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Chinese version of PSWQ (Ch-PSWQ) in a Chinese college sample (n=1243). Exploratory factor analysis of the Ch-PSWQ revealed a two-factor solution (engagement of worry and absence of worry). Confirmatory factor analysis and model comparison supported that the model of one factor with method effect provided the best fit to the data. The Ch-PSWQ and its factors evidenced good internal consistency and both convergent and discriminate validity. The present study supports the opinion that the second factor of PSWQ not only contains the component of evaluating pathological worry, but also might represent other traits.

  15. Modeling the brain morphology distribution in the general aging population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Roshchupkin, G.; Bron, E. E.; Ikram, M. A.; Vernooij, M. W.; Rueckert, D.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-03-01

    Both normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease cause morphological changes of the brain. To better distinguish between normal and abnormal cases, it is necessary to model changes in brain morphology owing to normal aging. To this end, we developed a method for analyzing and visualizing these changes for the entire brain morphology distribution in the general aging population. The method is applied to 1000 subjects from a large population imaging study in the elderly, from which 900 were used to train the model and 100 were used for testing. The results of the 100 test subjects show that the model generalizes to subjects outside the model population. Smooth percentile curves showing the brain morphology changes as a function of age and spatiotemporal atlases derived from the model population are publicly available via an interactive web application at agingbrain.bigr.nl.

  16. School Age Populations Research Needs - NCS Dietary Assessment Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawing conclusions about the validity of available dietary assessment instruments in school age children is hampered by the differences in instruments, research design, reference methods, and populations in the validation literature.

  17. Population Ageing in Ghana: Research Gaps and the Way Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuks J. Mba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to highlight research gaps and what should be done concerning population ageing in the Ghanaian context. The proportion of the elderly increased from 4.9 percent in 1960 to 7.2 percent in 2000, while the number rose from 0.3 million to 1.4 million over the same period (an increase of 367 percent. Projection results indicate that by 2050, the aged population will account for 14.1 percent of the total population. Very little is known about the living arrangements and health profile of Ghana's older population. With increasing urbanization and modernization, it is important to know something about intergenerational transfers from adult children to their elderly parents, and characterize the elderly persons' food security strategies. Training of researchers will be important in terms of strengthening Ghana's capacity to monitor trends, as well as to conduct research and explore new directions in population ageing research.

  18. Working memory, worry, and algebraic ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezise, Kelly; Reeve, Robert A

    2014-05-01

    Math anxiety (MA)-working memory (WM) relationships have typically been examined in the context of arithmetic problem solving, and little research has examined the relationship in other math domains (e.g., algebra). Moreover, researchers have tended to examine MA/worry separate from math problem solving activities and have used general WM tasks rather than domain-relevant WM measures. Furthermore, it seems to have been assumed that MA affects all areas of math. It is possible, however, that MA is restricted to particular math domains. To examine these issues, the current research assessed claims about the impact on algebraic problem solving of differences in WM and algebraic worry. A sample of 80 14-year-old female students completed algebraic worry, algebraic WM, algebraic problem solving, nonverbal IQ, and general math ability tasks. Latent profile analysis of worry and WM measures identified four performance profiles (subgroups) that differed in worry level and WM capacity. Consistent with expectations, subgroup membership was associated with algebraic problem solving performance: high WM/low worry>moderate WM/low worry=moderate WM/high worry>low WM/high worry. Findings are discussed in terms of the conceptual relationship between emotion and cognition in mathematics and implications for the MA-WM-performance relationship.

  19. Generational Transfers and Population Aging in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    artículo (arbitrado)--Universidad de Costa Rica, Instituto de investigaciones en Salud, 2011. Este documento es privado debido a limitaciones de derechos de autor. Population aging, a direct consequence of the demographic transition, is often portrayed in negative, even dire terms. This chapter examines some of the probable effects of population aging in Latin America within the framework of the National Transfer Accounts (NTA ) project (NTA 2010).1 The starting point is the NTA estimates ...

  20. Factor mixture modeling of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire: Evidence for distinct classes of worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Kristina J; Allan, Nicholas P; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-01-01

    Worry, the anticipation of future threat, is a common feature of anxiety and mood psychopathology. Considerable research has examined the latent structure of worry to determine whether this construct reflects a dimensional or taxonic structure. Recent taxometric investigations have provided support for a unidimensional structure of worry; however, the results of these studies are limited in that taxometric approaches are unable to assess for the presence of more than two classes of a given construct. Given the complex nature of worry, it is possible that worry may actually reflect a latent structure comprised of multiple classes that cannot be assessed through taxometric approaches. Thus, it is important to utilize newer statistical techniques, such as factor-mixture modeling (FMM), which allow for a more nuanced assessment of the latent structure of a given psychological construct. The aim of the current study was to examine the latent structure of worry using FMM. It was predicted that worry would reflect a three-class structure comprised of (1) a class of low, normative levels of worry, (2) a class of moderate, subclinical worry, and (3) a class of high, pervasive worry. The latent class structure of worry was assessed using FMM in a sample of 1337 participants recruited from the community through a research clinic. Results revealed a three-class structure of the PSWQ comprising low, moderate-high, and high classes of worry. We also provided convergent and discriminant validity of the worry classes by demonstrating that the high worry class was most associated with GAD and that the low worry class was the least associated with GAD. The clinical utility of the worry classes, including the creation of empirically based cut-scores, and the implications for future research are discussed.

  1. Density dependence in an age-structured population of great tits: identifying the critical age classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelon, Marlène; Grøtan, Vidar; Engen, Steinar; Bjørkvoll, Eirin; Visser, Marcel E; Saether, Bernt-Erik

    2016-09-01

    Classical approaches for the analyses of density dependence assume that all the individuals in a population equally respond and equally contribute to density dependence. However, in age-structured populations, individuals of different ages may differ in their responses to changes in population size and how they contribute to density dependence affecting the growth rate of the whole population. Here we apply the concept of critical age classes, i.e., a specific scalar function that describes how one or a combination of several age classes affect the demographic rates negatively, in order to examine how total density dependence acting on the population growth rate depends on the age-specific population sizes. In a 38-yr dataset of an age-structured great tit (Parus major) population, we find that the age classes, including the youngest breeding females, were the critical age classes for density regulation. These age classes correspond to new breeders that attempt to take a territory and that have the strongest competitive effect on other breeding females. They strongly affected population growth rate and reduced recruitment and survival rates of all breeding females. We also show that depending on their age class, females may differently respond to varying density. In particular, the negative effect of the number of breeding females was stronger on recruitment rate of the youngest breeding females. These findings question the classical assumptions that all the individuals of a population can be treated as having an equal contribution to density regulation and that the effect of the number of individuals is age independent. Our results improve our understanding of density regulation in natural populations.

  2. The Relation between Self-Reported Worry and Annoyance from Air and Road Traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Frits; Verhagen, Claudia; Uitenbroek, Daan

    2015-01-01

    Negative perceptions such as fear or worry are known to be an important determinant of annoyance. Annoyance caused by noise and odour has been analysed in relation to worry about safety or health due to environmental hazards, using responses to a health survey. In the survey area high environmental impacts come from air and road traffic. The survey results show a correlation between worry due to the airport or passing aircraft and noise and odour annoyance from aircraft (correlation coefficient (c.c.) close to 0.6). For the relation between worry about a busy street and annoyance from road traffic the correlation is lower (c.c. 0.4–0.5). Worries about different situations, such as living below sea level, close to an airport, busy street or chemical industry, are highly correlated (c.c. 0.5–0.9), also for situations that are not obviously related. Personal factors can also lead to more worry: being female, above 35 years of age, having a high risk for anxiety/depression and being in bad health increase the odds for being worried. The results thus suggest that worry about safety or health is correlated to both personal and environmental factors. PMID:25723645

  3. Worry and Rumination in Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Kaiser A; Iqbal, Naved

    2015-01-01

    Ample work has already been conducted on worry and rumination as negative thought processes involved in the etiology of most of the anxiety and mood related disorders. However, minimal effort has been exerted to investigate whether one type of negative thought process can make way for another type of negative thought process, and if so, how it subsequently results in experiencing a host of symptoms reflective of one or the other type of psychological distress. Therefore, the present study was taken up to investigate whether rumination mediates the relationship between worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and between worry and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in two clinical groups. Self-report questionnaires tapping worry, rumination, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) were administered to a clinical sample of 60 patients aged 30-40. Worry, rumination, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) correlated substantially with each other, however, rumination did not mediate the relationship between worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and between worry and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We also analyzed differences of outcome variables within two clinical groups. These results showed that worry and rumination were significantly different between GAD and OCD groups.

  4. The Relation between Self-Reported Worry and Annoyance from Air and Road Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frits van den Berg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Negative perceptions such as fear or worry are known to be an important determinant of annoyance. Annoyance caused by noise and odour has been analysed in relation to worry about safety or health due to environmental hazards, using responses to a health survey. In the survey area high environmental impacts come from air and road traffic. The survey results show a correlation between worry due to the airport or passing aircraft and noise and odour annoyance from aircraft (correlation coefficient (c.c. close to 0.6. For the relation between worry about a busy street and annoyance from road traffic the correlation is lower (c.c. 0.4–0.5. Worries about different situations, such as living below sea level, close to an airport, busy street or chemical industry, are highly correlated (c.c. 0.5–0.9, also for situations that are not obviously related. Personal factors can also lead to more worry: being female, above 35 years of age, having a high risk for anxiety/depression and being in bad health increase the odds for being worried. The results thus suggest that worry about safety or health is correlated to both personal and environmental factors.

  5. Measuring the Speed of Aging across Population Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    People in different subgroups age at different rates. Surveys containing biomarkers can be used to assess these subgroup differences. We illustrate this using hand-grip strength to produce an easily interpretable, physical-based measure that allows us to compare characteristic-based ages across educational subgroups in the United States. Hand-grip strength has been shown to be a good predictor of future mortality and morbidity, and therefore a useful indicator of population aging. Data from the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) were used. Two education subgroups were distinguished, those with less than a high school diploma and those with more education. Regressions on hand-grip strength were run for each sex and race using age and education, their interactions and other covariates as independent variables. Ages of identical mean hand-grip strength across education groups were compared for people in the age range 60 to 80. The hand-grip strength of 65 year old white males with less education was the equivalent to that of 69.6 (68.2, 70.9) year old white men with more education, indicating that the more educated men had aged more slowly. This is a constant characteristic age, as defined in the Sanderson and Scherbov article “The characteristics approach to the measurement of population aging” published 2013 in Population and Development Review. Sixty-five year old white females with less education had the same average hand-grip strength as 69.4 (68.2, 70.7) year old white women with more education. African-American women at ages 60 and 65 with more education also aged more slowly than their less educated counterparts. African American men with more education aged at about the same rate as those with less education. This paper expands the toolkit of those interested in population aging by showing how survey data can be used to measure the differential extent of aging across subpopulations. PMID:24806337

  6. Analysis on age structure of Zoysia japonica(Poaceae) population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYan; DAIBao-qing; LIANGYong-jun; MALian-ju

    2003-01-01

    The age-structure of natural population of Zoysia japonica in Xiuyan County of Liaoning Province was studied by generational method.The results showed that the highest tiller age class was three,but 1st age class tillers held dominant position with proportions over 95% in each month during the growing seasons.The 2nd age class and 2rd age class tillers were minority in the population.So Z.japonica population was an expanding population.The zero age class buds on the rhizomes were dominantin buds age structures.The proportion of buds to tillers on quantity in each month was about 30% to 40% and reached the highest at the end of September.The increasing of buds proportion before dormancy guaranteed the quantity of tillers in the next spring.The biomass of 1st age class tillers changed with time.The biomass kept increasing from April to July and reached the highest at the end of July and then decreased.

  7. Initial Validation of the Children's Worry Management Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Janice Lillian; Cassano, Michael; Suveg, Cynthia; Shipman, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the psychometric properties of a new instrument, the Children's Worry Management Scale (CWMS). The CWMS has three subscales that specify methods of regulating worry: inhibition (the suppression of worry), dysregulation (exaggerated displays of worry), and coping (constructive ways of managing worry). Using a Caucasian, middle-class…

  8. The When, Why, and How of Worry Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heiden, Colin; ten Broeke, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Worry is a component of many psychological disorders. Worry exposure is a technique that is useful in the treatment of excessive worry. However, there is little in the psychological literature on worry exposure. This leads to the impression that clinicians do not make much use of worry exposure. This paper offers a step-by-step description of the…

  9. Traveling wave dispersal in partially sedentary age-structured populations

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Thuc Manh; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a thorough study on the existence of traveling waves in a mathematical model of dispersal in a partially sedentary age-structured population. This type of model was first proposed by Veit and Lewis in [{\\it Am. Nat.}, {\\bf 148} (1996), 255-274]. We choose the fecundity function to be the Beverton-Holt type function. We extend the theory of traveling waves in the population genetics model of Weinberger in [{\\it SIAM J. Math. Anal.}, {\\bf 13} (1982), 353-396] to the case when migration depends on age groups and a fraction of the population does not migrate.

  10. An age-structured population balance model for microbial dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte M.V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an age-structured population balance model (ASPBM for a bioprocess in a continuous stirred-tank fermentor. It relates the macroscopic properties and dynamic behavior of biomass to the operational parameters and microscopic properties of cells. Population dynamics is governed by two time- and age-dependent density functions for living and dead cells, accounting for the influence of substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations on cell division, aging and death processes. The ASPBM described biomass and substrate oscillations in aerobic continuous cultures as experimentally observed. It is noteworthy that a small data set consisting of nonsegregated measurements was sufficient to adjust a complex segregated mathematical model.

  11. Migration and regional population aging in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J F; Ulack, R

    1991-10-01

    There is a growing realization that developing countries will be affected in the future by the problems associated with population aging. Although internal migration could exacerbate the problems of aging at subnational levels, there remains a paucity of research on the role of migration in elderly population change for the developing countries of the world. This study uses 1980 census data for the Philippines to explore the spatial and temporal dynamics of the country's elderly population. Through examination of internal migration patterns among the thirteen regions of the country and population projections, this paper demonstrates the potentially large role that migration plays in determining local patterns of aging.The National Capital Region, which is a primary destination of labor force migrants, exhibits the greatest projected increase in the share of the nation's elderly population, while the centrally located Visayas regions show rapid reductions in the future. The Visayas regions, however, may be expected to have the highest concentrations of elderly in their populations. Such findings suggest that labor force migration patterns, with subsequent aging-in-place, will most strongly influence near future distributions and concentrations of the elderly, and that national planning for the future's elderly population should incorporate regional examinations as a means of appropriately distributing financial and service related support.

  12. Population Ageing and Sustainable Development Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongxin

    2004-01-01

    According to the United Nations population projections, the population of the elderly is expected to roughly triple in China from 2000 to 2050,particularly when the generations who were born between the 1950s and 1970s move through the age structure, and also because people are living longer and fertility rates have fallen. population aging is expected to put pressure on government's fiscal balance through higher old-age security benefits and health-care expenditures. This work draws together the broad range of elements involved within a consistent framework, based on a computable dynamic general equilibrium model with an overlapping generation structure. Further analysis using model simulation illustrates that the alternative schemes for the benefit rate, retirement age and technological progress are likely to be beneficial, and that an obvious slow-down in the growth of living standards is likely to be avoided.

  13. Impact of Population Aging on Military and Security Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Šimková

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Population ageing is among the most important problems of developed European countries and the most frequently discussed social issues. The Czech Republic also faces population ageing and we cannot expect a different trend in the future. Life expectancy has increased due to better health care while current lifestyle often leads to lower natality, resulting in a negative rate of natural increase and a decreasing proportion of young people in population in the future. This problem affects all spheres of life and social and economic development. Population ageing may pose a threat to the security of the population in different ways. The functioning of the security system may be threatened due to decreasing workforce. Population ageing may undercut resources for military budgets. Young recruits represent an important part of military forces and the latter are competing in the labour market with more attractive occupations. Especially ensuring the stability of the personnel needed for securing crisis situations would be a significant problem of near future. This paper presents a demographic perspective on staffing and correct operation of military forces in the context of population ageing. It describes the current situation of human resources in the military policy of the Czech Republic and determines the negative impact of population ageing on recruitment potential. It deals with the sustainability of human resources for security forces.

  14. Population Ageing in Rural Settlements in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Nejašmić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic demographic characteristics of Croatia is the inherited dispersed population density with a large number of small settlements and the undeveloped system of regional and micro-regional centres. Such settlement structure was entirely inappropriate in the conditions of accelerated and urban-based industrialization after the Second World War. This period was characterised by a mass transition of agricultural population into non-agricultural activities, along with the abandonment of rural settlements. In addition to the strong emigration from rural areas in which younger age groups participated for the most part, there was a continuous reduction in fertility, too. All this has led to the narrowing of young age groups and consequently to the increase in the proportion of the elderly. An important factor of demographic ageing is the reduction in mortality of persons over 30 years of age and longer life respectively. Life expectancy of the Croatian population was 64.8 years in 1960 and 77.2 years in 1972. The average age constantly increased: it was 32.5 years in 1961, 35.4 in 1981 and it reached the high 41.7 years in 2011. The aggression and war against Croatia happened in the 1990s. Dramatic events affected the general social conditions and processes, strongly accelerating negative demographic trends. All this had further affected the socio-demographically eroded rural areas. There was a particularly difficult situation in the regions directly affected by the war; part of these areas had had the features of extreme demographic regression before the war sufferings and the war only further strengthened it. The overall population of Croatia is characterised by decreasing fertility, natural depopulation (negative natural change, total depopulation (since 1990 and intense population ageing. The duration and intensity of these processes clearly testifies to the demographic development of Croatia being very unfavourable. All this also

  15. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, William A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  16. Canadian Provincial Population Growth: Fertility, Migration, and Age Structure Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmonston, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe effect of changes in rates of mortality, fertility, and migration depend not only on the age specific patterns and levels of these rates, but on the age structure of the population. In orderto remove the influences of the age structure and concentrate on the impact of the demographic rates themselves, a common practice is to analyze the influences of the rates for a standard age structure. This paper adapts the general approach of using a standard age structure to a stationary population equivalent (SPE model, and analyzes current population change, using the SPE model, for provinces of Canada. Below-replacement fertility levels are only partially offset by net immigration. The SPE model evidences the decrease in the eventual provincial populations brought about by the below replacement fertility. Out-migration for some provincesto other areas of Canada accentuates their eventual population decreases.RésuméLes effets des changements des taux de mortalité, fécondité, et de migration dépendent non seulement des modèles par âge et des niveaux de ces taux, mais aussi de la structure par âge de la population. Pour éliminer les influences de la structure par âge et se concentrer sur les effets des taux démographiques mêmes, une pratique courante est d’analyser les influences des taux par une structure par âge de norme. Cet article adapte l’approche générale de la structure parâge à un modèle de population stationnaire équivalente (PSE. Cet article analyse les changements de population, en utilisant le modèle de PSE, dans les provinces canadiennes. Le taux de fécondité inférieur au seuil de reproduction de la population n’est que légèrement compensé par l’immigration nette. Le modèle de PSE démontre le déclin des populations provinciales éventuelles causé par le taux de fécondité inférieur au seuil de reproduction de la population. Le taux d’émigration entre certaines provinces et reste du

  17. Equity, Justice, Interdependence: Intergenerational Transfers and the Ageing Population

    OpenAIRE

    Rydell, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    The increase in the ratio of the elderly to the working age population as the demographic transition of low fertility and low mortality proceeds, has spurred a discussion concerning the equity of intergenerational transfers. The central question is if and how the state can afford the pensions and healthcare costs for growing older populations, and who should carry the burden. To a large extent, focus has been on public transfers while neglecting private transfers within families. There is als...

  18. On age distribution of population, government expenditure and fiscal federalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, C A

    1995-08-01

    "In this paper I build a simple model to analyze the consequences that population growth imposes on the relative needs of expenditure of governments in a fiscal federalism setup. I assume, first, that some government expenditure items can be classified according to the age of their recipient individuals and, second, that different levels of government are usually assigned different expenditure programs. The implication is that, for an initially given level of effective public good provision, changes in the size of population as well as in its age structure will influence the composition of public expenditure for different layers of administration in a different manner."

  19. Association of Microalbuminuria with Metabolic Syndrome among Aged Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Shu-Hua; Guan, Li-Ying; Wang, Yi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of the various components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on chronic kidney disease has been conflicting. We aim to investigate the association between MetS and microalbuminuria and identify the major contributing components of MetS that result in microalbuminuria in the Chinese aged population. Methods. A total of 674 adults aged 55-98 years (males: 266; mean age: 66.5 ± 7.5 years) were studied. MetS was defined by the 2004 Chinese Diabetes Society criteria and microalbuminuria by urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥3 mg/mmoL. Results. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was gradually increased with increasing number of MetS components (P microalbuminuria (OR = 1.781, 95% CI = 1.226-2.587; P microalbuminuria in the Chinese aged population. Elevated FPG is the most predominant component of metabolic syndrome associated with microalbuminuria followed by elevated SBP and reduced HDL-C.

  20. Systematic information processing style and perseverative worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Suzanne R; Meeten, Frances; Davey, Graham C L

    2013-12-01

    This review examines the theoretical rationale for conceiving of systematic information processing as a proximal mechanism for perseverative worry. Systematic processing is characterised by detailed, analytical thought about issue-relevant information, and in this way, is similar to the persistent, detailed processing of information that typifies perseverative worry. We review the key features and determinants of systematic processing, and examine the application of systematic processing to perseverative worry. We argue that systematic processing is a mechanism involved in perseverative worry because (1) systematic processing is more likely to be deployed when individuals feel that they have not reached a satisfactory level of confidence in their judgement and this is similar to the worrier's striving to feel adequately prepared, to have considered every possible negative outcome/detect all potential danger, and to be sure that they will successfully cope with perceived future problems; (2) systematic processing and worry are influenced by similar psychological cognitive states and appraisals; and (3) the functional neuroanatomy underlying systematic processing is located in the same brain regions that are activated during worrying. This proposed mechanism is derived from core psychological processes and offers a number of clinical implications, including the identification of psychological states and appraisals that may benefit from therapeutic interventions for worry-based problems.

  1. Relations among perceived parental rearing behaviors, attachment style, and worry in anxious children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy M; Whiteside, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    The present study extended the findings of Muris et al. [Muris, P., Meesters, C., Merckelbach, H., & Hulsenbeck, P. (2000). Worry in children is related to perceived parental rearing and attachment. Behavior Research and Therapy, 38, 487-497] regarding the relations between perceived parental rearing behaviors, self-reported attachment style, and worry in a community sample to a clinical sample of anxious children. Sixty-four children and adolescents, aged 7-18 years, with a primary anxiety disorder completed (a) the EMBU-C, a questionnaire measuring perceptions of parental rearing behaviors, (b) a single-item measure of attachment style, and (c) an index of worry severity. Findings revealed that child rated parental rearing behaviors, particularly parental rejection, were positively related to child worry. Self-reported attachment style was also related to worry, such that children who classified themselves as ambivalently attached reported higher levels of worry than did children who classified themselves as securely attached. Parenting style and attachment were found to make independent contributions to worry. The results are compared to those from Muris et al.'s community study, and implications for future research are discussed.

  2. Healthy Ageing: tackling the burden of disease and disability in an ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Klijs (Bart)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHealthy ageing of individuals is crucial to prevent strong increases in the burden of disease and disability due to population ageing. We aimed to quantify the current burden of disease and disability and assessed which determinants explain the burden of disability. The occurrence of dis

  3. Peritoneal dialysis in an ageing population: a 10-year experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent and there are increasing numbers of older patients with advanced CKD. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a potential treatment. This study aims to compare PD outcomes in age-defined populations in the largest PD centre in the Republic of Ireland over 10 years.

  4. Worry as an Uncertainty-Associated Emotion: Exploring the Role of Worry in Health Information Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Young; Hawkins, Robert P

    2016-08-01

    This study was carried out to understand how and why worry motivates health-related information seeking, and whether worry decreases after obtaining health-related information. It was proposed that worry influences health-related information-seeking behavior indirectly through cancer patients' desire for obtaining additional information. It was further expected that perceived knowledge about cancer could be increased after 2 months of searching for health information over the Internet, which would subsequently affect levels of worry. Using panel data collected from 224 women diagnosed with breast cancer, worry was found to predict patients' health information seeking via the perceived need for additional information. The results further showed significant increases in patients' perceived knowledge about breast cancer and decreased levels of worry after the seeking of health information for 2 months. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  5. Aging of the inceptive cellular population: the relationship between stem cells and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Catherine E; Galderisi, Umberto; Giordano, Antonio

    2009-04-02

    The average life expectancy worldwide has about doubled and the global population has increased six fold over the past century. With improving health care in the developed world there is a proportional augmentation in the treatment necessary for elderly patients occasioning the call for increased research in the area of aging and age-related diseases. The manifestation of this research has been focalized on the causative cellular processes and molecular mechanisms involved. Here we will discuss the efforts of this research in the area of stem cells, delving into the regulatory mechanisms and how their de-regulation could be attributed to aging and age-related diseases.

  6. Pterygium in Aged Population in Doumen County, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaili Wu; Mingguang He; Jingjing Xu; Shaozhen Li

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of pterygium and its influence on visual acuity in aged population of Doumen County, southern China.Methods: Apopulation-based survey was conducted in Doumen County, the rural area of southern China. Twenty-seven sample units were selected by random sampling. The prevalence and severity of pterygium and it-related low visual acuity were analyzed.Results: Of the total 4 762 individuals aged 50 years or over, 4 214 were examined. The prevalence of pterygium was 33.01% in subjects aged 50 years or above. There was a significantly higher prevalence in female (35.70%) than in male (29.70% , P =0.025). The prevalence of pterygium in age groups of 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s years old is 33.98%, 36.40%, 30.73% and 25.40%, respectively. Most of the pterygia were located in the nasal side (93.31%) of cornea, and only 6. 69% in the temporal side. 0.92% of the eyes had visual acuity less than 0.32, which were directly caused by pterygia.Conclusion: The current survey suggests that the pterygium is one of the most common diseases of external eye in the population aged 50 years and above. It is still leading to the impairment of visual acuity in the rural area.

  7. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in an Aging HIV Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Iguacel, R; Llibre, J M; Friis-Moller, N

    2015-01-01

    With more effective and widespread antiretroviral treatment, the overall incidence of AIDS- or HIV-related death has decreased dramatically. Consequently, as patients are aging, cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV population....... The incidence of CVD overall in HIV is relatively low, but it is approximately 1.5-2-fold higher than that seen in age-matched HIV-uninfected individuals. Multiple factors are believed to explain this excess in risk such as overrepresentation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (particularly smoking...

  8. Does Population Aging Drive Up Pro-Elderly Social Spending?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhuysse, Pieter

    This essay reviews recent evidence on the pro-elderly social spending bias of OECD welfare states. It shows that the cross-national variance in this variable is remarkably large, with Southern Europe and countries such as Germany, Austria, Japan, the USA, and Switzerland being most heavily pro......-elderly biased. It then points out that population ageing actually cannot explain very much of this pro-elderly bias variance. For instance, countries such as Denmark, Finland and Sweden are demographically old societies, yet they boast among the lowest pro-elderly spending biases in the OECD world, due...... to their greater commitment to family-friendly policies, active labour market policies and similar pro-young policies. The essay reviews a series of similarly counter-intuitive findings about generational politics and policies as published in Ageing Populations in Post-Industrial Democracies (Vanhuysse and Goerres...

  9. An evidence-based policy prescription for an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L; Hollander, Marcus J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors provide a policy prescription for Canada's aging population. They question the appropriateness of predictions about the lack of sustainability of our healthcare system. The authors note that aging per se will only have a modest impact on future healthcare costs, and that other factors such as increased medical interventions, changes in technology and increases in overall service use will be the main cost drivers. They argue that, to increase value for money, government should validate, as a priority, integrated systems of care delivery for older adults and recognize such systems as a major component of Canada's healthcare system, along with hospitals, primary care and public/population health. They also note a range of mechanisms to enhance such systems going forward. The authors present data and policy commentary on the following topics: ageism, healthy communities, prevention, unpaid caregivers and integrated systems of care delivery.

  10. The old age security hypothesis and optimal population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bental, B

    1989-03-01

    The application of the Samuelson-Diamond overlapping generations framework to the old age security hypothesis indicates that government intervention schemes can influence the relationship between population growth and capital accumulation. The most direct means of optimizing population growth is through taxes or subsidies that relate to the intergenerational transfer of wealth. A pay-as-you-go social security scheme, in which payment is predicated on the number of children the receiver has and is financed by taxes levied on the working population, emerges as the most likely intervention to produce the optimal steady state equilibrium. This system is able to correct any distortions the private sector may build into it. In contrast, a child support system, in which the government subsidizes or taxes workers according to their family size, can guarantee the optimal capital:labor ratio but not the optimal population growth rate. Thus, if the government seeks to decrease the population growth rate, the appropriate intervention is to levy a lump-sum social-security tax on workers and transfer the revenues to the old; the direction should be reversed if the goal is to increase population growth. Another alternative, a lump sum social security system, can guarantee optimal population growth but not a desirable capital:labor ratio. Finally, the introduction of money as a valued commodity into an economy with a high capital:labor ratio will also serve to decrease the population growth rate and solve the intergenerational transfer problem through the private sector without any need for government intervention.

  11. Population aging and the extended family in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Population aging produces changes in the availability of kin with uncertain implications for extended living arrangements. We propose a highly stylized model that can be used to analyze and project age-specific proportions of adults living in extended and nuclear households. The model is applied to Taiwan using annual data from 1978-1998. We estimate cohort and age effects showing that more recently born cohorts of seniors are less likely to live in extended households, but that as seniors age the proportion living in extended households increases. The effect of individual aging has diminished over time, however. The proportion of non-senior adults living in extended households has increased steadily because changes in the age structure have increased the availability of older kin. The model is used to project living arrangements and we conclude that the proportion living in extended households will begin to decline gradually for both seniors and non-seniors. The extended family is becoming less important in Taiwan, but it is not on the way out.

  12. Cold hardiness increases with age in juvenile Rhododendron populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev eArora

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Winter survival in woody plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors that affect the plant's ability to cold acclimate. Because woody perennials are long-lived and often have a prolonged juvenile (pre-flowering phase, it is conceivable that both chronological and physiological age factors influence adaptive traits such as stress tolerance. This study investigated annual cold hardiness (CH changes in several hybrid Rhododendron populations based on Tmax, an estimate of the maximum rate of freezing injury (ion leakage in cold-acclimated leaves from juvenile progeny. Data from F2 and backcross populations derived from R. catawbiense and R. fortunei parents indicated significant annual increases in Tmax ranging from 3.7 to to 6.4 C as the seedlings aged from 3 to 5 years old. A similar yearly increase (6.7° C was observed in comparisons of 1- and 2-year-old F1 progenies from a R. catawbiense x R. dichroanthum cross. In contrast, CH of the mature parent plants (> 10 years old did not change significantly over the same evaluation period. In leaf samples from a natural population of R. maximum, CH evaluations over two years resulted in an average Tmax value for juvenile 2- to 3- year- old plants that was 9.2 C lower than the average for mature (~30 years old plants. . A reduction in CH was also observed in three hybrid rhododendron cultivars clonally propagated by rooted cuttings (ramets - Tmax of 4-year-old ramets was significantly lower than the Tmax estimates for the 30- to 40-year-old source plants (ortets. In both the wild R. maximum population and the hybrid cultivar group, higher accumulation of a cold-acclimation responsive 25kDa leaf dehydrin was associated with older plants and higher CH. The feasibility of identifying hardy phenotypes at juvenile period and research implications of age-dependent changes in CH are discussed.

  13. Age estimation charts for a modern Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkin, Matthew; Taylor, Jane

    2012-09-10

    Calculation of the biological age of an individual has application in many fields of dentistry. It can be used to determine the appropriate timing of interventionist treatment for example in orthodontics; to analyse the developmental stage of an individual relative to the general population in the management of genetic or congenital conditions which disturb growth; and to estimate the age of a living or deceased person for forensic purposes. Many of the techniques used to estimate age can be quite time consuming to complete. This time component is a major disadvantage in a forensic context when age estimations in mass disasters are required as part of the post-mortem examination process. Consequently, forensic practitioners have tended to use the simpler but less reliable atlas style techniques of Schour and Massler and Ubelaker in these situations. For mass disaster situations, such as the recent Victorian Bushfires, it would be advantageous to have access to Australian specific data in the convenient Schour and Massler format. This project reinterpreted the Australian data previously collected by Blenkin and other relevant studies and applied it to a schematic similar to that of Ubelaker to develop a reliable, convenient and contemporary reference for use in age estimation.

  14. Worry about terror among young adults living in ongoing security uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ora; Mass-Friedman, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate worry about terror as a mediating variable, with the exogenous variables being media viewing, differentiation of self, and trait anxiety, and the endogenous variables being somatic symptoms and perceptions of security-related stress. Participants were divided into two groups by age/academic level: 248 high school students and 191 university students. A pathway correlation model was used to investigate worry about terror as a mediating variable. The central finding was that worry about terror was a significant mediating variable in the relationship between the extent of media viewing following terror events and the level of perception of security-related stress. That is, young people who said they worried a lot reported a high level of stress relating to the terror events they saw covered in the media. In addition, trait anxiety was found to have an effect on stress perception only via the level of worry about terror. This means that high levels of stress are not experienced by all highly trait-anxious people, but only by those who suffer from higher levels of worry about terror.

  15. Worries and Concerns among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Followed Prospectively over One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Petter Jelsness-Jørgensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease-related worries are frequently reported in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, but longitudinal assessments of these worries are scarce. In the present study, patients completed the rating form of IBD patient concerns (RFIPC at three occasions during one year. One-way analysis of variance (ANO VA, t-tests, bivariate correlation, and linear regression analyses were used to analyse data. The validity and reliability of the Norwegian RFIPC was tested. A total of 140 patients were included (V1, ulcerative colitis (UC n = 92, Crohn's disease (CD n = 48, mean age 46.9 and 40.0-year old, respectively. The highest rated worries included having an ostomy bag, loss of bowel control, and reduced energy levels. Symptoms were positively associated with more worries. A pattern of IBD-related worries was consistent over a period of one year. Worries about undergoing surgery or having an ostomy bag seemed to persist even when symptoms improved. The Norwegian RFIPC is valid and reliable.

  16. [Aging of the working population in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmarinen, J; Costa, G

    2000-01-01

    The working population over 50 years of age will grow considerably during the next 15 years. After 2010, the number of retired people over 65 years of age will be almost double that of 1995, with a strong impact also on working conditions and the labour market. Work ability is a dynamic process that changes, through its components, throughout life and is the result of the interaction between individual resources (including health, functional capacity, education and skills), working conditions, and the surrounding society. Work ability creates the basis for the employability of an individual, which can be supported by a number of actions (e.g. legislation on work and retirement) and social attitudes (e.g. age discrimination). Consequently, the prevalence of limitations in work ability varies significantly according to how it is evaluated and the frequency of work disability can vary considerably in different times, locations and populations. The Work Ability Index, created and used in a Finnish 11-year longitudinal study, has been proved a useful practical tool for the assessment of workers' fitness and a good predictor of work disability. Measures able to restore, maintain or promote work ability depend on the current work status and the needs of the target groups, and must concentrate on work content, physical work environment and the work community. The actions targeted towards the individual, on the other hand, concentrate on strengthening the health status and functional resources of the workers and developing professional expertise and skills. Correctly targeted and integrated measures improve work ability of ageing workers and therefore lead to improved work quality, increased productivity and also improved quality of life and well-being. They also have positive long-term effects on the "third age", when the worker retires.

  17. Locations that Support Social Activity Participation of the Aging Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline van den Berg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Social activities are an important aspect of health and quality of life of the aging population. They are key elements in the prevention of loneliness. In order to create living environments that stimulate older adults to engage in social activities, more insight is needed in the social activity patterns of the aging population. This study therefore analyzes the heterogeneity in older adults’ preferences for different social activity location types and the relationship between these preferences and personal and mobility characteristics. This is done using a latent class multinomial logit model based on two-day diary data collected in 2014 in Noord-Limburg in the Netherlands among 213 respondents aged 65 or over. The results show that three latent classes can be identified among the respondents who recorded social activities in the diary: a group that mainly socializes at home, a group that mainly socializes at a community center and a group that is more likely to socialize at public ‘third’ places. The respondents who did not record any interactions during the two days, are considered as a separate segment. Relationships between segment membership and personal and mobility characteristics were tested using cross-tabulations with chi-square tests and analyses of variance. The results suggest that both personal and mobility characteristics play an important role in social activity patterns of older adults.

  18. Complexity in caring for an ageing heart failure population: concomitant chronic conditions and age related impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Steeman, Els; Leventhal, Marcia E; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Hengartner-Kopp, Beatrice; Conca, Antoinette; Bernasconi, Arlette T; Petry, Heidi; Brunner-La Rocca, Hanspeter

    2004-12-01

    The complexity of caring for the ageing heart failure (HF) population is further complicated by concomitant chronic conditions (i.e., polypharmacy, depression), age related impairments (i.e., hearing, visual and cognitive impairments, impairments in activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), and other issues (e.g., health illiteracy, lack of social support). This paper provides an overview of these risk factors, outlines how they individually and in interplay endanger favourable outcome by putting patients at risk for poor self-management. Moreover, suggestions are made on how these issues could be addressed and integrated in heart failure management by applying gerontological care principles in caring for the ageing heart failure population.

  19. Population aging through survival of the fit and stable

    CERN Document Server

    Brotto, Tommaso; Kurchan, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    We study a system composed by individuals having an internal dynamics with many possible states that are partially stable, with varying mutation rates. Individuals reproduce and die with a rate that is a property of each state, not necessarily related to its stability, and the offspring is born on the parent's state. The total population is limited by resources or space, as for example in a chemostat or a Petri dish. We show that under very weak assumptions, such a system exhibits a complex adaptation behavior that may be identified with the `aging' dynamics of glassy systems: as time goes on, the response of the population to a change in the environment, and the rate of genetic divergence of two isolated subpopulations become progressively slower. Likewise, mutation rate and fitness become more correlated, even if they are completely uncorrelated for an isolated individual, underlining the fact that the interaction induced by limitation of resources is by itself efficient for generating collective effects. T...

  20. Cognitive self-consciousness and meta-worry and their relations to symptoms of worry and obsessional thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Gwendolijn Olivia; Rassin, Eric; Muris, Peter

    2005-02-01

    The relation between cognitive self-consciousness and meta-worry, and their association with symptoms of worry and obsessional thoughts were examined. 53 undergraduate students completed the expanded version of the Cognitive Self-consciousness Scale, the Meta-worry subscale of the Anxious Thoughts Inventory, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, and the Padua Inventory-Revised. Analysis showed that cognitive self-consciousness and meta-worry were moderately correlated (r =.57). Further, both constructs were positively associated with symptoms of worry and obsessional thoughts. When controlling for cognitive self-consciousness, metaworry remained significantly correlated to both types of symptoms. Yet, when controlling for meta-worry, correlations between cognitive self-consciousness and symptoms of worry and obsessional thoughts clearly attuned and were no longer significant. These findings suggest that meta-worry is more important for understanding excessive, intrusive thought patterns than the mere tendency to monitor one's thoughts.

  1. Epidemiology of pterygium in aged rural population of Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Qing-feng; XU Liang; JIN Xiu-ying; YOU Qi-sheng; YANG Xiao-hui; CUI Tong-tong

    2010-01-01

    Background Pterygium is a common ophthalmic disease and an important public health problem. It may be affected by many factors such as age, gender, ultraviolet radiation exposure, and time spent outdoors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of pterygium and evaluate the risk factors for the development of pterygium in the aged rural population of Beijing.Methods The investigation is a population-based cross-sectional study. Participants from 198 villages of 13 suburban districts, aged 55-85 years old, were invited to complete a medical record, and 37 067 individuals were taken external ocular and fundus photos at Beijing ocular disease survey in 2008-2009. The information was uploaded by Internet and diagnosed with stages and grades by ophthalmological specialists. The prevalence, stages and grades of pterygia were observed.Results Of the 37 067 individuals, 1395 (3.76%) had pterygium. There was a significantly higher prevalence in male (5.13%) than in female (3.17%, P=0.000). The prevelence rate increased obviously with ages (x2=7.939, P=0.019) in rural Beijing. The average prevalence of 5.91% in Daxing and Fangshan districts with low latitude and low precipitation was significantly higher than that in Miyun and Huairou districts with high latitude and deep precipitation (3.17%, P=0.000). The majority of the pterygia (43.5%) were in active stage and 46.5% pterygia involved pupil area corneas. Conclusions There is a statistically significant association between latitude and precipitation of habitation region and pterygium formation. Solar radiation, especially ultraviolet exposure represents a significant environment hazard to pterygium development.

  2. Worry in Older Community-Residing Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Kaye; Clemson, Lindy; Cant, Rosemary; Ke, Liang; Cumming, Robert G.; Kendig, Hal; Mathews, Mark

    2011-01-01

    With rising longevity, increasing numbers of older people are experiencing changes in their everyday family and social life, changes in their financial status, and a greater number of chronic conditions affecting their health. We took the opportunity to explore these relationships with worry in a group of volunteer community-living elderly (n =…

  3. Some Armchair Worries about Wheeled Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomous agents research aims to understand adaptive behavior by building models that exhibit such behavior. In this paper, I describe some theoretical worries about the tendency to simplify the sensory-motor control of these behaving models as much as possible. Wheeled robots provide a good examp

  4. THE STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF POPULATION BY AGE GROUPS IN THE RURAL AREAS OF BUCOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETA ILEANA MORAR (BUMBU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure analysis of population by age groups in the rural area of Bucovina desires to create a recent image of the rural population by age groups in the region of Bucovina , provided that after the year 2000 have occurred socio – economic changes with repercussions on the demographic component. The structure analysis by age group will be based on the share of population indicators on the major age groups, the share of population by age and quinquennial gender illustrated by age pyramid, the index of demographic aging and age-dependency ratio. This study is definitely needed in forecasting future regional development objectives and measures.

  5. Response to “Worrying Trends in Econophysics”

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Joseph L.

    2006-11-01

    This article is a response to the recent “Worrying Trends in Econophysics” critique written by four respected theoretical economists [M. Gallegatti, S. Keen, T. Lux, P. Ormerod, Worrying trends in econophysics, Physica A (2006), submitted for publication [1

  6. Assessment of worry and OCD : how are they related?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsoort, S; Emmelkamp, P; Vervaeke, G

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the overlap and differences between measures of worry and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). It was expected that: (1) worry and obsessive compulsive symptoms are distinct concepts, yet that (2) worry and the cognitive components of OCD are more strongly related compared to

  7. Perseverative cognition : the impact of worry on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Bart

    2010-01-01

    For a majority of people worries about upcoming stressful events are a common experience in daily life. The aim of this thesis was to examine the effects of common worries on somatic health. In particular, the effects of worry on somatic health complaints, like headache and back pain, and on cardiac

  8. Probiotics and prebiotics and health in ageing populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J

    2013-05-01

    In healthy adults microbial communities that colonise different regions of the human colon contribute nutrients and energy to the host via the fermentation of non-digestible dietary components in the large intestine. A delicate balance of microbial species is required to maintain healthy metabolism and immune function. Disturbance in this microbial balance can have negative consequences for health resulting in elevated inflammation and infection, that are contributory factors in diabetes and cancer. There is a growing awareness that the microbial balance in the colon may become increasingly perturbed with aging and therefore hasten the onset of certain diseases. Societal and dietary factors influence microbial community composition both in the short and long term in the elderly (>65 years old) whilst immunosenescence may also be linked to a perturbed distal gut microbiota and frailty in the elderly. Significant progress has been made in defining some of the dominant members of the microbial community in the healthy large intestine and in identifying their roles in metabolism. There is therefore an urgent need for better awareness of the impact of diet, prebiotic and probiotic strategies in driving human colonic microbial composition in order to understand the possibilities for maintaining healthy gut function and well-being in an increasingly elderly population. Here we review gut microbial changes associated with aging and how diet, prebiotics and probiotics may modulate the gut microbiota to maintain health in the elderly.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland.

  10. Age Structure of the Otter (Lutra lutra Population in England and Wales, and Problems with Cementum Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Sherrard-Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Age is an important parameter in understanding population structure and age-dependent processes such as accumulation of contaminants. In the current study, canines and incisors of sub-adult and mature wild otters (Lutra lutra from England and Wales were sectioned and incremental cementum lines were used as an indication of age. The age structure of the sample population is much younger than some European populations (of 110 otters aged, only 10 were aged four or older. Cementum ageing is useful here in giving a broad indication of age structure, but is imprecise for species which do not exhibit seasonal breeding. Age is likely to be underestimated in most cases.

  11. Intolerance of uncertainty, fear of anxiety, and adolescent worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michel J; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M

    2012-08-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable partially explained change in the other. Fear of anxiety and worry also showed evidence of a bidirectional relation, although change in fear of anxiety had a much weaker mediational effect on change in worry than vice versa. The findings show that relative to fear of anxiety, intolerance of uncertainty may play a greater role in the etiology of worry in adolescents.

  12. Personalized nutrigenomics: tailoring the diet to the aging diabesity population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Ruden

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas M Ruden1, Xiangyi Lu21Wayne State University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, C. S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 190 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, and this number is estimated to double by the year 2025. Diabetes is especially prominent in the elderly population because the IDF indicates age above 45 years as a major risk factor for diabetes. The most common trials for controlling diabetes focus on tighter glucose control as a means to reduce the long-term complications. However, whether tight blood sugar control or other dietary or pharmaceutical interventions in the elderly are more appropriate is not known. Major changes have taken place in our diet over the past 10,000 years since the beginning of the Agricultural Revolution, but our genes have not changed. Furthermore, the large numbers of diabetic elderly in the population are a recent phenomenon, because those with diabetes have historically died young. Genetically speaking, humans today live in a nutritional environment that differs from that for which our genetic constitution was selected. For example a high omega-6/omega-3 ratio, found in today’s Western diets, promotes the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Knowing who is at risk would be useful if it meant that one could avoid the environmental triggers that convert susceptibility to disease. The prospect of targeting specific dietary treatments at the elderly, who are predicted to gain the most therapeutic benefits, clearly has important clinical and economic consequences. In this review, we will discuss modern molecular genetic and epidemiological techniques which are now, or soon will

  13. Chronic fatigue is associated with increased disease-related worries and concerns in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lars-Petter Jelsness-Jφrgensen; Tomm Bernklev; Magne Henriksen; Roald Torp; Bjφrn Mourn

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of chronic fatigue on disease-related worries in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the potential multicolinearity between subjective questionnaires. METHODS: Patients in remission or with mild-tomoderate disease activity completed the fatigue questionnaire (FQ), the rating form of IBD patient concerns (RFIPC), the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and IBD questionnaire (N-IBDQ). In addition, clinical and epidemiological data were obtained. RESULTS: In total, 140 patients were included; of which 92 were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and 48 with Crohn's disease. the mean age of patients with chronic fatigue was 44.2 years (SD =15.8) and for non-fatigued patients was 44.7 years (SD = 16.0). Chrnnic fatigued patients had clinically significantly increased levels of disease-related worries, as measured by Cohen's d effect size. Worries about having an ostomy bag, loss of bowel control, and energy levels were most prominent in both chronic fatigued and non-chronic fatigued IBD patients. Variance inflation factor (VIF) and tolerance indicated that there were no problematic multicolinearity among the FQ, RFIPC, SF-36 and N-IBDQ responses (VIF 2). CONCLUSION: Chronic fatigue is associated with increased levels of disease-related worries and concerns in IBD. Increased levels of worries were also associated with impaired health-related quality of life.

  14. The effects of clown intervention on worries and emotional responses in children undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sara Costa; Arriaga, Patrícia

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated whether clown intervention could reduce preoperative worries and the affective responses of children undergoing minor surgery. Parental anxiety was also tested. Child's age, previous hospitalization, and temperament were tested as predictors of the child's responses during this preoperative phase. Seventy children were assigned to one of two groups: children accompanied by their parents and a pair of clowns or, those accompanied by the parents but without the clowns. The results emphasized the relevance of clown intervention on the reduction of preoperative worries and emotional responses, not only in children but also in their parents.

  15. An Analysis on the Spatial Distribution of Population Aging Pressure in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangWangzhou; Dong Suocheng; Wu Youde; Luo Renbo

    2012-01-01

    Based on comprehensive analysis of the impact of population aging to social and economic development, a comprehensive evaluation system including 18 indexes was constructed for evaluating regional pressure of population aging on social and economic development. Using statistics data of 31 regions in Chi- na from 2004 to 2008, the pressure of population aging on social and economic development, was comprehensively evaluated by using the factor analysis method. The spatial distribution of popu- lation aging in China was also analyzed. This study is to provide scientific basis for government to make strategies of coping with population aging according to regional pressure of population ag- ing on social and economic development in China.

  16. Effects of Personality on Psychiatric and Somatic Symptoms in Pregnant Women: The Role of Pregnancy Worries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Cecilia Penacoba; Monge, Francisco Javier Carmona; Abellan, Isabel Carretero; Morales, Dolores Marin

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of personality and pregnancy worries on pregnant women's mental and physical health with 154 women in the first half of their gestational period. Self-report questionnaires were used to collect information about control variables, sociodemographic (age, educational level, and work), and pregnancy variables…

  17. Perceived health in the Portuguese population aged ? 35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo de Figueiredo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the exploratory relationship between determinants of health, life satisfaction, locus of control, attitudes and behaviors and health related quality of life in an adult population. METHODS : Observational study (analytical and cross-sectional with a quantitative methodological basis. The sample was composed oy 1,214 inhabitants aged ≥ 35 in 31 civil parishes in the County of Coimbra, Portugal, 2011-2012. An anonymous and voluntary health survey was conducted, which collected the following information: demographic, clinical record, health and lifestyle behaviors; health related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study, Short Form-36; health locus of control; survey of health attitudes and behavior, and quality of life index. Pearson’s Linear Correlation, t-Student, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney; One-way ANOVA; Brown-Forsythe’s F; Kruskal-Wallis; Multiple Comparisons: Tukey (HSD, Games-Howell and Conover were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS : Health related quality of life was shown to be lower in females, in older age groups, in obese/overweight individuals, widows, unassisted, those living alone, living in rural/suburban areas, those who did not work and with a medium-low socioeconomic level. Respondents with poor/very poor self-perceived health (p < 0.0001, with chronic disease (p < 0.0001, who consumed < 3 meals per day (p ≤ 0.01, who were sedentary, who slept ≤ 6 h/day and had smoked for several years revealed the worst health results. Health related quality of life was positively related with a bigger internal locus, with better health attitudes and behaviors (physical exercise, health and nutritional care, length of dependence and with different areas of life satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS : Better health related quality of life was associated with certain social, psychological, family and health characteristics, a satisfactory lifestyle, better socioeconomic conditions and a good internal locus of control over

  18. Faster Increases in Human Life Expectancy Could Lead to Slower Population Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Counterintuitively, faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging. The conventional view that faster increases in human life expectancy would lead to faster population aging is based on the assumption that people become old at a fixed chronological age. A preferable alternative is to base measures of aging on people’s time left to death, because this is more closely related to the characteristics that are associated with old age. Using this alternative interpretation, we show that faster increases in life expectancy would lead to slower population aging. Among other things, this finding affects the assessment of the speed at which countries will age. PMID:25876033

  19. Population expansion and individual age affect endoparasite richness and diversity in a recolonising large carnivore population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniak, Ines; Heckmann, Ilja; Heitlinger, Emanuel; Szentiks, Claudia A.; Nowak, Carsten; Harms, Verena; Jarausch, Anne; Reinhardt, Ilka; Kluth, Gesa; Hofer, Heribert; Krone, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The recent recolonisation of the Central European lowland (CEL) by the grey wolf (Canis lupus) provides an excellent opportunity to study the effect of founder events on endoparasite diversity. Which role do prey and predator populations play in the re-establishment of endoparasite life cycles? Which intrinsic and extrinsic factors control individual endoparasite diversity in an expanding host population? In 53 individually known CEL wolves sampled in Germany, we revealed a community of four cestode, eight nematode, one trematode and 12 potential Sarcocystis species through molecular genetic techniques. Infections with zoonotic Echinococcus multilocularis, Trichinella britovi and T. spiralis occurred as single cases. Per capita endoparasite species richness and diversity significantly increased with population size and changed with age, whereas sex, microsatellite heterozygosity, and geographic origin had no effect. Tapeworm abundance (Taenia spp.) was significantly higher in immigrants than natives. Metacestode prevalence was slightly higher in ungulates from wolf territories than from control areas elsewhere. Even though alternative canid definitive hosts might also play a role within the investigated parasite life cycles, our findings indicate that (1) immigrated wolves increase parasite diversity in German packs, and (2) prevalence of wolf-associated parasites had declined during wolf absence and has now risen during recolonisation. PMID:28128348

  20. Population expansion and individual age affect endoparasite richness and diversity in a recolonising large carnivore population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniak, Ines; Heckmann, Ilja; Heitlinger, Emanuel; Szentiks, Claudia A.; Nowak, Carsten; Harms, Verena; Jarausch, Anne; Reinhardt, Ilka; Kluth, Gesa; Hofer, Heribert; Krone, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The recent recolonisation of the Central European lowland (CEL) by the grey wolf (Canis lupus) provides an excellent opportunity to study the effect of founder events on endoparasite diversity. Which role do prey and predator populations play in the re-establishment of endoparasite life cycles? Which intrinsic and extrinsic factors control individual endoparasite diversity in an expanding host population? In 53 individually known CEL wolves sampled in Germany, we revealed a community of four cestode, eight nematode, one trematode and 12 potential Sarcocystis species through molecular genetic techniques. Infections with zoonotic Echinococcus multilocularis, Trichinella britovi and T. spiralis occurred as single cases. Per capita endoparasite species richness and diversity significantly increased with population size and changed with age, whereas sex, microsatellite heterozygosity, and geographic origin had no effect. Tapeworm abundance (Taenia spp.) was significantly higher in immigrants than natives. Metacestode prevalence was slightly higher in ungulates from wolf territories than from control areas elsewhere. Even though alternative canid definitive hosts might also play a role within the investigated parasite life cycles, our findings indicate that (1) immigrated wolves increase parasite diversity in German packs, and (2) prevalence of wolf-associated parasites had declined during wolf absence and has now risen during recolonisation.

  1. A Study on the Issue of Population Aging among Ethnic Minorities in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Changde

    2014-01-01

    There are differences in the issue of population aging among China ’ s various ethnic groups.The aging process of some ethnic groups is very fast, and the structure of their population ag-ing belongs to a typical aging model .Some ethnic groups ’ aging process is relatively slow , and the structure of their aging still belongs to a young model.Moreover, the rate of aging of various eth-nic groups in the same region is also different , e-ven the rates and trends of aging within one specif-ic ethnic group also differ .Hence , the situation of population aging among minorities in China is very complicated . Based on the data from three demographic censuses conducted in 1990, 2000 and 2010, this article analyzes the differences of population aging among various ethnic groups . 1.The Basic Situation of Population Aging a-mong Ethnic Minorities in China According to the census , the population above age 60 among minority populations was 6.29 million in 1990.; It increased to 9.02 million in 2010;and reached above 11.75 million in 2010.The popula-tion above the age of 65 among the minority popula-tion was 4.05 million in 1990; 5.87 million in 1990;and reached 7.83 million in 2010. According to typical international standards of population aging frameworks and statistics from the 2000 census , China ’ s population has already be-come an aging population .Among the total popula-tion of that year , 10.46%of the population was a-bove the age of 60;7.10% of the population was above the age of 65.Among the ethnic minority populations , 8.57% of the population was above the age of 60 , and 5.58% was above the age of 65.Hence, the minority population had not yet become a typical aging population .However , in 2010, the rate of aging in the total minority popu-lation further increased , and it also became a typi-cal aging population . 2 .Ethnic Differences of Population Aging a-mong the Minorities There are 55 ethnic minorities in China , and the rate of aging among these

  2. What's the Worry with Social Anxiety? Comparing Cognitive Processes in Children with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Cate S; Donovan, Caroline L; Spence, Susan H; March, Sonja; Holmes, Monique C

    2016-12-05

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) in children is often comorbid with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). We investigated whether worry, intolerance of uncertainty, beliefs about worry, negative problem orientation and cognitive avoidance, that are typically associated with GAD, are present in children with SAD. Participants included 60 children (8-12 years), matched on age and gender. Groups included children: with primary GAD and without SAD (GAD); with primary SAD and without GAD (SAD); and without an anxiety disorder (NAD). GAD and SAD groups scored significantly higher than the NAD group on worry, intolerance of uncertainty, negative beliefs about worry and negative problem orientation, however, they did not score differently from each other. Only the GAD group scored significantly higher than the NAD group on cognitive avoidance. These findings further understanding of the structure of SAD and suggest that the high comorbidity between SAD and GAD may be due to similar underlying processes within the disorders.

  3. A survey on worries of pregnant women - testing the German version of the Cambridge Worry Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensichen Jochen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy is a transition period in a woman's life characterized by increased worries and anxiety. The Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS was developed to assess the content and extent of maternal worries in pregnancy. It has been increasingly used in studies over recent years. However, a German version has not yet been developed and validated. The aim of this study was (1 to assess the extent and content of worries in pregnancy on a sample of women in Germany using a translated and adapted version of the Cambridge Worry Scale, and (2 to evaluate the psychometric properties of the German version. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study and enrolled 344 pregnant women in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Women filled out structured questionnaires that contained the CWS, the Spielberger-State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI, as well as questions on their obstetric history. Antenatal records were also analyzed. Results The CWS was well understood and easy to fill in. The major worries referred to the process of giving birth (CWS mean value 2.26 and the possibility that something might be wrong with the baby (1.99, followed by coping with the new baby (1.57, going to hospital (1.29 and the possibility of going into labour too early (1.28. The internal consistency of the scale (0.80 was satisfactory, and we found a four-factor structure, similar to previous studies. Tests of convergent validity showed that the German CWS represents a different construct compared with state and trait anxiety but has the desired overlap. Conclusions The German CWS has satisfactory psychometric properties. It represents a valuable tool for use in scientific studies and is likely to be useful also to clinicians.

  4. Preschool Age Populations Research Needs - NCS Dietary Assessment Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawing conclusions from the validation studies on preschool populations discussed in this chapter is difficult because of the varied study designs, the relatively small study populations, and limited number of studies on each dietary assessment method.

  5. 77 FR 4000 - Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Office of the Secretary Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2011 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Commerce. ACTION: General Notice Announcing Population Estimates. SUMMARY: This notice announces the voting age population estimates as of July 1, 2011, for each state and the District of Columbia. We...

  6. 76 FR 37314 - Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2010 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Commerce. ACTION: General Notice Announcing Population Estimates. SUMMARY: This notice announces the voting age population estimates as of July 1, 2010, for each state and the District of Columbia. We...

  7. 78 FR 6289 - Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Office of the Secretary Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2012 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Commerce. ] ACTION: General notice announcing population estimates. SUMMARY: This notice announces the voting age population estimates as of July 1, 2012, for each state and the District of Columbia. We...

  8. 75 FR 4343 - Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Estimates of the Voting Age Population for 2009 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Commerce. ACTION: General Notice Announcing Population Estimates. SUMMARY: This notice announces the voting age population estimates as of July 1, 2009, for each state and the District of Columbia. We...

  9. Trans-generational effects on ageing in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, S.; Charmantier, A.; Verhulst, S.; Sheldon, B. C.

    2010-01-01

    Ageing, long thought to be too infrequent to study effectively in natural populations, has recently been shown to be ubiquitous, even in the wild. A major challenge now is to explain variation in the rates of ageing within populations. Here, using 49 years of data from a population of great tits (Pa

  10. Age and Time Population Differences: Young Adults, Gen Xers, and Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Age and Time disparities in young adult research populations are common because young adults are defined by varying age spans; members of Generation X and Millennial generations may both be considered young adults; study years vary, affecting populations; and qualitative methods with limited age/year samples are frequently utilized. The current…

  11. Exercise and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you ... to tie your shoes Alternative Names Age and exercise Images Benefit of regular exercise Flexibility exercise Exercise and age ...

  12. Aging in France: Population Trends, Policy Issues, and Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beland, Daniel; Durandal, Jean-Philippe Viriot

    2013-01-01

    Like in other advanced industrial countries, in France, demographic aging has become a widely debated research and policy topic. This article offers a brief overview of major aging-related trends in France. The article describes France's demographics of aging, explores key policy matters, maps the institutional field of French social gerontology…

  13. Statistics Anxiety and Worry: The Roles of Worry Beliefs, Negative Problem Orientation, and Cognitive Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2015-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a common problem for graduate students. This study explores the multivariate relationship between a set of worry-related variables and six types of statistics anxiety. Canonical correlation analysis indicates a significant relationship between the two sets of variables. Findings suggest that students who are more intolerant…

  14. Worry and working memory influence each other iteratively over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezise, Kelly; Reeve, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Little research has examined whether the relationship between working memory (WM) and anxiety/worry remains stable or changes over time; and, if changes occur, the factor(s) influencing change. Claims about influence are typically inferred from data collected at a single time point, and may misrepresent the nature of influence. To investigate the iterative influence of WM and Worry and/or vice versa, 133 fourteen-year-olds completed WM and Worry measures several times over the course of a single day as they prepared for a math test. We used a bivariate latent difference score model to analyse possible changes in WM-Worry relationships. The best fitting model indicated high Worry predicts decreases in WM, and low or decreased WM predicts increases in Worry; high WM with low Worry predicts accurate problem solving; low WM with high Worry predicts inaccurate problem solving. Findings show relationships between WM and Worry varies considerably over a single day, and initial disadvantages become worse over time.

  15. Outsourcing Memory in Response to an Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael; Schryer, Emily

    2015-11-01

    With baby boomers entering old age and longevity increasing, policymakers have focused on the physical, social, and health needs of older persons. We urge policymakers to consider cognitive aging as well, particularly normal, age-related memory decline. Psychological scientists attribute memory decline mainly to cognitive overload stemming from age-related reductions in sensory capacities, speed of cognitive processing, and the ability to filter out irrelevant information. Even in the absence of decline, however, memory is imperfect and forgetting can be especially consequential for older adults. For example, forgetting to take prescription medicines is an age-related problem largely because older adults tend to ingest many more prescription drugs. We propose that policymakers focus on increasing environmental support for memory that can reduce the burden on cognitive resources and thus improve recall. In providing environmental support, policymakers need to pay careful attention to potential age-related changes in physical and cognitive capacity, as well as behavior.

  16. Stable stroke occurrence despite incidence reduction in an aging population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorvaldsen, P; Davidsen, M; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    1999-01-01

    A stroke register was established at the Glostrup Population Studies in 1982 with the objective to monitor stroke occurrence in the population continuously during a 10-year period and contribute data to the WHO Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) Project. The pur...

  17. Worrying about wasting GP time as a barrier to help-seeking: a community-based, qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromme, Susanne K; Whitaker, Katriina L; Winstanley, Kelly; Renzi, Cristina; Smith, Claire Friedemann; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Worrying about wasting GP time is frequently cited as a barrier to help-seeking for cancer symptoms. Aim To explore the circumstances under which individuals feel that they are wasting GP time. Design and setting Community-based, qualitative interview studies that took place in London, the South East and the North West of England. Method Interviewees (n = 62) were recruited from a sample (n = 2042) of adults aged ≥50 years, who completed a ‘health survey’ that included a list of cancer ‘alarm’ symptoms. Individuals who reported symptoms at baseline that were still present at the 3-month follow-up (n = 271), and who had also consented to be contacted (n = 215), constituted the pool of people invited for interview. Analyses focused on accounts of worrying about wasting GP time. Results Participants were worried about wasting GP time when time constraints were visible, while dismissive interactions with their GP induced a worry of unnecessary help-seeking. Many felt that symptoms that were not persistent, worsening, or life-threatening did not warrant GP attention. Additionally, patients considered it time-wasting when they perceived attention from nurses or pharmacists to be sufficient, or when appointment structures (for example, ‘one issue per visit’) were not adhered to. Close relationships with GPs eased worries about time-wasting, while some patients saw GPs as fulfilling a service financed by taxpayers. Conclusion Worrying about wasting GP time is a complex barrier to help-seeking. GP time and resource scarcity, symptom gravity, appointment etiquette, and previous GP interactions contribute to increasing worries. Friendly GP relationships, economic reasoning, and a focus on the GP’s responsibilities as a medical professional reduce this worry. PMID:27215569

  18. Does selection of mortality model make a difference in projecting population ageing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Scherbov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In low mortality countries, assessing future ageing depends to a large extent on scenarios of future mortality reduction at old age. Often in population projections mortality reduction is implemented via life expectancy increases that do not specify mortality change at specific age groups. The selection of models that translate life expectancy into age-specific mortality rates may be of great importance for projecting the older age groups of future populations and indicators of ageing. Objective: We quantify how the selection of mortality models, assuming similar life expectancy scenarios, affects projected indices of population ageing. Methods: Using the cohort-component method, we project the populations of Italy, Japan, Russia, Sweden, and the USA. For each country, the given scenario of life expectancy at birth is translated into age-specific death rates by applying four alternative mortality models (variants of extrapolations of the log-mortality rates, the Brass relational model, and the Bongaarts shifting model. The models are contrasted according to their produced future age-specific mortality rates, population age composition, life expectancy at age 65, age at remaining life expectancy 15 years, and conventional and prospective old-age dependency ratios. Conclusions: We show strong differences between the alternative mortality models in terms of mortality age pattern and ageing indicators. Researchers of population ageing should be as careful about their choice of model of age patterns of future mortality as about scenarios of future life expectancy. The simultaneous extrapolation of age-specific death rates may be a better alternative to projecting life expectancy first and then deriving the age patterns of mortality in the second step.

  19. Disaster resilience and population ageing: the 1995 Kobe and 2004 Chuetsu earthquakes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haili; Maki, Norio; Hayashi, Haruo

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides a framework for evaluating the effects of population ageing on disaster resilience. In so doing, it focuses on the 1995 Kobe and 2004 Chuetsu earthquakes, two major disasters that affected Japan before the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. It analyses regional population recovery on the basis of pre-disaster and post-recovery demographic characteristics using defined transition patterns of population ageing. The evaluation framework demonstrates that various recovery measures make different contributions to disaster resilience for each transition pattern of population ageing. With reference to regional population ageing, the framework allows for a prediction of disaster resilience, facilitating place vulnerability assessments and potentially informing policy-making strategies for Japan and other countries with ageing populations.

  20. Maternal age and fetal loss: population based register linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Wohlfahrt, J; Christens, P;

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the association between maternal age and fetal death (spontaneous abortion, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth), taking into account a woman's reproductive history.......To estimate the association between maternal age and fetal death (spontaneous abortion, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth), taking into account a woman's reproductive history....

  1. An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Worry on Responses to a Discrimination Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salters-Pedneault, Kristalyn; Suvak, Michael; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of both the tendency to worry (trait worry) and the process of worry (state worry) on subsequent behavioral responding in a schedule discrimination learning task. High and low trait worriers were randomly assigned to a state worry or relaxation incubation condition and completed a test of executive functioning…

  2. Extending healthy ageing: nutrient sensitive pathway and centenarian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davinelli Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ageing is a challenge for any living organism and human longevity is a complex phenotype. With increasing life expectancy, maintaining long-term health, functionality and well-being during ageing has become an essential goal. To increase our understanding of how ageing works, it may be advantageous to analyze the phenotype of centenarians, perhaps one of the best examples of successful ageing. Healthy ageing involves the interaction between genes, the environment, and lifestyle factors, particularly diet. Besides evaluating specific gene-environment interactions in relation to exceptional longevity, it is important to focus attention on modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet and nutrition to achieve extension of health span. Furthermore, a better understanding of human longevity may assist in the design of strategies to extend the duration of optimal human health. In this article we briefly discuss relevant topics on ageing and longevity with particular focus on dietary patterns of centenarians and nutrient-sensing pathways that have a pivotal role in the regulation of life span. Finally, we also discuss the potential role of Nrf2 system in the pro-ageing signaling emphasizing its phytohormetic activation.

  3. Relations among Perceived Control over Anxiety-Related Events, Worry, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder in a Sample of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frala, Jamie L.; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Barreto, Carolina C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the associations among perceived control over anxiety-related events, worry, and both symptoms and diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The sample was comprised of 140 adolescents (60 girls) between the ages of 10 and 17 years (M[subscript age] = 14.6 years; SD = 2.25) recruited from the general community. Findings…

  4. Responsibility Attitudes in Obsessive-Compulsive Patients: The Contributions of Meta-Cognitive Beliefs and Worry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changiz Rahimi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obsessive patients are distressed by intrusivethoughts, which are related to unreal threats. These patientsfeel that they are responsible for harming themselves and others.While controlling worry and meta-cognitive beliefs, thepresent study aimed at comparing the responsibility attitudesin obsessive compulsive patients with those in normal subjectsto determine whether the difference in responsibility attitudesbetween two groups was significant.Methods: A group of 15 patients were compared with normalsubjects (n=15 who matched the patient group in terms ofgender, age and education. All subjects filled the ResponsibilityAttitude Scale, the Penn, State Worry Questionnaire andthe Meta-cognition Questionnaire -30. The findings were analyzedusing descriptive statistics as well as student t and ANCOVAtests.Results: Responsibility attitudes in obsessive patients weresignificantly higher than those in normal subjects (P<0.001,when patient worries and meta-cognitive beliefs were notcontrolled. However, after controlling patient's worry andmeta-cognitive beliefs there was no significant differencebetween responsibility attitudes in normal and obsessive–compulsive group.Conclusion: The findings might suggest that responsibilityattitude is not strongly related to obsessive-compulsive symptoms.It seems that it is a characteristic caused by basic metacognitivebeliefs, because the relationship between the responsibilityand the symptoms was dependent on meta-cognition.Therefore, in studying the etiology and treatment of obsessivecompulsive disorders focus on the responsibility attitudesalone cannot be very helpful.

  5. Bilingualism provides a neural reserve for aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutalebi, Jubin; Guidi, Lucia; Borsa, Virginia; Canini, Matteo; Della Rosa, Pasquale A; Parris, Ben A; Weekes, Brendan S

    2015-03-01

    It has been postulated that bilingualism may act as a cognitive reserve and recent behavioral evidence shows that bilinguals are diagnosed with dementia about 4-5 years later compared to monolinguals. In the present study, we investigated the neural basis of these putative protective effects in a group of aging bilinguals as compared to a matched monolingual control group. For this purpose, participants completed the Erikson Flanker task and their performance was correlated to gray matter (GM) volume in order to investigate if cognitive performance predicts GM volume specifically in areas affected by aging. We performed an ex-Gaussian analysis on the resulting RTs and report that aging bilinguals performed better than aging monolinguals on the Flanker task. Bilingualism was overall associated with increased GM in the ACC. Likewise, aging induced effects upon performance correlated only for monolinguals to decreased gray matter in the DLPFC. Taken together, these neural regions might underlie the benefits of bilingualism and act as a neural reserve that protects against the cognitive decline that occurs during aging.

  6. Population ageing and pension reform in a small open economy with non-traded goods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettendorf, Leon J. H.; Heijdra, Ben J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we study the implications of population ageing in an economy with a sizeable non-traded goods sector. To this effect a highly stylized micro-founded macro model is constructed in which the age structure of the population plays a non-trivial role. The model distinguishes separate birth

  7. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...

  8. TRAIT ANXIETY, DEFENSIVENESS, AND THE STRUCTURE OF WORRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EYSENCK, MW; VANBERKUM, J

    1992-01-01

    A principal components analysis of the ten scales of the Worry Questionnaire revealed the existence of major worry factors or domains of social evaluation and physical threat, and these factors were confirmed in a subsequent item analysis. Those high in trait anxiety had much higher scores on the Wo

  9. Homeschooling Worries: Trusting That the Dots Will Connect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Homeschooling parents worry a lot. And homeschooling parents of gifted children seem to worry even more than most. Parents who homeschool intense, smart, sensitive, and perfectionist children and teens are often themselves intense, smart, sensitive, and perfectionistic, even if they don't always think of themselves as gifted. One shouldn't be too…

  10. Trait anxiety, defensiveness, and the structure of worry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysenck, M.W.; van Berkum, J.J.A.

    1992-01-01

    A principal components analysis of the ten scales of the Worry Questionnaire revealed the existence of major worry factors or domains of social evaluation and physical threat, and these factors were confirmed in a subsequent item analysis. Those high in trait anxiety had much higher scores on the Wo

  11. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  12. The spectrum of worry in the community-dwelling elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Golden, Jeannette

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we examine the prevalence and distribution of worry, its content, and its associations with quality of life and depression, based on a large sample of community-dwelling elderly. We will attempt to distinguish between pathological and non-pathological worry based on these associations.

  13. Changes of ocular version with aging in normal Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Yeo

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate normative values of maximum versions in healthy Koreans and investigate age-associated changes in eye movement, using lateral and vertical version light-reflex (LVR) test. Two hundred forty normal healthy subjects whose corrected visual acuity was better than 20/50 in both eyes, from 4 to 79 yr old (30 subjects in each decade) were studied. Maximum sustained values of dextroversion, levoversion, supraversion, and infraversion in each eye were measured using LVR test. Changes of versions according to age were analyzed. Mean normal value of dextroversion, levoversion, supraversion, and infraversion in normal Koreans was 7.7 mm, 41.6 degrees, 33.9 degrees, and 7.7 mm respectively. Contrary to values of Caucasians, levoversion (adductive movement) was more excessive and infraversion (depression) was smaller in Koreans. All versions were decreased with aging (Paging compared with other versions (Page than levoversion (Paging but the ranges of ocular movements in Koreans were different with Caucasians as version least affected and most affected by age was infraversion and levoversion in Koreans. The study standardized normal maximal versions and aging changes of versions in Koreans.

  14. Ageing of a giant: a stochastic population forecast for China, 2006-2060

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Q.; Reuser, M.; Kraus, C.; Alho, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a stochastic population forecast for China with a special emphasis on population ageing. The so-called scaled model for error was used to quantify the uncertainty attached to the population predictions. Data scarcity was a major problem in the specification of the expected error

  15. Population structure age of Paraná state between 1970 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Pintor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of demographic transition began with an effort of Frank Notestein (1945 to understand the demographic changes that were occurring in Western Europe since the late nineteenth century. The demographic transition is the transition between two scenarios of population growth, which changes the age structure of the population. The aim of the article is to discuss the evolution of population structure age of Paraná state between 1970 and 2010. The changes in the age structure of the Paraná indicate a reduction in the share of young population and increasing aging population, an increase in the relative weight of the elderly population. Public policies on education, health, social security and labor market should consider the current change in the age structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the change in the age structure of the population of the state of Paraná. For this we used data Censuses of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE on the age distribution of urban and rural Paraná and its Mesoregions. It was concluded that the change in structure occurs group widespread in all Mesoregions state. However, it occurs unevenly between urban and rural population.

  16. Exceptional Brain Aging in a Rural Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Jeffrey; Michael, Yvonne; Calvert, James; Leahy, Marjorie; Crawford, Debbie; Kramer, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Context: The 2000 US Census identified 50,454 Americans over the age of 100. Increased longevity is only of benefit if accompanied by maintenance of independence and quality of life. Little is known about the prevalence of dementia and other disabling conditions among rural centenarians although this information is important to clinicians caring…

  17. Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids in the Danish population aged 1-80 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. U.; Bysted, Anette; Andersen, N. L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the intake of ruminant trans fatty acids (TFA) in the Danish population aged 1 - 80 years. Design: Descriptive study. Subjects: A sex- and age-stratified random sample drawn from the Danish Civil Registration System. A total of 3098 participants (51% female) aged 1 - 80 yea...

  18. Breast cancer screening: ''reassuring'' the worried well?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert; Ryle, Mette

    2011-01-01

    of women offered screening compared to a population of women not offered screening for breast cancer. METHODS: One thousand women, aged 50-69 years, were randomly drawn from the Danish Civil Registration System to receive part I of the questionnaire Consequences of Screening in Breast Cancer (COS-BC1......): the sample consisted of 500 women living in a geographical area where screening mammography had been offered for more than 10 years and 500 women living in an area where the public health authorities had never invited women to breast cancer screening. RESULTS: A total of 759 women returned the questionnaire....... Those living in areas where screening was not offered reported more negative psychosocial aspects compared to women living in areas where screening was offered. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that women tend to perceive breast cancer screening as a reassuring preventive initiative. Alternatively...

  19. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M;

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze effects of age, education and gender on acceptance of genetic testing. Subjects, n = 1967 aged 15-69, were a stratified random sample of the Finnish population. One thousand, one hundred and sixty nine subjects, 530 men and 639 women, returned the questionnaire....... The majority of the respondents approved of the availability of genetic testing. Young, aged 15-24, were more favourable towards testing and more willing to undergo suggested tests, but they were also more worried than others about the misuse of test results. Men aged 45-69 with only basic education were more...... in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related differences...

  20. Age-dependent dose coefficients for tritium in Asian populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A

    1999-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 56 (1989) and 67 (1993) have prescribed the biokinetic models and age-dependent dose coefficients for tritiated water and organically bound tritium. The dose coefficients are computed from values selected to specify the anatomical, morphological and physiological characteristics of a three-month-old, one-year-old, five-year-old, 10-year-old, 15-year-old and adult (Reference Man) Caucasian living in North America and Western Europe. However, values for Reference Man and other age groups are not directly applicable to Asians, because of differences in race, custom, dietary habits and climatic conditions. An Asian Man model, including five age groups, has been proposed by Tanaka and Kawamura (1996, 1998) for use in internal dosimetry. The basic concept of the ICRP Reference Man and the system describing body composition in ICRP Publication 23 (1975) were used. Reference values for Asians were given for the body weight and height, the mass of soft tissue, the mass of body water and the daily fluid balance, and are used to compute the dose coefficients for tritium. The age-dependent dose coefficients for Asians for tritiated water intakes are smaller by 20 to 30% of the currently prescribed values (Trivedi, 1998). The reduction in the dose coefficient values is caused by the increased daily fluid balance among Asians. The dose coefficient for tritiated water is 1.4 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Asian Man compared to 2.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. The dose coefficients for organically bound tritium are only marginally different from those of the ICRP values. The dose coefficient for organically bound tritium for Asian Man is 4.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -11} compared to 4.6 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. (author)

  1. Optimizing Population Screening of Bullying in School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Trinh, Vi; McDougall, Patricia; Duku, Eric; Cunningham, Lesley; Cunningham, Charles; Hymel, Shelley; Short, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    A two-part screening procedure was used to assess school-age children's experience with bullying. In the first part 16,799 students (8,195 girls, 8,604 boys) in grades 4 to 12 were provided with a definition of bullying and then asked about their experiences using two general questions from the Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire (1996). In the…

  2. Who Ate Whom: Population Dynamics With Age-Structured Predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    competes for food. Werner and Gilliam [2] review many examples of ecosystems in which competitive and predatory relationships are age- and size-dependent. As...of reproduction in that it transfers biomass from tadpoles to frogs, though it is certainly not identical. We have not fully explored the relationship ...limit cycles, though the limit cycles are not robust and rather unrealistic biologically, so in this model the two species are completely codependent

  3. Epidemiology Investigation of stroke among Mongolian and Han population aged over 45 in Inner Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Lan, Tian; Zhe, Yan; Hu, Baolige; Zhang, Guohua; He, Juan; Wang, Zhiguang; Jiang, Mingfang; Hu, Riletemuer

    2017-04-04

    To discuss the status of epidemiology of stroke in the Mongolian and Han population aged over 45 years and to understand the treatment and prevention of stroke. Data collected on stroke populations aged over 45 years in the six areas in Inner Mongolia were analyzed by using stratified multi-stage cluster sampling. The prevalence rate of stroke in patients aged over 45 years in Inner Mongolia was 4.62%. The stroke prevalence rate increased with age in both males and females, the Han and Mongolian populations, and was higher in males than in females in Inner Mongolia. The prevalence rate of stroke in the Mongolian population was higher than in the Han population. The incidence rate of stroke in patients aged over 45 years in Inner Mongolia was 0.28%, of which the rate of relapsed ischemic stroke was 23.29%. The proportion of ischemic stroke in the stroke patients was higher than hemorrhagic stroke. The prevalence and incidence rates of stroke in patients aged over 45 years in Inner Mongolia were high. The prevalence rate of stroke in both the Han population and the Mongolian population increased with age. Ischemic stroke was the major form of stroke.

  4. Frequency of Dental Caries in Four Historical Populations from the Chalcolithic to the Middle Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-M. Grimoud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of dental carie studies over the course of historical period underline mainly the prevalence evolution, the role of carbohydrates consumption and the impact of access to dietary resources. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare population samples from two archaeological periods the Chacolithic and Middle Age taking into account the geographical and socio economical situation. The study concerned four archaelogical sites in south west France and population samples an inlander for the Chalcolithic Age, an inlander, an costal and urban for the Middle Age. The materials studied included a total of 127 maxillaries, 103 mandibles and 3316 teeth. Data recorded allowed us to display that the Chalcolithic population sample had the lowest carie percentage and the rural inlander population samples of Middle Age the highest; in all cases molars were teeth most often affected. These ones differences could be explained according to time period, carious lesions were usually less recorded in the Chalcolithic Age than the Middle because of a lesser cultivation of cereals like in les Treilles Chacolithic population sample. In the Middle Age population samples, the rural inland sample Marsan showed the highest frequency of caries and ate more cereal than the coastal Vilarnau and the poor urban St Michel population samples, the first one ate fish and Mediterranean vegetal and fruits and the second one met difficulties to food access, in both cases the consumption of carbohydrates was lesser than Marsan population sample who lived in a geographical land convice to cereals cultivation.

  5. Analysis of the current situation regarding the aging rural population in China and proposed countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bo; Li, Xiyuan; Liu, Jie; Mao, Jiawen

    2012-06-01

    China has become a country with an aging population. Compared with the aged in urban areas, the aged in rural areas have low income and are subject to social security deficiencies; the oldest among them are the most vulnerable group. If an effective mechanism for handling health risk is not available, the poor health of the rural elderly will cause an increase in their poverty level, which in turn will cause their health to become worse. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the current situation regarding rural population aging in China and to develop countermeasures. Data from 4 national health services surveys were used to analyze the differences between urban and rural populations. The results of the analysis revealed that the aged population in rural areas has poor health; economic security for the aged population is insufficient; and resources for the aged are lacking in rural areas. The Chinese government should improve medicare for the aged in rural areas, and establish a medical treatment subsidy system and a medical support system for the aged in rural areas.

  6. Cholecystomucoclasis: revaluation of safety and validity in aged populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukada Tomoya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated the safety and validity of cholecystomucoclasis (CM and compared its intraoperative characteristics with those of standard cholecystectomy (SC. Methods We enrolled 174 patients who underwent cholecystectomy and retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of patients in the SC and CM groups. Results Significant differences in age (71.1 vs. 61.9 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS, and serum C-reactive protein levels (CRP (18.1 vs. 4.7 mg/dL were observed between the CM and SC groups. Conversely, no significant differences were observed in the operation time (129 vs. 108 min, amount of blood loss (147 vs. 80 mL, intraoperative complications (0% vs. 5.7%, or duration of hospital stay (13.2 vs. 8.9 days between the 2 groups. A high conversion rate (35.3%, postoperative complications (33%, and frequent drain insertions (94% were observed in the CM group. Conclusions CM is a safe and valid surgical procedure and surgeons should not hesitate to transition to CM for patients who are of advanced age, in poor general condition (high ASA classification, or have high levels of serum CRP.

  7. Gut bifidobacteria populations in human health and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arboleya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from the childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve and Bifidobacterium bifidum are generally dominant in infants whereas Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more dominant in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effect of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria can be associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria composition changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence in commonly known disease states.

  8. Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleya, Silvia; Watkins, Claire; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, and B. bifidum are generally dominant in infants, whereas B. catenulatum, B. adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more prevalent in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effects of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria have been associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria compositional changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence or absence in many disease states. PMID:27594848

  9. Ageing dynamics of a human-capital-specific population: A demographic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimiter Philipov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research on how rising human capital affects the consequences of population ageing rarely considers the fact that the human capital of the elderly population is composed in a specific way that is shaped by their earlier schooling and work experience. For an elderly population of a fixed size and age-sex composition, this entails that the higher its human capital, the greater the total amount of public pensions to be paid. Objective: The main purpose of this paper is to analyse the link between human capital and retiree benefits and its effect on population ageing from a demographic viewpoint. Methods: We construct an old age dependency ratio (OADR, in which each person, whether in the numerator or the denominator, is assigned the number of units corresponding to his/her level of human capital. Based on data for Italy, we study the dynamics of this human-capital-specific OADR with the help of multistate population projections to 2107. Results: Our results show that under specific conditions a constant or moderately growing human capital may aggravate the consequences of population ageing rather than alleviate them. Conclusions: With those findings, the authors would like to stimulate the debate on the search for demographic and/or socio-economic solutions to the challenges posed by population ageing.

  10. Colour pairs for constraining the age and metallicity of stellar populations

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Using a widely used stellar population synthesis model, we study the ability of using pairs of AB system colours to break the well-known stellar age--metallicity degeneracy and give constraints on the two stellar-population parameters (age and metallicity). The relative age and metallicity sensitivities of AB system colours that relate to u, B, g, V, r, R, i, I, z, J, H, and K bands are presented, and the abilities of various colour pairs for breaking the age--metallicity degeneracy are quant...

  11. THE PALEODEMOGRAPHIC PATTERN OF OYLUM HOYUK POPULATION (THE MIDDLE BRONZE AGE, KİLİS)

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşen Açıkkol Yıldırım

    2013-01-01

    In this study skeleton remaining of 72 individuals excavated from Middle Bronze Age layers of Oylum Höyük (mound) situated in Kilis province, were studied. Sex and age of skeletons, unearthed between 2007-2012, were determined and life tables of the population were formed. Mortality of infants and children of Oylum population was very high. Death rates were determined as 36.6 % for 0-5 years of age group, 57.75 % for 0-15 years of age group. 34.62 % of infants and children from 0-5 years of a...

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Outbreak Strain of Danish Origin Spreading at Worrying Rates among Greenland-Born Persons in Denmark and Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, T; Andersen, A B; Rasmussen, E M

    2013-01-01

    origin has been transmitted to Greenland-born persons in Denmark and subsequently to Greenland, where it is spreading at worrying rates and adding to the already heavy tuberculosis burden in this population group. It is now clear that the C2/1112-15 strain is able to gain new territories using a new...

  13. Evaluation of oral health status of retirement-age population in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidzis, Aldis; Cema, Ingrida; Krasta, Ingrida; Brinkmane, Anda; Kalnins, Imants

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Latvian government Health care financing regulations do not envisage free dental care in nursing homes. Consequently, in this situation arises need to carry out comparative evaluation of oral health status and quantity indicators of dental prosthodontics among retirement-age population in Latvia. The aim of the study was to estimate oral health and dental prosthodontics indicators among retirement-age population in Latvia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. We examinated 465 retirement-age inhabitants in Latvia. We assessed dental status, quantity and quality of the existing complete dental prostheses. We also evaluated the DMF-T index. RESULTS. Oral health indicators among Latvian retirement-age population are better than those for nursing homes residents in the same age group. Complete dental prostheses used by nursing homes residents do not meet denture's quality criteria. Retirement-age patients have oral hygiene problems. CONCLUSIONS. DMF-T index among Latvian retirement-age population is lower than among residents of nursing homes. The major component of DMF-T index is the number of lost teeth. The assessment of dental prostheses among residents of nursing homes showed unsatisfactory results. Retirement-age population in Latvia needs treatment of oral mucosal diseases, improvement of oral hygienic measures and increase of amount of dental prosthodontics.

  14. Population age composition, breeding biology and notes on the wolverine in Alaska and Yukon Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the population age, composition, breeding biology and notes on the wolverine in Alaska and the Yukon territory. Life history, physical...

  15. Older age relates to worsening of fine motor skills: A population based study of middle-aged and elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.Y. Hoogendam (Jory); F. van der Lijn (Fedde); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); A. Hofman (Albert); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); A. van der Lugt (Aad); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); J.N. van der Geest (Jos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In a population-based study of 1,912 community-dwelling persons of 45 years and older we investigated the relation between age and fine motor skills using the Archimedes spiral drawing test. Also, we studied the effect of brain volume on fine motor skills. Methods: Particip

  16. The sustainability of public finances in the context of population ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Dries Dury; Luc Van Meensel

    2007-01-01

    In the decades ahead, the size and age structure of the European population will change dramatically. These demographic changes will obviously have a significant impact on society. Economic growth is expected to slow down following the reduction in the population of working age. In addition, there will be strong upward pressure on public expenditure on pensions, health care and long-term care for the elderly. It is in that context that questions arise regarding the long-term sustainability of...

  17. A Social Relations Analysis of Liking for and by Peers: Associations with Gender, Depression, Peer Perception, and Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Waters, Allison M.; Kindermann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We used social relations modeling (SRM; mixed modeling and SOREMO) to examine liking among peers ("affective preferences") in relation to gender and socioemotional problems. Participants (N = 278, age 10 to 13) rated how much they liked each other and reported depressive symptoms, negative beliefs, and social worries. Boys and girls were equally…

  18. Generalized Anxiety Disorder: When Worry Gets Out of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where can I find more information? Share Generalized Anxiety Disorder: When Worry Gets Out of Control Download ... Order a free hardcopy What Is GAD? Occasional anxiety is a normal part of life. You might ...

  19. Coping with worry while waiting for diagnostic results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Stina; Nielsen, Camilla P; Hvidman, Lone;

    2016-01-01

    ' during this period, however, not enough is known about how high-risk women and their partners cope while waiting for diagnostic results. The aim of this study was to identify the strategies employed to cope with worry and uncertainty. METHODS: Qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 16 high......BACKGROUND: It is well documented that pregnant women experience increased worry and uncertainty following a high-risk prenatal screening result. While waiting for diagnostic results this worry continues to linger. It has been suggested that high-risk women put the pregnancy mentally 'on hold......-risk couples who underwent diagnostic testing. The couples were recruited at a university hospital fetal medicine unit in Denmark. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: All couples reported feeling worried and sad upon receiving a high-risk screening result. While waiting for diagnostic results...

  20. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health, money, or family problems. But people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) feel extremely worried or feel nervous about ... I find more information? To learn more about generalized anxiety disorder, visit: MedlinePlus (National Library of Medicine) http: / / medlineplus. ...

  1. The effects of reducing worry in patients with persecutory delusions: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our approach to advancing the treatment of psychosis is to focus on key single symptoms and develop interventions that target the mechanisms that maintain them. In our theoretical research we have found worry to be an important factor in the development and maintenance of persecutory delusions. Worry brings implausible ideas to mind, keeps them there, and makes the experience distressing. Therefore the aim of the trial is to test the clinical efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for worry for patients with persecutory delusions and determine how the worry treatment might reduce delusions. Methods/Design An explanatory randomized controlled trial - called the Worry Intervention Trial (WIT - with 150 patients with persecutory delusions will be carried out. Patients will be randomized to the worry intervention in addition to standard care or to standard care. Randomization will be carried out independently, assessments carried out single-blind, and therapy competence and adherence monitored. The study population will be individuals with persecutory delusions and worry in the context of a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis. They will not have responded adequately to previous treatment. The intervention is a six-session cognitive-behavioral treatment provided over eight weeks. The control condition will be treatment as usual, which is typically antipsychotic medication and regular appointments. The principal hypotheses are that a worry intervention will reduce levels of worry and that it will also reduce the persecutory delusions. Assessments will be carried out at 0 weeks (baseline, 8 weeks (post treatment and 24 weeks (follow-up. The statistical analysis strategy will follow the intention-to-treat principle and involve the use of linear mixed models to evaluate and estimate the relevant between- and within-subjects effects (allowing for the possibility of missing data. Both traditional regression and newer instrumental

  2. The relationships between perfectionism, pathological worry and generalised anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Handley, Alicia K; Egan, Sarah J.; Kane, Robert T.; Rees, Clare S

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationships between perfectionism, pathological worry and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) were investigated in a clinical sample presenting for treatment of perfectionism. Method This study explored the utility of perfectionism in predicting pathological worry in a sample of individuals with elevated perfectionism and GAD (n = 36). Following this, the study examined whether perfectionism could predict a principal GAD diagnosis in the full sample (n = 42). Results Scores on...

  3. Comparison of statistical population reconstruction using full and pooled adult age-class data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Skalski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-at-harvest data are among the most commonly collected, yet neglected, demographic data gathered by wildlife agencies. Statistical population construction techniques can use this information to estimate the abundance of wild populations over wide geographic areas and concurrently estimate recruitment, harvest, and natural survival rates. Although current reconstruction techniques use full age-class data (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, … years, it is not always possible to determine an animal's age due to inaccuracy of the methods, expense, and logistics of sample collection. The ability to inventory wild populations would be greatly expanded if pooled adult age-class data (e.g., 0.5, 1.5, 2.5+ years could be successfully used in statistical population reconstruction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the performance of statistical population reconstruction models developed to analyze full age-class and pooled adult age-class data. We performed Monte Carlo simulations using a stochastic version of a Leslie matrix model, which generated data over a wide range of abundance levels, harvest rates, and natural survival probabilities, representing medium-to-big game species. Results of full age-class and pooled adult age-class population reconstructions were compared for accuracy and precision. No discernible difference in accuracy was detected, but precision was slightly reduced when using the pooled adult age-class reconstruction. On average, the coefficient of variation (i.e., SE(θ/θ increased by 0.059 when the adult age-class data were pooled prior to analyses. The analyses and maximum likelihood model for pooled adult age-class reconstruction are illustrated for a black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus population in Washington State. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Inventorying wild populations is one of the greatest challenges of wildlife agencies. These new statistical population reconstruction models should expand the

  4. Influence of age, sex, plaque and smoking on periodontal conditions in a population from Bauru, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ragghianti,Mariana Schützer; Greghi, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; LAURIS, José Roberto Pereira; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of health and disease in populations, and of how these conditions are influenced by heredity, biology, physical environment, social environment, and personal behavior. There are many epidemiological studies in Brazilian population but few about the influence of some risk factors in periodontal conditions. This cross-sectional study was performed to assess the influence of age, sex, plaque and smoking on periodontal disease in a population from Bauru (Brazil). Data co...

  5. Influencing degree of ecosystems transformation on the age structure of populations apodemys sylvaticus Apodemys sylvaticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Zemlianyj

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Comparative description of percentage ratio of age groups in populyations of background kind is conducted - Apodemus silvaticus from the habitats different on the degree of transformations. It is set, that the age composition of populations of shallow mammals can serve by the criterion of their functioning.

  6. Active infection with Helicobacter pylori in an asymptomatic population of middle aged to elderly people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Peschke, F

    1998-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate prevalence and determinants of current Helicobacter pylori infection in an asymptomatic population of middle-aged to elderly people. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 337 participants of a general education programme of the University of Ulm aged 50...

  7. Impact of Population Ageing on Unemployment and Entrepreneurial Activity: the Case of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanni Marjetka Troha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the research is to investigate impact of population ageing on unemployment and entrepreneurial activity in Slovenia since it is one of the topical issues in an ageing Europe and has many implications for economic and non-economic welfare.

  8. Experience of aging in patients with rheumatic disease: A comparison with the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, C.; Taal, E.; Westerhof, G.J.; Gessel, van L.; Laar, van de M.A.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Self-perceptions of aging have been shown to predict mental and physical health and even longevity. This study examined the aging perceptions of patients with rheumatic disease and compared them with the general Dutch population. Methods: Consecutive patients visiting a rheumatology cl

  9. [Methodological note on subnational population projections by age and sex (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, T

    1980-07-01

    The purposes of this paper were to discuss the methods and assumptions on subnational population projections by age and sex, and to present 2 models on population projection for 47 Prefectures in Japan by age and sex up to 2000. Data are obtained from the results of the 1970 and 1975 population censuses of Japan for population by age and sex, and interprefectural migration streams by age and sex based on the 1970 population census. The 2 models are a sort of cohort-component method: 1 is the (NMR) net-migration model and the other is the (MTX) migration matrix model. The essential difference between the 2 is the separate consideration of out- and inmigration models. The formulas for estimating numbers of net migration in the NMR model are (4) and (5) in the text, where P is the number of the population, S is the life table survival ratios, and m is the rate of net migration. The formulas for estimating numbers of outmigration, migration streams from region i to region j, and inmigration, in the MTX model are (17)-(21), where E is the numbers of outmigration, e is the rate of outmigration, m (i,j) is the proportion of the number of migrants from i to j to total numbers of outmigrants from region i, and I is the numbers of inmigration for each region. Under constant conditions, for all rates, the projected population for 47 prefectures by age and sex up to 2000 using models NMR and MTX was obtained. The projected number of population in 2000 are shown in figures on pages 66 and 67. As the results of these projections, the increase in aged population between 1975-200 in the metropolitan areas, especially Tokyo (1), are greater than that in other areas, since the concentration of the young in the 3 metropolitan areas has rapidly dropped since 1950. (Author's modified)

  10. Does breeding population trajectory and age of nesting females influence disparate nestling sex ratios in two populations of Cooper's hawks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Robert N; Stout, William E; Giovanni, Matthew D; Levine, Noah H; Cava, Jenna A; Hardin, Madeline G; Haynes, Taylor G

    2015-09-01

    Offspring sex ratios at the termination of parental care should theoretically be skewed toward the less expensive sex, which in most avian species would be females, the smaller gender. Among birds, however, raptors offer an unusual dynamic because they exhibit reversed size dimorphism with females being larger than males. And thus theory would predict a preponderance of male offspring. Results for raptors and birds in general have been varied although population-level estimates of sex ratios in avian offspring are generally at unity. Adaptive adjustment of sex ratios in avian offspring is difficult to predict perhaps in part due to a lack of life-history details and short-term investigations that cannot account for precision or repeatability of sex ratios across time. We conducted a novel comparative study of sex ratios in nestling Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) in two study populations across breeding generations during 11 years in Wisconsin, 2001-2011. One breeding population recently colonized metropolitan Milwaukee and exhibited rapidly increasing population growth, while the ex-Milwaukee breeding population was stable. Following life-history trade-off theory and our prediction regarding this socially monogamous species in which reversed sexual size dimorphism is extreme, first-time breeding one-year-old, second-year females in both study populations produced a preponderance of the smaller and cheaper sex, males, whereas ASY (after-second-year), ≥2-year-old females in Milwaukee produced a nestling sex ratio near unity and predictably therefore a greater proportion of females compared to ASY females in ex-Milwaukee who produced a preponderance of males. Adjustment of sex ratios in both study populations occurred at conception. Life histories and selective pressures related to breeding population trajectory in two age cohorts of nesting female Cooper's hawk likely vary, and it is possible that these differences influenced the sex ratios we documented for

  11. Economic implications of Japan's aging population: a macro-economic demographic modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, N

    1982-01-01

    This paper utilizes a macroeconomic demographic model to analyze the probable impact of population aging on various public programs in Japan. Rapid fertility decline aided by mortality decline has caused the proportion of the Japanese population aged 65 and over to increase from 4.9% in 1950 to 9.0% in 1980. A population projection based on the 1975 population census assumes a recovery of fertility from a total fertility rate (TFR) of 1.9 in 1976 to 2.16 in 1980 and a gradual decline to 2.1 by 1987, while an alternative projection assumes a continuing fertility decline to a TFR of 1.65 in 2025. According to these assumptions, in 2025 18.12% to 21.29% of the total population would be aged 65 or over and 38.66% to 43.80% of the working age population would be aged 45-64. A macroeconomic neoclassical growth model with some Keynesian features was formulated to evaluate the future impact of population aging on social security programs. Population changes are transmitted to economic variables in the model through the supply of labor, level of savings, public health care plans, and old-age pension schemes. The simulation experiments included the 2 population projections and 2 alternative production functions, 1 with the quality of labor incorporated and 1 without. The results indicated that, regardless of the population projection and production function used, the growth of the economy is likely to slow to 1 or 0% in the beginning of the next century due to decreased growth of the labor force and a change in its quality due to age-compositional variations. Public health insurance schemes and pension plans will require increasing financial resources as a result of accelerated population aging; depending on the choice of benefit levels, the proportion of national income allocated to them is expected to range from 14%-40% in the year 2010. Per capita gross national product will continue to grow despite decreased economic growth, but savings might be adversely affected if the

  12. Traveling wave dispersal in partially sedentary age-structured biological populations

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Thuc Manh; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a thorough study on the existence of traveling waves in a mathematical model of dispersal in a partially sedentary age-structured population. This type of model was first proposed by Veit and Lewis in [{\\it Am. Nat.}, {\\bf 148} (1996), 255-274]. We choose the fecundity function to be the Beverton-Holt type function. We extend the theory of traveling waves in the population genetics model of Weinberger in [{\\it SIAM J. Math. Anal.}, {\\bf 13} (1982), 353-396] to the case when migration depends on age groups and a fraction of the population does not migrate.

  13. Dynamics of climate-based malaria transmission model with age-structured human population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addawe, Joel; Pajimola, Aprimelle Kris

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed to study the dynamics of malaria transmission with periodic birth rate of the vector and an age-structure for the human population. The human population is divided into two compartments: pre-school (0-5 years) and the rest of the human population. We showed the existence of a disease-free equilibrium point. Using published epidemiological parameters, we use numerical simulations to show potential effect of climate change in the dynamics of age-structured malaria transmission. Numerical simulations suggest that there exists an asymptotically attractive solution that is positive and periodic.

  14. The Effects of Worry and Rumination on Affect States and Cognitive Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Borkovec, Thomas D.; Sibrava, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of worry and rumination on affective states and mentation type were examined in an unselected undergraduate sample in Study 1 and in a sample of individuals with high trait worry and rumination, high rumination, and low worry/rumination in Study 2. Participants engaged in worry and rumination inductions, counterbalanced in order across…

  15. Autosomal resequence data reveal Late Stone Age signals of population expansion in sub-Saharan African foraging and farming populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray P Cox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major unanswered question in the evolution of Homo sapiens is when anatomically modern human populations began to expand: was demographic growth associated with the invention of particular technologies or behavioral innovations by hunter-gatherers in the Late Pleistocene, or with the acquisition of farming in the Neolithic? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigate the timing of human population expansion by performing a multilocus analysis of > or = 20 unlinked autosomal noncoding regions, each consisting of approximately 6 kilobases, resequenced in approximately 184 individuals from 7 human populations. We test the hypothesis that the autosomal polymorphism data fit a simple two-phase growth model, and when the hypothesis is not rejected, we fit parameters of this model to our data using approximate Bayesian computation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data from the three surveyed non-African populations (French Basque, Chinese Han, and Melanesians are inconsistent with the simple growth model, presumably because they reflect more complex demographic histories. In contrast, data from all four sub-Saharan African populations fit the two-phase growth model, and a range of onset times and growth rates is inferred for each population. Interestingly, both hunter-gatherers (San and Biaka and food-producers (Mandenka and Yorubans best fit models with population growth beginning in the Late Pleistocene. Moreover, our hunter-gatherer populations show a tendency towards slightly older and stronger growth (approximately 41 thousand years ago, approximately 13-fold than our food-producing populations (approximately 31 thousand years ago, approximately 7-fold. These dates are concurrent with the appearance of the Late Stone Age in Africa, supporting the hypothesis that population growth played a significant role in the evolution of Late Pleistocene human cultures.

  16. Dental age estimation from the developmental stage of the third molars in western Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Ren, Jiayin; Zhao, Shuping; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Na; Wu, Wanhong; Yuan, Shanshan; Wang, Hu

    2012-06-10

    The purpose of this study is to provide reference data about estimating dental age from third molars of the western Chinese population for comparing with other populations and being applied to the age estimation of western Chinese juveniles and adolescents. A total of 2078 digital panoramic radiographs of 989 male and 1089 female Chinese subjects aged between 5 and 23 years were examined. The mineralization status of the third molars was assessed using the formation stages described by Demirjian et al. with two modifications. The results showed that the development of third molars in the western Chinese population was likely to begin at age 5 in both males and females. The third molars 28 and 48 showed significantly higher frequency in females than in males. The third molars 18 in the stage 1, 38 in the stages 1, A and G, and 48 in the stage H showed significantly older average age in females than in males. The Demirjian's stages C and D could be used as a reference stage to determine dichotomously whether a western Chinese is more likely to be under or above age 14 or 16, respectively. This study provided reference data for the age estimation of western Chinese juveniles and adolescents by the mineralization stages of the third molar. Apart from forensic age determination in living subjects, the presented reference data can also be used for age estimations of unidentified corpses and skeletons.

  17. [Age structure and dynamics of Quercus wutaishanica population in Lingkong Mountain of Shanxi Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Shangguan, Tie-Liang; Duan, Yi-Hao; Guo, Wei; Liu, Wei-Hua; Guo, Dong-Gang

    2014-11-01

    Using the plant survivorship theory, the age structure, and the relationship between tree height and diameter (DBH) of Quercus wutaishanica population in Lingkong Mountain were analyzed, and the static life table was compiled and the survival curve plotted. The shuttle shape in age structure of Q. wutaishanica population suggested its temporal stability. The linear regression significantly fitted the positive correlation between tree height and DBH. The maximal life expectancy was observed among the trees beyond the age of the highest mortality and coincided with the lowest point of mortality density, suggesting the strong vitality of the seedlings and young trees that survived in the natural selection and intraspecific competition. The population stability of the Q. wutaishanica population was characterized by the Deevey-II of the survival curve. The dynamic pattern was characterized by the recession in the early phase, growth in the intermediate phase, and stability in the latter phase.

  18. Derivation of stochastic partial differential equations for size- and age-structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Edward J

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for size-structured and age- and size-structured populations are derived from basic principles, i.e. from the changes that occur in a small time interval. Discrete stochastic models of size-structured and age-structured populations are constructed, carefully taking into account the inherent randomness in births, deaths, and size changes. As the time interval decreases, the discrete stochastic models lead to systems of Itô stochastic differential equations. As the size and age intervals decrease, SPDEs are derived for size-structured and age- and size-structured populations. Comparisons between numerical solutions of the SPDEs and independently formulated Monte Carlo calculations support the accuracy of the derivations.

  19. Age trends in prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Roma minority population of Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeljko, Hrvojka Marija; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Barešić, Ana; Tomas, Zeljka; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Miličić, Jasna; Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Janićijević, Branka

    2013-07-01

    The Roma (Gypsy) are the largest European minority population characterized by poverty, social exclusion as well as by numerous life-style and cultural specificities, which all could have an adverse impact on their cardiovascular health. This study assesses the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors in community-based sample of 430 adult Roma, living in rural area of Croatia, by providing the actual and age-adjusted estimates using the European standard population. The most prominent classical CVD risk phenotypes (blood pressure, obesity, smoking, glucose and lipid profile) were selected, and the standard risk cut-offs were applied. The study has shown that compared to general population of Croatia, the Roma population bears a high CVD risk factors load related to smoking and high glucose level. The CVD risk factors prevalence in Roma also showed important sex and age patterns, the most imposing of which are the findings of higher prevalence of CVD risks in women (especially obesity and triglyceride levels) and the trend of higher body mass index (BMI) level in younger age group (18-34 years) which both stand in contrast to the trends characterizing the general population of Croatia. These findings are complemented by the trend of decreased risk in the oldest age group (65+ years) for all investigated CVD risk factors (with exception of triglycerides level) compared to the 50-64 age group. We conclude that the age and sex CVD risks pattern point to the health transition of this rural Roma population. As we expect the proportion of CVD in the Roma minority of Croatia to increase in the future along with further modernization of their lifestyle, the CVD prevention measures in this population are urgent and should be primarily targeted at women and at the younger segment of this population.

  20. Age and sex dependencies of anxiety and depression in cardiologic patients compared with the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Andreas; Kittel, Jörg; Karoff, Marthin; Schwarz, Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test age and sex effects on anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. Method: Sample 1 consisted of 2037 subjects of the German general population, and sample 2 comprised 2696 cardiologic patients. Results: In the group of the general population we observed a linear increase of depression and (to a lower extent) of anxiety with age. In contrast to that, the patients reached their anxiety and depression maxima in the range of 50 to 60 years, with decreasing mean values for older patients. This effect was observed in both sexes and was proved by an ANOVA interaction between age category and population (P<0.001). In the age range over 70 years the mean depression scores of the patients were even lower than those of the general population. Especially high anxiety and depression scores were found for retired males under 60 years of age. Conclusion: Premature retirement is associated with anxiety and depression in cardiologic patients which partly accounts for the different age effects of the samples. Longitudinal studies are needed to explain the underlying mechanisms of the age effects in more detail. PMID:19742054

  1. THE PALEODEMOGRAPHIC PATTERN OF OYLUM HOYUK POPULATION (THE MIDDLE BRONZE AGE, KİLİS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşen Açıkkol Yıldırım

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study skeleton remaining of 72 individuals excavated from Middle Bronze Age layers of Oylum Höyük (mound situated in Kilis province, were studied. Sex and age of skeletons, unearthed between 2007-2012, were determined and life tables of the population were formed. Mortality of infants and children of Oylum population was very high. Death rates were determined as 36.6 % for 0-5 years of age group, 57.75 % for 0-15 years of age group. 34.62 % of infants and children from 0-5 years of age group died before they completed their 1st year. Lifespan of males were longer than females (25 for females, 33 years for males. Average age of adults was 29. Mortality for females was highest in young adult period (18-30 ages however it becomes more prominent at adulthood period (30-45 years in males. Oylum Höyük population has one of the shortest lifespan among ancient Anatolian populations with its very high subadult death ratios. Paleopathological data states that, individuals were exposed to serious stress during growth period and reproductive period is the most dangerous period for females.

  2. The tight subgiant branch of the intermediate-age star cluster NGC 411 implies a single-aged stellar population

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengyuan; Bastian, Nathan; Deng, Licai; Niederhofer, Florian; Zhang, Chaoli

    2016-01-01

    The presence of extended main-sequence turn-off (eMSTO) regions in intermediate-age star clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds is often interpreted as resulting from extended star-formation histories (SFHs), lasting $\\geq$ 300 Myr. This strongly conflicts with the traditional view of the dominant star-formation mode in stellar clusters, which are thought of as single-aged stellar populations. Here we present a test of this interpretation by exploring the morphology of the subgiant branch (SGB) of NGC 411, which hosts possibly the most extended eMSTO among all known intermediate-age star clusters. We show that the width of the NGC 411 SGB favours the single-aged stellar population interpretation and rules out an extended SFH. In addition, when considering the red clump (RC) morphology and adopting the unproven premise that the widths of all features in the colour--magnitude diagram are determined by an underlying range in ages, we find that the SFH implied is still very close to that resulting from...

  3. Effects of migration on population aging (the case of the Valencian Community).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, C; Mendez, S; Safarova, G

    2012-01-01

    For Spain as a whole and the Valencian Community (VC) in particular both aging and migration have numerous important effects on their demographic development, e.g. in this century Spain has the greatest net migration in Europe, and inside Spain in the VC the proportion of the population of foreign citizenship is high. The paper aims at studying the interplay between aging and migration in the Valencian Community since the beginning of the 1990s. A number of aging characteristics have been computed for the VC and its regions for Spanish citizens and the population of foreign citizenship. Age structure of migration flows will be examined. The paper is based on censuses and micro-data on vital events. Results of the study revealing interrelations between migration and age structure may contribute to the management, administration and planning of social and health services.

  4. The impact of population ageing on future Danish drug expenditure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    Background Population ageing is likely to place an increasing burden on future health care budgets. Several studies have demonstrated that the impact of ageing on future hospital expenditures will be overestimated when not accounting for proximity to death. This is because greater health care...... expenditure among the elderly partly is due the high "costs of dying". Aims The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of the ageing Danish population on future total expenditures on out-of-hospital prescription drugs and to describe the association between age and drug expenditure among survivors...... compared to that of decedents. Methods Taking expenditure during the last year of life and the changes in mortality rates into account, future drug expenditure was projected by multiplying estimated mean annual drug expenditure according to age, gender and survival status by the predicted future number...

  5. Can Functional Cardiac Age be Predicted from ECG in a Normal Healthy Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd; Starc, Vito; Leban, Manja; Sinigoj, Petra; Vrhovec, Milos

    2011-01-01

    In a normal healthy population, we desired to determine the most age-dependent conventional and advanced ECG parameters. We hypothesized that changes in several ECG parameters might correlate with age and together reliably characterize the functional age of the heart. Methods: An initial study population of 313 apparently healthy subjects was ultimately reduced to 148 subjects (74 men, 84 women, in the range from 10 to 75 years of age) after exclusion criteria. In all subjects, ECG recordings (resting 5-minute 12-lead high frequency ECG) were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate up to 85 different conventional and advanced ECG parameters including beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, and signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG parameters. The prediction of functional age was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis using the best 5 univariate predictors. Results: Ignoring what were ultimately small differences between males and females, the functional age was found to be predicted (R2= 0.69, P ECGs, functional cardiac age can be estimated by multiple linear regression analysis of mostly advanced ECG results. Because some parameters in the regression formula, such as QTcorr, high frequency QRS amplitude and P-wave width also change with disease in the same direction as with increased age, increased functional age of the heart may reflect subtle age-related pathologies in cardiac electrical function that are usually hidden on conventional ECG.

  6. Worrying affects associative fear learning: a startle fear conditioning study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke J Gazendam

    Full Text Available A valuable experimental model for the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is that they originate from a learned association between an intrinsically non-aversive event (Conditioned Stimulus, CS and an anticipated disaster (Unconditioned Stimulus, UCS. Most anxiety disorders, however, do not evolve from a traumatic experience. Insights from neuroscience show that memory can be modified post-learning, which may elucidate how pathological fear can develop after relatively mild aversive events. Worrying--a process frequently observed in anxiety disorders--is a potential candidate to strengthen the formation of fear memory after learning. Here we tested in a discriminative fear conditioning procedure whether worry strengthens associative fear memory. Participants were randomly assigned to either a Worry (n = 23 or Control condition (n = 25. After fear acquisition, the participants in the Worry condition processed six worrisome questions regarding the personal aversive consequences of an electric stimulus (UCS, whereas the Control condition received difficult but neutral questions. Subsequently, extinction, reinstatement and re-extinction of fear were tested. Conditioned responding was measured by fear-potentiated startle (FPS, skin conductance (SCR and UCS expectancy ratings. Our main results demonstrate that worrying resulted in increased fear responses (FPS to both the feared stimulus (CS(+ and the originally safe stimulus (CS(-, whereas FPS remained unchanged in the Control condition. In addition, worrying impaired both extinction and re-extinction learning of UCS expectancy. The implication of our findings is that they show how worry may contribute to the development of anxiety disorders by affecting associative fear learning.

  7. Age estimation using third molar teeth: A study on southern Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Ajmal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the age of an individual between 13 and 23 years, using Demirjian method in Saudi male patients in the southern region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A total of 360 male patient′s digital panoramic radiographs were used to evaluate the morphology of mandibular 3rd molar teeth roots according to the Demirjian method. Using descriptive statistical method, age was calculated. Results: Result showed a strong relation of age with stages of root development of 3rd molar teeth. The standard deviation of mean of root development stages is 1.47 years of age. Conclusion: This study suggests that age can be predicted with a statistical significant result for ages between 13 and 23. Further studies with large population are needed for better statistical results and for female age assessment.

  8. The changes of cerebral morphology related to aging in Taiwanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Lan Sharon Wang

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study with the 3-dimensional (3D MRI reconstruction technique was conducted to investigate cerebral complexity changes related to age differences in native Taiwanese population. In our sample of 85 participants aged between 25 and 81, age was associated with gradual ventricular expansion. A nonlinear quadratic relationship between white matter volume and age was found overall in the brain. Widespread age-related reduction in white matter was detected from late adulthood onwards. However, no significant age-related changes in the cortex and whole brain volume were determined throughout adulthood. These findings provided information in describing brain structural complexity, which might in the future serve as an objective diagnostic index or as a predictive parameter for neurological diseases. Our method then may be used for cross-cultural longitudinal studies to evaluate the effect of disease, environment and aging on the brain.

  9. Resolving the age bimodality of galaxy stellar populations on kpc scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibetti, Stefano; Gallazzi, Anna R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Charlot, S.; Galbany, L.; García Benito, R.; Kehrig, C.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Márquez, I.; Sánchez, S. F.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxies in the local Universe are known to follow bimodal distributions in the global stellar populations properties. We analyze the distribution of the local average stellar-population ages of 654 053 sub-galactic regions resolved on ˜1-kpc scales in a volume-corrected sample of 394 galaxies, drawn from the CALIFA-DR3 integral-field-spectroscopy survey and complemented by SDSS imaging. We find a bimodal local-age distribution, with an old and a young peak primarily due to regions in early-type galaxies and star-forming regions of spirals, respectively. Within spiral galaxies, the older ages of bulges and inter-arm regions relative to spiral arms support an internal age bimodality. Although regions of higher stellar-mass surface-density, μ★, are typically older, μ★ alone does not determine the stellar population age and a bimodal distribution is found at any fixed μ★. We identify an "old ridge" of regions of age ˜9 Gyr, independent of μ★, and a "young sequence" of regions with age increasing with μ★ from 1-1.5 Gyr to 4-5 Gyr. We interpret the former as regions containing only old stars, and the latter as regions where the relative contamination of old stellar populations by young stars decreases as μ★ increases. The reason why this bimodal age distribution is not inconsistent with the unimodal shape of the cosmic-averaged star-formation history is that i) the dominating contribution by young stars biases the age low with respect to the average epoch of star formation, and ii) the use of a single average age per region is unable to represent the full time-extent of the star-formation history of "young-sequence" regions.

  10. Development and preliminary validation of the Constructive and Unconstructive Worry Questionnaire: A measure of individual differences in constructive versus unconstructive worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Ilona M; Dunlop, Patrick D

    2016-11-01

    This article presents a measure of individual differences in the tendencies to worry constructively and unconstructively, called the Constructive and Unconstructive Worry Questionnaire (CUWQ). The measure is based on a control theory perspective of worry and separates the tendency to worry in a way that facilitates goal-pursuit and threat reduction (constructive worry) from the tendency to worry in a way that hinders goal-pursuit while sustaining threat awareness (unconstructive worry). CUWQ scores were validated in 2 independent nonclinical samples, including North American (Sample 1, N = 295) and Australian (Sample 2, N = 998) residents. Final factor items were selected based on Sample 1, and the measure showed good model fit through a confirmatory factor analysis in Sample 2. In addition, scores on the 2 worry factors showed criterion-related validity by statistically predicting a variety of outcomes in both samples: Constructive worry was positively associated with punctuality and wildfire preparedness and negatively associated with trait-anxiety and amount of worry. Unconstructive worry, on the other hand, was positively associated with trait-anxiety and amount of worry, and negatively associated with punctuality and wildfire preparedness. The 2 factor scores were uncorrelated in Sample 1 and positively correlated in Sample 2, thereby showing that having a tendency to worry in an unconstructive manner does not prohibit 1 from worrying in a constructive manner as well. Understanding how the 2 tendencies to worry differ from each other and separating their measurement enables a better understanding of the role of worry in both normal behavior and psychopathology. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Genetic structure in dwarf bamboo (Bashania fangiana clonal populations with different genet ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing Ma

    Full Text Available Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP fingerprints were used to reveal genotypic diversity of dwarf bamboo (Bashania fangiana clonal populations with two different genet ages (≤30 years versus >70 years at Wolong National Natural Reserve, Sichuan province, China. We generated AFLP fingerprints for 96 leaf samples, collected at 30 m intervals in the two populations, using ten selective primer pairs. A total of 92 genotypes were identified from the both populations. The mean proportion of distinguishable genotypes (G/N was 0.9583 (0.9375 to 0.9792 and Simpson's index of diversity (D was 0.9982 (0.9973 to 0.9991. So, two B. fangiana populations were multiclonal and highly diverse. The largest single clone may occur over a distance of about 30 m. Our results demonstrated that the genotypic diversity and genet density of B. fangiana clonal population did not change significantly (47 versus 45 with genet aging and low partitioned genetic differentiation was between the two populations (Gst = 0.0571. The analysis of molecular variance consistently showed that a large proportion of the genetic variation (87.79% existed among the individuals within populations, whereas only 12.21% were found among populations. In addition, the high level of genotypic diversity in the two populations implies that the further works were needed to investigate the reasons for the poor seed set in B. fangiana after flowering.

  12. Age and gender might influence big five factors of personality: a preliminary report in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magan, Dipti; Mehta, Manju; Sarvottam, Kumar; Yadav, Raj Kumar; Pandey, R M

    2014-01-01

    Age and gender are two important physiological variables which might influence the personality of an individual. The influence of age and gender on big five personality domains in Indian population was assessed in this cross-sectional study that included 155 subjects (female = 76, male = 79) aged from 16-75 years. Big five personality factors were evaluated using 60-item NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) at a single point in time. Among the big five factors of personality, Conscientiousness was positively correlated (r = 0.195; P personality traits might change with age, and is gender-dependent.

  13. Cardiovascular risk in men aged over 40 in Boa Vista, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Maciel de Lima

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study highlights a worrying trend in increasing obesity and hypertension, most likely associated with increasingly poor diet and reduced participation in exercises. As the Brazilian population ages, this will drive increasing rates of cardiovascular mortality unless these trends are reversed. This study suggests that such campaigns should focus on men over the age of 40, who are married or divorced and of lower income.

  14. Bridging network divides: building capacity to support aging with disability populations through research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Federal and state efforts to rebalance long-term services and supports (LTSS) in favor of home and community based over institutional settings has helped create structural bridges between the historically separated aging and disability LTSS networks by integrating and/or linking aging and disability systems. These changes present new opportunities to study bridging mechanisms and program related outcomes at national and local levels through federally sponsored LTSS initiatives termed Rebalancing programs. Rebalancing programs also offer opportunities to explore and understand the capacity of LTSS networks (age integrated or linked aging and disability systems) to serve aging with disability populations, persons who live with long-term chronic conditions or impairments such as multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, intellectual or developmental disabilities. To date, there is limited evidence based LTSS program and practice knowledge about this heterogeneous population such as met and unmet needs or interventions to support healthy aging. Efforts that center on bridging the larger fields of aging and disability in order to build new knowledge and engage in knowledge translation and translational research are critical for building capacity to support persons aging with disability in LTSS. Generating the investment in bridging aging and disability research across stakeholder group, including researchers and funders, is vital for these efforts.

  15. A hierarchical kinetic theory of birth, death, and fission in age-structured interacting populations

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We study mathematical models describing the evolution of stochastic age-structured populations. After reviewing existing approaches, we present a full kinetic framework for age-structured interacting populations undergoing birth, death and fission processes, in spatially dependent environments. We define the complete probability density for the population-size-age-chart and find results under specific conditions. Connections with more classical models are also explicitly derived. In particular, we show that factorial moments for non-interacting processes are described by a natural generalization of the McKendrick-von Foerster equation, which describes mean-field deterministic behaviour. Our approach utilizes mixed type, multi-dimensional probability distributions similar to those employed in the study of gas kinetics, with terms that satisfy BBGKY-like equation hierarchies.

  16. A Hierarchical Kinetic Theory of Birth, Death and Fission in Age-Structured Interacting Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tom; Greenman, Chris D.

    2016-07-01

    We develop mathematical models describing the evolution of stochastic age-structured populations. After reviewing existing approaches, we formulate a complete kinetic framework for age-structured interacting populations undergoing birth, death and fission processes in spatially dependent environments. We define the full probability density for the population-size age chart and find results under specific conditions. Connections with more classical models are also explicitly derived. In particular, we show that factorial moments for non-interacting processes are described by a natural generalization of the McKendrick-von Foerster equation, which describes mean-field deterministic behavior. Our approach utilizes mixed-type, multidimensional probability distributions similar to those employed in the study of gas kinetics and with terms that satisfy BBGKY-like equation hierarchies.

  17. Accuracy of an equation for estimating age from mandibular third molar development in a Thai population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verochana, Karune; Prapayasatok, Sangsom; Janhom, Apirum; Mahasantipiya, Phattaranant May; Korwanich, Narumanas [Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2016-03-15

    This study assessed the accuracy of age estimates produced by a regression equation derived from lower third molar development in a Thai population. The first part of this study relied on measurements taken from panoramic radiographs of 614 Thai patients aged from 9 to 20. The stage of lower left and right third molar development was observed in each radiograph and a modified Gat score was assigned. Linear regression on this data produced the following equation: Y=9.309+1.673 mG+0.303S (Y=age; mG=modified Gat score; S=sex). In the second part of this study, the predictive accuracy of this equation was evaluated using data from a second set of panoramic radiographs (539 Thai subjects, 9 to 24 years old). Each subject's age was estimated using the above equation and compared against age calculated from a provided date of birth. Estimated and known age data were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient and descriptive statistics. Ages estimated from lower left and lower right third molar development stage were significantly correlated with the known ages (r=0.818, 0.808, respectively, P≤0.01). 50% of age estimates in the second part of the study fell within a range of error of ±1 year, while 75% fell within a range of error of ±2 years. The study found that the equation tends to estimate age accurately when individuals are 9 to 20 years of age. The equation can be used for age estimation for Thai populations when the individuals are 9 to 20 years of age.

  18. Trait worry is associated with difficulties in working memory updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavson, Daniel E; Miyake, Akira

    2016-11-01

    The current study investigated the effects of trait worry, a subcomponent of trait anxiety, on the process of updating information in working memory (WM). A leading theory on anxiety and executive functions, attentional control theory (ACT), states that anxiety is not related to WM updating in emotionally neutral situations. Previous research, however, has focused almost exclusively on WM span tasks that primarily emphasised storage, rather than the updating of WM representations. Moreover, few studies have directly examined the effects of trait worry. In this study, 116 subjects performed a WM updating task that required the memorisation of short lists of words and the within-trial removal of some of these items from WM. Results indicated that levels of trait worry were not related to word-span performance, but were related to performance on trials that required subjects to effectively update WM. Moreover, these effects were observed only for trait worry, not for levels of anxious arousal or comorbid levels of dysphoria. These results support the hypothesis that trait worry is related to WM updating performance and thereby extend ACT in new directions.

  19. A multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model

    CERN Document Server

    Faugeras, Blaise

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a generic multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model, and to assess its mathematical well-posedness. An initial-boundary-value problem is formulated. Existence and uniqueness of a positive weak solution is proved. Eventually, a comparison result is derived: the population of all regions decreases as the mortality rate increases in at least one region.

  20. Yeast Population Dynamics during the Fermentation and Biological Aging of Sherry Wines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Zarzoso, B.; Peris-Torán, M. J.; García-Maiquez, E.; Uruburu, F.; Querol, A.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular and physiological analyses were used to study the evolution of the yeast population, from alcoholic fermentation to biological aging in the process of “fino” sherry wine making. The four races of “flor” Saccharomyces cerevisiae (beticus, cheresiensis, montuliensis, and rouxii) exhibited identical restriction patterns for the region spanning the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS-1 and ITS-2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene, but this pattern was different, from those exhibited by non-flor S. cerevisiae strains. This flor-specific pattern was detected only after wines were fortified, never during alcoholic fermentation, and all the strains isolated from the velum exhibited the typical flor yeast pattern. By restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA and karyotyping, we showed that (i) the native strain is better adapted to fermentation conditions than commercial strains; (ii) two different populations of S. cerevisiae strains are involved in the process of elaboration, of fino sherry wine, one of which is responsible for must fermentation and the other, for wine aging; and (iii) one strain was dominant in the flor population integrating the velum from sherry wines produced in González Byass wineries, although other authors have described a succession of races of flor S. cerevisiae during wine aging. Analyzing all these results together, we conclude that yeast population dynamics during biological aging is a complex phenomenon and differences between yeast populations from different wineries can be observed. PMID:11319081

  1. Aging population in change – a crucial challenge for structurally weak rural areas in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Tatjana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides population decline, structurally weak rural areas in Austria face a new challenge related to demographic change: the increasing heterogeneity of their aging population. From the example of the so-called ‘best agers’ - comprising people aged 55 to 65 years - this contribution makes visible patterns and consequences of growing individualized spatial behaviour and spatial perception. Furthermore, contradictions between claims, wishes and expectations and actual engagement and commitment to their residential rural municipalities are being pointed out. These empirically-based facts are rounded off by considerations on the best agers’ future migration-behaviour and the challenges for spatial planning at the municipal level.

  2. Chronological age estimation based on third molar development in a Portuguese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Inês Morais; Júlio, Paula; Simões, Ricardo Jorge; Matos, Eduarda; Afonso, Américo; Magalhães, Teresa

    2011-03-01

    Third molar development was assessed using a sample of 1,131 orthopantomograms from a Portuguese population. The methodology applied was the eight stages (A-H) method described by Demirjian et al. The final sample was made of 739 orthopantomograms, 387 (52.5%) of which belonging to females; age ranged between 6.1 and 22.5 years old (mean age = 14.49, S.D. = 4.37). For each developmental stage, mean age, standard deviation, and minimal and maximal age was assessed; evaluation of the rate formation of each tooth, according to sex, was calculated and data distribution expressed in percentiles for each stage; the probability of an individual being 16 was also evaluated. The relationship between tooth development and chronological age had a statistical significance for all teeth and both sexes (p thesis that each population need specific data.

  3. Analysis of an Age Structured SEIRS Epidemic Model with Varying Total Population Size and Vaccination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Zhi Li; Geni Gupur; Guang-Tian Zhu

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the study of an age structured SEIRS epidemic model with a vaccination program when the total population size is not kept at constant. We first give the explicit expression of the reproduction number R((ψ),(λ))in the presence of vaccine((λ))is the exponent of growth of total population), and show that the infection-free steady state is linearly stable if R ((ψ),(λ))1, then we apply the theoretical results to vaccination policies to determine the optimal age or ages at which an individual should be vaccinated. It is shown that the optimal strategy can be either one-or two-age strategies.

  4. Changes of population by age and gender structure of Regions in the Republic of Macedonia

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    Resul Hamiti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the changes of population by age and the gender structure in the regions of the Republic of Macedonia. Age and gender is very important not only for the development of demographic process but also for the development of regions. They play an important role in planning the health care needs and other services with the socio-economic and cultural character. In this sense they affect the performance of demographic processes (births, deaths, marriages, etc. and are a result of bilateral relations fertility, mortality, migration movements and other social processes. The main objective of this paper is to identify the aging phenomenon of population in state level and regions. This paper also dedicates special importance to the changes of age and sex structure, during the period between1981-2014 in the regions of the republic of Macedonia.

  5. A genetic program theory of aging using an RNA population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiufang; Ma, Zhihong; Cheng, Jianjun; Lv, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a common characteristic of multicellular eukaryotes. Copious hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanisms of aging, but no single theory is generally acceptable. In this article, we refine the RNA population gene activating model (Lv et al., 2003) based on existing reports as well as on our own latest findings. We propose the RNA population model as a genetic theory of aging. The new model can also be applied to differentiation and tumorigenesis and could explain the biological significance of non-coding DNA, RNA, and repetitive sequence DNA. We provide evidence from the literature as well as from our own findings for the roles of repetitive sequences in gene activation. In addition, we predict several phenomena related to aging and differentiation based on this model.

  6. A stochastic step model of replicative senescence explains ROS production rate in ageing cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Lawless

    Full Text Available Increases in cellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS concentration with age have been observed repeatedly in mammalian tissues. Concomitant increases in the proportion of replicatively senescent cells in ageing mammalian tissues have also been observed. Populations of mitotic human fibroblasts cultured in vitro, undergoing transition from proliferation competence to replicative senescence are useful models of ageing human tissues. Similar exponential increases in ROS with age have been observed in this model system. Tracking individual cells in dividing populations is difficult, and so the vast majority of observations have been cross-sectional, at the population level, rather than longitudinal observations of individual cells.One possible explanation for these observations is an exponential increase in ROS in individual fibroblasts with time (e.g. resulting from a vicious cycle between cellular ROS and damage. However, we demonstrate an alternative, simple hypothesis, equally consistent with these observations which does not depend on any gradual increase in ROS concentration: the Stochastic Step Model of Replicative Senescence (SSMRS. We also demonstrate that, consistent with the SSMRS, neither proliferation-competent human fibroblasts of any age, nor populations of hTERT overexpressing human fibroblasts passaged beyond the Hayflick limit, display high ROS concentrations. We conclude that longitudinal studies of single cells and their lineages are now required for testing hypotheses about roles and mechanisms of ROS increase during replicative senescence.

  7. Depression in the aging: an important health problem in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús RIVERA NAVARRO; Benito-León, Julián; Pazzi Olazarán, Karla Amalia

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a disease which has an especially worrying impact on old aged people due to the increased risk factors for diseases in this age group. In Mexico there are very few studies on depression in aging. The objectives of our study are: 1) to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in old aged people and; 2) to analyze the relation between depressive symptoms and different risk factors of depression. The research is a cross-sectional population study and was made in Ciudad Victor...

  8. Worry Is Good for Breast Cancer Screening: A Study of Female Relatives from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Rita Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few prospective studies have examined associations between breast cancer worry and screening behaviours in women with elevated breast cancer risks based on family history. Methods. This study included 901 high familial risk women, aged 23–71 years, from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported breast screening behaviours at year-one followup were compared between women at low (N=305, medium (N=433, and high (N=163 levels of baseline breast cancer worry using logistic regression. Nonlinear relationships were assessed using likelihood ratio tests. Results. A significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was observed between breast cancer worry and mammography screening (P=0.034 for all women, where women at either low or high worry levels were less likely than those at medium to have a screening mammogram. A similar significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was also found among all women and women at low familial risk for worry and screening clinical breast examinations (CBEs. Conclusions. Medium levels of cancer worries predicted higher rates of screening mammography and CBE among high-risk women.

  9. Reduced lifespan and increased ageing driven by genetic drift in small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Jennifer N; David, Patrice; Haag, Christoph R

    2014-09-01

    Explaining the strong variation in lifespan among organisms remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Whereas previous work has concentrated mainly on differences in selection regimes and selection pressures, we hypothesize that differences in genetic drift may explain some of this variation. We develop a model to formalize this idea and show that the strong positive relationship between lifespan and genetic diversity predicted by this model indeed exists among populations of Daphnia magna, and that ageing is accelerated in small populations. Additional results suggest that this is due to increased drift in small populations rather than adaptation to environments favoring faster life histories. First, the correlation between genetic diversity and lifespan remains significant after statistical correction for potential environmental covariates. Second, no trade-offs are observed; rather, all investigated traits show clear signs of increased genetic load in the small populations. Third, hybrid vigor with respect to lifespan is observed in crosses between small but not between large populations. Together, these results suggest that the evolution of lifespan and ageing can be strongly affected by genetic drift, especially in small populations, and that variation in lifespan and ageing may often be nonadaptive, due to a strong contribution from mutation accumulation.

  10. The influence of shoot harvesting on the age structure of Convallaria majalis L. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kosiński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the structure of developmental stages and the age structure of Convallaria majalis L. populations. The investigation material consisted of individuals and modules from populations in Betulo-Quercetum, Fago-Quercetum, Melico-Fagetum and Tilio-Carpinetum, in which the leaves and inflorescence of C. majalis were cut annually over a period of three years. Fifty percent of the C. majalis regional population consisted of mature modules, 20% of juvenile modules, 25% of senile modules and a very small percentage of generative modules. In populations of Fago-Quercetum there are four times more senile modules than juvenile modules, while in Melico-Fagetum the percentage of juvenile modules is four times more numerous than the percentage of senile modules. The average age of modules is 4.7±3.8 years. Three year old individuals dominate in the population, while 10 year or older individuals are very rare. In the population disturbed by the three raw material collections, the percentage of juvenile modules was decreased by 50% and the percentage of generative modules was nonexistent. As a result, the average module age is higher than in the undisturbed population. Cutting leaves and inflorescence is an important factor in limiting the recruitment of juvenile modules. The growth of individuals in the disturbed population occurs among older modules, which were able to reproduce before the disturbance occurred. Young individuals (three to four years old are less numerous in the disturbed population, and the majority of individuals are three to six years old.

  11. The variability of lower third molar development in Northeast Malaysian population with application to age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johan, N A; Khamis, M F; Abdul Jamal, N Sk; Ahmad, B; Mahanani, E S

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the variability of the lower third molar (tooth 38 and 48) development in Northeast Malaysian population with respect to the side of dentition, to generate age prediction models and to compare the outcome with other studies. A total of 1080 orthopantomograms of Northeast Malaysian population aged between 14 and 25 years (540 males and 540 females) from the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia's archive which met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected and the maturity stages of tooth 38 and 48 were scored using Demirjian's stages (A-H). The findings showed a wide variation of the development of lower third molars in the Northeast Malaysian population. The roots developed earlier in males than in females. The development of the dentition on opposite sides of the mandible was synchronously in females and males. A multiple regression analysis shows that 71.1% of variance in age was explained by sex and developmental stage of tooth 48. An age prediction model was generated from the regression analysis: [Age = 7.117 + 1.907*(stage of tooth 48) - 0.432*(sex)] with mean prediction errors between -0.17 to 3.14 years. The obtained data in the current study are useful for references and determining age of unidentified human remains for identification investigation.

  12. Definitions of fitness in age-structured populations: Comparison in the haploid case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Sabin; Soares, Cintia

    2016-02-21

    Fisher's (1930) Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection (FTNS), and in particular the development of an explicit age-structured version of the theorem, is of everlasting interest. In a recent paper, Grafen (2015a) argues that Fisher regarded his theorem as justifying individual rather than population fitness maximization. The argument relies on a new definition of fitness in age-structured populations in terms of individual birth and death rates and age-specific reproductive values in agreement with a principle of neutrality. The latter are frequency-dependent and defined without reference to genetic variation. In the same paper, it is shown that the rate of increase in the mean of the breeding values of fitness weighted by the reproductive values, but keeping the breeding values constant as in Price (1972) is equal to the additive genetic variance in fitness. Therefore, this partial change is obtained by keeping constant not only the genotypic birth and death rates but also the mean age-specific birth and death rates from which the age-specific reproductive values are defined. In this paper we reaffirm that the Malthusian parameter which measures the relative rate of increase or decrease in reproductive value of each genotype in a continuous-time age-structured population is the definition of fitness used in Fisher's (1930) FTNS. This is shown by considering an age-structured asexual haploid population with constant age-specific birth and death (or survival) parameters for each type. Although the original statement of the FTNS is for a diploid population, this simplified haploid model allows us to address the definition of fitness meant in this theorem without the complexities and effects of a changing genic environment. In this simplified framework, the rate of change in mean fitness in continuous time is expected to be exactly equal to the genetic variance in fitness (or to the genetic variance in fitness divided by the mean fitness in discrete time), which can

  13. Relationship between the population age structure and recreational landscape: an example of Dubrava, Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Crljenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The starting point of this article follows a premise that demographic characteristics of a population, which constructs and consumes space on a daily basis, and cultural landscapes are interconnected, i.e. that certain demographics can be read from urban cultural landscapes in a greater or lesser extent. Of all the demographic structures incorporated in Croatian urban landscapes it is easiest to recognize the age, educational, religious, economic and ethnic/national composition, while the racial and gender structures are almost unnoticed. This paper presents the results of the analysis of the relationship between the population age structure and recreational landscapes of the eastern outskirts of Zagreb – Dubrava. By using the statistical analysis in the first part of the article, the author discusses the past and current age composition, as well as the trend of population aging. After that, the author provides descriptive and/or statistical analysis of some elements of recreational landscape in Dubrava, such as green areas, children’s and sports playgrounds, public gardens, sports centers, Grad mladih, and second homes, in order to determine the contemporary situation in the landscape. Considering the dominant process of rapid aging of the Dubrava population, a mismatch between the needs for recreation of the aged population and the real situation in the space was noticed. The lack of recreational facilities is evident not only for those intended for elderly residents, but also for the younger ones; the reasons are usually associated with the lack of financial resources, and in some cases with decision-making processes on a higher level than those of the city districts. Two subtypes of recreational landscapes were differentiated: sports and recreational landscape and second home landscape.

  14. Population biology of intestinal enterococcus isolates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized individuals in different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedim, Ana P; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-03-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  15. Worry and bother: factors in rural women's health decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, B Jan; Jackson, Melanie N G; Lassig, Sara L

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examined older rural women's health decision making. Thirty-three rural women were recruited to participate in semistructured qualitative interviews. Major themes emerged that focused on rural women's comments regarding their concerns about not worrying or bothering their children with personal health matters. Themes were discussed in the context of an ethic of care. Results suggest that it is important for mental health professionals, family physicians, social workers, and other practitioners to be aware of the sense of worry and concern for others that older rural women bring to bear in decision making about personal health issues.

  16. Medical aspects of ageing in a population with intellectual disability: II. Hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, H M

    1995-02-01

    Hearing function of an institutionalized population with intellectual disability, consisting of 70 subjects with a mean age of 70.1 (range 60-92) years at initial evaluation, was assessed during a 10-year longitudinal study. One subject had Down's syndrome and could not be assessed as a result of dementia. The total prevalence of mild to severe hearing loss (33.3% in the 60-70 age group and 70.4% in those over age 70) was comparable to reported data from an ageing population without intellectual disability in the United Kingdom (37%, respectively 60%). However, the proportion of moderate to severe losses might be higher (16.7% vs. 7% in the 60-70 age group and 33.3% vs. 18% in the older age group). Excess impairment was caused by severe congenital and childhood hearing impairment on one hand, and by conductive losses, probably caused by unrecognized chronic middle ear infections, superposed upon presbyacusis, on the other. Impacted ear wax was also a major problem. The incidence of new cases with hearing loss during follow-up was 50%. After individual habituation training hearing aids were used without difficulties by 20 out of 24 subjects. The importance of active screening and treatment of middle ear infections and hearing impairment from a young age onwards, and regular cleaning of the external ear canals is stressed.

  17. The Impact of Aging Agricultural Labor Population on Farmland Output: From the Perspective of Farmer Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guancheng Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese agriculture is facing an aging workforce which could negatively impact the industry. In this context, research is needed on how work preferences and age of farmers affect agricultural output. This paper attempts to investigate these factors to more fully understand the impact of an aging agricultural labor population on agricultural production. The results show that, in this context of aging, changes in the working-age households have a significant impact on agricultural output. Despite the fact that the impacts of intention to abandon land management were not significant, we can ignore this preference in the workforce. The combination of changes in the composition of the working-age households indicates that 58.53 percent of the agricultural producers will likely quit. This is a potential threat for the future of agricultural development. We also found that elderly farmers who do not intend to abandon farming had higher agricultural output compared to other farmers. This indicates that the adverse effects of changes in the agricultural population age result more from the agricultural output of older farmers who intend to give up farming. This intention adversely affected other elements and reduced investment. Therefore, various forms of training should increase efforts to cultivate modern professional farmers and policies should be simultaneously developed to increase agricultural production levels.

  18. An age-dependent population equation with diffusion and delayed birth process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fragnelli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new age-dependent population equation which takes into account not only a delay in the birth process, but also other events that may take place during the time between conception and birth. Using semigroup theory, we discuss the well posedness and the asymptotic behavior of the solution.

  19. Future requirements for and supply of ophthalmologists for an aging population in Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Ansah (John); D.F. de Korne (Dirk); S. Bayer (Steffen); C. Pan (Chong); T. Jayabaskar (Thiyagarajan); D.B. Matchar (David); N. Lew (Nicola); A. Phua (Andrew); V. Koh (Victoria); E.L. Lamoureux (Ecosse); D. Quek (Desmond)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract#### Background Singapore’s population, as that of many other countries, is aging; this is likely to lead to an increase in eye diseases and the demand for eye care. Since ophthalmologist training is long and expensive, early planning is essential. This paper forecasts workforce and

  20. Social Security Reform and Population Ageing in a Two-Sector Growth Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groezen, B.J.A.M.; Meijdam, A.C.; Verbon, H.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses the effects of reducing unfunded social security and population ageing on economic growth and welfare, both for a small open economy and for a closed economy.The economy consists of a service sector and a commodity sector.Productivity growth only occurs in the latter sector and i

  1. Social security reform and population ageing in a two-sector growth model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groezen, Bas van; Meijdam, L.; Verbon, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses the e¤ects of reducing unfunded social security and population ageing on economic growth and welfare, both for a small open economy and for a closed economy. The economy consists of a service sector and a commodity sector. Productivity growth only occurs in the latter sector and

  2. Age and Abundance Discrimination in Old Stellar Populations Using Mid-Ultraviolet Colors

    CERN Document Server

    Dorman, B; Rood, R T; Dorman, Ben; Connell, Robert W. O'; Rood, Robert T.

    2003-01-01

    The restframe mid-ultraviolet spectral region (2000-3200 A) is important in analyzing the stellar populations of the "red envelope" systems observed at high redshifts. Here, we explore the usefulness of the mid-UV for determining ages and abundances of old populations. A mid-UV to optical/IR wavelength baseline provides good separation of population components because the main sequence turnoff dominates the integrated light between 2500 and 4000 A. We find a six magnitude difference in the mid-UV continuum level over the metallicity range -1.5 < log Z/Z_o < +0.5 and a comparable difference (per unit log t) for ages in the range 4-16 Gyr. Logarithmic derivatives of mid-UV colors with respect to age or metal abundance are 3-10 times larger than for the UBV region. Most of the spectral information on old populations therefore resides below 4000 A. We investigate the capability of UBV and mid-UV broad-band colors to separately determine age and abundance, taking into account precision in the color measureme...

  3. Economic Implications of Japan's Ageing Population: A Macro-economic Demographic Modelling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Naohiro

    1982-01-01

    This study discusses the impact of the aging of the Japanese population upon various socioeconomic factors. Major findings are that the rate of real gross national product growth will decline continuously and that more financial resources will be required for government social security programs. (Editor/CT)

  4. Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C; Brillant, Martha G S; Clovis, Joanne B; McNally, Mary E; Filiaggi, Mark J; Kotzer, Robert D; Lawrence, Herenia P

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation Objectives To examine predictors of participation and to describe the methodological considerations of conducting a two-stage population-based oral health survey. Methods An observational, cross-sectional survey (telephone interview and clinical oral examination) of community-dwelling adults aged 45–64 and ≥65 living in Nova Scotia, Canada was conducted. Results The survey response rate was 21% for the interview and 13.5% for the examination. A total of 1141 participants completed one or both components of the survey. Both age groups had higher levels of education than the target population; the age 45–64 sample also had a higher proportion of females and lower levels of employment than the target population. Completers (participants who completed interview and examination) were compared with partial completers (who completed only the interview), and stepwise logistic regression was performed to examine predictors of completion. Identified predictors were as follows: not working, post-secondary education and frequent dental visits. Conclusion Recruitment, communications and logistics present challenges in conducting a province-wide survey. Identification of employment, education and dental visit frequency as predictors of survey participation provide insight into possible non-response bias and suggest potential for underestimation of oral disease prevalence in this and similar surveys. This potential must be considered in analysis and in future recruitment strategies. PMID:21916953

  5. Health and quality of life in an aging population - Food and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacalone, Davide; Wendin, Karin; Kremer, Stefanie; Frøst, Michael Bom; Bredie, Wender L.P.; Olsson, Viktoria; Otto, Marie H.; Skjoldborg, Signe; Lindberg, Ulla; Risvik, Einar

    2016-01-01

    In Europe the percentage of citizens aged 65 and over is increasing at an unprecedented rate, and is expected to account for over 30% of the population by 2050. Coupled with an increase in life expectancy, this massive demographic change calls for a major effort to ensure quality of life in our o

  6. Prologue: Toward an Understanding of Literacy Issues in Multicultural School-Age Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joyce L.

    2003-01-01

    This article introduces a forum that explores issues surrounding literacy in multicultural school-age populations. It discusses sociocultural factors that overshadow traditional literacy-learning objectives, the relationship between low socioeconomic status and low literacy, environmental influences that affect literacy, and culturally biased…

  7. META-ANALYSIS OF THE LIFE STYLE FACTORS RELEVANT TO ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS FOR THE AGING POPULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study is to characterize activity patterns, physiological changes, and environmental exposures for the aging population. Meta analysis was performed on more than 2000 reviewed articles to evaluate the lifestyle factors ...

  8. The age distribution of self-reported personality disorder traits in a household population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2009-04-01

    Stability over time is an essential criterion for the diagnosis of a personality disorder (PD) according to DSM-IV and ICD-10. However, both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies have demonstrated considerable changes of personality disorder traits during life-span, an observation which challenges this assumption. We measured self-reported DSM-IV personality disorder traits in a nationally representative community sample using a cross-sectional design. We investigated the association of dimensional PD scores with age. Our analyses confirmed a decreasing prevalence of personality disorder mean scores across age groups in the population, particularly Cluster B, with an increase in self-reported schizoid and obsessive-compulsive scores. Furthermore, specific interactions of demographic characteristics and age were identified. Analyses of transition points in the distribution of personality disorders across different age groups did not demonstrate increasing stability after age 30 as previously observed for normal personality traits. Significant changes occurred primarily after the third decade.

  9. Slow and fast scales for superprocess limits of age-structured populations

    CERN Document Server

    Méléard, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    A superprocess limit for an interacting birth-death particle system modelling a population with trait and age-structures is established. Traits of newborn offspring are inherited from the parents except when mutations occur, while ages are set to zero. Because of interactions between individuals, standard approaches based on the Laplace transform do not hold. We use a martingale problem approach and a separation of the slow (trait) and fast (age) scales. While the trait marginals converge in a pathwise sense to a superprocess, the age dynamics, on another time scale, averages to an equilibrium that depends on traits. The convergence of the whole process depending on trait and age, only holds for finite-dimensional time-marginals. We apply our results to the study of examples illustrating different cases of trade-off between competition and senescence.

  10. An apocalyptic vision of ageing in China: Old age care for the largest elderly population in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Sun, Li

    2015-06-01

    According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, by 2010 the number of people aged 60 or over had reached 178 million in China or 13% of its population. With the largest elderly population in the world in absolute numbers, China faces a challenge of providing care for the elderly both in the present and the future. Unlike old age pensions and health protection for the elderly, in Chinese society elderly care had never been considered to be a social problem but rather the individual family's responsibility. After the turn of the millennium, as the repercussions of increasingly ageing demographics, the results of the One-Child Policy and drastic changes in traditional family structures gradually became more apparent, this issue of elderly care has increasingly become one of the most pressing concerns for the ageing society. As there is little existing research on this particular topic, this article aims to shed light on elderly care in China, focusing on the care of elderly needing assistance with activities of daily living, since this group of elderly are most in need of care, their numbers having risen to 33 million in 2010. This article argues it is urgent for China to switch from informal family-based elderly care to the state's formal long-term care, illustrates that a model of social insurance (e.g. as in Germany) is advocated by many Chinese scholars and points out the ways in which it is different from both the commercialized models (e.g. as in the USA) and state organized "Beveridge" models (e.g. as in Sweden).

  11. Prevalence of microalbuminuria among middle-aged population of China: a multiple center cardiovascular epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guang; Wang, ZengWu; Zhang, Linfeng; Chen, Zuo; Wang, Xin; Guo, Min; Tian, Ye; Shao, Lan; Zhu, Manlu

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of microalbuminuria (MAU) and the relationships with other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among a middle-aged Chinese population. Data from 10 313 participants were included in our cross-sectional survey. Microalbuminuria was defined as the urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 30:300 mg/g from a single-spot morning urine sample. Microalbuminuria was found to be common in males and females (15.04% vs 10.09%) aged 35 to 64 years in this Chinese general population, especially in those with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. Multivariate analysis found that body mass index, triglyceride, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, alcohol consumption, hypertension, and diabetes were independently associated with MAU. Microalbuminuria may be a useful indicator for risk of CV disease in general populations.

  12. Age estimation in Portuguese population: The application of the London atlas of tooth development and eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Strahinja; Palmela Pereira, Cristiana; Vargas de Sousa Santos, Rui Filipe

    2017-03-01

    Chronological age estimation from the dental parameters is becoming increasingly important. The London atlas of tooth development is the most recent developed method and represents a modification of the previous older methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the London atlas for the dental age estimation in the Portuguese population. The study sample included 736 radiographic images (498 females and 238 males) of Portuguese origin, patients of Dental Clinic of Superior Institute of Health Sciences Egas Moniz and Dental Medicine Faculty, University of Lisbon. The age range of the individuals was between 3 and 24 years. Estimated age was compared with the chronological age using the paired t-test. The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between left and right side of the jaw (p>0.05). Both sides showed an average overestimation of age by one month approximately. Moreover, the significant difference between chronological and estimated age was not observed in the females. However, the significant difference was observed in a sample coming from males (right: p=0.008; left: p=0.003). Our results showed that the London atlas can be potentially used as a tool for age estimation. However, the difference between sexes clearly suggests that separate charts should be made for each sex. Further studies, which will have as a final goal the development of a new method for age estimation using dental parameters, are needed.

  13. Knee complaints vary with age and gender in the adult population. Population-based reference data for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, Przemyslaw T; Bergman, Stefan; Sundén-Lundius, Anne;

    2006-01-01

    Self-reported knee complaints may vary with age and gender. Reference data from the adult population would help to better interpret the outcome of interventions due to knee complaints. The objectives of the present study were to describe the variation of self-reported knee pain, function...... and quality of life with age and gender in the adult population and to establish population-based reference data for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  14. Age scope of high-risk population for esophageal cancer in Ci county

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Feng Chen; Jun Hou; Zhen-Wei Ding; Cui-Lan Guo; Cui-Yun Qiao; Guo-Hui Song; Shao-Sen Li; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yu-Tong He

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To define the age scope of high-risk population for esophageal cancer (EC) in Ci county.METHODS: The results of endoscopic examination of 2013 subjects, cytological screening of 16 763 persons and records of 9 265 patients with EC were analyzed by Ridit methods, the standard age group was 45-49 year group.RESULTS: The average age of patients with moderate esophageal epithelium dysplasia by endoscopic examination was 53.5 years, of severe esophageal epithelium dysplasia,51.4 years, early EC, 55.6 years. The average age of stage one severe epithelium dysplasia (SEEDI) by cytological screening was 51.2 years, of stage two severe epithelium esophageal dysplasia (SEED Ⅱ) 51.6 years, of advanced EC 61.7 years. In the group of 40-year olds,the value of Ridit by pathological diagnosis was 0.46, 95%CI, 0.45-0.47, that by cytological diagnosis was 0.45, 95%CI, 0.43-0.47. As the age increased at five-year intervals,the value of Ridit increased significantly.CONCLUSION: In Ci county of a high incidence area of EC, the age definition of high-risk population should be above 45 years.

  15. Population ageing and its implications on aggregate health care demand: empirical evidence from 22 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palangkaraya, Alfons; Yong, Jongsay

    2009-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the relationship between age and health care expenditure is not as straightforward as it appears. In fact, micro-level studies find that time to death, rather than ageing, is possibly the main driver of the escalating health care costs in developed countries. Unfortunately, the evidence at the macro level is less clear and often depends on the specification of the empirical model used. We use an aggregate demand framework to assess whether health expenditure is more likely to be driven by ageing per se or proximity to death. Using panel data from 22 OECD countries from the first half of the 1990s, we find population ageing to be negatively correlated with health expenditure once proximity to death is accounted for. This suggests that the effects of ageing on health expenditure growth might be overstated while the effects of the high costs of medical care at the end of life are potentially underestimated. With respect to the latter, our finding highlights the importance of long-term and hospice care management. An expanded long-term care program may not only improve patient welfare, but also reduce costs of care by reducing the duration of hospital care for terminally ill patients. If expensive medical treatment for patients near the end of life can be controlled for, health expenditure growth resulting from population ageing is unlikely to present a most serious problem.

  16. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dugas, M.J.; Laugesen, N.; Bukowski, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertain

  17. Worry and rumination : underlying processes and transdiagnostic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jolijn

    2014-01-01

    Worry and rumination are cognitive processes that have been proposed to constitute a driving force across many psychological disorders, emotional disorders in particular. The two concepts are often referred to by the overarching term repetitive negative thinking (RNT), however whether they are indee

  18. Exploring Sex Differences in Worry with a Cognitive Vulnerability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalta, Alyson K.; Chambless, Dianne L.

    2008-01-01

    A multivariate model was developed to examine the relative contributions of mastery, stress, interpretive bias, and coping to sex differences in worry. Rumination was incorporated as a second outcome variable to test the specificity of these associations. Participants included two samples of undergraduates totaling 302 men and 379 women. A path…

  19. Variations in Fearfulness and Worries of Xhosa Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Adebowale

    2010-01-01

    Xhosa-speaking South African children in school settings face several academic and emotional challenges. These may be due to family obligation, conformity to authority figures and over expectations from parents, teachers and society. This study examines the differences in the number and types of reported fears and worries in 200 South African…

  20. Perfectionism, Rumination, Worry, and Depressive Symptoms in Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Gordon L.; Coulter, Lisa-Marie; Hewitt, Paul L.; Nepon, Taryn

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined trait perfectionism, automatic perfectionistic thoughts, rumination, worry, and depressive symptoms in early adolescents. A group of 81 elementary school students in Grades 7 and 8 completed 5 questionnaires: the Child-Adolescent Perfectionism Scale, the Perfectionism Cognitions Inventory, the Children's Response Styles…

  1. Increased Pathological Worry Levels in Patients with Alopecia Areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basak Sahin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Alopecia Areata (AA is a type of hair loss that has been considered to have associations with various psychiatric disorders. In this study, we aimed to compare pathological worry levels between patients with AA and healthy controls (HC. Material and Method: Sixty-three patients with AA and 90 HCs were included in the present study after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. The socio-demographic characteristics, some clinical characteristics, and the scores from the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ were compared between groups. Results: The demographic characteristics were found to be similar between groups except for gender. The family history of AA was significantly higher in the AA group. The mean score of PSWQ in the AA group was 44.02 ± 11.59, compared to 39.71 ± 7.77 in the HC group. The mean score of PSWQ was significantly higher in the AA group (t=-3.27, p= 0.001.Discussion: The present study is the first to compare pathological worry between patients with AA and HCs. We suggest that pathological worry should be more thoroughly investigated in patients with AA to improve their quality of life. Also, this can be an effective approach to targeting the patients who may develop anxiety disorder.

  2. A Population Pharmacokinetic Approach to Describe Cephalexin Disposition in Adult and Aged Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Prados

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to characterize the pharmacokinetics of orally administered cephalexin to healthy adult and aged dogs, using a population pharmacokinetic approach. Two hundred and eighty-six cephalexin plasma concentrations obtained from previous pharmacokinetic studies were used. Sex, age, pharmaceutical formulation, and breed were evaluated as covariates. A one-compartment model with an absorption lag-time (Tlag best described the data. The final model included age (adult; aged on apparent volume of distribution (Vd/F, apparent elimination rate (ke/F, and Tlag; sex (female; male on ke/F, and breed (Beagle; mixed-breed on Vd/F. Addition of the covariates to the model explained 78% of the interindividal variability (IIV in Vd/F, 36% in ke/F, and 24% in Tlag, respectively. Formulation did not affect the variability of any of the pharmacokinetic parameters. Tlag was longer, whereas Vd/F and ke/F were lower in aged compared to adult animals; in female aged dogs ke/F was lower than in male aged dogs; however, the differences were of low magnitude. Different disposition of cephalexin may be expected in aged dogs.

  3. Anti-hepatitis C virus seroprevalence in the working age population in Poland, 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walewska-Zielecka, Bożena; Religioni, Urszula; Juszczyk, Grzegorz; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M; Czerw, Aleksandra; Soszyński, Piotr; Fronczak, Adam

    2017-01-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered by the World Health Organization (WHO) to be a serious public health concern and one of the major public health priorities. In 2005, it was estimated that there are 185 million anti-HCV positive people in the world, which constitutes 2.8% of the global population. Our study estimates the anti-HCV seroprevalence in the working age population (15-64 years-old), mostly urban and suburban residents, in Poland from 2004 to 2014. The studied group consisted of 61,805 working-age population representatives whose data were obtained from electronic medical records of an outpatient clinic network operating on a countrywide level. Positive anti-HCV test results were obtained in 957 patients, representing 1.5% of the whole population studied throughout the analysed period. The average age of all anti-HCV positive patients was 36.8 years. Analysis of the data suggests that the proportion of anti-HCV positive patients decreased over the study period (mean positive anti-HCV = -0.0017 × year + 3.3715; R(2) = 0.7558). In 2004, positive results were noted among 3.2% of patients undergoing HCV antibody tests, but in 2014, the percentage of patients with a positive result stood at 1.1%. The apparent decrease affected men and women similarly. Our study also provides evidence that screening people born before 1965 could be beneficial.

  4. The evolution of alternative cryptic female choice strategies in age-structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adam G

    2002-12-01

    Cryptic female choice is a potentially important aspect of the sexual selection process. According to the theory of sexual dialectics, postcopulation manipulation of relative male fertilization success can provide an avenue by which females can circumvent attempts by males to control female reproduction. Here I use stochastic models to investigate the evolution of cryptic female choice in populations with and without age structure. In populations without age structure, cryptic female choice will evolve only when (1) precopulatory mate choice by females is inefficient, (2) variation in male fitness is correlated with a trait upon which a female can base her choice of mates, and (3) the cost of multiple mating is not too high. In populations with age structure, similar conditions apply. However, selection sometimes favors females that employ alternative strategies of female choice at different ages. These results help to define the types of biological systems in which we should expect to see the evolution of cryptic female choice. They also illustrate that the evolution of choice strategies in females may be complex and may mirror in some important respects the evolution of alternative mating tactics in males.

  5. Missing X and Y: a review of participant ages in population-based eye studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, Hannah; Hewitt, Alex W; Mackey, David A

    2012-04-01

    Ophthalmic population-based studies have been used to establish the frequency of eye disease and the associated environmental and genetic factors that cause vision impairment and blindness. Most of these studies have concentrated on the diseases of ageing: cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Other studies have identified eye diseases in children but few studies of young adult eye disease exist. We conducted a systematic review of the ophthalmic literature to identify potential population-based eye studies and then note the age of participants in the studies. We then summarized the disease specific to young adults to show there is a need for further research to identify eye disease in this important and often-neglected group in the community. Eighty-four large population-based studies have been conducted worldwide: 9 in North America, 2 in South America, 17 in Africa, 35 in Asia, 11 in Australia and the Pacific, 6 in Europe, 4 in the Middle East and 1 that covered 3 continents. No studies specifically examined young adults. Twenty-six per cent of studies included young adults as part of all ages examined but none of these examined a large number of young adults.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants less than three months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Hill, Helen; Le Guellec, Chantal; Neal, Tim; Mahoney, Sarah; Paulus, Stephane; Castellan, Charlotte; Kassai, Behrouz; van den Anker, Johannes N; Kearns, Gregory L; Turner, Mark A; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2014-11-01

    Ciprofloxacin is used in neonates with suspected or documented Gram-negative serious infections. Currently, its use is off-label partly because of lack of pharmacokinetic studies. Within the FP7 EU project TINN (Treat Infection in NeoNates), our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants <3 months of age and define the appropriate dose in order to optimize ciprofloxacin treatment in this vulnerable population. Blood samples were collected from neonates treated with ciprofloxacin and concentrations were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. The data from 60 newborn infants (postmenstrual age [PMA] range, 24.9 to 47.9 weeks) were available for population pharmacokinetic analysis. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination showed the best fit with the data. A covariate analysis identified that gestational age, postnatal age, current weight, serum creatinine concentration, and use of inotropes had a significant impact on ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that 90% of hypothetical newborns with a PMA of <34 weeks treated with 7.5 mg/kg twice daily and 84% of newborns with a PMA ≥34 weeks and young infants receiving 12.5 mg/kg twice daily would reach the AUC/MIC target of 125, using the standard EUCAST MIC susceptibility breakpoint of 0.5 mg/liter. The associated risks of overdose for the proposed dosing regimen were <8%. The population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was evaluated in neonates and young infants <3 months old, and a dosing regimen was established based on simulation.

  7. The power of positive thinking: Pathological worry is reduced by thought replacement in Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Claire; Hayes, Sarra; Mathews, Andrew; Perman, Gemma; Hirsch, Colette R

    2016-03-01

    Worry in Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), takes a predominantly verbal form, as if talking to oneself about possible negative outcomes. The current study examined alternative approaches to reducing worry by allocating volunteers with GAD to conditions in which they either practiced replacing the usual form of worry with images of possible positive outcomes, or with the same positive outcomes represented verbally. A comparison control condition involved generating positive images not related to worries. Participants received training in the designated method and then practiced it for one week, before attending for reassessment, and completing follow-up questionnaires four weeks later. All groups benefited from training, with decreases in anxiety and worry, and no significant differences between groups. The replacement of worry with different forms of positive ideation, even when unrelated to the content of worry itself, seems to have similar beneficial effects, suggesting that any form of positive ideation can be used to effectively counter worry.

  8. Sex- and age-related variations of the somatotype in a Chuvasha population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, L; Kobyliansky, E

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this large, cross-sectional study was to describe the age- and sex-related variations of the somatotype, employing Heath and Carter's method, in a Chuvasha population residing in a rural region in central Russia. The investigated sample included 802 males aged 18-89 years (mean 46.9) and 738 females aged 18-90 years (mean 48.6). We evaluated the age and sex differences by one-way ANOVA with somatotype components as dependent variables and sex or age groups as grouping variables. Sex differences of somatotypes appear to be the strongest for endomorphy, with generally higher values in women. Endomorphy in males remained virtually unchanged after 30 years of age, but endomorphy in females kept increasing up to the 6th decade, and then subsequently decreased. Virtually no differences were noted in mesomorphy and a very small difference in ectomorphy between males and females aged 18-30 years. A reduction of sexual dimorphism in all somatotype components after age 70 was also observed. The largest difference of all somatotype components appeared between age groups 18-30 and 31-40 years. Thereafter, somatotypes remained practically unchanged. Mesomorphy continued to increase until the 5th decade in both sexes, while in females, endomorphy continuously increased until their 6th decade. In the 7th and 8th decades, a decrease in mean values was observed. Mesomorphy and ectomorphy showed opposite age-related trends. Results of our study clearly suggest that in physique investigations, the somatotypes need to be studied in each sex separately, and in studies of young people, they need also to be adjusted to age.

  9. Genetic evidence for an origin of the Armenians from Bronze Age mixing of multiple populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Marc; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Xue, Yali; Comas, David; Gasparini, Paolo; Zalloua, Pierre; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The Armenians are a culturally isolated population who historically inhabited a region in the Near East bounded by the Mediterranean and Black seas and the Caucasus, but remain under-represented in genetic studies and have a complex history including a major geographic displacement during World War I. Here, we analyse genome-wide variation in 173 Armenians and compare them with 78 other worldwide populations. We find that Armenians form a distinctive cluster linking the Near East, Europe, and the Caucasus. We show that Armenian diversity can be explained by several mixtures of Eurasian populations that occurred between ~3000 and ~2000 bce, a period characterized by major population migrations after the domestication of the horse, appearance of chariots, and the rise of advanced civilizations in the Near East. However, genetic signals of population mixture cease after ~1200 bce when Bronze Age civilizations in the Eastern Mediterranean world suddenly and violently collapsed. Armenians have since remained isolated and genetic structure within the population developed ~500 years ago when Armenia was divided between the Ottomans and the Safavid Empire in Iran. Finally, we show that Armenians have higher genetic affinity to Neolithic Europeans than other present-day Near Easterners, and that 29% of Armenian ancestry may originate from an ancestral population that is best represented by Neolithic Europeans.

  10. Color vision deficiency in a middle-aged population: the Shahroud Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Hashemi, Hassan; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Mehravaran, Shiva; Shariati, Mohammad; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of color vision defects in the middle-age population of Shahroud, Iran. We selected 6,311 people from the 40- to 64-year-old population through random cluster sampling. Color vision testing was performed with the Farnsworth D-15. Cases with similar and symmetric results in both eyes were classified as hereditary, and those with asymmetric results were considered acquired. Cases that did not conform to standard patterns were classified as unknown category. Of 5,190 respondents (response rate 82.2 %), 5,102 participants underwent the color vision test. Of these, 14.7 % (95 % confidence interval 13.7-15.6) had some type of color vision deficiency. Of the 2,157 male participants, 6.2 % were hereditary and 10.2 % were acquired and of the 2,945 female participants, 3.1 % were hereditary and 10 % were acquired. Hereditary color deficiencies were mostly of the deutan form (63.8 %), and acquired deficiencies were mostly tritan (66.1 %). The prevalence of hereditary and acquired color vision deficiency, as well as different types of red-green and blue-yellow color vision defects significantly increased with age (p color vision defects among the middle-aged population of Shahroud was significantly different from that seen in the younger population. This could be due to changes associated with age, gender, medical and ocular conditions, and differences in race and environment. Thus, results of previous examinations and the overall health status should be considered before making any judgment about the status of color vision in middle-aged people.

  11. Diversity and convergence of population aging: evidence from China and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishTaking the diversity and the convergence of demographic transitions intoconsideration, it is hypothesized that population aging that occurs in developed countries anddeveloping countries will reflect diversity, but will also show some convergence. In order to testthis hypothesis, the present study compares the population aging experiences of China (1971-2050 andCanada (1911-2050 and places them within the context of the demographic transition. In this paper welearn how, as population ages, these two countries will, through two distinct pathways, arrive atsimilar age structures by the middle of the 21st century. Both the diversity and the convergence ofpopulation aging are shown in this comparative study.FrenchEn constatant la diversité et la convergence des transitions démographiques,nous faisons l'hypothèse que le processus du vieillissement démographiquecomporte également une certaine diversité et montrera une convergence, enparticulier, entre les pays développés et les pays en développement. Afin devérifier cette hypothèse, la présente étude compare les vieillissementsdémographiques en Chine (1971-2050 et au Canada (1911-2050, en lesmettant dans le contexte de la transition démographique. Cet article montre qu’àmesure que vieillit la population, comment ces deux pays arriveront par deuxvoies distinctes à une structure par âge similaire au milieu du XXIème siècle. Ladiversité et la convergence du vieillissement sont toutes deux illustrées danscette étude comparative.

  12. Consumptive and nonconsumptive effects of cannibalism in fluctuating age-structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissinger, Scott A; Whiteman, Howard H; Denoël, Mathieu; Mumford, Miranda L; Aubee, Catherine B

    2010-02-01

    Theory and empirical studies suggest that cannibalism in age-structured populations can regulate recruitment depending on the intensity of intraspecific competition between cannibals and victims and the nature of the cannibalism window, i.e., which size classes interact as cannibals and victims. Here we report on a series of experiments that quantify that window for age-structured populations of salamander larvae and paedomorphic adults. We determined body size limits on cannibalism in microcosms and then the consumptive and nonconsumptive (injuries, foraging and activity, diet, growth) effects on victims in mesocosms with seminatural levels of habitat complexity and alternative prey. We found that cannibalism by the largest size classes (paedomorphs and > or = age 3+ yr larvae) occurs mainly on young-of-the-year (YOY) victims. Surviving YOY and other small larvae had increased injuries, reduced activity levels, and reduced growth rates in the presence of cannibals. Data on YOY survival in an experiment in which we manipulated the density of paedomorphs combined with historical data on the number of cannibals in natural populations indicate that dominant cohorts of paedomorphs can cause observed recruitment failures. Dietary data indicate that ontogenetic shifts in diet should preclude strong intraspecific competition between YOY and cannibals in this species. Thus our results are consistent with previous empirical and theoretical work that suggests that recruitment regulation by cannibalism is most likely when YOY are vulnerable to cannibalism but have low dietary overlap with cannibals. Understanding the role of cannibalism in regulating recruitment in salamander populations is timely, given the widespread occurrences of amphibian decline. Previous studies have focused on extrinsic (including anthropogenic) factors that affect amphibian population dynamics, whereas the data presented here combined with long-term field observations suggest the potential for

  13. Decrease of old age population mortality in Yugoslavia: Chance to increase anticipated life expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivojević Biljana M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the level and structure of old age population mortality in Yugoslavia with an aim to determine the intensity of realized changes and to provide an answer to how much they are significant and to approach the positive trends noted in developed countries in the latest period. Although it was insufficiently represented in the demographic analysis, the analysis of mortality in old people is gaining importance in the world. Apart from the reasons which result from the increase in the number of old people and thus their greater participation in the total number of deceased, enviable results have been achieved in decreasing old age mortality, which are more and more in focus of interest. While earlier research reported on the dominant influence of the decrease of younger age mortality to the increase of the expectation of life at birth, recent analysis precisely confirm the importance of decreasing mortality in old people. In mortality conditions from 1997/98, an additional 13.4 years of life in average is expected for men in Yugoslavia, and 15.2 for women. During more than five decades, the anticipated life expectancy for people over the age of 65 increased for only 1.2 years for men and 1.9 years for women. Out of that, the greatest increase was realized in the period 1950/51 - 1960/61 in both sexes. A small decrease in the average life expectancy was marked with men in the period 1960/61 - 1970/71, and with women in the latest period. Otherwise, all up to the eighties, the annual rate of increase was considerably lower than the rate of increase for zero year. It was only in the period 1980/81-1990/91 that faster growth had an anticipated life expectancy for the 65 years old. However, during the nineties unfavorable changes continued with the older, especially, female population. When comparing the values of the average life expectancy for people over 65 in Yugoslavia with corresponding values in developed countries, the lagging in

  14. Dental age estimation from the developmental stage of the third molars in Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2010-08-01

    A sharp increase in forensic age estimation of living persons has been observed in recent years. However, ethnic populations residing in different countries have been insufficiently analyzed. The aim of this study was to achieve a referral database and regression equations for dental age estimation of unaccompanied minors of Iran nationality. A total of 1200 orthopantomograms were collected from original Iran and equally divided in age categories between 10 and 27 years. On the radiographs, the developmental stage of the third molars was scored applying a Demirjian et al. scoring technique. Inter- and intra-observer reliabilities were tested using kappa statistics. Correlation between the scores of all four wisdom maxillary and mandibular third molars teeth and left/right symmetry were evaluated with spearman correlation coefficient. Student's t-test on asymmetry was performed and regression formulas were calculated. The present database was the first to assemble third molar developmental scores on radiographs of Iran individuals and provided more appropriate dental age estimation of unaccompanied Iran minors. To enhance the accuracy of forensic age estimates based on third molars mineralization, the use of population-specific standards is recommended.

  15. Health and quality of life in an aging population – food and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacalone, Davide; Wendin, Karin Maria Elisabet; Kremer, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    at demonstrating the relevance of sensory and consumer scientists in promoting food-related well-being in an aging population. The workshop contributions are here reviewed and summarized three main themes: nutritional needs, food perception and aging, and behavioral drivers of food consumption....... of life across the life span as a focal point. This short paper is based on a workshop held at the EuroSense meeting, focusing on research from sensory and consumer scientists. The workshop featured contributions focusing on food-related perception, needs and behavior of the elderly, and aimed...

  16. The ADAMTS9 gene is associated with cognitive aging in the elderly in a Taiwanese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C.; Kao, Chung-Feng; Yang, Cheng-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Evidence indicates that the pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with insulin resistance may contribute to cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this study, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within insulin resistance-associated genes, such as the ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 9 (ADAMTS9), glucokinase regulator (GCKR), and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARG) genes, may be linked with cognitive aging independently and/or through complex interactions in an older Taiwanese population. A total of 547 Taiwanese subjects aged over 60 years from the Taiwan Biobank were analyzed. Mini-Mental State Examinations (MMSE) were administered to all subjects, and MMSE scores were used to measure cognitive functions. Our data showed that four SNPs (rs73832338, rs9985304, rs4317088, and rs9831846) in the ADAMTS9 gene were significantly associated with cognitive aging among the subjects (P = 1.5 x 10−6 ~ 0.0002). This association remained significant after performing Bonferroni correction. Additionally, we found that interactions between the ADAMTS9 rs9985304 and ADAMTS9 rs76346246 SNPs influenced cognitive aging (P < 0.001). However, variants in the GCKR and PPARG genes had no association with cognitive aging in our study. Our study indicates that the ADAMTS9 gene may contribute to susceptibility to cognitive aging independently as well as through SNP-SNP interactions. PMID:28225792

  17. Visual cortex in aging and Alzheimer's disease: changes in visual field maps and population receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Alyssa A; Barton, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have suggested that cortical alterations underlie such age-related visual deficits as decreased acuity, little is known about what changes actually occur in visual cortex during healthy aging. Two recent studies showed changes in primary visual cortex (V1) during normal aging; however, no studies have characterized the effects of aging on visual cortex beyond V1, important measurements both for understanding the aging process and for comparison to changes in age-related diseases. Similarly, there is almost no information about changes in visual cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. Because visual deficits are often reported as one of the first symptoms of AD, measurements of such changes in the visual cortex of AD patients might improve our understanding of how the visual system is affected by neurodegeneration as well as aid early detection, accurate diagnosis and timely treatment of AD. Here we use fMRI to first compare the visual field map (VFM) organization and population receptive fields (pRFs) between young adults and healthy aging subjects for occipital VFMs V1, V2, V3, and hV4. Healthy aging subjects do not show major VFM organizational deficits, but do have reduced surface area and increased pRF sizes in the foveal representations of V1, V2, and hV4 relative to healthy young control subjects. These measurements are consistent with behavioral deficits seen in healthy aging. We then demonstrate the feasibility and first characterization of these measurements in two patients with mild AD, which reveal potential changes in visual cortex as part of the pathophysiology of AD. Our data aid in our understanding of the changes in the visual processing pathways in normal aging and provide the foundation for future research into earlier and more definitive detection of AD.

  18. The Worries Adult Children and Their Parents Experience for One Another

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Elizabeth L.; Fingerman, Karen L.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the worries adults and their parents experience for one another. To date, relatively little research has considered the experience of worry in this relationship. A small number of studies, however, suggest worry is relatively common in this relationship (Boutain, 2001; Cicirelli, 1988; Parker, Call, Dunkle, & Vaitkus, 2002).…

  19. Worry as a Predictor of Nutrition Behaviors: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Rebecca A.; Bergman, Hannah E.; Klein, William M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Worry has been shown to predict a variety of health behaviors, such as cancer screening, yet there are few studies linking worry and nutrition. This study used nationally representative data from National Cancer Institute's Food Attitudes and Behavior Survey ("n" = 3,397) to examine the association between health-related worry and a variety of…

  20. Examining the Relationship Between Worry and Sleep: A Daily Process Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Sarah Kate; Behar, Evelyn; Luhmann, Maike

    2016-07-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that worry and sleep are intimately linked. However, the relationship between these two phenomena over the course of a day remains largely unstudied. It is possible that (a) worry predicts sleep disturbance that night, (b) sleep disturbance predicts worry the following day, or (c) there is a bidirectional relationship between worry and sleep disturbance. The present study examined the daily relationship between worry (both during the day and immediately prior to sleep onset) and sleep in 50 high trait worriers who were randomly assigned to one of two interventions aimed at reducing worry as part of a larger study. A daily process approach was utilized wherein participants completed daily reports of sleep and worry during a 7-day baseline period followed by a 14-day intervention period. Results of repeated measures multilevel modeling analyses indicated that worry experienced on a particular day predicted increased sleep disturbance that night during both the baseline and intervention weeks. However, there was no evidence of a bidirectional relationship as sleep characteristics did not predict worry the following day. Additionally, the type of intervention that participants engaged in did not affect the daily relationship between worry and sleep. Results of the present study are consistent with the cognitive model of insomnia (Harvey, 2002) and highlight the importance of addressing and treating worry among individuals with high trait worry and sleep disturbance.

  1. Age distribution, polyps and rectal cancer in the Egyptian population-based cancer registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darlene Veruttipong; Amr S Soliman; Samuel F Gilbert; Taylor S Blachley; Ahmed Hablas; Mohamed Ramadan; Laura S Rozek; Ibrahim A Seifeldin

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To describe the clinical and epidemiologic profiles of the disease and to compare the findings with those generated from the previous hospital-based studies.METHODS:The Gharbiah cancer registry is the only population-based cancer registry in Egypt since 1998.We analyzed the data of all colorectal cancer patients included in the registry for the period of 1999-2007.All medical records of the 1364 patients diagnosed in Gharbiah during the study period were retrieved and the following information abstracted:age,residence,diagnosis date,grade,stage,topology,clinical characteristics,and histology variables.Egyptian census data for 1996 and 2006 were used to provide the general population's statistics on age,sex,residence and other related demographic factors.In addition to age-and sex-specific incidence rate analyses,we analyze the data to explore the incidence distribution by rural-urban differences among the 8 districts of the province.We also compared the incidence rates of Gharbiah to the rates of the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data of the United States.RESULTS:Over the 9 year-period,1364 colorectal cancer cases were included.The disease incidence under age 40 years was relatively high (1.3/105) while the incidence in the age groups 40 and over was very low (12.0/105,19.4/105 and 21.2/105 in the age groups 40-59 years,60-69 years and > 70 years,respectively).The vast majority of tumors (97.2%) had no polyps and 37.2% of the patients presented with primary lesions in the rectum.Colorectal cancer was more common in patients from urban (55%) than rural (45%) areas.Regional differences in colon and rectal cancer incidence in the 8 districts of the study province may refleet different etiologic patterns in this population.The registry data of Egypt shows a slightly higher incidence of colorectal cancer than the United States in subjects under age 40 years.The results also shows significantly lower incidence of colorectal cancer in

  2. IMPACTS OF AGEING POPULATION ON MONETARY AND EXCHANGE RATE MANAGEMENT IN SINGAPORE

    OpenAIRE

    PAUL S. L. YIP; Tan, K C

    2008-01-01

    This policy note finds that the ageing of the population in Singapore will cause a reversal of the current net Central Provident Fund (CPF) contribution into a substantial net CPF withdrawal from 2025, with a peak occurring at 2035. The result is qualitatively robust to changes in the underlying assumptions of the projection. The paper then highlights the implications of this change on the exchange rate and monetary management in Singapore. Finally, the paper proposes policy measures that can...

  3. Malaysia's ageing population : Viability of employment trust fund for retirement village

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Chwee Tin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to analyse the Feasibility of Retirement Village for Malaysia.s Ageing Population. The analysis process involves assessing the level of awareness and opinion in the respondents of the demand for Retirement Village in Malaysia using survey method. At the macro level perspective, an overview analysis of the social, economic, political and technical knowhow of implementing and operating a Retirement Village has been taken into consideration to verify the advantages and disadvanta...

  4. Poverty and family solidarity: a case-study of Portuguese aged population

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, Alice Delerue

    2006-01-01

    In Portugal, the eldest remain particularly vulnerable to poverty: 30% of the population aged 65 and over live below the poverty line. Does poverty mean less family solidarity? To answer this question we used data from a sample survey of 1100 elderly. From a categorical principal components analysis based on variables of monetary poverty, of poverty according to living conditions and of subjective poverty, we define a multiple index of poverty. Structural and functional intergener...

  5. Dissecting simulated disk galaxies I: the structure of mono-age populations

    CERN Document Server

    Martig, Marie; Flynn, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We study seven simulated disk galaxies, three with a quiescent merger history, and four with mergers in their last 9 Gyr of evolution. We compare their structure at z=0 by decomposing them into "mono-age populations" (MAPs) of stars within 500 Myr age bins. All studied galaxies undergo a phase of merging activity at high redshift, so that stars older than 9 Gyr are found in a centrally concentrated component, while younger stars are mostly found in disks. We find that most MAPs have simple exponential radial and vertical density profiles, with a scale-height that typically increases with age. Because a large range of merger histories can create populations with simple structures, this suggests that the simplicity of the structure of mono-abundance populations observed in the Milky Way by Bovy et al. (2012b,c) is not necessarily a direct indicator of a quiescent history for the Milky Way. Similarly, the anti-correlation between scale-length and scale-height does not necessarily imply a merger-free history. How...

  6. Association between poverty and psychiatric disability among Chinese population aged 15-64 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Pang, Lihua; Du, Wei; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2012-12-30

    Psychiatric disability is an important public health problem in China, and poverty may be positively correlated with disability. Little study in the existing literatures has explored the contribution of poverty to the psychiatric disability among Chinese population. Using a nationally representative data, this paper aims to investigate the association between poverty and psychiatric disability in Chinese population aged 15-64 years. We used the second China National Sample Survey on Disability, comprising 1.8 million people aged 15-64 years. Identification and classification for psychiatric disability was based on consensus manuals. We used standard weighting procedures to construct sample weights considering the multistage stratified cluster sampling survey scheme. Population weighted numbers, weighted proportions, and the adjusted Odd Ratios (OR) were calculated. For people with psychiatric disability aged 15-64 years, more than 4 million were below the poverty level in China. After controlling for other demographic variables, poverty was found to be significantly associated with psychiatric disability (OR=2.25, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.15-2.35). Given China is undergoing rapid social-economic transition and psychiatric diseases become a leading burden to the individuals, community, and health care systems, poverty reduction programs are warranted to prevent psychiatric disability and/or improve the lives for persons with psychiatric disability.

  7. Eruption age of permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors in the south Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Rakhi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The existing eruption schedules for permanent and deciduous dentition are based on studies in the Western population. Since Indians differ from Westerners racially, genetically, and environmentally, these studies fail to provide relevant guidance on the eruption schedule in the Indian population. This study aims at determining the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular molars and central incisors in the south Indian population. Materials and Methods: 10,156 apparently healthy Indian children in the age-group of 6-9 years were examined with mouth mirror and probe under adequate illumination for the status of the eruption of the permanent mandibular first molar and permanent mandibular central incisor. Pearson′s Chi-square test with Yates′ continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value for comparison of proportion between girls and boys. The values obtained in our study were compared with the standard values. The Z-test with continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value. Results: As per our study, the permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors erupted one to two years later compared to the values reported in Westerners. The earlier eruption of the permanent mandibular first molars compared to the permanent mandibular central incisors, as well as the earlier eruption of both the teeth in girls compared to boys, were in accordance with the existing literature. Conclusion: The eruption age reported by us may form a standard reference for eruption age in Indians.

  8. Psychosocial biomarker research: integrating social, emotional and economic factors into population studies of aging and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    There are complex reciprocal relationships between health and social, emotional and economic factors in aging populations. Social and affective neurosciences are rapidly developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying these phenomena using sophisticated behavioural, neuroimaging and psychophysiological methods. These techniques are often complex and expensive, so are generally used in relatively small selected samples rather than in large-scale cohort studies. However, an understanding of the significance of these processes in health and well-being depends on integrating findings from social and affective neuroscience into population-level studies. The aim of this article is to describe how a population perspective on the determinants of health and well-being in old age articulates with the agenda of social, affective and economic neuroscience, particularly through the application of psychosocial biomarker research. Social and affective neuroscience and epidemiological approaches provide complementary research strategies for understanding the mechanisms linking social, emotional and economic factors with health risk. This will be illustrated primarily from findings from two studies conducted at University College London, the Whitehall II Study and the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

  9. Evidence for multiple populations in the intermediate age cluster Lindsay 1 in the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Hollyhead, K; Lardo, C; Bastian, N; Hilker, M; Rejkuba, M; Koch, A; Grebel, E K; Georgiev, I

    2016-01-01

    Lindsay 1 is an intermediate age (approx 8 Gyr) massive cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Using VLT FORS2 spectra of 16 probable cluster members on the lower RGB of the cluster, we measure CN and CH band strengths (at 3883 and 4300 Angstroms respectively), along with carbon and nitrogen abundances and find that a sub-population of stars has significant nitrogen enrichment. A lack of spread in carbon abundances excludes evolutionary mixing as the source of this enrichment, so we conclude that this is evidence of multiple populations. Therefore, L1 is the youngest cluster to show such variations, implying that the process triggering the onset of multiple populations must operate until at least redshift ~1.

  10. Fourth-Order Method for Numerical Integration of Age- and Size-Structured Population Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannelli, M; Kostova, T; Milner, F A

    2008-01-08

    In many applications of age- and size-structured population models, there is an interest in obtaining good approximations of total population numbers rather than of their densities. Therefore, it is reasonable in such cases to solve numerically not the PDE model equations themselves, but rather their integral equivalents. For this purpose quadrature formulae are used in place of the integrals. Because quadratures can be designed with any order of accuracy, one can obtain numerical approximations of the solutions with very fast convergence. In this article, we present a general framework and a specific example of a fourth-order method based on composite Newton-Cotes quadratures for a size-structured population model.

  11. Rapid climate change did not cause population collapse at the end of the European Bronze Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armit, Ian; Swindles, Graeme T; Becker, Katharina; Plunkett, Gill; Blaauw, Maarten

    2014-12-02

    The impact of rapid climate change on contemporary human populations is of global concern. To contextualize our understanding of human responses to rapid climate change it is necessary to examine the archeological record during past climate transitions. One episode of abrupt climate change has been correlated with societal collapse at the end of the northwestern European Bronze Age. We apply new methods to interrogate archeological and paleoclimate data for this transition in Ireland at a higher level of precision than has previously been possible. We analyze archeological (14)C dates to demonstrate dramatic population collapse and present high-precision proxy climate data, analyzed through Bayesian methods, to provide evidence for a rapid climatic transition at ca. 750 calibrated years B.C. Our results demonstrate that this climatic downturn did not initiate population collapse and highlight the nondeterministic nature of human responses to past climate change.

  12. Age prediction formulae from radiographic assessment of skeletal maturation at the knee in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Jean E

    2014-01-01

    Age estimation in living subjects is primarily achieved through assessment of a hand-wrist radiograph and comparison with a standard reference atlas. Recently, maturation of other regions of the skeleton has also been assessed in an attempt to refine the age estimates. The current study presents a method to predict bone age directly from the knee in a modern Irish sample. Ten maturity indicators (A-J) at the knee were examined from radiographs of 221 subjects (137 males; 84 females). Each indicator was assigned a maturity score. Scores for indicators A-G, H-J and A-J, respectively, were totalled to provide a cumulative maturity score for change in morphology of the epiphyses (AG), epiphyseal union (HJ) and the combination of both (AJ). Linear regression equations to predict age from the maturity scores (AG, HJ, AJ) were constructed for males and females. For males, equation-AJ demonstrated the greatest predictive capability (R(2)=0.775) while for females equation-HJ had the strongest capacity for prediction (R(2)=0.815). When equation-AJ for males and equation-HJ for females were applied to the current sample, the predicted age of 90% of subjects was within ±1.5 years of actual age for male subjects and within +2.0 to -1.9 years of actual age for female subjects. The regression formulae and associated charts represent the most contemporary method of age prediction currently available for an Irish population, and provide a further technique which can contribute to a multifactorial approach to age estimation in non-adults.

  13. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tao, E-mail: huangt@ahu.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Sun, Liguang, E-mail: slg@ustc.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yin, Xijie [Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540–2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540–1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition. - Highlights: • Emperor penguin colonized at Amanda Bay, East Antarctic as early as AD 1540. • Populations of emperor penguin at Amanda Bay increase during the little ice age. • Depleted N isotope ratios of Emperor penguins during the LIA were observed.

  14. [Ageing and chronic diseases in Senegal. A comparison between rural (Ferlo) and urban (Dakar) populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboz, P; Touré, M; Hane, F; Macia, E; Coumé, M; Bâ, A; Boëtsch, G; Guèye, L; Chapuis-Lucciani, N

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of this study were: to compare the prevalence of hypertension, overweight and obesity in rural (Ferlo) and urban (Dakar) Senegalese populations aged 50 and over. The survey was conducted on individuals aged 50 and older living in the rural area (N=478) and in the urban area (N=220). We have collected data about age, gender, marital status, education level, and knowledge, treatment of hypertension, height, weight and blood pressure. We have observed that overweight and obesity were more prevalent in the urban area (Dakar) than in the rural one (Ferlo). The risk of overweight or obesity decreased when age increased, and women had weight problems more often than men. The prevalence of arterial hypertension was lower in rural area (55.86%) than in Dakar (66.36%), but increased at an older age. However, the logistic regression showed that these increased proportion of hypertension in Dakar is linked to the more important proportion of overweight and obese people in this area. Moreover, rates of knowledge, treatment and control of hypertension are particularly low in the rural area of Senegal. In conclusion, age-associated diseases should be better managed in Senegal, particularly in rural areas.

  15. White matter hyperintensities and imaging patterns of brain ageing in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, Mohamad; Erus, Guray; Toledo, Jon B; Zhang, Tianhao; Bryan, Nick; Launer, Lenore J; Rosseel, Yves; Janowitz, Deborah; Doshi, Jimit; Van der Auwera, Sandra; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Hosten, Norbert; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Schminke, Ulf; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Grabe, Hans J; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    White matter hyperintensities are associated with increased risk of dementia and cognitive decline. The current study investigates the relationship between white matter hyperintensities burden and patterns of brain atrophy associated with brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease in a large populatison-based sample (n = 2367) encompassing a wide age range (20-90 years), from the Study of Health in Pomerania. We quantified white matter hyperintensities using automated segmentation and summarized atrophy patterns using machine learning methods resulting in two indices: the SPARE-BA index (capturing age-related brain atrophy), and the SPARE-AD index (previously developed to capture patterns of atrophy found in patients with Alzheimer's disease). A characteristic pattern of age-related accumulation of white matter hyperintensities in both periventricular and deep white matter areas was found. Individuals with high white matter hyperintensities burden showed significantly (P brain regions typically affected by ageing and Alzheimer's disease dementia. To investigate a possibly causal role of white matter hyperintensities, structural equation modelling was used to quantify the effect of Framingham cardiovascular disease risk score and white matter hyperintensities burden on SPARE-BA, revealing a statistically significant (P brain atrophy found in beyond-normal brain ageing in the general population. White matter hyperintensities also contribute to brain atrophy patterns in regions related to Alzheimer's disease dementia, in agreement with their known additive role to the likelihood of dementia. Preventive strategies reducing the odds to develop cardiovascular disease and white matter hyperintensities could decrease the incidence or delay the onset of dementia.

  16. Spain: promoting the welfare of older adults in the context of population aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Juan P; Latorre, José M; Gatz, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Spain is one of the European countries with the most significant societal changes in the 21st century contributing to an aging population, in particular, high life expectancy coupled with low fertility, which will result in a doubling of the old-age dependency ratio. Demographic aging implies important challenges that affect the lives of people, families, the economy, public finances, and the reorganization of the health and social systems. Currently, the older population has become particularly vulnerable due to the economic crisis taking place in Spain, which has brought about the need for new policies and systems to protect older persons. The pension system is under the greatest threat in conjunction with possible changes in the national health care system. This report presents a general view of the main factors that surround and affect older adults in Spain, as well as policies developed by the government in response to the current and future situation. We highlight demographic predictions for the coming decades, quality-of-life indicators, situations of dependency, active aging policies, and the main research programs related to gerontology in Spain.

  17. Prescribing of medicines in the Danish paediatric population outwith the licensed age group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with off-label prescribing of medicines in a paediatric population. METHODS: We analysed spontaneous ADR reports for children from ages 0 to 17 years submitted to the Danish national ADR database from 1998 to 2007. We defined off-label pre......AIM: To identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with off-label prescribing of medicines in a paediatric population. METHODS: We analysed spontaneous ADR reports for children from ages 0 to 17 years submitted to the Danish national ADR database from 1998 to 2007. We defined off......-label prescribing as prescriptions outside the licensed age group. Off-label ADRs were categorized by therapeutic group, age of child, type and severity. The unit of analysis was one ADR. RESULTS: We analysed 4388 ADRs for children reported in the national database. Approximately 17% of reported ADRs were...... associated with off-label use, 60% of them serious. More than one half of off-label ADRs were reported in adolescents. Serious ADRs due to off-label prescribing are more likely to be reported for hormonal contraceptives (ATC group G), anti-acne preparations (ATC group D) and allergens (ATC group V...

  18. Development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Philippe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of spasticity with age in children with cerebral palsy (CP has, to our knowledge, not been studied before. In 1994, a register and a health care program for children with CP in southern Sweden were initiated. In the programme the child's muscle tone according to the modified Ashworth scale is measured twice a year until six years of age, then once a year. We have used this data to analyse the development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy. Methods All measurements of muscle tone in the gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in all children with CP from 0 to 15 years during the period 1995–2006 were analysed. The CP subtypes were classified according to the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe network system. Using these criteria, the study was based on 6218 examinations in 547 children. For the statistical analysis the Ashworth scale was dichotomized. The levels 0–1 were gathered in one category and levels 2–4 in the other. The pattern of development with age was evaluated using piecewise logistic regression in combination with Akaike's An Information Criterion. Results In the total sample the degree of muscle tone increased up to 4 years of age. After 4 years of age the muscle tone decreased each year up to 12 years of age. A similar development was seen when excluding the children operated with selective dorsal rhizotomy, intrathecal baclofen pump or tendo Achilles lengthening. At 4 years of age about 47% of the children had spasticity in their gastro-soleus muscle graded as Ashworth 2–4. After 12 years of age 23% of the children had that level of spasticity. The CP subtypes spastic bilateral and spastic unilateral CP showed the same pattern as the total sample. Children with dyskinetic type of CP showed an increasing muscle tone up to age 6, followed by a decreasing pattern up to age 15. Conclusion In children with CP, the muscle tone as measured with the Ashworth

  19. ASSESSMENT OF LIVING CONDITIONS OF THE UKRAINIAN WORKING-AGE POPULATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazhak, Iryna

    2017-01-01

    -political instability in the country, corruption, and personal financial status. Half of the respondents considered their family’s financial status to be unsatisfactory whilst only 15% deemed that they had satisfactory finances for life, and one-third declared themselves to be at poverty level. The highest number...... support from other people and 9% - had the opposite opinion. 77% declared that could get physical support and 13% - could not. 69% of the respondents were optimistic with respect to financial support whereas 20% considered that they could not get financial support. Few of the respondents mentioned...... as many women performing the majority of the duties as men. About one-third of the respondents considered their profession to be prestigious, about half - average, a quarter – low prestige. Respondents: the working-age population of Ukraine – males aged 18-65, females aged 18-60. The sample is split up...

  20. [Age dynamics of population gene pool of the Crimean pine (Pinus pallasiana D. Don) in Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Mudrik, E A; Krasnoshtan, O V; Velikorid'ko, T I; Kalafat, L A; Podgornyĭ, D Iu

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphism of young (14-16 years), middle-aged (70-80 years) and old (120-150 years) plants and their seed embryos has been studied using 20 and 10 allozyme loci correspondingly in the population of Pinus pallasiana D. Don from Mountain Crimea. It was revealed that the old-aged trees had significantly lower level of expected heterozygosity than the young plants. The level of observed heterozygosity of embryos of the uneven-aged plants was slightly different among the embryo samples and significantly lower than in the samples of maternal trees. Supernumerary homozygotation of the embryos is caused by low level of cross-pollination in three studied samples of plants (t(m) = 0,537-0,637).

  1. Dynamics of telomere length in different age groups in a Latvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zole, Egija; Pliss, Liana; Ranka, Renate; Krumina, Astrida; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-12-01

    The shortening of telomeres with ageing is a well-documented observation; however, the reported number of nucleotides in telomeres varies between different laboratories and studies. Such variability is likely caused by ethnic differences between the populations studied. Until now, there were no studies that investigated the variability of telomere length in a senescent Latvian population of the most common mitochondrial haplogroups, defined as H (45%), U (25%), Y chromosomal N1c (40%) and R1a1 (40%). Telomere length was determined in 121 individuals in different age groups, including a control group containing individuals of 20-40 years old and groups of individuals between 60-70 years old, 71-80 years old, 81-90 years old, and above 90 years old. Telomere length was determined using the Southern blot telomeric restriction fragment assay (TRF). Decreased telomere length with ageing was confirmed, but a comparison of centenarians and individuals between 60-90 years of age did not demonstrate a significant difference in telomere length. However, significant variability in telomere length was observed in the control group, indicating probable rapid telomere shortening in some individuals that could lead up to development of health status decline appearing with ageing. Telomere length measured in mononuclear blood cells (MNC) was compared with the telomere length measured in whole peripheral white blood cells (WBC) using TRF. Telomere length in MNC was longer than in WBC for the control group with individuals 20 to 40 years old; in contrast, for the group of individuals aged 65 to 85 years old, measured telomere length was shorter in MNC when compared to WBC.

  2. Weight status at age 18 influences marriage prospects. A population-based study of Swedish men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kark Malin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a longitudinal population-based study of the relationship between body mass index (BMI in early adulthood and marital status at 40 years of age, obese men were half as likely to be married compared with men of normal weight. Significant associations between obesity and marital status among men in a longitudinal setting are novel findings. Methods The study cohort comprised Swedish men born from 1951 to 1961. Height and weight at age 18 was gathered from the Military Service Conscription Register and information on marital status at 40 years of age was obtained from population registers by record-linkage using the unique personal identification number. The odds ratio (OR for being married was calculated by polytomous logistic regression analysis adjusting for birth year, intellectual performance, education, country of birth, residential area, socioeconomic position in childhood and adulthood, parental education and muscle strength. Results Our study included 486 599 Swedish men. Young men who were obese (BMI≥30.0 at 18 years of age had an OR of 0.49 (95% CI: 0.46–0.52 for being married at 40 years of age compared to normal weight men (BMI: 18.5–24.9. Underweight men (BMI≤18.5 had an OR of 0.84 (0.82–0.86 and overweight men (BMI: 25.0–29.9 had an OR of 0.83 (0.80–0.85 for being married at 40 years of age. Conclusion Underweight, overweight and obese men were less likely to be married than their normal weight counterparts. Obese men had the lowest likelihood of being married. Stigmatization and discrimination may partly explain these findings, but further research is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  3. Prevalence of self-reported food allergy in different age groups of georgian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomidze, N; Gotua, M

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies in high income countries suggested that a big proportion of the population in Europe and America report adverse reactions to food. Self-reported prevalence of food allergy varied from 1.2% to 17% for milk, 0.2% to 7% for egg, 0% to 2% for peanuts and fish, 0% to 10% for shellfish, and 3% to 35% for any food. The aim of our study was to report the prevalence of self-reported food allergy in the different age groups of Georgian population and to reveal the most common self-reported food allergens. ISAAC phase III study methodology and questionnaires were used for data collection. Questions about food allergy were added to the survey and involved questions about self-reported food allergy. 6-7 years old 6140 children (response rate-94,5%) and 13-14 years old 5373 adolescents (response rate-86,9%) from two locations of Georgia, Tbilisi and Kutaisi were surveyed. 500 randomly assessed adults from Tbilisi aged 18 years and older were added later (response rate-97,6%). Findings revealed that self-reported food allergy among 6-7 years old age group and 13-14 years old age were almost the same (15,7% and 15,9% correspondingly) and slightly lower in adult population - 13,9%. Study revealed, that hen's egg was the commonest implicated food for 6-7 years age group, hazel nut - for 13-14 years old age group followed by hen's egg. Walnut and hazel nut were most reported foods for adult population. The findings also revealed that food allergy is one of the most important risk factor for symptoms associated with asthma (OR-3,05; 95%CI 2.50-3.74), rhinoconjunctivitis (OR-2,85; 95%CI 2.24-3.64) and eczema (OR-5,42; 95%CI 4.08-7.18) in childhood. The data has provided the first epidemiological information related to food allergy among children and adults in Georgia. Results should serve as baseline information for food allergy screening, diagnosis and treatment. Our findings can also inform the public health officials on the disease burden and may offer some

  4. Can risk and illness perceptions predict breast cancer worry in healthy women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrea; Groarke, AnnMarie

    2016-09-01

    Predictors of breast cancer worry in healthy women remain unclear. Healthy women less than 50 years (N = 857) completed measures of family history, anxiety, absolute and comparative risk perceptions, illness perceptions, and breast cancer worry. Regression analyses revealed that having a family history of breast cancer, greater anxiety, higher absolute risk perceptions and negative illness perceptions predicted 45 per cent of the variance in breast cancer worry. Risk perceptions also partially mediated the relationship between illness perceptions and worry. This study provides novel evidence that both illness and risk perceptions are predictors of breast cancer worry in younger women from the community.

  5. Worrying about the LHC, a lesson from astrophysics?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    To worry about the LHC is a popular sport. I shall share my own worries, hopefully original, and do it via a parable (for this method, I can quote earlier authors). The parable concerns a topic in astrophysics (gamma-ray bursts) which happens to be a simple exercise --but quite an interesting one-- on elementary particle-physics and beam dynamics, topics not unrelated to the LHC. Though most of the talk will be dedicated to the physics and, in particular, to its recent developments, the allegory will allow me to detect what, I shall argue, may be dangerous 'viruses' invading science. I do not have the decisive antidotes, but I shall discuss some possible ones.

  6. Population Estimates of School Age Language Minorities and Limited English Proficiency Children of the United States, 1979-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Jorge

    Estimates of the school-age, 5-17-year-old, language minority and Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) populations in the United States are discussed. The estimates are based on the population counts for first, second, and third generation Hispanics, Anglos, Asians, and Blacks derived from the June 1988 Current Population Survey. The language minority…

  7. Distress Tolerance and Pathological Worry: Tests of Incremental and Prospective Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macatee, Richard J; Capron, Daniel W; Guthrie, Whitney; Schmidt, Norman B; Cougle, Jesse R

    2015-07-01

    Pathological worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have been linked with low distress tolerance (DT), although questions remain including whether this association exists independent of depression and comorbidity, the directionality of the relationship between worry and DT, and DT's nonredundancy with other worry-relevant variables (i.e., emotional reactivity, stressful life events). Further, it is unclear whether DT is merely a correlate of excessive worry or acts as a risk factor for its development. Two independent studies were completed to evaluate these questions. In Study 1, DT was examined in patients with GAD and healthy controls. In Study 2, a nonclinical sample completed baseline measures of DT, negative affect, and worry, as well as daily assessments of these constructs and stressors for 1month. In Study 1, lower DT was associated with GAD diagnosis and greater worry symptoms independent of extent of comorbidity and depressive symptoms. In Study 2, lower baseline DT predicted unique variance in daily worry and increases in worry over time, whereas baseline worry did not predict daily DT or decreases in DT 1month later. Findings suggest that low DT plays a role in excessive worry independent of relevant covariates (i.e., comorbidity, emotional reactivity, stressful life events) and that this relationship is unidirectional. Further, preliminary evidence indicates that low DT may be an overall risk factor for the development of worry, particularly during periods of romantic stress, although further research and replication is required.

  8. Craniofacial morphology in Austrian Early Bronze Age populations reflects sex-specific migration patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Alessandro; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Bookstein, Fred; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    The Early Bronze Age (2.300-1.500 BC) in lower Austria consists of three synchronous regional manifestations (Únetice, Unterwölbling, and Wieselburg cultures). The bearers of these cultures inhabited a relatively small geographic area and shared similar ecological conditions, but previous studies revealed population differences in skeletal morphology. We analyzed the cranial morphology of 171 individuals of these populations with a geometric morphometric approach in order to compare different migration scenarios. We find significant mean form differences between populations and between sexes. In a principal component analysis, the Wieselburg population, located southwest of the Danube, largely separates from the Únetice population north of the Danube, whereas the southwestern Unterwölbling group, which played a central role in trading bronze objects, overlaps with both. The Böheimkirchen group, inhabiting the southwestern Danubian area in the later phase of the Early Bronze Age, differs from the chronologically older Unterwölbling group. Geographic distance between six sites and position relative to the river Danube accounted for 64% of form distance variation; the effect of the river Danube was considerably larger than hat of geographic distance per se. As predicted for a patrilocal system in which females have a larger marriage domain than males, we found that female mean forms are more similar to each other than male mean forms. Geographic conditions explained more than twice as much variation in females as in males, suggesting that female migration was more affected by geographical constraints than male migration was.

  9. Modern health worries - the dark side of spirituality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köteles, Ferenc; Simor, Péter; Czető, Márton; Sárog, Noémi; Szemerszky, Renáta

    2016-08-01

    Modern health worries (MHWs) are widespread in modern societies. MHWs were connected to both negative and positive psychological characteristics in previous studies. The study aimed to investigate the relationships among intuitive-experiential information processing style, spirituality, MHWs, and psychological well-being. Members of the Hungarian Skeptic Society (N = 128), individuals committed to astrology (N = 601), and people from a non-representative community sample (N = 554) completed questionnaires assessing intuitive-experiential information processing style, spirituality, modern health worries (MHWs), and psychological well-being. Astrologers showed higher levels of spirituality, intuitive-experiential thinking, and modern health worries than individuals from the community sample; and skeptics scored even lower than the latter group with respect to all three constructs. Within the community sample, medium level connections between measures of spirituality and the experiential thinking style, and weak to medium level correlations between spirituality and MHWs were found. The connection between MHWs and experiential thinking style was completely mediated by spirituality. Individuals with higher levels of spirituality are particularly vulnerable to overgeneralized messages on health related risks. Official communication of potential risks based on rational scientific reasoning is not appropriate to persuade them as it has no impact on the intuitive-experiential system.

  10. Emotional Control Mediates the Association Between Dimensions of Perfectionism and Worry in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affrunti, Nicholas W; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2017-02-01

    Previous research has shown that perfectionism predicts for increased worry in children. Theoretically, children with high levels of perfectionism may show a decreased ability to control their emotions during times of perceived failure. Children may then worry as a maladaptive attempt to cope with intense emotions. The current study sought to test the mediating role of emotional control on the relation between perfectionism dimensions and worry in children. Participants were 66 parent-child dyads. Children were 7-13 years (50 % male; 77.3 % Caucasian, 9.1 % African American). Overall the model fit the data well. Results indicated that perfectionism domains predicted for emotional control deficits and increased worry. Emotional control also partially mediated the relation between perfectionism dimensions and worry. These results suggest that emotional control may be one mechanism through which perfectionism exerts its effect on worry and perfectionistic children may worry due to difficulty controlling their emotional responses.

  11. Providing Preoperative Information for Children Undergoing Surgery: A Randomized Study Testing Different Types of Educational Material to Reduce Children's Preoperative Worries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, S. C.; Arriaga, P.; Esteves, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study developed three types of educational preoperative materials and examined their efficacy in preparing children for surgery by analysing children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety. The sample was recruited from three hospitals in Lisbon and consisted of 125 children, aged 8-12 years, scheduled to undergo outpatient surgery.…

  12. Providing Preoperative Information for Children Undergoing Surgery: A Randomized Study Testing Different Types of Educational Material to Reduce Children's Preoperative Worries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, S. C.; Arriaga, P.; Esteves, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study developed three types of educational preoperative materials and examined their efficacy in preparing children for surgery by analysing children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety. The sample was recruited from three hospitals in Lisbon and consisted of 125 children, aged 8-12 years, scheduled to undergo outpatient surgery. The…

  13. Age estimation using development of third molars in South Indian population: A radiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadharshini, K. Indra; Idiculla, Jose Joy; Sivapathasundaram, B.; Mohanbabu, V.; Augustine, Dominic; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the estimation of chronological age based on the stages of third molar development following the eight stages (A–H) method of Demirjian et al. in Chennai population of South India. Materials and Methods: A sample consisting of 848 individuals (471 males and 377 females) aged between 14 and 30 years was randomly selected for the clinical evaluation and 323 orthopantomograms with clinically missing third molars were taken for radiological evaluation using Demirjian's method from a Chennai population of known chronological age and sex. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's Chi-square test and mean values were compared between the study groups using t-test or analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's highly significant difference (HSD). In the present study, P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The results showed that the mean age of having clinically completely erupted maxillary third molars was 22.41 years in male subjects and 23.81 years in female subjects and that of mandibular third molars was 21.49 years in male subjects and 23.34 years in female subjects. Mandibular third molars were clinically missing more often in females than in males. Eruption of mandibular third molars was generally ahead of the emergence of maxillary third molars into the oral cavity. Third molar development between male and female subjects showed statistically significant differences at calcification stage F and stage G in maxillary third molars and stage F in mandibular third molars (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There are differences indicating that maxillary and mandibular third molar eruption reached Demirjian's formation stages earlier in males than in females. It is suggested that in future studies, to increase the accuracy of age determination, indications of sexual maturity and ossification should also be evaluated in addition to third molar mineralization. PMID:25984465

  14. Does age modify the relationship between morbidity severity and physical health in English and Dutch family practice populations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, U.T.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lewis, M.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Vet, H.C. de; Bouter, L.M.; Croft, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the co-influences of age and morbidity severity on physical health in adult family practice populations. METHODS: Morbidity data in a 12-month period for 7,833 older English consulters aged 50 years and over and 6,846 Dutch consulters aged 18 years and over was linked to thei

  15. A synthetic circuit for selectively arresting daughter cells to create aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Bruno; Silver, Pamela A; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M

    2010-05-01

    The ability to engineer genetic programs governing cell fate will permit new safeguards for engineered organisms and will further the biological understanding of differentiation and aging. Here, we have designed, built and implemented a genetic device in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls cell-cycle progression selectively in daughter cells. The synthetic device was built in a modular fashion by combining timing elements that are coupled to the cell cycle, i.e. cell-cycle specific promoters and protein degradation domains, and an enzymatic domain which conditionally confers cell arrest. Thus, in the presence of a drug, the device is designed to arrest growth of only newly-divided daughter cells in the population. Indeed, while the engineered cells grow normally in the absence of drug, with the drug the engineered cells display reduced, linear growth on the population level. Fluorescence microscopy of single cells shows that the device induces cell arrest exclusively in daughter cells and radically shifts the age distribution of the resulting population towards older cells. This device, termed the 'daughter arrester', provides a blueprint for more advanced devices that mimic developmental processes by having control over cell growth and death.

  16. Ages and metallicities for quiescent galaxies in the Shapley Supercluster: Driving parameters of the stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Russell J; Hudson, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    We use high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for a sample of 232 quiescent galaxies in the Shapley Supercluster, to investigate how their stellar populations depend on velocity dispersion, luminosity and stellar mass. The sample spans a large range in velocity dispersion (sigma from 30-300 km/s) and in luminosity (M_R from -18.7 to -23.2). Estimates of age, total metallicity (Z/H) and alpha-element abundance ratio (a/Fe) were derived from absorption-line analysis, using single-burst models. Age, Z/H and a/Fe are all correlated positively with velocity dispersion, but we also find significant residual trends with luminosity: at given sigma, the brighter galaxies are younger, less alpha-enriched, and have higher Z/H. At face value, these results might suggest that the stellar populations depend on stellar mass as well as on velocity dispersion. However, we show that the observed trends can be reproduced by models in which the stellar populations depend systematically only on sigma, and are independent of stellar ma...

  17. Brain tissue volumes in the general population of the elderly: the AGES-Reykjavik study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Aspelund, Thor; Forsberg, Lars; Fredriksson, Jesper; Kjartansson, Olafur; Oskarsdottir, Bryndis; Jonsson, Palmi V; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Zijdenbos, Alex; van Buchem, Mark A; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2012-02-15

    Imaging studies have reported conflicting findings on how brain structure differs with age and sex. This may be explained by discrepancies and limitations in study population and study design. We report a study on brain tissue volumes in one of the largest cohorts of individuals studied to date of subjects with high mean age (mean ± standard deviation (SD) 76 ± 6 years). These analyses are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans acquired at baseline on 4303 non-demented elderly, and 367 who had a second MRI, on average 2.5 ± 0.2 years later. Tissue segmentation was performed with an automatic image analysis pipeline. Total brain parenchymal (TBP) volume decreased with increasing age while there was an increase in white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in both sexes. A reduction in both normal white matter (NWM)- and gray matter (GM) volume contributed to the brain shrinkage. After adjusting for intra-cranial volume, women had larger brain volumes compared to men (3.32%, p < 0.001) for TBP volume in the cross-sectional analysis. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant age-sex interaction in TBP volume with a greater rate of annual change in men (-0.70%, 95%CI: -0.78% to -0.63%) than women (-0.55%, 95%CI: -0.61% to -0.49%). The annual change in the cross-sectional data was approximately 40% less than the annual change in the longitudinal data and did not show significant age-sex interaction. The findings indicate that the cross-sectional data underestimate the rate of change in tissue volumes with age as the longitudinal data show greater rate of change in tissue volumes with age for all tissues.

  18. Age-dependent vitreous separation from the macula in a clinic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Z

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zahid Syed,1 Michael W Stewart2 1Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo School of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA Background: Vitreous degeneration begins soon after birth and accelerates throughout life. Vitreous liquefaction with a slowly progressive separation of the posterior hyaloid from the peripheral macula usually leads to complete posterior vitreous detachment. The purpose of this study is to measure the age-related prevalence of partial vitreous separation and the length of residual vitreous adhesion in an ophthalmology clinic population. Methods: Patients examined by the senior author (MWS during a 6-month period were included in a retrospective chart review. Demographic data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan results were gathered. Data analysis with descriptive statistics focused on the prevalence and extent of partial vitreous separation. Results: The mean age of the study patients was 69.9 years, and 62% were phakic. The highest prevalence of partial posterior hyaloid separation from the internal limiting membrane (71.2% was seen in the 50- to 54-year age group. This prevalence rate steadily decreased to 5.6% in the 95- to 99-year age group. The prevalence of complete vitreous detachment as determined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy increased from 1.7% in the <50-year age group to a maximum of 29.2% in the 75- to 79-year group. The length of vitreomacular adhesion averaged 4.6 mm in the 50- to 54-year age group and steadily decreased to 2.1 mm in the 90- to 95-year group. Conclusion: Vitreomacular separation affects the majority of eyes in the sixth decade of life. The prevalence of partial vitreous separation decreases with advancing age, probably because an increasing number of these patients progress to complete posterior vitreous detachment. Keywords: optical coherence tomography, posterior hyaloid, posterior vitreous detachment, syneresis, vitreomacular adhesion, vitreous

  19. Two distinct halo populations in the solar neighborhood. III. Evidence from stellar ages and orbital parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, William J; Nissen, Poul E; Pichardo, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In Papers I and II of this series, the existence of two distinct halo populations of stars have been found in the solar neighborhood. Precise relative ages and orbital parameters are determined for 67 halo and 16 thick-disk stars having metallicities in the range -1.4 < [Fe/H] < -0.4 to better understand the context of the two halo populations in the formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Ages are derived by comparing the positions of stars in the logT_{eff}-log(g) diagram with isochrones from the Y^2 models interpolated to the exact [Fe/H] and [alpha/Fe] values of each star. Possible systematic errors in T_{eff} and log(g) are considered and corrected. With space velocities from Paper I as initial conditions, orbital integrations have been carried out using a detailed, observationally constrained Milky Way model including a bar and spiral arms. The `high-alpha' halo stars have ages 2-3 Gyr larger than the `low-alpha' ones. The orbital parameters show very distinct differences between the `high-alpha' a...

  20. White noise and synchronization shaping the age structure of the human population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrat, Stanislaw; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Bonkowska, Katarzyna; Kula, Mateusz

    2007-06-01

    We have modified the standard diploid Penna model of ageing in such a way that instead of threshold of defective loci resulting in genetic death of individuals, the fluctuation of environment and "personal" fluctuations of individuals were introduced. The sum of the both fluctuations describes the health status of the individual. While environmental fluctuations are the same for all individuals in the population, the personal component of fluctuations is composed of fluctuations corresponding to each physiological function (gene, genetic locus). It is rather accepted hypothesis that physiological parameters of any organism fluctuate highly nonlinearly. Transition to the synchronized behaviors could be a very strong diagnostic signal of the life threatening disorder. Thus, in our model, mutations of genes change the chaotic fluctuations representing the function of a wild gene to the synchronized signals generated by mutated genes. Genes are switched on chronologically, like in the standard Penna model. Accumulation of defective genes predicted by Medawar's theory of ageing leads to the replacement of uncorrelated white noise corresponding to the healthy organism by the correlated signals of defective functions. As a result we have got the age distribution of population corresponding to the human demographic data.

  1. Education, Elderly Health, and Differential Population Aging in South Korea: A Demographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongoh Kye

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Population aging proceeds with other socioeconomic developments, including educational expansion. Improvements in educational attainment lead to changes in demographic behaviors such as assortative mating, fertility, and the intergenerational transmission of education, which change the health of the elderly and the education of their offspring generation. Objective: We examine such a jointly-changing process in South Korea. Methods: We apply a recursive demographic model (Mare and Maralani 2006 by using the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA. Results: First, improvements in education lead to improvements in health among the elderly. Intermediate demographic factors make positive contributions to this improvement. Second, improvements in education lead to a decline in the ratios of offspring to the elderly because better-educated people have fewer children. However, this decrease is not substantial. Third, improvements in education increase the ratio of college-educated offspring to the unhealthy elderly because of improvements in both offspring's education and elderly health. Conclusions: The results suggest that improvements in education change configurations of the elderly and their offspring's generations, mitigating the negative consequences of population aging, such as increasing burdens of elderly support.

  2. The chronological age estimation of third molar mineralization of Han population in southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Maofeng; Qiu, Lihua; Gao, Zhi; Bhandari, Kishor

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the chronology of third molar mineralization in Han population of southwestern China and find its unique characteristics so that it would provide a reference in several legal cases like forensic age estimation. The study used Demirjian's staging method to study 2192 orthopantomograms of 984 male and 1208 female subjects aged between 8 and 25 years. The statistical data was analyzed by Student's t test and ANOVA. The conclusions of the study are: (1) The chronological mineralization age of third molars of Han population in Southwestern China is similar to the Turkish and the Japanese, was earlier than the Austrian and Han of South China, but later than the Spanish. (2) The mineralization timing of the third molars between two sides in maxilla or mandible has no significant differences in the same gender group. (3) There is no significant difference in mineralization of third molars between male and female, except for tooth 48 in Demirjian's stage E. (4) The mineralization of third molar in maxilla is earlier than mandible.

  3. Gestational Age at Birth and 'Body-Mind' Health at 5 Years of Age: A Population Based Cohort Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified the effects of prematurity on the neonate\\'s physical health, however few studies have explored the effects of prematurity on both the physical and mental health of the child as they develop. Secondary analysis of data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a longitudinal study of infants (n = 18 818, born 2000-2002 in the United Kingdom) was performed. Effects of gestational age at birth on health outcomes at 5 years were measured using parental rating of their children\\'s general health and severity of behavior problems. The association between parent\\'s general health ratings and behavior problem ratings was low: 86% of those reporting serious behavior problems (5% of the sample, n = 764) rated their child as being in excellent, very good, or good health. Still, a gradient of increasing risk of poorer outcome with decreasing gestational age was observed for a composite health measure (poor\\/fair health and\\/or serious behavior problems), suggesting an association with prematurity for this composite assessment of health status. The greatest contribution to the childhood composite health measure at 5 years was for children born at 32-36 weeks gestation: population attributable fractions for having poor outcomes was 3.4% (Bonferroni-adjusted 95% confidence interval 1.1%-6.2%), compared to 1% (0.2-2.3) for birth at less than 32 weeks. Results suggest that preterm children, by school entry, are not only at high risk of physical health problems, but also of behavioral health problems. The recognition of, and response to comprehensive health and well-being outcomes related to prematurity are important in order to correctly plan and deliver adequate paediatric health services and policies.

  4. A Dengue Vaccination Model for Immigrants in a Two-Age-Class Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengki Tasman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a model of dengue transmission with some vaccination programs for immigrants. We classify the host population into child and adult classes, in regards to age structure, and into susceptible, infected and recovered compartments, in regards to disease status. Since migration plays important role in disease transmission, we include immigration and emigration factors into the model which are distributed in each compartment. Meanwhile, the vector population is divided into susceptible, exposed, and infectious compartments. In the case when there is no incoming infected immigrant, we obtain the basic reproduction ratio as a threshold parameter for existence and stability of disease-free and endemic equilibria. Meanwhile, in the case when there are some incoming infected immigrants, we obtain only endemic equilibrium. This indicates that screening for the immigrants is important to ensure the effectiveness of the disease control.

  5. Belief in the paranormal and modern health worries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utinans A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been found, that despite the improvement of the objective health indicators, people's subjective perception of health is that health indicators are getting worse (Barsky A.J., 1988, which is one of the reasons why a new term “modern health worries” is coming into use in medical literature (Petrie K.J., Wessely S., 2002. People are worried and scared of the effect of new high tech innovations (effect of cell phone radiation, environmental pollution, ozone layer depletion, etc., changes in manufacturing of food products (genetically modified food, food concentrates etc.. Nowadays, many people, being worried about their health, turn to new eating habits (veganism, defend themselves against various innovations in the health system (vaccination, etc. It could be defined as fear of consequences of scientific progress. The reason of fear is not only the misunderstanding of scientific innovations. Quite often, it is a belief in pseudoscientific theories (for example, “conspiracy” or belief in the paranormal phenomena (karma violations, disruption of the cosmic plan. In a part of cases protesters against vaccines and genetically modified food belong to new religious movements which are based on belief in the paranormal and magical thinking. Magical thinking predisposes to the negative attitude towards scientific assumptions and innovations, like a genetically modified food (Saher, 2006. Aim of study. To study the correlation between pseudoscientific assumptions, belief in the paranormal and modern health worries. This condition of modern health worries is becoming important for health care system. It causes the increase in the number of symptoms (Koteles et al., 2011, which, in its turn, increases the doctors' visit rate on one hand (Rief W et al., 2012, but, on the other hand, increases evasion to attend traditional medical care activities. Part of supporters of pseudoscientific beliefs experiences anxiety as to the bad food toxins

  6. Does Worrying Mean Caring Too Much? Interpersonal Prototypicality of Dimensional Worry Controlling for Social Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Thane M; Newman, Michelle G; Siebert, Erin C; Carlile, Jessica A; Scarsella, Gina M; Abelson, James L

    2016-01-01

    Worry, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms are dimensions that have each been linked to heterogeneous problems in interpersonal functioning. However, the relationships between these symptoms and interpersonal difficulties remain unclear given that most studies have examined diagnostic categories, not accounted for symptoms' shared variability due to general distress, and investigated only interpersonal problems (neglecting interpersonal traits, interpersonal goals, social behavior in daily life, and reports of significant others). To address these issues, students (Study 1; N=282) endorsed symptoms and interpersonal circumplex measures of traits and problems, as well as event-contingent social behaviors during one week of naturalistic daily interactions (N=184; 7,036 records). Additionally, depressed and anxious patients (N=47) reported symptoms and interpersonal goals in a dyadic relationship, and significant others rated patients' interpersonal goals and impact (Study 2). We derived hypotheses about prototypical interpersonal features from theories about the functions of particular symptoms and social behaviors. As expected, worry was uniquely associated with prototypically affiliative tendencies across all self-report measures in both samples, but predicted impacting significant others in unaffiliative ways. As also hypothesized, social anxiety was uniquely and prototypically associated with low dominance across measures, and general distress was associated with cold-submissive tendencies. Findings for depressive symptoms provided less consistent evidence for unique prototypical interpersonal features. Overall, results suggest the importance of multimethod assessment and accounting for general distress in interpersonal models of worry, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms.

  7. Stability analysis of age-structured population equations by pseudospectral differencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Dimitri; Cusulin, Caterina; Iannelli, Mimmo; Maset, Stefano; Vermiglio, Rossana

    2007-05-01

    In this paper a numerical scheme to investigate the stability of linear models of age-structured population dynamics is studied. The method is based on the discretization of the infinitesimal generator associated to the semigroup of the solution operator by using pseudospectral differencing techniques, hence following the approach recently proposed in Breda et al. [SIAM J Sci Comput 27(2): 482-495, 2005] for delay differential equations. The method computes the rightmost characteristic roots and it is shown to converge with spectral accuracy behavior.

  8. Changing epidemiology and clinical issues arising in an ageing cystic fibrosis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Michael D; Parkins, Vicky M; Rendall, Jackie C; Elborn, Stuart

    2011-04-01

    Improvements in the quality and implementation of medical care for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have resulted in a dramatic improvement in survival. Many of these strategies have focused on the effective management of pulmonary disease which has delayed its manifestations into later years. With an increasing number of patients surviving to later years the impact of chronic inflammation and nutritional compromise on other organ systems over a lifetime are increasingly manifest. This review highlights the changing epidemiology of the ageing CF population and the complications that may ensue.

  9. Constraining stellar population models - I. Age, metallicity, and abundance pattern compilation for Galactic globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Roediger, Joel C; Graves, Genevieve; Schiavon, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    We present an extenstive literature compilation of age, metallicity, and chemical abundance pattern information for the 41 Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) studied by Schiavon et al. (2005). Our compilation constitutes a notable improvement over previous similar work, particularly in terms of chemical abundances. Its primary purpose is to enable detailed evaluations of and refinements to stellar population synthesis models designed to recover the above information for unresolved stellar systems based on their integrated spectra. However, since the Schiavon sample spans a wide range of the known GGC parameter space, our compilation may also benefit investigations related to a variety of astrophysical endeavours, such as the early formation of the Milky Way, the chemical evolution of GGCs, and stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. For instance, we confirm with our compiled data that the GGC system has a bimodal metallicity distribution and is uniformly enhanced in the alpha-elements. When paired with the ages...

  10. Role of nursing personnel in the system of medical and social care for aged population

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    Chunakova V.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: The analysis of accessibility and quality of providing medical and social care for aged population. Methods: The analysis of the work of institutions of medical and social care has been carried out. According to the time-study of the working day of nurses the characteristics of nursing personnel have been determined. Results: Data on the arrangement of medical aid at home for aged patients of the Saratov region have been provided. The importance of nursing personnel in the system of complex medical and social care has been assessed and the main areas of nursing activity have been found out. Conclusion: The article has been stated that creation of quality control system for nursing personnel is of great necessity to provide effective medical and social care.

  11. Validation of the Worry about Sexual Outcomes Scale for Use in STI/HIV Prevention Interventions for Adolescent Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Jessica M.; Spitalnick, Josh; Milhausen, Robin R.; Wingood, Gina M.; Diclemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of a new scale to measure adolescents' worry regarding outcomes of risky sexual behavior (i.e. sexually transmitted infections, including HIV [STI/HIV], and unintended pregnancy). The 10-item worry about sexual outcomes (WASO) scale, resulting in two subscales STI/HIV worry and pregnancy worry, was…

  12. Changing patterns of tobacco use in a middle-aged population – the role of snus, gender, age, and education

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    Margareta Norberg

    2011-06-01

    use from baseline until follow-up and this was mainly due to a smoking cessation rate of < 1% a year. Snus use was started by 6.2% of the 30-year-old women (age at baseline, and this contributed to a stable prevalence of total tobacco use in this group. Seventy percent of baseline snus users still used snus at follow-up. Among smokers, 55% continued smoking, 12% of men and 7% of women switched to snus. Among those with dual tobacco use at baseline, a third of men and a fourth of women remained dual users 10 years later. Conclusion : There are increasing differences in tobacco use between educational groups. Higher smoking and snus use prevalence are found among those with basic education, and this is most pronounced in the younger group of this middle-aged population. In spite of a higher prevalence of smoking without snus use among women, total smoking prevalence is similar in men and women due to a higher prevalence of dual tobacco use, i.e. snus and cigarettes, among men. The increase in snus use is being paralleled by a slight increase in dual use and the smoking prevalence does not seem to be influenced by snus. This should be the subject of further studies and also have implications for tobacco control policies.

  13. Age-related changes in central corneal thickness in normal eyes among the adult Lithuanian population

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    Galgauskas S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Saulius Galgauskas,1 Grazina Juodkaite,1 Janina Tutkuviene2 1Center of Eye Diseases, 2Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Anthropology, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania Background: The purpose of this study was to estimate mean central corneal thickness (CCT and determine whether there are any correlations between CCT, age, and sex in the adult ­Lithuanian population.Methods: A total of 1,650 Caucasians of Lithuanian origin (aged 18–89 years comprising 688 (41.7% men and 962 (58.3% women were examined. Subjects were stratified by age into seven groups. CCT was measured using ultrasonic pachymetry. Correlations between CCT, age, and sex were sought.Results: Mean (± standard deviation CCT for both eyes was 544.6±30.5 µm. Mean CCT was 545.2±30.5 µm in the left eye and 544.6±30.5 µm in the right eye, and was 545.0±25.6 µm in men and 544.4±33.5 µm in women. Mean CCT was 550.8±35.7 µm in subjects aged 18–29 years, 557.5±27.6 µm in those aged 30–39 years, 551.3±31.4 µm in those aged 50–59 years, 544.0±31.4 µm in those aged 50–59 years, 544.2±31.6 µm in those aged 60–79 years, 535.1±27.8 µm in those aged 70–79 years, and 530.1±16.8 µm in those aged 80–89 years. No statistically significant difference in CCT was found between the sexes (P>0.05. However, there was a significant difference in subjects aged 18–29 years; men had higher CCT than women (P<0.05. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between CCT and age (r=−0.263, P<0.05 that was stronger in men (r=−0.406, P<0.05 than in women (r=−0.118, P<0.05. Conclusion: The mean CCT in adult Lithuanians was 544.6±30.5 µm, of the left eye 545.2±30.5 µm and of the right – 544.6±30.5 µm. CCT of the right eye was equal to the CCT of both eyes. Mean CCT was 545.0±25.6 µm in men and 544.4±33.5 µm in women. Young men tended to have higher CCT than women. CCT decreases over the

  14. Age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis angles in an elderly Japanese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryouta; Ono, Yuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar kyphosis and the decreased mobility of the lumbar spine increase the risk of falls and impair both the quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. However, in the elderly Japanese population, little is known about the age-related changes and sex-related differences in muscle strength, including of the upper and lower extremities and back extensors. An adequate kyphotic or lordotic angle has also not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis in 252 males and 320 females ≥50 years of age. Grip, back extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor strength; thoracic and lumbar kyphosis; and spinal inclination in the neutral standing position were assessed, together with the range of motion of the thoracic and lumbar spine and spinal inclination. Grip strength, back extensor strength, and the strength of the hip flexors and knee extensors decreased significantly with aging, both in males (P<0.0001) and in females (P=0.0015 to P<0.0001). The lumbar but not the thoracic kyphosis angle decreased significantly with aging, only in females (P<0.0001). Spinal inclination increased significantly with aging in both males (P=0.002) and females (P<0.0001). Back extensor strength and the thoracic kyphosis angle were significant variables influencing the lumbar kyphosis angle in both sexes. Spinal inclination correlated significantly with both the lumbar kyphosis angle and hip flexor strength in males, as well as with the lumbar kyphosis angle in females.

  15. Mortality forecast from gastroduodenal ulcer disease for different gender and age population groups in Ukraine

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    Duzhiy I.D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Until 2030 the ulcer mortality will have a growing trend as estimated by the World Health Organization. Detection of countries and population groups with high risks for the ulcer mortality is possible using forecast method. The authors made a forecast of mortality rate from complicated ulcer disease in males and females and their age groups (15-24, 25-34, 35-54, 55-74, over 75, 15 - over 75 in our country. The study included data of the World Health Organization Database from 1991 to 2012. The work analyzed absolute all-Ukrainian numbers of persons of both genders died from the ulcer causes (К25-К27 coded by the 10th International Diseases Classification. The relative mortality per 100 000 of alive persons of the same age was calculated de novo. The analysis of distribution laws and their estimation presents a trend of growth of the relative mortality. A remarkable increase of deaths from the ulcer disease is observed in males and females of the age after 55 years old. After the age of 75 years this trend is more expressed.

  16. Predicting Successful Aging in a Population-Based Sample of Georgia Centenarians

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    Jonathan Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Used a population-based sample (Georgia Centenarian Study, GCS, to determine proportions of centenarians reaching 100 years as (1 survivors (43% of chronic diseases first experienced between 0–80 years of age, (2 delayers (36% with chronic diseases first experienced between 80–98 years of age, or (3 escapers (17% with chronic diseases only at 98 years of age or older. Diseases fall into two morbidity profiles of 11 chronic diseases; one including cardiovascular disease, cancer, anemia, and osteoporosis, and another including dementia. Centenarians at risk for cancer in their lifetime tended to be escapers (73%, while those at risk for cardiovascular disease tended to be survivors (24%, delayers (39%, or escapers (32%. Approximately half (43% of the centenarians did not experience dementia. Psychiatric disorders were positively associated with dementia, but prevalence of depression, anxiety, and psychoses did not differ significantly between centenarians and an octogenarian control group. However, centenarians were higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS than octogenarians. Consistent with our model of developmental adaptation in aging, distal life events contribute to predicting survivorship outcome in which health status as survivor, delayer, or escaper appears as adaptation variables late in life.

  17. Age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis angles in an elderly Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryouta; Ono, Yuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar kyphosis and the decreased mobility of the lumbar spine increase the risk of falls and impair both the quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. However, in the elderly Japanese population, little is known about the age-related changes and sex-related differences in muscle strength, including of the upper and lower extremities and back extensors. An adequate kyphotic or lordotic angle has also not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the age-related changes in muscle strength and spinal kyphosis in 252 males and 320 females ≥50 years of age. Grip, back extensor, hip flexor, and knee extensor strength; thoracic and lumbar kyphosis; and spinal inclination in the neutral standing position were assessed, together with the range of motion of the thoracic and lumbar spine and spinal inclination. Grip strength, back extensor strength, and the strength of the hip flexors and knee extensors decreased significantly with aging, both in males (Pstrength and the thoracic kyphosis angle were significant variables influencing the lumbar kyphosis angle in both sexes. Spinal inclination correlated significantly with both the lumbar kyphosis angle and hip flexor strength in males, as well as with the lumbar kyphosis angle in females.

  18. Population Synthesis in the Blue II. The Spectroscopic Age of 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavon, R P; Faber, S M; Rose, J A; Rose, James A.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2002-01-01

    We develop a new set of models for intermediate-metallicity single stellar populations in the blue/optical region and use those models to determine the spectroscopic age of 47 Tuc. The models are based on a moderately high-resolution (1.8 A FWHM) empirical spectral library, state-of-the-art theoretical isochrones, kindly provided by M. Salaris, and new semi-empirical calibrations between fundamental stellar parameters and observables. Model line-strengths include all corrections for deficiencies of the stellar library that are described in Paper I. We highlight the importance of correctly modeling the giant-branch LF of the cluster in order to achieve a good reproduction of the integrated spectrum; agreement between the spectroscopic age and the age based on the cluster's color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is achieved only if the observed LF is used rather than the theoretical one, which lacks AGB stars. After all corrections are made, the CMD and the spectroscopic ages (from Hgamma and Hbeta) are both ~ 11 Gyrs. ...

  19. Age-dependent expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3B in PBMCs from a large European population enrolled in the MARK-AGE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarone, Fabio; Malavolta, Marco; Calabrese, Roberta; Guastafierro, Tiziana; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Reale, Anna; Franceschi, Claudio; Capri, Miriam; Hervonen, Antti; Hurme, Mikko; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Koller, Bernhard; Bernhardt, Jürgen; Schӧn, Christiane; Slagboom, P Eline; Toussaint, Olivier; Sikora, Ewa; Gonos, Efstathios S; Breusing, Nicolle; Grune, Tilman; Jansen, Eugène; Dollé, Martijn; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Sindlinger, Thilo; Bürkle, Alexander; Zampieri, Michele; Caiafa, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in the content and patterns of DNA methylation virtually throughout the entire human lifespan. Reasons for these variations are not well understood. However, several lines of evidence suggest that the epigenetic instability in aging may be traced back to the alteration of the expression of DNA methyltransferases. Here, the association of the expression of DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3B with age has been analysed in the context of the MARK-AGE study, a large-scale cross-sectional study of the European general population. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we assessed the variation of DNMT1 and DNMT3B gene expression in more than two thousand age-stratified women and men (35-75 years) recruited across eight European countries. Significant age-related changes were detected for both transcripts. The level of DNMT1 gradually dropped with aging but this was only observed up to the age of 64 years. By contrast, the expression of DNMT3B decreased linearly with increasing age and this association was particularly evident in females. We next attempted to trace the age-related changes of both transcripts to the influence of different variables that have an impact on changes of their expression in the population, including demographics, dietary and health habits, and clinical parameters. Our results indicate that age affects the expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3B as an almost independent variable in respect of all other variables evaluated.

  20. Population ageing trends in Serbia from the beginning of the 21st century and prospects until 2061: Regional aspect

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    Penev Goran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the 2011 Census confirm that Serbia is still among countries with the oldest population in Europe. Persons aged 65+ out­numbered those under the age of 15 by 20% (17.4% versus 14.4%, and the median age was 42.7 years. Population ageing has continued, but it was slower in the intercensal period of 2002-2011 than during the 1980s and 1990s. Population ageing in Serbia has not only continued but is also widespread at all territorial levels. According to the 2011 Census, in all four statistical regions (NUTS 2, people aged 65 or older outnumbered those under the age of 15 and, in comparison to 2002, regional differences in the key indicators of population ageing increased. Heterogeneity is more present at lower territorial levels (cities/municipalities with the least favourable age structure which will be pointed out. This paper also explores trends of components of population dynamics in the intercensal period 2002-2011, as well as causal relationship with the change of the age structure. Current demographic trends (low fertility, negative natural increase, net emigration and very old age structure severely limit the spectrum of future demographic changes both in the medium and especially in the short term. The situation is particularly influenced by the entrance of the large baby boom generation in the elderly ages. Explorations of future population trends are conducted based on the author’s own demographic projections for Serbia until 2061 (revision 2014. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47006: Investigation of demographic phenomena in the function of public policies in Serbia

  1. Cancer screening in a middle-aged general population: factors associated with practices and attitudes

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    Perneger Thomas V

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with cancer screening practices and with general attitudes toward cancer screening in a general population. Methods Mailed survey of 30–60 year old residents of Geneva, Switzerland, that included questions about screening for five cancers (breast, cervix uteri, prostate, colon, skin in the past 3 years, attitudes toward screening, health care use, preventive behaviours and socio-demographic characteristics. Cancer screening practice was dichotomised as having done at least one screening test in the past 3 years versus none. Results The survey response rate was 49.3% (2301/4670. More women than men had had at least one cancer screening test in the past 3 years (83.2% vs 34.5%, p Conclusion Attitudes play an important role in cancer screening practices among middle-aged adults in the general population, independent of demographic variables (age and sex that determine in part screening recommendations. Negative attitudes were the most frequent among men and the most socio-economically disadvantaged. The moderate participation rate raises the possibility of selection bias.

  2. Increasing opportunities for the productive engagement of older adults: a response to population aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Ernest; Matz-Costa, Christina; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    "Productive aging" puts forward the fundamental view that the capacity of older adults must be better developed and utilized in activities that make economic contributions to society-working, caregiving, volunteering. It is suggested that productive engagement can lead to multiple positive ends: offsetting fiscal strains of a larger older population, contributing to the betterment of families and civil society, and maintaining the health and economic security of older adults. Advocates claim that outdated social structures and discriminatory behaviors limit participation of older adults in these important social roles as well as prevent the optimization of outcomes for older adults, families, and society. We ask two important questions: (a) How can we shape policies and programs to optimally engage the growing resources of an aging population for the sake of society and older adults themselves? and (b) How can policies pertaining to productive engagement reduce health and economic disparities? We answer these questions by first describing the current state of engagement in each of the three productive activities and summarize some current policies and programs that affect engagement. Next we highlight challenges that cross-cut productive engagement. Finally, we provide policy recommendations to address these challenges.

  3. Population spherical aberration: associations with ametropia, age, corneal curvature, and image quality

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    Kingston AC

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Amanda C Kingston,1,2 Ian G Cox11Bausch + Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USAPurpose: The aim of this analysis was to determine the total ocular wavefront aberration values of a large phakic population of physiologically normal, ametropic eyes, gathered under the same clinical protocol using the same diagnostic wavefront sensor.Materials and methods: Studies were conducted at multiple sites in Asia, North America, Europe, and Australia. A Bausch + Lomb Zywave II Wavefront Aberrometer (Rochester, NY, USA was used to measure the lower and higher order aberrations of each eye. Data analysis was conducted using linear regression analysis to determine the relationship between total spherical aberration, ametropia, age, corneal curvature, and image quality.Results: Linear regression analysis showed no correlation (r = 0.0207, P = 0.4874 between degree of ametropia and the amount of spherical aberration. There was also no correlation when the population was stratified into myopic and hyperopic refractive groups (rm = 0.0529, Pm = 0.0804 and rh = 0.1572, Ph = 0.2754. There was a statistically significant and weak positive correlation (r = 0.1962, P < 0.001 between age and the amount of spherical aberration measured in the eye; spherical aberration became more positive with increasing age. Also, there was a statistically significant and moderately positive correlation (r = 0.3611, P < 0.001 with steepness of corneal curvature; spherical aberration became more positive with increasing power of the anterior corneal surface. Assessment of image quality using optical design software (Zemax™, Bellevue, WA, USA showed that there was an overall benefit in correcting the average spherical aberration of this population.Conclusion: Analysis of this dataset provides insights into the inherent spherical aberration of a typical phakic, pre-presbyopic, population and provides the ability to

  4. Comparative QTL analysis of maize seed artificial aging between an immortalized F2 population and its corresponding RILs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Zhanhui Zhang; Zhiyuan Fu; Zonghua Liu; Yanmin Hu; Jihua Tang

    2016-01-01

    Seed aging decreases the quality and vigor of crop seeds,thereby causing substantial agricultural and economic losses in crops.To identify genetic differences in seed aging between homozygotes and heterozygotes in maize,the seeds of a set of recombinant inbred lines(RILs) and an immortalized F2(IF2) population were subjected to artificial aging treatments for 0,2,3,and 4 days under 45℃ and 85%relative humidity and seed vigor was then evaluated in a field experiment.Seed vigor of all entries tested decreased sharply with longer aging treatment and seed vigor decreased more slowly in heterozygotes than in homozygotes.Forty-nine QTL were detected for four measured seed vigor traits in the RIL(28QTL) and IF2(21 QTL) populations.Only one QTL,qGP5,was detected in both populations,indicating that the genes involved in anti-aging mechanisms differed between inbred lines and hybrids.Several QTL were identified to be responsible for multiple seed vigor traits simultaneously in the RIL and IF2 populations under artificial aging conditions.These QTL may include major genes for seed vigor or seed aging.QTL qVI4 b and qGE3 a detected in the RIL population coincided with genes ZmLOX1 and ZmPLD1 in the same respective chromosomal regions.These QTL would be useful for screening for anti-aging genes in maize breeding.

  5. Comparative QTL analysis of maize seed artificial aging between an immortalized F2 population and its corresponding RILs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Zhanhui Zhang; Zhiyuan Fu; Zonghua Liu; Yanmin Hu; Jihua Tang

    2016-01-01

    Seed aging decreases the quality and vigor of crop seeds, thereby causing substantial agricultural and economic losses in crops. To identify genetic differences in seed aging between homozygotes and heterozygotes in maize, the seeds of a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and an immortalized F2 (IF2) population were subjected to artificial aging treatments for 0, 2, 3, and 4 days under 45 ºC and 85%relative humidity and seed vigor was then evaluated in a field experiment. Seed vigor of all entries tested decreased sharply with longer aging treatment and seed vigor decreased more slowly in heterozygotes than in homozygotes. Forty-nine QTL were detected for four measured seed vigor traits in the RIL (28 QTL) and IF2 (21 QTL) populations. Only one QTL, qGP5, was detected in both populations, indicating that the genes involved in anti-aging mechanisms differed between inbred lines and hybrids. Several QTL were identified to be responsible for multiple seed vigor traits simultaneously in the RIL and IF2 populations under artificial aging conditions. These QTL may include major genes for seed vigor or seed aging. QTL qVI4b and qGE3a detected in the RIL population coincided with genes ZmLOX1 and ZmPLD1 in the same respective chromosomal regions. These QTL would be useful for screening for anti-aging genes in maize breeding.

  6. Age related differences in dynamics of specific memory B cell populations after clinical pertussis infection.

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    Inonge van Twillert

    Full Text Available For a better understanding of the maintenance of immune mechanisms to Bordetella pertussis (Bp in relation to age, we investigated the dynamic range of specific B cell responses in various age-groups at different time points after a laboratory confirmed pertussis infection. Blood samples were obtained in a Dutch cross sectional observational study from symptomatic pertussis cases. Lymphocyte subpopulations were phenotyped by flowcytometry before and after culture. Memory B (Bmem cells were differentiated into IgG antibody secreting cells (ASC by polyclonal stimulation and detected by an ELISPOT assay specific for pertussis antigens pertussis toxin (Ptx, filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA and pertactin (Prn. Bp antigen specific IgG concentrations in plasma were determined using multiplex technology. The majority of subjects having experienced a clinical pertussis episode demonstrated high levels of both Bp specific IgG and Bmem cell levels within the first 6 weeks after diagnosis. Significantly lower levels were observed thereafter. Waning of cellular and humoral immunity to maintenance levels occurred within 9 months after antigen encounter. Age was found to determine the maximum but not base-line frequencies of Bmem cell populations; higher levels of Bmem cells specific for Ptx and FHA were reached in adults and (pre- elderly compared to under-fours and schoolchildren in the first 6 weeks after Bp exposure, whereas not in later phases. This age effect was less obvious for specific IgG levels. Nonetheless, subjects' levels of specific Bmem cells and specific IgG were weakly correlated. This is the first study to show that both age and closeness to last Bp encounter impacts the size of Bp specific Bmem cell and plasma IgG levels.

  7. Healthy eating habits among the population of Serbia: gender and age differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovičić, Ana Đ

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine healthy eating habits of the population of Serbia through three dimensions: knowledge, problems, and feelings as well as to determine whether there are any differences between genders and among different age-groups. The research instrument was an Eating Habits Questionnaire (EHQ) which consisted of 35 items. There were 382 respondents involved in the study. The reliability and factor structure of the questionnaire were verified by using factor analysis. The results of MANOVA showed that there is a significant difference in the habits concerning healthy eating between men and women [F (3,378)=4.26, p=0.006; Wilks' Lambda=0.97]. When the results for the dependent variables (knowledge, problems, and feelings) were considered separately, it was determined that there is no significant difference between men and women, which confirms the results of the t-test. The effect of age on the three dimensions of healthy eating habits was examined within three age-groups, by using ANOVA. The results showed that knowledge about healthy eating increases with age [F (2,379)=6.14, p=0.002] as well as positive feelings which occur as a result of healthy eating [F (2,379)=3.66, p=0.027]. Unlike ANOVA, MANOVA showed difference among the age-groups only when it came to the 'knowledge' variable. This study is important as it shows the current state of awareness on healthy eating habits in the researched populace and may be the basis for further research in this field in Serbia.

  8. Body Acceleration as Indicator for Walking Economy in an Ageing Population.

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    Giulio Valenti

    Full Text Available In adults, walking economy declines with increasing age and negatively influences walking speed. This study aims at detecting determinants of walking economy from body acceleration during walking in an ageing population.35 healthy elderly (18 males, age 51 to 83 y, BMI 25.5±2.4 kg/m2 walked on a treadmill. Energy expenditure was measured with indirect calorimetry while body acceleration was sampled at 60Hz with a tri-axial accelerometer (GT3X+, ActiGraph, positioned on the lower back. Walking economy was measured as lowest energy needed to displace one kilogram of body mass for one meter while walking (WCostmin, J/m/kg. Gait features were extracted from the acceleration signal and included in a model to predict WCostmin.On average WCostmin was 2.43±0.42 J/m/kg and correlated significantly with gait rate (r2 = 0.21, p<0.01 and regularity along the frontal (anteroposterior and lateral (mediolateral axes (r2 = 0.16, p<0.05 and r2 = 0.12, p<0.05 respectively. Together, the three variables explained 46% of the inter-subject variance (p<0.001 with a standard error of estimate of 0.30 J/m/kg. WCostmin and regularity along the frontal and lateral axes were related to age (WCostmin: r2 = 0.44, p<0.001; regularity: r2 = 0.16, p<0.05 and r2 = 0.12, p<0.05 respectively frontal and lateral.The age associated decline in walking economy is induced by the adoption of an increased gait rate and by irregular body acceleration in the horizontal plane.

  9. Psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in old age: a prospective population-based study

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    Piirtola Maarit

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that the use of any psychotropic and the concomitant use of two or more benzodiazepines are related to an increased risk of fractures in old age. However, also controversial results exist. The aim was to describe associations between the use of a psychotropic drug, or the concomitant use of two or more of these drugs and the risk of fractures in a population aged 65 years or over. Methods This study was a part of a prospective longitudinal population-based study carried out in the municipality of Lieto, South-Western Finland. The objective was to describe gender-specific associations between the use of one psychotropic drug [benzodiazepine (BZD, antipsychotic (AP or antidepressant (AD] or the concomitant use of two or more psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in a population 65 years or over. Subjects were participants in the first wave of the Lieto study in 1990-1991, and they were followed up until the end of 1996. Information about fractures confirmed with radiology reports in 1,177 subjects (482 men and 695 women during the follow-up was collected from medical records. Two follow-up periods (three and six years were used, and previously found risk factors of fractures were adjusted as confounding factors separately for men and women. The Poisson regression model was used in the analyses. Results The concomitant use of two or more BZDs and the concomitant use of two or more APs were related to an increased risk of fractures during both follow-up periods after adjusting for confounding factors in men. No similar associations were found in women. Conclusions The concomitant use of several BZDs and that of several APs are associated with an increase in the risk of fractures in older men. Our findings show only risk relations. We cannot draw the conclusion that these drug combinations are causes of fractures.

  10. Frequency of Werner helicase 1367 polymorphism and age-related morbidity in an elderly Brazilian population

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    M.A.C. Smith

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the WRN gene. The gene was identified in 1996 and its product acts as a DNA helicase and exonuclease. Some specific WRN polymorphic variants were associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The identification of genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for complex diseases affecting older people can improve their prevention, diagnosis and prognosis. We investigated WRN codon 1367 polymorphism in 383 residents in a district of the city of São Paulo, who were enrolled in an Elderly Brazilian Longitudinal Study. Their mean age was 79.70 ± 5.32 years, ranging from 67 to 97. This population was composed of 262 females (68.4% and 121 males (31.6% of European (89.2%, Japanese (3.3%, Middle Eastern (1.81%, and mixed and/or other origins (5.7%. There are no studies concerning this polymorphism in Brazilian population. These subjects were evaluated clinically every two years. The major health problems and morbidities affecting this cohort were cardiovascular diseases (21.7%, hypertension (83.7%, diabetes (63.3%, obesity (41.23%, dementia (8.0%, depression (20.0%, and neoplasia (10.8%. Their prevalence is similar to some urban elderly Brazilian samples. DNA was isolated from blood cells, amplified by PCR and digested with PmaCI. Allele frequencies were 0.788 for the cysteine and 0.211 for the arginine. Genotype distributions were within that expected for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Female gender was associated with hypertension and obesity. Logistic regression analysis did not detect significant association between the polymorphism and morbidity. These findings confirm those from Europeans and differ from Japanese population.

  11. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding; Sun, Liguang; Yin, Xijie

    2016-09-15

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540-2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540-1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition.

  12. Blood typing profile of a school-aged population of a North Togo township.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovor, Ahoefa; Fétéké, Lochina; Kueviakoe, Irénée M; Kpatarou, Laye; Mawussi, Koffi; Magnang, Hézouwè; Ségbéna, Akuété Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of hemoglobin (Hb) variants and ABO blood groups in a school population aged 6 to 9 years in the township of Agbandé-Yaka in North Togo. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 570 children of four primary schools at Agbande-Yaka, between March and July 2010. Hemoglobin characterization was done by alkaline buffer electrophoresis and the blood types ABO-Rhesus (Rh) D by immuno-hematological methods. A Hb variant was detected in 37.0% of the schoolchildren. Among them, the AS trait accounted for 11.9% and the AC trait for 20.2%. Homozygous Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) was not found but Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) appeared at a frequency of 3.3%, while compound heterozygotes carrying Hb SC were seen at a frequency of 1.6%. The O, B and A blood groups accounted for 49.0, 26.8 and 21.9%, respectively. The Hb anomalies reached a high prevalence in this school population. These results are remarkable by the absence of homozygous Hb S individuals compared to homozygous Hb C individuals, which were as numerous as expected. The frequencies of the ABO blood groups are similar to what has been found in other West African populations.

  13. EnviroAtlas - Percentage of Working Age Population Who Are Employed by Block Group for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the employment rate, or the percent of the population aged 16-64 who have worked in the past 12 months. The employment rate is a...

  14. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2015. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  15. The population size and age structure of the bald eagle on Homer Spit, Homer, Alaska during the winter 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes baseline data that was collected on the population size, age structure, intra-specific behavior or aggressiveness, and the frequency in which...

  16. Mortality among the working age population receiving incapacity benefits in New Zealand, 1981-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Caroline; Blakely, Tony; Tobias, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Like many OECD countries New Zealand has experienced a large increase in the number of working-age people receiving incapacity benefits in the last 3 decades, despite apparent improvements in population health. This paper examines trends in mortality rates of people receiving sickness benefit or invalid's benefit (SBIB) between 1981 and 2004 using repeated cohort studies (linking the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, and 2001 censuses to mortality data). Mortality rates, standardised for age and ethnicity, were calculated for each census cohort for 25-64 year olds by benefit receipt status. Standardised rate differences and rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to measure disparities on both absolute and relative scales. Between 1981 and 2004 overall SBIB receipt increased from 2% to 5% of the working age population. Mortality rates were at least three times higher in the SBIB than the non-SBIB group at all points in time for men and women. Mortality rates declined in all groups, for example in men receiving SBIB, mortality decreased from 2354/100,000 in the 1981-84 cohort to 1371/100,000 in the 2001-04 cohort. Absolute inequalities between SBIB and non-SBIB declined in both men and women (for example in women standardised rate differences decreased from 954/100,000 to 688/100,000) but relative inequalities remained largely stable (for example in men the risk ratio increased from 4.27 to 4.54). Mortality rates declined more in sickness benefit than invalid's benefit recipients. The substantial expansion of SBIB receipt in New Zealand has not been accompanied by any reduction in the excess mortality risk experienced by SBIB recipients. These findings are likely to reflect the changing nature of the economy, labour force and disability experience in New Zealand.

  17. Old stellar population synthesis: new age and mass estimates for Mayall Ⅱ = G1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ma; Richard de Grijs; Zhou Fan; Soo-Chang Rey; Zhen-Yu Wu; Xu Zhou; Jiang-Hua Wu; Zhao-Ji Jiang; Jian-Sheng Chen; Kyungsook Lee; Sangmo Tony Sohn

    2009-01-01

    Mayall Ⅱ = G1 is one of the most luminous globular clusters (GCs) in M31. Here, we determine its age and mass by comparing multicolor photometry with theo-retical stellar population synthesis models. Based on far- and near-ultraviolet GALEX photometry, broad-band UBV RI, and infrared JHK8 2MASS data, we construct the most extensive spectral energy distribution of G1 to date, spanning the wavelength range from 1538 to 20000A. A quantitative comparison with a variety of simple stellar pop-ulation (SSP) models yields a mean age which is consistent with G1 being among the oldest building blocks of M31 and having formed within ~1.7Gyr after the Big Bang. Irrespective of the SSP model or stellar initial mass function adopted, the resulting mass estimates (of order 107M⊙) indicate that G1 is one of the most massive GCs in the Local Group. However, we speculate that the cluster's exceptionally high mass suggests that it may not be a genuine GC. Our results also suggest that G1 may contain, on average, (1.65±0.63) × 102L⊙ far-ultraviolet-bright, hot, extreme horizontal-branch stars, depend-ing on the adopted SSP model. In addition, we demonstrate that extensive multi-passband photometry coupled with SSP analysis enables one to obtain age estimates for old SSPs that have similar accuracies as those from integrated spectroscopy or resolved stellar pho-tometry, provided that some of the free parameters can be constrained independently.

  18. Size of the lower third molar space in relation to age in Serbian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelić Ksenija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. It is considered that the shortage of space is the major cause of the third molar impaction. The aim of this study was to establish the frequency of insufficient lower third molar eruption space in Serbian population, to question the differences in this frequency in the subjects of different age, to determine the influence of the lower third molar space (retromolar space size on third molar eruption, and to investigate a possible correlation between the size of gonial angle and the space/third molar width ratio. Methods. Digital orthopantomograms were taken from 93 patients divided into two groups: early adult (16-18 years of age and adult (18-26 patients. Retromolar space, mesiodistal third molar crown width, gonial angle and eruption levels were measured. Results. The space/third molar width in early adult subjects was smaller (p < 0.0001 and insufficient space was significantly more frequent (p = 0.0003 than in adult patients. Considerably more third molars erupted in case of enough space in both age groups (p < 0.0001. There was no difference between the means of gonial angle size in relations to the available space. Conclusions. The retromolar space/third molar width ratio is more favorable in adult subjects. Gonial angle is not in correlation with the retromolar space/third molar width ratio. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45005

  19. A changing relationship between disability and survival in the elderly population: differences by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamarca, Rosa; Ferrer, Montserrat; Andersen, Per Kragh;

    2003-01-01

    it was 3.5 for women and 1.8 for men, while at 90 years it was 1.9 and 1.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Disability increases monotonically over time while the risk of mortality associated with disability varies with gender and age. Elderly disabled women should be considered a target group for intervention......BACKGROUND: Longitudinal studies estimating the association between disability and mortality in the elderly population have typically assumed disability constant through the follow-up study period. Current knowledge indicates that such assumptions may not be appropriate. Our purpose was to examine...... of disability had increased by the end of the follow-up (from 42.0 to 60.0% among women and from 30.0 to 48.0%, among men); 7.5% of disabled women at baseline and 28.5% of men recovered from disability. The adjusted relative risk of dying for those with basic ADLs dependency varied with age: at 80 years of age...

  20. Incidence Rate of Concomitant Systemic Diseases in the Aging Population with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Sayılır

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the concomitant systemic diseases with postmenopausal osteoporosis and to investigate the points to be considered in treatment approach of patients with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: The study included 110 female patients admitted to our clinic and followed up after postmenopausal osteoporosis diagnosis. Besides the demographic data; the concomitant diseases of the patients such as hypertension, hypo-hyperthyroidism, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease, malignancy, osteoarthritis, gastrointestinal system diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD- asthma and depression were also recorded. Results: The mean age of the patients included in our study was 65.9±9.8 years. When the concomitant systemic diseases were examined; 40 patients had hypertension, 32 patients had osteoarthritis, 24 patients had gastrointestinal tract problems, 22 patients had thyroid disease, 21 patients had depression, 15 patients had hyperlipidemia, 12 patients had diabetes mellitus, 10 patients had COPD - asthma, 7 patients had cardiac diseases, 5 patients had malignancy and 2 patients had Alzheimer disease. Conclusion: Osteoporosis is a common disease in the geriatric population. As a chronic disease with an increasing incidence with aging; it can cause many health problems, prevalently pathological bone fractures, in our country and all over the world. Constitutively, prophylaxis of osteoporosis should be the first step. Because systemic diseases with increasing incidence with aging may affect the severity of osteoporosis and impair the treatment; it is important for both clinicians and the society to have sufficient information about osteoporosis.

  1. Social Inequalities in Self-Reported Health in the Ukrainian Working-age Population: Finding from the ESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazhak, Iryna

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the possible social inequalities in self-reported health among the Ukrainian working-age population by exploring the associations of the social determinants of health with poor self-reported health. Data for this study is derived from the European Social...... the existence of some socio-economic, employment-related inequalities, and others in self-reported health among the Ukrainian working-age population...

  2. Age estimation and the developing third molar tooth: an analysis of an Australian population using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassed, Richard B; Briggs, C; Drummer, Olaf H

    2011-09-01

    The third molar tooth is one of the few anatomical sites available for age estimation of unknown age individuals in the late adolescent years. Computed tomography (CT) images were assessed in an Australian population aged from 15 to 25 years for development trends, particularly concerning age estimation at the child/adult transition point of 18 years. The CT images were also compared to conventional radiographs to assess the developmental scoring agreement between the two and it was found that agreement of Demirjian scores between the two imaging modalities was excellent. The relatively wide age ranges (mean ± 2SD) indicate that the third molar is not a precise tool for age estimation (age ranges of 3-8 years) but is, however, a useful tool for discriminating the adult/child transition age of 18 years. In the current study 100% of females and 96% of males with completed roots were over 18 years of age.

  3. Winter Latitudinal Population Age-Structure of a Migratory Seagull (Larus fuscus Differs between Its Two Major Migratory Flyways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. M. Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The migration is energy-demanding and is expected to greatly affect the distribution of individuals over the species range and condition the choice of migratory routes. We investigated the wintering distributions and migratory flyways use of geographically contiguous populations of Lesser Black-backed Gulls (Larus fuscus and difference in population winter age structure between migratory flyways. Recoveries of metal ringed pulli from Denmark, Sweden, and Finland were used. The results showed that contiguous populations can have distinct wintering distribution patterns and migratory flyways. More importantly, we found that depending on the place of origin, the population winter distribution may or may not show a latitudinal cline in the age structure. The population migrating via the eastern Atlantic flyway (western flyway showed a winter age-related latitudinal cline, with adults staying at more northern latitudes than immatures. In contrast, no such pattern was found in the population migrating along the Mediterranean/Black sea flyway (eastern flyway. Interestingly, immatures within the eastern population showed a more dispersed pattern of migratory bearings. Overall, our results enhance the importance of the migration flyway in shaping the age structure of populations in the winter quarters and how it may influence the effect of other factors like sexual maturation.

  4. On the bubble? With healthcare job growth outstripping population in aging Rust Belt cities, some question the trend's durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joe; Kutscher, Beth

    2013-03-01

    Aging Rust Belt cities are some of the leaders in healthcare job growth despite stagnant or decreasing populations, even amid mounting pressure to cut healthcare costs. Areas seeing rapid population growth aren't as dependent on healthcare. "Cities that are growing quickly are most likely adding diversified industries," says Dr. Sheldon Retchin, of the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System.

  5. The neural correlates of worry in association with individual differences in neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servaas, Michelle Nadine; Riese, Harriëtte; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, André

    2014-09-01

    The tendency to worry is a facet of neuroticism that has been shown to mediate the relationship between neuroticism and symptoms of depression and anxiety. The aim of the current study was to investigate the neural correlates of state worry in association with neuroticism. One-hundred twenty participants were selected from an initially recruited sample of 240 women based on their neuroticism score. First, participants completed a questionnaire to assess the excessiveness and uncontrollability of pathological worry. Second, we measured brain activation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participants were randomly presented with 12 worry-inducing sentences and 12 neutral sentences in a mood induction paradigm. Individuals scoring higher on neuroticism reported to worry more in daily life and to have generated more worry-related thoughts after the presentation of a worry-inducing sentence. Furthermore, imaging results showed the involvement of default mode and emotional brain areas during worry, previously associated with self-related processing and emotion regulation. Specifically, cortical midline structures and the anterior insula showed more activation during worry, when individuals indicated to have generated more worry-related thoughts. Activation in the retrosplenial and visual cortex was decreased in individuals scoring higher on neuroticism during worry, possibly suggesting reduced autobiographical specificity and visual mental imagery. In the literature, both these processes have been related to the cognitive avoidance of emotional distress. Excessive worry features in a number of emotional disorders and results from studies that elucidate its neural basis may help explain how and why neuroticism contributes to vulnerability for psychopathology.

  6. Social implications and workforce issues in the oral health of an ageing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fac

    2015-03-01

    A functional and socially acceptable level of oral health is an integral part of healthy ageing! More teeth, more sophisticated dental technology and increasing co-morbidities of an ageing Australian society will have significant impacts on oral health professionals and their capacities to work within expanded teams of health, education and social organizations. Society is adapting its perspective on the social role of older citizens; replacing its perception of the elderly as an economic social burden, to one of senior citizens as being a respected and active source of social and economic benefit. Maintaining general and oral health for older Australians will bring into sharp focus the need for recognizing and managing not only the biological markers associated with ageing and frailty, but also the potential mediators on health outcomes associated with changing health and social behaviours. Increasing social capital of older Australians through national policy initiatives such as the Living Longer Living Better reforms, and greater involvement of allied health and carers' organizations in oral health education and health promotion will set a new scene for the roles of dental professionals. Issues of equity will drive the service delivery agenda, and a socio-cultural shift to 'consumer-directed' health outcomes will shape the range of services, quality of care and support required by an older Australian population. Formal education and training modules for aged care workers, allied health practitioners and geriatricians will develop. The challenge for the dental profession is the coordination and integration of these changes into new models of dental and general health care.

  7. (CALIFORNIA) META-ANALYSIS OF THE LIFE STYLE FACTORS RELEVANT TO ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS FOR THE AGING POPULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Aging Initiative study is to characterize activity patterns, physiological changes, and environmental exposures for the aging population. Meta-analysis was performed on more than 2000 reviewed articles to evaluate the l...

  8. Fractionating the role of executive control in control over worry: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallion, Lauren S; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Jha, Amishi P

    2014-03-01

    Uncontrollable anxious thought characterizes a number of emotional disorders. Little is known, however, about the cognitive mechanisms that underlie the ability to control these thoughts. The present study investigated the extent to which two well-characterized executive control processes--working memory and inhibition--are engaged when an individual attempts to control worry. Participants completed a concurrent assessment of these processes while attempting to control personally-relevant worried and neutral thoughts. To examine the specificity of these effects to attempts to control worry, versus a residual "depletion" effect of having previously engaged in worry, a subset of participants completed the assessment without instructions to control their worried or neutral thoughts. Attempts to control worry engaged working memory and inhibition to a greater extent than did attempts to control neutral thought. This increased engagement was not explained solely by anxious affect, nor was it significantly associated with trait worry. Engagement did not differ by group, suggesting that executive control depletion by worry cannot be dismissed as an alternative explanation of these findings. These results highlight working memory and inhibition as potentially valuable constructs for deepening our understanding of the nature and treatment of worry and its control.

  9. Worry as an adaptive avoidance strategy in healthy controls but not in pathological worriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Borlimi, Rosita; Brighetti, Gianni; Caselli, Gabriele; Favaretto, Ettore; Giardini, Irene; Marzocchi, Camilla; Nucifora, Valeria; Rebecchi, Daniela; Ruggiero, Giovanni M; Sassaroli, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The cognitive avoidance model of worry assumes that worry has the adaptive function to keep under control the physiological arousal associated with anxiety. This study aimed to test this model by the use of a fear induction paradigm in both pathological and healthy individuals. Thirty-one pathological worriers and 36 healthy controls accepted to be exposed to a fear induction paradigm (white noise) during three experimental conditions: worry, distraction, and reappraisal. Skin conductance (SCR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were measured as indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system functioning. Worriers showed increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic activation during the worry condition compared to non-worriers. There were no differences between groups for the distraction and reappraisal conditions. SCRs to the white noises during worry were higher in worriers versus controls throughout the entire worry period. Intolerance of uncertainty - but not metacognitive beliefs about worry - was a significant moderator of the relationship between worry and LF/HF-HRV in pathological worriers. Results support the cognitive avoidance model in healthy controls, suggesting that worry is no longer a functional attitude when it becomes the default/automatic and pathological response.

  10. Testing Cognitive and Emotion-Focused Models of Worry in Black and White Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz, Sarah J; Bakhti, Rinad; Stevens, Kimberly T; Curewitz, Alana

    2015-01-01

    Several models have been proposed to conceptualize worry. Broadly, the models can be classified as cognitive (including the Avoidance Model, the Intolerance of Uncertainty Model, and the Metacognitive Model) and emotion-focused (including Emotion Dysregulation and Acceptance-Based models). Although these models have received strong empirical investigation in primarily non-Hispanic White samples, no known study has examined the applicability to racial and ethnic minority groups. The current study compared the proportion of variance explained by cognitive and emotion-focused models of worry in White and Black samples. Results indicated that cognitive and emotion-focused models significantly predicted worry in both Black and White samples. However, the overall amount of variance in worry explained by the models was less for Black samples. Specifically, controlling for gender, the cognitive models explained 53% of the variance in worry in the White sample compared with 19% in the Black sample. Similarly, the emotion-focused models explained 34% of the variance in worry in the White sample but only 13% in the Black sample. These findings suggest that well-established conceptual frameworks for worry failed to explain the bulk of the variance in worry in Black samples, leaving much unknown. Additional research is needed to identify key variables that may further explain worry in ethnic minority samples.

  11. On the worrying fate of Data Deficient amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Javier; Loyola, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The 'Data Deficient' (DD) category of the IUCN Red List assembles species that cannot be placed in another category due to insufficient information. This process generates uncertainty about whether these species are safe or actually in danger. Here, we give a global overview on the current situation of DD amphibian species (almost a quarter of living amphibians) considering land-use change through habitat modification, the degree of protection of each species and the socio-political context of each country harboring DD species. We found that DD amphibians have, on average, 81% of their ranges totally outside protected areas. Worryingly, more than half of DD species have less than 1% of their distribution represented in protected areas. Furthermore, the percentage of overlap between species' range and human-modified landscapes is high, at approximately 58%. Many countries harboring a large number of DD species show a worrying socio-political trend illustrated by substantial, recent incremental increases in the Human Development Index and lower incremental increases in the establishment of protected areas. Most of these are African countries, which are located mainly in the central and southern regions of the continent. Other countries with similar socio-political trends are in southeastern Asia, Central America, and in the northern region of South America. This situation is concerning, but it also creates a huge opportunity for considering DD amphibians in future conservation assessments, planning, and policy at different levels of government administration.

  12. [Preventive medicine and care for the elderly population in the super-aged society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2013-06-01

    Prevention, particularly with regard to older people, has assumed increasing importance in policy in recent years. Prevention not only focuses on diseases but also on the geriatric syndrome and frailty must be crucial for the well-being of older people in the super-aged society. The preventive services aim to sustain independent living among those who are vulnerable and the preventive strategies should be supported by an evidence base that links risk factors with particular conditions and interventions to reduce risk and ameliorate the impact of illness and impairments. However, due to the heterogeneity of this population and a paucity of research on this field, it is difficult to make universal recommendations for the preventive services for the older people.

  13. The Effects of Housing on Health and Health Risks in an Aging Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Anne Louise; Somrongthong, Ratana; Dullyperadis, Saovalux

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the last decade, Thailand has experienced an aging population, especially in rural areas. Research finds a strong, positive relationship between good quality housing and health, and this paper assesses the impact and living experience of housing of older people in rural Thailand....... Methods. This was a mixed-method study, using data from observations of the physical adequacy of housing, semistructured interviews with key informants, and archival information from health records for 13 households in rural Thailand. Results. There were four main themes, each of which led to health risks...... for the older people: “lighting and unsafe wires,” “house design and composition,” “maintenance of the house,” and “health care equipment.” The housing was not appropriately designed to accommodate health care equipment or to fully support individual daily activities of older people. Numerous accidents occurred...

  14. Living alone and antidepressant medication use: a prospective study in a working-age population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulkki-Råback Laura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing proportion of the population lives in one-person households. The authors examined whether living alone predicts the use of antidepressant medication and whether socioeconomic, psychosocial, or behavioral factors explain this association. Methods The participants were a nationally representative sample of working-age Finns from the Health 2000 Study, totaling 1695 men and 1776 women with a mean age of 44.6 years. In the baseline survey in 2000, living arrangements (living alone vs. not and potential explanatory factors, including psychosocial factors (social support, work climate, hostility, sociodemographic factors (occupational grade, education, income, unemployment, urbanicity, rental living, housing conditions, and health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, obesity, were measured. Antidepressant medication use was followed up from 2000 to 2008 through linkage to national prescription registers. Results Participants living alone had a 1.81-fold (CI = 1.46-2.23 higher purchase rate of antidepressants during the follow-up period than those who did not live alone. Adjustment for sociodemographic factors attenuated this association by 21% (adjusted OR = 1.64, CI = 1.32-2.05. The corresponding attenuation was 12% after adjustment for psychosocial factors (adjusted OR = 1.71, CI = 1.38-2.11 and 9% after adjustment for health behaviors (adjusted OR = 1.74, CI = 1.41-2.14. Gender-stratified analyses showed that in women the greatest attenuation was related to sociodemographic factors and in men to psychosocial factors. Conclusions These data suggest that people living alone may be at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The public health value is in recognizing that people who live alone are more likely to have material and psychosocial problems that may contribute to excess mental health problems in this population group.

  15. Integration of Medical Care and Endowment: A New Exploration of Endowment Mode in the Context of Population Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinpeng; XU; Xiaopeng; FU

    2015-01-01

    China’s aging pressure is increasingly serious. The elderly people are difficult to seek medical advice,the elderly dependency ratio is soaring,finance fails to bear such heavy load,and social endowment service pressure is also constantly increasing. Traditional endowment mode is already incapable of satisfying current endowment demands. On the basis of the population aging,this paper came up with the new endowment mode " hospital + nursing home" and analyzed its feasibility. Finally,it reached the conclusion that this endowment mode is helpful for solving problems of endowment and medical care,and alleviating the problem of population aging.

  16. Immunosenescence and herd immunity: with an ever-increasing aging population do we need to rethink vaccine schedules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pierre Olivier; Aspinall, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Vaccination is a powerful public health tool that has been of tremendous benefit in protecting vulnerable populations from specific infections. Moreover, in addition to the direct benefits to vaccinated individuals, the indirect effects of protection at the community level have also been demonstrated and termed 'herd immunity'. The predicted demographic shift in the population landscape towards an ever-increasing aging population and the evidence suggesting that older individuals produce less-than-optimal vaccine responses have raised the question of rethinking vaccine schedules. This article provides evidence that even if herd immunity might be an option to indirectly protect the aging and aged adult population, the highest priorities for the near future must be to understand how vaccine responses in older individuals can be improved, to break down the public, cultural, societal and political barriers to vaccination and to counter the antivaccination movement that inhibits the worldwide spread of lifelong immunization programs.

  17. Modelling of intermediate-age stellar populations III Effects of dust-shells around AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mouhcine, M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,we present single stellar population models of intermediate age stellar populations where dust-enshrouded AGB stars are introduced. The formation of carbon stars is also accounted for, and is taken to be a function of both initial mass and metallicity. The effect of the dusty envelopes around AGB stars on the optical/near-infrared spectral energy distribution were introduced using semi-emipirical models where the mass-loss and the photospheric chemistry determine the spectral properties of a star along the AGB sequence. The spectral dichotomy between O-rich stars and C-rich stars is taken into account in the modelling. We have investigated the AGB sequence morphology in he near-infrared CMD as a function of time and metallicity. We show that this diaggram is characterized by three morphological features, occupied by optically bright O-rich stars, optically bright C-rich stars, and dust-enshrouded O-rich and C-rich stars respectively. Our models are able to reproduce the distribution of the three...

  18. Population aging in the state of Parana and impact of pensions and retirements in income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Diane Nakatani-Macedo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the aging process of the population of Paraná municipalities and its consequences in participation of pensions in total income. Were used the Census database obtained from IPARDES 1980, 1991, 2000 and 2010, in 399 municipalities of Paraná. PNAD (National Research of Household Samples, from years 1988 to 2012, database were used to measure the evolution of rent share due by pensions and annuities, through the decomposition of the Gini index methodology. We concluded that within 30 years the share of elderly in the population increased over three times, on average, for the localities of the state, going from 3.81% in 1980 to 12.83% in 2010 and there is a higher concentration of elderly in the municipalities located further north of the state. Income from pensions and retirements expanded their shares over total income by 125%; in 1988 presented a share of 7.5% over total income, increasing to 15.9% in 2012.

  19. Prevalence of Coronary Risk Factors among Population Aged 35 Years and Above From Rural Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is predicted that cardiovascular diseases will be the most important cause of mortality in India by the year 2015. Since the key to combating the increased incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is the control of known risk factors by a population based strategy aimed at comprehensive risk reduction, it is pertinent to study the magnitude of the risk. Aim: The present study was therefore conducted to assess the prevalence of certain coronary risk factors among rural population aged 35 years and above in Maharashtra. Methods: The present community based cross sectional survey was carried out in the rural area of Pune district on 272 subjects using a structured questionnaire, clinical examination followed by lab investigations. SPSS version 17.0 was used for analysis. Results: Tobacco consumption was found to be prevalent in 51.83% of the study subjects followed by physical inactivity which was prevalent among 31.61% whereas high diastolic blood pressure was found to be prevalent in 29.41% of the study subjects. Obesity and alcohol consumption were found to be prevalent among 13.97% of the study subjects. Among the biochemical parameters studied, hypertriglyceridemia was found to be prevalent in 22.05% followed by raised fasting blood sugar in 15.44% of the study subjects. Conclusion: Behaviour change communication strategies targeting these modifiable known high risk factors need to be emphasized to lower coronary heart disease (CHD related morbidity burden in the community.

  20. The spatial and age distribution of stellar populations in DDO 190

    CERN Document Server

    Aparicio, A

    2000-01-01

    The spatial distribution of stellar populations, the star formation history, and other properties of the dIrr galaxy DDO 190 have been analyzed using color--magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of about 3900 resolved stars and the Ha fluxes of HII regions. From the mean color index of the red giant branch, a mean metallicity [Fe/H]=-2.0 is obtained. The I magnitude of the TRGB has been used to estimate the distance. DDO 190 is 2.9+/-0.2 Mpc from the Milky Way, 2.1 Mpc from the M 94 group (CnV-I), 2.4 Mpc from the M 81 group and 2.9 Mpc from the barycenter of the Local Group, all indicating that it is an isolated, field galaxy. The surface-brightness distribution of the galaxy is well fitted by ellipses of ellipticity e=1-a/b=0.1 and P.A.=82deg. The radial star density distribution follows an exponential law of scale length a=43."4, corresponding to 611 pc. The Holmberg semi-major axis to mu_B=26.5 is estimated to be r^B_(26.5)=3.'0. Stellar populations of different ages in DDO 190 show strong spatial decoupling, the old...

  1. Holes in teeth - Dental caries in Neolithic and Early Bronze Age populations in Central Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklisch, Nicole; Ganslmeier, Robert; Siebert, Angelina; Friederich, Susanne; Meller, Harald; Alt, Kurt W

    2016-01-01

    This study provides diachronic insight into the epidemiology of carious defects in teeth of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age populations in Central Germany over a period of 4000 years. The data were retrieved from skeletal remains uncovered at 21 sites throughout the Middle Elbe-Saale region (MES), comprising a total of 494 individuals with preserved teeth. The data generated were examined for age- and sex-related differences in order to gain information about the dietary habits and socio-economic structures of the period with the goal of identifying potential diachronic changes. The results indicated that dietary habits changed over the course of the Neolithic period: the prevalence of caries significantly decreased between the Early and Late Neolithic. The adults from the Early Neolithic sample, particularly those from the LBK bore the highest rate of caries. This highlights the essential importance of cereals in the diet of the early farmers in the Middle Elbe-Saale region. As time went on, meat and dairy products became more and more important, which had a positive impact on dental health. The data also show sex-specific differences: women were more often affected by caries than men and female jaws also generally exhibited greater numbers of carious teeth than their male counterparts. Dental health is a reflection of both biological factors and of economic and sociocultural structures.

  2. The Economic consequences of Mitigation of the Population aging through the Fiscal Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Véghová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore in what extent does the increase of the number of productive population by using immigrant labour force represents a possible solution for the USA and the EU member states, which could weaken the effects of economic consequences of aging. This issue is relevant also because the USA and the EU member states have been amongst the most popular destinations of international migration. Therefore, these two subjects can or will have to choose from potential immigrants, as the number of them coming to these countries is much higher than America or Europe want to accept (just think of more than a million arrested illegal migrants in these countries every year. We can claim that the ongoing economic reforms in western countries (e.g. the French retirement reform, the German reform of the labour market and creation of immigrant policies, economic benefits of migration to decrease problems caused by aging, are positive. Slow speed is typical for them, accompanied by resistance of inhabitants and fear of the consequences of political decisions. The direction is correct, but sometimes the speed is not. Furthermore, problems with applying the law can occur, along with breaking the immigration laws and a series of repeated amnesties are good practical examples of that. Faster speed and prompt decisiveness are expected from the politicians

  3. The challenge to UK energy policy: An ageing population perspective on energy saving measures and consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, Neveen, E-mail: n.hamza@ncl.ac.u [School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Newcastle University, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Gilroy, Rose [School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Newcastle University, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    With a focus on the residential sector, this paper explores the likelihood of the UK government meeting its energy targets. The paper contends that energy policy needs to take into account the interplay of four major factors: an ageing population of increasing diversity; a cultural inclination for older housing much of which is thermally inefficient; levels of fuel poverty; and the inexorable rise of consumer spending on leisure related services and goods. Decisions made by older households (both the poorer and the better off) may be critical to the success of energy policy. Among the better off the changing expectations of the baby boomers, with their predilection for consumption and travel, may have particular impact. The paper concludes that much of the reduction in carbon footprint made by older people's choices in heating and insulation may be offset, not only by increasing domestic thermal comfort, but also potentially by increasing consumables in the home and other consumer lifestyle choices. What could be achieved at best, may be a shift in energy mix. - Research highlights: {yields} An aging society in the UK will not lead to reduction in energy consumption. {yields} Physical ability, housing condition, cultural habits and energy poverty undermine policy. {yields} Rise of home entertainment and consumerism 'Afluenza' increase energy consumption.

  4. Platelets in the paediatric population: the influence of age and the limitations of automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felle, P; McMahon, C; Rooney, S; Donnelly, P; Ni Chonchubhair, F

    2005-08-01

    Accurate and precise platelet counting is important for the clinical management of children with platelet disorders. Current automated technologies are often unable to discriminate platelets from non-platelet particles particularly in circumstances where platelet anisocytosis is common. This study compares manual methodology and the automated technologies; impedance, optical density and CD61 immunoplatelet method (available on the Cell Dyn 4000) with the reference method of flow cytometric analysis in a paediatric population. A total of 141 samples were analysed and divided into specific age related groups and groups with thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis. Data analysis showed that the CD61 method compared best with the reference method and this was evident in all the specified groups. The mean platelet count obtained by optical and manual methods were lower, suggesting that these methods are less reliable. The impedance count method was accurate despite its limitations. Strong correlations were observed in the 2-14 year age group but there was greater variation in the platelet characteristics in neonates. The CD61 method is the automated method of choice and would be particularly useful in the problem groups (platelet counts <50 x 10(9)/l and neonates <1 month old).

  5. Age-targeted chemotherapy for control of urinary schistosomiais in endemic populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. King

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Severity of urinary tract morbidity increases with intensity and duration of Schistosoma haematobium infection. We assessed the ability of yearly drug therapy to control infection intensity and reduce S. haematobium-associated disease in children 5-21 years old in an endemic area of Kenya. In year I, therapy resulted in reduced prevalence (66% to 22%, P < 0.001 and intensity of S. haematobium infection (20 to 2 eggs/10 mL, urine, with corresponding reductions in the prevalence of hematuria (52% to 19%, P < 0.001. There was not, however, a significant first-year effect on prevalence of urinary tract abnormalities detected by ultrasound. Repeat therapy in years 2 and 3 resulted in significant regression of hydronephrosis and bladder abnormalities (41% to 6% prevalence, P< 0.001, and further reductions in proteinuria. Repeat age-targeted therapy was associated with decreased prevalence of infection among young children (< 5yr entering into the target age group. Two years after discontinuation of therapy, intensity of S. haematobium infection and ultrasound abnormalities remained suppressed, but hematuria prevalence began to increase (to 33% in 1989. Reinstitution of annual therapy in 1989 and 1990 reversed this trends. We conclude that annual oral therapy provides an effective strategy for control of morbidity due to S. haematobium on population basis, both through regression of disease in treated individuals, and prevention of infection in untreated subjects.

  6. Indigenous yeast population from Georgian aged wines produced by traditional "Kakhetian" method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela; Siesto, Gabriella; Poeta, Cinzia; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romano, Patrizia

    2013-12-01

    The yeast microbiota present in wines produced by the ancient "Kakhetian" method in Georgia (EU) was studied. This technique involves the use of terracotta vessels (amphoras), during spontaneous fermentation, maceration phase and wine ageing. The analysed yeasts were collected from wines after maturation for one year in ten amphoras from a Georgian winery. The 260 isolates were all identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the majority were classified as flor yeasts by restriction analysis of ITS region. A first technological and molecular screening was used to select 70 strains for further characterization. Both genetic and metabolic characterization discriminated flor from non-flor strains. The combined results obtained by analysis of interdelta region and mtDNA-RFLP yielded 23 different biotypes; no biotype was common to flor and non-flor strains. The wines produced by flor yeasts showed a high content in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, acetoin, whereas the level of other compounds was similar to wines obtained by non-flor strains. This study represents the first report on the composition of yeast microbiota involved in the maturation of this traditional wine. These flor strains represent an interesting yeast population, in possession of peculiar characteristics allowing them to survive during wine ageing, becoming the dominant flora in the final wine.

  7. Alcohol Consumption Practices among Married Women of Reproductive Age in Nepal: A Population Based Household Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narbada Thapa

    .3-97.4.Alcohol consumption was common practice among married women of reproductive age in Nepal with variation among the subgroups of population. Thus, further investigation and behavior change communication interventions to reduce alcohol consumption especially among the women with higher risk of drinking is essential.

  8. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics of elder self-neglect in an US Chinese aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the socio-demographic and socioeconomic characteristics associated with prevalence and severity of elder self-neglect in an U.S. Chinese older population. The PINE study is a population-based epidemiological study in the greater Chicago area. In total, 3159 Chinese older adults were interviewed from 2011 to 2013. Elder self-neglect was assessed with systematic observations of a participant's personal and home environment across five domains: hoarding, personal hygiene, house in need of repair, unsanitary conditions, and inadequate utility. Elder self-neglect was prevalent among older adults aged 80 years or over (mild self-neglect: 34.6% 95% CI 30.9-38.4; moderate/severe: 15.6% 95% CI 12.8-18.6), men (mild: 28.6% 95% CI 26.1-31.3; moderate/severe: 13.1% 95% CI 11.2-15.1), those with 0-6 years of education (mild: 32.2% 95% CI 29.7-34.9; moderate/severe: 12.6% 95% CI 10.8-14.5), and those with an annual personal income between $5000 and $10,000 (mild: 30.8% 95% CI 28.4-33.2; moderate/severe: 11.8% 95% CI 10.2-13.5). Older age (mild self-neglect: OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03; moderate/severe self-neglect: OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.03) and lower education levels (mild self-neglect: OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.08; moderate/severe self-neglect: OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.09) were associated with significantly increased odds of elder self-neglect. Women (moderate/severe self-neglect: OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.58-0.93) had significantly decreased odds of moderate/severe elder self-neglect. No significant association was found between levels of income and overall elder-self-neglect of all severities. Future research is needed to examine risk/protective factors associated with elder self-neglect in U.S. Chinese older populations.

  9. Older age relates to worsening of fine motor skills: a population-based study of middle-aged and elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, Y.Y.; Van der Lijn, F.; Vernooij, M.W.; Hofman, A.; Niessen, W.J.; Van der Lugt, A.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Van der Geest, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In a population-based study of 1,912 community-dwelling persons of 45 years and older, we investigated the relation between age and fine motor skills using the Archimedes spiral-drawing test. Also, we studied the effect of brain volume on fine motor skills. Methods: Participants were

  10. Dental age estimation utilizing third molar development: A review of principles, methods, and population studies used in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James M; Senn, David R

    2010-09-10

    When an individual reaches the age of legal majority, their treatment within the criminal and civil legal systems is changed dramatically in the United States. Forensic odontologists are often asked to assist government agencies in estimating the ages of persons who may or may not have reached that legally important age. The third molars are the only teeth useful as forensic estimators of chronological age in the target age group. This study reviews the principles, methodology, and population data of the most commonly used technique in the United States, the analysis of the third molar development based on modified Demirjian staging. The method analyzes the developing third molar to estimate mean age, age intervals and the empirical probability that an individual has reached the anniversary of her or his eighteenth birthday.

  11. Analysis of the standing age distribution and age-specific recruitment rate of the George River and Beverly barren-ground caribou populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taylor

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary advantage of the standing age distribution of a population is that it can be sampled. Analysis of the age frequencies for estimates of survival rates and determinations of population status by life table construction depend heavily on assumption that require additional data to evaluate. The analysis of age structures for the George River (Messier et al., 1988 and Beverly (Thomas and Barry, 1990a,b caribou herd was reviewed. An alternativ method of estimating age specific survival rates was explored. The dependence of the life tables produced by the analysis of Messier et al. (1988 and Thomas and Barry (1990a,b on tenuous and untestable assumptions regarding population growth rate over the life span of the oldest animals, stability of the standing age distribution, and constancy of life table parameters was emphasized. Although the life tables produced by Messier et al. (1988 for the George River herd and Thomas and Barry (1990a,b for the Beverly herd are probably the best available for barren-ground caribou, they should be used with caution, particularly for management decisions.

  12. Providing preoperative information for children undergoing surgery: a randomized study testing different types of educational material to reduce children's preoperative worries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, S C; Arriaga, P; Esteves, F

    2014-12-01

    This study developed three types of educational preoperative materials and examined their efficacy in preparing children for surgery by analysing children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety. The sample was recruited from three hospitals in Lisbon and consisted of 125 children, aged 8-12 years, scheduled to undergo outpatient surgery. The participants were randomly assigned to one of the seven independent conditions that were combined into the following three main groups: an experimental group, which received educational materials with information about surgery and hospitalization (a board game, a video or a booklet); a comparison group, which received entertaining material with the same format type; and a control group, which did not receive any material. Children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety were evaluated after the experimental manipulation. Children who received educational materials were significantly less worried about surgery and hospital procedures than children in the comparison and the control groups, although no statistically differences were found between the type of materials within the experimental group, and no significant effect occurred on parental state anxiety. These results do however support the hypothesis that providing preoperative materials with educational information reduce children's preoperative worries.

  13. Population Aging at Cross-Roads: Diverging Secular Trends in Average Cognitive Functioning and Physical Health in the Older Population of Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Steiber

    Full Text Available This paper uses individual-level data from the German Socio-Economic Panel to model trends in population health in terms of cognition, physical fitness, and mental health between 2006 and 2012. The focus is on the population aged 50-90. We use a repeated population-based cross-sectional design. As outcome measures, we use SF-12 measures of physical and mental health and the Symbol-Digit Test (SDT that captures cognitive processing speed. In line with previous research we find a highly significant Flynn effect on cognition; i.e., SDT scores are higher among those who were tested more recently (at the same age. This result holds for men and women, all age groups, and across all levels of education. While we observe a secular improvement in terms of cognitive functioning, at the same time, average physical and mental health has declined. The decline in average physical health is shown to be stronger for men than for women and found to be strongest for low-educated, young-old men aged 50-64: the decline over the 6-year interval in average physical health is estimated to amount to about 0.37 SD, whereas average fluid cognition improved by about 0.29 SD. This pattern of results at the population-level (trends in average population health stands in interesting contrast to the positive association of physical health and cognitive functioning at the individual-level. The findings underscore the multi-dimensionality of health and the aging process.

  14. Population Aging at Cross-Roads: Diverging Secular Trends in Average Cognitive Functioning and Physical Health in the Older Population of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses individual-level data from the German Socio-Economic Panel to model trends in population health in terms of cognition, physical fitness, and mental health between 2006 and 2012. The focus is on the population aged 50-90. We use a repeated population-based cross-sectional design. As outcome measures, we use SF-12 measures of physical and mental health and the Symbol-Digit Test (SDT) that captures cognitive processing speed. In line with previous research we find a highly significant Flynn effect on cognition; i.e., SDT scores are higher among those who were tested more recently (at the same age). This result holds for men and women, all age groups, and across all levels of education. While we observe a secular improvement in terms of cognitive functioning, at the same time, average physical and mental health has declined. The decline in average physical health is shown to be stronger for men than for women and found to be strongest for low-educated, young-old men aged 50-64: the decline over the 6-year interval in average physical health is estimated to amount to about 0.37 SD, whereas average fluid cognition improved by about 0.29 SD. This pattern of results at the population-level (trends in average population health) stands in interesting contrast to the positive association of physical health and cognitive functioning at the individual-level. The findings underscore the multi-dimensionality of health and the aging process.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak strain of Danish origin spreading at worrying rates among greenland-born persons in Denmark and Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillebaek, T; Andersen, A B; Rasmussen, E M; Kamper-Jørgensen, Z; Pedersen, M K; Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Ladefoged, K; Thomsen, V O

    2013-12-01

    Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues at high rates among Greenland-born persons in Greenland and Denmark, with 203 and 450 notified cases per 10(5) population, respectively, in the year 2010. Here, we document that the predominant M. tuberculosis outbreak strain C2/1112-15 of Danish origin has been transmitted to Greenland-born persons in Denmark and subsequently to Greenland, where it is spreading at worrying rates and adding to the already heavy tuberculosis burden in this population group. It is now clear that the C2/1112-15 strain is able to gain new territories using a new population group as the "vehicle." Thus, it might have the ability to spread even further, considering the potential clinical consequences of strain diversity such as that seen in the widely spread Beijing genotype. The introduction of the predominant M. tuberculosis outbreak strain C2/1112-15 into the Arctic circumpolar region is a worrying tendency which deserves attention. We need to monitor whether this strain already has, or will, spread to other countries.

  16. Age-structured mark-recapture analysis: A virtual-population-analysis-based model for analyzing age-structured capture-recapture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, L.G.; Pine, William E.; Walters, C.J.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new model to estimate capture probabilities, survival, abundance, and recruitment using traditional Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methods within a standard fisheries virtual population analysis framework. This approach compares the numbers of marked and unmarked fish at age captured in each year of sampling with predictions based on estimated vulnerabilities and abundance in a likelihood function. Recruitment to the earliest age at which fish can be tagged is estimated by using a virtual population analysis method to back-calculate the expected numbers of unmarked fish at risk of capture. By using information from both marked and unmarked animals in a standard fisheries age structure framework, this approach is well suited to the sparse data situations common in long-term capture-recapture programs with variable sampling effort. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  17. Risk factors of dental disease in working age population of a large industrial city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Klimenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Back in 2005, the WHO has identified European targets by 2020, that provide specific measures for improving dental health and define clear rates of intensity and prevalence of dental diseases. Most EU countries that adopted the WHO recommended principles have already achieved the goals regarding dental health. Level of diseases of the teeth and oral cavity among the population of Ukraine is higher than in the EU countries. Consistently high prevalence of dental diseases among population of all age groups, especially prevalence of dental caries, which is confirmed by the results of various epidemiological studies is a cause of concern. Nowadays factors that influence occurrence of the teeth and oral cavity diseases among the working age population of a large industrial city are not enough studied. The aim of the study was to determine the factors leading to the worsening of the working age population of the large industrial city dental health. To establish the risk factors was developed a special closed-type questionnaire, careful attention in which was paid to personal oral hygiene. Methods and results.The most influential factors leading to the increase of the Green - Vermilon index are personal oral hygiene factors and lifestyle of the individual: brushing teeth less than 2 times a day (odds ratio OR=2,64, 95% СІ: 0,97-7,14; р<0,05; smoking (odds ratio OR=2,07, 95% СІ: 0,78-5,53; р<0,05; alcohol intake 1-2 times a week and more often (odds ratio OR=1,82, 95% СІ: 0,61-5,42; р<0,05 lead to increased chances of a low level of oral hygiene. The level of oral hygiene is also affected by the socio-economic factors: higher education in 1.9 times decreases chances of a low level of oral hygiene (odds ratio OR=1,88, 95% СІ: 0,68-5,22; р<0,05; income at subsistence level and below (odds ratio OR=1,20, 95% СІ: 0,45-3,19; р<0,05. According to our research, level of oral hygiene is also influenced by medical and organizational factors

  18. The Ageing Population and the Associated Challenges of the Slovenian Pension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Verbič

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of welfare effects in Slovenia, an analysis of supplementary pension insurance in Slovenia and an analysis of the effects of the pension fund deficit on the sustainability of Slovenian public finances. Stress was placed upon varying the parameters of the current Slovenian pension system and introducing mandatory supplementary pension insurance in Slovenia. It has been established that while young generations and new generations will lose from the pension reform, even complete implementation of the reform might not be sufficient to compensate for unfavourable demographic developments. The volume of supplementary pension saving is insufficient at present in Slovenia to compensate the deterioration of rights from the first pension pillar.Not only is the participation in the (voluntary second pillar insufficient, but, especially, the premia are too low. The level of the expected deficit of the PAYG-financed state pension fund seems to be worrying, though a higher activity level among the elderly would subsequently increase the volume of contributions to the first pension pillar, thus also reducing the state pension fund deficit.

  19. An estimation of the prevalence of intellectual disabilities and its association with age in rural and urban populations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Lakhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intellectual disability (ID is a global public health concern. Prevalence of ID and its association with age and other demographic factors is required for planning purposes in India. Objective: This study analyzed the age-adjusted prevalence of ID in rural and urban populations and its correlation with age in children and adults. Materials and Methods: Disability data published in the report (2002 of National Sample Survey Organization were analyzed, using Z-test to measure differences in age-adjusted prevalence. Spearman rho was calculated to determine strength and direction of the association, and regression analysis was used to predict prevalence rate, based on age in rural and urban population settings. Results: Overall, India has a prevalence of 10.5/1000 in ID. Urban population has slightly higher rate (11/1000 than rural (10.08/1000; P = 0.044. Age was found to be highly correlated with prevalence of ID in rural children (ϱ =0.981, P = 0.019 as well as in children (ϱ = −0.954, P = 0.000 and adults (ϱ = −0.957, P = 0.000 in urban population. The possibility of confounding or the existence of covariates for children in urban settings was noted. Conclusion: Results of this study match findings in other epidemiological studies. However, multistage, large-scale studies are recommended for investigating prevalence rates with different severity levels of ID.

  20. Worry is associated with impaired gating of threat from working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Daniel M; Shackman, Alexander J; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Larson, Christine L

    2015-02-01

    Dispositional anxiety is a well-established risk factor for the development of anxiety and other emotional disorders. These disorders are common, debilitating, and challenging to treat, pointing to the need to understand the more elementary neurocognitive mechanisms that confer elevated risk. Importantly, many of the maladaptive behaviors characteristic of anxiety, such as worry, occur when threat is absent. This raises the possibility that worry reflects difficulties gating threat-related information from working memory--a limited capacity workspace that supports the maintenance, recall, and manipulation of information--and facilitates goal-directed thoughts and actions. Here, we tested, for the first time, whether trait-like individual differences in worry, a key facet of the anxious phenotype, reflect difficulties gating threat and neutral-related distracters from working memory. Results indicated that both dispositional worry and anxiety individually predicted the combined filtering cost of threat and neutral distracters. Importantly, worry was associated with inefficient filtering of threat-related, but not neutral, distracters from working memory. In contrast, dispositional anxiety was related to a similar level of threat and neutral filtering cost. Furthermore, dispositional anxiety's relationship to filtering of threat was predominantly driven by differences in worry. These results suggest that the propensity to worry is characterized by a failure to gate task-irrelevant threat from working memory. These results provide a framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying chronic worry and, more broadly, the cognitive architecture of dispositional anxiety.

  1. Do Metacognitions and Intolerance of Uncertainty Predict Worry in Everyday Life? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielsch, Carolin; Andor, Tanja; Ehring, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) suggest that excessive worry is due to positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and/or intolerance of uncertainty. Empirical support mainly derives from cross-sectional studies with limited conclusiveness, using self-report measures and thereby possibly causing recall biases. The aim of the present study therefore was to examine the power of these cognitive variables to predict levels of worry in everyday life using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). Metacognitions and intolerance of uncertainty were assessed using well-established self-report questionnaires in 41 nonclinical participants who subsequently completed ratings on worry intensity and burden on a portable device for 1week at seven times a day once every 2hours. Results showed significant associations of negative metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty, but not positive metacognitive beliefs, with worry in everyday life. In multilevel regression analyses, a substantial proportion of variance of everyday worry could be accounted for by negative metacognitions over and above trait worry and daily hassles. Intolerance of uncertainty likewise emerged as a valid predictor when tested in isolation, but did not explain additional variance once negative metacognitions were controlled. The findings support current cognitive models of excessive worry and highlight the role of negative metacognitions. By using EMA to assess levels of worry in everyday life, they extend earlier findings focusing exclusively on retrospective questionnaire measures.

  2. The Neural Correlates of Worry in Association with Individual Differences in Neuroticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servaas, Michelle Nadine; Riese, Harriette; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The tendency to worry is a facet of neuroticism that has been shown to mediate the relationship between neuroticism and symptoms of depression and anxiety. The aim of the current study was to investigate the neural correlates of state worry in association with neuroticism. One-hundred twenty partici

  3. Relationships among Perceived Racial Stress, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Worry in a Black Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, LaTanya S.; West, Lindsey M.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely…

  4. Hope and Worry in Mothers of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder or Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogston, Paula L.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Mothers of children with an autism spectrum disorder (n = 199) or Down syndrome (n = 60) responded to an online questionnaire that assessed their hope and worry. Findings support previous research suggesting that hope is a protective factor against psychological distress: mothers with higher hope reported lower worry. Mothers who reported lower…

  5. Worry in Children: Changing Associations with Fear, Thinking, and Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Imogen; Szabó, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Worry in adults has been conceptualized as a thinking process involving problem-solving attempts about anticipated negative outcomes. This process is related to, though distinct from, fear. Previous research suggested that compared to adults, children's experience of worry is less strongly associated with thinking and more closely related to fear.…

  6. Worry, General Self-Efficacy and School Achievement: An Exploratory Study with Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Natalia Yuen Yi; Westwood, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study identified issues in school--and in life outside school--that caused significant worry for 120 Chinese adolescents (72 males, 48 females) attending a secondary school in Hong Kong. The study explored relationships existing among 3 variables comprising degree of worry, students' general self-efficacy, and their academic achievement.…

  7. A Preliminary Investigation of Stimulus Control Training for Worry: Effects on Anxiety and Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Sarah Kate; Behar, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    For individuals with generalized anxiety disorder, worry becomes associated with numerous aspects of life (e.g., time of day, specific stimuli, environmental cues) and is thus under poor discriminative stimulus control (SC). In addition, excessive worry is associated with anxiety, depressed mood, and sleep difficulties. This investigation sought…

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children in a Large Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Sarah L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric…

  9. Copy number variation of age-related macular degeneration relevant genes in the Korean population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun Park

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Studies that analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in various genes have shown that genetic factors are strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD susceptibility. Copy number variation (CNV may be an additional type of genetic variation that contributes to AMD pathogenesis. This study investigated CNV in 4 AMD-relevant genes in Korean AMD patients and control subjects. METHODS: Four CNV candidate regions located in AMD-relevant genes (VEGFA, ARMS2/HTRA1, CFH and VLDLR, were selected based on the outcomes of our previous study which elucidated common CNVs in the Asian populations. Real-time PCR based TaqMan Copy Number Assays were performed on CNV candidates in 273 AMD patients and 257 control subjects. RESULTS: The predicted copy number (PCN, 0, 1, 2 or 3+ of each region was called using the CopyCaller program. All candidate genes except ARMS2/HTRA1 showed CNV in at least one individual, in which losses of VEGFA and VLDLR represent novel findings in the Asian population. When the frequencies of PCN were compared, only the gain in VLDLR showed significant differences between AMD patients and control subjects (p = 0.025. Comparisons of the raw copy values (RCV revealed that 3 of 4 candidate genes showed significant differences (2.03 vs. 1.92 for VEGFA, p<0.01; 2.01 vs. 1.97 for CFH, p<0.01; 1.97 vs. 2.01, p<0.01 for ARMS2/HTRA1. CONCLUSION: CNVs located in AMD-relevant genes may be associated with AMD susceptibility. Further investigations encompassing larger patient cohorts are needed to elucidate the role of CNV in AMD pathogenesis.

  10. 'Population laboratories' or 'laboratory populations'? Making sense of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, 1965-1987

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Tiago; Palladino, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Interest among historians, philosophers and sociologists of science in population-based biomedical research has focused on the randomised controlled trial to the detriment of the longitudinal study, the temporally extended, serial observation of individuals residing in the same community. This is pe

  11. Habitual physical activity and vascular aging in a young to middle-age population at low cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo; Mhamdi, Leila

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Regular endurance exercise has been shown to reduce the age-related increase in arterial stiffness that is thought to contribute to cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of age and habitual physical activity on carotid artery wall thickness...... by the Framingham prediction score sheet. All subjects underwent B-mode ultrasonography of the extracranial carotid arteries and physical activity assessment by actigraph, an accelerometer capable of monitoring the intensity and duration of body movements. The intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery...... was measured on ultrasound images, along with systodiastolic changes in luminal diameter, and indices of carotid stiffness were calculated. RESULTS: Intima-media thickness and carotid stiffness increased with age in both men and women (r=0.24 to 0.52, P

  12. The structure of optimal time- and age-dependent harvesting in the Lotka-McKendrik population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritonenko, Natali; Yatsenko, Yuri

    2007-07-01

    The paper analyzes optimal harvesting of age-structured populations described by the Lotka-McKendrik model. It is shown that the optimal time- and age-dependent harvesting control involves only one age at natural conditions. This result leads to a new optimization problem with the time-dependent harvesting age as an unknown control. The integral Lotka model is employed to explicitly describe the time-varying age of harvesting. It is proven that in the case of the exponential discounting and infinite horizon the optimal strategy is a stationary solution with a constant harvesting age. A numeric example on optimal forest management illustrates the theoretical findings. Discussion and interpretation of the results are provided.

  13. The challenge to UK energy policy. An ageing population perspective on energy saving measures and consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, Neveen; Gilroy, Rose [School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Newcastle University, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    With a focus on the residential sector, this paper explores the likelihood of the UK government meeting its energy targets. The paper contends that energy policy needs to take into account the interplay of four major factors: an ageing population of increasing diversity; a cultural inclination for older housing much of which is thermally inefficient; levels of fuel poverty; and the inexorable rise of consumer spending on leisure related services and goods. Decisions made by older households (both the poorer and the better off) may be critical to the success of energy policy. Among the better off the changing expectations of the baby boomers, with their predilection for consumption and travel, may have particular impact. The paper concludes that much of the reduction in carbon footprint made by older people's choices in heating and insulation may be offset, not only by increasing domestic thermal comfort, but also potentially by increasing consumables in the home and other consumer lifestyle choices. What could be achieved at best, may be a shift in energy mix. (author)

  14. Physiological age in Lutzomyia youngi (Diptera: Psychodidae populations from an endemic area for cutaneous leishmaniasis, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scorza José V.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Batches of sylvatic females of Lutzomyia youngi (Phlebotominae captured in a Shannon trap on twelve occasions over one year in a locality where subcutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic, near the city of Trujillo, Venezuela, were used to study: 1 the percentages of parous females according to previously established criteria and 2 the average number of eggs laid spontaneously by isolated females during 7 days after feeding on hamsters. The data on the batches of females captured on nights previous to the rainy period (prepluvial were compared with those on females captured after the rains (postpluvial . Significant differences were detected by variation analysis for two variables and different number of N, as also were consistent groupings by Duncan's Test for pre-and postpluvial lots of females. The females captured on nights prior to the rainy periods (January-March and August-September presented higher rates of nulliparity (86-72% and contained or laid a greater number of eggs (71-67 than those captured after the rains (March-June and November-December which presented lower rates of nulliparity (60-24% and a smaller number of eggs (50-30. The rainfall peaks occurred in April and September-October, respectively. It is considered that these differences can be used by epidemiological studies as a means of estimating the physiological age of female populations of L. youngy.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms in age-related macular degeneration in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunus; Bulgu; Gokhan; Ozan; Cetin; Vildan; Caner; Ebru; Nevin; Cetin; Volkan; Yaylali; Cem; Yildirim

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To assess the association between age-related macular degeneration(AMD) and three single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPS) related to the vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) gene.METHODS:The patients who were diagnosed with AMD were included in this prospective study. Three SNPs(rs1413711, rs2146323, and rs3025033) of the VEGF gene were genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples of the 82 patients and 80 controls.RESULTS:The genotype frequencies of rs1413711 and rs2146323 were not significantly different between the study group and the control group(P =0.072 and P =0.058).However, there was a significant difference in the genotype frequencies of these SNPs between the wet type AMD and dry type AMD(P =0.005 and P =0.010,respectively). One of the SNPs(rs1413711) was also found to be associated with the severity of AMD(P =0.001)with significant genotype distribution between early,intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. The ancestral alleles were protective for both SNPs while the polymorphic alleles increased the risk for dry AMD.CONCLUSION:VEGF SNPs rs1413711 and rs2146323 polymorphisms are significantly associated with AMD subtypes in our population.

  16. Total-tau and phospho-tau(181Thr) in cerebrospinal fluid of neurologically intact population increase with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, J; Psujek, M; Bartosik-Psujek, H

    2009-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated molecule playing a crucial role in maintenance of neuronal integrity and in many neurodegenerative processes; its pathology has become a hallmark feature at the tissue level. The aim of the study was to estimate total tau and phospho-tau (Thr181) concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy population. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were taken from 129 subjects (age 18-77 years) without known neurologic or psychiatric condition. Both total-tau and phospho-tau levels showed significant correlation with age, which was more pronounced in older population.

  17. Near Point of Convergence Break for Different Age Groups in Turkish Population with Normal Binocular Vision: Normative Data

    OpenAIRE

    Nihat Sayın; Birsen Gökyiğit; Pelin Kaynak; Duygu Tüzün Sayın; Ahmet Demirok; Serpil Akar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the near point of convergence break in Turkish population with normal binocular vision and to obtain the normative data for the near point of convergence break in different age groups. Such database has not been previously reported. Material and Method: In this prospective study, 329 subjects with normal binocular vision (age range, 3-72 years) were evaluated. The near point of convergence break was measured 4 times repeatedly wit...

  18. The relationship between mono-abundance and mono-age stellar populations in the Milky Way disk

    CERN Document Server

    Minchev, I; Chiappini, C; Martig, M; Anders, F; Matijevic, G; de Jong, R S

    2016-01-01

    Studying the Milky Way disk structure using stars in narrow bins of [Fe/H] and [alpha/Fe] has recently been proposed as a powerful method to understand the Galactic thick and thin disk formation. It has been assumed so far that these mono-abundance populations (MAPs) are also coeval, or mono-age, populations. Here we study this relationship for a Milky Way chemo-dynamical model and show that equivalence between MAPs and mono-age populations exists only for the high-[alpha/Fe] tail, where the chemical evolution curves of different Galactic radii are far apart. At lower [alpha/Fe]-values a MAP is composed of stars with a range in ages, even for small observational uncertainties and a small MAP bin size. Due to the disk inside-out formation, for these MAPs younger stars are typically located at larger radii, which results in negative radial age gradients that can be as large as 2 Gyr/kpc. Positive radial age gradients can result for MAPs at the lowest [alpha/Fe] and highest [Fe/H] end. Such variations with age p...

  19. Cluster analysis of polyphenol intake in a French middle-aged population (aged 35–64 years)

    OpenAIRE

    Julia, Chantal; Touvier, Mathilde; Lassale, Camille; Fezeu, Léopold; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols have been suggested as protective factors for a range of chronic diseases. However, studying the impact of individual polyphenols on health is hindered by the intrinsic inter-correlations among polyphenols. Alternatively, studying foods rich in specific polyphenols fails to grasp the ubiquity of these components. Studying overall dietary patterns would allow for a more comprehensive description of polyphenol intakes in the population. Our objective was to identify clusters of diet...

  20. Age of fusion of the distal radial and ulnar epiphyses from hand radiographs-A study in Kashmiri population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nida; Noor, Farida; Ahmad, Shabir; Fazili, Khalid Majid

    2016-12-01

    Age estimation is a crucial parameter involved in investigations pertaining to civil and criminal procedures. It also aids in various examinations in forensic medicine, pediatrics, endocrinology and radiology. One of the important methods for skeletal age estimation is the age of fusion of the epiphyses. But there occur variations in the skeletal ages due to environmental, hormonal, ethnic and other factors. Hence, there arises the need for separate standards of ossification for different regions. The present study was conducted to ascertain the age of fusion of the distal radial and ulnar epiphyses in Kashmiri population. A total of 160 healthy subjects, including 80 males and 80 females with ages ranging from 12 to 20years were studied. Their chronological age was obtained and the X-ray of their left hand was taken in the A.P view after taking the consent from their parents. The starting of epiphyseal fusion in lower end of radius in male was observed at 15-16years in 20% of the male population and for females, it was observed at 13-14years in 10% of the female population. The completion of epiphyseal fusion in lower end of radius in 100% males was noticed at 18-19years and for 100% females, it was noticed at 17-18years. The starting up of epiphyseal fusion in lower end of ulna in males was observed at 14-15years in 10% of the male population and for females, it was observed at 13-14years in 10% of the female population. The completion of epiphyseal fusion in lower end of ulna in 100% males was noticed at 18-19years and for 100% females, it was noticed at 17-18years. In case of males the age of fusion of the epiphyses of lower end of radius and lower end of ulna was found to be in the same age group 18 to 19years. Also in case of females the age of fusion of the epiphyses of lower end of radius and lower end of ulna was found to be in the same age group 17 to 18years. It was further observed that females showed fusion in advance of male subjects. The findings of

  1. The Impact of Population Ageing on Technological Progress and TFP Growth, with Application to United States: 1950-2050

    OpenAIRE

    Izmirlioglu, Yusuf

    2008-01-01

    I examine the effect of age-distribution of the society on economic growth through technological progress. I build a multisector economy model that involves population pyramid. I characterize the steady-state of the model for low and high population growth rate. Higher population growth rate yields faster TFP and output growth in the long-run. I analyze dynamic behavior of the economy. I calibrate the model for United States, 1950-2000 and using the estimated parameters I make predictions abo...

  2. [Cause of death of the working-age population of Ufa in relation to the area of residence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafutdinova, N Kh

    1997-01-01

    Two districts, one with developed oil-processing and petrochemical industries and administrative one, were selected in Ufa city for 20-year study of mortality among able-bodied population. Both districts demonstrated a decreasing share of able-bodied people in mortality structure. However, mortality of able-bodied population in the industrial district tended to increase, in the administrative one--to decrease. The main death causes were traumatism, cardiovascular diseases, malignancies. Mean age at death among the able-bodied population was lower in the industrial district, among the people engaged into oil-processing and petrochemical industries, transport and building sector.

  3. Patterns of alpha asymmetry in those with elevated worry, trait anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms: A test of the worry and avoidance models of alpha asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ezra E; Zambrano-Vazquez, Laura; Allen, John J B

    2016-05-01

    Some authors have argued that worry cues lateralization of frontal brain activity leftward, whereas other varieties of avoidance motivation cue lateralization of frontal brain activity rightward. By comparison, more right-than-left parietal activity correlates with anxious arousal. The purpose of the present report was to test two models of brain lateralization and anxiety: one model that proposed that worry correlates with more left-frontal activity and another model that proposed that avoidance motivation (including worry) correlates with more right-frontal activity. Undergraduate students were selected for worry, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and trait anxiety using self-report questionnaires. A subset of participants also met DSM-IV criteria for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Alpha asymmetry and also a global-power-adjusted metric of alpha power were calculated from each participant's resting-state EEG. It was expected that participants with elevated worry and participants meeting criteria for GAD would show more left-than-right frontal activity. In contrast, participants with elevated trait anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and those with an OCD diagnosis were expected to exhibit more right-than-left frontal activity. Participants with elevated worry, participants with a GAD diagnosis, and participants with elevated obsessive-compulsive symptoms, had more left frontal activity than low symptom individuals. Those with high scores on trait anxiety, but low worry, had greater right frontal and parietal activity compared to controls. The present results suggest that brain lateralization is not solely related to avoidance motivation, and suggest that facets of anxiety may cut across dimensions not well-represented by DSM-based categories.

  4. Age estimation of an Indian population by using the Kim′s scoring system of occlusal tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahari A Telang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Age is one of the prime factors employed to establish the identity of an individual and the use of teeth for this purpose has been considered reliable. Tooth wear is widely accepted as a physiological consequence of aging and evaluation of tooth wear can be a simple and convenient tool to estimate age in adults. Aims: The present study was conducted to record the degree of tooth wear among Indian adults and to estimate their ages from the degree of tooth wear based on Kim′s scoring system. Materials and Methods: Dental stone casts of 120 participants were used to assess the degree of occlusal tooth wear based on the criteria given by Kim et al. Statistical Analysis Used: The age of all subjects was estimated based on these scores using multiple regression analysis function. Results: The degree of tooth wear showed a significant positive correlation with age in each and every examined tooth of both males and females. The predicted age was within ± 5 years of actual age in 70% of males and 68.3% females, and within ± 3 years of actual age in 50% of males and 50.1% of females. Conclusions: Kim′s scoring system has proven to be a useful tool in estimation of age using occlusal wear in an Indian population with a high level of accuracy in adults.

  5. Effect of age, education, and bilingualism on confrontation naming in older illiterate and low-educated populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashaie, Sameer; Obler, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of age as well as the linked factors of education and bilingualism on confrontation naming in rural Kashmir by creating a culturally appropriate naming test with pictures of 60 objects. We recruited 48 cognitively normal participants whose ages ranged from 18 to 28 and from 60 to 85. Participants in our study were illiterate monolinguals (N = 18) and educated Kashmiri-Urdu bilinguals (N = 30). Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that younger adults performed better than older adults (P < 0.01) and the age effect was quadratic (age(2)). It also showed Age X Education and Age X L2 Speaking interactions predicted naming performance. The Age X Education interaction indicated that the advantages of greater education increased with advancing age. Since education is in the second language (L2) in our population, this finding is no doubt linked to the Age X L2 Speaking interaction. This suggests that L2 speaking proficiency contributed more to first language (L1) naming with advancing age.

  6. Effect of Age, Education, and Bilingualism on Confrontation Naming in Older Illiterate and Low-Educated Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Ashaie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of age as well as the linked factors of education and bilingualism on confrontation naming in rural Kashmir by creating a culturally appropriate naming test with pictures of 60 objects. We recruited 48 cognitively normal participants whose ages ranged from 18 to 28 and from 60 to 85. Participants in our study were illiterate monolinguals (N=18 and educated Kashmiri-Urdu bilinguals (N=30. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that younger adults performed better than older adults (P<0.01 and the age effect was quadratic (age2. It also showed Age X Education and Age X L2 Speaking interactions predicted naming performance. The Age X Education interaction indicated that the advantages of greater education increased with advancing age. Since education is in the second language (L2 in our population, this finding is no doubt linked to the Age X L2 Speaking interaction. This suggests that L2 speaking proficiency contributed more to first language (L1 naming with advancing age.

  7. A Taxometric Investigation of the Latent Structure of Worry: Dimensionality and Associations with Depression, Anxiety, and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Bergman, Shawn M.; Green, Bradley A.; Zlomke, Kimberly R.

    2010-01-01

    Worry has been described as a core feature of several disorders, particularly generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The present study examined the latent structure of worry by applying 3 taxometric procedures (MAXEIG, MAMBAC, and L-Mode) to data collected from 2 large samples. Worry in the first sample (Study 1) of community participants (n = 1,355)…

  8. Biological properties of differently-aged human keratinocytes:population doubling time growth curve and cell cycle analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological properties of keratinocytes from differently-aged healthy human beings. Methods Keratinocytes from fetus,teenager and middle-aged groups were separated and cultured. The population doubling time (PDT) and cell growth curve in different cells were compared,and the cell cycles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results ① In primary culture of keratinocytes,the adherence time in middle-aged group was longer than that in fetus and teenager groups. However,all cell morphology sh...

  9. Aspartic acid racemization in dentin of the third molar for age estimation of the Chaoshan population in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shisheng; Lv, Yanyi; Wang, Dian; Yu, Xiaojun

    2016-09-01

    Aspartic acid racemization in teeth has been increasingly used to estimate chronological age with a considerably high accuracy in forensic practice. The Chaoshan population in South China is relatively isolated in geography, and has specific lifestyle and dietary inhibits. It is still unknown whether this method is suitable for this population. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between chronological age and the d/l aspartic acid ratio in dentin in the third molar tooth of the Chaoshan population. Fifty-eight non-carious third molar teeth (31 mandibles and 27 maxillae), from 58 living individuals of known age (24 males and 34 females), were retrieved. Dentin was extracted from these teeth. The d- and l-aspartic acids in dentins were separated and detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Linear regression was performed between the d/l aspartic acid ratio of dentins and chronological age. Results showed that the correlation coefficient (r) was 0.969, and the mean absolute error (MAE) was 2.19 years, its standard deviation (SD) was ±1.53 years, indicating excellent correlation. There was no significant difference in racemization rates of dentin between sexes (P=0.113, F=2.6), or between mandibles and maxillae (P=0.964, F=0.000). Results indicate that the ratio of the d and l forms of aspartic acid of dentins, in the third molar, is closely correlated with chronological age, special lifestyle do no obviously affect the accuracy of the age estimations by aspartic acid racemization of the dentin in the third molar and that aspartic acid racemization in the third molar dentin can be used as an accurate method to estimate chronological age in the Chaoshan population in South China.

  10. The validation of a French-language version of the Aging Perceptions Questionnaire (APQ) and its extension to a population aged 55 and over

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ingrand, Isabelle

    2012-04-30

    AbstractBackgroundSeveral studies have shown the influence of the perceptions of aging on the cognitive functioning and the mental and physical health of older people. These relationships have not to date been studied in France where validated instruments are lacking. The primary objective of this study was to validate a French-language version of the Aging Perceptions Questionnaire (APQ) in the French general population aged 65 and over. The secondary objective was to study the stability of the dimensions of this instrument among participants aged 55 to 64.MethodsThe study was proposed to the cohort of the Observatoire Régional du Vieillissement (OPREVI) (observatory of aging), located in a small town in Poitou-Charentes (western France). An anonymous questionnaire including the APQ was sent by mail to inhabitants aged 55 and over. The original English language APQ was described with adults aged 65 and older. It has 32 items distributed on 7 dimensions: timeline chronic and cyclical, positive and negative consequences, positive and negative control and emotional representations.Results656 adults participated in this survey (286 men, 370 women). Among those aged 65 and over (n = 394), the seven-factor structure estimated by confirmatory factor analysis was coherent with original findings. Internal consistency as evaluated by Cronbach alpha, was between 0.83 for consequences negative and 0.52 for control negative. Several dimensions were strongly correlated. Among participants aged 55 to 64 (n = 262), the same factorial model yielded an acceptable fit. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis concluded to approximate factorial invariance between the two age groups with a null delta in comparative fit index.ConclusionThis study among French people aged 65 and over, added further evidence of the multidimensional structure of the French version of the APQ which is superimposed to the dimensions of the original Irish version. The same factorial structure

  11. The validation of a French-language version of the Aging Perceptions Questionnaire (APQ and its extension to a population aged 55 and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrand Isabelle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown the influence of the perceptions of aging on the cognitive functioning and the mental and physical health of older people. These relationships have not to date been studied in France where validated instruments are lacking. The primary objective of this study was to validate a French-language version of the Aging Perceptions Questionnaire (APQ in the French general population aged 65 and over. The secondary objective was to study the stability of the dimensions of this instrument among participants aged 55 to 64. Methods The study was proposed to the cohort of the Observatoire Régional du Vieillissement (OPREVI (observatory of aging, located in a small town in Poitou-Charentes (western France. An anonymous questionnaire including the APQ was sent by mail to inhabitants aged 55 and over. The original English language APQ was described with adults aged 65 and older. It has 32 items distributed on 7 dimensions: timeline chronic and cyclical, positive and negative consequences, positive and negative control and emotional representations. Results 656 adults participated in this survey (286 men, 370 women. Among those aged 65 and over (n = 394, the seven-factor structure estimated by confirmatory factor analysis was coherent with original findings. Internal consistency as evaluated by Cronbach alpha, was between 0.83 for consequences negative and 0.52 for control negative. Several dimensions were strongly correlated. Among participants aged 55 to 64 (n = 262, the same factorial model yielded an acceptable fit. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis concluded to approximate factorial invariance between the two age groups with a null delta in comparative fit index. Conclusion This study among French people aged 65 and over, added further evidence of the multidimensional structure of the French version of the APQ which is superimposed to the dimensions of the original Irish version. The same

  12. Brief Report: No Association between Parental Age and Extreme Social-Communicative Autistic Traits in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elise B.; Munir, Kerim; McCormick, Marie C.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Santangelo, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the relationship between parental age and extreme social-communicative autistic traits in the general population. The parents of 5,246 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) completed the Social and Communication Disorders Checklist (SCDC). The association between parental age…

  13. Tuck Jump Assessment: An Exploratory Factor Analysis in a College Age Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lininger, Monica R; Smith, Craig A; Chimera, Nicole J; Hoog, Philipp; Warren, Meghan

    2017-03-01

    Lininger, MR, Smith, CA, Chimera, NJ, Hoog, P, and Warren, M. Tuck Jump Assessment: An exploratory factor analysis in a college age population. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 653-659, 2017-Due to the high rate of noncontact lower extremity injuries that occur in the collegiate setting, medical personnel are implementing screening mechanisms to identify those athletes that may be at risk for certain injuries before starting a sports season. The tuck jump assessment (TJA) was created as a "clinician friendly" tool to identify lower extremity landing technique flaws during a plyometric activity. There are 10 technique flaws that are assessed as either having the apparent deficit or not during the TJA. Technique flaws are then summed up for an overall score. Through expert consensus, these 10 technique flaws have been grouped into 5 modifiable risk factors: ligament dominance, quadriceps dominance, leg dominance or residual injury deficits, trunk dominance ("core" dysfunction), and technique perfection. Research has not investigated the psychometric properties of the TJA technique flaws or the modifiable risk factors. The present study is a psychometric analysis of the TJA technique flaws to measure the internal structure using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using data from collegiate athletes (n = 90) and a general college cohort (n = 99). The EFA suggested a 3 factor model accounting for 46% of the variance. The 3 factors were defined as fatigue, distal landing pattern, and proximal control. The results differ from the 5 modifiable risk categories as previously suggested. These results may question the use of a single score, a unidimensional construct, of the TJA for injury screening.

  14. Heterogeneity in Autonomic Arousal Level in Perseverative Worry: The Role of Cognitive Control and Verbal Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Gim Y.; Vasey, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    One puzzle in high worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is the heterogeneity in the level of autonomic arousal symptoms seen among affected individuals. While current models agree that worry persists, in part, because it fosters avoidance of unpleasant internal experiences, they disagree as to whether worry does so by suppressing activation of autonomic arousal or by fostering persistent autonomic hyperarousal. Our Cognitive Control Model predicts that which pattern of autonomic arousal occurs depends on whether or not a worrier has sufficient cognitive control capacity to worry primarily in a verbal versus imagery-based manner. Because this model has been supported by only one study to date, the present study sought to replicate and extend that study’s findings. Results from an online survey in an unselected sample of over 900 college students provide further support for our model’s central tenet and initial support for its prediction that higher effortful control is associated with a higher percentage of verbal thought during worry. Finally, we report tentative evidence that autonomic arousal symptoms in worry and GAD vary as a function of individual differences in cognitive control capacity because higher capacity is linked to a greater predominance of verbal thought during worry.

  15. Role of worry in patients with chronic tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldirola, Daniela; Teggi, Roberto; Daccò, Silvia; Sangiorgio, Erika; Bussi, Mario; Perna, Giampaolo

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus-related distress appears to be more strongly associated with multiple psychological factors than with any perceptual properties of tinnitus. Prior studies have not investigated the role of worry in tinnitus sufferers. Worry is a dispositional cognitive trait that involves a pervasive, non-specific, future-oriented proneness to fretting, which can foster negative affective states and catastrophic thinking about a specific trouble when the trouble is actual and present. We examined the relationship between worry and self-perceived anxiety and depressive symptoms and handicap in 54 outpatients with chronic tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss who had been previously recruited for a randomized double-blind study on the efficacy of transmeatal low-level laser therapy for tinnitus. We measured the current anxiety and depressive symptoms with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y-1/Self-evaluation Depression Scale, the handicap with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, and the proneness to worry with the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. For the psychoacoustic tinnitus measures, we considered the loudness match and the minimum masking level. We found that tinnitus-related anxiety and depressive symptoms and handicap were significantly associated with proneness to worry (linear regression models, p tinnitus in clinical practice. Early therapeutic interventions for reducing proneness to worry may facilitate better adaptation to tinnitus.

  16. Cross-sectional study of sleep quantity and quality and amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive function in an ageing population: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the association between sleep disturbances and cognitive function in younger and older individuals from an ageing population. METHODS: 3,968 male and 4,821 female white participants, aged 50 years and over, from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA were studied. Information on sleep quality and quantity as well as both amnestic (memory, ACF and non-amnestic (non-memory, nACF function was available at Wave 4 (2008. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate the relationship between sleep and cognitive function. RESULTS: After adjustment for multiple confounders in the younger group (50-64 years duration of sleep explained 15.2% of the variance in ACF (p = 0.003 and 20.6% of nACF (p = 0.010. In the older group (65+ years the estimates were 21.3% (p<0.001 and 25.6% (p<0.001, respectively. For sleep quality, there was a statistically significant association between sleep quality and both ACF (p<0.001 and nACF (p<0.001 in the older age group, but not in the younger age group (p = 0.586 and p = 0.373, respectively; interaction between age and sleep quality in the study sample including both age groups: p<0.001 for ACF and p = 0.018 for nACF. Sleep quality explained between 15.1% and 25.5% of the variance in cognition. The interaction with age was independent of duration of sleep. At any level of sleep duration there was a steeper association between sleep quality and ACF in the older than the younger group. CONCLUSIONS: The associations between sleep disturbances and cognitive function vary between younger and older adults. Prospective studies will determine the temporal relationships between sleep disturbances and changes in cognition in different age groups.

  17. Near Point of Convergence Break for Different Age Groups in Turkish Population with Normal Binocular Vision: Normative Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Sayın

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the near point of convergence break in Turkish population with normal binocular vision and to obtain the normative data for the near point of convergence break in different age groups. Such database has not been previously reported. Material and Method: In this prospective study, 329 subjects with normal binocular vision (age range, 3-72 years were evaluated. The near point of convergence break was measured 4 times repeatedly with an accommodative target. Mean values of near point of convergence break were provided for these age groups (≤10, 11-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, and >60 years old. A statistical comparison (one-way ANOVA and post-hoc test of these values between age groups was performed. A correlation between the near point of convergence break and age was evaluated by Pearson’s correlation test. Results: The mean value for near point of convergence break was 2.46±1.88 (0.5-14 cm. Specifically, 95% of measurements in all subjects were 60 year-old age groups in the near point of convergence break values (p=0.0001, p=0.0001, p=0.006, p=0.001, p= 0.004. A mild positive correlation was observed between the increase in near point of convergence break and increase of age (r=0.355 (p<0.001. Discussion: The values derived from a relatively large study population to establish a normative database for the near point of convergence break in the Turkish population with normal binocular vision are in relevance with age. This database has not been previously reported. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 402-6

  18. The burden and etiology of community-onset pneumonia in the aging Japanese population: a multicenter prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konosuke Morimoto

    Full Text Available The increasing burden of pneumonia in adults is an emerging health issue in the era of global population aging. This study was conducted to elucidate the burden of community-onset pneumonia (COP and its etiologic fractions in Japan, the world's most aged society.A multicenter prospective surveillance for COP was conducted from September 2011 to January 2013 in Japan. All pneumonia patients aged ≥ 15 years, including those with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP, were enrolled at four community hospitals on four major islands. The COP burden was estimated based on the surveillance data and national statistics.A total of 1,772 COP episodes out of 932,080 hospital visits were enrolled during the surveillance. The estimated overall incidence rates of adult COP, hospitalization, and in-hospital death were 16.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.6 to 20.9, 5.3 (4.5 to 6.2, and 0.7 (0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 person-years (PY, respectively. The incidence rates sharply increased with age; the incidence in people aged ≥ 85 years was 10-fold higher than that in people aged 15-64 years. The estimated annual number of adult COP cases in the entire Japanese population was 1,880,000, and 69.4% were aged ≥ 65 years. Aspiration-associated pneumonia (630,000 was the leading etiologic category, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia (530,000, Haemophilus influenzae-associated pneumonia (420,000, and respiratory virus-associated pneumonia (420,000, including influenza-associated pneumonia (30,000.A substantial portion of the COP burden occurs among elderly members of the Japanese adult population. In addition to the introduction of effective vaccines for S. pneumoniae and influenza, multidimensional approaches are needed to reduce the pneumonia burden in an aging society.

  19. Age gradients in the stellar populations of massive star forming regions based on a new stellar chronometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Broos, Patrick S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Luhman, Kevin L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Naylor, Tim [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Povich, Matthew S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State Polytechnic University, 3801 West Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768 (United States); Garmire, Gordon P. [Huntingdon Institute for X-ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    A major impediment to understanding star formation in massive star-forming regions (MSFRs) is the absence of a reliable stellar chronometer to unravel their complex star formation histories. We present a new estimation of stellar ages using a new method that employs near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray photometry, Age {sub JX} . Stellar masses are derived from X-ray luminosities using the L{sub X} -M relation from the Taurus cloud. J-band luminosities are compared to mass-dependent pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models to estimate ages. Age {sub JX} is sensitive to a wide range of evolutionary stages, from disk-bearing stars embedded in a cloud to widely dispersed older PMS stars. The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) project characterizes 20 OB-dominated MSFRs using X-ray, mid-infrared, and NIR catalogs. The Age {sub JX} method has been applied to 5525 out of 31,784 MYStIX Probable Complex Members. We provide a homogeneous set of median ages for over 100 subclusters in 15 MSFRs; median subcluster ages range between 0.5 Myr and 5 Myr. The important science result is the discovery of age gradients across MYStIX regions. The wide MSFR age distribution appears as spatially segregated structures with different ages. The Age {sub JX} ages are youngest in obscured locations in molecular clouds, intermediate in revealed stellar clusters, and oldest in distributed populations. The NIR color index J – H, a surrogate measure of extinction, can serve as an approximate age predictor for young embedded clusters.

  20. Spatio-temporal variations in age structures of a partially re-established population of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Dominic A.; Leslie,, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Examination of age structures and sex ratios is useful in the management of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis) and other furbearers. Reintroductions and subsequent recolonizations of river otters have been well documented, but changes in demographics between expanding and established populations have not been observed. As a result of reintroduction efforts, immigration from Arkansas and northeastern Texas, and other efforts, river otters have become partially reestablished throughout eastern and central Oklahoma. Our objective was to examine age structures of river otters in Oklahoma and identify trends that relate to space (watersheds, county) and time (USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service county trapping records). We predicted that river otters in western areas of the state were younger than river otters occurring farther east. From 2005–2007, we obtained salvaged river otter carcasses from federal and state agencies, and we live-captured other river otters using leg hold traps. Seventy-two river otters were sampled. Overall, sex ratios were skewed toward females (1F∶0.8M), but they did not differ among spatiotemporal scales examined. Teeth were removed from salvaged and live-captured river otters (n  =  63) for aging. One-year old river otters represented the largest age class (30.2%). Proportion of juveniles (populations of river otters in Oklahoma contained younger ages than more established eastern populations.

  1. An epidemiological study of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and Rural areas of kanpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : - What is the magnitude of Diabetes mellitus in the urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives:To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To compare the magnitude of problem of diabetes mellitus between urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To study the possible associates and socio-demographic variables related to diabetes mellitus.Study Design : Cross sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on three thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables : Age, Sex. impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Education, Working status. Social class, family history of diabetes.Statistical analysis : Chi-square lest, percentagesResults From a total of 676 persons of high risk age group i.e. 45 years and above, the overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the study areas was observed lobe 7. l%with 9.94% in urban and 3.61% in rural areas, the maximum percetage of diabetes cases (41.66% was in the age group of 56-60 years. Higher prevalence of diabetes was observed in the obese (56.25% and sedentary (87.5% persons. The family history' of diabetes mellitus was present in (35.41% of diabetes mellitus cases.

  2. Characterizing Ultraviolet and Infrared Observational Properties for Galaxies. I. Influences of Dust Attenuation and Stellar Population Age

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Ye-Wei; Hao, Cai-Na; Kong, Xu; Zhou, Xu

    2012-01-01

    The correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color, i.e. the IRX-UV relation, was regarded as a prevalent recipe for correcting extragalactic dust attenuation. Considerable dispersion in this relation discovered for normal galaxies, however, complicates its usability. In order to investigate the cause of the dispersion, in this paper, we select five spiral nearby galaxies, and perform spatially resolved studies on each individual of the galaxies, with combination of ultraviolet and infrared imaging data. We measure all positions within each galaxy and divide the extracted regions into young and evolved stellar populations. By means of this approach, we attempt to discover separate effects of dust attenuation and stellar population age on the IRX-UV relation for individual galaxies. In this work, in addition to dust attenuation, stellar population age is interpreted to be another parameter in the IRX-UV function, and the diversity of star formation histories is suggested to ...

  3. Metabonomics and population studies: age-related amino acids excretion and inferring networks through the study of urine samples in two Italian isolated populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Beneduci, Amerigo; Pontoni, Gabriele; Capasso, Giovambattista; Lanzara, Carmela; Andrighetto, Gilberto; Hladnik, Uros; Nunes, Virginia; Palacin, Manuel; Gasparini, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The study of two different Italian isolated populations was combined with a metabonomic approach to better understand tubular handling of amino acids. Levels of amino acids and metabolites have been analyzed by Nucleic Magnetic Resonance and expressed as ratio vs urinary creatinine concentration (mmol/mol). For most of the amino acids there is an age-related U shape pattern of excretion, with the peaks during childhood and old age, and a significant reduction in the adult age. Hierarchical cluster analysis has clearly identified three groups clustering the same amino acids: His, Thr and Ala (group one); Gly and Phe (group two) and a third larger one. Results have been further confirmed by factor and regression analysis, and used to confirm and, in some cases, infer new amino acids networks. As a matter of facts, the identification of strong evidences for clustering of urine excretion of several neutral amino acids suggests the predominant impact of relevant and common transporters.

  4. Core features of suicide. Gender, age, alcohol and other putative risk factors in a low-incidence population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, August G; Stórá, Tormódur

    2009-01-01

    confirmed. Others were not, such as an increasing rate with old age. In diagnostics, the role of psychiatric disorders was confirmed, but so was a substantial role of "no disorder". Increase period revealed a high proportion of cases with alcohol involved and a substantial part included males, in age groups...... 25-64 years, unmarried, divorced and alcohol intoxicated. The main conclusion was that a low-incidence population of suicide population confirmed some supposed core features of the suicide phenomenon. Others, related to age and psychiatric disorders, were only partially confirmed. In periods...... information. Results showed that suicide rate had been low since the Second World War. However, there was an increase throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Supposed core features of suicide, such as gender, marital status, former psychiatric admittance, former suicidal behaviour, alcohol and method preference were...

  5. Population ageing in the Netherlands: Demographic and financial arguments for a balanced approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salverda, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dutch policy makers recently set the public debate on ageing alight by enforcing drastic cuts in early retirement opportunities; increasing taxation of the aged and augmenting retirement age are also considered. The prime argument is to diminish a burden on public finances far in future. This paper

  6. Heterosis in age-specific selected populations of a seed beetle: sex differences in longevity and reproductive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Biljana; Đorđević, Mirko; Janković, Jelena; Savković, Uroš; Tucić, Nikola

    2015-04-01

    We tested mutation accumulation hypothesis for the evolution of senescence using short-lived and long-lived populations of the seed-feeding beetle, Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say), obtained by selection on early- and late-life for many generations. The expected consequence of the mutation accumulation hypothesis is that in short-lived populations, where the force of natural selection is the strongest early in life, the late-life fitness traits should decline due to genetic drift which increases the frequency of mutations with deleterious effects in later adult stages. Since it is unlikely that identical deleterious mutations will increase in several independent populations, hybrid vigor for late-life fitness is expected in offspring obtained in crosses among populations selected for early-life fitness traits. We tested longevity of both sexes, female fecundity and male reproductive behavior for hybrid vigor by comparing hybrid and nonhybrid short-lived populations. Hybrid vigor was confirmed for male virility, mating speed and copulation duration, and longevity of both sexes at late ages. In contrast to males, the results on female fecundity in short-lived populations did not support mutation accumulation as a genetic mechanism for the evolution of this trait. Contrary to the prediction of this hypothesis, male mating ability indices and female fecundity in long-lived populations exhibited hybrid vigor at all assayed age classes. We demonstrate that nonhybrid long-lived populations diverged randomly regarding female and male reproductive fitness, indicating that sexually antagonistic selection, when accompanied with genetic drift for female fecundity and male virility, might be responsible for overriding natural selection in the independently evolving long-lived populations.

  7. Cross-sectional study of height and weight in the population of Andalusia from age 3 to adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosano Carlos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives In Andalusia there were no studies including a representative sample of children and adolescent population assessing growth and weight increase. Our objectives were to develop reference standards for weight, height and BMI for the Andalusian pediatric population, from 3 to 18 years of age for both genders, and to identify the final adult height in Andalusia. Subjects and methods Two samples were collected. The first included individuals from 3 to 18 years of age (3592 girls and 3605 boys. They were stratified according type of study center, size of population of origin, age (32 categories of 0.5 years and gender, using cluster sampling. Subjects from >18 to 23 years of age (947 women and 921 men were sampled in 6 non-university educational centers and several university centers in Granada. Exclusion criteria included sons of non-Spanish mother or father, and individuals with chronic conditions and/or therapies affecting growth. Two trained fellows collected the data through February to December 2004, for the first sample, and through January to May 2005, for the second. Reference curves were adjusted using Cole's LMS method, and the quality of the adjustment was assessed using the tests proposed by Royston. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was applied to the final models obtained. Results Data for 9065 cases (4539 women and 4526 men were obtained; 79.39% (n = 7197 in the up to 18 years of age group. In the first sampling only 0.07% (3 girls and 2 boys refused to participate in the study. In addition, 327 students (4.5% were absent when sampling was done. We present mean and standard deviation fort height, weight and BMI at 0.5 years intervals, from 3 to 23 years of age, for both genders. After adjustment with the different models, percentiles for height, weight (percentiles 3, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, and 97 and BMI (percentiles 3, 5, 50, 85, 95, and 97 are presented for both genders. Conclusion This is

  8. Heart failure in very elderly population- a profile of heart failure in patients over the age of eighty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher V.Chien; Dani Hackner; Ernst R. Schwarz

    2007-01-01

    Objective Heart failure is an epidemic in the elderly, but there is a striking lack of data in this clinically important patient population. We investigated the demographics, cardiac performance, and medication management of a segment of the hospital population in at least their eighth decade of life. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 75 records of heart failure patients who were 80 years of age or older. Records were reviewed for demographic information, presence or absence of diastolic dysfunction, evaluation of ejection fraction, and medication usage including angiotensin-concerting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs),beta-adrenergic blockers, digoxin, and aldosterone antagonists. Assessment for contra-indications to ACE inhibitor or ARBs use was also performed to assess co-morbidities that limit treatment of heart failure. Results The population of very elderly with heart failure is heterogeneous. We found a higher proportion of females as well as higher rates of diastolic dysfunction in patients aged ≥ 90 years compared to patients between the ages of 80-89 years. Usage of ACE inhibitors, ARBs and beta-adrenergic blockers was strikingly low throughout the very elderly population. While co-morbid conditions limited use of agents in many cases, there was a lack of explicit contra-indication in most patients not on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB. Conclusions Heart failure is not a single disease processes, but a continuum of disease processes that vary with age. The elderly with heart failure are an undertreated population, in part due to the multitude of co-morbidities that affect them. Further prospective studies are needed to better understand the physiology and ideal treatment regiment in this growing population.

  9. Fifteen years of econophysics: worries, hopes and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Roehner, Bertrand M

    2010-01-01

    This anniversary paper is an occasion to recall some of the events that shaped institutional econophysics. But in these thoughts about the evolution of econophysics in the last 15 years we also express some concerns. Our main worry concerns the relinquishment of the simplicity requirement. Ever since the groundbreaking experiments of Galileo some three centuries ago, the great successes of physicists were largely due to the fact that they were able to decompose complex phenomena into simpler ones. Remember that the first observation of the effects of an electrical current was made by Alessandro Volta (1745-1827) on the leg of a frog! Clearly, to make sense this observation had to be broken down into several separate effects. Nowadays, with computers being able to handle huge amounts of data and to simulate any stochastic process no matter how complicated, there is no longer any real need for such a search for simplicity. Why should one spend time and effort trying to break up complicated phenomena when it is ...

  10. Has actuarial aging "slowed" over the past 250 years? A comparison of small-scale subsistence populations and European cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Fenelon, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    G.C. Williams's 1957 hypothesis famously argues that higher age-independent, or "extrinsic," mortality should select for faster rates of senescence. Long-lived species should therefore show relatively few deaths from extrinsic causes such as predation and starvation. Theoretical explorations and empirical tests of Williams's hypothesis have flourished in the past decade but it has not yet been tested empirically among humans. We test Williams's hypothesis using mortality data from subsistence populations and from historical cohorts from Sweden and England/Wales, and examine whether rates of actuarial aging declined over the past two centuries. We employ three aging measures: mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), Ricklefs's omega, and the slope of mortality hazard from ages 60-70, m'(60-70), and model mortality using both Weibull and Gompertz-Makeham hazard models. We find that (1) actuarial aging in subsistence societies is similar to that of early Europe, (2) actuarial senescence has slowed in later European cohorts, (3) reductions in extrinsic mortality associate with slower actuarial aging in longitudinal samples, and (4) men senesce more rapidly than women, especially in later cohorts. To interpret these results, we attempt to bridge population-based evolutionary analysis with individual-level proximate mechanisms.

  11. Goal directed worry rules are associated with distinct patterns of amygdala functional connectivity and vagal modulation during perseverative cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Meeten

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive and uncontrollable worry is a defining feature of Generalized Anxiety Disorder. An important endeavor in the treatment of pathological worry is to understand why some people are unable to stop worrying once they have started. Worry perseveration is associated with a tendency to deploy goal-directed worry rules (known as ‘as many as can’ worry rules; AMA. These require attention to the goal of the worry task and continuation of worry until the aims of the ‘worry bout’ are achieved. This study examined the association between the tendency to use AMA worry rules and neural and autonomic responses to a perseverative cognition induction. To differentiate processes underlying AMA worry rule use from trait worry, we also examined the relationship between scores on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire and neural and autonomic responses following the same induction. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance brain imaging while measuring emotional bodily arousal from heart rate variability (where decreased HRV indicates stress-related parasympathetic withdrawal in 19 patients with GAD and 21 control participants. Seed-based analyses were conducted to quantify brain changes in functional connectivity with the amygdala. The tendency to adopt an AMA worry rule was associated with validated measures of worry, anxiety, depression, and rumination. AMA worry rule endorsement predicted a stronger decrease in HRV and was positively associated with increased connectivity between right amygdala and locus coeruleus, a brainstem noradrenergic projection nucleus. Higher AMA scores were also associated with increased connectivity between amygdala and rostral superior frontal gyrus. Higher PSWQ scores amplified decreases in functional connectivity between right amygdala and subcallosal cortex, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and areas of parietal cortex. Our results identify neural mechanisms underlying the deployment of

  12. Age and sex-specific mortality of wild and captive populations of a monogamous pair-bonded primate (Aotus azarae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Sam; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen

    2016-01-01

    In polygynous primates, a greater reproductive variance in males has been linked to their reduced life expectancy relative to females. The mortality patterns of monogamous pair-bonded primates, however, are less clear. We analyzed the sex differences in mortality within wild (NMales = 70, NFemales...... were best fit by the logistic and Gompertz models respectively, implying greater heterogeneity in the wild environment likely due to harsher conditions. We found that age patterns of mortality were similar between the sexes in both populations. We calculated life expectancy and disparity, the latter...... a measure of the steepness of senescence, for both sexes in each population. Males and females had similar life expectancies in both populations; the wild population overall having a shorter life expectancy than the captive one. Furthermore, captive females had a reduced life-disparity relative to captive...

  13. The effects of gender and age on forensic personal identification from frontal sinus in a Turkish population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Ertugrul; Asirdizer, Mahmut; Bora, Aydin; Hekimoglu, Yavuz; Etli, Yasin; Gumus, Orhan; Keskin, Siddik

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To define the dimensions of the frontal sinus in groups standardized for age and gender and to discuss the reasons and the effects of the variations. Methods: Frontal sinus measurements were obtained from paranasal CT scans of 180 males and 180 females in the Radiology Department of Dursun Odabas Medical Center of Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, which is located in Eastern Turkey, between February and March 2016. The width and height of sinuses were measured on a coronal plane, and the anteroposterior length was measured on an axial plane. Volumes were calculated using the Hospital Information Management Systems and Image Archiving and Management System program. The Statistical Package of the Social Science version 13 was used for statistical analyses. Results: We determined differences in the frontal sinus measurements of different age groups in a Turkish adult population. Frontal sinus dimensions were usually higher in females and lower in males after 40-49 years of age than their younger counterparts, but the measurements were lower in females and higher in males in 70≤ years of age group than 60-69 years of age. Left frontal sinus was dominant in young age groups but right frontal sinus was dominant in groups 40-49 years of age or older. Conclusion: We observed crossing of the measurements between the different age groups, which we could not find clear explanations. The results of such studies may affect forensic identification from frontal sinus measurements. PMID:28042629

  14. A retrospective analysis of heterophoria values in a clinical population aged 18 to 30 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. Makgaba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on heterophoria values in South Africans  is  scanty. The  purpose  of  this  paper therefore, is to present information on the distribution of heterophoria in a clinical popula-tion aged 18 to 30 years, which hitherto is not available. The data presented here was obtained from  the  record  cards  of  475  black  South African  patients  examined  at  the  Optometry clinic, University of Limpopo (Turfloop cam-pus between 2000 and 2005. The patients were examined by final year students under the supervision  of  qualified  optometrists.  Heterophoria was  measured  for  each  patient  using  the  von Graefe  method.  The  horizontal  heterophoria for distance vision (6 m ranged from 16 prism diopters (pd esophoria to 12 pd exophoria with a mean of 0.74 pd exophoria (SD = ± 2.84 pd. For  distance  vision,  esophoria  ranged  from 0.5 to 16 pd with a mean of 3.08 pd (SD = ± 3.09, while exophoria ranged from 0.5 pd to 12 pd with a mean of 2.21 pd (SD = 1.82 pd. For near vision (0.4 m, the horizontal phorias ranged from 17 pd esophoria to 15 pd exopho-ria with a mean of 3.84 pd exophoria (SD = ± 4.80 pd. The near esophorias ranged from 0.5 to 17 pd with a mean 4.88 pd (SD = ± 3.41, while the exophorias ranged from 1.0 to 15 pd with a mean of 6.30 pd (SD = ± 2.58. Vertical heterophoria for distance vision ranged from 5 to 3 pd right hyperphoria with a mean of 0.05 pd right hyperphoria (SD = ± 0.76 whereas at near it ranged from 4 to 6 pd right hyperphoria with a mean of 0.08 pd right hypophoria (SD =  ±  0.96.  The  distributions  of  heterophoria at distance and near were non-normal.  There was  no  significant  gender  variation  in  the horizontal  values  for  distance  vision  and  the vertical  (distance  and  near  ones.  However, there was a statistically significant gender varia-tion  in  the  near  horizontal  values  (p

  15. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico's cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico.

  16. Are the prevalence and treatment of asthma similar in elite athletes and the aged-matched non-athlete population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, S; Marks, G

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medications in elite athletes compared with an age-matched non-athlete population. Data were collected from the respiratory component of annual medical screening of 424 elite athletes from the Queensland Academy of Sport. Measures included the prevalence of current asthma and ever doctor-diagnosed asthma, and the prevalence of use of treatment for asthma including beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroid medication. The prevalence of current asthma in athletes aged 18-29 years was 14% (95% CI, 9-19%), which did not differ significantly from the prevalence in the non-athlete control population (11%; 95% CI, 9-12%, P=0.3). Of athletes with current asthma, 27% were not taking any medications for asthma, and 25% were treated with short-acting beta-agonist medications alone and were not taking inhaled corticosteroids. These data indicate that the overall cumulative and period prevalence of asthma in Queensland athletes is similar to that in the general age-matched population. Athletes use beta-agonists with a frequency similar to the general population.

  17. Methods for projecting the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases in aging populations: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookmeyer, R; Gray, S

    Projections of the incidence and prevalence of disease are important for public health planning. This paper describes methods for projecting the incidence and prevalence of a chronic disease in ageing populations. The approach uses age-specific disease incidence rates together with assumptions about survival to reconstruct disease prevalence. The methods can be used to evaluate the potential impact of public health interventions that may prevent disease or prolong survival. We used the methods to project the future prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States. We found that the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease will nearly quadruple over the next 50 years. Although projections of the absolute prevalence are sensitive to assumptions about the age-specific incidence rates of disease, the proportionate growth is relatively insensitive. The increase in prevalence results from the ageing of the U.S. population. In order to perform the calculations, we have assembled U.S. Census population projections and U.S. mortality rates into computer software that is available from the authors at www.jhsph.edu/Departments/Biostats/software.h tml.

  18. Age as a determinant of phosphate flame retardant exposure of the Australian population and identification of novel urinary PFR metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eede, Nele; Heffernan, Amy L; Aylward, Lesa L; Hobson, Peter; Neels, Hugo; Mueller, Jochen F; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The demand for alternative flame retardant materials such as phosphate flame retardants and plasticizers (PFRs) is increasing, although little is known of their possible effects on human health and development. To date, no information on the exposure of children or general Australian population to PFRs is available. The objectives of this study were to characterize the average levels and age-related patterns of PFR metabolites in urine in the general Australian population and to identify novel hydroxylated PFR metabolites in urine. Surplus pathology urine samples from Queensland, Australia were stratified and pooled by age and sex (3224 individuals aged 0 to 75years into 95 pools) according to two different pooling strategies at two different time periods. Samples were analyzed by solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry following enzymatic treatment. Nine PFR metabolites were measured in the Australian population, including the first report of a hydroxylated metabolite of TCIPP (BCIPHIPP). Diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), BCIPHIPP and bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP) were detected in >95% of samples. DPHP, a metabolite of aryl-PFRs, was found in several samples at levels which were one order of magnitude higher than previously reported (up to 730ng/mL). Weighted linear regression revealed a significant negative association between log-normalized BDCIPP and DPHP levels and age (pPFR biomonitoring studies.

  19. The Search for Multiple Populations in Magellanic Cloud Clusters II: The Detection of Multiple Populations in Three Intermediate-Age SMC Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Niederhofer, F; Kozhurina-Platais, V; Larsen, S; Hollyhead, K; Lardo, C; Cabrera-Ziri, I; Kacharov, N; Platais, I; Salaris, M; Cordero, M; Dalessandro, E; Geisler, D; Hilker, M; Li, C; Mackey, D; Mucciarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    This is the second paper in our series about the search for multiple populations in Magellanic Cloud star clusters using the Hubble Space Telescope. Here we report the detection of multiple stellar populations in the colour-magnitude diagrams of the intermediate-age clusters Lindsay 1, NGC 416 and NGC 339. With ages between 6.0 and 7.5 Gyr, these clusters are the youngest ones in which chemical abundance spreads have been detected so far. This confirms that the appearance of multiple populations is not restricted to only ancient globular clusters, but may also be a common feature in clusters as young as 6 Gyr. Our results are in agreement with a recent spectroscopic study of Lindsay 1. We found that the fraction of enriched stars in NGC 416 is ~45% whereas it is ~25% in NGC 339 and ~36% in Lindsay 1. Similar to NGC 121, these fractions are lower than the average value for globular clusters in the Milky Way.

  20. Eating patterns in a population-based sample of children aged 5 to 7 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micali, Nadia; Simonoff, Emily; Elberling, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    There is still a lack of research on childhood eating patterns and their correlates in relation to psychopathology and parentally perceived impact in general population samples. We aimed to determine which eating patterns were more likely to be identified as problematic by parents, and their impact...... and association with childhood psychopathology (emotional, behavioral, and pervasive developmental disorders) in a general population child cohort....

  1. Studies of Health and Long-Term Care Expenditure Growth in Aging Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A.M. de Meijer (Claudine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn recent decades, elderly populations in most developed countries have increased considerably, both in absolute and relative terms. This growth of the elderly share of the population is mainly attributable to two demographic transitions: the (simultaneous) increase in longevity and decr

  2. Paternal age increases the risk for autism in an Iranian population sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasanfar Roksana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder which is known to have a strong genetic component and is most likely oligogenic. However, the necessary role of environmental factors has been well documented. Prior research suggests that parental characteristics, such as age and level of education, may be associated with a risk of autism. Parental age has been shown to be associated with many disorders, such as schizophrenia, childhood cancer and fetal death. However, results from studies of parental age and autism are inconsistent. Methods In the present study, we investigated the association of autism with parental age in 179 autism cases and 1611 matched cohort children from Iran. Each case was matched with nine cohort controls on parental education, sex, order of birth, consanguineous marriage, urbanism and province of residence. The Cox regression model was used to carry out conditional logistic regression on the matched data. Results There was a significant association between higher paternal age, but not maternal age, and an increasing risk of autism. An analysis of the combined effect of parental age and education also revealed that parents with higher education had an increased risk of having autistic children, with a dose-response effect of parental age. Conclusions This study, which is the first epidemiological study of autism in Iran, provides evidence of the association of paternal age and risk of autism.

  3. Neurasthenia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and the Medicalization of Worry in a Vietnamese Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Allen L

    2016-04-26

    This article examines two forms of the medicalization of worry in an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Biomedical psychiatrists understand patients' symptoms as manifestations of the excessive worry associated with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Drawing on an ethnopsychology of emotion that reflects increasingly popular models of neoliberal selfhood, these psychiatrists encourage patients to frame psychic distress in terms of private feelings to address the conditions in their lives that lead to chronic anxiety. However, most patients attribute their symptoms to neurasthenia instead of GAD. Differences between doctors' and patients' explanatory models are not just rooted in their understandings of illness but also in their respective conceptualizations of worry in terms of emotion and sentiment. Patients with neurasthenia reject doctors' attempts to psychologize distress and maintain a model of worry that supports a sense of moral selfhood based on notions of obligation and sacrifice.

  4. Emotion as a boost to metacognition: how worry enhances the quality of confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    Emotion and cognition are known to interact during human decision processes. In this study we focus on a specific kind of cognition, namely metacognition. Our experiment induces a negative emotion, worry, during a perceptual task. In a numerosity task subjects have to make a two alternative forced choice and then reveal their confidence in this decision. We measure metacognition in terms of discrimination and calibration abilities. Our results show that metacognition, but not choice, is affected by the level of worry anticipated before the decision. Under worry individuals tend to have better metacognition in terms of the two measures. Furthermore understanding the formation of confidence is better explained with taking into account the level of worry in the model. This study shows the importance of an emotional component in the formation and the quality of the subjective probabilities.

  5. Age-predicted values for lumbar spine, proximal femur, and whole-body bone mineral density: results from a population of normal children aged 3 to 18 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, C.E. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: webber@hhsc.ca; Beaumont, L.F. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Morrison, J. [McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Sala, A. [McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Pediatrics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Univ. of Milan-Bicocca, Monza (Italy); Barr, R.D. [McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Pediatrics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    We measured areal bone mineral density (BMD) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the lumbar spine and the proximal femur and for the total body in 179 subjects (91 girls and 88 boys) with no known disorders that might affect calcium metabolism. Results are also reported for lumbar spine bone mineral content (BMC) and for the derived variable, bone mineral apparent density (BMAD). Expected-for-age values for each variable were derived for boys and girls by using an expression that represented the sum of a steady increase due to growth plus a rapid increase associated with puberty. Normal ranges were derived by assuming that at least 95% of children would be included within 1.96 population standard deviations (SD) of the expected-for-age value. The normal range for lumbar spine BMD derived from our population of children was compared with previously published normal ranges based on results obtained from different bone densitometers in diverse geographic locations. The extent of agreement between the various normal ranges indicates that the derived expressions can be used for reporting routine spine, femur, and whole-body BMD measurements in children and adolescents. The greatest difference in expected-for-age values among the various studies was that arising from intermanufacturer variability. The application of published conversion factors derived from DXA measurements in adults did not account fully for these differences, especially in younger children. (author)

  6. Age, chronic non-communicable disease and choice of traditional Chinese and western medicine outpatient services in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoh Eng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1997 Hong Kong reunified with China and the development of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM started with this change in national identity. However, the two latest discussion papers on Hong Kong's healthcare reform have failed to mention the role of TCM in primary healthcare, despite TCM's public popularity and its potential in tackling the chronic non-communicable disease (NCD challenge in the ageing population. This study aims to describe the interrelationship between age, non-communicable disease (NCD status, and the choice of TCM and western medicine (WM services in the Hong Kong population. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of the Thematic Household Survey (THS 2005 dataset. The THS is a Hong Kong population representative face to face survey was conducted by the Hong Kong Administrative Region Government of China. A random sample of respondents aged >15 years were invited to report their use of TCM and WM in the past year, together with other health and demographic information. A total of 33,263 persons were interviewed (response rate 79.2%. Results Amongst those who received outpatient services in the past year (n = 18,087, 80.23% only visited WM doctors, 3.17% consulted TCM practitioners solely, and 16.60% used both type of services (double consulters. Compared to those who only consulted WM doctor, multinomial logistic regression showed that double consulters were more likely to be older, female, NCD patients, and have higher socioeconomic backgrounds. Further analysis showed that the association between age and double consulting was curvilinear (inverted U shaped regardless of NCD status. Middle aged (45-60 years NCD patients, and the NCD free "young old" group (60-75 years were most likely to double consult. On the other hand, the relationship between age and use of TCM as an alternative to WM was linear regardless of NCD status. The NCD free segment of the population was more inclined to use TCM alone

  7. [The Health, Well-Being, and Aging ("SABE") survey: methodology applied and profile of the study population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albala, Cecilia; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia; León Díaz, Esther María; Ham-Chande, Roberto; Hennis, Anselm J; Palloni, Alberto; Peláez, Martha; Pratts, Omar

    2005-01-01

    This document outlines the methodology of the Salud, Bienestar y Envejecimiento (Health, Well-Being, and Aging) survey (known as the "SABE survey"), and it also summarizes the challenges that the rapid aging of the population in Latin America and the Caribbean imposes on society in general and especially on health services. The populations of the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean are aging at a rate that has not been seen in the developed world. The evaluation of health problems and disability among older adults in those countries indicates that those persons are aging with more functional limitations and worse health than is true for their counterparts in developed nations. In addition, family networks in Latin America and the Caribbean are changing rapidly and have less capacity to make up for the lack of protections provided by social institutions. The multicenter SABE study was developed with the objective of evaluating the state of health of older adults in seven cities of Latin America and the Caribbean: Bridgetown, Barbados; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Havana, Cuba; Mexico City, Mexico; Montevideo, Uruguay; Santiago, Chile; and São Paulo, Brazil. The SABE survey has established the starting point for systematic research on aging in urban areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. Comparative studies of these characteristics and with this comparative nature should be extended to other countries, areas, and regions of the world in order to expand the knowledge available on older adults.

  8. Worry about skin cancer mediates the relation of perceived cancer risk and sunscreen use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Marc T; Ellis, Erin M

    2014-12-01

    Preventive health behaviors are believed to be motivated in part by a person's perception of risk for a particular health problem. Risk contains a cognitive component, beliefs about the chances of a health problem occurring, and an affective component, fear or worry about the health problem. Although both have been shown to influence behavior, the nature of their interrelation as an influence on behavior has not been examined. Data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, a US nationally-representative telephone survey was analyzed. Participants reported perceived absolute and comparative risk for skin cancer, feelings of worry about skin cancer, and sunscreen use behavior. Analyses examined main effects models for the relation between perceived risk, worry, and sunscreen use, as well as both moderated and mediated models. For both absolute and comparative risk, the relation between cognitively-based perceived risk for skin cancer and sunscreen use was fully mediated by feelings of worry, as evidenced by significant direct effects of worry (bs > 0.046, ps worry (bs > 0.19, ps worry was included in the models, direct effects of risk perceptions were non-significant (bs worry on the relation between risk and behavior. While cognitive risk appraisals do influence decision making and may be addressed by interventions, these findings demonstrate that affectively-based risk components play a key role in behavior regulation. Affectively-based risk might be an effective target for interventions and should be incorporated more fully in decision-making models.

  9. When we should worry more: using cognitive bias modification to drive adaptive health behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Notebaert

    Full Text Available A lack of behavioural engagement in health promotion or disease prevention is a problem across many health domains. In these cases where people face a genuine danger, a reduced focus on threat and low levels of anxiety or worry are maladaptive in terms of promoting protection or prevention behaviour. Therefore, it is possible that increasing the processing of threat will increase worry and thereby enhance engagement in adaptive behaviour. Laboratory studies have shown that cognitive bias modification (CBM can increase or decrease anxiety and worry when increased versus decreased processing of threat is encouraged. In the current study, CBM for interpretation (CBM-I is used to target engagement in sun protection behaviour. The goal was to investigate whether inducing a negative rather than a positive interpretation bias for physical threat information can enhance worry elicited when viewing a health campaign video (warning against melanoma skin cancer, and consequently lead to more adaptive behaviour (sun protection. Participants were successfully trained to either adopt a positive or negative interpretation bias using physical threat scenarios. However, contrary to expectations results showed that participants in the positive training condition reported higher levels of worry elicited by the melanoma video than participants in the negative training condition. Video elicited worry was, however, positively correlated with a measure of engagement in sun protection behaviour, suggesting that higher levels of worry do promote adaptive behaviour. These findings imply that more research is needed to determine under which conditions increased versus decreased processing of threat can drive adaptive worry. Various potential explanations for the current findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  10. When we should worry more: using cognitive bias modification to drive adaptive health behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notebaert, Lies; Chrystal, Jessica; Clarke, Patrick J F; Holmes, Emily A; MacLeod, Colin

    2014-01-01

    A lack of behavioural engagement in health promotion or disease prevention is a problem across many health domains. In these cases where people face a genuine danger, a reduced focus on threat and low levels of anxiety or worry are maladaptive in terms of promoting protection or prevention behaviour. Therefore, it is possible that increasing the processing of threat will increase worry and thereby enhance engagement in adaptive behaviour. Laboratory studies have shown that cognitive bias modification (CBM) can increase or decrease anxiety and worry when increased versus decreased processing of threat is encouraged. In the current study, CBM for interpretation (CBM-I) is used to target engagement in sun protection behaviour. The goal was to investigate whether inducing a negative rather than a positive interpretation bias for physical threat information can enhance worry elicited when viewing a health campaign video (warning against melanoma skin cancer), and consequently lead to more adaptive behaviour (sun protection). Participants were successfully trained to either adopt a positive or negative interpretation bias using physical threat scenarios. However, contrary to expectations results showed that participants in the positive training condition reported higher levels of worry elicited by the melanoma video than participants in the negative training condition. Video elicited worry was, however, positively correlated with a measure of engagement in sun protection behaviour, suggesting that higher levels of worry do promote adaptive behaviour. These findings imply that more research is needed to determine under which conditions increased versus decreased processing of threat can drive adaptive worry. Various potential explanations for the current findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  11. Worry and problem-solving skills and beliefs in primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Parkinson, Monika; Creswell, Catharine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association between worry and problem-solving skills and beliefs (confidence and perceived control) in primary school children. Method. Children (8–11 years) were screened using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children. High (N ¼ 27) and low (N ¼ 30) scorers completed measures of anxiety, problem-solving skills (generating alternative solutions to problems, planfulness, and effectiveness of solutions) and problem-solving beliefs(confidence and perceived ...

  12. Familial aggregation of pure tone hearing thresholds in an aging European population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Topsakal, Vedat

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the familial correlations and intraclass correlation of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in specific frequencies. In addition, heritability estimates were calculated.......To investigate the familial correlations and intraclass correlation of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in specific frequencies. In addition, heritability estimates were calculated....

  13. Hemispherical dominance of glucose metabolic rate in the brain of the 'normal' ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Spyrou, NM

    2004-01-01

    In the 'normal' ageing brain a decrease in the cerebral metabolic rate has been determined across many brain regions. This study determines whether age differences would affect metabolic rates in regions and different hemispheres of the brain. The regional metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) was exa

  14. Use of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire to Identify Individuals with Gad: An Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available 1.1.Background and Objectives: The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ has been established as an efficacious tool to identify individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD as against those with other anxiety disorders. We report on the use of the PSWQ in the Indian population to identify individuals with GAD. 1.2.Methods: 30 individuals with GAD and 60 with other anxiety disorders without GAD completed the PSWQ. 1.3.Results: Using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis, a score of 64, which optimized both sensitivity and specificity, was found to discriminate between individuals with GAD and those with other anxiety disorders without GAD. 1.4.Limitations:The study conducted on a small sample would benefit from further research to establish the PSWQ as an efficacious tool for identify individuals with GAD. 1.5.Conclusion: Results from the current study offer strong support for the use of the PSWQ for initial screening and identification of individuals with GAD who present for treatment for anxiety disorders.

  15. Self-esteem and social anxiety in an adolescent female eating disorder population: age and diagnostic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Nicole; Buchholz, Annick; Boerner, Katelynn E; Henderson, Katherine A; Norris, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This study explored symptoms of social anxiety and multidimensional self-esteem in a clinical, adolescent female eating disorder population. Using self-report measures, data from 344 females revealed significant negative relationships between dimensions of self-esteem and social anxiety. A diagnostic difference emerged, with the restricting subgroup reporting significantly higher perceived physical appearance and global self-worth than those with binge/purge symptoms or bulimia nervosa. No significant age differences or age by diagnosis interaction effects emerged. These findings suggest that in clinical samples of adolescent eating disorders, self-esteem and social anxiety share a significant inverse relationship and seem to remain fairly constant across adolescence.

  16. Eastern region represents a worrying cluster of active hepatitis C in Algeria in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalem, Aïcha; Selmani, Karima; Hihi, Narjes; Bencherifa, Nesrine; Mostefaoui, Fatma; Kerioui, Cherif; Pineau, Pascal; Debzi, Nabil; Berkane, Saadi

    2016-08-01

    Algeria is the largest country of Africa, peopled with populations living a range of traditional/rural and modern/urban lifestyles. The variations of prevalence of chronic active hepatitis care poorly known on the Algerian territory. We conducted a retrospective survey on all patients (n = 998) referred to our institution in 2012 and confirmed by us for an active hepatitis C. Half of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) isolates were genotyped. Forty Algerian regions out of the 48 were represented in our study. Three geographical clusters (Aïn-Temouchent/SidiBelAbbes, Algiers, and a large Eastern region) with an excess of active hepatitis C were observed. Patients coming from the Eastern cluster (Batna, Khenchela, Oum el Bouaghi, and Tebessa) were strongly over-represented (49% of cases, OR = 14.5, P < 0.0001). The hallmarks of Eastern region were an excess of women (65% vs. 46% in the remaining population, P < 0.0001) and the almost exclusive presence of HCV genotype 1 (93% vs. 63%, P = 0.0001). The core of the epidemics was apparently located in Khenchela (odds ratio = 24.6, P < 0.0001). This situation is plausibly connected with nosocomial transmission or traditional practices as scarification (Hijama), piercing or tattooing, very lively in this region. Distinct hepatitis C epidemics are currently affecting Algerian population. The most worrying situation is observed in rural regions located east of Algeria. J. Med. Virol. 88:1394-1403, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biological properties of differently-aged human keratinocytes:population doubling time growth curve and cell cycle analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-qun Ma; Jie Feng; Lech Chyczewski; Jacek Niklinski

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological properties of keratinocytes from differently-aged healthy human beings. Methods Keratinocytes from fetus, teenager and middle-aged groups were separated and cultured. The population doubling time (PDT) and cell growth curve in different cells were compared, and the cell cycles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results ① In primary culture of keratinocytes, the adherence time in middle-aged group was longer than that in fetus and teenager groups. However, all cell morphology showed no obvioas differences. In subculture of kecatinocytes, with donator's age increasing, time of cell adherence prolonged, passage number decreused and differences in cell morphology were obrioas. ② The average PDT of keratinocytes was shorter in fetus group than in teenager and middle-aged groups. Bat difference in cell growth curve between different passages was not observed. ③ Keratinocytes showed G2/M period in fetus group but G0/G1 period in teenager and middle-aged groups mainly. Conclusion As age increases, the biological properties of keratinocytes change obviously.

  18. Correlative and comparative study of Fishman′s skeletal maturity indicators with CVMI and chronological age in Lucknow population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachan Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study consists of comparison and correlation between the hand-wrist skeletal maturation indicator (SMI and the cervical vertebral maturation indicator (CVMI and verification of the reliability of the vertebral index and chronological age in the determination of the stages of the skeletal maturation. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of randomly selected 90 children from Lucknow population with 45 males (age range 10-13 years and 45 females (age range 9-12 years. Hand wrist radiograph taken for SMI, Lateral cephalogram taken for CVMI. Correlation was made between cervical vertebrae maturation and hand wrist maturation. These two methods and the chronological age were compared using the Newman-Keuls test. Results: There was strong correlation between SMI and CVMI for both male and female (0.849, 0.932. Cervical vertebrae maturation indicator and hand-wrist skeletal maturational indicator (SMI showed no statistical signi?cant difference for males and females. However, females showed maturation at an early age as compared to males. Chronological age shows significant difference in comparison to skeletal age. Conclusion: It was concluded that CVMI stages can also be used as for assessing skeletal maturity. Cervical vertebrae assessment provided a reliable assessment for pubertal growth spurt, it would be bene?cial to use a lateral cephalogram for skeletal maturity assessment and thereby eliminate the need for an additional radiograph (hand-wrist radiograph. This is cost effective and will also reduce the radiation exposure to the patient.

  19. Population Synthesis in the Blue III. The Integrated Spectrum of M67 and the Spectroscopic Age of M32

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavon, R P; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Rose, Nelson Caldwell & James A.

    2004-01-01

    We construct an integrated spectrum of the intermediate age, solar metallicity Galactic cluster M67, from individual spectra of cluster members. The integrated spectrum is used as a template to test our stellar population synthesis (SPS) models, in an age and [Fe/H] regime where such models remain largely untested. We show that our models predict a spectroscopic age of 3.5 +/- 0.5 Gyr for M67, in excellent agreement with the age we derive from the color-magnitude diagram of the cluster. The same age is obtained when using Hbeta, Hgamma or Hdelta as the age indicator. Our models predict the abundances of Fe, Mg, C and N in agreement with detailed abundance analyses of cluster stars, to within 0.1 dex. Encouraged by the high degree of consistency of our models, we apply them to the study of the integrated spectrum of the central 3 arcsec of the compact elliptical galaxy M32. The resulting luminosity-weighted age of the galaxy ranges between 2 and 3.5 Gyr, depending on the Balmer line used. According to our mode...

  20. Gait patterns in a community-dwelling population aged 50 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, V J A; van der Geest, J N; Hoogendam, Y Y; Hofman, A; Breteler, M M B; Ikram, M A

    2013-04-01

    Poor gait is an important risk factor for falls and associated with higher morbidity and mortality. It is well established that older age is associated with worse gait, but it remains unclear at what age this association is first seen. Moreover, previous studies focused mainly on normal walking, but gait also encompasses turning and tandem walking. In a large study of community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly persons we investigated the association of age with gait, focusing on normal walking, turning and tandem walking. In 1500 persons aged 50 years and over, we measured gait using an electronic walkway. Participants performed normal walks, turning and a tandem walk. With principal components analysis of 30 variables we summarized gait into five known gait factors: Rhythm, Variability, Phases, Pace and Base of Support; and uncovered two novel gait factors: Tandem and Turning. The strongest associations with age were found for Variability (difference in Z-score -0.29 per 10 years increase (95% confidence interval: -0.34; -0.24)), Phases (-0.31 per 10 years (-0.36; -0.27)) and Tandem (-0.25 per 10 years (-0.30; -0.20)). Additionally, these factors already showed association with the youngest age groups, from 55 to 60 years of age and older. Our study shows that Variability, Phases and Tandem have the strongest association with age and are the earliest to demonstrate a poorer gait pattern with higher age. Future research should further investigate how these gait factors relate with gait-related diseases in their earliest stages.