WorldWideScience

Sample records for age-related eye disease

  1. Does eating particular diets alter risk of age-related macular degeneration in users of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Recent information suggests that the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) supplement, enhanced intake of omega-3 fatty acids, and diminishing dietary glycemic index (dGI) are protective against advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Dietary information was collected a...

  2. Common cell biologic and biochemical changes in aging and age-related diseases of the eye: Toward new therapeutic approaches to age-related ocular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reviews of information about age related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, and glaucoma make it apparent that while each eye tissue has its own characteristic metabolism, structure and function, there are common perturbations to homeostasis that are associated with age-related dysfunction. The c...

  3. Nutrition and Age-Related Eye Diseases: The ALIENOR (Antioxydants, LIpides Essentiels, Nutrition et Maladies OculaiRes) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Delcourt, Cécile; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Marie-Bénédicte, Rougier; Le Goff, Mélanie; Malet, Florence; Joseph, Colin; Dartigues, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Background: Worldwide, degenerative eye diseases (age-related maculopathy (ARM), cataract, glaucoma) are the main causes of visual impairment and blindness, which contribute to disability in the elderly. Mainly three types of nutritional factors are investigated for their potential protection against eye ageing: antioxidants; lutein and zeaxanthin (carotenoids which accumulate specifically in the eye); omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Few epidemiological studies ha...

  4. Calorie restriction: A new therapeutic intervention for age-related dry eye disease in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decrease in lacrimal gland secretory function is closely related to aging and leads to an increased prevalence of dry eye syndrome. Since calorie restriction (CR) is considered to prevent functional decline of various organs due to aging, we hypothesized that CR could prevent age-related lacrimal dysfunction. Six-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into ad libitum (AL) and CR (-35%) groups. After 6 months of CR, tear function was examined under conscious state. After euthanasia, lacrimal glands were subjected to histological examination, tear protein secretion stimulation test with Carbachol, and assessment of oxidative stress with 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) antibodies. CR significantly improved tear volume and tended to increase tear protein secretion volume after stimulation with Carbachol compared to AL. The acinar unit density was significantly higher in the CR rats compared to AL rats. Lacrimal glands in the CR rats showed a lesser degree of interstitial fibrosis. CR reduced the concentration of 8-OHdG and the extent of staining with HNE in the lacrimal gland, compared to AL. Furthermore, our electron microscopic observations showed that mitochondrial structure of the lacrimal gland obtained from the middle-aged CR rats was preserved in comparison to the AL rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that CR may attenuate oxidative stress related damage in the lacrimal gland with preservation of lacrimal gland functions. Although molecular mechanism(s) by which CR maintains lacrimal gland function remains to be resolved, CR might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating dry eye syndrome.

  5. Calorie restriction: A new therapeutic intervention for age-related dry eye disease in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Okada, Naoko; Ogawa, Yoko [Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Murat, Dogru [Department of Ocular Surface and Visual Optics, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Shigeru; Nakashima, Hideo [Research Center, Ophtecs Corporation, Hyogo (Japan); Shimmura, Shigeto [Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Shinmura, Ken [Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tsubota, Kazuo, E-mail: tsubota@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-07-09

    A decrease in lacrimal gland secretory function is closely related to aging and leads to an increased prevalence of dry eye syndrome. Since calorie restriction (CR) is considered to prevent functional decline of various organs due to aging, we hypothesized that CR could prevent age-related lacrimal dysfunction. Six-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into ad libitum (AL) and CR (-35%) groups. After 6 months of CR, tear function was examined under conscious state. After euthanasia, lacrimal glands were subjected to histological examination, tear protein secretion stimulation test with Carbachol, and assessment of oxidative stress with 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) antibodies. CR significantly improved tear volume and tended to increase tear protein secretion volume after stimulation with Carbachol compared to AL. The acinar unit density was significantly higher in the CR rats compared to AL rats. Lacrimal glands in the CR rats showed a lesser degree of interstitial fibrosis. CR reduced the concentration of 8-OHdG and the extent of staining with HNE in the lacrimal gland, compared to AL. Furthermore, our electron microscopic observations showed that mitochondrial structure of the lacrimal gland obtained from the middle-aged CR rats was preserved in comparison to the AL rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that CR may attenuate oxidative stress related damage in the lacrimal gland with preservation of lacrimal gland functions. Although molecular mechanism(s) by which CR maintains lacrimal gland function remains to be resolved, CR might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating dry eye syndrome.

  6. Knowledge and Awareness of Age Related Eye Diseases: a Population-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Katibeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine general awareness and knowledge about cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy (DR, as common avoidable causes of blindness in an Iranian population. Methods: This cross-sectional population-based survey was performed on residents over 45 years of age in Tehran. The sampling frame was the list of all landline phone numbers registered by the Telecommunications Center of Iran, through which systematic random sampling was performed. Data was collected by phone-call interviews and completing a semi-structured questionnaire. Awareness was defined as whether the respondent had ever heard of the disease. Knowledge was assessed by realizing different aspects of each disease. Results: Of a total of 1,084 eligible people including 574 (52.9% women and 510 (47.1% men were included and 957 subjects (response rate, 88.3% completed the interview. Awareness regarding glaucoma, cataract and DR was 46.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]:43.4 -49.8%, 82.9% (95% CI: 80.5 -85.3% and 86.2% (95% CI: 84-88.4%. In addition, 19.2% (95% CI: 16.7 -21.7%, 57.3% (95% CI: 54.2-60.4% and 72% (95% CI: 69.2 -74.8% of respondents could give at least a basic definition of the mentioned diseases, respectively. Only 22.6% (95% CI: 20-25.2% and 41.6% (95% CI: 38.5-44.7% realized glaucoma and DR as a treatable condition; in contrast, 77.2% (95% CI: 74.5-79.9% categorized cataract as treatable. Only 19% and 7.1% knew that DR and glaucoma may commence without any apparent symptoms. Conclusion: Compared with cataract and DR, most participants had limited information about glaucoma. In addition, few of the respondents were familiar with the initial symptoms of DR and glaucoma.

  7. Co-morbidity of depression and anxiety in common age-related eye disease: a population-based study of 662 adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranmalee Eramudugolla

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of co-morbid age-related eye disease and symptoms of depression and anxiety in late life, and the relative roles of visual function and disease in explaining symptoms of depression and anxiety. A community-based sample of 662 individuals aged over 70 years was recruited through the electoral roll. Vision was measured using a battery of tests including high and low contrast visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, motion sensitivity, stereoacuity, Useful Field of View and visual fields. Depression and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Goldberg scales. The prevalence of self-reported eye disease (cataract, glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration in the sample was 43.4%, with 7.7% reporting more than one form of ocular pathology. Of those with no eye disease, 3.7% had clinically significant depressive symptoms. This rate was 6.7% among cataract patients, 4.3% among those with glaucoma, and 10.5% for age-related macular degeneration. Generalized linear models adjusting for demographics, general health, treatment and disability examined self-reported eye disease and visual function as correlates of depression and anxiety. Depressive symptoms were associated with cataract only, age-related macular degeneration, comorbid eye diseases and reduced low contrast visual acuity. Anxiety was significantly associated with self-reported cataract, and reduced low contrast visual acuity, motion sensitivity and contrast sensitivity. We found no evidence for elevated rates of depressive or anxiety symptoms associated with self-reported glaucoma. The results support previous findings of high rates of depression and anxiety in cataract and age-related macular degeneration, and in addition show that mood and anxiety are associated with objective measures of visual function independently of self-reported eye disease. The findings have implications for the assessment and treatment of mental health in the context of late

  8. Chinese Medicine for Eye Diseases: Principles of Treatment of Age Related Macular Degeneration-AMD%Chinese Medicine for Eye Diseases:Principles of Treatment of Age Related Macular Degeneration-AMD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The AMD causes a deterioration of the central field of vision of the human eye caused by loss of function of the macula. The macula is the central part of the retina, the part that receives the most freely detailed information since it contains a considerable number of daylight sensitive and colour sensitive photoreceptor cells. People with little skin pigments like European people are more frequently affected than people from the Asian continent for example. Three quarters of the people who are affected by AMD suffer from the dry form of macular degeneration which means lack of fluid or dehydration of the back part of the eye. There is no effective treatment to be known so far.

  9. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  10. Folate and age-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durga, J.

    2004-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders and an increase in their risk factors, such as decreased concentrations of folate and increased concentrations of homocysteine. The association of folate and homocysteine with age-related disease and, most impo

  11. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States, and some form of AMD is thought to affect more than 9 million individuals. Risk factors include older age, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, white race, female sex, and a family history of AMD. There are two types of advanced AMD: nonexudative (dry or geographic atrophy) and exudative (wet or neovascular). Both cause progressive central vision loss with intact peripheral vision. Nonexudative AMD accounts for 80% to 90% of all advanced cases, and more than 90% of patients with severe vision loss have exudative AMD. On ophthalmoscopic examination, early findings include drusen (ie, yellow deposits in the retina). Prominent choroidal vessels, subretinal edema, and/or hemorrhage are seen in wet AMD. Regular eye examinations, visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography are used for diagnosis and to guide management. There is no specific therapy for dry AMD, but antioxidant supplementation may be helpful. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Optical aids and devices can help to maximize function for patients with AMD. PMID:27348529

  12. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  13. Aging, frailty and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, T; Larbi, A; Witkowski, J M; McElhaney, J; Loeb, M; Mitnitski, A; Pawelec, G

    2010-10-01

    The concept of frailty as a medically distinct syndrome has evolved based on the clinical experience of geriatricians and is clinically well recognizable. Frailty is a nonspecific state of vulnerability, which reflects multisystem physiological change. These changes underlying frailty do not always achieve disease status, so some people, usually very elderly, are frail without a specific life threatening illness. Current thinking is that not only physical but also psychological, cognitive and social factors contribute to this syndrome and need to be taken into account in its definition and treatment. Together, these signs and symptoms seem to reflect a reduced functional reserve and consequent decrease in adaptation (resilience) to any sort of stressor and perhaps even in the absence of extrinsic stressors. The overall consequence is that frail elderly are at higher risk for accelerated physical and cognitive decline, disability and death. All these characteristics associated with frailty can easily be applied to the definition and characterization of the aging process per se and there is little consensus in the literature concerning the physiological/biological pathways associated with or determining frailty. It is probably true to say that a consensus view would implicate heightened chronic systemic inflammation as a major contributor to frailty. This review will focus on the relationship between aging, frailty and age-related diseases, and will highlight possible interventions to reduce the occurrence and effects of frailty in elderly people. PMID:20559726

  14. The Role of the Reactive Oxygen Species and Oxidative Stress in the Pathomechanism of the Age-Related Ocular Diseases and Other Pathologies of the Anterior and Posterior Eye Segments in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Małgorzata; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) form under normal physiological conditions and may have both beneficial and harmful role. We search the literature and current knowledge in the aspect of ROS participation in the pathogenesis of anterior and posterior eye segment diseases in adults. ROS take part in the pathogenesis of keratoconus, Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy, and granular corneal dystrophy type 2, stimulating apoptosis of corneal cells. ROS play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma stimulating apoptotic and inflammatory pathways on the level of the trabecular meshwork and promoting retinal ganglion cells apoptosis and glial dysfunction in the posterior eye segment. ROS play a role in the pathogenesis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. ROS induce apoptosis of human lens epithelial cells. ROS promote apoptosis of vascular and neuronal cells and stimulate inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in the course of diabetic retinopathy. ROS are associated with the pathophysiological parainflammation and autophagy process in the course of the age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26881021

  15. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  16. Antioxidant Micronutrients in the Prevention of Age-related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polidori M

    2003-01-01

    The role and functions of antioxidant micronutrients such as ascorbate (vitamin C), a-tocopherol (vitamin E) and carotenoids that are provided through the diet in aging and in the prevention of age-related diseases are discussed in the present work. In general, a healthy lifestyle involving regular exercise and avoidance of tobacco or alcohol abuse are the key to the prevention of several age-related diseases including cardiovascular diseases, dementia and cancer. A balanced and regular nutri...

  17. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armanios, M.; Cabo, R. de; Mannick, J.; Partridge, L.; Deursen, J. van; Villeda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing thr

  18. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionStandard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions.MethodsThe Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group.The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists.DiscussionThis trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial.

  19. Antioxidant Micronutrients in the Prevention of Age-related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polidori M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The role and functions of antioxidant micronutrients such as ascorbate (vitamin C, a-tocopherol (vitamin E and carotenoids that are provided through the diet in aging and in the prevention of age-related diseases are discussed in the present work. In general, a healthy lifestyle involving regular exercise and avoidance of tobacco or alcohol abuse are the key to the prevention of several age-related diseases including cardiovascular diseases, dementia and cancer. A balanced and regular nutrition with at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day is a critical constituent of such a healthy lifestyle.

  20. Dietary approaches that delay age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Arthur V; Hilmer, Sarah N; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Jamieson, Hamish A; Truswell, A Stewart; Sharma, Anita P; Mason, Rebecca S; Morris, Brian J; Le Couteur, David G

    2006-01-01

    Reducing food intake in lower animals such as the rat decreases body weight, retards many aging processes, delays the onset of most diseases of old age, and prolongs life. A number of clinical trials of food restriction in healthy adult human subjects running over 2-15 years show significant reductions in body weight, blood cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure, which are risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle interventions that lower energy balance by reducing body weight such as physical exercise can also delay the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In general, clinical trials are suggesting that diets high in calories or fat along with overweight are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and dementia. There is a growing literature indicating that specific dietary constituents are able to influence the development of age-related diseases, including certain fats (trans fatty acids, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats) and cholesterol for cardiovascular disease, glycemic index and fiber for diabetes, fruits and vegetables for cardiovascular disease, and calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis and bone fracture. In addition, there are dietary compounds from different functional foods, herbs, and neutraceuticals such as ginseng, nuts, grains, and polyphenols that may affect the development of age-related diseases. Long-term prospective clinical trials will be needed to confirm these diet-disease relationships. On the basis of current research, the best diet to delay age-related disease onset is one low in calories and saturated fat and high in wholegrain cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables, and which maintains a lean body weight. Such a diet should become a key component of healthy aging, delaying age-related diseases and perhaps intervening in the aging process itself. Furthermore, there are studies suggesting that nutrition in childhood and

  1. Age-related changes in the macula. A histopathological study of fifty Indian donor eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Jyotirmay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is clinically less common in India compared to the West. Therefore, clinicians are unfamiliar with histopathologic evidence of age-related macular changes in the Indian population. METHODS: Fifty consecutive human donor eyes removed for corneal grafting were studied for gross, microscopic and histochemical features of age-related changes in the macula in the Indian population. A horizontal block was cut from the globe including the optic disc, and the macula. Six sections, 6 microns thick, were cut from three levels in the macula at a distance of 140 microns. These were stained with haemotoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, Mallory, Masson trichrome, alcian blue and von Kossa stains. The presence of basal laminar deposits, drusen and thickening and calcification of Bruch′s membrane in the macula were assessed at 400 x magnification using a modified version of Sark′s classification. RESULTS: Twenty-four donor eyes (48% had some form of age-related macular change. These included basal laminar deposits, hard drusen, soft drusen, extensive retinal pigment epithelium atrophy of the macula, and disciform degeneration of macula. A combination of changes was often seen. Age-related changes were more common in the seventh and eighth decade. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that histological changes characteristic of the early stages of age-related macular degeneration are fairly common in the Indian population. However, advanced macular changes are significantly rare.

  2. Nutritional influences on epigenetics and age-related disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional epigenetics has emerged as a novel mechanism underlying gene–diet interactions, further elucidating the modulatory role of nutrition in aging and age-related disease development. Epigenetics is defined as a heritable modification to the DNA that regulates chromosome architecture and modu...

  3. Telomere length variations in aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are gene sequences present at chromosomal ends and are responsible for maintaining genome integrity. Telomere length is maximum at birth and decreases progressively with advancing age and thus is considered as a biomarker of chronological aging. This age associated decrease in the length of telomere is linked to various ageing associated diseases like diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, cancer etc. and their associated complications. Telomere length is a result of combined effect of oxidative stress, inflammation and repeated cell replication on it, and thus forming an association between telomere length and chronological aging and related diseases. Thus, decrease in telomere length was found to be important in determining both, the variations in longevity and age-related diseases in an individual. Ongoing and progressive research in the field of telomere length dynamics has proved that aging and age-related diseases apart from having a synergistic effect on telomere length were also found to effect telomere length independently also. Here a short description about telomere length variations and its association with human aging and age-related diseases is reviewed.

  4. Emerging therapies for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration--VEGF Trap-Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejdak, Robert; Szkaradek, Małgorzata; Grieb, Paweł; Jünemann, Anselm G M

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the industrialized world. The most severe form of this disease is exudative AMD. It accounts for 10% of cases of AMD and is responsible for approximately 90% cases of severe vision loss due to AMD. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy changed the standard-of-care for this blinding disease. This article presents one promising new drug for the treatment of exudative AMD--VEGF Trap-Eye. PMID:22384659

  5. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanios, Mary; de Cabo, Rafael; Mannick, Joan; Partridge, Linda; van Deursen, Jan; Villeda, Saul

    2015-12-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing through the use of model organisms, how to apply this knowledge in the clinic is less clear. In September, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, hosted a conference at the beautiful Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover, Germany with the goal of broadening our understanding of the aging process and its meaning as a 'risk factor' in disease. Here, several of the speakers at that conference answer questions posed by Nature Medicine. PMID:26646495

  6. Stem cells: Potential therapy for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    -engineered organs) to restore the functions of damaged or defective tissues and organs and thus to "rejuvenate" the failing aging body. One of the most important sources for cellular medicine is embryonic and adult (somatic) stem cells (SSCs). One example of SCCs with enormous clinical potential is the mesenchymal......Aging is associated with a progressive failing of tissues and organs of the human body leading to a large number of age-related diseases. Regenerative medicine is an emerging clinical discipline that aims to employ cellular medicines (normal cells, ex vivo expanded cells, or tissue...... stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial cells, and probably also neuron-like cells. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, MSCs are among the first...

  7. Validation of anti-aging drugs by treating age-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2009-01-01

    Humans die from age-related diseases, which are deadly manifestations of the aging process. In order to extend life span, an anti-aging drug must delay age-related diseases. All together age-related diseases are the best biomarker of aging. Once a drug is used for treatment of any one chronic disease, its effect against other diseases (atherosclerosis, cancer, prostate enlargement, osteoporosis, insulin resistance, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, age-related macular degeneration) may be...

  8. The Minnesota Grading System Using Fundus Autofluorescence of Eye Bank Eyes: A Correlation To Age-Related Macular Degeneration (An AOS Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Timothy W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To establish a grading system of eye bank eyes using fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and identify a methodology that correlates FAF to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with clinical correlation to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). Methods Two hundred sixty-two eye bank eyes were evaluated using a standardized analysis of FAF. Measurements were taken with the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO). First, high-resolution, digital, stereoscopic, color images were obtained and graded according to AREDS criteria. With the neurosensory retina removed, mean FAF values were obtained from cSLO images using software analysis that excludes areas of atrophy and other artifact, generating an FAF value from a grading template. Age and AMD grade were compared to FAF values. An internal fluorescence reference standard was tested. Results Standardization of the cSLO machine demonstrated that reliable data could be acquired after a 1-hour warm-up. Images obtained prior to 1 hour had falsely elevated levels of FAF. In this initial analysis, there was no statistical correlation of age to mean FAF. There was a statistically significant decrease in FAF from AREDS grade 1, 2 to 3, 4 (P < .0001). An internal fluorescent standard may serve as a quantitative reference. Conclusions The Minnesota Grading System (MGS) of FAF (MGS-FAF) establishes a standardized methodology for grading eye bank tissue to quantify FAF compounds in the retinal pigment epithelium and correlate these findings to the AREDS. Future studies could then correlate specific FAF to the aging process, histopathology AMD phenotypes, and other maculopathies, as well as to analyze the biochemistry of autofluorescent fluorophores. PMID:19277247

  9. Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things College Students Should Do For Their Eyes Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions Nov. 01, 2013 The ... cataract or eye disorder that needs treatment. Common Childhood Eye Diseases & Conditions When the following diseases are ...

  10. The Corneoscleral Shell of the Eye: an Age-Related Analysis of Structural Biomechanical Properties. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Iomdina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural biomechanical properties of the ocular corneoscleral shell largely determine its anatomic and optical parameters and its supporting and protective function. Therefore, changes related to age restructuring processes may affect the state of the cornea and the sclera, which should be taken into account in diagnosing eye diseases, especially age-related. According to actual literary data, age-related changes of the corneoscleral shell affecting its biomechanical properties involve all connective tissue components of the extracellular matrix: fibrous proteins (collagen and elastin and intermediate substance components (proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans. Aged patients have a larger diameter of elastic fiber fibrils in the external part of the sclera and a lower density of fibrils in the center as compared to young patients, which is an evidence of elastin damage at the molecular level and fibril degeneration. Age-related changes of proteoglycans are primarilymanifested in hydration loss, which leads to an increase in corneal and sclera density and regional thinning of tissues. Agerelated changes of collagen are less expressed than those of elastin and proteoglycans. Yet, the distance between collagen fibrils in the cornea becomes smaller with age; they are subject to destruction, and small spaces devoid of collagen tend to appear in the posterior stroma. The most pronounced age-related degenerative changes of collagen in the deeper layers of the corneal stroma occur in the limb, which accumulates more cross striated collagen fibrils. Recent years of research have shown that the formation of cross-linked chemical bonds, i.e. intra- and intermolecular cross links of collagen is the most important structural factor. It is this particular process that is responsible for structural stability of the corneal and scleral tissue, which tends to change with age or due to certain eye diseases, such as keratoconus or progressive myopia

  11. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetic Eye Disease How can diabetes affect my eyes? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes ... diabetes can also affect the nerves to the eye. Having high blood glucose from diabetes causes decreased blood supply to the ...

  12. Safety and Tolerability Study of AAV2-sFLT01 in Patients With Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-05

    Macular Degeneration; Age-Related Maculopathies; Age-Related Maculopathy; Maculopathies, Age-Related; Maculopathy, Age-Related; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Neovascularization; Gene Therapy; Therapy, Gene; Eye Diseases

  13. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...

  14. Metabolic syndrome and eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Stanley; Mohamed Abdul, Riswana Banu Binte; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Tien Y; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming a worldwide medical and public health challenge as it has been seen increasing in prevalence over the years. Age-related eye diseases, the leading cause of blindness globally and visual impairment in developed countries, are also on the rise due to aging of the population. Many of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been shown to be associated with these eye diseases. However, the association of metabolic syndrome with eye diseases is not clear. In this review, we reviewed the evidence for associations between metabolic syndrome and certain ocular diseases in populations. We also reviewed the association of individual metabolic syndrome components with ocular diseases due to a paucity of research in this area. Besides, we also summarised the current understanding of etiological mechanisms of how metabolic syndrome or the individual components lead to these ocular diseases. With increasing evidence of such associations, it may be important to identify patients who are at risk of developing metabolic syndrome as prompt treatment and intervention may potentially decrease the risk of developing certain ocular diseases.

  15. Phacoemulsification Surgery in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Kumar, Balakrishna Vineeth; Prasad, Som

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the visual outcomes and effect of phacoemulsification surgery on the progression of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods. Retrospective, noncomparative, and interventional case series. Thirty eyes from 29 subjects with neovascular AMD treated with intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections who underwent phacoemulsification and had a postsurgery follow-up of 6 months were included. LogMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was assessed preoperatively; 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively; and finally at the last visit. The frequency of anti-VEGF therapy, calculated as the number of intravitreal injections per month, and central macular thickness (CMT) before and after cataract surgery were determined. Results. Median (range) logMAR BCVA was 0.69 (0.16 to 1.32) preoperatively; 0.55 (−0.04 to 1.32) at 1 month, 0.52 (−0.1 to 1.32) at 3 months, and 0.50 (0.0 to 1.32) at 6 months postoperatively; and 0.6 (0.0 to 1.4) at final visit (P = 0.0011). There was no difference in the frequency of anti-VEGF injections between the immediate 6 months before and after phacoemulsification, which was equal to 0.1667 injections per month (P = 0.6377). Median CMT measured 203 μm preoperatively, which temporarily increased to 238 μm at 1 month after surgery (P = 0.0093) and then spontaneously returned to baseline, measuring 212.5 μm at 3 months postoperatively (P = 0.3811). Conclusion. Phacoemulsification surgery significantly improved vision in patients with neovascular AMD, with no increased need for anti-VEGF injections to keep the macula dry postoperatively. PMID:24719771

  16. P73 and age-related diseases: is there any link with Parkinson Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Grespi, Francesca; Melino, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    P73 is a member of the p53 transcription factors family with a prominent role in neurobiology, affecting brain development as well as controlling neuronal survival. Accordingly, p73 has been identified as key player in many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, neuroAIDS and Niemann-Pick type C disease. Here we investigate possible correlations of p73 with Parkinson disease. Tyrosine hydroxylase is a crucial player in Parkinson disease being the enzyme necessary...

  17. Age-related changes in central corneal thickness in normal eyes among the adult Lithuanian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galgauskas S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Saulius Galgauskas,1 Grazina Juodkaite,1 Janina Tutkuviene2 1Center of Eye Diseases, 2Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Anthropology, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania Background: The purpose of this study was to estimate mean central corneal thickness (CCT and determine whether there are any correlations between CCT, age, and sex in the adult ­Lithuanian population.Methods: A total of 1,650 Caucasians of Lithuanian origin (aged 18–89 years comprising 688 (41.7% men and 962 (58.3% women were examined. Subjects were stratified by age into seven groups. CCT was measured using ultrasonic pachymetry. Correlations between CCT, age, and sex were sought.Results: Mean (± standard deviation CCT for both eyes was 544.6±30.5 µm. Mean CCT was 545.2±30.5 µm in the left eye and 544.6±30.5 µm in the right eye, and was 545.0±25.6 µm in men and 544.4±33.5 µm in women. Mean CCT was 550.8±35.7 µm in subjects aged 18–29 years, 557.5±27.6 µm in those aged 30–39 years, 551.3±31.4 µm in those aged 50–59 years, 544.0±31.4 µm in those aged 50–59 years, 544.2±31.6 µm in those aged 60–79 years, 535.1±27.8 µm in those aged 70–79 years, and 530.1±16.8 µm in those aged 80–89 years. No statistically significant difference in CCT was found between the sexes (P>0.05. However, there was a significant difference in subjects aged 18–29 years; men had higher CCT than women (P<0.05. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between CCT and age (r=−0.263, P<0.05 that was stronger in men (r=−0.406, P<0.05 than in women (r=−0.118, P<0.05. Conclusion: The mean CCT in adult Lithuanians was 544.6±30.5 µm, of the left eye 545.2±30.5 µm and of the right – 544.6±30.5 µm. CCT of the right eye was equal to the CCT of both eyes. Mean CCT was 545.0±25.6 µm in men and 544.4±33.5 µm in women. Young men tended to have higher CCT than women. CCT decreases over the

  18. Visible Age-Related Signs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Schnohr, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is 1 of the most common age-related diseases, and also 1 of the most common causes of death in the general population. We tested the hypothesis that visible age-related signs associate with risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), myocardial infarction (MI), and de...

  19. A thermographic study on eyes affected by Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison among various forms of the pathology and analysis of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Biagini, Ilaria; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Sodi, Andrea; Corvi, Andrea; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the ocular thermographic profiles in eyes affected by Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, (2) whether any risk factors associated with the disease could affect the development of a form of AMD rather than another. Thirty-four eyes with Age-Related Maculopathy (ARM), 41 eyes with dry AMD, 60 eyes affected by wet AMD, and 74 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included in the study. The control group consisted of 48 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, systemic diseases and a body temperature higher than 37.5 °C. A total of 210 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The Ocular Surface Temperature (OST) of five ocular areas was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA test and multivariate analysis were used for statistical analyses. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P-value > 0.05), however, OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P-value < 0.0001). Smokers showed higher possibility (P-value = 0.012) of developing wet AMD instead of dry AMD. Infrared thermography may be a helpful, non-invasive and not time-consuming method to be used in the management of patients with this common degenerative maculopathy.

  20. Mechanistically linking age-related diseases and dietary carbohydrate via autophagy and the ubiquitin proteolytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data indicate that consuming diets that deliver sugar to the blood rapidly (called high glycemic index, GI) is associated with enhanced risk for age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These debilities...

  1. Dietary Approaches that Delay Age-Related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Arthur V.; Hilmer, Sarah N.; Jennie C. Brand-Miller; Jamieson, Hamish A; Truswell, A Stewart; Sharma, Anita P; Mason, Rebecca S.; Morris, Brian J.; Le Couteur, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Reducing food intake in lower animals such as the rat decreases body weight, retards many aging processes, delays the onset of most diseases of old age, and prolongs life. A number of clinical trials of food restriction in healthy adult human subjects running over 2–15 years show significant reductions in body weight, blood cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure, which are risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle interventions that lower energ...

  2. Growth factors, aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Longo, Valter D

    2016-06-01

    Simple organisms including yeast and flies with mutations in the IGF-1 and Tor-S6K pathways are dwarfs, are highly protected from toxins, and survive up to 3 times longer. Similarly, dwarf mice with deficiencies in the growth hormone-IGF-I axis are also long lived and protected from diseases. We recently reported that humans with Growth Hormone Receptor Deficiency (GHRD) rarely develop cancer or diabetes. These findings are in agreement with the effect of defects in the Tor-S6K pathways in causing dwarfism and protection of DNA. Because protein restriction reduces both GHR-IGF-1 axis and Tor-S6K activity, we examined links between protein intake, disease, and mortality in over 6000 US subjects in the NHANES CDC database. Respondents aged 50-65 reporting a high protein intake displayed an increase in IGF-I levels, a 75% increased risk of overall mortality and a 3-4 fold increased risk of cancer mortality in agreement with findings in mouse experiments. These studies point to a conserved link between proteins and amino acids, GHR-IGF-1/insulin, Tor-S6k signaling, aging, and diseases. PMID:26883276

  3. Genetic, behavioral, and sociodemographic risk factors for second eye progression in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lechanteur, Y.T.; Ven, J.P. van de; Smailhodzic, D.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Fauser, S.; Groenewoud, J.M.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was conducted to investigate the correlation of genetic, sociodemographic, and behavioral risk factors with second eye progression to end-stage AMD. METHODS: One hundred and eight patients with end-stage AMD in one or both eyes were included in a retrospective time-to-event analy

  4. Inflammation in Aging and Age-related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ikeno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The San Antonio Nathan Shock Center Conferences have attracted international speakers and participants since 1995. This annual conference, held in Bandera, Texas, USA, addresses a different topic in the biology of aging each year. The venue's intimate setting, relatively remote location, and common areas are ideal for a small conference (80–100 participants, where copious informal intellectual interchange supplements that of the formal sessions. The 2011 meeting, part of an annual series sponsored by the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, TX, USA, and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Biology of Aging, addressed the causes of age-associated inflammation and its effect on age-associated diseases.

  5. Research Highlights from the Purdue-UAB Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Connie M.; Barnes, Stephen; Wyss, J. Michael; Kim, Helen; Morré, Dorothy M.; Morré, D. James; Simon, James E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Janle, Elsa M; Ferruzzi, Mario G.

    2009-01-01

    The Purdue-UAB Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Disease uses multidisciplinary and innovative technologies to investigate the bioavailability of bioactive polyphenolic constituents from botanicals and their relationship to human health. Many age-related diseases are associated with oxidative stress and tissue damage. One of the research goals of the Purdue-UAB Center is to investigate the bioavailability of bioactive natural compounds from a complex botanical mixture to the organ af...

  6. [Diabetic eye disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, José; Vaz-Pereira, Sara; Nascimento, João; Rosa, Paulo Caldeira

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by sustained hyperglycemia leading to macro and microvascular complications. The eye is one of the main organs affected by this disease, being diabetic retinopathy the most well-known microvascular complication and the leading cause of blindness in the working age population. However, diabetic ocular disease is not only characterized by diabetic retinopathy. Other important ocular manifestations of diabetes mellitus include cataract, glaucoma, ischemic optic neuropathy, cranial nerve palsies and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome. Here, we emphasize diabetic retinopathy as the most important and characteristic complication of diabetes mellitus, but also review less well-known complications with the aim to alert and sensitize non-ophthalmologist clinicians that treat diabetic individuals, in order to promote an early diagnosis and treatment of the sight-threatening complications of diabetes. PMID:25817504

  7. What determines age-related disease: do we know all the right questions?

    OpenAIRE

    Juckett, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The average human lifespan has increased throughout the last century due to the mitigation of many infectious diseases. More people now die of age-related diseases than ever before, but these diseases have been resistant to elimination. Progress has been made in treatments and preventative measures to delay the onsets of these diseases, but most cancers and vascular diseases are still with us and they kill about the same fraction of the population year after year. For example, US Caucasian fe...

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells: a revolution in therapeutic strategies of age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Huang, Sha; Cheng, Biao; Nie, Xiaohu; Enhe, Jirigala; Feng, Changjiang; Fu, Xiaobing

    2013-01-01

    The great evolutionary biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky once said: "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution". Aging is a complex biological phenomenon and the factors governing the process of aging and age-related diseases are only beginning to be understood, oxidative stress, telomere shortening in DNA components and genetic changes were shown to be the mainly regulating mechanisms during the recent decades. Although a considerable amount of both animal and clinical data that demonstrate the extensive and safe use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is available, the precise summarization and identification of MSCs in age-related diseases remains a challenge. Along this line, this review discussed several typical age-related diseases for which MSCs have been proved to confer protection and put forward a hypothesis for the association among MSCs and age-related diseases from an evolutionary perspective. Above all, we hope further and more research efforts could be aroused to elucidate the role and mechanisms that MSCs involved in the age-related diseases.

  9. High Resolution Topography of Age-Related Changes in Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Electroencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E Sprecher

    Full Text Available Sleeping brain activity reflects brain anatomy and physiology. The aim of this study was to use high density (256 channel electroencephalography (EEG during sleep to characterize topographic changes in sleep EEG power across normal aging, with high spatial resolution. Sleep was evaluated in 92 healthy adults aged 18-65 years old using full polysomnography and high density EEG. After artifact removal, spectral power density was calculated for standard frequency bands for all channels, averaged across the NREM periods of the first 3 sleep cycles. To quantify topographic changes with age, maps were generated of the Pearson's coefficient of the correlation between power and age at each electrode. Significant correlations were determined by statistical non-parametric mapping. Absolute slow wave power declined significantly with increasing age across the entire scalp, whereas declines in theta and sigma power were significant only in frontal regions. Power in fast spindle frequencies declined significantly with increasing age frontally, whereas absolute power of slow spindle frequencies showed no significant change with age. When EEG power was normalized across the scalp, a left centro-parietal region showed significantly less age-related decline in power than the rest of the scalp. This partial preservation was particularly significant in the slow wave and sigma bands. The effect of age on sleep EEG varies substantially by region and frequency band. This non-uniformity should inform the design of future investigations of aging and sleep. This study provides normative data on the effect of age on sleep EEG topography, and provides a basis from which to explore the mechanisms of normal aging as well as neurodegenerative disorders for which age is a risk factor.

  10. High Resolution Topography of Age-Related Changes in Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprecher, Kate E; Riedner, Brady A; Smith, Richard F; Tononi, Giulio; Davidson, Richard J; Benca, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping brain activity reflects brain anatomy and physiology. The aim of this study was to use high density (256 channel) electroencephalography (EEG) during sleep to characterize topographic changes in sleep EEG power across normal aging, with high spatial resolution. Sleep was evaluated in 92 healthy adults aged 18-65 years old using full polysomnography and high density EEG. After artifact removal, spectral power density was calculated for standard frequency bands for all channels, averaged across the NREM periods of the first 3 sleep cycles. To quantify topographic changes with age, maps were generated of the Pearson's coefficient of the correlation between power and age at each electrode. Significant correlations were determined by statistical non-parametric mapping. Absolute slow wave power declined significantly with increasing age across the entire scalp, whereas declines in theta and sigma power were significant only in frontal regions. Power in fast spindle frequencies declined significantly with increasing age frontally, whereas absolute power of slow spindle frequencies showed no significant change with age. When EEG power was normalized across the scalp, a left centro-parietal region showed significantly less age-related decline in power than the rest of the scalp. This partial preservation was particularly significant in the slow wave and sigma bands. The effect of age on sleep EEG varies substantially by region and frequency band. This non-uniformity should inform the design of future investigations of aging and sleep. This study provides normative data on the effect of age on sleep EEG topography, and provides a basis from which to explore the mechanisms of normal aging as well as neurodegenerative disorders for which age is a risk factor.

  11. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Adult Risk Factors for Age-Related Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Andrea; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Harrington, HonaLee; Milne, Barry J.; Polanczyk, Guilherme; Pariante, Carmine M.; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand why children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences are at elevated risk for age-related disease, such as cardiovascular disease, by testing whether adverse childhood experiences predict enduring abnormalities in stress-sensitive biological systems, namely, the nervous, immune, and endocrine/metabolic systems. Design A 32-year prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Setting New Zealand. Participants A total of 1037 members of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study. Main Exposures During their first decade of life, study members were assessed for exposure to 3 adverse psychosocial experiences: socioeconomic disadvantage, maltreatment, and social isolation. Main Outcome Measures At age 32 years, study members were assessed for the presence of 3 age-related-disease risks: major depression, high inflammation levels (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level >3 mg/L), and the clustering of metabolic risk biomarkers (overweight, high blood pressure, high total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high glycated hemoglobin, and low maximum oxygen consumption levels. Results Children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences were at elevated risk of depression, high inflammation levels, and clustering of metabolic risk markers. Children who had experienced socioeconomic disadvantage (incidence rate ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.36–2.62), maltreatment (1.81; 1.38–2.38), or social isolation (1.87; 1.38–2.51) had elevated age-related-disease risks in adulthood. The effects of adverse childhood experiences on age-related-disease risks in adulthood were nonredundant, cumulative, and independent of the influence of established developmental and concurrent risk factors. Conclusions Children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences have enduring emotional, immune, and metabolic abnormalities that contribute to explaining their elevated risk for age-related disease. The

  12. Impact of Endothelial Microparticles on Coagulation, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis in Age-Related Vascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Markiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial microparticles (EMPs are complex vesicular structures that originate from plasma membranes of activated or apoptotic endothelial cells. EMPs play a significant role in vascular function by altering the processes of inflammation, coagulation, and angiogenesis, and they are key players in the pathogenesis of several vascular diseases. Circulating EMPs are increased in many age-related vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebral ischemia, and congestive heart failure. Their elevation in plasma has been considered as both a biomarker and bioactive effector of vascular damage and a target for vascular diseases. This review focuses on the pleiotropic roles of EMPs and the mechanisms that trigger their formation, particularly the involvement of decreased estrogen levels, thrombin, and PAI-1 as major factors that induce EMPs in age-related vascular diseases.

  13. Zooming in on the hippocampus in aging and age-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, L.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure important for memory and emotion regulation. The hippocampal formation is susceptible to aging and age-related diseases, which is manifested as volume loss, visible on MRI scans. The hippocampal formation consists of several subfields with different cel

  14. Cellular senescence in aging and age-related disease: from mechanisms to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Childs, B.G.; Durik, M.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a process that imposes permanent proliferative arrest on cells in response to various stressors, has emerged as a potentially important contributor to aging and age-related disease, and it is an attractive target for therapeutic exploitation. A wealth of information about senesc

  15. What determines age-related disease: do we know all the right questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, David A

    2010-06-01

    The average human lifespan has increased throughout the last century due to the mitigation of many infectious diseases. More people now die of age-related diseases than ever before, but these diseases have been resistant to elimination. Progress has been made in treatments and preventative measures to delay the onsets of these diseases, but most cancers and vascular diseases are still with us and they kill about the same fraction of the population year after year. For example, US Caucasian female deaths from breast plus genital cancers have remained a fairly constant approximately 7% of the age-related disease deaths from 1938 to 1998 and have been consistently approximately 2-fold greater than female colon plus rectal cancer deaths over that span. This type of stability pattern pervades the age-related diseases and suggests that intrinsic properties within populations determine these fractions. Recognizing this pattern and deciphering its origin will be necessary for the complete understanding of these major causes of death. It would appear that more than the random processes of aging drive this effect. The question is how to meaningfully approach this problem. This commentary discusses the epidemiological and aging perspectives and their current limitations in providing an explanation. The age of bioinformatics offers hope, but only if creative systems approaches are forthcoming. PMID:19904627

  16. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  17. OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS AND AGE-RELATED DISEASES: REALITIES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiology is so high that in many countries omega-3 fatty acids are included into the treatment protocols for patients with cardiovascular diseases. This therapeutic class slows down oxidative stress and chronic inflammation processes, thereby providing a significant contribution to the complex treatment of hypertension. Besides, omega-3 fatty acids slow down the aging process and prevent the development of age-related diseases affecting the rate of telomere shortening.

  18. Glycation: the angiogenic paradox in aging and age-related disorders and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, F; Grossin, N; Chassagne, P; Puisieux, F; Boulanger, E

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenesis is generally a quiescent process which, however, may be modified by different physiological and pathological conditions. The "angiogenic paradox" has been described in diabetes because this disease impairs the angiogenic response in a manner that differs depending on the organs involved and disease evolution. Aging is also associated with pro- and antiangiogenic processes. Glycation, the post-translational modification of proteins, increases with aging and the progression of diabetes. The effect of glycation on angiogenesis depends on the type of glycated proteins and cells involved. This complex link could be responsible for the "angiogenic paradox" in aging and age-related disorders and diseases. Using diabetes as a model, the present work has attempted to review the age-related angiogenic paradox, in particular the effects of glycation on angiogenesis during aging.

  19. Estimation of Heterogeneity in Diagnostic Parameters of Age-related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokh, David; Stambler, Ilia

    2014-08-01

    The heterogeneity of parameters is a ubiquitous biological phenomenon, with critical implications for biological systems functioning in normal and diseased states. We developed a method to estimate the level of objects set heterogeneity with reference to particular parameters and applied it to type II diabetes and heart disease, as examples of age-related systemic dysfunctions. The Friedman test was used to establish the existence of heterogeneity. The Newman-Keuls multiple comparison method was used to determine clusters. The normalized Shannon entropy was used to provide the quantitative evaluation of heterogeneity. There was obtained an estimate for the heterogeneity of the diagnostic parameters in healthy subjects, as well as in heart disease and type II diabetes patients, which was strongly related to their age. With aging, as with the diseases, the level of heterogeneity (entropy) was reduced, indicating a formal analogy between these phenomena. The similarity of the patterns in aging and disease suggested a kind of "early aging" of the diseased subjects, or alternatively a "disease-like" aging process, with reference to these particular parameters. The proposed method and its validation on the chronic age-related disease samples may support a way toward a formal mathematical relation between aging and chronic diseases and a formal definition of aging and disease, as determined by particular heterogeneity (entropy) changes. PMID:25110613

  20. Inefficient DNA Repair Is an Aging-Related Modifier of Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Sepe; Chiara Milanese; Sylvia Gabriels; Derks, Kasper W.J.; Cesar Payan-Gomez; Wilfred F.J. van IJcken; Yvonne M.A. Rijksen; Alex L. Nigg; Sandra Moreno; Silvia Cerri; Fabio Blandini; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Pier G. Mastroberardino

    2016-01-01

    The underlying relation between Parkinson’s disease (PD) etiopathology and its major risk factor, aging, is largely unknown. In light of the causative link between genome stability and aging, we investigate a possible nexus between DNA damage accumulation, aging, and PD by assessing aging-related DNA repair pathways in laboratory animal models and humans. We demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts from PD patients display flawed nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity and that Ercc1 mutant mice...

  1. Inefficient DNA Repair Is an Aging-Related Modifier of Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sepe, Sara; Milanese, Chiara; Gabriels, Sylvia; Derks, Kasper W.J.; Payan-Gomez, Cesar; Wilfred F.J. van IJcken; Yvonne M.A. Rijksen; Nigg, Alex L.; Moreno, Sandra; Cerri, Silvia; Blandini, Fabio; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Mastroberardino, Pier G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The underlying relation between Parkinson’s disease (PD) etiopathology and its major risk factor, aging, is largely unknown. In light of the causative link between genome stability and aging, we investigate a possible nexus between DNA damage accumulation, aging, and PD by assessing aging-related DNA repair pathways in laboratory animal models and humans. We demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts from PD patients display flawed nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity and that Ercc1 mut...

  2. An eye on nutrition: The role of vitamins, essential fatty acids, and antioxidants in age-related macular degeneration, dry eye syndrome, and cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Meagen M; Durrani, Khayyam; Payette, Michael J; Suchecki, Jeanine

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment is a global epidemic. In developing countries, nutritional deficiency and cataracts continue to be the leading cause of blindness, whereas age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts are the leading causes in developed nations. The World Health Organization has instituted VISION 2020: "The Right to Sight" as a global mission to put an end to worldwide blindness. In industrialized societies, patients, physicians, researchers, nutritionists, and biochemists have been looking toward vitamins and nutrients to prevent AMD, cataracts, and dry eye syndrome (DES). Nutrients from the AREDS2 study (lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, copper, eicosapentanoic acid [EPA], and docosahexanoic acid [DHA]) set forth by the National Institutes of Health remain the most proven nutritional therapy for reducing the rate of advanced AMD. Omega-3 fatty acids, especially DHA, have been found to improve DES in randomized clinical trials. Conflicting results have been seen with regard to multivitamin supplementation on the prevention of cataract. PMID:26903189

  3. Innate immunity and inflammation in ageing: a key for understanding age-related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonna-Romano Giuseppina

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The process of maintaining life for the individual is a constant struggle to preserve his/her integrity. This can come at a price when immunity is involved, namely systemic inflammation. Inflammation is not per se a negative phenomenon: it is the response of the immune system to the invasion of viruses or bacteria and other pathogens. During evolution the human organism was set to live 40 or 50 years; today, however, the immune system must remain active for much a longer time. This very long activity leads to a chronic inflammation that slowly but inexorably damages one or several organs: this is a typical phenomenon linked to ageing and it is considered the major risk factor for age-related chronic diseases. Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes and even sarcopenia and cancer, just to mention a few – have an important inflammatory component, though disease progression seems also dependent on the genetic background of individuals. Emerging evidence suggests that pro-inflammatory genotypes are related to unsuccessful ageing, and, reciprocally, controlling inflammatory status may allow a better chance of successful ageing. In other words, age-related diseases are "the price we pay" for a life-long active immune system: this system has also the potential to harm us later, as its fine tuning becomes compromised. Our immune system has evolved to control pathogens, so pro-inflammatory responses are likely to be evolutionarily programmed to resist fatal infections with pathogens aggressively. Thus, inflammatory genotypes are an important and necessary part of the normal host responses to pathogens in early life, but the overproduction of inflammatory molecules might also cause immune-related inflammatory diseases and eventually death later. Therefore, low responder genotypes involved in regulation of innate defence mechanisms, might better control inflammatory responses and age-related disease development, resulting in an increased

  4. Discover the network mechanisms underlying the connections between aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialiang; Huang, Tao; Song, Won-Min; Petralia, Francesca; Mobbs, Charles V; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Yong; Schadt, Eric E; Zhu, Jun; Tu, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Although our knowledge of aging has greatly expanded in the past decades, it remains elusive why and how aging contributes to the development of age-related diseases (ARDs). In particular, a global mechanistic understanding of the connections between aging and ARDs is yet to be established. We rely on a network modelling named "GeroNet" to study the connections between aging and more than a hundred diseases. By evaluating topological connections between aging genes and disease genes in over three thousand subnetworks corresponding to various biological processes, we show that aging has stronger connections with ARD genes compared to non-ARD genes in subnetworks corresponding to "response to decreased oxygen levels", "insulin signalling pathway", "cell cycle", etc. Based on subnetwork connectivity, we can correctly "predict" if a disease is age-related and prioritize the biological processes that are involved in connecting to multiple ARDs. Using Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an example, GeroNet identifies meaningful genes that may play key roles in connecting aging and ARDs. The top modules identified by GeroNet in AD significantly overlap with modules identified from a large scale AD brain gene expression experiment, supporting that GeroNet indeed reveals the underlying biological processes involved in the disease. PMID:27582315

  5. Physiological antioxidative network of the bilirubin system in aging and age-related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Young eKim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is detrimental to life processes and is particularly responsible for aging and age-related diseases. Thus, most organisms are well equipped with a spectrum of biological defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. The major efficient antioxidative mechanism is the glutathione system, operating a redox cycling mechanism for glutathione utilization, which consists of glutathione and its peroxidase and reductase. However, this system is mainly effective for hydrophilic oxidants, while lipophilic oxidants require another scavenging system. Since many age-related pathological conditions are related to lipid peroxidation, especially in association with the aging process, the physiological role of the scavenging system for lipophilic oxidants should be considered. In this regard, the biliverdin to bilirubin conversion pathway, via biliverdin reductase, is suggested to be another major protective mechanism that scavenges lipophilic oxidants because of the lipophilic nature of bilirubin. The efficiency of this bilirubin system might be potentiated by operation of the intertwined bicyclic systems of the suggested redox metabolic cycle of biliverdin and bilirubin and the transcriptional control cycle of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-1. In order to combat oxidative stress, both anti-oxidative systems, against hydrophilic and lipophilic oxidants, respectively, are required to work cooperatively. In this regard, the roles of the bilirubin system in aging and age-related diseases are reassessed in this review, and their interacting networks are evaluated.

  6. Inefficient DNA Repair Is an Aging-Related Modifier of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Sara; Milanese, Chiara; Gabriels, Sylvia; Derks, Kasper W J; Payan-Gomez, Cesar; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Rijksen, Yvonne M A; Nigg, Alex L; Moreno, Sandra; Cerri, Silvia; Blandini, Fabio; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Mastroberardino, Pier G

    2016-05-31

    The underlying relation between Parkinson's disease (PD) etiopathology and its major risk factor, aging, is largely unknown. In light of the causative link between genome stability and aging, we investigate a possible nexus between DNA damage accumulation, aging, and PD by assessing aging-related DNA repair pathways in laboratory animal models and humans. We demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts from PD patients display flawed nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity and that Ercc1 mutant mice with mildly compromised NER exhibit typical PD-like pathological alterations, including decreased striatal dopaminergic innervation, increased phospho-synuclein levels, and defects in mitochondrial respiration. Ercc1 mouse mutants are also more sensitive to the prototypical PD toxin MPTP, and their transcriptomic landscape shares important similarities with that of PD patients. Our results demonstrate that specific defects in DNA repair impact the dopaminergic system and are associated with human PD pathology and might therefore constitute an age-related risk factor for PD. PMID:27210754

  7. β-amyloidopathy in the Pathogenesis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Correlation with Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Victor V; Nesterova, Alla A

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of new biotechnology and genetic engineering methods to the study of the aging organism allowed to select a group of neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) which have a similar mechanism of pathogenesis including pathological processes of protein aggregation and its deposition in the structures of nerve tissue. The development of eye and brain from one embryonic germ layer, community of ethiopathogenetic and morphological manifestations of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), a common pathway of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) are associated with the pathological aggregation of fibrillar β-amyloid (Aβ) protein and the development of β-amyloidopathy in structural elements of the eye and the brain. The review demonstrates the keynote of AMD and AD pathogenesis is β-amyloidopathy that is a manifestation of proteinopathy leading to cytotoxicity, neurodegeneration and the development of pathological apoptosis activated by the formation of intracellular Aβ. This view on the problem predetermines the development of new strategies for the creating of ophthalmogeriatric and neuroprotective drugs affecting the pathogenesis and including all stages of Aβ formation and pathological aggregation. PMID:26427402

  8. The role of DNA methylation in aging, rejuvenation, and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adiv A; Akman, Kemal; Calimport, Stuart R G; Wuttke, Daniel; Stolzing, Alexandra; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-10-01

    DNA methylation is a major control program that modulates gene expression in a plethora of organisms. Gene silencing through methylation occurs through the activity of DNA methyltransferases, enzymes that transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the carbon 5 position of cytosine. DNA methylation patterns are established by the de novo DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) DNMT3A and DNMT3B and are subsequently maintained by DNMT1. Aging and age-related diseases include defined changes in 5-methylcytosine content and are generally characterized by genome-wide hypomethylation and promoter-specific hypermethylation. These changes in the epigenetic landscape represent potential disease biomarkers and are thought to contribute to age-related pathologies, such as cancer, osteoarthritis, and neurodegeneration. Some diseases, such as a hereditary form of sensory neuropathy accompanied by dementia, are directly caused by methylomic changes. Epigenetic modifications, however, are reversible and are therefore a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Numerous drugs that specifically target DNMTs are being tested in ongoing clinical trials for a variety of cancers, and data from finished trials demonstrate that some, such as 5-azacytidine, may even be superior to standard care. DNMTs, demethylases, and associated partners are dynamically shaping the methylome and demonstrate great promise with regard to rejuvenation.

  9. The Rationale for Delaying Aging and the Prevention of Age-Related Diseases

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    Nir Barzilai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [Excerpt] We offer a different approach to delaying or preventing age-related diseases. To understand the necessity for a new approach we have plotted the mortality rates in Israelis in relation to specific age groups and diseases. With the common phenomenon of aging of Western populations it is of utmost importance to follow time-dependent and age-dependent mortality patterns to predict future needs of Western health systems. Age-specific, gender-specific, and cause-of-death-specific mortality rates were extracted from the statistical abstract of Israel1 and include data for the period of 1975–2010; these are presented in Figure 1, separately for men (A and women (B. Detailed age-specific causes of death data were available for the year 2009. Data presented were restricted to 5-year age groups starting at age 50, and for cause-specific mortality to the following age groups: 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85+. Causes of mortality were separated into malignant diseases, acute myocardial infarction, other ischemic heart diseases, other forms of heart diseases, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, respiratory diseases, diseases of kidney, infectious diseases, all external causes, signs/symptoms and ill-defined conditions, and all other diseases. Figure 1 is similar to the one posted on the National Institute of Aging website and similar to data across the industrial world. The striking feature of this graph is that aging is a major log scale risk for most diseases, including the major killers: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. For example, while aging is a 100-fold risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD according to Figure 1, hypercholesterolemia is known to carry only a three-fold risk for CVD. For each of the mentioned diseases, aging is a log risk greater than the most important known risk factor for that disease.

  10. The Role of Vitamins in the Treatment of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mandić, Zdravko; Benčić, Goran; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    The role of vitamins in the treatment of age related macular degeneration was reviewed. The following studies were selected for review: Eye Disease Case Control Study (EDCCS), Beaver Dam Eye Study, Blue Mountains Eye Study, Pathologies Oculaires Liees a l'Age Study (studija POLA) and Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). These studies showed that antioxidant intake could be recommended in patients with certain forms of age related macular degeneration. A definite answer concerning the role o...

  11. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material for age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksuphew, Sarawut; Noisa, Parinya

    2015-03-26

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the key event that leads to nervous system dysfunctions and diseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, for instance Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, are associated to aging and suggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neural stem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenous neural stem cells exist throughout life and are found in specific niches of human brain. These neural stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of new neurons to restore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of the brain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated, propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most cell types of the brain. On the other hand, other types of stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can also serve as a source for neural stem cell production, that hold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. The replacement of neural stem cells, either endogenous or stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impaired brain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic mean for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinical features and current routinely treatments of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are documented. Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence of neural stem cells and their derivatives in curing such diseases, together with the remaining challenges to achieve the best outcome for patients.

  12. Rehabilitation of Age-related Diseases%老年疾病的康复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔旭妍

    2015-01-01

    基于国际功能、残疾和健康分类(ICF)中关于疾病与健康理念,及生物医学向生物-心理-社会-环境医学模式的转变的理论,分系统阐述了老年疾病,并从个体、社会和环境几个方面阐述老年疾病的康复。%The transformation of the ICF disease and health concept and biomedical based on to the bio psycho social environment of medical model theory, This paper describes the age-related diseases and expounds rehabilitation from the individual, social and environmental aspects.

  13. Niemann-Pick C disease gene mutations and age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zech

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a rare autosomal-recessively inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in NPC1 (95% or NPC2. Given the highly variable phenotype, diagnosis is challenging and particularly late-onset forms with predominantly neuropsychiatric presentations are likely underdiagnosed. Pathophysiologically, genetic alterations compromising the endosomal/lysosomal system are linked with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. We sought to examine a possible association of rare sequence variants in NPC1 and NPC2 with Parkinson's disease (PD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, and to genetically determine the proportion of potentially misdiagnosed NPC patients in these neurodegenerative conditions. By means of high-resolution melting, we screened the coding regions of NPC1 and NPC2 for rare genetic variation in a homogenous German sample of patients clinically diagnosed with PD (n = 563, FTLD (n = 133 and PSP (n = 94, and 846 population-based controls. The frequencies of rare sequence variants in NPC1/2 did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Disease-associated NPC1/2 mutations were found in six PD patients (1.1% and seven control subjects (0.8%, but not in FTLD or PSP. All rare variation was detected in the heterozygous state and no compound heterozygotes were observed. Our data do not support the hypothesis that rare NPC1/2 variants confer susceptibility for PD, FTLD, or PSP in the German population. Misdiagnosed NPC patients were not present in our samples. However, further assessment of NPC disease genes in age-related neurodegeneration is warranted.

  14. Inefficient DNA Repair Is an Aging-Related Modifier of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sepe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The underlying relation between Parkinson’s disease (PD etiopathology and its major risk factor, aging, is largely unknown. In light of the causative link between genome stability and aging, we investigate a possible nexus between DNA damage accumulation, aging, and PD by assessing aging-related DNA repair pathways in laboratory animal models and humans. We demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts from PD patients display flawed nucleotide excision repair (NER capacity and that Ercc1 mutant mice with mildly compromised NER exhibit typical PD-like pathological alterations, including decreased striatal dopaminergic innervation, increased phospho-synuclein levels, and defects in mitochondrial respiration. Ercc1 mouse mutants are also more sensitive to the prototypical PD toxin MPTP, and their transcriptomic landscape shares important similarities with that of PD patients. Our results demonstrate that specific defects in DNA repair impact the dopaminergic system and are associated with human PD pathology and might therefore constitute an age-related risk factor for PD.

  15. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS. Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  16. Principles and practice of hormetic treatment of aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Suresh Is

    2008-02-01

    Aging is characterized by stochastic accumulation of molecular damage, progressive failure of maintenance and repair, and consequent onset of age-related diseases. Applying hormesis in aging research and therapy is based on the principle of stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways by repeated exposure to mild stress. Studies on the beneficial biological effects of repeated mild heat shock on human cells in culture, and other studies on the anti-aging and life-prolonging effects of proxidants, hypergravity, irradiation and ethanol on cells and organisms suggest that hormesis as an antiaging and gerontomodulatory approach has a promising future. Its clinical applications include prevention and treatment of diabetes, cataract, osteoporosis, dementia and some cancers.

  17. The Association of Outdoor Activity and Age-Related Cataract in a Rural Population of Taizhou Eye Study: Phase 1 Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Tang

    Full Text Available To study the relationship between outdoor activity and risk of age-related cataract (ARC in a rural population of Taizhou Eye Study (phrase 1 report.A population-based, cross-sectional study of 2006 eligible rural adults (≥45 years old from Taizhou Eye Study was conducted from Jul. to Sep. 2012. Participants underwent detailed ophthalmologic examinations including uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, intraocular pressure (IOP, slit lamp and fundus examinations as well as questionnaires about previous outdoor activity and sunlight protection methods. ARC was recorded by LOCSⅢ classification system. The prevalence of cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract were assessed separately for the risk factors and its association with outdoor activity.Of all 2006 eligible participants, 883 (44.0% adults were diagnosed with ARC. The prevalence rates of cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract per person were 41.4%, 30.4% and 1.5%, respectively. Women had a higher tendency of nuclear and cortical cataract than men (OR = 1.559, 95% CI 1.204-2.019 and OR = 1.862, 95% CI 1.456-2.380, respectively. Adults with high myopia had a higher prevalence of nuclear cataract than adults without that (OR = 2.528, 95% CI 1.055-6.062. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that age was risk factor of nuclear (OR = 1.190, 95% CI 1.167-1.213 and cortical (OR = 1.203, 95% CI 1.181-1.226 cataract; eyes with fundus diseases was risk factor of posterior subcapsular cataract (OR = 6.529, 95% CI 2.512-16.970. Outdoor activity was an independent risk factor of cortical cataract (OR = 1.043, 95% CI 1.004-1.083. The risk of cortical cataract increased 4.3% (95% CI 0.4%-8.3% when outdoor activity time increased every one hour. Furthermore, the risk of cortical cataract increased 1.1% (95% CI 0.1%-2.0% when cumulative UV-B exposure time increased every one year.Outdoor activity was an independent risk factor for cortical

  18. Management of thyroid eye disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Tanda, Maria Laura [Department of Endocrinology, University of Insubria, Ospedale di Circolo, Viale Borri, 57, 21100 Varese (Italy); Marcocci, Claudio; Pinchera, Aldo [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  19. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  20. Role of homocysteine in age-related vascular and non-vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnetti, L; Bottiglieri, T; Lowenthal, D

    1997-08-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) may represent a metabolic link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular diseases and old-age dementias. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease, and is also associated with cerebrovascular disease; specifically, the risk of extracranial carotid atherosclerosis significantly increases in relation to Hcy levels. Hcy is a reliable marker of vitamin B12 deficiency, a common condition in the elderly which is known to induce neurological deficits including cognitive impairment; a high prevalence of folate deficiency has been reported in psychogeriatric patients suffering from depression and dementia. Both these vitamins occupy a key position in the remethylation and synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), a major methyl donor in CNS; therefore, deficiencies in either of these vitamins lead to a decrease in SAMe and increase in Hcy, which can be critical in the aging brain. Another pathogenetic mechanism linking high Hcy levels to reduced cognitive performances in the elderly might be represented by excitotoxicity, since hyperhomocysteinemia may lead to an excessive production of homocysteic acid and cysteine sulphinic acid, which act as endogenous agonists of NMDA receptors. Considering the reasonably high prevalence in the general population of a genetic predisposition to a thermolabile form of the enzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), hyperhomocysteinemia can be seen as the result of multiple genetic and environmental factors leading to vascular and/or neurodegenerative disorders where age-related involutive phenomena represent a common pathogenetic ground. Systematic studies in different psychogeriatric conditions monitoring Hcy levels and clinical features before and after vitamin supplementation are therefore highly recommended. PMID:9359935

  1. Cognitive Reserve Modifies Age-Related Alterations in CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rodrigo P.; Schultz, Stephanie A.; Austin, Benjamin P.; Boots, Elizabeth A.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Sager, Mark; Hermann, Bruce P.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Carlsson, Cindy; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Although advancing age is the strongest risk factor for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent studies have shown that there are individual differences in susceptibility to age-related alterations in the biomarkers of AD pathophysiology. Objective In this study, we investigated whether cognitive reserve modifies the adverse influence of age on key cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional cohort of 268 individuals (211 cognitively normal and 57 cognitively impaired) from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention and the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center participated in this study. They underwent lumbar puncture for collection of CSF samples, from which amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) were immunoassayed. Additionally, we computed t-tau/Aβ42 and p-tau/Aβ42 ratios. Cognitive reserve was indexed by years of education, with ≥16 years taken to confer high reserve. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the effect of age on CSF biomarkers was modified by cognitive reserve. Main outcome measures CSF levels of Aβ42, t-tau, p-tau, t-tau/Aβ42, and p-tau/Aβ42. Results There were significant age*cognitive reserve interactions for CSF t-tau (p=.019), p-tau (p=.009), t-tau/Aβ42 (p=.021), and p-tau/Aβ42 (p=.004). Specifically, with advancing age, individuals with high cognitive reserve exhibited attenuated adverse alterations in these CSF biomarkers compared with individuals with low cognitive reserve. This attenuation of age effects by cognitive reserve tended to be more pronounced in the cognitively-impaired group compared with the cognitively-normal group. Lastly, there was modest evidence of a dose response relationship such that the effect of age on the biomarkers was progressively attenuated given additional years of schooling. Conclusions and Relevance In a sample comprised of both cognitively

  2. Nutraceutical properties of extra-virgin olive oil: a natural remedy for age-related disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virruso, Claudia; Accardi, Giulia; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Candore, Giuseppina; Vasto, Sonya; Caruso, Calogero

    2014-04-01

    The health benefits of the Mediterranean diet can be largely ascribed to the nutraceutical properties of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). Mono-unsaturated fatty acids and various phenolic compounds, such as oleocanthal, oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosol, are the main nutraceutical substances of EVOO. These substances have been suggested to have the ability to modulate aging-associated processes. In experimental models, it has been shown that EVOO with high concentrations of polyphenols has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. Indeed, it was observed that hydroxytyrosol and oleocanthal inhibit the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and -2) responsible for prostaglandin production; oleuropein is a radical scavenger that blocks the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins. Due to the relevance of olive oil in the economy of Sicily, our group has been funded to assess the nutraceutical properties of different kinds of olive oil. Indeed, the aim of the study is to evaluate effects of EVOOs, with low and high polyphenols content, on immuno-inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in young and old people. A further objective of our group is to evaluate effects of EVOO, with low and high polyphenol content, on the expression of genes encoding proteins that take part in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway involved in longevity. The results of the study will be useful for producing olive oil enriched in nutraceutical properties that may be likely helpful in the prevention of age-related diseases. PMID:24219356

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Redox Signaling in Myofibroblast Differentiation and Age-Related Fibrotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Sampson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofibroblast activation plays a central role during normal wound healing. Whereas insufficient myofibroblast activation impairs wound healing, excessive myofibroblast activation promotes fibrosis in diverse tissues (including benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH leading to organ dysfunction and also promotes a stromal response that supports tumor progression. The incidence of impaired wound healing, tissue fibrosis, BPH, and certain cancers strongly increases with age. This paper summarizes findings from in vitro fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation systems that serve as cellular models to study fibrogenesis of diverse tissues. Supported by substantial in vivo data, a large body of evidence indicates that myofibroblast differentiation induced by the profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta is driven by a prooxidant shift in redox homeostasis due to elevated production of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4-derived hydrogen peroxide and supported by concomitant decreases in nitric oxide/cGMP signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes. Fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation can be inhibited and reversed by restoring redox homeostasis using antioxidants or NOX4 inactivation as well as enhancing nitric oxide/cGMP signaling via activation of soluble guanylyl cyclases or inhibition of phosphodiesterases. Current evidence indicates the therapeutic potential of targeting the prooxidant shift in redox homeostasis for the treatment of age-related diseases associated with myofibroblast dysregulation.

  4. Oxidative damage impact on aging and age-related diseases: drug targeting of telomere attrition and dynamic telomerase activity flirting with imidazole-containing dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Vishnyakova, Khava S; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2014-01-01

    carcinine, making it clinically possible that slowing down the rate of telomere shortening could slow down the human aging process in specific tissues where proliferative senescence is known to occur with the demonstrated evidence of telomere shortening appeared to be a hallmark of oxidative stress and disease. The preliminary longitudinal studies of elderly individuals suggest that longer telomeres are associated with better survival and an advanced oral nutritional support with non-hydrolyzed carnosine (or carcinine and patented compositions thereof) and patented N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops are useful therapeutic tools of a critical telomere length maintenance that may fundamentally be applied in the treatment of age-related sight-threatening eye disorders, prolong life expectancy, increase survival and chronological age of an organism in health control, smoking behavior and disease. PMID:24894799

  5. Differential age-related changes in N170 responses to upright faces, inverted faces, and eyes in Japanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study were to investigate the development of face perception in Japanese children, focusing on the changes in face processing strategies (holistic and/or configural vs. feature-based that occur during childhood. To achieve this, we analyzed the face-related N170 component, evoked by upright face, inverted face, and eyes stimuli in 82 Japanese children aged between 8- and 13-years-old. During the experiment, the children were asked to perform a target detection task in which they were told to press a button when they saw images of faces or kettles with moustaches, glasses, and fake noses; i.e., an implicit face perception task. The N170 signals observed after the presentation of the upright face stimuli were longer in duration and/or had at least two peaks in the 8-11-year-old children, whereas those seen in the 12-13-year-old children were sharp and only had a single peak. N170 latency was significantly longer after the presentation of the eyes stimuli than after the presentation of the upright face stimuli in the 10- and 12-year-old children. In addition, significant differences in N170 latency were observed among all three stimulus types in the 13-year-old children. N170 amplitude was significantly greater after the presentation of the eyes stimuli than after the presentation of the upright face stimuli in the 8-10- and 12-year-old children. The results of the present study indicate that the upright face stimuli were processed using holistic and/or configural processing by the 13-year-old children.

  6. Vasodilators and Blood Pressure Lowering Medications and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Beaver Dam Eye Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of vasodilator and antihypertensive medication use to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design A longitudinal population-based study. Participants Persons 43–86 years of age living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin in 1988–1990. Methods Examinations were performed every 5 years over a 20-year period. There were 9676 total person-visits over the course of the study. Status of AMD was determined from grading retinal photographs. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of AMD. Results The 5-year incidence of early AMD over the 20-year period was 8.4%, for late AMD it was 1.4%, for pure geographic atrophy (GA) it was 0.6%, for exudative AMD it was 0.9%, and for progression of AMD it was 24.9%. While adjusting for age, sex, and other factors, using a vasodilator (hazard ratio [HR]=1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25 – 2.38), particularly oral nitroglycerin (1.81, 1.14 – 2.90) was associated with an increased risk of early AMD. Using an oral beta blocker was associated with an increased hazard of incident exudative AMD (1.71, 1.04 – 2.82) but not pure GA (0.51, 0.20 – 1.29) or progression (0.92, 0.67 – 1.28) of AMD over the 20-year period. Conclusions Use of vasodilators is associated with a 72% increase in the hazard of incidence of early AMD and use of oral beta blockers is associated with a 71% increase in the hazard of incident exudative AMD. If these findings are replicated it may have implications for care of older adults as vasodilators and oral beta blockers are commonly used drugs by older persons. PMID:24793737

  7. Asymmetry of disciform scarring in bilateral disease when one eye is treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, P.M.; Archer, D.B.; Chakravarthy, U. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01

    A previous study has shown that in age-related macular degeneration a high degree of concordance of disciform scar size occurs in the two eyes of any one patient. In a study of 35 patients with choroidal neovascular membrane who were treated with low dose ionising radiation to the macula of the affected eye, 11 were found to have bilateral disease. The visual outcome and scar size and morphology in the two eyes of each of these patients were compared. This study has provided evidence in support of reduced scarring and maintenance of better central visual function in radiotherapy treated eyes when compared with untreated fellow eyes. (author).

  8. Telomeres and telomerase as therapeutic targets to prevent and treat age-related diseases [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bär

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres, the protective ends of linear chromosomes, shorten throughout an individual’s lifetime. Telomere shortening is a hallmark of molecular aging and is associated with premature appearance of diseases associated with aging. Here, we discuss the role of telomere shortening as a direct cause for aging and age-related diseases. In particular, we draw attention to the fact that telomere length influences longevity. Furthermore, we discuss intrinsic and environmental factors that can impact on human telomere erosion. Finally, we highlight recent advances in telomerase-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of diseases associated with extremely short telomeres owing to mutations in telomerase, as well as age-related diseases, and ultimately aging itself.

  9. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. Ry

    1997-01-01

    Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification......Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification...

  10. Interest of active posturography to detect age-related and early Parkinson's disease-related impairments in mediolateral postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Cédrick T; Delval, Arnaud; Defebvre, Luc

    2014-11-15

    Patients with Parkinson's disease display impairments of postural control most particularly in active, challenging conditions. The objective of the present study was to analyze early signs of disease-related and also age-related impairments in mediolateral body extension and postural control. Fifty-five participants (18 Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 patients in the off-drug condition, 18 healthy elderly control subjects, and 19 young adults) were included in the study. The participants performed a quiet stance task and two active tasks that analyzed the performance in mediolateral body motion: a limit of stability and a rhythmic weight shift task. As expected, the patients displayed significantly lower and slower body displacement (head, neck, lower back, center of pressure) than elderly control subjects when performing the two body excursion tasks. However, the behavioral variability in both tasks was similar between the groups. Under these active conditions, the patients showed significantly lower contribution of the hip postural control mechanisms compared with the elderly control subjects. Overall, the patients seemed to lower their performance in order to prevent a mediolateral postural instability. However, these patients, at an early stage of their disease, were not unstable in quiet stance. Complementarily, elderly control subjects displayed slower body performance than young adults, which therefore showed an additional age-related impairment in mediolateral postural control. Overall, the study illustrated markers of age-related and Parkinson's disease impairments in mediolateral postural control that may constrain everyday activities in elderly adults and even more in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  11. Time trends for risk of severe age-related diseases in individuals with and without HIV infection in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; May, Margaret T; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2015-01-01

    , and were living in Denmark at the time of study inclusion. Data for study outcomes were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry and the Danish National Registry of Causes of Death and were cardiovascular diseases (myocardial infarction and stroke), cancers (virus associated, smoking related......, and other), severe neurocognitive disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, and osteoporotic fractures. We calculated excess and age-standardised incidence rates and adjusted incidence rate ratios of outcomes for time after HIV diagnosis, highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation...... of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and severe neurocognitive disease did not increase substantially with time after HIV diagnosis or ART initiation. Except for chronic kidney diseases, the age-standardised and relative risks of age-related diseases did not increase with calendar time. INTERPRETATIONS: Severe age...

  12. Age-related declines and disease-associated variation in immune cell telomere length in a wild mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirne, Christopher; Delahay, Richard; Hares, Michelle; Young, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Immunosenescence, the deterioration of immune system capability with age, may play a key role in mediating age-related declines in whole-organism performance, but the mechanisms that underpin immunosenescence are poorly understood. Biomedical research on humans and laboratory models has documented age and disease related declines in the telomere lengths of leukocytes ('immune cells'), stimulating interest their having a potentially general role in the emergence of immunosenescent phenotypes. However, it is unknown whether such observations generalise to the immune cell populations of wild vertebrates living under ecologically realistic conditions. Here we examine longitudinal changes in the mean telomere lengths of immune cells in wild European badgers (Meles meles). Our findings provide the first evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune cell telomere lengths in a wild vertebrate. That the rate of age-related decline in telomere length appears to be steeper within individuals than at the overall population level raises the possibility that individuals with short immune cell telomeres and/or higher rates of immune cell telomere attrition may be selectively lost from this population. We also report evidence suggestive of associations between immune cell telomere length and bovine tuberculosis infection status, with individuals detected at the most advanced stage of infection tending to have shorter immune cell telomeres than disease positive individuals. While male European badgers are larger and show higher rates of annual mortality than females, we found no evidence of a sex difference in either mean telomere length or the average rate of within-individual telomere attrition with age. Our findings lend support to the view that age-related declines in the telomere lengths of immune cells may provide one potentially general mechanism underpinning age-related declines in immunocompetence in natural populations. PMID:25268841

  13. Age-related declines and disease-associated variation in immune cell telomere length in a wild mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Beirne

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence, the deterioration of immune system capability with age, may play a key role in mediating age-related declines in whole-organism performance, but the mechanisms that underpin immunosenescence are poorly understood. Biomedical research on humans and laboratory models has documented age and disease related declines in the telomere lengths of leukocytes ('immune cells', stimulating interest their having a potentially general role in the emergence of immunosenescent phenotypes. However, it is unknown whether such observations generalise to the immune cell populations of wild vertebrates living under ecologically realistic conditions. Here we examine longitudinal changes in the mean telomere lengths of immune cells in wild European badgers (Meles meles. Our findings provide the first evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune cell telomere lengths in a wild vertebrate. That the rate of age-related decline in telomere length appears to be steeper within individuals than at the overall population level raises the possibility that individuals with short immune cell telomeres and/or higher rates of immune cell telomere attrition may be selectively lost from this population. We also report evidence suggestive of associations between immune cell telomere length and bovine tuberculosis infection status, with individuals detected at the most advanced stage of infection tending to have shorter immune cell telomeres than disease positive individuals. While male European badgers are larger and show higher rates of annual mortality than females, we found no evidence of a sex difference in either mean telomere length or the average rate of within-individual telomere attrition with age. Our findings lend support to the view that age-related declines in the telomere lengths of immune cells may provide one potentially general mechanism underpinning age-related declines in immunocompetence in natural populations.

  14. Long-Term Visual Outcomes for a Treat and Extend Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regimen in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mrejen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy, clinicians are now focused on various treatment strategies to better control neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Herein, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients with treatment-naïve NVAMD initially classified based on fluorescein angiography (FA alone or with an anatomic classification utilizing both FA and optical coherence tomography (OCT and correlated long-term visual outcomes of these patients treated with an anti-VEGF Treat-and-Extend Regimen (TER with baseline characteristics including neovascular phenotype. Overall, 185 patients (210 eyes were followed over an average of 3.5 years (range 1–6.6 with a retention rate of 62.9%, and visual acuity significantly improved with a TER that required a mean number of 8.3 (±1.6 (± standard deviation intravitreal anti-VEGF injections/year (range 4–13. The number of injections and the anatomic classification were independent predictors of visual acuity at 6 months, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years. Patients with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes and received more injections than the other neovascular subtypes. There were no serious adverse events. A TER provided sustained long-term visual gains. Eyes with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes than those with other neovascular subtypes.

  15. The emerging role of Notch pathway in ageing: Focus on the related mechanisms in age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Madonna, Rosalinda; Melino, Gerry; Caruso, Calogero

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which is fundamental for the development of all tissues, organs and systems of human body. Recently, a considerable and still growing number of studies have highlighted the contribution of Notch signaling in various pathological processes of the adult life, such as age-related diseases. In particular, the Notch pathway has emerged as major player in the maintenance of tissue specific homeostasis, through the control of proliferation, migration, phenotypes and functions of tissue cells, as well as in the cross-talk between inflammatory cells and the innate immune system, and in onset of inflammatory age-related diseases. However, until now there is a confounding evidence about the related mechanisms. Here, we discuss mechanisms through which Notch signaling acts in a very complex network of pathways, where it seems to have the crucial role of hub. Thus, we stress the possibility to use Notch pathway, the related molecules and pathways constituting this network, both as innovative (predictive, diagnostic and prognostic) biomarkers and targets for personalised treatments for age-related diseases. PMID:27328278

  16. Endophenotypes for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Extending Our Reach into the Preclinical Stages of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Gorin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The key to reducing the individual and societal burden of age-related macular degeneration (AMD-related vision loss, is to be able to initiate therapies that slow or halt the progression at a point that will yield the maximum benefit while minimizing personal risk and cost. There is a critical need to find clinical markers that, when combined with the specificity of genetic testing, will identify individuals at the earliest stages of AMD who would benefit from preventive therapies. These clinical markers are endophenotypes for AMD, present in those who are likely to develop AMD, as well as in those who have clinical evidence of AMD. Clinical characteristics associated with AMD may also be possible endophenotypes if they can be detected before or at the earliest stages of the condition, but we and others have shown that this may not always be valid. Several studies have suggested that dynamic changes in rhodopsin regeneration (dark adaptation kinetics and/or critical flicker fusion frequencies may be more subtle indicators of AMD-associated early retinal dysfunction. One can test for the relevance of these measures using genetic risk profiles based on known genetic risk variants. These functional measures may improve the sensitivity and specificity of predictive models for AMD and may also serve to delineate clinical subtypes of AMD that may differ with respect to prognosis and treatment.

  17. Fatty liver, carotid disease and gallstones: A study of age-related associations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amedeo Lonardo; Paola Loria; Silvia Lombardini; Federica Scaglioni; Stefano Ballestri; Anna Maria Verrone; Marco Bertolotti; Lucia Carulli; Dorval Ganazzi; Nicola Carulli

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate carotid intima-media thickening (IMT)and plaques, gallstone disease (GD) and fatty liver (FL)as a function of age.METHODS: In 449 subjects, FL and carotid disease were assessed ultrasonographically. In a subgroup of 65/449 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), carotid disease, GD and associated factors were determined.RESULTS: FL of unspecified etiology was more common in younger and GD in older individuals. FL subjects had an increased prevalence of IMT and a decreased prevalence of plaques and manifested carotid disease earlier. Plaques were more common in subjects with GD.Age was an independent predictor of carotid disease outcome and FL was a protective factor for plaques. In NAFLD, there was an inverse correlation between body weight and age and the latter independently predicted carotid findings.CONCLUSION: Cardiovascular risk in patients with FL and NAFLD needs to be assessed as a function of age and body weight.

  18. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features ... are sent to the brain. Causes High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina. The higher the blood ...

  19. Age-related differences in celiac disease: Specific characteristics of adult presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santiago; Vivas; Luis; Vaquero; Laura; Rodríguez-Martín; Alberto; Caminero

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease may appear both in early childhood andin elderly subjects. Current knowledge of the disease has revealed some differences associated to the age of presentation. Furthermore, monitoring and prognosis of celiac subjects can vary depending on the pediatric or adult stage. The main objective of this review is to provide guidance for the adult diagnostic and follow-up processes, which must be tailored specifically for adults and be different from pediatric patients.

  20. Technical difficulties and possibilities in surgical prophylaxis of intraoperative complications during the phacoemulsification of the age-related cataract in eyes with a short axial length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu.A. Tereshchenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose. To study initially unfavorable technical features of intraoperative phacoemulsification (PE difficulties of the age-related ataract in eyes with a short axial length and a search of possibilities to overcome them. Material and methods. Nuances of PE performance of the agerelated cataract were analyzed in 89 eyes with a short axial length as well as their long-term results. The nuclear form of cataract, the increased density of a lens nucleus prevailed. The PE technique: technology of small cuts, implantation of the flexible IOL, the torsion mode of ultrasound. There was carried out a detailed evaluation of technical features of PE performance. The follow-up was 3 years. Results. There were revealed following adverse features of PE performance: an increased risk of insertion of the iris root because of a shallow anterior chamber; dense and large nuclei of lenses, an increased frequency of capsular bag incompetence, a frequent combination with a deep eyeball location in the orbit and prominent superciliary arches. Conclusion. The techniques used by us to overcome the increased risk of intraoperative complications included: a blepharostat application with a built-in aspiration system, the torsion mode of ultrasound (OZIL with an increase of vacuum up to 600mmHg and an aspiration irrigation flow up to 42-50ml/min, an additional sealing of the cut with the DisCoVisc viscoelastic, a minimization of liquid volume injected into the sub-capsular space, an application of the technique for an incomplete cracking of nucleus (by 3/4 of its depth.

  1. Parkinson's disease accelerates age-related decline in haptic perception by altering somatosensory integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konczak, Jürgen; Sciutti, Alessandra; Avanzino, Laura; Squeri, Valentina; Gori, Monica; Masia, Lorenzo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Sandini, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated how Parkinson's disease alters haptic perception and the underlying mechanisms of somatosensory and sensorimotor integration. Changes in haptic sensitivity and acuity (the abilities to detect and to discriminate between haptic stimuli) due to Parkinson's disease were systematically quantified and contrasted to the performance of healthy older and young adults. Using a robotic force environment, virtual contours of various curvatures were presented. Participants explored these contours with their hands and indicated verbally whether they could detect or discriminate between two contours. To understand what aspects of sensory or sensorimotor integration are altered by ageing and disease, we manipulated the sensorimotor aspect of the task: the robot either guided the hand along the contour or the participant actively moved the hand. Active exploration relies on multimodal sensory and sensorimotor integration, while passive guidance only requires sensory integration of proprioceptive and tactile information. The main findings of the study are as follows: first, a decline in haptic precision can already be observed in adults before the age of 70 years. Parkinson's disease may lead to an additional decrease in haptic sensitivity well beyond the levels typically seen in middle-aged and older adults. Second, the haptic deficit in Parkinson's disease is general in nature. It becomes manifest as a decrease in sensitivity and acuity (i.e. a smaller perceivable range and a diminished ability to discriminate between two perceivable haptic stimuli). Third, thresholds during both active and passive exploration are elevated, but not significantly different from each other. That is, active exploration did not enhance the haptic deficit when compared to passive hand motion. This implies that Parkinson's disease affects early stages of somatosensory integration that ultimately have an impact on processes of sensorimotor integration. Our results suggest that

  2. You Have Diabetes. How Can You Avoid Serious Eye Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Day You have diabetes. How can you avoid serious eye diseases? Did you know that diabetic retinopathy, an eye ... Or that the number of people with this serious eye disease that damages the blood vessels inside the retina, ...

  3. Lipid peroxidation and cataracts: N-acetylcarnosine as a therapeutic tool to manage age-related cataracts in human and in canine eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoly I; Yermakova, Valentina N; Brikman, Igor V; Bours, Johan

    2004-01-01

    primary (diene conjugates, cetodienes) lipid peroxidation (LPO) products, while in later stages there is a prevalence of LPO fluorescent end-products. A reliable increase in oxiproducts of fatty acyl content of lenticular lipids was shown by a direct gas chromatography technique producing fatty acid fluorine-substituted derivatives. The lens opacity degree correlates with the level of the LPO fluorescent end-product accumulation in its tissue, accompanied by sulfhydryl group oxidation of lens proteins due to a decrease of reduced glutathione concentration in the lens. The injection of LPO products into the vitreous has been shown to induce cataract. It is concluded that peroxide damage of the lens fibre membranes may be the initial cause of cataract development. N-acetylcarnosine (as the ophthalmic drug Can-C), has been found to be suitable for the nonsurgical prevention and treatment of age-related cataracts. This molecule protects the crystalline lens from oxidative stress-induced damage, and in a recent clinical trial it was shown to produce an effective, safe and long-term improvement in sight. When administered topically to the eye in the form of Can-C, N-acetylcarnosine functions as a time-release prodrug form of L-carnosine resistant to hydrolysis with carnosinase. N-acetylcarnosine has potential as an in vivo universal antioxidant because of its ability to protect against oxidative stress in the lipid phase of biological cellular membranes and in the aqueous environment by a gradual intraocular turnover into L-carnosine. In our study the clinical effects of a topical solution of N-acetylcarnosine (Can-C) on lens opacities were examined in patients with cataracts and in canines with age-related cataracts. These data showed that N-acetylcarnosine is effective in the management of age-related cataract reversal and prevention both in human and in canine eyes. PMID:15139774

  4. The microbiota and microbiome in aging: potential implications in health and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Heidi J; Quagliarello, Vincent J

    2015-04-01

    Advances in bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing allow for characterization of the human commensal bacterial community (microbiota) and its corresponding genome (microbiome). Surveys of healthy adults reveal that a signature composite of bacteria characterizes each unique body habitat (e.g., gut, skin, oral cavity, vagina). A myriad of clinical changes, including a basal proinflammatory state (inflamm-aging), that directly interface with the microbiota of older adults and enhance susceptibility to disease accompany aging. Studies in older adults demonstrate that the gut microbiota correlates with diet, location of residence (e.g., community dwelling, long-term care settings), and basal level of inflammation. Links exist between the microbiota and a variety of clinical problems plaguing older adults, including physical frailty, Clostridium difficile colitis, vulvovaginal atrophy, colorectal carcinoma, and atherosclerotic disease. Manipulation of the microbiota and microbiome of older adults holds promise as an innovative strategy to influence the development of comorbidities associated with aging.

  5. [Progress in induced pluripotent stem cell research for age-related neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, Takahashi et al. established a method for reprogramming somatic cells by introducing definite transcription factors, which enabled the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells. In turn, it has become possible to use these iPSCs for producing various tissues needed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, which have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is expected to bring forth rapid progress in the clarification of mechanisms underlying the diseases and discovery of new innovative drugs and lead to rapid progress in regenerative medicine. In recent years, recapitulation and analysis of disease conditions using iPSCs derived from the patients themselves have been reported, and remarkable advances have been made, even for late-onset neurodegenerative disorders. These findings show that the phenotypes of late-onset neurodegenerative disorders can be recapitulated in iPSC-derived neuronal cells, which are reflected the early developmental stages, indicating cellular abnormalities exist from the prenatal period, despite the late onset diseases. In this review, we summarize the state of iPSCs research in the context of neurodegenerative disorders, discuss the possible ways for understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and discovering new drugs, and describe some other aspects of regenerative medicine.

  6. Drugs, nutrients, and phytoactive principles improving the health span of rodent models of human age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Michel; Picard, Frédéric; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2012-02-01

    Rodents are often the species of choice to examine the effect of drugs on survival and on the progression of specific diseased tissues. This statement is also true for research laboratories working in the field of nutrition and aging. In addition to diets that can reduce the life expectancy of rodents, such as diabetogenic or high-fat diets, genetically modified rodents exhibiting different accelerated age-associated diseases also provide important biologic tools to decipher the impact of drugs, nutrients, or phytoactive compounds on their health and life span. This review covers some of the chemicals believed to decelerate the appearance of age-related diseases in different rodent models. Such chemicals include antioxidants, anti-inflammatory molecules, modulators of metabolic sensors, calorie restriction mimetics, and vegetal polyphenolic compounds that affect mitochondrial functions, cellular proliferation or differentiation as well as cell functionality.

  7. Update on thyroid eye disease and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick D Bothun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Erick D Bothun,1,2 Ryan A Scheurer,1 Andrew R Harrison,1,3 Michael S Lee1,4,51Departments of Ophthalmology, 2Pediatrics, 3Otolaryngology, 4Neurosurgery, and 5Neurology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAAbstract: Thyroid eye disease is a heterogeneous autoimmune orbital reaction typically manifesting in middle age. The inflammation may parallel or remain isolated from a related inflammatory cascade in the thyroid called Graves’ disease. The orbital manifestations can lead to severe proptosis, dry eyes, strabismus, and optic neuropathy. In this article, we will discuss this unique condition including the ophthalmic findings and management. Keywords: Graves’ disease, thyroid eye disease, proptosis, orbital decompression, enlarged extraocular muscles

  8. Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Age Related Macular Degeneration in the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Y Yip

    Full Text Available To examine the cross sectional and longitudinal relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD in a large British cohort study.The EPIC Norfolk Eye study is nested in a larger prospective cohort study. Data on cardiovascular risk factors were collected at baseline (1993-1997 and follow up (2006-2011 via clinical examination, validated lifestyle questionnaires and serum blood samples. AMD was ascertained using standardised grading of fundus photographs at the follow up. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between baseline and follow up risk factors with AMD.5,344 pairs (62.0% of total 8623 of fundus photographs were of sufficient quality for grading of AMD in participants with mean age of 67.4 years old (range 44-91 at diagnosis. There were 28 cases of late AMD (0.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI=0.3-0.8% and 645 cases of early AMD (12.1%, 95%CI=11.2-13.0.%. In multivariable analysis, older people with higher levels of baseline high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C and C-reactive protein (CRP were more likely to have any signs of AMD, after adjusting for sex, education, smoking, and systolic blood pressure. In cross sectional analysis, only older age and higher HDL were significantly associated with AMD.We have found that older age and higher levels of CRP and HDL-C were associated with increased odds of AMD in this population in the longitudinal analysis, but older age and HDL-C, not CRP was significantly associated with AMD in the cross sectional analysis. The prevalence of AMD in this cohort was low compared to other cohorts in Europe, the US and Australia, and probably reflects the some selection biases in follow up participation as well as the low rate of smoking among our healthy participants.

  9. Silver paper: the future of health promotion and preventive actions, basic research, and clinical aspects of age-related disease--a report of the European Summit on Age-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Franco, Alain; Sommer, Pascal; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jankowska, Ewa; Maggi, Adriana; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rys, Andrzej; Szczerbinska, Kataryna; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Milewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-01

    BACKGROUND. In September 2008, under the French Presidency of the European Union and with the support of the Polish Minister of Health, a European Summit on Age-Related Disease was organised inWroclaw (Poland). At this meeting, European politicians, gerontologists and geriatricians gathered to discuss a common approach to future challenges related to age-related disease. Politicians and decision-makers from the European Union and Ministers of Health and their deputies from many European countries raised the problems and difficulties to be tackled in a growing population with a high burden of disease, and asked scientists to write a consensus document with recommendations for future actions and decisions. Scientists and clinicians worked in parallel in three different groups, on health promotion and preventive actions, basic research in age-related disease, and clinical aspects of disease in older people. Beforehand, the format of the paper with recommendations was discussed, and it was finally agreed that, for a better understanding by decision- makers, it would be divided in two different columns: one with facts that were considered settled and agreed by most experts (under the heading We know), and a second with recommendations related to each fact (We recommend). No limit on the number of topics to be discussed was settled. After careful and detailed discussion in each group, which in most cases included the exact wording of each statement, chairpersons presented the results in a plenary session, and new input from all participants was received, until each of the statements and recommendations were accepted by a large majority. Areas with no consensus were excluded from the document. Immediately after the Summit, the chairpersons sent the document both to the main authors and to a list of experts (see footnote) who had made presentations at the summit and agreed to review and critically comment on the final document, which is presented below. As regards the

  10. The Critical Need to Promote Research of Aging and Aging-related Diseases to Improve Health and Longevity of the Elderly Population

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Kunlin; Simpkins, James W.; Ji, Xunming; Leis, Miriam; Stambler, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    Due to the aging of the global population and the derivative increase in aging-related non-communicable diseases and their economic burden, there is an urgent need to promote research on aging and aging-related diseases as a way to improve healthy and productive longevity for the elderly population. To accomplish this goal, we advocate the following policies: 1) Increasing funding for research and development specifically directed to ameliorate degenerative aging processes and to extend healt...

  11. Oberity and eye diseases%肥胖与眼病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙葆忱; 胡爱莲; 杨晓慧; 郑远远

    2016-01-01

    肥胖是全球范围内的重大公共卫生问题,在许多国家患病率以惊人的速度增长。肥胖被认为是许多眼病重要的危险因素,尤其是年龄相关的眼病如白内障、青光眼、年龄相关性黄斑病变、糖尿病性视网膜病变等。随着全球老龄化加剧,肥胖引起的眼病增加,对社会及家庭的各种负担也会加剧,因此强调防止肥胖至关重要。目前尚缺少肥胖与眼病相关性的病理生理学机制明确的解释,因此是亟需研究的重要课题。(国际眼科纵览,2016,40:201-205)%Globally,obesity is a major public health problem,with prevalence increasing at stagger-ing rates in many countries.Obesity has been recognized as a significant risk factor for many eye diseases, especially the age related eye diseases,such as cataract,glaucoma,age-related macular degeneration,and diabetic retinopathy.As global aging intensifies,eye disease associated with obesity also increases,and vari-ous burdens on society and family will be increased dramatically.Therefore,we emphasized that it is essen-tial to prevent obesity.On account of a clear pathophysiological mechanisms explanation for the association of obesity with eye diseases is currently lacking,therefore,this is a very problem to be resolved in the future. (Int Rev Ophthalmol,2016,40:201-205)

  12. The effects of a lutein-based supplement on objective and subjective measures of retinal and visual function in eyes with age-related maculopathy -- a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrow, Emma J; Bartlett, Hannah E; Eperjesi, Frank; Gibson, Jonathan M

    2013-06-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are lipid-soluble antioxidants found within the macula region of the retina. Links have been suggested between increased levels of these carotenoids and reduced risk for age-related macular disease (ARMD). Therefore, the effect of lutein-based supplementation on retinal and visual function in people with early stages of ARMD (age-related maculopathy, ARM) was assessed using multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), contrast sensitivity and distance visual acuity. A total of fourteen participants were randomly allocated to either receive a lutein-based oral supplement (treated group) or no supplement (non-treated group). There were eight participants aged between 56 and 81 years (65·50 (SD 9·27) years) in the treated group and six participants aged between 61 and 83 years (69·67 (SD 7·52) years) in the non-treated group. Sample sizes provided 80% power at the 5% significance level. Participants attended for three visits (0, 20 and 40 weeks). At 60 weeks, the treated group attended a fourth visit following 20 weeks of supplement withdrawal. No changes were seen between the treated and non-treated groups during supplementation. Although not clinically significant, mfERG ring 3 N2 latency (P=0·041) and ring 4 P1 latency (P=0·016) increased, and a trend for reduction of mfERG amplitudes was observed in rings 1, 3 and 4 on supplement withdrawal. The statistically significant increase in mfERG latencies and the trend for reduced mfERG amplitudes on withdrawal are encouraging and may suggest a potentially beneficial effect of lutein-based supplementation in ARM-affected eyes. PMID:23084077

  13. AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION IS A VASCULAR DISEASE, PART OF VASCULOPATHY: HOLISTIC APPROACH OF THE AMD’S PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, PREVENTION AND PREVENTIVE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fischer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial system assures unhindered functioning and stability of the internal milieu maintaining vascular health and protecting against vascular injury, noxa. by producing, synthesising and excreting various substances: vasodilators and vasoconstrictors, growth factors and their inhibitors, pro-inflammatory and antiinflammatory agents, pro-thrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, and by keeping them in a strict equilibrium: endothelial dysfunction is the change of these properties, what is inappropriate with regard to the preservation of organ function. In the genesis and later development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, endothelial dysfunction (ED has a crucial key role. AMD-risk factors often are identical wih the risk factors of (cardiovascular (CV diseases, so the two conditions have a similar pathogenesis. These risk factors lead to vascular injury through the same mechanism of actions, by inducing oxidative stress (OS → ED!: harm (noxa, i.e. |AMD| risk factors → oxidative stress [OS] → endothelial activation [EA], endothlial dysfunction [ED], respectively → vacular injury, vascular disease. Disordered function of endothelium in the vessels supplying the affected ocular structures with blood (ED have a key role in the genesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Wall of blood vessels including thoose in choroids may be triggered by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic influences-impacts-stimuli (noxa, against which protracted response, the so-called host defense response may develop, and in consequence of this, vascular damage pathological consecutive changes ending in AMD, ultimately, may develop. As the human vascular system is uniform and consubstantial, the medicines/non-medicinal methods desribed below [the RAAS-inhibiting (1 angiotensin converting enzyme ihibitors and (2 angiotensinreceptor blockers |AT1 receptor blocker

  14. Dyslipidemia and eye diseases in the adult Chinese population: the Beijing eye study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Wang

    Full Text Available To determine associations between dyslipidemia and ocular diseases, the population-based Beijing Eye Study 2006 examined 3251 subjects (age≥45 years who underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination and biochemical blood analysis. Dyslipidemia was defined as any of the following: hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol concentration≥5.72 mmol/L (220 mg/dL or hypertriglyceridemia (triglyceride concentration≥1.70 mmol/L (150 mg/dL or low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C concentration≤0.91 mmol/L (35 mg/dL. Biochemical blood examinations were available for 2945 (90.6% subjects. After adjustment for age, gender, habitation region, body mass index, self reported income, blood glucose concentration, diastolic blood pressure and smoking, dyslipidemia was significantly associated with higher intraocular pressure (P<0.001 and beta zone of parapapillary atrophy (P = 0.03. Dyslipidemia was not significantly associated with the prevalence of glaucoma (P = 0.99, retinal vein occlusions (P = 0.92, diabetic retinopathy (P = 0.49,presence of retinal vascular abnormalities such as focal or general arteriolar narrowing, age-related macular degeneration(P = 0.27, nuclear cataract (P = 0.14, cortical cataract (P = 0.93, and subcapsular cataract (P = 0.67. The results make one conclude that, controlled for systemic and socioeconomic parameters, dyslipidemia was not associated with common ophthalmic disorders including glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers in Eye Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Julie

    2016-07-17

    Current evidence suggests lutein and its isomers play important roles in ocular development in utero and throughout the life span, in vision performance in young and later adulthood, and in lowering risk for the development of common age-related eye diseases in older age. These xanthophyll (oxygen-containing) carotenoids are found in a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, and they are present in especially high concentrations in leafy green vegetables. Additionally, egg yolks and human milk appear to be bioavailable sources. The prevalence of lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin in supplements is increasing. Setting optimal and safe ranges of intake requires additional research, particularly in pregnant and lactating women. Accumulating evidence about variable interindividual response to dietary intake of these carotenoids, based on genetic or metabolic influences, suggests that there may be subgroups that benefit from higher levels of intake and/or alternate strategies to improve lutein and zeaxanthin status. PMID:27431371

  16. Bilateral versus unilateral thyroid eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Bahmani Kashkouli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to compare demographics, clinical manifestations, associated systemic and ocular factors, severity and activity of patients with unilateral thyroid eye disease (U-TED versus bilateral thyroid eye disease (B-TED. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all patients with Graves′ hyperthyroidism and primary hypothyroidism seen in an endocrinology clinic were included from September 2003 to July 2006. Demographics, complete eye examination, severity score (NOSPECS, total eye score, and clinical activity score were recorded and compared in the B-TED and U-TED groups of patients. Results: From 851 patients with thyroid disorders, 303 (35.6% had TED. Thirty-two patients (32/ 303, 10.56% were found to have U-TED. Patients with U-TED (mean age 31.6 ± 11.6 years were significantly younger than patients with B-TED (mean age 37.7 ± 14.7 years. Monovariate analysis (Chi-square and independent sample t-test showed a significantly higher severity score in B-TED (U-TED 4.09±4.05, B-TED: 6.7±6.3; P= 0.002 and more activity score in B-TED (U-TED= 1.03±0.96, B-TED: 1.74±1.6, P= 0.001. However, multivariate analysis did not show any significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, type of thyroid disease, duration of thyroid disease and TED, severity and activity of TED, smoking habit, and presentation of TED before or after the presentation of thyroid disease (0.1disease, associated findings, and severity and activity of TED.

  17. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  18. Cytoskeletal Pathologies of Age-Related Diseases between Elderly Sri Lankan (Colombo) and Indian (Bangalore) Brain Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Shankar, S K; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Gorrie, Catherine; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo Hun; Steinbusch, H W; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2016-01-01

    Within South Asia, Sri Lanka represents fastest aging with 13% of the population was aged over 60's in 2011, whereas in India it was 8%. Majority of the Sri Lankan population based genetic studies have confirmed their origin on Indian mainland. As there were inadequate data on aging cytoskeletal pathologies of these two nations with their close genetic affiliations, we performed a comparison on their elderly. Autopsy brain samples of 50 individuals from Colombo, Sri Lanka (mean age 72.1 yrs ± 7.8, mean ± S.D.) and 42 individuals from Bangalore, India (mean age 65.9 yrs ± 9.3) were screened for neurodegenerative pathologies using immunohistochemical techniques. A total of 79 cases with incomplete clinical history (Colombo- 47 and Bangalore- 32) were subjected to statistical analysis and 13 cases, clinically diagnosed with dementia and/or Parkinsonism disorders were excluded. As per National Institute on Aging- Alzheimer's Association guidelines, between Colombo and Bangalore samples, Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change for intermediate/ high level was 4.25% vs. 3.12% and low level was 19.15% vs. 15.62% respectively. Pathologies associated with Parkinsonism including brainstem predominant Lewy bodies- 6.4% and probable progressive supra nuclear palsy- 2.13% were found solely in Colombo samples. Alzheimer related pathologies were not different among elders, however, in Colombo males, neurofibrillary tangle grade was significantly higher in the region of hippocampus (odds ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 0.07-0.7) and at risk in midbrain substantia nigra (p = 0.075). Other age-related pathologies including spongiform changes (p Colombo samples. Taken together, aging cytoskeletal pathologies are comparatively higher in elderly Sri Lankans and this might be due to their genetic, dietary and/ or environmental variations.

  19. Age-Related Macular Degeneration and the Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Uchino, Miki; Sastry, Srinivas M.; Schaumberg, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Research has indicated some shared pathogenic mechanisms between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, results from prior epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent as to whether AMD is predictive of future CVD risk. Objective To systematically review population-based cohort studies of the association between AMD and risk of total CVD and CVD subtypes, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. Data Sources A systematic search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases and reference lists of key retrieved articles up to December 20, 2012 without language restriction. Data Extraction Two reviewers independently extracted data on baseline AMD status, risk estimates of CVD and methods used to assess AMD and CVD. We pooled relative risks using random or fixed effects models as appropriate. Results Thirteen cohort studies (8 prospective and 5 retrospective studies) with a total of 1,593,390 participants with 155,500 CVD events (92,039 stroke and 62,737 CHD) were included in this meta-analysis. Among all studies, early AMD was associated with a 15% (95% CI, 1.08–1.22) increased risk of total CVD. The relative risk was similar but not significant for late AMD (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.98–1.40). In analyses restricted to the subset of prospective studies, the risk associated with early AMD did not appreciably change; however, there was a marked 66% (95% CI, 1.31–2.10) increased risk of CVD among those with late AMD. Conclusion Whereas the results from all cohort studies suggest that both early and late AMD are predictive of a small increase in risk of future CVD, subgroup analyses limited to prospective studies demonstrate a markedly increased risk of CVD among people with late AMD. Retrospective studies using healthcare databases may have inherent methodological limitations that obscure such association. Additional prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the associations between AMD and specific CVD outcomes

  20. Influence of age-related cataract and cataract-surgery on dominance eye%年龄相关性白内障及手术对老年人优势眼的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢潇英; 祝雪宁; 喻芳; 李瑾; 赵云娥

    2014-01-01

    背景 年龄相关性白内障及其手术后优势眼的变化与患者视觉质量呈明显相关,但白内障术后患者优势眼的变化与视力改变的关系研究较少. 目的 观察年龄相关性白内障及白内障手术对老年人优势眼的影响.方法 采用系列病例观察研究方法.收集2011年12月至2012年4月在温州医科大学附属眼视光医院就诊的年龄相关性白内障患者87例,患者行白内障超声乳化摘出联合IOL植入术.患者按标准对数视力表最佳矫正远视力分组,双眼间视力差别≥2行者为A组,双眼间视力差别≤1行者为B组,分别于术前及术后1d、1周、1个月、3个月用卡洞法或拇指法检测患者优势眼的分布及变化情况,以MecNmar检验对术眼手术前后优势眼分布的差异进行统计学分析. 结果 患者术前LogMAR最佳矫正远视力中位数(M)值为0.40(0.00 ~ 1.40),术后为0.00(-0.08~0.30),差异有统计学意义(Z=-9.481,P=0.000).A组42例患者中术前右眼为优势眼者24例,左眼18例;33例(占78.57%)患者白内障较轻的眼为优势眼,9例(占21.43%)白内障较重眼为优势眼;患者术后右眼为优势眼者31例,左眼者11例;42例患者中13例发生优势眼转变,其中10例由左眼变为右眼,3例由右眼变为左眼,4例优势眼不稳定.B组45例患者中,术前右眼为优势眼者27例,左眼优势眼者18例;患者中4例优势眼发生转变,3例由左眼变为右眼,1例由右眼变为左眼,5例优势眼不稳定.两组患者手术前、手术后优势眼的分布差异均无统计学意义(A组:P=0.092;B组:P=0.727). 结论 年龄相关性白内障导致的屈光介质混浊可对优势眼产生影响,白内障术后屈光介质透明性改变会导致优势眼的转换.%Background The alteration of dominance eye is associated with visual quality in patients with age-related cataract or after cataract-surgery.However,the study on the relationship of dominance eye shift with vision

  1. What effects has the cataract surgery on the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)?

    OpenAIRE

    Bockelbrink, A; Rasch, A; Roll, S.; Willich, SN; Greiner, W

    2006-01-01

    Background The cataract (Cataracta senilis) is the most frequent eye disease of elderly people worldwide. In Germany, the cataract operation - with currently 450,000 interventions each year the most frequent operation in ophthalmology - can be seen as routine surgery. The age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a further one of the most common, age-related eye diseases and the most frequent cause of blindness of elderly people in industrial nations. Due to demographic changes an increasing ...

  2. What effects has the cataract surgery on the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)?

    OpenAIRE

    Willich, Stefan N.; Roll, Stephanie; Rasch, Andrej; Bockelbrink, Angelina; Greiner, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Background: The cataract (Cataracta senilis) is the most frequent eye disease of elderly people worldwide. In Germany, the cataract operation - with currently 450,000 interventions each year the most frequent operation in ophthalmology – can be seen as routine surgery. The age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a further one of the most common, age-related eye diseases and the most frequent cause of blindness of elderly people in industrial nations. Due to demographic changes an increasing...

  3. Eye diseases in children in jourdan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate eye diseases in children in Jordan and to see whether it is necessary to conduct a visual screening programme. Methods: The study was conducted between July 2010 and July 2012 at four Royal Medical Service hospitals located in northern, eastern, middle and southern parts of Jordan. Children aged (6-14 years) attending paediatric clinics for various reasons were enrolled. Ophthalmologic assessment included visual acuity and anterior and posterior segment examination. Patients with visual acuity of less than 20/20 underwent refraction under cyclopegia. Results: Of the 3200 children in the study ocular abnormalities were found in 366 (11.4%); 312 (9.8%) had visual acuity less than 20/20 in one or both eyes. Refractive error was seen in 286 (8.9%); while vernal catarrh was the second most common ocular abnormality with 51 (1.6%) patients followed by squint 16(0.5%). Four (0.12%) patients had severe visual impairment and one (0.03%) patient was blind. Conclusion: The prevalence of refractive error was high in school children in the study area. It is important to conduct a visual screening programme in early school years in order to prevent amblyopia. (author)

  4. The Interleukin-6 inflammation pathway from cholesterol to aging – Role of statins, bisphosphonates and plant polyphenols in aging and age-related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoigui Sota

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe the inflammation pathway from Cholesterol to Aging. Interleukin 6 mediated inflammation is implicated in age-related disorders including Atherosclerosis, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Coronary Artery Disease, Osteoporosis, Type 2 Diabetes, Dementia and Alzheimer's disease and some forms of Arthritis and Cancer. Statins and Bisphosphonates inhibit Interleukin 6 mediated inflammation indirectly through regulation of endogenous cholesterol synthesis and isoprenoid depletion. Polyphenolic compounds found in plants, fruits and vegetables inhibit Interleukin 6 mediated inflammation by direct inhibition of the signal transduction pathway. Therapeutic targets for the control of all the above diseases should include inhibition of Interleukin-6 mediated inflammation.

  5. Genetic testing and counselling in inherited eye disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Jensen, Hanne; Timshel, Susanne;

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genetics have made genetic testing in patients with inherited eye disease increasingly accessible, and the initiation of clinical intervention trials makes it increasingly clinically relevant. Based on a multidisciplinary collaboration between ophthalmologists and clinical geneticists......, the extensive register of families with monogenic inherited eye diseases at the National Eye Clinic of the Kennedy Center in Denmark provides a valuable asset waiting to be exploited in the global effort to reduce blindness caused by genetic defects....

  6. Age-related effects of smoking on coronary artery disease assessed by gray scale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soo-Jin; Mintz, Gary S; Weisz, Giora; Mehran, Roxana; Rabbani, LeRoy E; Verheye, Stefan; Serruys, Patrick W; Xu, Ke; Stone, Gregg W; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-04-15

    Although smoking is a risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis, the age-related impact on lesion morphology has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the age-related impact of smoking on the extent of atherosclerosis and arterial remodeling. In Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree, 687 patients with acute coronary syndrome underwent 3-vessel gray scale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound imaging of 3,185 nonculprit lesions. In 207 patients ≤65 years, current (smoking within 1 month) and former (no smoking for >1 month) smokers showed significantly smaller normalized volumes of external elastic membrane (EEM), lumen, and P + M (plaque + media) compared with nonsmokers. At the minimal lumen area site, current and former smokers had significantly smaller EEM, lumen, and P + M areas than nonsmokers. Conversely, in 480 patients >65 years, current smokers had greater normalized P + M volumes than nonsmokers with no difference in normalized EEM or lumen volumes. Finally, in patients >65 years (but not in patients ≤65 years), current smokers showed more plaque ruptures (4.7% vs 1.8%, p = 0.05) and echolucent plaques (8.3% vs 3.9%, p = 0.05) compared with nonsmokers. On multivariable analysis, a history of smoking (combining current and former smoking) predicted smaller normalized EEM volumes compared with nonsmokers ≤65 years. In conclusion, in patients ≤65 years, but not in patients >65 years, smoking had a vascular constrictive effect that contributed to severe luminal stenosis. Conversely, smokers >65 years had more plaque with greater plaque instability. PMID:25726380

  7. A genome-wide scan reveals important roles of DNA methylation in human longevity by regulating age-related disease genes.

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    Fu-Hui Xiao

    Full Text Available It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer's disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity.

  8. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  9. The protective effect of lipoic acid on selected cardiovascular diseases caused by age-related oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibska, Beata; Goraca, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be the primary cause of many cardiovascular diseases, including endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and heart failure. Oxidative stress increases during the aging process, resulting in either increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production or decreased antioxidant defense. The increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease is directly related to age. Aging is also associated with oxidative stress, which in turn leads to accelerated cellular senescence and organ dysfunction. Antioxidants may help lower the incidence of some pathologies of cardiovascular diseases and have antiaging properties. Lipoic acid (LA) is a natural antioxidant which is believed to have a beneficial effect on oxidative stress parameters in relation to diseases of the cardiovascular system.

  10. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320. The ocular surface temperature (OST of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272. OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P>0.05. Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  11. Can Vitamin A be Improved to Prevent Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Stargardt Disease and Other Retinal Dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Leonide; Washington, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how an imperfect visual cycle results in the formation of vitamin A dimers, thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases, and summarize how slowing vitamin A dimerization has been a therapeutic target of interest to prevent blindness. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of vitamin A dimerization, an alternative form of vitamin A, one that forms dimers more slowly yet maneuvers effortlessly through the visual cycle, was developed. Such a vitamin A, reinforced with deuterium (C20-D3-vitamin A), can be used as a non-disruptive tool to understand the contribution of vitamin A dimers to vision loss. Eventually, C20-D3-vitamin A could become a disease-modifying therapy to slow or stop vision loss associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease and retinal diseases marked by such vitamin A dimers. Human clinical trials of C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001) are underway.

  12. EGFR Signaling Pathway and Related-miRNAs In Age-related Diseases: The Example of miR-221 and miR-222

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Presently, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer are the most clinically problematic age-related diseases worldwide. Although being distinct disorders, their developments share common cellular mechanisms. Oncogenesis and neurodegeneration arise from the deregulation of signaling pathways, as a consequence of the resulting imbalance in cellular homeostasis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR belongs to an important cellular signaling pathway, which regulates proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and migration. As transcriptional targets of EGFR, the microRNAs-221/222 (miR-221/222 are important expression regulators. Dysfunctions in their networks are associated with cellular disruptions. The transcriptional activation of these miRNAs seems to be involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, metastization and in the acquisition of resistance to therapies. The up-regulation of miR-221/222 is associated with increased expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and repression of cell cycle inhibitors, which are key molecules in oncogenesis and neurodegeneration processes. The interaction loop between proliferative signaling pathways and miRNA expression could reveal new targets for controlling the molecular behavior of age-related diseases.

  13. A critical review of Vitamin C for the prevention of age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Fiona E.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants in the diet have long been thought to confer some level of protection against the oxidative damage that is involved in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease as well as general cognitive decline in normal aging. Nevertheless, support for this hypothesis in the literature is equivocal. In the case of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in particular, lack of consideration of some of the specific features of vitamin C metabolism has led to studies in which classification of participants accord...

  14. Mechanisms and Implications of Age-Related Changes in the Liver: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Gan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is hepatic steatosis associated with metabolic abnormalities such as overweight/central obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2D, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD is becoming the most common liver disease in contemporary society, with the highest prevalence in those over 60 years. NAFLD pathology ranges from simple steatosis to a necroinflammatory fibrosing disorder called steatohepatitis (SH, the latter associated with high risk of developing cirrhosis, often occuring in the seventh to ninth decades of life. While the main health implications of NAFLD are increased risk of developing T2D, cardiovascular diseases, and common cancers, there is substantantially increased standardized mortality, and deaths from decompensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Little is known about the interactive effects of ageing and NAFLD, with most studies focusing on the younger population. This paper summarises the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical course of NAFLD, with particular attention to persons over age 60 years. An approach to the management of NASH and its complications in the elderly, will also be presented here.

  15. Psychophysical function in age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neelam, Kumari

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the late stage of age-related maculopathy (ARM), is the leading cause of blind registration in developed countries. The visual loss in AMD occurs due to dysfunction and death of photoreceptors (rods and cones) secondary to an atrophic or a neovascular event. The psychophysical tests of vision, which depend on the functional status of the photoreceptors, may detect subtle alterations in the macula before morphological fundus changes are apparent ophthalmoscopically, and before traditional measures of visual acuity exhibit deterioration, and may be a useful tool for assessing and monitoring patients with ARM. Furthermore, worsening of these visual functions over time may reflect disease progression, and some of these, alone or in combination with other parameters, may act as a prognostic indicator for identifying eyes at risk for developing neovascular AMD. Lastly, psychophysical tests often correlate with subjective and relatively undefined symptoms in patients with early ARM, and may reflect limitation of daily activities for ARM patients. However, clinical studies investigating psychophysical function have largely been cross-sectional in nature, with small sample sizes, and lack consistency in terms of the grading and classification of ARM. This article aims to comprehensively review the literature germane to psychophysical tests in ARM, and to furnish the reader with an insight into this complex area of research.

  16. Beyond and behind the fingerprints of oxidative stress in age-related diseases: Secrets of successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, M Cristina; Scholtes, Marlies

    2016-04-01

    Several years after the first publication of the definition of oxidative stress by Helmut Sies, this topic is still focus of a large body of attention and research in the field of aging, neurodegeneration and disease prevention. The conduction of clinical and epidemiological research without a solid biochemical rationale has led to largely frustrating results without being able to disprove the oxidative stress hypothesis. The present work is dedicated to Helmut Sies and describes the successful scientific approach to bench-to-bedside (-to-behavior) oxidative stress clinical research. PMID:27095215

  17. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, S R

    1997-06-01

    Based on a study of mummies, skeletons, burial rites, medical instruments, medicaments, literature and objets d'art from Ancient Egypt before the Hellenistic Period, the understanding of the eye, its diseases and their treatment at that time is described. Magic spells, religious rites and medical treatments, especially with eye ointments, were probably used often complementary to one another. We must be very cautious about our conclusions in regard to the effectiveness of the treatments. Eye diseases have been depicted only exceptionally in Egyptian art, except for blindness and 'symbolic blindness'. PMID:9253993

  18. Eclectic Ocular Comorbidities and Systemic Diseases with Eye Involvement: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo-Durán, María D; Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; García-Medina, José J; Arévalo, J Fernando; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Nucci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Coexistence of several ocular diseases is more frequent than suspected. In spite of the refractive errors, one or more of the following can be detected simultaneously: glaucoma, cataracts, uveitis, age-related macular degeneration, and dry eyes. In addition, as people age, ocular comorbidities are much more usually seen. Specific diseases are openly acknowledged to affect the eyes and vision, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension blood pressure, arthritis, hyperthyroidism, neurodegenerative disorders, hematologic malignancies, and/or systemic infections. Recent advances in early diagnosis and therapy of the ophthalmic pathologies have reinforced patient options to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Because of this, it is essential not to overlook sight-threatening conditions such as the ocular comorbidities and/or the eye involvement in the context of systemic disorders. Moreover, the important role of the multidisciplinary cooperation to improve and sustain management of patients affected with eclectic ocular comorbidities and/or systemic disorders with eye repercussion is specifically addressed. This review intends to shed light on these topics to help in making opportune diagnosis and appropriately managing the affected patients. PMID:27051666

  19. Eclectic Ocular Comorbidities and Systemic Diseases with Eye Involvement: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María D. Pinazo-Durán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coexistence of several ocular diseases is more frequent than suspected. In spite of the refractive errors, one or more of the following can be detected simultaneously: glaucoma, cataracts, uveitis, age-related macular degeneration, and dry eyes. In addition, as people age, ocular comorbidities are much more usually seen. Specific diseases are openly acknowledged to affect the eyes and vision, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension blood pressure, arthritis, hyperthyroidism, neurodegenerative disorders, hematologic malignancies, and/or systemic infections. Recent advances in early diagnosis and therapy of the ophthalmic pathologies have reinforced patient options to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Because of this, it is essential not to overlook sight-threatening conditions such as the ocular comorbidities and/or the eye involvement in the context of systemic disorders. Moreover, the important role of the multidisciplinary cooperation to improve and sustain management of patients affected with eclectic ocular comorbidities and/or systemic disorders with eye repercussion is specifically addressed. This review intends to shed light on these topics to help in making opportune diagnosis and appropriately managing the affected patients.

  20. Eclectic Ocular Comorbidities and Systemic Diseases with Eye Involvement: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; García-Medina, José J.; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Nucci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Coexistence of several ocular diseases is more frequent than suspected. In spite of the refractive errors, one or more of the following can be detected simultaneously: glaucoma, cataracts, uveitis, age-related macular degeneration, and dry eyes. In addition, as people age, ocular comorbidities are much more usually seen. Specific diseases are openly acknowledged to affect the eyes and vision, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension blood pressure, arthritis, hyperthyroidism, neurodegenerative disorders, hematologic malignancies, and/or systemic infections. Recent advances in early diagnosis and therapy of the ophthalmic pathologies have reinforced patient options to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Because of this, it is essential not to overlook sight-threatening conditions such as the ocular comorbidities and/or the eye involvement in the context of systemic disorders. Moreover, the important role of the multidisciplinary cooperation to improve and sustain management of patients affected with eclectic ocular comorbidities and/or systemic disorders with eye repercussion is specifically addressed. This review intends to shed light on these topics to help in making opportune diagnosis and appropriately managing the affected patients. PMID:27051666

  1. Is age-related failure of metabolic reprogramming a principal mediator in idiopathic Parkinson's disease? Implications for treatment and inverse cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and other vulnerable nervous system regions characterized by extensive axonal arborization and intense energy requirements. Systemic age-related depression of mitochondrial function, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and depressed expression of genes supporting energy homeostasis is more severe in IPD than normal aging such that energy supply may exceed regional demand. In IPD, the overall risk of malignancy is reduced. Cancer is a collection of proliferative diseases marked by malignant transformation, dysregulated mitosis, invasion and metastasis. Many cancers demonstrate normal mitochondrial function, preserved OXPHOS, competent mechanisms of energy homeostasis, and metabolic reprogramming capacities that are lacking in IPD. Metabolic reprogramming adjusts OXPHOS and glycolytic pathways in response to changing metabolic needs. These opposite metabolic features form the basis of a two component hypothesis. First, that depressed mitochondrial function, OXPHOS deficiency and impaired metabolic reprogramming contribute to focal energy failure, neurodegeneration and disease expression in IPD. Second, that the same systemic metabolic deficits inhibit development and proliferation of malignancies in IPD. Studies of mitochondrial aging, familial PD (FPD), the lysosomal storage disorder, Gaucher's disease, Parkinson's disease cybrids, the mitochondrial cytopathies, and disease-related metabolic reprogramming both in IPD and cancer provide support for this model. PMID:27372878

  2. Etiology, prevalence, and treatment of dry eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny L Gayton

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Johnny L GaytonEyesight Associates, Warner Robins, GA, USAPurpose: This review article examines the prevalence, etiology, and current therapies of dry eye disease, with special focus on postmenopausal women.Method: A systematic literature search utilizing MEDLINE was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles related to dry eye published prior to September 2008. The terms “dry eye” and “women” were searched in combination with one or more of the following words or phrases: prevalence, postmenopausal, etiology, risk factors, therapy, medications, surgery, tear film, and quality of life. Articles were selected based on their direct applicability to the subject matter. A manual search was also conducted based on citations in the published literature.Results: Epidemiologic studies identified prevalence rates ranging from 7% in the United States to 33% in Taiwan and Japan. Risk factors include advanced age, female sex, smoking, extreme heat or cold weather conditions, low relative humidity, use of video display terminals, refractive surgery, contact lens wear, and certain medications.Conclusion: The last decade has brought about a better understanding of the etiology of dry eye disease. New therapies that can alleviate the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease and, consequently, improve the quality of life of dry eye patients are available in the market.Keywords: dry eye disease, etiology, prevalence, postmenopausal women

  3. Lutein and Age-Related Ocular Disorders in the Older Adult: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutein, a carotenoid found in dark green, leafy vegetables, has been implicated as being protective against the acquired ocular diseases, such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. In the eye, lutein may act as an antioxidant and as a blue light filter to protect the underlying tissues ...

  4. High power visible diode laser for the treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Arne; Hagen, Clemens; Harlander, Maximilian; Nussbaumer, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    We present a high power visible diode laser enabling a low-cost treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation, including the two leading causes of blindness worldwide (diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration) as well as retinopathy of prematurely born children, intraocular tumors and retinal detachment. Laser coagulation requires the exposure of the eye to visible laser light and relies on the high absorption of the retina. The need for treatment is constantly increasing, due to the demographic trend, the increasing average life expectancy and medical care demand in developing countries. The World Health Organization reacts to this demand with global programs like the VISION 2020 "The right to sight" and the following Universal Eye Health within their Global Action Plan (2014-2019). One major point is to motivate companies and research institutes to make eye treatment cheaper and easily accessible. Therefore it becomes capital providing the ophthalmology market with cost competitive, simple and reliable technologies. Our laser is based on the direct second harmonic generation of the light emitted from a tapered laser diode and has already shown reliable optical performance. All components are produced in wafer scale processes and the resulting strong economy of scale results in a price competitive laser. In a broader perspective the technology behind our laser has a huge potential in non-medical applications like welding, cutting, marking and finally laser-illuminated projection.

  5. Binocular eye movements in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christopher W.

    2013-03-01

    Binocular eye movements form a finely-tuned system that requires accurate coordination of the oculomotor dynamics and supports the vergence movements for tracking the fine binocular disparities required for 3D vision, and are particularly susceptible to disruption by brain injury and other neural dysfunctions. Saccadic dynamics for a population of 84 diverse participants show tight coefficients of variation of 2-10% of the mean value of each parameter. Significantly slower dynamics were seen for vertical upward saccades. Binocular coordination of saccades was accurate to within 1-4%, implying the operation of brainstem coordination mechanisms rather than independent cortical control of the two eyes. A new principle of oculomotor control - reciprocal binocular inhibition - is introduced to complement Sherrington's and Hering's Laws. This new law accounts for the fact that symmetrical vergence responses are about five times slower than saccades of the same amplitude, although a comprehensive analysis of asymmetrical vergence responses revealed unexpected variety in vergence dynamics. This analysis of the variety of human vergence responses thus contributes substantially to the understanding of the oculomotor control mechanisms underlying the generation of vergence movements and of the deficits in the oculomotor control resulting from mild traumatic brain injury.

  6. Human secretory phospholipase A(2), group IB in normal eyes and in eye diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, Jan U; Bazan, Nicolas G; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    , retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma were evaluated. RESULTS: Expression of hGIB was found in various cells of the eye. The most abundant expression was found in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, the inner photoreceptor segments, ganglion cells and the corneal endothelium. We explored diseases involving...

  7. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    cause of blindness among Caucasian individuals in developed countries. Blindness resulting from AMD rarely occurs before age 70, and most cases occur after age 80. The age-standardised 1-year incidence of legal blindness resulting from AMD is 212 cases per million. Two-thirds of AMD cases have CNV......Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian...... individuals than in pigmented races. In predominantly Caucasian populations, the age-standardised prevalence of AMD in at least one eye is 7760 cases per million. The age-standardised cumulated 1-year incidence of AMD in at least one eye is 1051 cases per million individuals. AMD is the most important single...

  8. A review of the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Oduntan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals, referred to as oxidants are molecules in the body with unpaired electrons, hence are unstable and ready to bond with other molecules with unpaired electrons.  They include Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS such as superoxide anion radicals (·O¯, hydrogen peroxide (H202, and hydroxyl free radicals (·OH.  Endogenous sources of ROS include metabolic and other organic processes, while exogenous sources include ultraviolet radiation and environmental toxins such as smoke.  Antioxidants (oxidant scavengers such as ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and glutathione as well as various enzymatic compounds such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase and glutathione reductase are also present in the body and in manyfoods or food supplements.  An imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidantsis termed oxidative stress and can lead to cell or tissue damage and aging. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many serious systemic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and neurological disorders.  Also, laboratory and epidemiological studies have implicated oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the majority of common serious eye diseases such as cataract, primary open angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. In this article, we reviewed the current information on the roles of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various eye diseases and the probable roles of antioxidants.  Eye care practitioners will find this article useful as it provides information on the pathogenesis of common eye diseases. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(4 182-190

  9. Emerging Technologies Look Deeper into the Eyes to Catch Signs of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the eyes to catch signs of disease Emerging technologies look deeper into the eyes to catch signs ... to eye gazing Adaptive optics (AO) is one technology helping to overcome this problem. It deals with ...

  10. Secondary Analyses of the Effects of Lutein/Zeaxanthin on Age-Related Macular Degeneration Progression AREDS2 Report No.3

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Y Chew; Clemons, Traci E.; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Danis, Ronald P; Ferris, Frederick L.; Elman, Michael J.; Antoszyk, Andrew; Ruby, Alan; Orth, David; Bressler, Susan B.; Fish, Gary; Hubbard, Baker; Klein, Michael; Chandra, Suresh; Blodi, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation for treatment of age-related macular degeneration contains vitamins C, E, beta-carotene and zinc with copper. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) assessed the value of substituting lutein/zeaxanthin in the AREDS formulation because of the demonstrated risk of lung cancer from beta-carotene in smokers and former smokers. As previously reported in a secondary analysis, AREDS2 participants taking lutein/zeaxanthin with or without omega-3...

  11. Sleep and mood disorders in dry eye disease and allied irritating ocular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Masahiko Ayaki; Motoko Kawashima; Kazuno Negishi; Taishiro Kishimoto; Masaru Mimura; Kazuo Tsubota

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep and mood disorders in patients with irritating ocular diseases. The study design was a cross-sectional/case-control study conducted in six eye clinics. Out of 715 outpatients diagnosed with irritating ocular surface diseases and initially enrolled, 301 patients with dry eye disease (DED) and 202 age-matched control participants with other ocular surface diseases were analyzed. The mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiet...

  12. Vision, eye disease, and art: 2015 Keeler Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, M F

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine normal vision and eye disease in relation to art. Ophthalmology cannot explain art, but vision is a tool for artists and its normal and abnormal characteristics may influence what an artist can do. The retina codes for contrast, and the impact of this is evident throughout art history from Asian brush painting, to Renaissance chiaroscuro, to Op Art. Art exists, and can portray day or night, only because of the way retina adjusts to light. Color processing is complex, but artists have exploited it to create shimmer (Seurat, Op Art), or to disconnect color from form (fauvists, expressionists, Andy Warhol). It is hazardous to diagnose eye disease from an artist's work, because artists have license to create as they wish. El Greco was not astigmatic; Monet was not myopic; Turner did not have cataracts. But when eye disease is documented, the effects can be analyzed. Color-blind artists limit their palette to ambers and blues, and avoid greens. Dense brown cataracts destroy color distinctions, and Monet's late canvases (before surgery) showed strange and intense uses of color. Degas had failing vision for 40 years, and his pastels grew coarser and coarser. He may have continued working because his blurred vision smoothed over the rough work. This paper can barely touch upon the complexity of either vision or art. However, it demonstrates some ways in which understanding vision and eye disease give insight into art, and thereby an appreciation of both art and ophthalmology. PMID:26563659

  13. Vision, eye disease, and art: 2015 Keeler Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, M F

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine normal vision and eye disease in relation to art. Ophthalmology cannot explain art, but vision is a tool for artists and its normal and abnormal characteristics may influence what an artist can do. The retina codes for contrast, and the impact of this is evident throughout art history from Asian brush painting, to Renaissance chiaroscuro, to Op Art. Art exists, and can portray day or night, only because of the way retina adjusts to light. Color processing is complex, but artists have exploited it to create shimmer (Seurat, Op Art), or to disconnect color from form (fauvists, expressionists, Andy Warhol). It is hazardous to diagnose eye disease from an artist's work, because artists have license to create as they wish. El Greco was not astigmatic; Monet was not myopic; Turner did not have cataracts. But when eye disease is documented, the effects can be analyzed. Color-blind artists limit their palette to ambers and blues, and avoid greens. Dense brown cataracts destroy color distinctions, and Monet's late canvases (before surgery) showed strange and intense uses of color. Degas had failing vision for 40 years, and his pastels grew coarser and coarser. He may have continued working because his blurred vision smoothed over the rough work. This paper can barely touch upon the complexity of either vision or art. However, it demonstrates some ways in which understanding vision and eye disease give insight into art, and thereby an appreciation of both art and ophthalmology.

  14. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  15. Thyroid eye disease: honing your skills to improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi, Linda R; Elliott, Alexandra T; Roper-Hall, Gill; Cruz, Oscar A

    2010-10-01

    Thyroid eye disease affects the eyelids, orbital compartment, and extraocular muscles, resulting in a highly variable degree of chemosis and enlargement of the preorbital fat pads, eyelid retraction, proptosis, restrictive strabismus, torticollis, and, rarely, compressive or congestive optic neuropathy. Although most patients with thyroid eye disease are best treated conservatively, those more severely affected may benefit from orbital decompression, strabismus surgery, or eyelid retraction repair after stabilization has occurred. Botulinum A toxin, high-dose intravenous corticosteroids, and radiation treatment are therapeutic options in select cases. Compressive or congestive optic neuropathy and severe corneal exposure warrant consideration of surgical intervention on an urgent basis without waiting for stabilization. Epidemiology and risks and benefits of high-dose steroids and radiation therapy are reviewed along with recommendations to improve conservative as well as surgical management of this disease. Strategies to manage strabismus and optimize outcomes are provided.

  16. Portable retinal imaging for eye disease screening using a consumer-grade digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Simon; Larichev, Andrey; Zamora, Gilberto; Soliz, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The development of affordable means to image the retina is an important step toward the implementation of eye disease screening programs. In this paper we present the i-RxCam, a low-cost, hand-held, retinal camera for widespread applications such as tele-retinal screening for eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, and age-related ocular diseases. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities. The i-RxCam uses a Nikon D3100 digital camera body. The camera has a CMOS sensor with 14.8 million pixels. We use a 50mm focal lens that gives a retinal field of view of 45 degrees. The internal autofocus can compensate for about 2D (diopters) of focusing error. The light source is an LED produced by Philips with a linear emitting area that is transformed using a light pipe to the optimal shape at the eye pupil, an annulus. To eliminate corneal reflex we use a polarization technique in which the light passes through a nano-wire polarizer plate. This is a novel type of polarizer featuring high polarization separation (contrast ratio of more than 1000) and very large acceptance angle (>45 degrees). The i-RxCam approach will yield a significantly more economical retinal imaging device that would allow mass screening of the at-risk population.

  17. Dietary analysis and patterns of nutritional supplement use in normal and age-related macular disease affected subjects: a prospective cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eperjesi Frank

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor diet is thought to be a risk factor for many diseases, including age-related macular disease (ARMD, which is the leading cause of blind registration in those aged over 60 years in the developed world. The aims of this study were 1 to evaluate the dietary food intake of three subject groups: participants under the age of 50 years without ARMD (U50, participants over the age of 50 years without ARMD (O50, and participants with ARMD (AMD, and 2 to obtain information on nutritional supplement usage. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study designed in a clinical practice setting. Seventy-four participants were divided into three groups: U50; 20 participants aged 50 years, from 52 to 77 (62.7 ± 6.8 years, and ARMD; 27 participants aged > 50 years with ARMD, from 55 to 79 (66.0 ± 5.8 years. Participants were issued with a three-day food diary, and were also asked to provide details of any daily nutritional supplements. The diaries were analysed using FoodBase 2000 software. Data were input by one investigator and statistically analysed using Microsoft Excel for Microsoft Windows XP software, employing unpaired t-tests. Results Group O50 consumed significantly more vitamin C (t = 3.049, p = 0.005 and significantly more fibre (t = 2.107, p = 0.041 than group U50. Group ARMD consumed significantly more protein (t = 3.487, p = 0.001 and zinc (t = 2.252, p = 0.029 than group O50. The ARMD group consumed the highest percentage of specific ocular health supplements and the U50 group consumed the most multivitamins. Conclusions We did not detect a deficiency of any specific nutrient in the diets of those with ARMD compared with age- and gender-matched controls. ARMD patients may be aware of research into use of nutritional supplementation to prevent progression of their condition.

  18. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  19. Effects of vitrectomy on age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roller, A. Brock; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Boldt, H. Culver; Abramoff, M.D.; Russell, Stephen R.; Folk, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether vitrectomy alters the long-term progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Retrospective case-control study. Participants Forty-four eyes of 22 patients with AMD who underwent vitrectomy in 1 eye were included in the study. The progression of AMD at

  20. Ocular inserts - Advancement in therapy of eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kumari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocular insert represents a significant advancement in the therapy of eye disease. Ocular inserts are defined as sterile, thin, multilayered, drug-impregnated, solid or semisolid consistency devices placed into the cul-de-sac or conjuctival sac, whose size and shape are especially designed for ophthalmic application. They are composed of a polymeric support that may or may not contain a drug. The drug can later be incorporated as dispersion or a solution in the polymeric support. They offer several advantages as increased ocular residence and sustained release of medication into the eye. The insert includes a body portion sized to position within a lachrymal canaliculus of the eyelid. The inserts are classified according to their solubility as insoluble, soluble, or bioerodible inserts. The release of drug from the insert depends upon the diffusion, osmosis, and bioerosion of the drug, and this article is an attempt to present a brief about this newer drug delivery system.

  1. Abnormal Eye Movements in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael P.; Cohen, Mark; Petersen, Robert B.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McDougall, Alan; Tusa, Ronald J.; Leigh, R. John

    1993-01-01

    We report 3 patients with autopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who, early in their course, developed abnormal eye movements that included periodic alternating nystagmus and slow vertical saccades. These findings suggested involvement of the cerebellar nodulus and uvula, and the brainstem reticular formation, respectively. Cerebellar ataxia was also an early manifestation and, in one patient, a frontal lobe brain biopsy was normal at a time when ocular motor and cerebellar signs were conspicuous. As the disease progressed, all saccades and quick phases of nystagmus were lost, but periodic alternating gaze deviation persisted. At autopsy, 2 of the 3 patients had pronounced involvement of the cerebellum, especially of the midline structures. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease should be considered in patients with subacute progressive neurological disease when cognitive changes are overshadowed by ocular motor findings or ataxia.

  2. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Max Damico

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    , photodynamic therapy with verteporfin is the treatment of choice. Photodynamic therapy is also effective in eyes with pure occult CNV and evidence of recent disease progression. For new subfoveal CNV with poor vision and recurrent CNV, laser photocoagulation can be considered........ Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...... a fluorescein angiographic study and a physician capable of interpreting it. For CNV not involving the foveal centre, the only evidence-based treatment is laser photocoagulation. For AMD cases with subfoveal CNV, good visual acuity, and predominantly classic fluorescence pattern on fluorescein angiography...

  4. Common Eye Diseases in Children in Saudi Arabia (Jazan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darraj, Abdulrahman; Barakat, Walid; Kenani, Mona; Shajry, Reem; Khawaji, Abdullah; Bakri, Sultan; Makin, Abdulrahman; Mohanna, Azza; Yassin, Abu Obaida

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The rise in childhood eye diseases has become a matter of concern in Saudi Arabia, and hence a study has been conducted on the residents of Jazan. The aim of the research was to find out the root cause of such issues and provide a solution to prevent such circumstances for it may affect the vision of children. In this study, therefore, we aimed to determine the types of childhood eye diseases in Jazan and to discuss the best ways to prevent them or prevent their effect on the vision of our children. Our institutions are working toward the longevity and welfare of the residents, and healthcare is one of the important aspects in such a field. METHODS This is a retrospective review of all patients less than 18 years of age who presented to the pediatric ophthalmology clinic of Prince Mohammed Bin Nasser Hospital, Jazan, between October 2014 and October 2015. The data, collected on 385 cases, included the age at first presentation, sex, clinical diagnosis, refractive error (RE) if present, and whether the child had amblyopia. If the child did not undergo complete ophthalmic examination with cycloplegic refraction, he/she was excluded. All data were collected and analyzed using the software SPSS. A P-value sex among children with REs and squint. Trauma was seen more commonly among males and in the group aged 12–18 years. CONCLUSION In this retrospective study, the focus was on the common childhood eye diseases that were considerably high. Hypermetropia was the predominant RE, which is in contrast to other studies where myopia was more common. However, it is important to promote public education on the significance of early detection of strabismus, REs, and amblyopia and have periodic screening in schools. The discussion of the various issues is aimed at increasing the awareness and building a support for the cause by creating the knowledge base to treat things on time and acknowledging the severity of the issues. PMID:27679531

  5. The association of sleep quality with dry eye disease: the Osaka study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Uchino, Miki; Yokoi, Norihiko; Uchino, Yuichi; Dogru, Murat; Komuro, Aoi; Sonomura, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of dry eye disease with sleep quality. Methods In 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among all the employees, mainly young and middle-aged Japanese office workers, who used visual display technology, at a company in Osaka, Japan (N=672; age range =26–64 years). The participants were classified according to the Japanese dry eye diagnosis criteria by dry eye examination results including the Schirmer test, fluorescein and lissamine green staining, tear film break-up time, and symptom questionnaire into three groups as follows: definite dry eye disease, probable dry eye disease, and no dry eye disease. To determine sleep quality, Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (global score) was implemented. The global score (range =0–21) was calculated by summing seven sleep variable scores (scale, 0–3); scores ≥5.5 indicated poor sleep. Results The total mean global score was 5.1±2.3 (completed N=383); 45% of the dry eye disease participants reported having poor sleep quality, while 34% of the no dry eye disease participants did so, with a significant difference found in the global score (P=0.002). Furthermore, a statistically significant association was observed between the global score and dry eye disease (P=0.005). Conclusion Poor sleep quality is associated with dry eye disease, especially with dry eye symptoms. PMID:27330271

  6. Dry Eye Disease Incidence Associated with Chronic Graft-Host Disease: Nonconcurrent Cohort Study (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Shahzad I.; De la Parra-Colín, Paola; De Melo-Franco, Rafael; Johnson, Christopher; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with stable or progressive dry eye disease and to determine the true incidence in patients with no prior history of dry eye disease. Methods: A nonconcurrent cohort study at a single institution with 136 patients who had no previous history of dry eye disease before HSCT. Survival analysis was used to estimate dry eye disease incidence. The incidence rate was calculated using life tables as the number of observed dry eye disease cases divided by the person-time at risk accumulated by the cohort. Transition probabilities were calculated from time of transplant to time of diagnosis, and then to last recorded visit. Results: Incidence rate was 0.8 cases of dry eye disease per person-year, and half of the population at risk developed dry eye disease during the first 10 months post transplant. Time to develop dry eye disease was 2.5 months for mild dry eye disease, 9.6 months for moderate dry eye disease, and 13.2 months for severe dry eye disease. In terms of cumulative incidence, 73% of subjects developed dry eye disease (50% mild, 16% moderate, and 7% severe) at the time of diagnosis. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that dry eye disease associated with cGVHD is an extremely frequent event and shows a wide spectrum of severity, with a mild form presenting early and a moderate to severe form presenting later after HSCT. These findings need to be studied further to elucidate if these are two different pathophysiological entities or just different expressions of the same pathology. PMID:27507907

  7. The relationship between sex and symmetry in thyroid eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavoussi SC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shaheen C Kavoussi,1 Joseph N Giacometti,2 J Javier Servat,1 Flora Levin11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Cullen Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAPurpose: To examine the relationships between sex and symmetry in the context of disease activity, severity, and thyroid status in thyroid eye disease.Methods: Retrospective chart review of 31 men and 31 women with untreated thyroid eye disease. Subjective complaints, smoking status, thyroid status, and objective findings pertinent to the clinical activity score (CAS and “NO SPECS” classification were recorded. Overall disease asymmetry was defined as having simultaneous asymmetry of both more than one symptom and more than one external finding. Asymmetry was compared across sex and thyroid status. CAS and NO SPECS severity were compared across sex, symmetry, and thyroid status. Results: Asymmetric appearance was reported by 58% of men and 19% of women. Asymmetric proptosis (>2 mm difference was seen in 45% of men and 23% of women (P=0.036. Overall asymmetry was seen in 55% of men and 19% of women (P=0.017. Thyroid status and sex had a combined effect on symmetry, as 15 of 16 hyperthyroid females (94% demonstrated symmetric disease. Average NO SPECS severity was 3.5 (standard deviation [SD] 1.4 in men and 3.3 (SD 1.1 in women (P=0.51, and was 3.8 (SD 1.4 in asymmetric patients versus 3.2 (SD 1.3 in symmetric patients (P=0.08. The CAS was higher in asymmetric than symmetric patients (1.84 versus 0.97; P=0.012. Conclusion: Men demonstrated more asymmetric disease (proptosis and overall asymmetry than women, while hyperthyroid females demonstrated more symmetry than euthyroid and hypothyroid males and females. NO SPECS severity score was unaffected by sex, thyroid status, or symmetry. Asymmetric patients demonstrated higher clinical activity scores.Keywords: Graves

  8. Age-Related White Matter Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Yun Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related white matter changes (WMC are considered manifestation of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and are related to age and vascular risk factors. Most recent studies have shown that WMC are associated with a host of poor outcomes, including cognitive impairment, dementia, urinary incontinence, gait disturbances, depression, and increased risk of stroke and death. Although the clinical relevance of WMC has been extensively studied, to date, only very few clinical trials have evaluated potential symptomatic or preventive treatments for WMC. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding in the pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical importance, chemical biomarkers, and treatments of age-related WMC.

  9. [Parkinson Disease With Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep and enactment of dream content. RBD is associated with Parkinson disease (PD) and has high incidence in PD patients. PD patient with RBD mainly presents rigid type, has longer disease duration, more severe motor and non-motor symptoms and poorer activity of daily living and life quality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of RBD may be related to dysfunctions of pontine tegmentum, locus coeruleus/sub-locus coeruleus complex and related projections. The diagnosis of RBD depends on clinical histories and video-polysomnography (v-PSG). Besides treatment for PD, protective measures have to be taken for patients and their sleep partners. If abnormal behaviors during sleep cause distress and danger,patients should be given drug therapy. PMID:26521483

  10. Differences in spectral absorption properties between active neovascular macular degeneration and mild age related maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaskas, Konstantinos; Nourrit, Vincent; Dinsdale, Michelle; Henson, David B; Aslam, Tariq

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the differences in spectral absorption properties between the maculae of patients with active neovascular macular degeneration and those with early age related maculopathy (ARM). Patients attending for management of neovascular age related macular degeneration (AMD) underwent multispectral imaging with a system comprising of a modified digital fundus camera coupled with a 250-W tungsten-halogen lamp and a liquid crystal fast-tuneable filter. Images were obtained at 8 wavelengths between 496 and 700 nm. Aligned images were used to generate a DLA (differential light absorption, a measure of spectral absorption properties) map of the macular area. DLA maps were generated for both eyes of 10 sequential patients attending for anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections. Each of these patients had active leaking neovascular AMD in one eye and early ARM or milder disease in the fellow eye. Eyes with neovascular AMD demonstrated lower average levels of DLA compared with their fellow eyes with early ARM (p=0.037, t test). The significant difference in DLA demonstrates the potential of multispectral imaging for differentiating the two pathologies non-invasively. PMID:23137662

  11. Cytokines in thyroid eye disease: potential for anticytokine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, R S

    1998-05-01

    Interactions between between orbital fibroblasts and immunocompetent cells that infiltrate or reside within the orbit are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease (TED). These interactions are mediated primarily by cytokines; interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1alpha and leukoregulin are of particular interest in this regard. These mediators induce or enhance the in vitro expression of immunomodulatory proteins in orbital fibroblasts, and stimulate proliferative and metabolic activities of these cells. The stimulation by particular cytokines of glycosaminoglycan synthesis in orbital fibroblasts is an important factor in the development of the clinical disease. A similarly important pathophysiological role for cytokines has been defined in rheumatoid arthritis. In this disease, the chronic erosive changes in the cartilage and bone of the joints result from cytokine-stimulated production of collegenases and other neutral proteases by synovial cells and articular chondrocytes. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatologic joint disease has led to treatment trials aimed at immune-modulation, including trials of anticytokine therapy. Lessons learned in early clinical trials using these biological therapies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis can be applied to studies of similar agents in the treatment of TED. PMID:9623733

  12. A STUDY TO COMPARE FUNDUS FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Sujatha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE To compare the diagnostic accuracy of optical coherence tomography with Fundus Fluorescein Angiography in diagnosing Age related macular degeneration. METHODS A total 25 patients newly diagnosed as Age related macular degeneration were included in the study. The study was done during the time period between August 2013 to November 2015 this is a prospective randomized hospital based study. RESULTS Maximum no of patients affected belonged to the age group of 50-70 years and 60% were females. The most common symptom was defective vision accounting for 92%. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia were the most common risk factors. 12% of the cases had unilateral disease and 88% had bilateral disease. 6% of eyes were normal in both FFA and OCT. 62% of the eyes by FFA and 61% of the eyes by OCT had dry ARMD and 32 % of the eye by FFA and 33 % by OCT had wet ARMD. CONCLUSION Fundus Fluorescein Angiography is the gold standard tool for screening ARMD and OCT is more specific in detecting early subretinal neovascular membrane and also to assess the activity of the neovascular membranes. Hence OCT is superior to FFA in diagnosing early wet ARMD and thus helps in early management of patients with ARMD.

  13. Simple Physics in Diseases and Embryonic Development of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirinifard, Abbas

    2011-03-01

    While molecular-level regulation within cells during embryonic development is highly complex, the physical mechanisms which translate this intracellular information into multicellular physical structure at the tissue level are often surprisingly simple. I will discuss an example where regulation of cell-cell contact energies is primarily responsible for robust and evolvable regular patterns, the organization of the ommatidia and supporting cells into the regular tiling characteristic of the Drosophila eye and another example where adhesion failures in the human retina result in choroidal neovascularization leading to blindness. In both cases, simulations based on materials-science techniques can help us understand the patterning mechanisms and the reasons for their robustness and failures. Such simulations are easy to extend to other developmental phenomena and to development-related diseases like cancer. EPA grant ``The Texas-Indiana Virtual STAR Center'' and NIH grants R01 GM76692 and R01 GM077138.

  14. Rapid eye movement sleep disturbances in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnulf, I.; Nielsen, J.; Lohmann, E.;

    2008-01-01

    and shortened rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and increased periodic leg movements. Three HD patients (12%) had REM sleep behavior disorders. No sleep abnormality correlated with CAG repeat length. Reduced REM sleep duration (but not REM sleep behavior disorders) was present in premanifest carriers and patients...... with very mild HD and worsened with disease severity. In contrast to narcoleptic patients, HD patients had no cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, or sleep paralysis. Four HD patients had abnormally low (sleep latencies, but none had multiple sleep-onset REM periods. Conclusions......: The sleep phenotype of HD includes insomnia, advanced sleep phase, periodic leg movements, REM sleep behavior disorders, and reduced REM sleep but not narcolepsy. Reduced REM sleep may precede chorea. Mutant huntingtin may exert an effect on REM sleep and motor control during sleep Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  15. Common Eye Diseases in Children in Saudi Arabia (Jazan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darraj, Abdulrahman; Barakat, Walid; Kenani, Mona; Shajry, Reem; Khawaji, Abdullah; Bakri, Sultan; Makin, Abdulrahman; Mohanna, Azza; Yassin, Abu Obaida

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The rise in childhood eye diseases has become a matter of concern in Saudi Arabia, and hence a study has been conducted on the residents of Jazan. The aim of the research was to find out the root cause of such issues and provide a solution to prevent such circumstances for it may affect the vision of children. In this study, therefore, we aimed to determine the types of childhood eye diseases in Jazan and to discuss the best ways to prevent them or prevent their effect on the vision of our children. Our institutions are working toward the longevity and welfare of the residents, and healthcare is one of the important aspects in such a field. METHODS This is a retrospective review of all patients less than 18 years of age who presented to the pediatric ophthalmology clinic of Prince Mohammed Bin Nasser Hospital, Jazan, between October 2014 and October 2015. The data, collected on 385 cases, included the age at first presentation, sex, clinical diagnosis, refractive error (RE) if present, and whether the child had amblyopia. If the child did not undergo complete ophthalmic examination with cycloplegic refraction, he/she was excluded. All data were collected and analyzed using the software SPSS. A P-value education on the significance of early detection of strabismus, REs, and amblyopia and have periodic screening in schools. The discussion of the various issues is aimed at increasing the awareness and building a support for the cause by creating the knowledge base to treat things on time and acknowledging the severity of the issues.

  16. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Presentation and Treatment of Graves' Disease and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargason, Caroline W; Chelnis, James G; Barahimi, Behin I; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is an inflammatory, autoimmune orbitopathy with multifactorial etiology. Clinical presentation of TED spans a range from mild surface irritation to vision threatening compressive optic neuropathy. Potential vision loss underscores the importance of understanding genetic and environmental factors influencing the severity of TED presentation. This review will describe the classic risk factors for TED, outline treatments for Graves' disease (GD) and TED, and describe newer evidence of socioeconomic disparities in TED presentation.

  17. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    for the disease and are older than 50 years; (2) who have been diagnosed with unilateral age-related macular degeneration in order to prevent damage of the contralateral eye; (3) who have bilateral age-related macular degeneration in order to avert deterioration and in the hope of a potential improvement. However, randomised prospective clinical trials are still needed to elucidate the potential role of these drug treatments in the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26548469

  18. Dry Eye Disease Patients with Xerostomia Report Higher Symptom Load and Have Poorer Meibum Expressibility

    OpenAIRE

    Fostad, Ida G.; Eidet, Jon R.; Tor P. Utheim; Ræder, Sten; Lagali, Neil S.; Messelt, Edvard B.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate if xerostomia (dry mouth) is associated with symptoms and signs of dry eye disease (DED). At the Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, patients with symptomatic DED with different etiologies were consecutively included in the study. The patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmological work-up and completed self-questionnaires on symptoms of ocular dryness (Ocular Surface Disease Index [OSDI] and McMonnies Dry Eye Questionnaire) and the Sjögren’s syndrome (SS...

  19. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  20. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the ...

  1. Nutrients for the aging eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen HM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Helen M Rasmussen,1 Elizabeth J Johnson2 1Educational Studies, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Carotenoid and Health Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-inflammatories may provide benefit in decreasing the risk of age-related eye disease. Nutrients of interest are vitamins C and E, β-carotene, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. While a recent survey finds that among the baby boomers (45–65 years old, vision is the most important of the five senses, well over half of those surveyed were not aware of the important nutrients that play a key role in eye health. This is evident from a national survey that finds that intake of these key nutrients from dietary sources is below the recommendations or guidelines. Therefore, it is important to educate this population and to create an awareness of the nutrients and foods of particular interest in the prevention of age-related eye disease. Keywords: nutrition, aging, eye health

  2. A Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Inhibiting the Response to Intravitreal Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Therapy in Wet Age-Related Macular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel S. Falcão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD is an ocular disorder that can be successfully treated with intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy. We report a case of incomplete response to intravitreal therapy associated with a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. Methods: A 72-year-old male with wet AMD responded poorly to intravitreal bevacizumab and ranibizumab injections. The removal of a ccRCC led to the spontaneous stabilization of the choroidal neovascular lesion. The renal carcinoma was examined for Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene alterations. Immunohistochemical profiling of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathway addressing the marker HIF-1α and its downstream targets VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and carbonic anhydrase IX was performed. Results: Genotyping of the ccRCC revealed the presence of a truncating VHL mutation (p.E134fs*25. Immunohistochemistry displayed HIF pathway target activation and VEGF expression in the ccRCC tumour cells. Following tumour removal, the neovascular lesion remained stable for 6 months without any further anti-VEGF therapy. Conclusion: The somatic VHL mutation correlates with persistent high levels of HIF-1α pathway targets and VEGF expression in the ccRCC. We postulate that this increased VEGF in the tumour and subsequently in the plasma levels could have caused the incomplete response to intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy. Stabilization of the wet AMD following tumour removal indicates that the angiogenic secreting tumour (ccRCC abrogates the response to VEGF inhibitor therapy. Thus, in cases of poor response to intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy, systemic evaluation including plasma levels of VEGF and/or systemic screening for VEGF-producing tumours should be considered.

  3. The role of octreoscan in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassas, G E; Kahaly, G J

    1999-05-01

    Until recently there was no imaging technique available which could demonstrate pathological changes in orbital tissues and could be regarded as a reliable measure of inflammation in thyroid eye disease (TED). Pentetreotide (a synthetic derivative of somatostatin) labelled with 111In has been used to localize tumours which possess surface or membrane receptors for somatostatin in vivo using a gamma camera (1). This technique visualizes somatostatin receptors in endocrine-related tumours in vivo and predicts the inhibitory effect of the somatostatin analogue octreotide on hormone secretion by the tumours (1). By applying 111In-DTPA-d-Phe octreotide scintigraphy (octreoscan), accumulation of the radionuclide was also detected in both the thyroid and orbit of patients with Graves' disease (2-4). If peak activity in the orbit 5h after injection of radiolabelled octreotide is set at 100%, a decrease to 40+/-4% is found at 24h, significantly different from the decrease in blood pool radioactivity, which is 15+/-4% at 24h. Accumulation of the radionuclide is most probably due to the presence in the orbital tissue of activated lymphocytes bearing somatostatin receptors (5). Alternative explanations are binding to receptors on other cell types (e.g. myoblasts, fibroblasts or endothelial cells) or local blood pooling due to venous stasis by the autoimmune orbital inflammation. PMID:10229898

  4. Eye Health in New Zealand: A Study of Public Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Eye Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mark J.; Frederikson, Lesley; Borman, Barry; Bednarek, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to measure the public knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to eye health and disease in New Zealand (NZ). Design/methodology/approach: A 22-item survey of 507 adults in NZ was conducted. The survey was developed using interviews and focus groups, as well as comparisons with other benchmark international studies.…

  5. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  6. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD. Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory

  7. Systematic age-related differences in chronic disease management in a population-based cohort study: a new paradigm of primary care is required.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Buja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our interest in chronic conditions is due to the fact that, worldwide, chronic diseases have overtaken infectious diseases as the leading cause of death and disability, so their management represents an important challenge for health systems. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of primary health care services in managing diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF and coronary heart disease (CHD, by age group. METHODS: This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted in Italy, enrolling 1,948,622 residents ≥ 16 years old. A multilevel regression model was applied to analyze compliance to care processes with explanatory variables at both patient and district level, using age group as an independent variable, and adjusting for sex, citizenship, disease duration, and Charlson index on the first level, and for District Health Unit on the second level. RESULTS: The quality of chronic disease management showed an inverted U-shaped relationship with age. In particular, our findings indicate lower levels for young adults (16-44 year-olds, adults (45-64, and oldest old (+85 than for patients aged 65-74 in almost all quality indicators of CHD, CHF and diabetes management. Young adults (16-44 y, adults (45-64 y, the very old (75-84 y and the oldest old (+85 y patients with CHD, CHF and diabetes are less likely than 65-74 year-old patients to be monitored and treated using evidence-based therapies, with the exceptions of echocardiographic monitoring for CHF in young adult patients, and renal monitoring for CHF and diabetes in the very old. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that more effort is needed to ensure that primary health care systems are sensitive to chronic conditions in the young and in the very elderly.

  8. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration : the three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K; Lee, Kristine E; Stricker, Bruno H; Vingerling, Johannes R; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E K; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. METHODS: setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mou

  9. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration: The three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Klein (Ronald); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); E. Rochtchina (Elena); X. Gao (Xiaoyi); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); T.A. Sivakumaran (Theru); G. Burlutsky (George); R. McKean-Cowdin (Roberta); A. Hofman (Albert); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); K.E. Lee (Kristine); B.H. Stricker; J.R. Vingerling (Hans); P. Mitchell (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Meta-analysis. Methods setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES),

  10. The effect of time-dependent macromolecular crowding on the kinetics of protein aggregation: a simple model for the onset of age-related neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Allen

    2014-08-01

    A linear increase in the concentration of "inert" macromolecules with time is incorporated into simple excluded volume models for protein condensation or fibrillation. Such models predict a long latent period during which no significant amount of protein aggregates, followed by a steep increase in the total amount of aggregate. The elapsed time at which these models predict half-conversion of model protein to aggregate varies by less than a factor of two when the intrinsic rate constant for condensation or fibril growth of the protein is varied over many orders of magnitude. It is suggested that this concept can explain why the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the aggregation of very different proteins and peptides appear at approximately the same advanced age in humans.

  11. The research situation of telomeres and aging related diseases%端粒与衰老相关疾病的研究概况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱娜; 魏革

    2015-01-01

    许多研究表明在衰老相关疾病的发生、发展与端粒长度、端粒酶活性的相关变化具有一定的联系,另外如激素等许多因素可以影响端粒长度、端粒酶的活性。本文对此进行综述。%Many studies have shown that the occurrence and development of diseases associated with aging, and the change of telomere length and telomerase activity has certain contact. In addition, many factors such as hormones, can affect the telomere length and telomerase activity. In this paper, these connections are reviewed.

  12. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  13. Systemic and Ocular Long Pentraxin 3 in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene Bæk; Faber, Carsten; Fog, Lea Munthe;

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been associated with both systemic and ocular alterations of the immune system. In particular dysfunction of complement factor H (CFH), a soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of the complement system, has been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. One of...... stimulation with TNF-alpha or activated T cells (P<0.01). These findings indicate that PTX3 expressed in the eye cannot be detected systemically and systemic PTX3 may have little or no impact on disease progression, but our findings do not exclude that locally produced PTX3 produced in the posterior segment...

  14. Nutrients for the aging eye

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen HM; Johnson EJ

    2013-01-01

    Helen M Rasmussen,1 Elizabeth J Johnson2 1Educational Studies, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Carotenoid and Health Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-infla...

  15. Diminishing risk for age-related macular degeneration with nutrition: a current view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Molly; Weikel, Karen; Garber, Caren; Taylor, Allen

    2013-07-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  16. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Taylor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  17. Inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Ema; Campbell, Matthew; Kiang, Anna-Sophia; Humphries, Marian; Doyle, Sarah L; Humphries, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness in elderly individuals in the developed world, affecting 30-50 million people worldwide. AMD primarily affects the macular region of the retina that is responsible for the majority of central, color and daytime vision. The presence of drusen, extracellular protein aggregates that accumulate under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a major pathological hallmark in the early stages of the disease. The end stage 'dry' and 'wet' forms of the disease culminate in vision loss and are characterized by focal degeneration of the RPE and cone photoreceptors, and choroidal neovascularization (CNV), respectively. Being a multifactorial and genetically heterogeneous disease, the pathophysiology of AMD remains unclear, yet, there is ample evidence supporting immunological and inflammatory processes. Here, we review the recent literature implicating some of these immune processes in human AMD and in animal models. PMID:24664703

  18. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  19. A novel nanoscale-dispersed eye ointment for the treatment of dry eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjian; Wang, Yan; Lee, Benjamin Tak Kwong; Liu, Chang; Wei, Gang; Lu, Weiyue

    2014-03-01

    A novel nanoscale-dispersed eye ointment (NDEO) for the treatment of severe evaporative dry eye has been successfully developed. The excipients used as semisolid lipids were petrolatum and lanolin, as used in conventional eye ointment, which were coupled with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) as a liquid lipid; both phases were then dispersed in polyvinyl pyrrolidone solution to form a nanodispersion. Single-factor experiments were conducted to optimize the formulations. A transmission electron micrograph showed that the ointment matrix was entrapped in the nanoemulsion of MCT, with a mean particle size of about 100 nm. The optimized formulation of NDEO was stable when stored for six months at 4 °C, and demonstrated no cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells when compared with commercial polymer-based artificial tears (Tears Natural® Forte). The therapeutic effects of NDEO were evaluated on a mouse model with ‘dry eye’. Both the tear break-up time and fluorescein staining demonstrated therapeutic improvement, displaying a trend of positive correlation with higher concentrations of ointment matrix in the NDEO formulations compared to a marketed product. Histological evaluation demonstrated that the NDEO restored the normal corneal and conjunctival morphology and is safe for ophthalmic application.

  20. A novel nanoscale-dispersed eye ointment for the treatment of dry eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel nanoscale-dispersed eye ointment (NDEO) for the treatment of severe evaporative dry eye has been successfully developed. The excipients used as semisolid lipids were petrolatum and lanolin, as used in conventional eye ointment, which were coupled with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) as a liquid lipid; both phases were then dispersed in polyvinyl pyrrolidone solution to form a nanodispersion. Single-factor experiments were conducted to optimize the formulations. A transmission electron micrograph showed that the ointment matrix was entrapped in the nanoemulsion of MCT, with a mean particle size of about 100 nm. The optimized formulation of NDEO was stable when stored for six months at 4 °C, and demonstrated no cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells when compared with commercial polymer-based artificial tears (Tears Natural® Forte). The therapeutic effects of NDEO were evaluated on a mouse model with ‘dry eye’. Both the tear break-up time and fluorescein staining demonstrated therapeutic improvement, displaying a trend of positive correlation with higher concentrations of ointment matrix in the NDEO formulations compared to a marketed product. Histological evaluation demonstrated that the NDEO restored the normal corneal and conjunctival morphology and is safe for ophthalmic application. (paper)

  1. Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Vitrectomy Are Helpful in Diagnosing and Treating Eyes with Advanced Coats' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Imaizumi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of Coats’ disease are often associated with total retinal detachment, and a differential diagnosis from retinoblastoma is critically important. In such eyes, laser- and/or cryoablation is often ineffective or sometimes impossible to perform. We report a case of advanced Coats’ disease in which a rapid pathological examination of subretinal fluid was effective for the diagnosis, and external subretinal drainage combined with vitrectomy was effective in preserving the eye.

  2. Age-related skin changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božanić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related skin changes can be induced by chronological ageing, manifested in subcutaneous fat reduction, and photo-ageing eliciting increased elastotic substance in the upper dermis, destruction of its fibrilar structure, augmented intercellular substance and moderate inflammatory infiltrate. Forty-five biopsy skin samples of the sun-exposed and sun-protected skin were analyzed. The patients were both males and females, aged from 17 to 81 years. The thickness of the epidermal layers and the number of cellular living layers is greater in younger skin. The amount of keratohyaline granules is enlarged in older skin. Dermoepidermal junction is flattened and the presence of elastotic material in the dermis is pronounced with age. The amount of inflammatory infiltrate is increased, the fibrous trabeculae are thickened in older skin and the atrophy of the hypodermis is observed. Chronological ageing alters the fibroblasts metabolism by reducing their life span, capacity to divide and produce collagen. During ageing, the enlargement of collagen fibrils diminishes the skin elasticity.

  3. Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in thyroid disease when the eye protrudes forward; cosmetic surgery, if the eyelids are opened too widely. Frequently ... disease when the eye protrudes forward or after cosmetic surgery if the eyelids are opened too widely, dry ...

  4. PTEN, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izak S. Tait

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of PTEN, this protein has been shown to be an effective suppressor of cancer and a contributor to longevity. This report will review, in depth, the associations between PTEN and other molecules, its mutations and regulations in order to present how PTEN can be used to increase longevity. This report will collect recent research of PTEN and use this to discuss PTEN’s role in caloric restriction, antioxidative defense of DNA-damage and the role it plays in suppressing tumors. The report will also discuss that variety of ways that PTEN can be compromised, through mutations, complete loss of alleles and its main antagonist, the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  5. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  6. Sleep and mood disorders in dry eye disease and allied irritating ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Kawashima, Motoko; Negishi, Kazuno; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep and mood disorders in patients with irritating ocular diseases. The study design was a cross-sectional/case-control study conducted in six eye clinics. Out of 715 outpatients diagnosed with irritating ocular surface diseases and initially enrolled, 301 patients with dry eye disease (DED) and 202 age-matched control participants with other ocular surface diseases were analyzed. The mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores were 6.4 ± 3.2 and 11.1 ± 5.7 for severe DED (n = 146), 5.5 ± 3.3 and 9.8 ± 4.0 for mild DED (n = 155), 5.5 ± 3.1 and 9.5 ± 6.6 for chronic conjunctivitis (n = 124), and 5.0 ± 3.3 and 8.9 ± 5.3 for allergic conjunctivitis (n = 78). There were significant differences among these diagnostic groups for PSQI (P < 0.05). Regression analysis of patients with DED revealed the PSQI and HADS scores were significantly correlated with the severity of DED (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that sleep quality in patients with DED is significantly worse than in patients with other irritating ocular surface diseases and it is correlated with the severity of DED. PMID:26927330

  7. A review of creatine supplementation in age-related diseases: more than a supplement for athletes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel N. Smith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Creatine is an endogenous compound synthesized from arginine, glycine and methionine. This dietary supplement can be acquired from food sources such as meat and fish, along with athlete supplement powders. Since the majority of creatine is stored in skeletal muscle, dietary creatine supplementation has traditionally been important for athletes and bodybuilders to increase the power, strength, and mass of the skeletal muscle. However, new uses for creatine have emerged suggesting that it may be important in preventing or delaying the onset of neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. On average, 30% of muscle mass is lost by age 80, while muscular weakness remains a vital cause for loss of independence in the elderly population. In light of these new roles of creatine, the dietary supplement’s usage has been studied to determine its efficacy in treating congestive heart failure, gyrate atrophy, insulin insensitivity, cancer, and high cholesterol. In relation to the brain, creatine has been shown to have antioxidant properties, reduce mental fatigue, protect the brain from neurotoxicity, and improve facets/components of neurological disorders like depression and bipolar disorder. The combination of these benefits has made creatine a leading candidate in the fight against age-related diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, long-term memory impairments associated with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, and stroke. In this review, we explore the normal mechanisms by which creatine is produced and its necessary physiology, while paying special attention to the importance of creatine supplementation in improving diseases and disorders associated with brain aging and outlining the clinical trials involving creatine to treat these diseases.

  8. 25-Gauge Microincision Vitrectomy to Treat Vitreoretinal Disease in Glaucomatous Eyes after Trabeculectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kunikata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the feasibility of using 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy surgery (25GMIVS to treat vitreoretinal disease in glaucomatous eyes which have previously undergone trabeculectomy (TLE. Methods. A consecutive, interventional case series. We performed 25GMIVS in 15 glaucomatous eyes that had undergone TLE. Follow-up period was 11.5 months. Results. 25GMIVS was successfully used and led to improvement in visual acuity (P<0.01. We performed 25GMIVS for proliferative diabetic retinopathy with neovascular glaucoma in 53% of eyes (8 of 15. Although 3 eyes needed further TLE following 25GMIVS, final IOP was below 21 mmHg in all eyes except one eye (93% and was comparable to pre-25GMIVS IOP (P=0.20 without an increase in the number of glaucoma medications (P=0.14. Conclusions. 25GMIVS is a feasible treatment for vitreoretinal disease in eyes with preexisting TLE, effective in both significantly improving BCVA and preserving the filtering bleb, while not excluding further glaucoma surgery.

  9. 干眼对年龄相关性白内障患者人工晶状体度数测量和计算准确性的影响%Pilot study on dry eye affecting the accuracy of intraocular lens power measurement in age-related cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪莲花; 李英俊

    2016-01-01

    眼的百分数明显低于非干眼对照组(17.3%与28.0%),差异均有统计学意义(x2=4.513,P=0.032;x2 =4.236,P=0.037).BUT与角膜K值呈显著负相关(r=-0.204,P=0.011).结论 干眼可影响白内障术前IOL度数测定的精确性,其术后的屈光度较术前预测值轻度偏向远视.%Background The incidence of dry eye is gradually increasing,and the aging of population is one of factors.Researches showed that the change of tear film stability leads to shift of corneal refractive power, which probably affects the measurement of intraocular lens (IOL) power.The influence of dry eye on the calculation of IOL power is worth paying close attention.Objective This study was to investigate the influence of dry eye on the accuracy of IOL power calculation in age-related cataractous patients.Methods A non-randomized controlled clinical study was performed.Two hundred and sixteen eyes of 216 cataract patients were enrolled in Yanbian Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital from May 2013 to February 2014.The visual acuity, intraocular pressure, break up time of tear film (BUT),Schirmer Ⅰ test (S] t) and corneal fluorescein staining were examined in all the eyes,and then the patients were assigned to mild dry eye group (73 eyes), severe dry eye group (68 eyes) and non-dry eye control group (75 eyes).The axial length (AL) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured using IOL Master for the calculation of IOL power and K value (corneal curvature).Phacoemulsification with IOL implantation was performed on all the eyes,and the refractive power was measured with KR 8100 automatic optometry 2 months after operation.The mean absolute refractive error (MARE) between actual refraction and predicted refraction was calculated, and percentage of eyes in different refractive error ranges was compared between the dry eye group and non-dry eye control group.The correlations of dry eye-related parameters with peroperative K value and refractive error were analyzed.This study

  10. 25-Gauge Microincision Vitrectomy to Treat Vitreoretinal Disease in Glaucomatous Eyes after Trabeculectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Kunikata; Naoko Aizawa; Nobuo Fuse; Toshiaki Abe; Toru Nakazawa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the feasibility of using 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy surgery (25GMIVS) to treat vitreoretinal disease in glaucomatous eyes which have previously undergone trabeculectomy (TLE). Methods. A consecutive, interventional case series. We performed 25GMIVS in 15 glaucomatous eyes that had undergone TLE. Follow-up period was 11.5 months. Results. 25GMIVS was successfully used and led to improvement in visual acuity (P < 0.01). We performed 25GMIVS for proliferative diabeti...

  11. [Age-related changes of sensory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Hanyu, Haruo; Umahara, Takahiko

    2013-10-01

    Pathological processes usually superimpose on physiological aging even in the sensory system including visual, hearing, olfactory, taste and somatosensory functions. Representative changes of age-related changes are presbyopia, cataracts, and presbyacusis. Reduced sense of smell is seen in normal aging, but the prominent reduction detected by the odor stick identification test is noticed especially in early stage of Alzheimer or Parkinson disease. Reduced sense of taste is well-known especially in salty sense, while the changes of sweet, bitter, and sour tastes are different among individuals. Finally, deep sensation of vibration and proprioception is decreased with age as well as superficial sensation (touch, temperature, pain). As a result, impaired sensory system could induce deterioration of the activities of daily living and quality of life in the elderly. PMID:24261198

  12. VISUAL REHABILITATION IN LOW VISION PATIENTS WITH AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Using optical visual aids, visual rehabilitation was performed in 14 low vision patients(25 eyes) with age-related macular degeneration. With distance aids, visual acuity improvement appeared in 24 eyes(95%) out of the 25 eyes. Twelve eyes(48%) obtained a visual acuity equal to or better than 0.4. With near visual aids, near acuity of all eyes(100%) was improved. Thirteen eyes(52%) got the near vision equal to or better than 0.5. Ten patients could read No.5 Chinese Reading Card. The reading success rat...

  13. In vivo imaging of retinal pigment epithelium cells in age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ethan A; Rangel-Fonseca, Piero; Parkins, Keith; Fischer, William; Latchney, Lisa R; Folwell, Margaret A; Williams, David R; Dubra, Alfredo; Chung, Mina M

    2013-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues demonstrated that the RPE cell mosaic can be resolved in the living human eye non-invasively by imaging the short-wavelength autofluorescence using an adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscope. This method, based on the assumption that all subjects have the same longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) correction, has proved difficult to use in diseased eyes, and in particular those affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work, we improve Morgan's method by accounting for chromatic aberration variations by optimizing the confocal aperture axial and transverse placement through an automated iterative maximization of image intensity. The increase in image intensity after algorithmic aperture placement varied depending upon patient and aperture position prior to optimization but increases as large as a factor of 10 were observed. When using a confocal aperture of 3.4 Airy disks in diameter, images were obtained using retinal radiant exposures of less than 2.44 J/cm(2), which is ~22 times below the current ANSI maximum permissible exposure. RPE cell morphologies that were strikingly similar to those seen in postmortem histological studies were observed in AMD eyes, even in areas where the pattern of fluorescence appeared normal in commercial fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images. This new method can be used to study RPE morphology in AMD and other diseases, providing a powerful tool for understanding disease pathogenesis and progression, and offering a new means to assess the efficacy of treatments designed to restore RPE health.

  14. 免疫基因多态性与衰老和增龄相关疾病关系%The relationship between the polymorphism of immunity genes and both aging and age-related diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮清伟; 俞卓伟; 保志军; 马永兴

    2013-01-01

    Aging is acommon,progressive and irreversible state of multi-cell dysfunction.Immune aging mainly includes the declines of regenerative capacity and lymphoid lineage differentiation potential,the hyporesponsive to infection and vaccination,the hyperresponsive in the context of inflammatory pathology,and the increased risk of autoimmunity.The dysfunction of aged immune system accelerates the occurrence of aging and age-related diseases.The mutation of immunity genes that affect immune responses accelerates or slows aging process and age-related diseases.The frequencies of acquired immunity genes,such as immune protective HLA Ⅱ DRB1 *11 and DRB*16-associated haplotype,are increased in the longevity populations.The increased susceptibility of immune inflammatory response,morbidity and mortality in the elderly is often associated with decreased frequencies of anti-inflammatory factor IL-10-1082G allele,TNF-β1 haplotype cnd10T/C,cnd25G/G,-988C/C,-800G/A,low proinflammatory fator TNFα level related extended TNF-A genotype-1031C/C,-863C/A,-857C/C,IL-6-174 CC and IFN-γ+874 T allele as well.The innate immunity genes,such as highly expressed anti-inflammatory +896 G KIR4 allele,CCR5△32 variant,-765 C Cox-2 allele,-1708 G and 21 C 5-Lox alleles are detected in centenarians.In age-related diseases,a higher CMV-specific IgG antibody level in elderly individuals is associated with a decreased frequency of KIR haplotypes KIR2DS5 and A1B10 and an increased frequency of MBL2 haplotypes LYPB,LYQC and HYPD that result in the absence of MBL2 protein.The increased frequencies of CRP ATG haplotypes and CFH 402 His allele indicate high mortality in the elderly.In the present study,we review the advances in the polymorphism and haplotype of innate and adoptive immunity genes,and their association with both aging and age-related diseases.To strengthen the analysis of extended haplotypes,epigenetic studies of immunity genes and genetic study of hematopoietic stem cell senescence will

  15. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study to the Epidemiology of Cataract, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Cho, Eunyoung; Ogata, Soshiro; Jacques, Paul; Taylor, Allen; Chiu, Chung-Jung; Wiggs, Janey L.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to understanding the genetic and lifestyle factors that influence the risk of cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS between 1976 and 2016. Results. The NHS has helped to elucidate the roles of genetics, lifestyle factors (e.g., cigarette smoking associated with cataract extraction and age-related macular degeneration), medical conditions (e.g., diabetes associated with cataract extraction and glaucoma), and dietary factors (e.g., greater carotenoid intake and lower glycemic diet associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration) in the etiology of degree and progression of lens opacities, cataract extraction, age-related macular degeneration, primary open-angle glaucoma, and exfoliation glaucoma. Conclusions. The findings from the NHS, combined with those of other studies, have provided compelling evidence to support public health recommendations for helping to prevent age-related eye diseases: abstinence from cigarette smoking, maintenance of healthy weight and diabetes prevention, and a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables. PMID:27459452

  16. Constraining eye movement in individuals with Parkinson's disease during walking turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, V N Pradeep; Saucedo, Fabricio; Murray, Nicholas G; Powell, Douglas W; Reed-Jones, Rebecca J

    2016-10-01

    Walking and turning is a movement that places individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) at increased risk for fall-related injury. However, turning is an essential movement in activities of daily living, making up to 45 % of the total steps taken in a given day. Hypotheses regarding how turning is controlled suggest an essential role of anticipatory eye movements to provide feedforward information for body coordination. However, little research has investigated control of turning in individuals with PD with specific consideration for eye movements. The purpose of this study was to examine eye movement behavior and body segment coordination in individuals with PD during walking turns. Three experimental groups, a group of individuals with PD, a group of healthy young adults (YAC), and a group of healthy older adults (OAC), performed walking and turning tasks under two visual conditions: free gaze and fixed gaze. Whole-body motion capture and eye tracking characterized body segment coordination and eye movement behavior during walking trials. Statistical analysis revealed significant main effects of group (PD, YAC, and OAC) and visual condition (free and fixed gaze) on timing of segment rotation and horizontal eye movement. Within group comparisons, revealed timing of eye and head movement was significantly different between the free and fixed gaze conditions for YAC (p  0.05). In addition, while intersegment timings (reflecting segment coordination) were significantly different for YAC and OAC during free gaze (p falls. PMID:27324086

  17. Thinking the unthinkable: Alzheimer's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Mad Cow disease: the age-related reemergence of virulent, foodborne, bovine tuberculosis or losing your mind for the sake of a shake or burger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of the age-related reemergence of foodborne Mycobacterium bovis (bovine tuberculosis) as a vector for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD or human Mad Cow Disease) and Mad Cow disease itself is real. The CDC reported last May of an outbreak of CJD linked to the consumption of meat contaminated "with the agent causing" bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a New Jersey racetrack between the time frame 1995-2004. In the opinion of experts, ample justification exists for considering a similar pathogenesis for Alzheimer's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and the other spongiform encephalopathies such as Mad Cow disease. In fact, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Alzheimer's often coexist and at this point are thought to differ merely by time-dependent physical changes. A recent study links up to 13% of all "Alzheimer's" victims as really having Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Bovine tuberculosis, which includes Mycobacterium bovis and M. avium-intracellulare or paratuberculosis, is and has always been the most prevalent threat to the cattle industry, and the USDA reports that between 20% and 40% of US dairy herds are infected with paratuberculosis alone. The health risk for milk tainted with M. bovis has been known for decades and there was a time not so long ago when "tuberculin-tested" was printed on every milk container. Schliesser stated that meat from tuberculous animals may also constitute a significant risk of infection. At the turn of the 20th century 25% of the many US deaths from TB in adults were caused by M. bovis. Dairy products aside, when past and present meat consumption are factored in, there is three times the risk of developing Alzheimer's in meat eaters as opposed to vegetarians. The investigation into the causal trail for Creutzfeldt-Jakob, indistinguishable from Alzheimer's except for its shorter, lethal course might have grown cold where it not for Roel's and others who linked mad cow in cattle with M. bovis and related paratuberculosis on clinical, pathologic

  18. Eye disease, the fertility decline, and the emergence of global income differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas B.; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    This research advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that regional variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. By reducing work life expectancy, high historical eye disease incidence has served to diminish...... the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. As a consequence of a differential timing of the take-off to growth, prompted by differences in the inherent return to skill formation, global income disparities have emerged....

  19. Allogeneic corneoscleral limbus tissue transplantation for treatment of the necrosis in porphyria eye disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Yan; Yan; Lu; Jie; Yin; Feng; Jiang; Zhen-Ping; Huang

    2014-01-01

    · Porphyria cutanea tarda(PCT) with ocular complications are rarely reported. To the best of our knowledge, no reports exist on allogeneic corneoscleral limbus tissue transplantation for treatment of these.Amniotic membrane grafting had been performed in their patient suffering from porphyria eye disease, but necrosis developed in the grafts. Nevertheless, in our patient, allogeneic corneoscleral limbus transplantation prevented necrosis from development at corneoscleral limbus. So we considered that the allogeneic corneoscleral limbus transplantation might be an option to repair the necrosis in porphyria eye disease with avoiding sunlight and using artificial tear drops.

  20. RNA-binding proteins in eye development and disease: implication of conserved RNA granule components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Soma; Siddam, Archana D; Barnum, Carrie E; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Lachke, Salil A

    2016-07-01

    The molecular biology of metazoan eye development is an area of intense investigation. These efforts have led to the surprising recognition that although insect and vertebrate eyes have dramatically different structures, the orthologs or family members of several conserved transcription and signaling regulators such as Pax6, Six3, Prox1, and Bmp4 are commonly required for their development. In contrast, our understanding of posttranscriptional regulation in eye development and disease, particularly regarding the function of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), is limited. We examine the present knowledge of RBPs in eye development in the insect model Drosophila as well as several vertebrate models such as fish, frog, chicken, and mouse. Interestingly, of the 42 RBPs that have been investigated for their expression or function in vertebrate eye development, 24 (~60%) are recognized in eukaryotic cells as components of RNA granules such as processing bodies, stress granules, or other specialized ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. We discuss the distinct developmental and cellular events that may necessitate potential RBP/RNA granule-associated RNA regulon models to facilitate posttranscriptional control of gene expression in eye morphogenesis. In support of these hypotheses, three RBPs and RNP/RNA granule components Tdrd7, Caprin2, and Stau2 are linked to ocular developmental defects such as congenital cataract, Peters anomaly, and microphthalmia in human patients or animal models. We conclude by discussing the utility of interdisciplinary approaches such as the bioinformatics tool iSyTE (integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery) to prioritize RBPs for deriving posttranscriptional regulatory networks in eye development and disease. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:527-557. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27133484

  1. Olive Oil Consumption and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Le Goff, Mélanie; Samieri, Cécilia; Dartigues, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Background Olive oil provides a mixture of lipids and antioxidant nutrients which may help preventing age-related diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, little is known about the associations between olive oil consumption and the risk of AMD. Objective To examine associations between olive oil use and AMD prevalence in elderly subjects. Methods Alienor (Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition et maladies OculaiRes) is a population-based study on eye diseases performed in elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). In 1999–2000, frequencies of consumption of main categories of dietary fats used were collected. In 2006–2088, AMD was graded from non mydriatic retinal photographs into three exclusive stages: no AMD, early AMD, and late AMD. Two categories of preferred dietary fat used (olive oil, n-3 rich oils, n-6 rich oils, mixed oils, butter and margarine) were defined: “no use” and “regular use” (using fat for spreading and/or cooking and/or dressing). Associations of AMD with each fat use were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions models. Results Our study included 654 subjects (1269 eyes) with complete data (n = 268 eyes with early AMD and n = 56 with late AMD). After adjustment for potential confounders, regular use of olive oil was significantly associated with a decreased risk of late AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21;0.91). In contrast, regular use of olive oil was not significantly associated with early AMD (OR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.59;1.21). No associations were found between regular consumption of n-3 rich oils, n-6 rich oils, mixed oils, butter and margarine and AMD, whatever the stage. Conclusions This study suggests a protective effect of olive oil consumption for late AMD in this elderly community-dwelling population. Characterization of the mediating nutrients deserves further research. PMID:27467382

  2. The British Asian Community Eye Study: Outline of results on the prevalence of eye disease in British Asians with origins from the Indian subcontinent

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    Abdul Rauf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asians from the Indian Subcontinent form the largest ethnic minority in the United Kingdom. Data on the prevalence of visually-impairing eye conditions in this population are vital for planning eye health care services. Materials and Methods: This survey was based in the two London boroughs with the largest Asian populations. Subjects originating from the Indian Subcontinent were identified from GP practice records. All subjects were asked about demographic details and were given a full ophthalmological examination. The severity of cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related maculopathy was recorded. Blindness was defined as logMAR visual acuity of 0.99 (Snellen equivalence 20/200 in the better eye or worse, ′low vision′ was defined as Snellen equivalence of 20/63 or worse (logMAR 0.5 or higher, and visual impairment was defined as visual acuity worse than 20/40. Results: The median age was 56 years. Two hundred and eighty four subjects did not attend for eye examination. Of the 922 examined, 128 subjects (13.9% were ′visually impaired,′ 39 (4.2% had ′low vision,′ and 6 (0.7% were bilaterally blind. The overall prevalence of cataract, open-angle glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy were 77%, 1.0%, 8.7%, and 8.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Visual impairment rates amongst Asians seem to be similar to Caucasian populations in the UK. The prevalence of cataract and diabetic retinopathy is higher, while the risk of ARMD and OAG are comparable. In view of the high cataract prevalence, a more detailed assessment of the visual profile and factors limiting healthcare accessibility in this community are needed.

  3. Age-related differences in electroencephalogram connectivity and network topology.

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    Knyazev, Gennady G; Volf, Nina V; Belousova, Ludmila V

    2015-05-01

    To better understand age-related differences in brain function and behavior, connectivity between brain regions was estimated from electroencephalogram source time series in eyes closed versus eyes open resting condition. In beta band, decrease of connectivity upon eyes opening was more pronounced in younger than in older participants. The extent of this decrease was associated with reaction time in attention tasks, and this relationship was fully mediated by participants' age, implying that physiological processes, which lead to age-related slowing, include changes in beta reactivity. Graph-theoretical analysis showed a decrease of modularity and clustering in beta and gamma band networks in older adults, implying that age makes brain networks more random. The overall number of nodes identified as hubs in posterior cortical regions decreased in older participants. At the same time, increase of connectedness of anterior nodes, probably reflecting compensatory activation of the anterior attentional system, was observed in beta-band network of older adults. These findings show that normal aging mostly affects interactions in beta band, which are probably involved in attentional processes. PMID:25766772

  4. Constraining eye movement in individuals with Parkinson's disease during walking turns.

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    Ambati, V N Pradeep; Saucedo, Fabricio; Murray, Nicholas G; Powell, Douglas W; Reed-Jones, Rebecca J

    2016-10-01

    Walking and turning is a movement that places individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) at increased risk for fall-related injury. However, turning is an essential movement in activities of daily living, making up to 45 % of the total steps taken in a given day. Hypotheses regarding how turning is controlled suggest an essential role of anticipatory eye movements to provide feedforward information for body coordination. However, little research has investigated control of turning in individuals with PD with specific consideration for eye movements. The purpose of this study was to examine eye movement behavior and body segment coordination in individuals with PD during walking turns. Three experimental groups, a group of individuals with PD, a group of healthy young adults (YAC), and a group of healthy older adults (OAC), performed walking and turning tasks under two visual conditions: free gaze and fixed gaze. Whole-body motion capture and eye tracking characterized body segment coordination and eye movement behavior during walking trials. Statistical analysis revealed significant main effects of group (PD, YAC, and OAC) and visual condition (free and fixed gaze) on timing of segment rotation and horizontal eye movement. Within group comparisons, revealed timing of eye and head movement was significantly different between the free and fixed gaze conditions for YAC (p  0.05). In addition, while intersegment timings (reflecting segment coordination) were significantly different for YAC and OAC during free gaze (p segment coordination during turning. As such, eye movements may be an important addition to training programs for those with PD, possibly promoting better coordination during turning and potentially reducing the risk of falls.

  5. Structural brain MRI studies in eye diseases : are they clinically relevant? A review of current findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Doety; Hanekamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Many eye diseases reduce visual acuity or are associated with visual field defects. Because of the well-defined retinotopic organization of the connections of the visual pathways, this may affect specific parts of the visual pathways and cortex, as a result of either deprivation or transsynaptic deg

  6. Visual Hallucinations in the Psychosis Spectrum and Comparative Information From Neurodegenerative Disorders and Eye Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, Flavie; Collerton, Daniel; Ffytche, Dominic H.; Jardri, Renaud; Pins, Delphine; Dudley, Robert; Blom, Jan Dirk; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Eperjesi, Frank; Ford, Stephen; Laroi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on visual hallucinations (VHs) has been conducted in the context of eye disease and neurodegenerative conditions, but little is known about these phenomena in psychiatric and nonclinical populations. The purpose of this article is to bring together current knowledge regarding VH

  7. Dr.Zhang Ren's Experience in Acupuncture Treatment of Obstinate Eye Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Dr.Zhang Ren (張仁), the board chairman of Shanghai Acupuncture Association, has been engaging in acupuncture treatment for more than 30years, during which he has kept on exploring the acupuncture therapies for obstinate diseases,especially for the obstinate eye diseases, ant summed up rich experience in this aspect. The following is a summary of what the author has learned from Dr. Zhang Ren.

  8. Awareness and knowledge of common eye diseases among the academic staff (non-medical faculties) of University of Malaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Y K; Reddy, S C; Karina, R

    2004-08-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the level of awareness and knowledge of common eye diseases (cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and refractive errors) among 473 academic staff (non-medical faculties) of University Malaya. The awareness of cataract was in 88.2%, diabetic retinopathy in 83.5%, refractive errors in 75.3% and glaucoma in 71.5% of the study population. The knowledge about all the above common eye diseases was moderate, except presbyopia which was poor. Multivariate analysis revealed that females, older people, and those having family history of eye diseases were significantly more aware and more knowledgeable about the eye diseases. Health education about eye diseases would be beneficial to seek early treatment and prevent visual impairment in the society.

  9. The controversy over the association between statins use and progression of age-related macular degeneration: a mini review

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    Vasileios Peponis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Vasileios Peponis1, Spyridon E Chalkiadakis1, Stefanos Bonovas2,3, Nikolaos M Sitaras21Athens Eye Hospital, 2nd Eye Clinic, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece; 3Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, Athens, GreeceObjective: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in ¬western societies. Statins comprise a class of pharmacological agents that reduce plasma cholesterol levels, and have been shown to prevent progression of atherosclerosis and reduce cardiovascular mortality. The relationship between these medications and AMD has been evaluated in several recent studies. Herein, we examine the current evidence for an association between statin use and risk of AMD.Methods: Literature database search (Medline, Scopus, and Science Citation Index Expanded for articles published up to March 2010, using particular search terms.Results: From the current evidence available, it is not safe to conclude upon the assumption of a protective effect of statins against age-related maculopathy and AMD.Conclusion: There is a need for large scale prospective studies with a long follow-up period and accurate assessment of AMD to further explore this matter.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration (AMD, blindness, statin use, controversy

  10. Carotenoids and co-antioxidants in age-related maculopathy: design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Kumari; Hogg, Ruth E; Stevenson, Michael R; Johnston, Elinor; Anderson, Roger; Beatty, Stephen; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is the leading cause of blind registration in the Western World among individuals 65 years or older. Early AMD, a clinical state without overt functional loss, is said to be present clinically when yellowish deposits known as drusen and/or alterations of fundus pigmentation are seen in the macular retina. Although the etiopathogenesis of AMD remains uncertain, there is a growing body of evidence in support of the view that cumulative oxidative damage plays a causal role. Appropriate dietary antioxidant supplementation is likely to be beneficial in maintaining visual function in patients with AMD, and preventing or delaying the progression of early AMD to late AMD. The Carotenoids in Age-Related Maculopathy (CARMA) Study is a randomized and double-masked clinical trial of antioxidant supplementation versus placebo in 433 participants with either early AMD features of sufficient severity in at least one eye or any level of AMD in one eye with late AMD (neovascular AMD or central geographic atrophy) in the fellow eye. The aim of the CARMA Study is to investigate whether lutein and zeaxanthin, in combination with co-antioxidants (vitamin C, E, and zinc), has a beneficial effect on visual function and/or prevention of progression from early to late stages of disease. The primary outcome is improved or preserved distance visual acuity at 12 months. Secondary outcomes include improved or preserved interferometric acuity, contrast sensitivity, shape discrimination ability, and change in AMD severity as monitored by fundus photography. This article outlines the CARMA Study design and methodology, including its rationale. PMID:19065432

  11. Nutrition and the eye.

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    Congdon, N G; West, K P

    1999-12-01

    The topic "nutrition and the eye" cannot adequately be covered in a single review article; indeed, dozens of books and hundreds of articles have been written on the subject. This review concentrates on three areas in which specific nutrients are known or theorized to have a major impact on vision and the visual system: vitamin A deficiency; antioxidants and their proposed role in the prevention of age-related cataract and macular degeneration; and nutritional optic neuropathies, including those of the recent Cuban epidemic. In addition, this article touches on nutritional treatments that have been suggested for several less common eye diseases and, finally, considers several less prevalent conditions in which deficiency of or excess exposure to a particular nutrient has been associated with ocular pathology. PMID:10662253

  12. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

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    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  13. Screening eye diseases in babies: an italian experience on 5000 healthy, consecutive newborns

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    Roberto Perilli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Visual performance of eyes with congenital pathologies is conditioned by an early diagnosis. Families having problems in accessing health services risk to delay or miss both an early diagnosis and an early treatment and amblyopia (lazy eye prevention. METHODS: In our hospital, all full-term, healthy newborns are thoroughly examined by an ophthalmologist in the maternal ward, 1 to 3 days after birth. RESULTS: Among the first 5000 newborns examined, a high incidence of congenital pathologies compared to international literature was reported, with differences between Caucasians and non-Caucasians. CONCLUSION: Performing an early in-hospital thorough eye examination in all newborns as a screening would be an effective way to miss none and to start an early and effective pathway of disease treatment.

  14. Lifestyle Determinants on Prevention and Improvement of Dry Eye Disease from the Perspective of Iranian Traditional Medicine

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    Haji-Ali-Nili, Neda; Khoshzaban, Fariba; Karimi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dry eye disease is one of the most common public health problems in the field of ophthalmology that causes decreased physical, psychological, social and occupational functioning, and interferes with daily activities like reading, driving, computer work and watching TV. The effect of this disease on quality of life is similar to severe migraine and angina. In addition, the severity of the disease is closely related to depression. Outbreaks are increasing with the use of contact lenses and refractive surgery such as LASIK. The purpose of this paper is to assess the causes of dry eye and its prevention by the principles of hygiene. Methods: In this review study, traditional medicine resources like Al canon fil tibb, Sharh-al-Al Asbab and Exir-e-azam have been studied with engine motors such as Google Scholar and PubMed. Results: From the perspective of Iranian traditional medicine, the principles of maintaining health include air, food and drink, exercise and rest, sleep and wakefulness, mental state, retention of essential materials and depletion of wastes from the body. Proper performance of each principle is useful for the prevention of disease in different organs, including the eyes. Recommendations for the prevention or treatment of dry eye disease include the prevention of dryness in the eye or the entire body. In addition, the stomach and brain are important to eye health. Accordingly, one of the most effective managements of dry eye disease is avoiding foods that affect the eye in this way; for example garlic and onion. Conclusion: Maintaining eye health is related to aspects of physical and mental health of the whole body. Therefore, codification of an integrated plan that contains eating and sleeping patterns, exercise, general clearing, eye clearing, and mental health is essential for treating dry eye disease.

  15. HALLERVORDEN-SPATZ DISEASE - A RARE CASE REPORT - “Eye of th e Tiger” Sign

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    Mallikarjunaiah H. S.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD is a rare neurological disease characterized by progressivedegeneration of basal ganglia, globuspallidus and reticular part of the substantianigra, produced byironaccumulation. The defect has been found in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2 producing gene locatedinchromosome 20p13-p12.3. Clinical presentations include dystonia, dysarthria, dysphasia, dementia, severemental retardation and severe movement disability may develop at later stages. Rare clinical features includerigidity, choreoathetosis, seizures, optic atrophy and pigmentary retinopathy. The characteristic MRI brainpattern of HSD shows the “eye of the tiger ” pattern. Treatment is symptomatic. We present the case of apatient, 19 years old boy with Hallervorden-Spatz disease who came to our physiotherapy department withfeatures of spasticity, dystonia and gait difficulty. He was diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings and typicalMRI brain of “eye of the tiger” pattern. His detailed evaluation was carried out and physiotherapy treatmentwas started.

  16. Parkinson's disease brain mitochondria have impaired respirasome assembly, age-related increases in distribution of oxidative damage to mtDNA and no differences in heteroplasmic mtDNA mutation abundance

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    Keeney Paula M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and is frequently complicated by depression and cognitive impairment. sPD likely has multiple interacting causes that include increased oxidative stress damage to mitochondrial components and reduced mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity. We analyzed mitochondria from postmortem sPD and CTL brains for evidence of oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, heteroplasmic mtDNA point mutations and levels of electron transport chain proteins. We sought to determine if sPD brains possess any mtDNA genotype-respiratory phenotype relationships. Results Treatment of sPD brain mtDNA with the mitochondrial base-excision repair enzyme 8-oxyguanosine glycosylase-1 (hOGG1 inhibited, in an age-dependent manner, qPCR amplification of overlapping ~2 kbase products; amplification of CTL brain mtDNA showed moderate sensitivity to hOGG1 not dependent on donor age. hOGG1 mRNA expression was not different between sPD and CTL brains. Heteroplasmy analysis of brain mtDNA using Surveyor nuclease® showed asymmetric distributions and levels of heteroplasmic mutations across mtDNA but no patterns that statistically distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD brain mitochondria displayed reductions of nine respirasome proteins (respiratory complexes I-V. Reduced levels of sPD brain mitochondrial complex II, III and V, but not complex I or IV proteins, correlated closely with rates of NADH-driven electron flow. mtDNA levels and PGC-1α expression did not differ between sPD and CTL brains. Conclusion PD brain mitochondria have reduced mitochondrial respiratory protein levels in complexes I-V, implying a generalized defect in respirasome assembly. These deficiencies do not appear to arise from altered point mutational burden in mtDNA or reduction of nuclear signaling for mitochondrial biogenesis, implying downstream etiologies. The origin of age-related

  17. Ocular herpes:the pathophysiology,management and treatment of herpetic eye diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucy; Zhu; Hua; Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses are a prominent cause of human viral disease, second only to the cold and influenza viruses. Most herpesvirus infections are mild or asymptomatic. However, when the virus invades the eye, a number of pathologies can develop and its associated sequelae have become a considerable source of ocular morbidity. The most common culprits of herpetic eye disease are the herpes simplex virus(HSV), varicella zoster virus(VZV), and cytomegalovirus(CMV). While primary infection can produce ocular disease, the most destructive manifestations tend to arise from recurrent infection. These recurrent infections can wreck devastating effects and lead to irreversible vision loss accompanied by a decreased quality of life, increased healthcare usage, and significant cost burden. Unfortunately, no method currently exists to eradicate herpesviruses from the body after infection. Treatment and management of herpes-related eye conditions continue to revolve around antiviral drugs, although corticosteroids, interferons, and other newer therapies may also be appropriate depending on the disease presentation. Ultimately, the advent of effective vaccines will be crucial to preventing herpesvirus diseases altogether and cutting the incidence of ocular complications.

  18. Meibum lipid composition in Asians with dry eye disease.

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    Sin Man Lam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous lipidomic analyses of the human meibum had largely focused on individuals from non-Asian populations, despite the higher prevalence of dysfunctional tear syndrome (DTS observed across Asia. Information pertaining to the alterations in lipid profiles in relation to DTS onset and progression is also lacking and warrants comprehensive experimental analysis. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the meibum lipidome of 27 DTS patients and 10 control subjects for a total of 256 lipid species from 12 major lipid classes, including cholesteryl ester (CE, wax ester (WE, triacylglyceride (TAG, (O-acyl-ω-hydroxy fatty acid (OAHFA, glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, PC; phosphatidylethanolamine, PE; phosphatidylinositol, PI; phosphatidylglycerol, PG and sphingolipids (sphingomyelin, SM; ceramide, Cer; glucosylceramide, GluCer; dihexosylceramide, DihexCer. Neutral lipids were analysed using high-performance liquid-chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS was used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of polar lipid species. DTS patients were classified into three severity groups (i.e. mild, moderate and severe based on the ocular surface disease index (OSDI. A significantly lower level of TAG (p<0.05 was observed in patients under the moderate category compared to the mild category. Notably, a number of OAHFA species displayed consistently decreasing levels that correlate with increasing disease severity. An attempt was also made to investigate the changes in meibum lipid profiles of DTS patients compared to normal individuals classified based on OSDI score. Several unsaturated TAG and PC species were found at significantly higher levels (p<0.05 in patients than controls. CONCLUSION: The current study presents, for the first time, a comprehensive lipidome of meibum from individuals of an Asian ethnicity, which can potentially offer new insights into the higher

  19. A Comprehensive Review on Dry Eye Disease: Diagnosis, Medical Management, Recent Developments, and Future Challenges

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    Suvarna P. Phadatare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES or keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS is a common disorder of the tear film caused by decreased tear production or increased evaporation and manifests with a wide variety of signs and symptoms. The present review from interpretation of the literature gives detailed information on the prevalence, definition, causes, diagnostic tests, and medical management of dry eye disease. A number of systems contribute to the physiological integrity of the ocular surface and disruption of system may or may not produce symptoms. Therefore accurate diagnosis of dry eyes with no or minimal disruption of physiological function is necessary. The paper also discusses different colloidal drug delivery systems and current challenges in the development of topical ophthalmic drug delivery systems for treatment of KCS. Due to the wide prevalence and number of factors involved, newer, more sensitive diagnostic techniques and novel therapeutic agents have been developed to provide ocular delivery systems with high therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this review is to provide awareness among the patients, health care professionals, and researchers about diagnosis and treatment of KCS and recent developments and future challenges in management of dry eye disease.

  20. Botulinum neurotoxin type A versus punctal plug insertion in the management of dry eye disease

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    Amal A Bukhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the efficacies of punctal plug insertion and Botulinum toxin injection in dry eye disease not responding to topical medications. Materials and Methods: A non-controlled randomized clinical trial of two parallel groups of 60 dry eye patients seen in the clinic not responding to topical medications were divided into two groups. One group received punctal plugs and the other group received Botulinum toxin injections to prevent lacrimal tear drainage. Results: Of a total of 36 patients with a mean age of 44.5 years who received punctal plugs, 50% of them experienced improvements in the clinical manifestations of their disease. 12/36 (33.3% developed plug extrusion, and 6/36 (16.7% patients developed conjunctival erosions with irritation that necessitated plug removal within one week of insertion. A total of 24 patients with a mean age of 47.5 years received injections of Botulinum toxin. Of these, 83.3% had improvement in all of the clinical manifestations of dry eye. 4/24 (16.7% had no improvement in the degrees to which they experienced foreign body sensations, 33.3% reported shampoo entering the eye while showering. All of the patients who received Botulinum toxin injections were satisfied with the results of their treatment, whereas only 72.3% of the patients who received punctal plugs were satisfied with their results. Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin A injections can be a very good alternative to punctal plugs in improving the clinical manifestations of dry eye disease They are associated with the development of fewer and milder complications and with higher levels of patient satisfaction.

  1. The burden and spectrum of vitreo-retinal diseases among ophthalmic outpatients in a resource-deficient tertiary eye care setting in South-Eastern Nigeria

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    Eze Boniface

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was designed to determine the rate and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases at a tertiary eye care center in South-eastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The outpatient register at the Eye Clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, was retrospectively examined to identify all new patients registered between January 2004 and December 2008. A chart review of subjects with vitreo-retinal disease was conducted to record relevant demographic and clinical data including the needs for vitreo-retinal care. Descriptive and analytical statistics were performed. A P-value < 0.001 (one degree of freedom was considered statistically significant. Results: Of the 8,239 new patients reported during the period, 326 subjects (males- 59.3%; females- 40.7%; sex ratio = 1.1:1 aged 49.3 ± 16.8 years (range 3-82 years had vitreo-retinal disease. The rate of vitreo-retinal disease was 3.9%. The rate was higher in subjects above 40 years old (P < 0.001, but did not differ between sexes (P = 0.469. Diabetic retinopathy (24.9%, hypertensive retinopathy (13.3%, and age-related macular degeneration (10.7% were the leading vitreo-retinal diseases. Blindness from vitreo-retinal disease was bilateral in 6.1% of subjects and unilateral in 17.5% of subjects. The common co-morbidities were ocular conditions such as refractive error (19.8%, cataract (14.2%, and glaucoma (10.4%; and systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (14.6% and hypertension (13.2%. Conclusions: The rate of vitreo-retinal diseases among new ophthalmic outpatients at UNTH, Enugu, is 3.9%. Retinal vascular disorders and age-related maculopathy are the leading retinal diseases. At UNTH, resource needs for vitreo-retinal care are urgent including retinal photography/angiography, laser photocoagulation, intra-vitreal pharmacotherapy, and vitreo-retinal surgery.

  2. Thyroid Eye Disease With Significant Levator Involvement and Ptosis: A Case Report.

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    Scruggs, Ryan T; Black, Evan H

    2015-01-01

    A case of an 87-year-old woman with a history of Graves disease presenting with a 5-year history of severe ptosis and very poor levator function of the left side is presented. MRI revealed marked enlargement of all extraocular muscles and significant enlargement of the left levator muscle. Given the patient's age and atypical presentation of thyroid eye disease (TED), she was taken to the operating room for biopsy and ptosis repair with frontalis suspension. Histopathological analysis revealed chronic inflammation and fibrosis consistent with Graves disease.

  3. Water outage increases the risk of gastroenteritis and eyes and skin diseases

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    Chou Chang-Hung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study used insurance claims data to investigate infections associated with short-term water outage because of constructions or pipe breaks. Methods The present study used medical claims of one million insured persons for 2004-2006. We estimated incidences of gastroenteritis and eye and skin complaints for 10 days before, during, and after 10 days of water supply restriction for outpatient visits and for emergency and in-patient care combined. Results There was an increase in medical services for these complaints in outpatient visits because of water outages. Poisson regression analyses showed that increased risks of medical services were significant for gastroenteritis (relative risk [RR] 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26-1.37, skin disease (RR 1.36, 95% CI 1.30-1.42, and eye disease patients (RR 1.34, 95% CI 1.26-1.44. Similar risks were observed during 10-day lag periods. Compared with those in cool days, risks of medical services are higher when average daily temperature is above 30°C for gastroenteritis (RR 12.1, 95% CI 6.17-23.7, skin diseases (RR 4.48, 95% CI 2.29-8.78, and eye diseases (RR 40.3, 95% CI 7.23-224. Conclusion We suggest promoting personal hygiene education during water supply shortages, particularly during the warm months.

  4. Quantitative analysis of cone photoreceptor distribution and its relationship with axial length, age, and early age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Obata

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It has not been clarified whether early age-related macular degeneration (AMD is associated with cone photoreceptor distribution. We used adaptive optics fundus camera to examine cone photoreceptors in the macular area of aged patients and quantitatively analyzed its relationship between the presence of early AMD and cone distribution. METHODS: Sixty cases aged 50 or older were studied. The eyes were examined with funduscopy and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to exclude the eyes with any abnormalities at two sites of measurement, 2° superior and 5° temporal to the fovea. High-resolution retinal images with cone photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics fundus camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France. After adjusting for axial length, cone packing density was calculated and the relationship with age, axial length, or severity of early AMD based on the age-related eye disease study (AREDS classification was analyzed. RESULTS: Patient's age ranged from 50 to 77, and axial length from 21.7 to 27.5 mm. Mean density in metric units and that in angular units were 24,900 cells/mm2, 2,170 cells/deg2 at 2° superior, and 18,500 cells/mm2, 1,570 cels/deg2 at 5° temporal, respectively. Axial length was significantly correlated with the density calculated in metric units, but not with that in angular units. Age was significantly correlated with the density both in metric and angular units at 2° superior. There was no significant difference in the density in metric and angular units between the eyes with AREDS category one and those with categories two or three. CONCLUSION: Axial length and age were significantly correlated with parafoveal cone photoreceptor distribution. The results do not support that early AMD might influence cone photoreceptor density in the area without drusen or pigment abnormalities.

  5. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

  6. Saccadic eye movement characteristics in adult Niemann-Pick Type C disease: relationships with disease severity and brain structural measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry A Abel

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC is a rare genetic disorder of lipid metabolism. A parameter related to horizontal saccadic peak velocity was one of the primary outcome measures in the clinical trial assessing miglustat as a treatment for NPC. Neuropathology is widespread in NPC, however, and could be expected to affect other saccadic parameters. We compared horizontal saccadic velocity, latency, gain, antisaccade error percentage and self-paced saccade generation in 9 adult NPC patients to data from 10 age-matched controls. These saccadic measures were correlated with appropriate MRI-derived brain structural measures (e.g., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, frontal eye fields, supplemental eye fields, parietal eye fields, pons, midbrain and cerebellar vermis and with measures of disease severity and duration. The best discriminators between groups were reflexive saccade gain and the two volitional saccade measures. Gain was also the strongest correlate with disease severity and duration. Most of the saccadic measures showed strongly significant correlations with neurophysiologically appropriate brain regions. While our patient sample is small, the apparent specificity of these relationships suggests that as new diagnostic methods and treatments become available for NPC, a broader range of saccadic measures may be useful tools for the assessment of disease progression and treatment efficacy.

  7. Trends and topics in eye disease research in PubMed from 2010 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denion, Eric; Mortemousque, Bruno; Mouriaux, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to provide a report on scientific production during the period 2010–2014 in order to identify the major topics as well as the predominant actors (journals, countries, continents) involved in the field of eye disease. Methods: A PubMed search was carried out to extract articles related to eye diseases during the period 2010–2014. Data were downloaded and processed through developed PHP scripts for further analysis. Results: A total of 62,123 articles were retrieved. A total of 3,368 different journals were found, and 19 journals were identified as “core journals” according to Braford’s law. English was by far the predominant language. A total of 853,182 MeSH terms were found, representing an average of 13.73 (SD = 4.98) MeSH terms per article. Among these 853,182 MeSH terms, 14,689 different MeSH terms were identified. Vision Disorders, Glaucoma, Diabetic Retinopathy, Macular Degeneration, and Cataract were the most frequent five MeSH terms related to eye diseases. The analysis of the total number of publications showed that Europe and Asia were the most productive continents, and the USA and China the most productive countries. Interestingly, using the mean Five-Year Impact Factor, the two most productive continents were North America and Oceania. After adjustment for population, the overall ranking positions changed in favor of smaller countries (i.e. Iceland, Switzerland, Denmark, and New Zealand), while after adjustment for Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the overall ranking positions changed in favor of some developing countries (Malawi, Guatemala, Singapore). Conclusions: Due to the large number of articles included and the numerous parameters analyzed, this study provides a wide view of scientific productivity related to eye diseases during the period 2010–2014 and allows us to better understand this field. PMID:26819840

  8. Oxidation stress role in age-related cataractogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žorić Lepša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Age-related cataract not only diminishes human life quality but it also represents a big impact on healthcare budget of almost every country as the population ages globally. Hence, cataract prevention is a big and true challenge, but a very difficult task to be accomplished. Nowadays cataract is more than a routinely recognized and almost always successfully operated ophthalmologic disease. The diagnosis of age-related cataract diagnosis might alert doctors to some systemic disorders on the whole body level. Increasing age is certainly the most essential age-related cataract risk factor. However, it seems that cataract could be a multifactor disease because of its individual, familiar, racial and gender expression differences. Oxidation stress. Oxidation stress and its form caused by ultraviolet light-photo-oxidative stress - are considered to be crucial in the etiopatho­genesis of cataract. All biomolecules suffer damages during cataract formation. On the other side, the lens posses a range of antioxidant elements and mechanisms of their action, which enable long lasting maintenance of lens transparency and functioning. Although they are primary characteristics of the lens, these antioxidant elements also depend on their systemic availability and consumption. This paper is a short literature review of the relation between oxidation stress and age-related cataract.

  9. Visual hallucinations in the psychosis spectrum and comparative information from neurodegenerative disorders and eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Flavie; Collerton, Daniel; Ffytche, Dominic H; Jardri, Renaud; Pins, Delphine; Dudley, Robert; Blom, Jan Dirk; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Eperjesi, Frank; Ford, Stephen; Larøi, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Much of the research on visual hallucinations (VHs) has been conducted in the context of eye disease and neurodegenerative conditions, but little is known about these phenomena in psychiatric and nonclinical populations. The purpose of this article is to bring together current knowledge regarding VHs in the psychosis phenotype and contrast this data with the literature drawn from neurodegenerative disorders and eye disease. The evidence challenges the traditional views that VHs are atypical or uncommon in psychosis. The weighted mean for VHs is 27% in schizophrenia, 15% in affective psychosis, and 7.3% in the general community. VHs are linked to a more severe psychopathological profile and less favorable outcome in psychosis and neurodegenerative conditions. VHs typically co-occur with auditory hallucinations, suggesting a common etiological cause. VHs in psychosis are also remarkably complex, negative in content, and are interpreted to have personal relevance. The cognitive mechanisms of VHs in psychosis have rarely been investigated, but existing studies point to source-monitoring deficits and distortions in top-down mechanisms, although evidence for visual processing deficits, which feature strongly in the organic literature, is lacking. Brain imaging studies point to the activation of visual cortex during hallucinations on a background of structural and connectivity changes within wider brain networks. The relationship between VHs in psychosis, eye disease, and neurodegeneration remains unclear, although the pattern of similarities and differences described in this review suggests that comparative studies may have potentially important clinical and theoretical implications.

  10. [Pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease - does autoimmunity against the TSH receptor explain all cases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Jack R; Lahooti, Hooshang

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy, or thyroid eye disease (TED), is a complex inflammatory disorder of the eye that, as its name implies, is usually associated with thyroid disease. Clinical observation supports the existence of three main TED subtypes, namely ocular myopathy, congestive myopathy, and mixed congestive and myopathic ophthalmopathy. Although the precise pathophysiology of TED remains unclear, it is likely to reflect an autoimmune reaction involving sensitised T lymphocytes and autoantibodies directed against a specific orbital or thyroid-and-orbital shared antigen(s). One well-studied candidate in this immune reaction is the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), which is also expressed in the orbital fibroblast and preadipocyte. Most patients with ophthalmopathy have associated Graves' disease, 10% have Hashimoto's thyroiditis in which the eye changes are often mild and expressed mainly as upper eyelid retraction (UER), and 10% have no apparent associated thyroid disease - so-called "euthyroid Graves' disease". Ophthalmopathy can also occur in some patients with transient thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and Graves' disease many years after treatment of the hyperthyroidism - situations where TSHR antibodies are not expected to be present, suggesting that the relationship between TSHR antibodies and the eye disorder has not been established for all cases. In our studies of TED we have investigated the nature and significance of antibodies targeting other eye muscle and orbital connective tissue (OCT) antigens, in particular the calcium binding protein calsequestrin (CASQ1) and the orbital fibroblast membrane antigen collagen XIII. Our working hypotheses for the pathogenesis of TED are: i) the initial reaction in the orbit is antibody and T lymphocyte targeting of the TSHR in the OCT compartment, and ii) the associated extra ocular and upper eyelid muscle inflammation reflects either autoimmunity against primary skeletal muscle antigens such as CASQ

  11. Pharmacogenetics and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen G. Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacogenetics seeks to explain interpatient variability in response to medications by investigating genotype-phenotype correlations. There is a small but growing body of data regarding the pharmacogenetics of both nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Most reported data concern polymorphisms in the complement factor H and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes. At this time, the data are not consistent and no definite conclusions may be drawn. As clinical trials data continue to accumulate, these relationships may become more apparent.

  12. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M E A Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future.

  13. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  14. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Scientific Director Office of the Clinical Director Education Programs All Education National Eye Health Education Program Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education ...

  15. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  16. The Role of the Immune Response in the Pathogenesis of Thyroid Eye Disease: A Reassessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T Rosenbaum

    Full Text Available Although thyroid eye disease is a common complication of Graves' disease, the pathogenesis of the orbital disease is poorly understood. Most authorities implicate the immune response as an important causal factor. We sought to clarify pathogenesis by using gene expression microarray.An international consortium of ocular pathologists and orbital surgeons contributed formalin fixed orbital biopsies. RNA was extracted from orbital tissue from 20 healthy controls, 25 patients with thyroid eye disease (TED, 25 patients with nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI, 7 patients with sarcoidosis and 6 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA. Tissue was divided into a discovery set and a validation set. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays which include 54,000 probe sets.Principal component analysis showed that gene expression from tissue from patients with TED more closely resembled gene expression from healthy control tissue in comparison to gene expression characteristic of sarcoidosis, NSOI, or granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Unsupervised cluster dendrograms further indicated the similarity between TED and healthy controls. Heat maps based on gene expression for cytokines, chemokines, or their receptors showed that these inflammatory markers were associated with NSOI, sarcoidosis, or GPA much more frequently than with TED.This is the first study to compare gene expression in TED to gene expression associated with other causes of exophthalmos. The juxtaposition shows that inflammatory markers are far less characteristic of TED relative to other orbital inflammatory diseases.

  17. Plasmonic ELISA for the ultrasensitive detection of disease biomarkers with the naked eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Rica, Roberto; Stevens, Molly M.

    2012-12-01

    In resource-constrained countries, affordable methodologies for the detection of disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. However, current strategies for ultrasensitive detection often require sophisticated instruments that may not be available in laboratories with fewer resources. Here, we circumvent this problem by introducing a signal generation mechanism for biosensing that enables the detection of a few molecules of analyte with the naked eye. The enzyme label of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) controls the growth of gold nanoparticles and generates coloured solutions with distinct tonality when the analyte is present. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and HIV-1 capsid antigen p24 were detected in whole serum at the ultralow concentration of 1 × 10-18 g ml-1. p24 was also detected with the naked eye in the sera of HIV-infected patients showing viral loads undetectable by a gold standard nucleic acid-based test.

  18. [Using Guangming (GB37) acupoint to treat eye diseases: from historical suspense to modern clinical experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T; Wu, M Z

    2016-05-01

    Guangming (GB37) gained its name before the writing of Huang di Ming Tang Jing (The Yellow Emperor's Mingtang Classic), the earliest work of the art of acupuncture point. However, in acupuncture and moxibustion works before the Song Dynasty, this acupoint was not used to treat eye diseases. In Dou Hanqing's Zhen jiu biao you fu (Song to Elucidate Mysteries in Acupuncture Moxibustion), Guangming was used to treat oculopathy as an alias of Cuanzhu (BL2). Influenced by this, the alias "Guangming" was mistaken as Guangming (GB37) of the Gallbladder Meridian in the Bian que shen ying zhen jiu yu long jing (Bian Que Acupuncture and Moxibustion Jade Dragon Classic) of the Yuan Dynasty, and the symptom of eye itch was added to the indications of Guangming (GB37). This was wrongly informed in the later acupuncture and moxibustion works, and the modern scholars also accepted it and confirmed its effect by the clinical and experimental research. PMID:27485868

  19. Classification of iRBD and Parkinson's disease patients based on eye movements during sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Koch, Henriette; Frandsen, Rune;

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from the sleep disorder idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) have been observed to be in high risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). This makes it essential to analyze them in the search for PD biomarkers. This study aims at classifying patients...... suffering from iRBD or PD based on features reflecting eye movements (EMs) during sleep. A Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic model was developed based on features extracted from two electrooculographic (EOG) signals measured as parts in full night polysomnographic (PSG) recordings from ten control...... subjects. The trained model was tested on ten other control subjects, ten iRBD patients and ten PD patients, obtaining a EM topic mixture diagram for each subject in the test dataset. Three features were extracted from the topic mixture diagrams, reflecting “certainty”, “fragmentation” and “stability...

  20. Mechanical eye injuries in children aged 0-15 years treated at the Clinic of Eye Diseases in Belgrade: Frequency, causes and preventive measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Eye injuries represent a significant problem in children. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and causes of the eye injury and to propose measures of the eye injury prevention in children up to 15 years of age. Methods. This was a retrospective study of 552 children with the eye injuries treated at the Clinic of Eye Diseases in Belgrade during the period March 1999 to February 2010. Gender and age of the children, time of injury, the type and site of injuries, visual acuity upon admission and at discharge, as well as the time of surgery in relation to time of injury were analyzed. Results. The ratio between the injured boys and girls was 3.6:1. The highest percentage of injured children was in the group 6-10 years old (39.7%; the injuries were almost evenly distributed according to months during the year and days during the week. The percentages of severe closed and open injuries of the eyeball were almost equal. Visual acuity upon discharge and subsequent follow-up examinations were significantly improved after the applied treatment in comparison with the visual acuity upon admission. Conclusion. Eye injuries in children still represent a severe health problem. Regarding the youngest age group of children, adults are mainly responsible for these injuries due to their lack of attention, while in older children these injuries are the result of the production and distribution of inappropriate toys and a failure to implement the legal traffic regulations applicable to children. The prevention of eye injuries is essential.

  1. Comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Zamora, G.; Vahtel, M.; Soliz, P.; Barriga, S.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several research groups have developed automatic algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR) in individuals with diabetes (DM), using digital retinal images. Studies have indicated that diabetics have 1.5 times the annual risk of developing primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) as do people without DM. Moreover, DM patients have 1.8 times the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although numerous investigators are developing automatic DR detection algorithms, there have been few successful efforts to create an automatic algorithm that can detect other ocular diseases, such as POAG and AMD. Consequently, our aim in the current study was to develop a comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm that not only detects DR in retinal images, but also automatically identifies glaucoma suspects and AMD by integrating other personal medical information with the retinal features. The proposed system is fully automatic and provides the likelihood of each of the three eye disease. The system was evaluated in two datasets of 104 and 88 diabetic cases. For each eye, we used two non-mydriatic digital color fundus photographs (macula and optic disc centered) and, when available, information about age, duration of diabetes, cataracts, hypertension, gender, and laboratory data. Our results show that the combination of multimodal features can increase the AUC by up to 5%, 7%, and 8% in the detection of AMD, DR, and glaucoma respectively. Marked improvement was achieved when laboratory results were combined with retinal image features.

  2. Design of a population-based study of visual impairment in India : The Andhra Pradesh eye disease study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandona Rakhi

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable population-based epidemiologic data regarding vision and ocular morbidity, as well as those about the perceptions of people regarding visual impairment and eye care, are lacking for the most part in the developing world including India. These data are the basis on which effective eye care services can be developed. To meet this need we designed the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study, a population-based epidemiology study of 10,000 people in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. The design of this study is described in this paper. Various options for the sample size, study areas, sampling procedure, and recruitment of subjects were considered. A sample size of 10,000 people, 5,000 each in the < or = 30 and > 30 years age groups, was determined to obtain reasonable confidence in estimating the prevalence of diseases and odds ratios for risk factors of interest. A multistage sampling strategy was chosen for the study which was assumed to give a design effect of 1.5 for the estimates. One urban area, Hyderabad, and three rural areas, West Godavari, Adilabad and Mahbubnagar districts, were selected in Andhra Pradesh. Interview instruments were developed to obtain detailed information about demographic data, diet, ocular and systemic history, risk factors for eye diseases, visual function, quality of life, barriers to eye care, and knowledge about eye diseases. A detailed examination procedure was devised to obtain a broad range of normative and abnormal data related to eyes and vision. A protocol was developed for doing automated visual fields, slitlamp and fundus photography. Computer databases were made in FoxPro for data entry and subsequent analysis with SPSS. Pilot studies were done to test the instruments, procedures, and logistics of the study in urban and rural areas. Information from the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study is expected to help in planning and implementation of effective long-term preventive, curative, and

  3. DIABETIC AND HYPERTENSIVE EYE DISEASE, AWARENESS AND EVALUATION - A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diabetes Mellitus, particularly the Type 2 is a major health problem and of great concern worldwide and so is the Hypertension, the prevalence of which is rising and both combined together may lead to economical blindness if not treated adequately and in time. Hypertension was also identified as the 3 rd ranked factor for disability adjusted life years by the world health report 2002. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A total of 1306 patients attending eye department for either routine checkup or referred by physicians for ophthalmoscopic examinations were studied. Relevant questions were asked regarding the presence of disease and their ocular problems along with the visual status. RESULTS : Mean age of the patients was 55.5 years, males 53.2% and females 46.75%. 118 pa tients were diabetic, 375 patients were hypertensive and 132 patients had combined disease. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy in the disease specific group was 61.01% and hypertensive retinopathy was 19.46%. It was found that awareness of diabetic retinopa thy was more in diabetic population compared to the non - diabetic group, whereas knowledge of hypertension affecting the eye was much poor. Lack of awareness was found directly related to the level of illiteracy and ignorance. Prevalence of retinopathy in t his series was found 24.57% in diabetics & 64.8% in hypertensives. CONCLUSION : People’s education regarding the systemic disease related eye problems and formal education of general public especially of females will be a great step towards reducing the vis ual impairment. Importance of regular follow - up once diagnosed should be emphasized for early detection and management thereby

  4. The molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration: an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saritha Katta; Inderjeet Kaur; Subhabrata Chakrabarti

    2009-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder of the eye and the third leading cause of blindness worldwide. With a multifactorial etiology, AMD results in progressive loss of central vision affecting the macular region of the eye in elderly. While the prevalence is relatively higher in the Caucasian populations, it has gradually become a major public health issue among the non-Caucasian populations (including Indians) as well due to senescence, rapidly changing demographics and life-style factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on large case–control cohorts have helped in mapping genes in the complement cascade that are involved in the regulation of innate immunity with AMD susceptibility. Genes involved with mitochondrial oxidative stress and extracellular matrix regulation also play a role in AMD pathogenesis. Majority of the associations observed in complement (CFH, CFB, C2 and C3) and other (ARMS2 and HTRA1) genes have been replicated in diverse populations worldwide. Gene–gene (CFH with ARMS2 and HTRA1) interactions and correlations with environmental traits (smoking and body mass index) have been established as significant covariates in AMD pathology. In this review, we have provided an overview on the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms in AMD worldwide and highlight the AMD-associated-candidate genes and their potential role in disease pathogenesis.

  5. Challenges in the Development of Therapy for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cynthia X; Sun, Aixu; Yu, Ying; Liu, Qianyong; Tan, Yue-Qing; Tachibana, Isamu; Zeng, Hong; Wei, Ji-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial progressive degenerative disease of the retinal photoreceptors, pigmented epithelium and Bruch's membrane/choroid in central retina, causes visual impairment in millions of elderly people worldwide. The only available therapy for this disease is the over-the-counter (OTC) multi-vitamins plus macular xanthophyll (lutein/zeaxanthin) which attempts to block the damages of oxidative stress and ionizing blue light. Therefore development of dry AMD prescribed treatment is a pressing unmet medical need. However, this effort is currently hindered by many challenges, including an incomplete understanding of the mechanism of pathogenesis that leads to uncertain targets, confounded by not yet validated preclinical models and the difficulty to deliver the drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. Additionally, with slow disease progression and a less than ideal endpoint measurement method, clinical trials are necessarily large, lengthy and expensive. Increased commitment to research and development is an essential foundation for dealing with these problems. Innovations in clinical trials with novel endpoints, nontraditional study designs and the use of surrogate diseases might shorten the study time, reduce the patient sample size and consequently lower the budget for the development of the new therapies for the dry AMD. PMID:26427400

  6. Immunology of age related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kijlstra Aize; Yang Peizeng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Age-related macular degeneration(AMD)is the most important cause of blindness in persons over 55 years of age in the Western world.In view of the increasing life expectancy we can assume that the problem will increase dramatically over the coming decades unless preventive or therapeutic measures are developed.Towards this goal many groups all over the world have performed epidemiological studies to identify potential risk factors for AMD.

  7. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, E; Neelam, K.; Nolan, John; Eong, K. G. A.; BEATTY, S

    2006-01-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary...

  8. Development of criteria for evaluating clinical response in thyroid eye disease using a modified Delphi technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Tsirbas, Angelo; Gordon, Mark;

    2009-01-01

    trials in thyroid eye disease. The steering committee discussed the results in a face-to-face meeting (nominal group technique) and evaluated each criterion with respect to its feasibility, reliability, redundancy, and validity. Redundant measures were consolidated or excluded. RESULTS: Criteria were......% of participants) rated 153 criteria in Delphi 3 (67 criteria were excluded because of redundancy). Criteria with a mean greater than 6 (1 = least appropriate to 9 = most appropriate) were further evaluated by the nominal group technique and provisional core measures were chosen. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Delphi...

  9. Age-related retinopathy in NRF2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cumulative oxidative damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 is a transcription factor that plays key roles in retinal antioxidant and detoxification responses. The purposes of this study were to determine whether NRF2-deficient mice would develop AMD-like retinal pathology with aging and to explore the underlying mechanisms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Eyes of both wild type and Nrf2(-/- mice were examined in vivo by fundus photography and electroretinography (ERG. Structural changes of the outer retina in aged animals were examined by light and electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence labeling. Our results showed that Nrf2(-/- mice developed age-dependent degenerative pathology in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Drusen-like deposits, accumulation of lipofuscin, spontaneous choroidal neovascularization (CNV and sub-RPE deposition of inflammatory proteins were present in Nrf2(-/- mice after 12 months. Accumulation of autophagy-related vacuoles and multivesicular bodies was identified by electron microscopy both within the RPE and in Bruch's membrane of aged Nrf2(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that disruption of Nfe2l2 gene increased the vulnerability of outer retina to age-related degeneration. NRF2-deficient mice developed ocular pathology similar to cardinal features of human AMD and deregulated autophagy is likely a mechanistic link between oxidative injury and inflammation. The Nrf2(-/- mice can provide a novel model for mechanistic and translational research on AMD.

  10. Macrophage Phenotype in the Ocular Surface of Experimental Murine Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, In-Cheon; Coursey, Terry G; Bian, Fang; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in the cornea and conjunctiva of C57BL/6 mice with induced experimental dry eye. C57BL/6 mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) were evaluated at 1, 5, and 10 days and C57BL/6 mice maintained in non-stressed environment were used as controls. Whole eyes and adnexa were excised for histology or used for gene expression analysis. Location and phenotype of macrophages infiltrating the cornea and conjunctiva was evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evaluated macrophage markers and T cell-related and inflammatory cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that macrophages reside in the conjunctiva of control and dry eye mice and their number did not change with DS. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the level of M1 macrophage marker, iNOS, increased prominently in the conjunctiva at DS 10 days. In contrast, there was a non-significant decrease of the M2 marker Arg1 with DS. The levels of inflammatory cytokine, IL-12a mRNA transcript in the conjunctiva increased significantly at DS1 and decreased at DS5, while levels of IL-18 were significantly increased at DS 10. Macrophages reside in the ocular surface tissues of C57BL/6 mice. Although the number of macrophages in the conjunctiva does not change, evidence of inflammatory M1 activation after desiccating stress was observed. Better understanding of phagocyte diversity and activation in dry eye disease provide a basis for the development of phagocyte-targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:25772203

  11. Role of intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection for Management of Neovascular Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha K Desai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age related macular degeneration ( ARMD is the major cause of severe visual loss in older adults. Different treatment modalities are available such as: Laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy,transpupillary thermotherapy,submacular surgery and anti-veg. Aims and Objectives: The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreally administered Bevacizumab a humanized monoclonal anti and ndash;VEGF in Neovascular Age related Macular Degeneration. Methodology: This non randomized, prospective study was carried out on 75 eyes of 75 patients attending the OPD at M and J Institute Of Ophthalmology and diagnosed as having Neovascular ARMD confirmed on FFA and SD-OCT . After taking written informed consent all patients were injected with intravitreal Bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 ml. Follow up visits were scheduled one week, one month post procedure and every monthly thereafter. Results: 75 eyes of 75 patients were included in this non randomized prospective study. and 29.33% patients required 2 injections. Visual acuity is improved more than 3 lines from baseline in 21.33% patient, 64% patient have 2-3 lines gain and 6.66% patients showed 0-1 line gain in snellen's visual acuity. 5.33% patients have a loss of 1 line from baseline and 2.66% patients showed loss of 2-3 lines. Central foveal thickness decreased more than 200 microns from baseline in 52% patients, 28% patients have decreased of 100-200 microns and 20% patients have decreased of less than 100 microns. Discussion: Approximately 10 % of ARMD patients manifest the neovascular form of the disease. 12 weeks. Our study showed that 80% patients had decrease in central foveal thickness more than 100 microns from baseline at the end of one year. 85% patients had gain of 2 or more lines on Snellen's visual acuity chart from baseline.No patient had any serious local or systemic adverse reactions.Limitations of our study is small number of patients,ICG not done

  12. A mobile decision support system for red eye diseases diagnosis: experience with medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Marta Manovel; López, Miguel Maldonado; de la Torre Díez, Isabel; Jimeno, José Carlos Pastor; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    A good primary health care is the base for a better healthcare system. Taking a good decision on time by the primary health care physician could have a huge repercussion. In order to ease the diagnosis task arise the Decision Support Systems (DSS), which offer counselling instead of refresh the medical knowledge, in a profession where it is still learning every day. The implementation of these systems in diseases which are a frequent cause of visit to the doctor like ophthalmologic pathologies are, which affect directly to our quality of life, takes more importance. This paper aims to develop OphthalDSS, a totally new mobile DSS for red eye diseases diagnosis. The main utilities that OphthalDSS offers will be a study guide for medical students and a clinical decision support system for primary care professionals. Other important goal of this paper is to show the user experience results after OphthalDSS being used by medical students of the University of Valladolid. For achieving the main purpose of this research work, a decision algorithm will be developed and implemented by an Android mobile application. Moreover, the Quality of Experience (QoE) has been evaluated by the students through the questions of a short inquiry. The app developed which implements the algorithm OphthalDSS is capable of diagnose more than 30 eye's anterior segment diseases. A total of 67 medical students have evaluated the QoE. The students find the diseases' information presented very valuable, the appearance is adequate, it is always available and they have ever found what they were looking for. Furthermore, the students think that their quality of life has not been improved using the app and they can do the same without using the OphthalDSS app. OphthalDSS is easy to use, which is capable of diagnose more than 30 ocular diseases in addition to be used as a DSS tool as an educational tool at the same time. PMID:27142275

  13. Dry Eye Disease Patients with Xerostomia Report Higher Symptom Load and Have Poorer Meibum Expressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidet, Jon R.; Utheim, Tor P.; Ræder, Sten; Lagali, Neil S.; Messelt, Edvard B.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate if xerostomia (dry mouth) is associated with symptoms and signs of dry eye disease (DED). At the Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, patients with symptomatic DED with different etiologies were consecutively included in the study. The patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmological work-up and completed self-questionnaires on symptoms of ocular dryness (Ocular Surface Disease Index [OSDI] and McMonnies Dry Eye Questionnaire) and the Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) questionnaire (SSQ). Three hundred and eighteen patients (52% women and 48% men) with DED were included. Patient demographics were: 0 to 19 years (1%), 20 to 39 (25%), 40 to 59 (34%), 60 to 79 (35%) and 80 to 99 (5%). Xerostomia, defined as “daily symptoms of dry mouth the last three months” (as presented in SSQ) was reported by 23% of the patients. Female sex was more common among patients with xerostomia (81%) than among non-xerostomia patients (44%; Pxerostomia (60 ± 15 years) were older than those without xerostomia (51 ± 17; Pxerostomia patients (65%) than among non-xerostomia patients (35%; Pxerostomia had a higher OSDI score (19.0 ± 10.0) than those without xerostomia (12.9 ± 8.0; Pxerostomia patients had more pathological meibum expressibility (0.9 ± 0.7) than those without xerostomia (0.7 ± 0.8; P = 0.046). Comparisons of OSDI and ocular signs were performed after controlling for the effects of sex, age and the number of systemic prescription drugs used. In conclusion, xerostomia patients demonstrated a higher DED symptom load and had poorer meibum expressibility than non-xerostomia patients. PMID:27148875

  14. Recent developments in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buschini E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Buschini, Antonio M Fea, Carlo A Lavia, Marco Nassisi, Giulia Pignata, Marta Zola, Federico M Grignolo Ospedale Oftalmico, Ophthalmic Section, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD, also called geographic atrophy, is characterized by the atrophy of outer retinal layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells. Dry AMD accounts for 80% of all intermediate and advanced forms of the disease. Although vision loss is mainly due to the neovascular form (75%, dry AMD remains a challenge for ophthalmologists because of the lack of effective therapies. Actual management consists of lifestyle modification, vitamin supplements, and supportive measures in the advanced stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study demonstrated a statistically significant protective effect of dietary supplementation of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, and copper on dry AMD progression rate. It was also stated that the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, has protective effects. Other antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals (such as crocetin, curcumin, and vitamins B9, B12, and B6 are under evaluation, but the results are still uncertain. New strategies aim to 1 reduce or block drusen formation, 2 reduce or eliminate inflammation, 3 lower the accumulation of toxic by-products from the visual cycle, 4 reduce or eliminate retinal oxidative stress, 5 improve choroidal perfusion, 6 replace/repair or regenerate lost RPE cells and photoreceptors with stem cell therapy, and 7 develop a target gene therapy. Keywords: dry AMD, geographic atrophy, new AMD therapy

  15. [Excessive medical problems in the treatment of common eye diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L H

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, some typical excessive medical problems in the treatment of common eye diseases in children were listed as follows: unnecessary examinations carried out for children with little or no corresponding complaints; prescription for spectacles for physiological hyperopia or astigmatism in children; over-diagnosis, over-or nonstandard-treatment for amblyopia; strabismus surgeries performed in children with esotropia but without full optical correction of hyperopic refractive error, in children with monocular strabismus and amblyopia but without standard cover therapy, in children with intermittent exotropia but without optical correction of myopic refractive errors and myopic anisometropia, and without evaluation of their fusional control ability; exaggerated the harm of myopia and the curative effect of Orthokeratology contact lenses without considering the patient's compliance; cataract surgery performed in infants with partial opacity of the lens that has little effect on the vision. Every ophthalmologist should work based on evidence-based preferred practice pattern, professional standards and expert consensus to promote the standardization of the diagnosis and treatment of children's common eye diseases in China. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 561-564). PMID:27562274

  16. The Effect of Colchicine on Thyroid Eye Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saklamaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid eye disease (TED is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves’ disease (GD. Corticosteroids are mostly used drug for this complication. Can colchicine be used for the treatment of Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO? A 49-year-old female, who suffered hyperthyroidism for 5 years, was admitted to our clinic for GO. Although the euthyroidism was achieved, there was no improvement in orbitopathy. Because of the patient’s condition, we could not prescribe corticosteroids to our patient. TED improved after 3 months of colchicine treatment and the patient was found to be satisfied with her new appearance. No side effects related with colchicine treatment were observed. Colchicine can be used as an effective and safe drug in GO.

  17. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. PMID:26370651

  18. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  19. Adverse environmental conditions influence age-related innate immune responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwa Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- The innate immune system plays an important role in the recognition and induction of protective responses against infectious pathogens, whilst there is increasing evidence for a role in mediating chronic inflammatory diseases at older age. Despite indications that environmental conditions can influence the senescence process of the adaptive immune system, it is not known whether the same holds true for the innate immune system. Therefore we studied whether age-related innate immune responses are similar or differ between populations living under very diverse environmental conditions. Methods- We compared cross-sectional age-related changes in ex vivo innate cytokine responses in a population living under affluent conditions in the Netherlands (age 20–68 years old, n = 304 and a population living under adverse environmental conditions in Ghana (age 23–95 years old, n = 562. Results- We found a significant decrease in LPS-induced Interleukin (IL-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF production with age in the Dutch population. In Ghana a similar age-related decline in IL-10 responses to LPS, as well as to zymosan, or LPS plus zymosan, was observed. TNF production, however, did not show an age-associated decline, but increased significantly with age in response to co-stimulation with LPS and zymosan. Conclusion- We conclude that the decline in innate cytokine responses is an intrinsic ageing phenomenon, while pathogen exposure and/or selective survival drive pro-inflammatory responses under adverse living conditions.

  20. Precursors of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Linneberg, Allan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    by questionnaire. Digital grayscale fundus photographs were recorded in red-free illumination and graded for the presence of macular drusen >63µm in either eye and the presence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen as a mean of both eyes. RESULTS: Macular drusen >63µm were associated with the level of physical......PURPOSE: To investigate associations of small, hard macular drusen and larger macular drusen with obesity-related risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 888 subjects aged 30-60 years characterized using anthropometric measurements and blood sample analyses. Physical activity was assessed.......0005). A waist circumference in the top quartile increased the odds for drusen >63µm in men whereas in women having a waist circumference in the middle quartiles reduced these odds. The presence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen was associated with lower levels of serum high-density lipoprotein...

  1. The senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8): a model of age-related cognitive decline with relevance to alterations of the gene expression and protein abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Poon, H Fai

    2005-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is an accelerated aging model that was established through phenotypic selection from a common genetic pool of AKR/J strain of mice. The SAM model was established in 1981, including nine major senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP) substrains and three major senescence-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR) substrains, each of which exhibits characteristic disorders. Recently, SAMP8 have drawn attention in gerontological research due to its characteristic learning and memory deficits at old age. Many recent reports provide insight into mechanisms of the cognitive impairment and pathological changes in SAMP8. Therefore, this mini review examines the recent findings of SAMP8 mice abnormalities at the gene and protein levels. The genes and proteins described in this review are functionally categorized into neuroprotection, signal transduction, protein folding/degradation, cytoskeleton/transport, immune response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All of these processes are involved in learning and memory. Although these studies provide insight into the mechanisms that contribute to the learning and memory decline in aged SAMP8 mice, higher throughput techniques of proteomics and genomics are necessary to study the alterations of gene expression and protein abnormalities in SAMP8 mice brain in order to more completely understand the central nervous system dysfunction in this mouse model. The SAMP8 is a good animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of age-related learning and memory deficits at the gene and protein levels. PMID:16026957

  2. Glaucoma and dry eye disease: the role of preservatives in glaucoma medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Sitompul

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a common cause of irreversible blindness with increasing prevalence. Some of glaucoma patients will also experience dry eye. Dry eye is the most frequent side effect related to benzalkonium chloride (BAC-containing eye drop  used for glaucoma patients. In addition, glaucoma and dry eyes have shared risk factors that are old age and female. Dry eye among glaucoma patients need to be treated promptly as it produces discomfort, reduces patients’ compliance and   decreases success rate of glaucoma therapy. Dry eye symptoms can be treated by applying preservative-free eye drop, giving combination of preservative containing and preservative-free eye drop to reduce BAC exposure, prescribing artificial tear and conducting surgery to minimize or eliminate the need of topical medication. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:302-5Keywords: benzalkonium chloride, dry eye, glaucoma

  3. Evaluation of Tear Malate Dehydrogenase 2 in Mild Dry Eye Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Guo; Houbin Huang; Yuli Pi; Hancheng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tear malate dehydrogenase 2 on monitoring ocular surface injury in mild dry eye (DE) disease. Methods: A total of 15 DE patients (30 eyes) with mild sub-jective symptoms but no ocular surface fluorescein staining signs were enrolled in this study. (DE group)..The control group was 15 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers (30 eyes)..All subjects were asked to fill out a DE symptoms questionnaire and take different tests including tear MDH and MDH2 activities evaluation,..tear breakup time. (TBUT), Schirmer I,.and slit-lamp examination of the ocular surface. We investigated different changes in tear MDH and MDH2 ac-tivities in the DE group and control group,.discussed the as-sociation between tear MDH2 activity and DE symptoms, and the relationship between tear MDH2 activity and diagnostic tests (Schirmer I and TBUT). We also analyzed the changes in tear MDH2 activities after the treatment with artificial tears. Results:.Tear MDH activities in the DE group and control group were 288 ±102 U/L and 259 ±112 U/L,.respectively, and this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The tear MDH2 activities in DE group were significantly in-creased compared with control group. Tear MDH2 was signif-icantly and negatively correlated with the Schirmer’s value (r=-0.733,P Conclusion: Tear MDH2 activity can indicate ocular surface injury in mild DE patients and may be used to monitor the re-sponse to therapy.

  4. Fungal Eye Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Fungal Eye Infections Recommend on ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch File Formats Help: How do ...

  5. Structural functional associations of the orbit in thyroid eye disease: Kalman filters to track extraocular rectal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L.; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-03-01

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention, and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  6. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive. PMID:20623902

  7. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  8. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood. PMID:27171415

  9. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ya Huang

    Full Text Available Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.10-1.20 for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10 for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14 for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood.

  10. Interaction of complement factor h and fibulin3 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Wyatt

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen in Bruch's membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A sequence variant (Y402H in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7 of complement factor H (CFH is associated with risk for "dry" AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3, which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H. This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD.

  11. Clinical Applications of Dexamethasone for Aged Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadia, Beatriz; Calvo, Pilar; Ferreras, Antonio; Bartol, Fran; Verdes, Guayente; Pablo, Luis

    2016-09-01

    The risk of severe eye problems has been found to increase significantly with age, particularly between the fifth and sixth decades of life. Cataracts, dry eye, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion (RVO) are very common and very different age-related ocular diseases that reduce the patient's quality of life. The rationale for using corticosteroids to treat anterior and posterior ocular segment diseases is driven by inflammation. Dexamethasone, one of the most powerful corticosteroids available, is widely used for topical or intravitreal administration. Topical dexamethasone has proven efficacy for the management of postoperative inflammation in the anterior segment after cataract surgery and symptom relief in dry-eye disease. A new sustained-release 700 µg dexamethasone intravitreal implant (DEX) was recently approved for the treatment of macular edema following RVO, diabetic macular edema, or non-infectious uveitis, and its use is increasing, especially when other therapeutic agents have failed. The most common side effects are increased intraocular pressure and cataract formation. The potency of DEX, alone or in combination with other agents, makes DEX a promising option for treating several retinal diseases. PMID:27566619

  12. Corneal Transplantation in Disease Affecting Only One Eye: Does It Make a Difference to Habitual Binocular Viewing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K Bandela

    Full Text Available Clarity of the transplanted tissue and restoration of visual acuity are the two primary metrics for evaluating the success of corneal transplantation. Participation of the transplanted eye in habitual binocular viewing is seldom evaluated post-operatively. In unilateral corneal disease, the transplanted eye may remain functionally inactive during binocular viewing due to its suboptimal visual acuity and poor image quality, vis-à-vis the healthy fellow eye.This study prospectively quantified the contribution of the transplanted eye towards habitual binocular viewing in 25 cases with unilateral transplants [40 yrs (IQR: 32-42 yrs and 25 age-matched controls [30 yrs (25-37 yrs]. Binocular functions including visual field extent, high-contrast logMAR acuity, suppression threshold and stereoacuity were assessed using standard psychophysical paradigms. Optical quality of all eyes was determined from wavefront aberrometry measurements. Binocular visual field expanded by a median 21% (IQR: 18-29% compared to the monocular field of cases and controls (p = 0.63. Binocular logMAR acuity [0.0 (0.0-0.0] almost always followed the fellow eye's acuity [0.00 (0.00 --0.02] (r = 0.82, independent of the transplanted eye's acuity [0.34 (0.2-0.5] (r = 0.04. Suppression threshold and stereoacuity were poorer in cases [30.1% (13.5-44.3%; 620.8 arc sec (370.3-988.2 arc sec] than in controls [79% (63.5-100%; 16.3 arc sec (10.6-25.5 arc sec] (p<0.001. Higher-order wavefront aberrations of the transplanted eye [0.34 μ (0.21-0.51 μ] were higher than the fellow eye [0.07 μ (0.05-0.11 μ] (p<0.001 and their reduction with RGP contact lenses [0.09 μ (0.08-0.12 μ] significantly improved the suppression threshold [65% (50-72%] and stereoacuity [56.6 arc sec (47.7-181.6 arc sec] (p<0.001.In unilateral corneal disease, the transplanted eye does participate in gross binocular viewing but offers limited support to fine levels of binocularity. Improvement in the transplanted

  13. Elevated high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and age-related macular degeneration: the Alienor study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Cougnard-Grégoire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. METHODS: The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France. AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes; large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247; late AMD (n = 40, 61. Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC, Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, and triglycerides (TG were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261, higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54-3.90; P = 0.0002 and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46-3.59; P = 0.0003. Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48-5.17; p = 0.45. No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that elderly patients with high HDL

  14. IN-SITU OPHTHALMIC GELS FOR THE TREATMENT OF EYE DISEASES

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    M. Jothi, S.L. Harikumar* and Geeta Aggarwal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Topical administration of a drug in the conjunctival cul-de-sac is the treatment of choice for diseases of the anterior segment of eye. Development of ophthalmic drug delivery systems has always been challenging because of the drawbacks with this route, like non-productive absorption, drainage, induced lacrimation, tear turn over, impermeability of drugs to cornea. New approaches have been investigated for delivery of drugs to the eye by means of polymeric delivery of ophthalmic drugs to the pre-and intra ocular tissues, have been attempted to increase the bioavailability and the duration of therapeutic action of ocular drug. Certain new approaches to increase the ocular bioavailability, duration of the drug action and to reduce the undesirable side effects are by using drug carriers that regulate pre-corneal drug loss and improve the corneal contact time. Many of these systems prolong ocular bioavailability but do not control drug penetration through the cornea. Consequently, the drug concentration at the site of action might remain inadequate. Therefore, it is necessary to develop safer, efficacious and more acceptable ocular therapeutic system. The ocular bioavailability of the drugs can be improved by prolonging their residence time in the cul-de-sac and by increasing their corneal permeability. There are various new dosage forms like in-situ gel, collagen shield, etc.

  15. Translating the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements Project findings to the clinic: ENCODE's implications for eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Paul G; Hewitt, Alex W

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10 years after the Human Genome Project unravelled the sequence of our DNA, the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project sought to interpret it. Data from the recently completed project have shed new light on the proportion of biologically active human DNA, assigning a biochemical role to much of the sequence previously considered to be 'junk'. Many of these newly catalogued functional elements represent epigenetic mechanisms involved in regulation of gene expression. Analogous to an Ishihara plate, a gene-coding region of DNA (target dots) only comes into context when the non-coding DNA (surrounding dots) is appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the ENCODE project, discussing the significance of these data for ophthalmic research and eye disease. The novel insights afforded by the ENCODE project will in time allow for the development of new therapeutic strategies in the management of common blinding disorders.

  16. Parkinson's disease brain mitochondria have impaired respirasome assembly, age-related increases in distribution of oxidative damage to mtDNA and no differences in heteroplasmic mtDNA mutation abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Keeney Paula M; Dunham Lisa D; Morton Stephanie L; Arthur Charles R; Bennett James P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and is frequently complicated by depression and cognitive impairment. sPD likely has multiple interacting causes that include increased oxidative stress damage to mitochondrial components and reduced mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity. We analyzed mitochondria from postmortem sPD and CTL brains for evidence of oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA...

  17. Development of lifitegrast: a novel T-cell inhibitor for the treatment of dry eye disease

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    Semba CP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Charles P Semba,1 Thomas R Gadek2 1Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Ophthalma Logic Consulting, Park City, UT, USA Abstract: Dry eye disease (DED is a multifactorial disorder of the ocular surface characterized by symptoms of discomfort, decreased tear quality, and chronic inflammation that affects an estimated 20 million patients in the US alone. DED is associated with localized inflammation of the ocular surface and periocular tissues leading to homing and activation of T cells, cytokine release, and development of hyperosmolar tears. This inflammatory milieu results in symptoms of eye dryness and discomfort. Homing of T cells to the ocular surface is influenced by the binding of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18; αLβ2, a cell surface adhesion protein, to its cognate ligand, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54, which is expressed on inflamed ocular/periocular epithelium and vascular endothelium. LFA-1/ICAM-1 binding within the immunologic synapse enables both T-cell activation and cytokine release. Lifitegrast is a novel T-cell integrin antagonist that is designed to mimic the binding epitope of ICAM-1. It serves as a molecular decoy to block the binding of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibits the downstream inflammatory process. In vitro studies have demonstrated that lifitegrast inhibits T-cell adhesion to ICAM-1-expressing cells and inhibits secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, interleukin (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6, all of which are known to be associated with DED. Lifitegrast has the potential to be the first pharmaceutical product approved in the US indicated for the treatment of both symptoms and signs of DED. Clinical trials involving over 2,500 adult DED patients have demonstrated that topically administered lifitegrast 5

  18. Sarcopenia and Age-Related Endocrine Function

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    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle, is characterized by a deterioration of muscle quantity and quality leading to a gradual slowing of movement, a decline in strength and power, and an increased risk of fall-related injuries. Since sarcopenia is largely attributed to various molecular mediators affecting fiber size, mitochondrial homeostasis, and apoptosis, numerous targets exist for drug discovery. In this paper, we summarize the current understanding of the endocrine contribution to sarcopenia and provide an update on hormonal intervention to try to improve endocrine defects. Myostatin inhibition seems to be the most interesting strategy for attenuating sarcopenia other than resistance training with amino acid supplementation. Testosterone supplementation in large amounts and at low frequency improves muscle defects with aging but has several side effects. Although IGF-I is a potent regulator of muscle mass, its therapeutic use has not had a positive effect probably due to local IGF-I resistance. Treatment with ghrelin may ameliorate the muscle atrophy elicited by age-dependent decreases in growth hormone. Ghrelin is an interesting candidate because it is orally active, avoiding the need for injections. A more comprehensive knowledge of vitamin-D-related mechanisms is needed to utilize this nutrient to prevent sarcopenia.

  19. Comparison of diagnostic tests in distinct well-defined conditions related to dry eye disease.

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    Monica Alves

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study compares signs, symptoms and predictive tools used to diagnose dry eye disease (DED and ocular surface disorders in six systemic well-defined and non-overlapping diseases. It is well known that these tests are problematic because of a lack of agreement between them in identifying these conditions. Accordingly, we provide here a comparative clinical profile analysis of these different diseases. METHODS: A spontaneous and continuous sample of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS (n=27, graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD (n=28, Graves orbitopathy (n=28, facial palsy (n=8, diabetes mellitus without proliferative retinopathy (n=14 and glaucoma who chronically received topical drugs preserved with benzalkonium chloride (n=20 were enrolled. Evaluation consisted of a comprehensive protocol encompassing: (1 structured questionnaire - Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI; (2 tear osmolarity (TearLab Osmolarity System - Ocusense; (3 tear film break-up time (TBUT; (4 fluorescein and lissamine green staining; (5 Schirmer test and (6 severity grading. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty five patients (aged 48.8 years-old ± 14.1, male:female ratio=0.4 were enrolled in the study, along with 24 age and gender matched controls. Higher scores on DED tests were obtained in Sjögren Syndrome (P<0.05, except for tear film osmolarity that was higher in diabetics (P<0.001 and fluorescein staining, that was higher in facial palsy (P<0.001. TFBUT and OSDI correlated better with other tests. The best combination of diagnostic tests for DED was OSDI, TBUT and Schirmer test (sensitivity 100%, specificity 95% and accuracy 99.3%. CONCLUSIONS: DED diagnostic test results present a broad range of variability among different conditions. Vital stainings and TBUT correlated best with one another whereas the best test combination to detect DED was: OSDI/TBUT/Schirmer.

  20. A novel source of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in retina: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

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    Kee Dong Yoon

    Full Text Available Aging of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells of the eye is marked by accumulations of bisretinoid fluorophores; two of the compounds within this lipofuscin mixture are A2E and all-trans-retinal dimer. These pigments are implicated in pathological mechanisms involved in some vision-threatening disorders including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Studies have shown that bisretinoids are photosensitive compounds that undergo photooxidation and photodegradation when irradiated with short wavelength visible light. Utilizing ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS we demonstrate that photodegradation of A2E and all-trans-retinal dimer generates the dicarbonyls glyoxal (GO and methylglyoxal (MG, that are known to modify proteins by advanced glycation endproduct (AGE formation. By extracellular trapping with aminoguanidine, we established that these oxo-aldehydes are released from irradiated A2E-containing RPE cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA revealed that the substrate underlying A2E-containing RPE was AGE-modified after irradiation. This AGE deposition was suppressed by prior treatment of the cells with aminoguanidine. AGE-modification causes structural and functional impairment of proteins. In chronic diseases such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, MG and GO modify proteins by non-enzymatic glycation and oxidation reactions. AGE-modified proteins are also components of drusen, the sub-RPE deposits that confer increased risk of AMD onset. These results indicate that photodegraded RPE bisretinoid is likely to be a previously unknown source of MG and GO in the eye.

  1. Age Related Change in Thyroid Function

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    Shakila Rahman, Nasim Jahan, Nayma Sultana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Thyroid hormones play a vital role in metabolism, sensitivity of tissues to other hormones and also in oxygen consumption of almost all cells of the body. However, mild to moderate decrease in function of thyroid gland may occur with advancing age even in apparently healthy elderly subjects.Objectives: To observe age related change in thyroid function status in apparently healthy elderly subjects in Bangladesh.Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka between 1st January 2011 and 31st December 2011. Sixty apparently healthy elderly subjects of both sexes aged 50 to 75 years were taken as study group. They were collected from Probin Nibash Hitoishi Shangha, Agargaon, Dhaka. In addition, 30 apparently healthy young adult subjects aged 20-40 years were included as control. For assessment of thyroid function, serum free thyroxine (FT4, free triiodothyronine (FT3 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels were estimated by ELISA method. Statistical analysis was done by one way ANOVA, Bonferroni test and Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient test as applicable.Results: In this study, mean serum free thyroxine (FT4 and free triiodothyronine (FT3 levels were significantly (p<0.001 lower and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level was significantly (p<0.001 higher in apparently healthy elderly subjects in comparison to those of the healthy young subjects. Again, serum FT4 and FT3 levels were negatively correlated whereas serum TSH level was positively correlated with age of the subjects.Conclusion: The present study revealed a progressive decrease in thyroid function with advancement of age.

  2. Intraoperative performance and longterm outcome of phacoemulsification in age-related cataract.

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    Dholakia Sheena

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate intraoperative performance and longterm surgical outcome after phacoemulsification of age-related cataracts. METHODS: Prospective, observational, non-comparative study of 165 consecutive eyes undergoing phacoemulsification with nuclear sclerosis Grade I to III (Scale I to V. Preoperative evaluation included specular microscopy. Phacoemulsification was performed by a single surgeon using a standardised surgical technique under topical anaesthesia. Intraoperatively, effective phaco time (EPT, wound site thermal injury (WSTI, serious complications (eg. vitreous loss, posterior capsule rupture, zonulolysis and intraoperative posterior capsule opacification (plaque were evaluated. Postoperatively, posterior capsule opacification (PCO, Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy rate, corneal endothelial count, best corrected visual acuity and cystoid macular oedema were evaluated. Eyes were examined at 6 months and then yearly for 3 years. RESULTS: Mean ages of 78 males and 87 females were 59.12 +/- 8.56 and 58.34 +/- 7.45 years respectively. EPT was 36 +/- 19 seconds and WSTI occurred in 7 eyes (4.7%. No serious intraocular complications occurred. Intraoperative posterior capsule opacification (plaque was present in 21 eyes (13.93%. Postoperatively, PCO occurred in 8 eyes (4.84% and Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy was performed in 3 eyes (1.8%. Endothelial cell loss was 7.1% at 3 years follow-up. At the end of 3 years follow-up, 146 eyes (88.89% maintained a best corrected visual acuity of > or = 6/12. Cystoid macular oedema did not occur in any eye at 1 and 6 months′ follow-up. CONCLUSION: PCO rates and endothelial cell loss were acceptable. Consistent and reproducible outcome can be obtained after phacoemulsification of age related cataracts (grade I to III.

  3. Evaluation of patients with dry eye disease for conjunctival Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen; Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Mahran, Magda H.; Elborgy, Ebrahim S.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the possibility of the development of dry eye disease (DED) as a result of persistent infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the conjunctiva of patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 58 patients of age range 20-50y, diagnosed with DED confirmed by Schirmer I test and tear breakup time. The non-dry eye control group included 27 subjects of the same age. Ocular specimens were collected as conjunctival scrapings and swabs divided into three groups: the first used for bacterial culture, the second and third taken to detect Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. RESULTS Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 65.5% and 76% of DED patients by DFA and PCR methods respectively. Ureaplasma urealyticum was found in 44.8% of DED infected patients using the PCR method. Both organisms were identified in only 37.9% of DED patients found to be infected. Control subjects had a 22% detection rate of Chlamydia trachomatis by DFA assay versus a 7% detection rate by PCR; while Ureaplasma urealyticum was detected in 3.7% of the controls by PCR method. The conjunctival culture revealed that gram positive microorganisms represented 75% of isolates with coagulase negative Staphylococci the most common (50%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (20%), whereas gram negative microorganisms occurred in 25% of cases, isolating Moraxella spp. as the most frequent organism. CONCLUSION Our results tend to point out that Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum were detected in a moderate percentage of patients with DED, and could be a fair possibility for its development. PCR is more reliable in detecting Chlamydia trachomatis than DFA technique. The presence of isolated conjunctival bacterial microflora can be of some potential value. PMID:27803864

  4. Evaluation of Corneal Deformation Analyzed with Scheimpflug Based Device in Healthy Eyes and Diseased Ones

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    Michele Lanza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between corneal biomechanical and morphological data in healthy eyes, eyes that underwent myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK, keratoconus affected eyes, and keratoconus affected eyes that underwent corneal collagen crosslinking (CCC. Complete clinical eye examination of all eyes was followed by tomographic (Pentacam, Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany and biomechanical (Corvis ST, Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany evaluation. Differences among Corvis ST (CST parameters in the different groups have been performed. Linear regression between central corneal thickness (CCT, intraocular pressure (IOP, and anterior corneal curvature measured with Sim’K (KM, versus corneal deformation parameters measured with Corvis ST in the different groups, has been run using SPSS software version 18.0. We evaluated 64 healthy eyes of 64 patients with a mean refractive error of -0.65±1.68 D (measured as spherical equivalent, 17 eyes of 17 patients that underwent myopic PRK for a mean refractive defect of -4.91±2.05 D (measured as spherical equivalent, 16 eyes of 16 patients affected by keratconus (stage 2-3 of Amsler Classification, and 13 eyes of 13 patients affected by keratoconus that underwent CCC. Our data suggest that corneal curvature would have a greater influence on corneal deformation than CCT; in fact KM values are more strongly associated with more CST parameters both about corneal change in shape and both about the corneal ability to come back at original shape.

  5. Dietary lactoferrin alleviates age-related lacrimal gland dysfunction in mice.

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    Motoko Kawashima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Decrease in lacrimal gland secretory function is related to age-induced dry eye disease. Lactoferrin, the main glycoprotein component of tears, has multiple functions, including anti-inflammatory effects and the promotion of cell growth. We investigated how oral administration of lactoferrin affects age-related lacrimal dysfunction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Twelve-month-old male C57BL/6Cr Slc mice were randomly divided into a control fed group and an oral lactoferrin treatment group. Tear function was measured at a 6-month time-point. After euthanasia, the lacrimal glands were subjected to histological examination with 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG antibodies, and serum concentrations of 8-OHdG and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL were evaluated. Additionally, monocyte chemotactic protein-1(MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α gene expression levels were determined by real-time PCR. The volume of tear secretion was significantly larger in the treated group than in the control. Lactoferrin administration reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and the MCP-1 and TNF-α expression levels. Serum concentrations of 8-OHdG and HEL in the lactoferrin group were lower than those in the control group and were associated with attenuated 8-OHdG immunostaining of the lacrimal glands. CONCLUSION: Oral lactoferrin administration preserves lacrimal gland function in aged mice by attenuating oxidative damage and suppressing subsequent gland inflammation.

  6. Genome engineering in ophthalmology: Application of CRISPR/Cas to the treatment of eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S C; McCaughey, Tristan; Swann, Olivia; Pébay, Alice; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-07-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system has enabled an accurate and efficient means to edit the human genome. Rapid advances in this technology could results in imminent clinical application, and with favourable anatomical and immunological profiles, ophthalmic disease will be at the forefront of such work. There have been a number of breakthroughs improving the specificity and efficacy of CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome editing. Similarly, better methods to identify off-target cleavage sites have also been developed. With the impending clinical utility of CRISPR/Cas technology, complex ethical issues related to the regulation and management of the precise applications of human gene editing must be considered. This review discusses the current progress and recent breakthroughs in CRISPR/Cas-based gene engineering, and outlines some of the technical issues that must be addressed before gene correction, be it in vivo or in vitro, is integrated into ophthalmic care. We outline a clinical pipeline for CRISPR-based treatments of inherited eye diseases and provide an overview of the important ethical implications of gene editing and how these may influence the future of this technology. PMID:27181583

  7. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in women with Parkinson's disease is an underdiagnosed entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Rohan R; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kr

    2016-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Little information exists about RBD in women with PD. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical expression of RBD in women with PD and note any differences in women with PD with and without RBD. One hundred fifty-six patients with PD were recruited. There were 37 women with PD and probable RBD was diagnosed using the RBD Screening Questionnaire. Other scales included Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale, Epworth Sleep Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Probable RBD was diagnosed in 10 women with PD (27%). Most often (70%) RBD occurred after the onset of parkinsonian symptoms. Women with probable RBD were older, had shorter duration of PD symptoms, lower tremor score, and higher axial signs score. They had insomnia (80% versus non-probable RBD patients 44%, p=0.019), and poor sleep quality with excessive daytime sleepiness. Anxiety and depression were common in women with probable RBD. Episodes were brief and confined to vocalization and simple limb movements. No injury to self or bed partners was noted. Women with PD have fewer fights and less aggressive dream enacting behaviour than men, but suffer from significant disturbed sleep, and levels of anxiety and depression. PMID:26765761

  8. Transthyretin (prealbumin in eye structures and variation of vitreous-transthyretin in diseases

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    Ramakrishnan S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the presence of transthyretin (TTR, prealbumin a protein which binds retinol to retinol-binding protein in various ocular tissues and to study its quantitative changes in the vitreous humor in various diseases Method: Estimation of TTR was done by electrophoresis of 10 mg protein in each sample of tears, aqueous humor, vitreous, retina, and lens by an Imaging Densitometer using prealbumin as the standard. Results: TTR was present in all the eye structures except the lens and tear. The retina and the vitreous had relatively higher amounts of TTR compared with aqueous. The identity of TTR was confirmed by immuno-electrophoresis using anti-human TTR. Two bands in SDS electrophoresis revealed that this protein is a heterodimer. There was a significant decrease in vitreous TTR in diabetes with hypertension and increase in one case each of diabetes with hypertension associated with leukaemia or carcinoma with hepato-splenomegaly. Conclusion: Vitreous TTR is probably from retina and retinal pigment epithelium. The level of vitreous TTR is likely to have diagnostic significance in some retinal diseases.

  9. Genome engineering in ophthalmology: Application of CRISPR/Cas to the treatment of eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S C; McCaughey, Tristan; Swann, Olivia; Pébay, Alice; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-07-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system has enabled an accurate and efficient means to edit the human genome. Rapid advances in this technology could results in imminent clinical application, and with favourable anatomical and immunological profiles, ophthalmic disease will be at the forefront of such work. There have been a number of breakthroughs improving the specificity and efficacy of CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome editing. Similarly, better methods to identify off-target cleavage sites have also been developed. With the impending clinical utility of CRISPR/Cas technology, complex ethical issues related to the regulation and management of the precise applications of human gene editing must be considered. This review discusses the current progress and recent breakthroughs in CRISPR/Cas-based gene engineering, and outlines some of the technical issues that must be addressed before gene correction, be it in vivo or in vitro, is integrated into ophthalmic care. We outline a clinical pipeline for CRISPR-based treatments of inherited eye diseases and provide an overview of the important ethical implications of gene editing and how these may influence the future of this technology.

  10. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Jelena; Wang, Ziyuan; de Jong, Henk; Vermeer, Koenraad A.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and changes in retinal layer thicknesses occur which could be used as biomarkers for disease monitoring and diagnosis. Due to the topology disrupting pathology, existing segmentation methods often fail. Here, we present a solution for the segmentation of retinal layers in dry AMD subjects by extending our previously presented loosely coupled level sets framework which operates on attenuation coefficients. In eyes affected by AMD, Bruch's membrane becomes visible only below the drusen and our segmentation framework is adapted to delineate such a partially discernible interface. Furthermore, the initialization stage, which tentatively segments five interfaces, is modified to accommodate the appearance of drusen. This stage is based on Dijkstra's algorithm and combines prior knowledge on the shape of the interface, gradient and attenuation coefficient in the newly proposed cost function. This prior knowledge is incorporated by varying the weights for horizontal, diagonal and vertical edges. Finally, quantitative evaluation of the accuracy shows a good agreement between manual and automated segmentation.

  11. Lipids, Lipid Genes and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Three Continent Age-Related Macular Degeneration Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Meta-analysis. Methods Setting Three population-based cohorts. Population 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES) and Rotterdam Study (RS). Observation Procedures Participants were followed over 20 years and examined at 5-year intervals. Hazard ratios (HRs) associated with lipid levels per standard deviation above the mean or associated with each additional risk allele for each lipid pathway gene were calculated using random-effects inverse-weighted meta-analysis models, adjusting for known AMD risk factors. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of AMD. Results The average 5-year incidences of early AMD were 8.1%, 15.1%, and 13.0% in the BDES, BMES, and RS, respectively. Substantial heterogeneity in the effect of cholesterol and lipid pathway genes on the incidence and progression of AMD was evident when the data from the three studies were combined in meta-analysis. After correction for multiple comparisons, we did not find a statistically significant association between any of the cholesterol measures, statin use, or serum lipid genes and any of the AMD outcomes in the meta-analysis. Conclusion In a meta-analysis, there were no associations of cholesterol measures, history of statin use, or lipid pathway genes to the incidence and progression of AMD. These findings add to inconsistencies in earlier reports from our studies and others showing weak associations, no associations, or inverse associations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol with AMD. PMID:24879949

  12. An Investigation of Age-Related Differences in Understanding of Empathy and Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Kuske, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated age-related differences in social cognition, emotional understanding, Theory of Mind (ToM) and empathy. A new task assessing different aspects of social cognition (ToM, emotional understanding, knowledge/understanding of social rules) using cartoon-strip stories was applied in conjunction with established measures of emotion recognition (‘the faces task’, or FEEST), ToM (‘Reading the mind in the eyes task’), empathy (IRI) and executive functions (Bri...

  13. Age-Related Changes in the Misinformation Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Rachel; Hayne, Harlene

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined relation between age-related changes in retention and age-related changes in the misinformation effect. Found large age-related retention differences when participants were interviewed immediately and after 1 day, but after 6 weeks, differences were minimal. Exposure to misleading information increased commission errors.…

  14. Assessment of targeting accuracy of a low-energy stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D [Radiation Physics Department, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chell, Erik; Hansen, Steven; Gertner, Michael, E-mail: ptaddei@mdanderson.or [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., 8000 Jarvis Avenue, Newark, CA 94560 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, is a neovascular disease that may be controlled with radiation therapy. Early patient outcomes of external beam radiotherapy, however, have been mixed. Recently, a novel multimodality treatment was developed, comprising external beam radiotherapy and concomitant treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. The radiotherapy arm is performed by stereotactic radiosurgery, delivering a 16 Gy dose in the macula (clinical target volume, CTV) using three external low-energy x-ray fields while adequately sparing normal tissues. The purpose of our study was to test the sensitivity of the delivery of the prescribed dose in the CTV using this technique and of the adequate sparing of normal tissues to all plausible variations in the position and gaze angle of the eye. Using Monte Carlo simulations of a 16 Gy treatment, we varied the gaze angle by {+-}5{sup 0} in the polar and azimuthal directions, the linear displacement of the eye {+-}1 mm in all orthogonal directions, and observed the union of the three fields on the posterior wall of spheres concentric with the eye that had diameters between 20 and 28 mm. In all cases, the dose in the CTV fluctuated <6%, the maximum dose in the sclera was <20 Gy, the dose in the optic disc, optic nerve, lens and cornea were <0.7 Gy and the three-field junction was adequately preserved. The results of this study provide strong evidence that for plausible variations in the position of the eye during treatment, either by the setup error or intrafraction motion, the prescribed dose will be delivered to the CTV and the dose in structures at risk will be kept far below tolerance doses.

  15. Development of an Arabic version of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire as a tool to study eye diseases patients in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nizar; Saleh; Abdelfattah; Mohamed; Amgad; Ahmed; A; Salama; Marina; E; Israel; Ghada; A; Elhawary; Ahmed; E; Radwan; Mohamed; M; Elgayar; Tamer; M; EL; Nakhal; Islam; T; Elkhateb; Heba; A; Hashem; Doha; K; Embaby; Amira; A; Elabd; Reem; K; Elwy; Magdi; S; Yacoub; Hamdy; Salem; Mohamed; Abdel-Baqy; Ahmad; Kassem

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To develop and test an Arabic version of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25(NEI-VFQ-25).METHODS:NEI-VFQ-25 was translated into Arabic according to WHO translation guidelines. We enrolled adult consenting patients with bilateral chronic eye diseases who presented to 14 hospitals across Egypt from October to December 2012, and documented their clinical findings. Psychometric properties were then tested using STATA.RESULTS:We recruited 379 patients, whose mean age was(54.5±15)y. Of 46.2% were males, 227 had cataract,31 had glaucoma, 23 had retinal detachment, 37 had diabetic retinopathy, and 61 had miscellaneous visual defects. Non-response rate and the floor and ceiling numbers of the Arabic version(ARB-VFQ-25) were calculated. Internal consistency was high in all subscales(except general health), with Cronbach-α ranging from0.702-0.911. Test-retest reliability was high(intraclass correlation coefficient 0.79).CONCLUSION:RB-VFQ-25 isareliableandvalidtool for assessing visual functions of Arabic speaking patients. However, some questions had high non-response rates and should be substituted by available alternatives. Our results support the importance of including self-reported visual functions as part of routine ophthalmologic examination.

  16. Surgical Responses of Medial Rectus Muscle Recession in Thyroid Eye Disease-Related Esotropia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jeong Lyu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the surgical outcomes and surgical responses of medial rectus muscle (MR recession patients with thyroid eye disease (TED-related esotropia (ET. The surgical dose-response curves 1 week postoperatively and at the final visit were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were applied to investigate factors influencing surgical dose-response. A total of 43 patients with TED-related ET that underwent MR recession were included. The final success rate was 86.0% and the rate of undercorrection was 14.0%. The surgical dose-response curves of TED-related ET showed a gentle slope compared with those of standard surgical tables. In the univariable model, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was the only significant factor influencing surgical dose-response of MR recession in TED-related ET (β = -0.397, P = 0.044. In a model adjusted for age, sex, type of surgery, and preoperative horizontal angle of deviation, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession showed marginal significance (β = -0.389, P = 0.064. The surgical dose-response curve of TED-related ET was unique. Simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was associated with increased surgical dose-response in TED-related ET.

  17. Safety Profile and Effects of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Vital Signs in Thyroid Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Ling Yong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze changes in vital signs (heart rate (HR, systolic (SBP, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP during and after intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP and any other adverse effects. Methods. Retrospective review of charts of patients who received IVMP as treatment regime for thyroid eye disease. All subjects had vital signs charted during and after infusions. Results. This study included 38 subjects and a total of 242 infusions administered. IVMP resulted in a small but significant percentage drop in mean SBP at 30 min (p<0.001 and 60 min (p=0.03 but no difference at 90 min. There was also small but significant percentage drop in mean DBP and HR (DBP: p<0.001 for 30 min, p=0.001 for 60 min, and p=0.02 for 90 min and HR: p<0.001 for 30 min, 60 min, and 90 min. There were no cumulative effects on change of blood pressure or HR. There were 6 episodes of bradycardia (2.5% and 12 episodes of moderate to severe hypertension (5%. No significant cardiovascular or hepatic toxicity was found. Conclusion. IVMP is relatively safe and efficacious. IVMP demonstrated mild and noncumulative effects on vital signs. Severe hypertension may occur in susceptible individuals such as those with underlying hypertension and uncontrolled thyroid dysfunction, whereas bradycardia may be more likely in those on beta-blockers.

  18. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Salimi, Ali; Dadar, Mahsa; Jones, Barbara E; Collins, D Louis; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson's disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 69 PD patients with probable RBD, 240 patients without RBD and 138 healthy controls, using deformation-based morphometry (p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). All data were extracted from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. PD patients with probable RBD showed smaller volumes than patients without RBD and than healthy controls in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, medullary reticular formation, hypothalamus, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients. PMID:27245317

  19. Comprehensive Review of the Literature on Existing Punctal Plugs for the Management of Dry Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, Naz; Bever, Greg; Mahmood, S. M. Jafar; Moshirfar, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Numerous designs of punctal and canalicular plugs are available on the market. This variety presents challenges to ophthalmologists when choosing punctal plugs for the management of various ocular conditions. The aim of this literature review is to provide a classification system for lacrimal occlusive devices based on their location and duration of action as well as to identify different characteristics of each one of them. We want to give a comprehensive overview on punctal and canalicular plugs including their manufacturing companies, indications, and complications that have been reported in various articles. PubMed and Google Scholar were used to identify articles written in English as well as few articles written in Japanese, Chinese, Slovak, and Spanish that had abstracts in English. Nine different companies that manufacture punctal and canalicular plugs were identified and their plugs were included in this review. Punctal and canalicular plugs are used in the management of various ocular conditions including dry eye disease and punctal stenosis as well as in ocular drug delivery. Although they are a relatively safe option, associated complications have been reported in the literature such as infection, allergic reaction, extrusion, and migration. PMID:27088009

  20. Age-related consequences of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zaepfel, Alysia; Bjornstad, Petter; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2014-01-01

    The severity and frequency of childhood obesity has increased significantly over the past three to four decades. The health effects of increased body mass index as a child may significantly impact obese youth as they age. However, many of the long-term outcomes of childhood obesity have yet to be studied. This article examines the currently available longitudinal data evaluating the effects of childhood obesity on adult outcomes. Consequences of obesity include an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and its associated retinal and renal complications, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obstructive sleep apnea, polycystic ovarian syndrome, infertility, asthma, orthopedic complications, psychiatric disease, and increased rates of cancer, among others. These disorders can start as early as childhood, and such early onset increases the likelihood of early morbidity and mortality. Being obese as a child also increases the likelihood of being obese as an adult, and obesity in adulthood also leads to obesity-related complications. This review outlines the evidence for childhood obesity as a predictor of adult obesity and obesity-related disorders, thereby emphasizing the importance of early intervention to prevent the onset of obesity in childhood. PMID:24434909

  1. Ranibizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkova NP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nadezhda P Cvetkova, Kristina Hölldobler, Philipp Prahs, Viola Radeck, Horst Helbig, David Märker Department of Ophthalmology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany Purpose: Our aim was to evaluate an optical coherence tomography (OCT and visual acuity (VA-guided, variable-dosing regimen with intravitreal ranibizumab injection for treating patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD from 2007 to 2012. Design: This was a retrospective clinical study of 5 years follow-up in a tertiary eye center. Patients and methods: In this study, 66 patients with neovascular AMD (mean age of 74 years, SD 8.7 years were included. We investigated the development of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, the number of intravitreal injections, and the central retinal thickness measured with OCT (OCT Spectralis over 5 years of intravitreal treatment. Results: The mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections over 5 years was 8.8. The mean BCVA before therapy was 0.4 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR. After 5 years of therapy, the mean BCVA was 0.6 logMAR. In all, 16% of treated patients had stable VA over 5 years and 10% of study eyes approved their VA. The mean OCT-measured central retinal thickness at the beginning of this study was 295 µm; after 5 years of treatment, the mean central retinal thickness was 315 µm. There was an increase in central retinal thickness in 47.5% of examined eyes. Conclusion: Other studies showed VA improvement in OCT-guided variable-dosing regimens. Our study revealed a moderate decrease in VA after a total mean injection number as low as 8.8 injections over 5 years. In OCT, an increase in central retinal thickness over 5 years could be observed. Probably, this is due to deficient treatment when comparing the total injection number to other treatment regimens. Anti-VEGF therapy helps to keep the VA stable for a period of time, but cannot totally stop the progression of

  2. Morphological analysis of age-related iridocorneal angle changes in normal and glaucomatous cases using anterior segment optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama Y; Mori K; Ikeda Y; Ueno M; Kinoshita S

    2013-01-01

    Yuko Maruyama, Kazuhiko Mori, Yoko Ikeda, Morio Ueno, Shigeru Kinoshita Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: To analyze age-related morphological changes of the iridocorneal angle in normal subjects and glaucomatous cases, using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Methods: This study involved 58 eyes of 58 open-angle glaucoma cases and 72 eyes of 72 age-matched normal-open-angle control subjects. Iridocorneal angle s...

  3. What effects has the cataract surgery on the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stefan N.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cataract (Cataracta senilis is the most frequent eye disease of elderly people worldwide. In Germany, the cataract operation - with currently 450,000 interventions each year the most frequent operation in ophthalmology – can be seen as routine surgery. The age related macular degeneration (AMD is a further one of the most common, age-related eye diseases and the most frequent cause of blindness of elderly people in industrial nations. Due to demographic changes an increasing number of patients will suffer from cataract and AMD at the same time. This coincidence leads to a greater interest in the question of a mutual influence of both diseases, respectively their therapies, on each other. Objectives: The aim of this report was the evaluation of the medical and health economic effects of cataract operations on the development and progression of an age related macular degeneration (AMD. It was differentiated between first manifestations of AMD, progression of early stages of AMD and influence on further impairment in late stages of AMD. Methods: The relevant publications for this report were identified by DIMDI via structured database enquiry as well as common, self-made enquiry and were evaluated, based on the criteria of evidence based medicine. The present report included German and English literature published since 1983. Results: The database enquiry generated a record of 2769 issue-related publications. Eight medical publications were eligible for analysis in the course of the present HTA report. No relevant studies on health economical, ethical, social or legal issues could be included. Three epidemiological cohort studies provided some evidence for a promoting influence of cataract extractions on the progression of early types of AMD. Two of the epidemiological studies assessed the risk of first manifestation of AMD after cataract extraction. Both came up with up with increased incidences that did not reach statistical

  4. Contact lenses and associated anterior segment disorders: dry eye disease, blepharitis, and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemp, Michael A; Bielory, Leonard

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses the use of contact lenses in patients suffering from dry eye and ocular allergy. The diagnosis of dry eye is outlined along with the relationship between contact lenses, the tear film, and the ocular surface. A practical approach to the recognition and management of the dry eye patient wishing to wear contact lenses is presented. In addition, a consideration of a careful strategy to identify patients with ocular allergy and manage the use of contact lenses in these patients is developed with an emphasis on the avoidance of complications.

  5. Is Coffee Consumption associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Kumari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Coffee is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between coffee consumption and risk of systemic diseases; however, there is paucity of data in relation to coffee consumption and risk of eye diseases. This study aims to examine the relationship between coffee consumption and risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and diabetic retinopathy (DR in multiethnic population of Singapore. Materials and MethodsWe analyzed the data from 4121 study participants from the Singapore Prospective Study Program to examine the relationship of coffee to prevalence of AMD and DR. A standardized questionnaire that included information about the habitual amount of coffee consumed was completed by all study participants. Presence and severity of AMD and DR was assessed on fundus photographs using the Mutiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Grading Protocol. ResultsThe prevalence of AMD and DR in our population was 5.4% and 32.0%, respectively. A positive history of coffee consumption was present in 77.5% of AMD population and 76.1% of DR population with majority of participants consuming 1-2 cups of coffee daily. No statistically significant association was observed between coffee consumption and odds of AMD or DR after adjusting for confounding factors [AMD: Odds Ratio (OR = 1.27, Confidence Interval (CI = 0.88-1.83, p = 0.20; DR: OR = 1.36, CI = 0.69-2.69, p = 0.37. ConclusionThis epidemiological study of a large multiethnic population data set do not support the hypothesis that habitual intake of coffee and caffeine is associated with an altered risk of AMD and DR among Asians.

  6. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  7. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Forest

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD. A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease.

  8. Myelin Breakdown Mediates Age-Related Slowing in Cognitive Processing Speed in Healthy Elderly Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Po H.; Lee, Grace J.; Tishler, Todd A.; Meghpara, Michael; Thompson, Paul M.; Bartzokis, George

    2013-01-01

    Background: To assess the hypothesis that in a sample of very healthy elderly men selected to minimize risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease, myelin breakdown in late-myelinating regions mediates age-related slowing in cognitive processing speed (CPS). Materials and methods: The prefrontal lobe white matter and the genu of…

  9. International vision requirements for driver licensing and disability pensions: using a milestone approach in characterization of progressive eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain M Bron

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alain M Bron1, Ananth C Viswanathan2, Ulrich Thelen3, Renato de Natale4, Antonio Ferreras5, Jens Gundgaard6, Gail Schwartz7, Patricia Buchholz81Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Glaucoma Research Unit, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Department of Genetics, University College of London Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK; 3Private Practice, Munster, Germany; 4Ospedale Civile di Monselice, Monselice, Italy; 5Ophthalmology, Miguel Servet University Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain; 6COWI, Kolding, Denmark; 7Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Glaucoma Consultants, Baltimore, MD, USA; 8Patricia Buchholz Consulting, Karlsruhe, GermanyObjective: Low vision that causes forfeiture of driver’s licenses and collection of disability pension benefits can lead to negative psychosocial and economic consequences. The purpose of this study was to review the requirements for holding a driver’s license and rules for obtaining a disability pension due to low vision. Results highlight the possibility of using a milestone approach to describe progressive eye disease.Methods: Government and research reports, websites, and journal articles were evaluated to review rules and requirements in Germany, Spain, Italy, France, the UK, and the US.Results: Visual acuity limits are present in all driver’s license regulations. In most countries, the visual acuity limit is 0.5. Visual field limits are included in some driver’s license regulations. In Europe, binocular visual field requirements typically follow the European Union standard of ≥120°. In the US, the visual field requirements are typically between 110° and 140°. Some countries distinguish between being partially sighted and blind in the definition of legal blindness, and in others there is only one limit.Conclusions: Loss of driving privileges could be used as a milestone to monitor progressive eye disease. Forfeiture could be standardized as a

  10. Age-related hypoxia in CNS pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bădescu, George Mihai; Fîlfan, Mădălina; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Dumbravă, DănuŢ Adrian; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Although neuropathological conditions differ in the etiology of the inflammatory response, cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuroinflammation are probably similar in aging, hypertension, depression and cognitive impairment. Moreover, a number of common risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis are increasingly understood to act as "silent contributors" to neuroinflammation and can underlie the development of disorders such as cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) and subsequent dementia. On the other hand, acute neuroinflammation, such as in response to traumatic or cerebral ischemia, aggravates the acute damage and can lead to a number of pathological such as depression, post-stroke dementia and potentially neurodegeneration. All of those sequelae impair recovery and most of them provide the ground for further cerebrovascular events and a vicious cycle develops. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms associated with vascular dementia, stroke and related complications is of paramount importance in improving current preventive and therapeutic interventions. Likewise, understanding of molecular factors and pathways associated with neuroinflammation will eventually enable the discovery and implementation of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies indicated in a wide range of neurological conditions. PMID:27151686

  11. New Eye Treatment Saves Former Math Teacher's Sight | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Age-related Macular Degeneration New Eye Treatment Saves Former Math Teacher's Sight Summer 2016 ... AMD (also called wet AMD) in her left eye. Eventually, both eyes became involved. In neovascular AMD, ...

  12. Characterization of Retinal Disease Progression in a 1-Year Longitudinal Study of Eyes With Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy in Diabetes Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Luisa; Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify eyes of patients with diabetes type 2 that show progression of retinal disease within a 1-year period using noninvasive techniques. METHODS: Three hundred seventy-four type 2 diabetic patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy......DR and in central retinal thickness in eyes with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetes type 2 are able to identify eyes at risk of progression. These eyes/patients should be selected for inclusion in future clinical trials of drugs targeted to prevent diabetic retinopathy progression to vision...

  13. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Symptoms Correlate with Domains of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Ru Zhang; Jing Chen; Zi-Jiao Yang; Hui-Jun Zhang; Yun-Ting Fu; Yun Shen; Pei-Cheng He

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).However, little is known regarding the relation between the severity of RBD and the different domains of cognitive impairment.The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate the domains of cognitive impairment in patients with PD and RBD, and (2) to explore risk factors for PD-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) and the relationship between RBD severity and impairment in different cognitive domains in PD.Methods: The participants were grouped as follows: PD without RBD (PD-RBD;n =42), PD with RBD (PD + RBD;n =32), idiopathic RBD (iRBD;n =15), and healthy controls (HCs;n =36).All participants completed a battery of neuropsychological assessment of attention and working memory, executive function, language, memory, and visuospatial function.The information of basic demographics, diseases and medication history, and motor and nonmotor manifestations was obtained and compared between PD-RBD and PD + RBD groups.Particular attention was paid to the severity of RBD assessed by the RBD Questionnaire-Hong Kong (RBDQ-HK) and the RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ), then we further examined associations between the severity of RBD symptoms and cognitive levels via correlation analysis.Results: Compared to PD-RBD subjects, PD + RBD patients were more likely to have olfactory dysfunction and their Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores were higher (P < 0.05).During neuropsychological testing, PD + RBD patients performed worse than PD-RBD patients, including delayed memory function, especially.The MCI rates were 33%, 63%, 33%, and 8% for PD-RBD, PD + RBD, iRBD, and HC groups, respectively.RBD was an important factor for the PD-MCI variance (odds ratio =5.204, P =0.018).During correlation analysis, higher RBDSQ and RBDQ-HK scores were significantly associated with poorer performance on the Trail Making Test-B (errors) and

  14. The incidence and clinical characteristics of the immune phase eye disease in treated cases of human leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pappachan Joseph

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uveitis is increasingly being reported from south India following epidemics of leptospirosis. The incidence of eye involvement in treated patients has not been investigated properly in prospective studies. Aims :To determine the incidence, clinical spectrum and risk factors for Leptospiral uveitis in antibiotic-treated patients. Settings and Design: A prospective cohort study conducted among the patients treated for leptospirosis at Calicut Medical College between July and November 2002 and a seroprevalence study among sewage workers. Materials And Methods: As many as 360 patients admitted with suspected leptospirosis were studied by clinical examination, baseline ophthalmic survey, laboratory investigations and Leptospira serology (Microagglutination test - MAT; and IgM and IgG using ELISA during the epidemic. Of the 282 seropositive and antibiotic-treated cases, 174 patients who completed 30 months of regular follow-up were analyzed. A cross-sectional serosurveillance also was performed among 50 sewage workers to determine the baseline MAT titer. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis and logistic regression. Results: Thirty-two patients (18.4% developed the eye disease during follow-up. The mean age was 43.9 years and the sex ratio was equal. Twenty-one patients (65.6% had anterior uveitis. Only six patients (18.8% had visual symptoms. Median duration for developing anterior uveitis was 4 weeks. Recurrent uveitis was not seen following treatment. None had vision-threatening eye disease. Clinical and laboratory abnormalities during the acute phase did not pose risk for development of the eye disease later. Forty-six sewage workers (92% showed a MAT titer of 1/25. Conclusions: Uveitis is common following acute leptospirosis. Antibiotic-treated patients during the acute phase of illness developed only mild uveitis.

  15. Lens Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Cell Density in Human Age-related Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xialin Liu; Yizhi Liu; Jianliang Zheng; Qiang Huang; Huling Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the potential effect of the lens epithelial cell proliferation in age-related cataract.Methods: In vitro cell proliferation was assayed by MTT method to evaluate the lens epithelial cell density, index, and proliferation capacity in normal lens and all kinds of age-related cataract. Capsulotomy specimens from all kinds of patients who underwent cataract phacoemulsification extraction surgery were compared with the lens epithelial specimens from non-cataract lenses of Eye Bank eyes.Results: Lens epithelial cell density of central anterior capsule (LECD) in female normal lens was higher than that in male, LECD in nuclear cataract( > NⅢ ) was higher than that in normal lens, but in the mature cortical cataract, LF CD was lower. Mitotic index of three kinds of age-related cataracts in vivo had no statistical difference, neither did cell proliferation capacity of cultivated cells in vitro.Conclusion: The individual difference of lens epithelial cell density and proliferation capacity in vivo may be an important underlying cause for senile cataract in the cellular level, especially for nuclear cataract.

  16. Age-related changes in murine T cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Vissinga (Christine)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies presented here was to obtain a more detailed and integrated picture of the age-related changes in cellular immunity. The age-related changes of cellular immunity were studied by in vivo induction of DTH responses to a variety of antigens (Chapters 2 and 3). The res

  17. SIRT1 ameliorates age-related senescence of mesenchymal stem cells via modulating telomere shelterin

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    Huiqiang eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs senescence, which impairs its tissue repair capacity in vivo and hence compromises the effects of MSCs-based therapy in clinical applications, is closely related to aging and aging-related diseases. Here, we demonstrated the effect of SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase, on age-related MSCs senescence. Knockdown of SIRT1 in young MSCs induces cellular senescence and inhibits cellular proliferation ability whereas overexpression of SIRT1 in aged MSCs reversed the cellular senescence and regained its proliferation capacity, suggesting that SIRT1 could modulate age-induced MSCs senescence. Aging-related proteins, P16 and P21, might be involved in SIRT1-mediated anti-aging effect on MSCs. SIRT1 could positively modulate age-related DNA damage in MSCs. In addition, SIRT1 could induce telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT expression and consequently enhance telomerase activity, however, no significant change was observed in telomere length. Moreover, SIRT1 could positively regulate TPP1, an important member of telomere shelterin, expression. Together, these results demonstrate that SIRT1 dampens age-related MSCs senescence, which was correlated with the up-regulation of TPP1 expression, telomerase activity and down-regulation of DNA damage.

  18. Dry Eye Disease following Refractive Surgery: A 12-Month Follow-Up of SMILE versus FS-LASIK in High Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare dry eye disease following SMILE versus FS-LASIK. Design. Prospective, nonrandomised, observational study. Patients. 90 patients undergoing refractive surgery for myopia were included. 47 eyes underwent SMILE and 43 eyes underwent FS-LASIK. Methods. Evaluation of dry eye disease was conducted preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, using the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Questionnaire (SEEQ and TBUT. Results. TBUT reduced following SMILE at 1 and 3 months (p<0.001 and at 1, 3, and 6 months following FS-LASIK (p<0.001. TBUT was greater following SMILE than FS-LASIK at 3, 6, and 12 months (p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.009, resp.. SEEQ scores increased (greater symptoms following SMILE at 1 month (p<0.001 and 3 months (p=0.003 and at 1, 3, and 6 months following FS-LASIK (p<0.001. SMILE produced lower SEEQ scores (fewer symptoms than FS-LASIK at 1, 3, and 6 months (p<0.001. Conclusion. SMILE produces less dry eye disease than FS-LASIK at 6 months postoperatively but demonstrates similar degrees of dry eye disease at 12 months.

  19. School eye health appraisal

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    Desai Sanjiv

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available School children form an important large target group which must be screened adequately for early detection of eye diseases and prevention of blindness. A total approach in a school eye health programme must include teacher orientation and health education of children in addition to screening for eye diseases. The ocular morbidity pattern in 5135 school children of Jodhpur is discussed in this paper and it is hoped that it will be an indicator to all eye care agencies to help plan their priorities in the delivery of school based eye care.

  20. The Role of Thyroid Eye Disease and Other Factors in the Overcorrection of Hypotropia Following Unilateral Adjustable Suture Recession of the Inferior Rectus (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Natalie C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Overcorrection of hypotropia subsequent to adjustable suture surgery following inferior rectus recession is undesirable, often resulting in persistent diplopia and reoperation. I hypothesized that overcorrection shift after suture adjustment may be unique to thyroid eye disease, and the use of a nonabsorbable suture may reduce the occurrence of overcorrection. Methods A retrospective chart review of adult patients who had undergone eye muscle surgery with an adjustable suture technique was performed. Overcorrection shifts that occurred between the time of suture adjustment and 2 months postoperatively were examined. Descriptive statistics, linear regression, Anderson-Darling tests, generalized Pareto distributions, odds ratios, and Fisher tests were performed for two overcorrection shift thresholds (>2 and >5 prism diopters [PD]). Results Seventy-seven patients were found: 34 had thyroid eye disease and inferior rectus recession, 30 had no thyroid eye disease and inferior rectus recession, and 13 patients had thyroid eye disease and medial rectus recession. Eighteen cases exceeded the 2 PD threshold, and 12 exceeded the 5 PD threshold. Statistical analyses indicated that overcorrection was associated with thyroid eye disease (P=6.7E-06), inferior rectus surgery (P=6.7E-06), and absorbable sutures (>2 PD: OR=3.7, 95% CI=0.4–35.0, P=0.19; and >5 PD: OR=6.0, 95% CI=1.1–33.5, P=0.041). Conclusions After unilateral muscle recession for hypotropia, overcorrection shifts are associated with thyroid eye disease, surgery of the inferior rectus, and use of absorbable sutures. Surgeons performing unilateral inferior rectus recession on adjustable suture in the setting of thyroid eye disease should consider using a nonabsorbable suture to reduce the incidence of postoperative overcorrection. PMID:22253487

  1. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P N Scholl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112 and controls (n = 67. Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH, factor B-C2 (BF-C2 and complement C3 (C3 genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001, were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  2. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Genetics and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), widely prevalent across the globe, is a major stakeholder among adult visual morbidity and blindness, not only in the Western world but also in Asia. Several risk factors have been identified, including critical genetic factors, which were never imagined 2 decades ago. The etiopathogenesis is emerging to demonstrate that immune and complement-related inflammation pathway members chronically exposed to environmental insults could justifiably influence disease morbidity and treatment outcomes. Approximately half a dozen physiological and biochemical cascades are disrupted in the AMD disease genesis, eventually leading to the distortion and disruption of the subretinal space, subretinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch membrane, thus setting off chaos and disorder for signs and symptoms to manifest. Approximately 3 dozen genetic factors have so far been identified, including the recent ones, through powerful genomic technologies and large robust sample sizes. The noteworthy genetic variants (common and rare) are complement factor H, complement factor H-related genes 1 to 5, C3, C9, ARMS2/HTRA1, vascular endothelial growth factor A, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2/KDR, and rare variants (show causal link) such as TIMP3, fibrillin, COL4A3, MMP19, and MMP9. Despite the enormous amount of scientific information generated over the years, diagnostic genetic or biomarker tests are still not available for clinicians to understand the natural course of the disease and its management in a patient. However, further research in the field should reduce this gap not only by aiding the clinician but also through the possibilities of clinical intervention with complement pathway-related inhibitors entering preclinical and clinical trials in the near future. PMID:27488064

  3. Genetic Markers in Biological Fluids for Aging-Related Major Neurocognitive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Castro-Chavira, S.A.; Fernández, T.; Nicolini, H.; Diaz-Cintra, S.; Prado-Alcalá, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related major neurocognitive disorder (NCD), formerly named dementia, comprises of the different acquired diseases whose primary deficit is impairment in cognitive functions such as complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, perceptual/motor skills, and social cognition, and that are related to specific brain regions and/or networks. According to its etiology, the most common subtypes of major NCDs are due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), vascular disease (VaD), L...

  4. Age-related changes in glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yuangui; Carvey, Paul M.; Ling, Zaodung

    2006-01-01

    The most reliable and robust risk factor for some neurodegenerative diseases is aging. It has been proposed that processes of aging are associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species and a disturbance of glutathione homeostasis in the brain. Yet, aged animals have rarely been used to model the diseases that are considered to be age-related such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. This suggests that the results from these studies would be more valuable if aged animals were used. ...

  5. [The active search for occupational diseases in the engineering industries. Diseases associated with exposure to welding activities in optical radiation: dry eye syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messineo, A; Leone, M; Sanna, S; Arrigoni, E; Teodori, C; Pecorella, I; Imperatore, A; Villarini, S; Macchiaroli, S

    2011-01-01

    In the project of active research of occupational diseases was conducted a study on 45 welders in the engineering companies, with particular attention to the hazards of exposure to the optical radiation. The protocol used involved the execution of Breack Up test, Schirmer test, corneal staining and scraping cytology. It revealed that more than half of the welders had ocular lesions referable to their work activity as well as some permanent functional damages with the characters of dry eye syndrome. None of these diseases, which could alert for medical-legal and insurance, was highlighted by the occupational health physician.

  6. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration risk based on CFH, LOC387715/HTRA1, and smoking.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Anne E.; Nick Orr; Chris Patterson; Hossein Esfandiary; Ruth Hogg; Vivienne McConnell; Giuliana Silvestri; Usha Chakravarthy

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. The macula is the central region of the retina, the tissue at the back of the eye that converts light into electrical messages and sends them to the brain. In the commonest form of AMD—“dry” AMD—the light-sensitive cells in the macula gradually die. In “wet” or “neovascular” AMD (one in 10 cases of AMD, but responsible for 90% of severe AMD-related blindness), abnormal blood...

  7. Visual outcomes in relation to time to treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara Brandi; Fuchs, Josefine;

    2015-01-01

    within the range 0.23-0.24 Snellen and the median patient age within 79-80 years, whereas BCVA at first visit after the third injection increased from 0.24 to 0.31 (p ...PURPOSE: To study the relation between the interval from diagnosis to initiation of intravitreal injection therapy and visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to report changes over time in fellow-eye status. METHODS: Retrospective chart review. The study included...

  8. Age-related changes in ultra-triathlon performances

    OpenAIRE

    Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph,; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    International audience BackgroundThe age-related decline in performance has been investigated in swimmers, runners and triathletes. No study has investigated the age-related performance decline in ultra-triathletes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the age-related declines in swimming, cycling, running and overall race time for both Triple Iron ultra-triathlon (11.4-km swimming, 540-km cycling and 126.6-km running) and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (38-km swimming, 1,800-km cycling and...

  9. The quality of life impact of peripheral versus central vision loss with a focus on glaucoma versus age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Evans

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Keith Evans1, Simon K Law2, John Walt3, Patricia Buchholz4, Jan Hansen31Global Health Outcomes, Wolters Kluwer Health, Chester, United Kingdom; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Global Health Outcomes Strategy and Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 4Health Economics, Pricing, and Reimbursement, Allergan GmbH, Ettlingen, GermanyPurpose: It is well accepted that conditions that cause central vision loss (CVL have a negative impact on functional ability and quality of life (QoL, but the impact of diseases that cause peripheral vision loss (PVL is less well understood. Focusing on glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, the effects of CVL and PVL on QoL were compared. Methods: A systematic literature review of publications reporting QoL in patients with CVL or PVL identified 87 publications using four generic (Short-Form Health Survey-36 and -12, EuroQoL EQ-5D and Sickness Impact Profile and five vision-specific (National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-51, -39, and -25, Impact of Vision Impairment and Visual Function-14 QoL instruments; 33 and 15 publications reported QoL in ARMD and glaucoma, respectively.Results: QoL was impaired to a similar extent by diseases associated with PVL and CVL, but different domains were affected. In contrast to ARMD, mental aspects appeared to be affected more than physical aspects in patients with glaucoma.Conclusions: The differential impact upon QoL might be a function of the pathology of the diseases, for example potential for blindness and better ability to perform physical tasks due to retention of central vision may explain these observations in glaucoma.Keywords: vision loss, quality of life, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic macular edema, cataracts

  10. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  11. Eye pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  12. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of aging...

  13. Assessing Age-Related Etiologic Heterogeneity in the Onset of Islet Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittni N. Frederiksen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D, a chronic autoimmune disease, is often preceded by a preclinical phase of islet autoimmunity (IA where the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed and circulating autoantibodies can be detected. The goal of this study was to demonstrate methods for identifying exposures that differentially influence the disease process at certain ages by assessing age-related heterogeneity. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY has followed 2,547 children at increased genetic risk for T1D from birth since 1993 in Denver, Colorado, 188 of whom developed IA. Using the DAISY population, we evaluated putative determinants of IA, including non-Hispanic white (NHW ethnicity, maternal age at birth, and erythrocyte membrane n-3 fatty acid (FA levels, for age-related heterogeneity. A supremum test, weighted Schoenfeld residuals, and restricted cubic splines were used to assess nonproportional hazards, that is, an age-related association of the exposure with IA risk. NHW ethnicity, maternal age, and erythrocyte membrane n-3 FA levels demonstrated a significant age-related association with IA risk. Assessing heterogeneity in disease etiology enables researchers to identify associations that may lead to better understanding of complex chronic diseases.

  14. Tryptophan metabolism : entering the field of aging and age-related pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is an important risk factor for many debilitating diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration. In model organisms, interfering with metabolic signaling pathways, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 (IIS) and TOR pathways, can protect against age-related pathologies an

  15. GRM7 variants confer susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, Rick A; Van Laer, Lut; Huentelman, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Here we describe the results of the first whole genome association study for ARHI. The stud...

  16. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  17. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies. PMID:27220225

  18. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  19. New concept in nutrition for the maintenance of the aging eye redox regulation and therapeutic treatment of cataract disease; synergism of natural antioxidant imidazole-containing amino acid-based compounds, chaperone, and glutathione boosting agents: a systemic perspective on aging and longevity emerged from studies in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Cataract, opacification of the lens, is one of the commonest causes of loss of useful vision during aging, with an estimated 16 million people world-wide affected. The role of nutritional supplementation in prevention of onset or progression of ocular disease is of interest to health care professionals and patients. The aging eye seems to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. This review outlines the potential role of the new nutritional strategy on redox balance in age-related eye diseases and detail how the synergism and interaction of imidazole-containing amino acid-based compounds (nonhydrolized L-carnosine, histidine), chaperone agents (such as, L-carnosine, D-pantethine), glutathione-boosting agents (N-acetylcysteine, vitamin E, methionine), and N-acetylcarnosine eye drops plays key roles in the function and maintenance of the redox systems in the aging eye and in the treatment of human cataract disease. A novel patented oral health supplement is presented which enhances the anticataract activity of eye drops and activates functional visual acuity. The clinical data demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of a combined oral health care treatment with amino acids possessing chaperone-like activity with N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops. L-carnosine and N-acetylcarnosine protected the chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin and reduced the increased posttranslational modifications of lens proteins. Biological activities of the nonhydrolyzed carnosine in the oral formulation are based on its antioxidant and antiglycating (transglycating) action that, in addition to heavy metal chelation and pH-buffering ability, makes carnosine an essential factor for preventing sight-threatening eye disorders having oxidative stress in their pathogenesis, neurodegeneration, and accumulation of senile features. The findings suggest that synergism is required between carnosine or other imidazole-containing compounds and reduced glutathione in tissues and cells for

  20. Transpupillary thermotherapy for choroidal neovascular membrane in age related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Manisha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT in choroidal neovasularisation (CNVM secondary to age related macular degeneration ( AMD. Material and methods: Retrospective, non-randomized study of 28 eyes of 28 patients with subfoveal CNVM (classic, occult or mixed secondary to AMD. Results: Fifteen patients (53.57% maintained their pre-treatment vision, 2 (7.14% patients showed improvement of more than 2 lines and 11(39.28% patients showed deterioration of vision by> 2 lines. Angiographic and clinical regression of CNVM was noted in 19 patients (67.8% on an average follow up of 15.32 ± 3.31 months. Conclusion: TTT leads to stabilisation of vision in 60% of treated eyes with CNVM due to AMD.

  1. Slowing down: age-related neurobiological predictors of processing speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Eckert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-relatedcognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed - dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging.

  2. New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_161359.html New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss Older people's brains have a harder time processing ... conversation, many older people chalk it up to hearing loss. But a new, small study finds that the ...

  3. Age-Related Deterioration of Rod Vision in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Fan, Jie; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2010-01-01

    Even in healthy individuals, aging leads to deterioration in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual field, and dark adaptation. Little is known about the neural mechanisms that drive the age-related changes of the retina and more specifically of photoreceptors. According to one hypothesis, the age-related deterioration in rod function is due to the limited availability of 11-cis-retinal for rod pigment formation. To determine how aging affects rod photoreceptors and to test the retinoid ...

  4. Conjunctival flora of healthy and diseased eyes of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus): implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, M; Bexton, S

    2016-07-23

    Ocular pathology is relatively common in stranded seals admitted to wildlife rehabilitation hospitals. Some have pre-existing problems, while others develop eye problems in captivity, and in particular ulcerative keratitis, due to factors such as large prominent eyes, suboptimal water quality, trauma and infighting. Despite treatment, corneal ulcerations can rapidly progress to 'melting' ulcers with subsequent rupture of the globe. In this case series, 32 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) had conjunctival swabs taken on admission to a UK wildlife hospital to identify ocular bacterial flora and nine had subsequent swabs taken after four weeks to see if this changed in captivity. Additionally, nine seals with ocular pathology were also swabbed. Although a wide range of bacteria were cultured on admission, the most common isolates were Gemella haemolysans, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens All 'melting' ulcers were associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which suggests this bacterial species may be significant in the pathogenesis of progressive stromal ulceration in grey seals. PMID:27188623

  5. Neural Regulation of Lacrimal Gland Secretory Processes: Relevance in Dry Eye Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Dartt, Darlene A.

    2009-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is the major contributor to the aqueous layer of the tear film which consists of water, electrolytes and proteins. The amount and composition of this layer is critical for the health, maintenance, and protection of the cells of the cornea and conjunctiva (the ocular surface). Small changes in the concentration of tear electrolytes have been correlated with dry eye syndrome. While the mechanisms of secretion of water, electrolytes and proteins from the lacrimal gland differ,...

  6. Photodynamic Therapy for Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenjin Jin; Jian Ge; Shaobo Zhou; Huiyi Chen; Xiaojing Zhong; Ruzhang Jiang; Lingyan Chen; Lirong Chen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate short-term effects of single photodynamic therapy (PDT) for agerelated macular degeneration (AMD) accompanied with choroidal neovascularization (CNV).Methods: We analyzed retrospectively the effects of single PDT for 20 patients (20 eyes)with CNV caused by AMD. Corrected visual acuity, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optic coherence tomography (OCT) were examined before and after PDT. All patients were followed up at least 3 months.Results: At the end of 3-month follow-up, 5 eyes had vision progress, 15 eyes had vision stable and no eye had vision deterioration. Fluorescein angiography one week post PDT showed cessation of fluorescein leakage in 8 eyes with predominant classic CNV, and reduction of fluorescein leakage in 12 eyes with minimal classic CNV or occult CNV without classic component. At the 3-month following PDT fluorescein angiography showed fluorescein leakage reappeared in 4 of 8 eyes with predominant classic CNV.Among 12 eyes with minimal classic CNV or occult CNV without classic component, 9eyes showed decreased or unchanged fluorescein leakage, 3 eyes had a progression of fluorescein leakage. Optic coherence tomography showed obvious recovery of serous sensory retinal detachment after PDT.Conclusion: PDT may occlude or inhibit CNV caused by AMD in short term. No obvious side effects were noticed.

  7. Age-related variations in the microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Linde, F;

    2002-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the microstructure of cancellous bone is crucial for diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment of age-related skeletal diseases. Until now, little has been known about age-related variations in the microstructure of peripheral cancellous bone. This study quantified age......-related changes in the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone. One hundred and sixty cylindrical cancellous bone specimens were produced from 40 normal proximal tibiae from 40 donors, aged 16-85 years. These specimens were micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanned......, and microstructural properties were determined. The specimens were then tested in compression to obtain Young's modulus. The degree of anisotropy, mean marrow space volume, and bone surface-to-volume ratio increased significantly with age. Bone volume fraction, mean trabecular volume, and bone surface density...

  8. Role of hyperosmolarity in the pathogenesis and management of dry eye disease: proceedings of the OCEAN group meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Christophe; Aragona, Pasquale; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Tomlinson, Alan; Calonge, Margarita; Boboridis, Kostas G; Akova, Yonca A; Geerling, Gerd; Labetoulle, Marc; Rolando, Maurizio

    2013-10-01

    Dry eye disease (DED), a multifactorial disease of the tears and ocular surface, is common and has a significant impact on quality of life. Reduced aqueous tear flow and/or increased evaporation of the aqueous tear phase leads to tear hyperosmolarity, a key step in the vicious circle of DED pathology. Tear hyperosmolarity gives rise to morphological changes such as apoptosis of cells of the conjunctiva and cornea, and triggers inflammatory cascades that contribute to further cell death, including loss of mucin-producing goblet cells. This exacerbates tear film instability and drives the cycle of events that perpetuate the condition. Traditional approaches to counteracting tear hyperosmolarity in DED include use of hypotonic tear substitutes, which have relatively short persistence in the eye. More recent attempts to counteract tear hyperosmolarity in DED have included osmoprotectants, small organic molecules that are used in many cell types throughout the natural world to restore cell volume and stabilize protein function, allowing adaptation to hyperosmolarity. There is now an expanding pool of clinical data on the efficacy of DED therapies that include osmoprotectants such as erythritol, taurine, trehalose and L-carnitine. Osmoprotectants in DED may directly protect cells against hyperosmolarity and thereby promote exit from the vicious circle of DED physiopathology. PMID:24112228

  9. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  10. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  11. Age-related reduction of chromatin fractal dimension in toluidine blue - stained hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor; Petrovic, Danica; Paunovic, Jovana; Vucevic, Danijela; Radosavljevic, Tatjana; Pantic, Senka

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we proposed a hypothesis that chromatin of mouse hepatocytes exhibits age-related reduction of fractal dimension. This hypothesis was based on previously published works demonstrating that complexity of biological systems such as tissues, decreases during the process of physiological aging. Liver tissue was obtained from 24 male mice divided into 3 age groups: 10-days-old (young, juvenile), 210-days-old (adult) and 390-days-old. The tissue was stained using a modification of toluidine blue (nucleic acid - specific) staining method. A total of 480 chromatin structures (20 for each animal) were analyzed. For each structure, the values of fractal dimension, lacunarity, textural angular second moment and inverse difference moment were calculated using ImageJ software and its plugins. The results indicated the age-related reduction in fractal dimension and increase in lacunarity (p<0.01). Fractal dimension is a potentially good indicator of age associated changes in chromatin structure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that fractal complexity of hepatocyte chromatin decreases during the process of physiological aging. Fractal analysis as a method could be useful in detection of small age-related changes in chromatin distribution not otherwise visible with naked eye on conventional tissue micrographs. PMID:27412950

  12. The Role of Biological Agents and Immunomodulators in Treatment Strategies for Thyroid Eye Disease: An Evidence-based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, Anna; Migliori, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    Graves' Disease is an autoimmune disease where circulating antibodies bind to the thyrotropin receptors on the thyroid gland. These bound antibodies mimic thyroid stimulating hormone without the normal feedback from the anterior pituitary, causing hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis. These antibodies also interact with orbital tissues and cause the characteristic orbital findings of thyroid eye disease (TED). It is not clearly understood why anatomically and physiologically distinct tissues like the thyroid gland and orbit are affected selectively, or why the orbital disease tends to be self-limited. Identifying and understanding these processes is critical to targeting therapy. In the active phase of the disease patients may experience orbital inflammation, eyelid and conjunctiva edema (chemosis), eyelid retraction, proptosis, ocular motility restriction, and optic nerve compression. Current treatment strategies for the ocular symptoms have been predominantly directed at symptomatic relief. More recently, investigators have concentrated their efforts to better understanding the underlying pathophysiologic processes to direct therapy at these processes. This review examines the current literature exploring a variety of newer therapeutic alternatives, including immunomodulative and suppressive agents, targeted at strategic points of the active-phase TED pathophysiological pathways. Specifically, biological agents including rituximab, adalimumab, intravenous immunoglobulin and others are reviewed with considerations for pathophysiology, extent of literature support, and adverse effects. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-06.asp, free with no login].

  13. Results of Intravitreal Ranibizumab Treatment for Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Karaca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab injection for exudative age-related macular degeneration. Ma te ri al and Met hod: In this study, we included forty-eight eyes of 43 age-related macular degeneration patients followed for at least twelve months. Mean age was 73.65±8.93 years and mean follow-up time was 14.2 months. All patients received three consecutive monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections and then were followed up with clinical examination and optic coherence tomography monthly. Re-injection was executed as needed. Re sults: Twenty patients were male (46.5% and twenty-three patients were female (53.5%. The average number of ranibizumab injection was 3.7 (3-7 per eye. Twenty-six lesions (54.2% were classic (predominantly and minimally and twenty-two (45.8% were occult. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 46.8 letters with ETDRS chart at the initial examination and 55.5 letters at twelfth month. Mean central foveal thickness decreased from 320 microns to 269 microns. There was a statistically significant improvement in visual acuity and central foveal thickness. On the other hand, this improvement was not significant between lesion types. During follow-up, there were no systemic or serious ocular complications determined. Dis cus si on: Intravitreal ranibizumab injection is safe and effective, both anatomically and functionally, for age-related macular degeneration. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 25-9

  14. Bilateral optic nerve edema presenting as initial manifestation of thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michelle E; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2016-10-01

    A 48-year-old smoker with a history of hyperthyroidism treated 10 years prior to presentation with radioactive iodine ablation of the thyroid gland presented to his ophthalmologist with a 2-week history of transient loss of vision in the right eye occurring for 1 to 2 hours each morning. He denied ocular pain, diplopia or change in the prominence of one or both eyes. Examination revealed 2 mm of relative proptosis on the right, bilateral temporal flare and lower lid retraction. There was minimal upper lid retraction and no evidence of lid lag. Ocular motility was full. Dilated fundoscopic examination revealed bilateral optic nerve edema, right more than left. CT of the orbit demonstrated enlargement of the extraocular muscles bilaterally with marked enlargement of the right medial rectus and left inferior rectus muscles resulting in crowding at the orbital apex bilaterally. Laboratory testing revealed the patient to be hyperthyroid. The patient was treated with high dose oral steroids followed by orbital radiation. Hyperthyroidism was managed by the patient's primary care physician. Visual symptoms rapidly improved with oral steroids and orbital radiation. Optic nerve edema completely resolved. Repeat CT imaging demonstrated a reduction in the enlargement of the extraocular muscles with relief of bilateral optic nerve compression.

  15. Brain protein oxidation in age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with aggregated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D A; Kanski, J

    2001-07-15

    Protein oxidation, one of a number of brain biomarkers of oxidative stress, is increased in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders or animal models thereof, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, prion disorders, such as Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and alpha-synuclein disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Each of these neurodegenerative disorders is associated with aggregated proteins in brain. However, the relationship among protein oxidation, protein aggregation, and neurodegeneration remain unclear. The current rapid progress in elucidation of mechanisms of protein oxidation in neuronal loss should provide further insight into the importance of free radical oxidative stress in these neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Marek's disease virus infection in the eye: chronological study of the lesions, virus replication, and vaccine-induced protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiri, Arun K R; Cortes, Aneg L; Lee, Lucy F; Gimeno, I M

    2008-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection in the eye was studied chronologically after inoculating 1-day-old chickens with a very virulent MDV strain, Md5. The ocular lesions could be classified as early lesions (6-11 days postinoculation [dpi]) and late lesions (26 and 56 dpi), based upon the location and severity of the lesions. The early lesions involved iris, ciliary body, and choroid layer, and were characterized by endothelial cell hypertrophy, vasculitis, and infiltration of lymphocytes (mainly CD8+), plasma cells, macrophages, and heterophils. Expression of early MDV-antigen pp38 in the cells infiltrating choroid layer was detected as early as 11 dpi. Late lesions consisted of severe lymphohistiocytic uveitis, keratitis, pectenitis, vitreitis, retinitis, and segmental to diffuse retinal necrosis. Cell infiltration included macrophages, granulocytes, plasma cells, and both CD4+ and CD8+ cells of various sizes. Expression of early MDV-antigen pp38 was readily found within the retina, uveal tract, and corneal epithelium. No expression of late-antigen gB or oncoprotein meq was detected in any of the eyes examined. A second experiment was conducted to study the effect of vaccination on the development of ocular lesions. Both HVT and CVI988 were able to protect against the development of early ocular lesions in chickens infected with very virulent plus strain MDV 648A. However, only CVI988 conferred complete protection against the development of late ocular lesions. HVT conferred partial protection, as it reduced the frequency and severity of the late ocular lesions. These results enhance our understanding of the nature and pattern of MDV infection in the eye.

  17. Age-related effects in the neocortical organization of chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrey, Michelle M; Reamer, Lisa A; Mareno, Mary Catherine;

    2014-01-01

    Among primates, humans exhibit the most profound degree of age-related brain volumetric decline in particular regions, such as the hippocampus and the frontal lobe. Recent studies have shown that our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, experience little to no volumetric decline in gray and...... of 11 major sulci of the chimpanzee brains were also measured. We found that chimpanzees showed increased gyrification with age and a cubic relationship between age and white matter volume. For the association between age and sulcus depth and width, the results were mostly non......-significant with the exception of one negative correlation between age and the fronto-orbital sulcus. In short, results showed that chimpanzees exhibit few age-related changes in global cortical organization, sulcus folding and sulcus width. These findings support previous studies and the theory that the age-related changes...

  18. Age-related changes in task related functional network connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Steffener

    Full Text Available Aging has a multi-faceted impact on brain structure, brain function and cognitive task performance, but the interaction of these different age-related changes is largely unexplored. We hypothesize that age-related structural changes alter the functional connectivity within the brain, resulting in altered task performance during cognitive challenges. In this neuroimaging study, we used independent components analysis to identify spatial patterns of coordinated functional activity involved in the performance of a verbal delayed item recognition task from 75 healthy young and 37 healthy old adults. Strength of functional connectivity between spatial components was assessed for age group differences and related to speeded task performance. We then assessed whether age-related differences in global brain volume were associated with age-related differences in functional network connectivity. Both age groups used a series of spatial components during the verbal working memory task and the strength and distribution of functional network connectivity between these components differed across the age groups. Poorer task performance, i.e. slower speed with increasing memory load, in the old adults was associated with decreases in functional network connectivity between components comprised of the supplementary motor area and the middle cingulate and between the precuneus and the middle/superior frontal cortex. Advancing age also led to decreased brain volume; however, there was no evidence to support the hypothesis that age-related alterations in functional network connectivity were the result of global brain volume changes. These results suggest that age-related differences in the coordination of neural activity between brain regions partially underlie differences in cognitive performance.

  19. The Association between Dry Eye Disease and Physical Activity as well as Sedentary Behavior: Results from the Osaka Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoko Kawashima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the association of dry eye disease (DED with physical activity and sedentary behavior. Methods. The cross-sectional survey conducted included Japanese office workers who use visual display terminals (n=672. DED was assessed according to the Japanese Dry Eye Diagnostic Criteria, and participants were categorized into “definite DED,” “probable DED,” or “non-DED” groups based on the results of DED examinations. Physical activity and sedentary behavior of participants were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, and physical activity level was calculated in metabolic equivalent units per week (MET, min/week. Participants were classified as having a high, moderate, or low level of physical activity. Results. Participants with abnormal tear break-up time (BUT (≤5 s were involved in sedentary behavior for significantly longer duration than those with normal BUT (P=0.035. Non-DED participants (14.5% tended to have higher levels of physical activity than definite DED participants (2.5%. Participants with definite DED had significantly lower MET scores than those with non-DED (P=0.025. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that a lower level of physical activity and sedentary behavior are associated with DED; however, longitudinal/intervention studies with large groups of participants are needed to validate these findings.

  20. Reduced sympathetic activity in idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Mehlsen, Jesper; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    More than 50% of patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) will develop Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. In a previous study, we found attenuated heart rate responses in iRBD and Parkinson's disease patients during sleep. The current study aimed to evaluate heart rate...... variability further in order to identify possible changes in these components during wakefulness and sleep in patients with iRBD and Parkinson's disease....

  1. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  2. Eye Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  3. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  4. Stereotactic targeting and dose verification for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gertner, Michael; Chell, Erik; Pan, Kuang-Hung; Hansen, Steve; Kaiser, Peter K.; Moshfeghi, Darius M. [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States); Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44915 (United States); Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Validation of the targeting and dose delivery of the IRay low voltage age-related macular degeneration treatment system. Methods: Ten human cadaver eyes were obtained for this study and mounted in the IRay system. Using gel and vacuum, an I-Guide immobilization device was coupled to the eyes and radiochromic film was affixed to the posterior aspect of the globes. Three narrow x-ray beams were delivered through the pars plana to overlap on the predicted nominal fovea. A needle was placed through the center of the film's beam spot and into the eye to register the film and the inner retina. The process was performed three times for each of the ten eyes (30 simulated treatments; 90 individual beams). The globes were dissected to assess the targeting accuracy by measuring the distances from the needles to the fovea. The dose to the fovea was calculated from the radiochromic film. Results: X-ray targeting on the retina averaged 0.6{+-}0.4 mm from the fovea. Repeated treatments on the same eye showed a reproducibility of 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The optic nerve was safely avoided, with the 90% isodose edge of the beam spot between 0.4 and 2.6 mm from the edge of the optic disk. Measured dose matched that prescribed. Conclusions: This study provides confidence that the IRay, with an average accuracy of 0.6 mm and a precision of 0.4 mm, can reliably treat most AMD lesions centered on the fovea. With the exception of motion, all sources of error are included.

  5. Future Prospects for the Treatment of Graves' Hyperthyroidism and Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, S; Place, R F; Krieger, C C; Gershengorn, M C

    2015-09-01

    Although there are adequate therapies for Graves' hyperthyroidism, mild to moderate Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is usually treated symptomatically whereas definitive therapy is reserved for severe, vision-threatening GO. Importantly, none of the treatment regimens for Graves' disease used today are directed at the pathogenesis of the disease. Herein, we review some aspects of what is known about the pathogenesis of these 2 major components of Graves' disease, specifically the apparent important roles of the TSH and IGF-1 receptors, and thereafter describe future therapeutic approaches directed at these receptors. We propose that targeting these receptors will yield effective and better tolerated treatments for Graves' disease, especially for GO.

  6. Long-term outcome after radiation therapy for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Miyamoto, Hideki; Hiroshiba, Naoko; Kimura, Hideya; Ogura, Yuichiro; Honda, Yoshihito; Sasai, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of low-dose radiation therapy on subfoveal choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration. The clinical course and visual outcome were compared retrospectively among two treated groups and a control group; 15 patients (15 eyes) received 10 Gy, another 15 patients (15 eyes) received 20 Gy. The control group consisted of 15 patients (15 eyes) without treatment. All patients were followed up for at least 18 months, and most were followed up for 3 years. The macula was irradiated with either 10 Gy in 5 fractions or with 20 Gy in 10 fractions after computed tomography (CT) simulation enabled real-time treatment planning from multiple CT slices. During the 3 years of follow-up, the lesions became better in 5 eyes, unchanged in 1, and worse in 9 with 10 Gy radiation; better in 7 eyes, unchanged in 1, and worse in 7 eyes with 20 Gy; and better in 1 eye and worse in 14 with no treatment. The difference between the groups treated with radiation and the control was statistically significant (P<.05). Visual acuity was also significantly better in the group receiving 20 Gy than in the control group up to 2 years after radiation (P<.01). Radiation may extend the period of good visual function substantially by reducing subfoveal choroidal neovascularization activity. (author)

  7. Age-Related Differences in the Production of Textual Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Andrea; Boewe, Anke; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Narratives produced by 69 healthy Italian adults were analyzed for age-related changes of microlinguistic, macrolinguistic and informative aspects. The participants were divided into five age groups (20-24, 25-39, 40-59, 60-74, 75-84). One single-picture stimulus and two cartoon sequences were used to elicit three stories per subject. Age-related…

  8. Age-related maculopathy: A genetic and epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M. Willemse-Assink (Jacqueline)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn the 19th century, age-related maculopathy (ARM) was described for the first time as an agerelated abnormality of the macula lutea. ARM consists of a variety of clinical signs, from the early stages with soft distinct drusen, indistinct drusen and pigment alterations up to the late st

  9. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many reports of relations between age and cognitive variables and of relations between age and variables representing different aspects of brain structure and a few reports of relations between brain structure variables and cognitive variables. These findings have sometimes led to inferences that the age-related brain changes cause the…

  10. PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, ameliorates age-related renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Nim; Lim, Ji Hee; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-08-01

    The kidney ages quickly compared with other organs. Expression of senescence markers reflects changes in the energy metabolism in the kidney. Two important issues in aging are mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. PPARα plays a major role as a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in various processes. In this study, 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups, the control group (n=7) and the fenofibrate-treated group (n=7) was fed the normal chow plus fenofibrate for 6months. The PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, improved renal function, proteinuria, histological change (glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial fibrosis), inflammation, and apoptosis in aging mice. This protective effect against age-related renal injury occurred through the activation of AMPK and SIRT1 signaling. The activation of AMPK and SIRT1 allowed for the concurrent deacetylation and phosphorylation of their target molecules and decreased the kidney's susceptibility to age-related changes. Activation of the AMPK-FOXO3a and AMPK-PGC-1α signaling pathways ameliorated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that activation of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling may have protective effects against age-related renal injury. Pharmacological targeting of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling molecules may prevent or attenuate age-related pathological changes in the kidney. PMID:27130813

  11. Extrinsic Mechanisms Involved in Age-Related Defective Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    in the alterations of osteoblastogenesis and the resulting decline in bone formation with aging. Notably, the age-related osteoblast dysfunctions and defective bone formation are caused by a number of extrinsic clinical factors that inhibit anabolic signaling pathways in bone. Thus, targeting these pathways can...

  12. Report of the TFOS/ARVO Symposium on global treatments for dry eye disease: an unmet need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, David A; Hammitt, Katherine M; Schaumberg, Debra A; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Begley, Carolyn G; Gjorstrup, Per; Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Quentric, Yann; Barabino, Stefano; Dalton, Michelle; Novack, Gary D

    2012-04-01

    In September 2010, a Symposium in Florence, Italy, was held to address the unmet need for global treatments for dry eye disease (DED). It was sponsored by The Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society (TFOS; www.TearFilm.org) and co-sponsored by the Association for Research in Vision & Ophthalmology (www.arvo.org). The Symposium objectives were two-fold: first, to discuss accepted and emerging clinical endpoints of DED with regulatory experts from around the world; and second, to consider how to improve clinical trials of treatments for DED. The Symposium focused on the personal and collective burden of DED, as well as the developmental and regulatory challenges associated with generating new DED therapeutics. This article provides a synopsis of many of the presentations, discussions and recommendations of this Symposium. PMID:22482471

  13. Pax6 downregulation mediates abnormal lineage commitment of the ocular surface epithelium in aqueous-deficient dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying Ting; Chen, Feeling Y T; Vijmasi, Trinka; Stephens, Denise N; Gallup, Marianne; McNamara, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Keratinizing squamous metaplasia (SQM) of the ocular surface is a blinding consequence of systemic autoimmune disease and there is no cure. Ocular SQM is traditionally viewed as an adaptive tissue response during chronic keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) that provokes pathological keratinization of the corneal epithelium and fibrosis of the corneal stroma. Recently, we established the autoimmune regulator-knockout (Aire KO) mouse as a model of autoimmune KCS and identified an essential role for autoreactive CD4+ T cells in SQM pathogenesis. In subsequent studies, we noted the down-regulation of paired box gene 6 (Pax6) in both human patients with chronic KCS associated with Sjögren's syndrome and Aire KO mice. Pax6 encodes a pleiotropic transcription factor guiding eye morphogenesis during development. While the postnatal function of Pax6 is largely unknown, we hypothesized that its role in maintaining ocular surface homeostasis was disrupted in the inflamed eye and that loss of Pax6 played a functional role in the initiation and progression of SQM. Adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells from Aire KO mice to immunodeficient recipients confirmed CD4+ T cells as the principal downstream effectors promoting Pax6 downregulation in Aire KO mice. CD4+ T cells required local signaling via Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1) to provoke Pax6 loss, which prompted a switch from corneal-specific cytokeratin, CK12, to epidermal-specific CK10. The functional role of Pax6 loss in SQM pathogenesis was indicated by the reversal of SQM and restoration of ocular surface homeostasis following forced expression of Pax6 in corneal epithelial cells using adenovirus. Thus, tissue-restricted restoration of Pax6 prevented aberrant epidermal-lineage commitment suggesting adjuvant Pax6 gene therapy may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent SQM in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases of the ocular surface. PMID:24143217

  14. Pax6 downregulation mediates abnormal lineage commitment of the ocular surface epithelium in aqueous-deficient dry eye disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ting Chen

    Full Text Available Keratinizing squamous metaplasia (SQM of the ocular surface is a blinding consequence of systemic autoimmune disease and there is no cure. Ocular SQM is traditionally viewed as an adaptive tissue response during chronic keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS that provokes pathological keratinization of the corneal epithelium and fibrosis of the corneal stroma. Recently, we established the autoimmune regulator-knockout (Aire KO mouse as a model of autoimmune KCS and identified an essential role for autoreactive CD4+ T cells in SQM pathogenesis. In subsequent studies, we noted the down-regulation of paired box gene 6 (Pax6 in both human patients with chronic KCS associated with Sjögren's syndrome and Aire KO mice. Pax6 encodes a pleiotropic transcription factor guiding eye morphogenesis during development. While the postnatal function of Pax6 is largely unknown, we hypothesized that its role in maintaining ocular surface homeostasis was disrupted in the inflamed eye and that loss of Pax6 played a functional role in the initiation and progression of SQM. Adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells from Aire KO mice to immunodeficient recipients confirmed CD4+ T cells as the principal downstream effectors promoting Pax6 downregulation in Aire KO mice. CD4+ T cells required local signaling via Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1 to provoke Pax6 loss, which prompted a switch from corneal-specific cytokeratin, CK12, to epidermal-specific CK10. The functional role of Pax6 loss in SQM pathogenesis was indicated by the reversal of SQM and restoration of ocular surface homeostasis following forced expression of Pax6 in corneal epithelial cells using adenovirus. Thus, tissue-restricted restoration of Pax6 prevented aberrant epidermal-lineage commitment suggesting adjuvant Pax6 gene therapy may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent SQM in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases of the ocular surface.

  15. Chronic Disease in Health Emergencies: In the Eye of the Hurricane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earl S. Ford, MD, MPH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Inadequately controlled chronic diseases may present a threat to life and well-being during the emergency response to natural disasters. An estimate of the possible numbers of people who may require treatment for chronic diseases should help in planning a response, but such information for local areas is not easily accessible. We explored how a current surveillance system could be used to provide estimates of the potential needs for emergency treatment of chronic diseases in the wake of a natural disaster. Methods We used data from adults aged 18 years or older who participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS in 2004 to estimate the prevalence and numbers of people with diabetes, heart disease, stroke, hypertension, and current asthma who lived in the New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner, La, metropolitan statistical area. Results About 9.0% of participants had diabetes, 4.6% had angina or coronary heart disease, 3.0% had had a myocardial infarction, 2.0% had had a stroke, and 6.3% had current asthma. About 25.4% adults had at least one of the above conditions. Conclusion A surveillance system such as the BRFSS can provide potentially useful baseline information about the numbers of people with chronic diseases and the treatment that they receive; this information can assist the medical and public health community in assessing the needs of people with chronic diseases after disasters and in planning relief efforts.

  16. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Chien

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  17. NPY antagonism reduces adiposity and attenuates age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjoon; Fujishita, Chika; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Kim, Sang Eun; Chiba, Takuya; Mori, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-12-01

    An orexigenic hormone, neuropeptide Y (NPY), plays a role not only in the hypothalamic regulation of appetite, but also in the peripheral regulation of lipid metabolism. However, the intracellular mechanisms triggered by NPY to regulate lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we report that NPY deficiency reduces white adipose tissue (WAT) mass and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism in mice. Gene expression involved in adipogenesis/lipogenesis was found to decrease, whereas proteins involved in lipolysis increased in gonadal WAT (gWAT) of NPY-knockout mice. These changes were associated with an activated SIRT1- and PPARγ-mediated pathway. Moreover, the age-related decrease of de novo lipogenesis in gWAT and thermogenesis in inguinal WAT was inhibited by NPY deficiency. Further analysis using 3T3-L1 cells showed that NPY inhibited lipolysis through the Y1 receptor and enhanced lipogenesis following a reduction in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and SIRT1 protein expression. Therefore, NPY appears to act as a key regulator of adipose tissue metabolism via the CREB-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Taken together, NPY deficiency reduces adiposity and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism, suggesting that antagonism of NPY may be a promising target for drug development to prevent age-related metabolic diseases.

  18. Aging-related systemic manifestations in COPD patients and cigarette smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Boyer

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is often associated with age-related systemic abnormalities that adversely affect the prognosis. Whether these manifestations are linked to the lung alterations or are independent complications of smoking remains unclear.To look for aging-related systemic manifestations and telomere shortening in COPD patients and smokers with minor lung destruction responsible for a decline in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO corrected for alveolar volume (KCO.Cross-sectional study in 301 individuals (100 with COPD, 100 smokers without COPD, and 101 nonsmokers without COPD.Compared to control smokers, patients with COPD had higher aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV, lower bone mineral density (BMD and appendicular skeletal muscle mass index (ASMMI, and shorter telomere length (TL. Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were similar between control smokers and COPD patients. Smokers did not differ from nonsmokers for any of these parameters. However, smokers with normal spirometry but low KCO had lower ASMMI values compared to those with normal KCO. Moreover, female smokers with low KCO, had lower BMD and shorter TL compared to those with normal KCO.Aging-related abnormalities in patients with COPD are also found in smokers with minor lung dysfunction manifesting as a KCO decrease. Decreased KCO might be useful, particularly among women, for identifying smokers at high risk for aging-related systemic manifestations and telomere shortening.

  19. Dry eye disease and depression-anxiety-stress: A hospital-based case control study in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Gokler, Mehmet Enes; Unsal, Alaettin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between dry eye disease (DED) and psychosomatic conditions, such as depression, stress, and anxiety, and the distribution of associated risk factors. Methods: In this case control study, the sample consisted of 121 DED subjects and 242 control subjects. Each subjects was diagnosed as having DED or not by an ophthalmologist. Ocular Surface Disease Index and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales were administered to all subjects. Data were analysed using chi-square and Mann Whitney U tests as a univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression as a multivariate analysis. Results: Of 1,458 consecutive outpatients, clinically diagnosed DED was present in 121 individuals (8.3%). There was a significant relationship of family history of DED (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.84-2.41), chronic disease history (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.66-4.87), OSDI score (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.97–4.06), depression (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.30-3.27), anxiety (OR, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.67-4.23), and stress (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.48-3.67) with DED. Conclusion: Individuals with depression, anxiety and stress are more likely to experience DED. In addition to confirming some well-known risk factors, this study has found new associations between DED and a family history of DED and the presence of stress. PMID:26150857

  20. About the Eye

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Supported by the NEI Research at NEI All Research at NEI Office of the Scientific Director Office of the Clinical Director Education Programs All Education National Eye Health Education Program Diabetic Eye Disease Education ... (DIVRO) Student Training Programs NEI Home About ...

  1. Treatment of severe Graves eye disease%严重Graves眼病的治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕新生

    2000-01-01

    @@ Graves眼病分型 Graves眼病是一种眼眶内的眼外肌和眶后脂肪结缔组织受累的自身免疫性疾病,是导致眼球突出的常见疾病.Hall等将Graves眼病分为Graves病眼型(Graves' ophthalmopathy)和眼型Graves病(ophthalmopathy Graves' disease,orbital Graves' disease).

  2. Aging Chart: a community resource for rapid exploratory pathway analysis of age-related processes

    OpenAIRE

    Moskalev, Alexey; Zhikrivetskaya, Svetlana; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Dobrovolskaya, Evgenia; Gurinovich, Roman; Kuryan, Oleg; Pashuk, Aleksandr; Jellen, Leslie C.; Aliper, Alex; Peregudov, Alex; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Aging research is a multi-disciplinary field encompassing knowledge from many areas of basic, applied and clinical research. Age-related processes occur on molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, system, organismal and even psychological levels, trigger the onset of multiple debilitating diseases and lead to a loss of function, and there is a need for a unified knowledge repository designed to track, analyze and visualize the cause and effect relationships and interactions between the many elemen...

  3. Aging-related changes in calcium binding proteins in rat perirhinal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Moyer, James R.; Furtak, Sharon C.; McGann, John P.; Brown, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been linked to neuropathological symptoms observed in aging and age-related disease. Alterations in the distribution and relative frequency of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs), which are important in regulating intracellular calcium levels, may contribute to disruption of calcium homeostasis. Here we examined the laminar distribution of three CaBPs in rat perirhinal cortex (PR) as a function of aging. Calbindin-D28k (CB), parvalbumin (PV)...

  4. Less efficient pattern separation may contribute to age-related spatial memory deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial memory deficits have been well-documented in older adults and may serve as an early indicator of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) in some individuals. Pattern separation is a critical mechanism for reducing potential interference among similar memory representations to enhance memory accuracy. A small but growing literature indicates that spatial pattern separation may become less efficient as a result of normal aging, possibly due to age-related changes in ...

  5. A genome-wide association study for age-related hearing impairment in the Saami

    OpenAIRE

    Van Camp, Guy; Van Laer, Lut; Huyghe, Jeroen; Hannula, Samuli; Van Eyken, Els; Stephan, Dietrich; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Aikio, Pekka; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Fransen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    International audience This study aimed to contribute to the elucidation of the genetic basis of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), a common multifactorial disease with an important genetic contribution as demonstrated by heritability studies. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Finnish Saami, a small ancient genetically isolated population without evidence of demographic expansion. The choice of this study population was motivated by its anticipated higher exten...

  6. A genome-wide association study for age-related hearing impairment in the Saami

    OpenAIRE

    Van Laer, Lut; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Hannula, Samuli; Van Eyken, Els; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Aikio, Pekka; Fransen, Erik; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at contributing to the elucidation of the genetic basis of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), a common multifactorial disease with an important genetic contribution as demonstrated by heritability studies. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Finnish Saami, a small, ancient, genetically isolated population without evidence of demographic expansion. The choice of this study population was motivated by its anticipated higher extent of LD, potentially o...

  7. Patients’ knowledge and perspectives on wet age-related macular degeneration and its treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma Kandula; Jeffrey C Lamkin; Teresa Albanese; et al

    2010-01-01

    Sushma Kandula1, Jeffrey C Lamkin1, Teresa Albanese2, Deepak P Edward11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Health Service Research and Education Institute, SUMMA Health System, Akron OH, USASummary: There have been no studies examining the level of understanding age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) patients have about their disease, or their perceptions about intraocular injections as treatment. In this study, patient knowledge about ARMD risk factors was low but patients appeared more optimisti...

  8. Patients’ knowledge and perspectives on wet age-related macular degeneration and its treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kandula, Sushma; Jeffrey C Lamkin; Albanese, Teresa; Deepak P Edward

    2010-01-01

    Summary: There have been no studies examining the level of understanding age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) patients have about their disease, or their perceptions about intraocular injections as treatment. In this study, patient knowledge about ARMD risk factors was low but patients appeared more optimistic than fearful when confronted with intraocular antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections as treatment. Purpose: In recent years there has been an increase in our u...

  9. Complement C1q Activates Canonical Wnt Signaling and Promotes Aging-Related Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuhiko T. Naito; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Liu, Mei-Lan; Higo, Tomoaki; NAKAGAWA, AKITO; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Hara, Yurina; Shimizu, Ippei; Zhu, Weidong; Toko, Haruhiro; Katada, Akemi; Akazawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in development of various organs and pathogenesis of many diseases, and augmented Wnt signaling has recently been implicated in mammalian aging and aging-related phenotypes. We here report that complement C1q activates canonical Wnt signaling and promotes aging-associated decline in tissue regeneration. Serum C1q concentration is increased with aging, and Wnt signaling activity is augmented during aging in the serum and in multiple tissues of wild-type mice,...

  10. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences

    OpenAIRE

    Chaleckis, Romanas; MURAKAMI, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Human blood provides a rich source of information about metabolites that reflects individual differences in health, disease, diet, and lifestyle. The coefficient of variation for human blood metabolites enriched in red blood cells or plasma was quantified after careful preparation. We identified 14 age-related metabolites. Metabolites that decline strikingly in the elderly include antioxidants and compounds involved in high physical activity, including carnosine, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine, ophth...

  11. [Age-related Macular Degeneration in the Japanese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the Japanese often shows different clinical features from those described in Caucasians. For example, we often observe choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in elderly patients without drusen in the fundus. The high incidence of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) in AMD among Japanese is well-known. The reason why such differences occur in clinical manifestations of AMD has been one of my main interests. In this review article, I will discuss the characteristics of AMD in the Japanese population, as found in our recent study. I. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of AMD in the Japanese population. Cohort studies are important to determine the prevalence and incidence of diseases. In Japan, cohort studies began to be carried out rather late compared with Western countries. Although good cohort studies from Japan are reported in the literature, the size of the cohorts was not sufficiently large to determine the prevalence of AMD. However, a recent meta-analysis of Asian cohorts has shown that the prevalence of late AMD in Asians is not different from that reported in Caucasians. On the other hand, the prevalence of early AMD appears lower in the Japanese than in Caucasians. Recently, we have published the results of the Nagahama Cohort study. In this cohort study, we found a high prevalence of drusen. It seems that the incidence of dry AMD is likely to increase among Japanese. In Japan, most retina specialists classify AMD into three categories : typical AMD, PCV, and retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). However, there are no definite diagnostic criteria to distinguish between the three conditions. To compare the clinical features of Japanese and Western cases of AMD, and to determine the incidence of the three types of AMD, we exchanged data about 100 consecutive cases between Kyoto University and Centre d'Ophtalmologie de Paris, France. Interestingly, the diagnoses made by the two institutes were not always in

  12. Ageism, age relations, and garment industry work in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, J A; Marshall, V W

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the complexities of age relations at work. Garment workers believed that their fate was linked to ageism and that their work experience was discounted by management. Managers wanted to be rid of older workers because they commanded higher wages than younger workers. The issue was cost reduction, and age was implicated unintendedly. Still, managers seemed to use stereotypical images to discourage older workers and they did not organize work routines to facilitate the adaptation of them. Instead, they subcontracted the easy jobs, relying on the experience of the older employees for difficult work while not adapting the workplace. Theoretically, the authors argue that ageism and age discrimination can best be understood through a recognition of the importance of structured age relations and human agency.

  13. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system. PMID:26915078

  14. Corneal Dendritic Cell Density Is Associated with Subbasal Nerve Plexus Features, Ocular Surface Disease Index, and Serum Vitamin D in Evaporative Dry Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye disease (DED has evolved into a major public health concern with ocular discomfort and pain being responsible for significant morbidity associated with DED. However, the etiopathological factors contributing to ocular pain associated with DED are not well understood. The current IVCM based study investigated the association between corneal dendritic cell density (DCD, corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBNP features, and serum vitamin D and symptoms of evaporative dry eye (EDE. The study included age and sex matched 52 EDE patients and 43 heathy controls. A significant increase in the OSDI scores (discomfort subscale was observed between EDE (median, 20.8 and control (median, 4.2 cohorts (P23 (P<0.05. A positive correlation was observed between DCD and OSDI discomfort subscale (r=0.348; P<0.0003 and SBNP features. An inverse correlation was observed between vitamin D and OSDI scores (r=-0.332; P=0.0095 and DCD with dendritic processes (r=-0.322; P=0.0122. The findings implicate DCD, SBNP features, and vitamin D with EDE symptoms.

  15. The Theory Behind the Age-Related Positivity Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Andrew E.; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    The “positivity effect” refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather and Carstensen, 2005) scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have faile...

  16. Within-Cohort Age-Related Differences in Cognitive Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the level of cognitive functioning can be influenced by characteristics of the environment that change over time. Many developmental researchers have referred to these influences as cohort effects, and have used year of birth as the basis for determining cohort membership. Furthermore, age-related differences in cognitive functioning are sometimes assumed to be primarily attributable to cohort differences, which implies that differences between birth cohorts should ...

  17. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Tanigawa

    Full Text Available Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG, one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV, which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress.

  18. Age-Related Changes in Trabecular and Cortical Bone Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayue Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly population has substantially increased worldwide. Aging is a complex process, and the effects of aging are myriad and insidious, leading to progressive deterioration of various organs, including the skeleton. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis in the elderly population increase the risk for fractures and morbidity. Osteoporosis is one of the most common conditions associated with aging, and age is an independent risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. With the development of noninvasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT, micro-CT, and high resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT, imaging of the bone architecture provides important information about age-related changes in bone microstructure and estimates of bone strength. In the past two decades, studies of human specimens using imaging techniques have revealed decreased bone strength in older adults compared with younger adults. The present paper addresses recently studied age-related changes in trabecular and cortical bone microstructure based primarily on HR-pQCT and micro-CT. We specifically focus on the three-dimensional microstructure of the vertebrae, femoral neck, and distal radius, which are common osteoporotic fracture sites.

  19. Age-related decrease of meiotic cohesins in human oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy in fetal chromosomes is one of the causes of pregnancy loss and of congenital birth defects. It is known that the frequency of oocyte aneuploidy increases with the human maternal age. Recent data have highlighted the contribution of cohesin complexes in the correct segregation of meiotic chromosomes. In mammalian oocytes, cohesion is established during the fetal stages and meiosis-specific cohesin subunits are not replenished after birth, raising the possibility that the long meiotic arrest of oocytes facilitates a deterioration of cohesion that leads to age-related increases in aneuploidy. We here examined the cohesin levels in dictyate oocytes from different age groups of humans and mice by immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian sections. The meiosis-specific cohesin subunits, REC8 and SMC1B, were found to be decreased in women aged 40 and over compared with those aged around 20 years (P<0.01. Age-related decreases in meiotic cohesins were also evident in mice. Interestingly, SMC1A, the mitotic counterpart of SMC1B, was substantially detectable in human oocytes, but little expressed in mice. Further, the amount of mitotic cohesins of mice slightly increased with age. These results suggest that, mitotic and meiotic cohesins may operate in a coordinated way to maintain cohesions over a sustained period in humans and that age-related decreases in meiotic cohesin subunits impair sister chromatid cohesion leading to increased segregation errors.

  20. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirne, Christopher; Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-02-24

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them. PMID:26888036

  1. Vision for improvement: Expressive writing as an intervention for people with Stargardt's disease, a rare eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Jennifer L; Lu, Qian

    2016-05-01

    This study implemented and evaluated the effectiveness of an expressive writing intervention among patients with Stargardt's disease, a rare disease due to macular degeneration. Participants were randomly assigned to either an expressive writing intervention or a neutral writing condition. Participants completed measures at three time points: baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks post-intervention. Psychological health outcomes improved at the 3-week follow-up for the intervention condition compared to control. Self-reported physical health improved at the 6-week follow-up in the intervention condition compared to control. These results suggest that expressive writing may be an effective, practical, and low-cost intervention for those with Stargardt's disease.

  2. Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in treatment-naive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Møller, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. Purpose: To report the effects of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin((R))) in treatment-naive patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) assessed by visual acuity (VA), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and contrast sensitivity. Methods: A prospective, uncontrolled...... neovascularization (CNV), 6 (23.1%) had predominantly classic CNV and 5 (19.2%) had minimally classic CNV. Ophthalmic outcome measures included changes in standardized Early Treatment Diabetic Research Study (ETDRS) VA, contrast sensitivity and OCT. The patients were examined at baseline and 1 week, 6 weeks, 3...... months and 6 months after the first injection. Re-treatment was given on an 'as needed' basis. Results: Twenty-four eyes of 24 patients completed 6 months of follow-up. Two patients chose to discontinue the study. Mean ETDRS VA score improved from 55 letters at baseline to 60 letters at 1 week (P < 0...

  3. Cataract surgery and age-related macular degeneration. An evidence-based update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataract often coexist in patients and concerns that cataract surgery is associated with an increased risk of incidence or progression of existing AMD has been raised. This systematic review and meta-analysis is focused on presenting the evidence...... concerning progression of AMD in patients undergoing cataract surgery. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases. Two randomized trials and two case-control trials were identified. Quality of the studies was assessed using the Cochrane...... risk of bias tool, data were extracted, and meta-analyses were performed. Quality of the available evidence was evaluated using the GRADE system. RESULTS: We found that visual acuity at 6-12 months follow-up was significantly better (6.5-7.5 letters) in eyes that had undergone cataract surgery than...

  4. Interactions of visual hallucinations, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Abhishek; Hegde, Shantala; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease may develop various non-motor symptoms during the course of the illness. Visual hallucinations (VH) and cognitive impairment (CI) are two common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Studies have reported association of both VH and CI with presence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Presence of visual hallucinations and cognitive impairment has been described as risk factors for emergence of each other. There is marked overlap in the risk factors for development of RBD, VH and CI in patients with PD. Results of clinical and epidemiological studies as well as studies based on neuroimaging, electrophysiology especially transcranial magnetic stimulation and neuropsycholgical evaluations in PD patients have suggested presence of certain common neurobiological process leading to emergence of RBD, VH and CI. Structural neuroimaging studies using voxel-based morphometry have often reported grey matter atrophy of hippocampus and parahippocampal cortices in PD patients with RBD, VH and CI. Cholinergic dysfunction is common in PD patients with RBD, VH and CI. This review explores the complex interactions of RBD, VH and CI in patients with PD and their potential implications.

  5. Dietary Sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin Carotenoids and Their Role in Eye Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashida Ali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The eye is a major sensory organ that requires special care for a healthy and productive lifestyle. Numerous studies have identified lutein and zeaxanthin to be essential components for eye health. Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoid pigments that impart yellow or orange color to various common foods such as cantaloupe, pasta, corn, carrots, orange/yellow peppers, fish, salmon and eggs. Their role in human health, in particular the health of the eye, is well established from epidemiological, clinical and interventional studies. They constitute the main pigments found in the yellow spot of the human retina which protect the macula from damage by blue light, improve visual acuity and scavenge harmful reactive oxygen species. They have also been linked with reduced risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and cataracts. Research over the past decade has focused on the development of carotenoid-rich foods to boost their intake especially in the elderly population. The aim of this article is to review recent scientific evidences supporting the benefits of lutein and zexanthin in preventing the onset of two major age-related eye diseases with diets rich in these carotenoids. The review also lists major dietary sources of lutein and zeaxanthin and refers to newly developed foods, daily intake, bioavailability and physiological effects in relation to eye health. Examples of the newly developed high-lutein functional foods are also underlined.

  6. Presence of Eye Diseases in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Presencia de afecciones oftalmológicas en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2

    OpenAIRE

    Bárbara Suárez Rodríguez; María Adela Llull Tombo; Mariela Julia Curbelo Gómez; Leonor Díaz Alfonso; Anay Martínez Díaz

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem worldwide given that it is one of the most common non-communicable diseases. The severity and diversity of its chronic complications includes the visual organ. Objective: To identify the presence of eye diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A descriptive case series study was conducted at the Center for Diabetes Care and Educatio...

  7. [Interdisciplinary interaction in vascular diseases of the eye, diabetes and diabetic retinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleophas, W; Dellanna, F

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 is greatly increasing worldwide. An early therapy with intensified control of diabetes and blood pressure is especially important to avoid delayed complications. In addition to diabetic foot syndrome, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy still represent commonly occurring problems. Despite improvements in the quality of care, the targets of the St. Vincent Declaration have still not yet been achieved. Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy show parallels in the course of the disease and in the pathological anatomical alterations which have led to the inauguration of a diabetic renal-retinal syndrome. The ophthalmological assessment of the retina was previously considered to be a diagnostic aid for assessment of diabetic nephropathy; however, nowadays a simple estimation of the glomerular filtration rate using the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formula and determination of microalbuminuria can in contrast give ophthalmologists an early indication of the possible presence of microangiopathic alterations.

  8. Absence of collagen XVIII in mice causes age-related insufficiency in retinal pigment epithelium proteostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivinen, Niko; Felszeghy, Szabolcs; Kinnunen, Aino I; Setälä, Niko; Aikio, Mari; Kinnunen, Kati; Sironen, Reijo; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Collagen XVIII has the structural properties of both collagen and proteoglycan. It has been found at the basement membrane/stromal interface where it is thought to mediate their attachment. Endostatin, a proteolytic fragment from collagen XVIII C-terminal end has been reported to possess anti-angiogenic properties. Age-related vision loss in collagen XVIII mutant mice has been accompanied with a pathological accumulation of deposits under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have recently demonstrated that impaired proteasomal and autophagy clearance are associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. This study examined the staining levels of proteasomal and autophagy markers in the RPE of different ages of the Col18a1 (-/-) mice. Eyes from 3, 6-7, 10-13 and 18 months old mice were enucleated and embedded in paraffin according to the routine protocol. Sequential 5 μm-thick parasagittal samples were immunostained for proteasome and autophagy markers ubiquitin (ub), SQSTM1/p62 and beclin-1. The levels of immunopositivity in the RPE cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Collagen XVIII knock-out mice had undergone age-related RPE degeneration accompanied by an accumulation of drusen-like deposits. Ub protein conjugate staining was prominent in both RPE cytoplasm and extracellular space whereas SQSTM1/p62 and beclin-1 stainings were clearly present in the basal part of RPE cell cytoplasm in the Col18a1 (-/-) mice. SQSTM1/p62 displayed mild extracellular space staining. Disturbed proteostasis regulated by collagen XVIII might be responsible for the RPE degeneration, increased protein aggregation, ultimately leading to choroidal neovascularization. PMID:27125427

  9. Aflibercept in wet age-related macular degeneration: a perspective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohr, Matthew; Kaiser, Peter K

    2012-07-01

    In the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has emerged as a key target of therapy. Currently, patients with neovascular AMD are treated with monthly intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. Aflibercept is a novel recombinant fusion protein engineered to bind all isoforms of VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor. It is the latest medication to receive US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the treatment of neovascular AMD. Theoretical models suggest this molecule may have a longer duration of action compared with current treatments. The results of the VEGF Trap-Eye: Investigation of Efficacy and Safety in wet Age-related Macular Degeneration studies (VIEW 1 and VIEW 2) support this by demonstrating that aflibercept, dosed every 2 months after a monthly loading dose for 3 months, was noninferior in the proportion of patients who maintained or improved vision at 52 weeks compared with monthly injections of ranibizumab. These results were maintained over the 2 years of the studies. Aflibercept (Eylea; Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA and Bayer, Basel, Switzerland) was approved by the FDA for the treatment of neovascular AMD on 18 November 2011. PMID:23342231

  10. Pink Eye: What To Do

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-12

    In this podcast, CDC's Adam Cohen, MD, a pediatrician and parent, discusses conjunctivitis (pink eye), a common eye condition in children and adults. He reviews pink eye causes and treatment, suggestions on when to call or visit a doctor, and practical tips to prevent pink eye from spreading.  Created: 10/12/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 10/13/2010.

  11. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  12. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  13. Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Muscle of Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, A; Wojcik, S; Pagano, T B; De Biase, D; Russo, V; Iovane, V; Grieco, E; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2016-03-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a multifactorial condition that represents a major healthcare concern for the elderly population. Although its morphologic features have been extensively studied in humans, animal models, and domestic and wild animals, only a few reports about spontaneous sarcopenia exist in other long-lived animals. In this work, muscle samples from 60 healthy Podolica-breed old cows (aged 15-23 years) were examined and compared with muscle samples from 10 young cows (3-6 years old). Frozen sections were studied through standard histologic and histoenzymatic procedures, as well as by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. The most prominent age-related myopathic features seen in the studied material included angular fiber atrophy (90% of cases), mitochondrial alterations (ragged red fibers, 70%; COX-negative fibers, 60%), presence of vacuolated fibers (75%), lymphocytic (predominantly CD8+) inflammation (40%), and type II selective fiber atrophy (40%). Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of major histocompatibility complex I in 36 cases (60%) and sarcoplasmic accumulations of β-amyloid precursor protein-positive material in 18 cases (30%). In aged cows, muscle atrophy was associated with accumulation of myostatin. Western blot analysis indicated increased amount of both proteins-myostatin and β-amyloid precursor protein-in muscles of aged animals compared with controls. These findings confirm the presence of age-related morphologic changes in cows similar to human sarcopenia and underline the possible role of amyloid deposition and subsequent inflammation in muscle senescence. PMID:26869152

  14. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aging assessment of Westinghouse DS-series low-voltage air circuit breakers was performed as part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. The objectives of this study are to characterize age-related degradation within the breaker assembly and to identify maintenance practices to mitigate their effect. Since this study has been promulgated by the failures of the reactor trip breakers at the McGuire Nuclear Station in July 1987, results relating to the welds in the breaker pole lever welds are also discussed. The design and operation of DS-206 and DS-416 breakers were reviewed. Failure data from various national data bases were analyzed to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and mechanisms. Additional operating experiences from one nuclear station and two industrial breaker-service companies were obtained to develop aging trends of various subcomponents. The responses of the utilities to the NRC Bulletin 88-01, which discusses the center pole lever welds, were analyzed to assess the final resolution of failures of welds in the reactor trips. Maintenance recommendations, made by the manufacturer to mitigate age-related degradation were reviewed, and recommendations for improving the monitoring of age-related degradation are discussed. As described in Volume 2 of this NUREG, the results from a test program to assess degradation in breaker parts through mechanical cycling are also included. The testing has characterized the cracking of center-pole lever welds, identified monitoring techniques to determine aging in breakers, and provided information to augment existing maintenance programs. Recommendations to improve breaker reliability using effective maintenance, testing, and inspection programs are suggested. 13 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Squalamine lactate for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Brian; Desai, Avinash; Garcia, Charles A; Thomas, Edgar; Gast, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Squalamine lactate inhibits angiogenesis by a long-lived, intracellular mechanism of action. The drug is taken up into activated endothelial cells through caveolae, small invaginations in the cellular membrane. Subsequently, the drug binds to and "chaperones" calmodulin to an intracellular membrane compartment and blocks angiogenesis at several levels. A series of basic investigations, preclinical studies, and human clinical trials have begun to establish the proof of concept, efficacy, and safety parameters for use of squalamine lactate as a therapeutic agent for exudative age-related macular degeneration and several types of malignancies. PMID:16935213

  16. Age-Related Changes in Demand–Withdraw Communication Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Holley, Sarah R.; Haase, Claudia M.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Demand–withdraw communication is a set of conflict-related behaviors in which one partner blames or pressures while the other partner withdraws or avoids. The present study examined age-related changes in these behaviors longitudinally over the course of later life stages. One hundred twenty-seven middle-aged and older long-term married couples were observed at 3 time points across 13 years as they engaged in a conversation about an area of relationship conflict. Husbands’ and wives’ demand–w...

  17. The common eye diseases of misdiagnosis amblyopia and clinical analysis%误诊为弱视的常见眼病及临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾惠莉; 来小丽; 邓宏伟; 刘春民; 宋桂婷

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the common eye diseases of misdiagnosis amblyopia and clinical characters in order to improve the level of diagnosis.Methods Thirty-seven patients with misdiagnosis amblyopia were prospectively analyzed.By routine and special ophthalmologic examinations,misdiagnosis amblyopia was diagnosed other organic eye disease.Results Eye disease types with misdiagnosis amblyopia had retinal disease 19 cases (51.35%),lens disorder 3 cases (8.11%),intracalvarium disease 1 case (2.70%),hysteria 2 cases (5.41%),and optometry 12 cases (32.43%).Conclusions Amblyopia can be correctly diagnosed by rulling out organic eye diseases and according to the amblyopic diagnosis of different age children.%目的 探讨误诊为弱视的常见眼病及临床特征以提高诊断水平.方法 回顾性分析37例误诊为弱视的患者,经眼科常规及辅助检查而确诊其眼病.结果 误诊为弱视的眼病类型:眼底病19例(51.35%),晶状体异常3例(8.11%),颅内病变l例(2.70%),癔病2例(5.41%),屈光不正12例(32.43%).结论 弱视应在排除器质性眼病的同时结合不同年龄段儿童弱视诊断标准进行正确的诊断.

  18. Long-lasting effects of anti-VEGF/photodynamic combination therapy in the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration: a retrospective chart review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Garcia R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rosemary Silva-Garcia, Colleen McLellan, Fadi S Shaya, Kent W Small Macula and Retina Institute, Molecular Insight Research Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Medical Towers, Glendale, CA, USA Purpose: To examine the potential long-term benefit of an anti-VEGF/photodynamic therapy (PDT combination on patients treated for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 29 eyes (subjects from 26 patients (eight male and 18 female that showed sustained, positive response to combination therapy for exudative AMD for a minimum of 1 year. Collected data included: visual acuity, central retinal thickness, intraocular pressure and history of glaucoma, wet AMD onset and treatment history, concomitant use of anticoagulants and past history or development of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease while receiving combination therapy. Results: Subjects underwent an average of five injections and two PDT treatments in total over 16 months before the choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM stabilized and became inactive for at least 1 year. Prior to the effective anti-VEGF/PDT combination therapy the median Snellen visual acuity ranged from 20/200 to 20/250 and presented at no worse than 20/200 at 1 year after treatment. Some subjects were followed for up to 5 years and remained inactive.Conclusion: Combination therapy can cause long-lasting closure of the CNVM, even with advanced disease resistant to anti-VEGF monotherapy. Keywords: anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, photodynamic therapy, age-related macular degeneration, bevacizumab, visual acuity, intraocular pressure

  19. Changes in Timing and kinematics of goal directed eye-hand movements in early-stage Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Muilwijk (Bas); S. Verheij (Simone); J.J.M. Pel (Johan); A.J.W. Boon (Andrea); J. van der Steen (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Many daily activities involve intrinsic or extrinsic goal-directed eye and hand movements. An extensive visuomotor coordination network including nigro-striatal pathways is required for efficient timing and positioning of eyes and hands. The aim of this study was to investigat

  20. Complex treatment of allergic eye diseases using interferon alfa-2b and loratadine gel for topical and external use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Surov,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aimis to determine the efficacy of Allergoferon® — combined medicine composed of interferon alfa-2b and loratadine gel for topical and external use — in ocular allergies treatment.Materials and methods. 60 patients with allergic eye diseases were treated. Allergoferon® gel applied QID on upper and lower eyelids was used as a first-line therapy. Efficacy was measured using the following criteria: chemozis, eyelid edema, conjunctival redness and discharge, the presence of conjunctival follicles and papillae. All symptoms were scored using a 4‑point scale (0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe.Results. Topical administration of Allergoferon® was associated with significant symptoms reduction, i.e., chemozis by 82 %, eyelid edema by 91 %, conjunctival redness by 79 %, eyelid redness by 88 %, conjunctival discharge by 95 %, the presence of conjunctival follicles and papillae by 76 %.Conclusion. Allergoferon® gel for topical and external use quickly reduces tissue allergic reactions and, consequently, terms of treatment. This medication is highly-effective as a therapy of ocular allergies owing to its antihistamine, anti-inflammatory and anti-exudative effects.

  1. Eye Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  2. Black Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyesight if not treated. If both eyes are black after a head injury, it could signify a skull fracture or other serious injury. Next Black Eye Symptoms Related Ask an Ophthalmologist Answers How ...

  3. Intravitreal bevacizumab combined with infliximab in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization secondary to age-related macular degeneration: case report series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Guilherme Azevedo de Freitas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility of the combined use of bevacizumab (Avastin® and combined with infliximab (Remicade® in the treatment of naive choroidal neovascularization due to age-related macular degeneration eyes. METHODS: Intravitreal injections of bevacizumab combined with infliximab in 6 neovascular age-related macular degeneration eyes. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examination on the initial visit and at days 1, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 following the first injection. Optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography were performed during at initial visit and monthly during the 6 months follow-up period. Electroretinography was performed before and 30 days after initial injection, in order to evaluate retinal toxicity induced by such treatment. RESULTS: Thirty days after the first injection, 5 eyes (83% shown decrease in macular thickness. No change was seen in electroretinogram in any eyes compared to initially performed electroretinogram. All phakic eyes developed cataract. One patient developed vitritis and was submitted to medical treatment successfully. At the end of the 6 months follow-up period, 4 patients showed significant improvement in the exudative process of choroidal neovascularization. One eye had mild persistent submacular fluid without active choroidal neovascularization, and another eye had persistent amount of intraretinal fluid due to active choroidal neovascularization. CONCLUSION: The combined use of bevacizumab with infliximab in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration was effective in reducing leakage and improving the macular thickness. However, it is not possible to assert that the results were related to synergic effects of the combination therapy. A controlled study with more cases is necessary to precisely define the complication rates; however the dosage and/or association of drugs studied in this research should not be recommended in clinical practice due to

  4. Age-Related Loss of Muscle Mass and Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Goldspink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related muscle wasting and increased frailty are major socioeconomic as well as medical problems. In the quest to extend quality of life it is important to increase the strength of elderly people sufficiently so they can carry out everyday tasks and to prevent them falling and breaking bones that are brittle due to osteoporosis. Muscles generate the mechanical strain that contributes to the maintenance of other musculoskeletal tissues, and a vicious circle is established as muscle loss results in bone loss and weakening of tendons. Molecular and proteomic approaches now provide strategies for preventing age-related muscle wasting. Here, attention is paid to the role of the GH/IGF-1 axis and the special role of the IGFI-Ec (mechano growth factor/MGF which is derived from the IGF-I gene by alternative splicing. During aging MGF levels decline but when administered MGF activates the muscle satellite (stem cells that “kick start” local muscle repair and induces hypertrophy.

  5. Age-related differences in moral identity across adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Murua, Lourdes Andrea; Jia, Fanli

    2016-06-01

    In this study, age-related differences in adults' moral identity were investigated. Moral identity was conceptualized a context-dependent self-structure that becomes differentiated and (re)integrated in the course of development and that involves a broad range of value-orientations. Based on a cross-sectional sample of 252 participants aged 14 to 65 years (148 women, M = 33.5 years, SD = 16.9) and a modification of the Good Self-Assessment, it was demonstrated that mean-level of moral identity (averaged across the contexts of family, school/work, and community) significantly increased in the adult years, whereas cross-context differentiation showed a nonlinear trend peaking at the age of 25 years. Value-orientations that define individuals' moral identity shifted so that self-direction and rule-conformity became more important with age. Age-related differences in moral identity were associated with, but not fully attributable to changes in personality traits. Overall, findings suggest that moral identity development is a lifelong process that starts in adolescence but expands well into middle age. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27124654

  6. KCNQ channels regulate age-related memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available In humans KCNQ2/3 heteromeric channels form an M-current that acts as a brake on neuronal excitability, with mutations causing a form of epilepsy. The M-current has been shown to be a key regulator of neuronal plasticity underlying associative memory and ethanol response in mammals. Previous work has shown that many of the molecules and plasticity mechanisms underlying changes in alcohol behaviour and addiction are shared with those of memory. We show that the single KCNQ channel in Drosophila (dKCNQ when mutated show decrements in associative short- and long-term memory, with KCNQ function in the mushroom body α/βneurons being required for short-term memory. Ethanol disrupts memory in wildtype flies, but not in a KCNQ null mutant background suggesting KCNQ maybe a direct target of ethanol, the blockade of which interferes with the plasticity machinery required for memory formation. We show that as in humans, Drosophila display age-related memory impairment with the KCNQ mutant memory defect mimicking the effect of age on memory. Expression of KCNQ normally decreases in aging brains and KCNQ overexpression in the mushroom body neurons of KCNQ mutants restores age-related memory impairment. Therefore KCNQ is a central plasticity molecule that regulates age dependent memory impairment.

  7. Learning and aging related changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Oliveira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A goal of many laboratories that study aging is to find a key cellular change(s that can be manipulated and restored to a young-like state, and thus, reverse the age-related cognitive deficits. We have chosen to focus our efforts on the alteration of intrinsic excitability (as reflected by the postburst afterhyperpolarization, AHP during the learning process in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We have consistently found that the postburst AHP is significantly reduced in hippocampal pyramidal neurons from young adults that have successfully learned a hippocampus-dependent task. In the context of aging, the baseline intrinsic excitability of hippocampal neurons is decreased and therefore cognitive learning is impaired. In aging animals that are able to learn, neuron changes in excitability similar to those seen in young neurons during learning occur. Our challenge, then, is to understand how and why excitability changes occur in neurons from aging brains and cause age-associated learning impairments. After understanding the changes, we should be able to formulate strategies for reversing them, thus making old neurons function more as they did when they were young. Such a reversal should rescue the age-related cognitive deficits.

  8. Auditory white noise reduces age-related fluctuations in balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J M; Will, O J; McGann, Z; Balasubramaniam, R

    2016-09-01

    Fall prevention technologies have the potential to improve the lives of older adults. Because of the multisensory nature of human balance control, sensory therapies, including some involving tactile and auditory noise, are being explored that might reduce increased balance variability due to typical age-related sensory declines. Auditory white noise has previously been shown to reduce postural sway variability in healthy young adults. In the present experiment, we examined this treatment in young adults and typically aging older adults. We measured postural sway of healthy young adults and adults over the age of 65 years during silence and auditory white noise, with and without vision. Our results show reduced postural sway variability in young and older adults with auditory noise, even in the absence of vision. We show that vision and noise can reduce sway variability for both feedback-based and exploratory balance processes. In addition, we show changes with auditory noise in nonlinear patterns of sway in older adults that reflect what is more typical of young adults, and these changes did not interfere with the typical random walk behavior of sway. Our results suggest that auditory noise might be valuable for therapeutic and rehabilitative purposes in older adults with typical age-related balance variability. PMID:27495013

  9. NSAIDs may protect against age-related brain atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara B Bendlin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in humans is associated with brain differences including decreased number of activated microglia. In animals, NSAIDs are associated with reduced microglia, decreased amyloid burden, and neuronal preservation. Several studies suggest NSAIDs protect brain regions affected in the earliest stages of AD, including hippocampal and parahippocampal regions. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the protective effect of NSAID use on gray matter volume in a group of middle-aged and older NSAID users (n = 25 compared to non-user controls (n = 50. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Non-user controls showed smaller volume in portions of the left hippocampus compared to NSAID users. Age-related loss of volume differed between groups, with controls showing greater medial temporal lobe volume loss with age compared to NSAID users. These results should be considered preliminary, but support previous reports that NSAIDs may modulate age-related loss of brain volume.

  10. Strategies for improving early detection and diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keane PA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pearse A Keane,1 Gabriella de Salvo,2 Dawn A Sim,1 Srini Goverdhan,2 Rupesh Agrawal,1 Adnan Tufail1 1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Abstract: Treatment of the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD has been revolutionized by the introduction of such agents as ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept. As a result, the incidence of legal blindness occurring secondary to AMD has fallen dramatically in recent years in many countries. While these agents have undoubtedly been successful in reducing visual impairment and blindness, patients with neovascular AMD typically lose some vision over time, and often lose the ability to read, drive, or perform other important activities of daily living. Efforts are therefore under way to develop strategies that allow for earlier detection and treatment of this disease. In this review, we begin by providing an overview of the rationale for, and the benefits of, early detection and treatment of neovascular AMD. To achieve this, we begin by providing an overview of the pathophysiology and natural history of choroidal neovascularization, before reviewing the evidence from both clinical trials and “real-world” outcome studies. We continue by highlighting an area that is often overlooked: the importance of patient education and awareness for early AMD detection. We conclude the review by reviewing an array of both established and emerging technologies for early detection of choroidal neovascularization, ranging from Amsler chart testing, to hyperacuity testing, to advanced imaging techniques, such as optical coherence tomography. Keywords: Amsler, detection, choroidal neovascularization, hyperacuity, optical coherence tomography

  11. The relevance of chemokine signalling in modulating inherited and age-related retinal degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Ulrich Fo; Robbie, Scott J; Bainbridge, James Wb; Ali, Robin R

    2014-01-01

    Systemic monocytes, tissue resident macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia have specific roles in immune surveillance and maintenance of tissue homeostasis and are key regulator and effector cells of the local immune response to acute and chronic tissue injury.Two major signalling pathways that differentially define trafficking behaviour and activation of systemic and local myeloid cell populations in response to exogenous and endogenous inflammatory stimuli are the Ccl2-Ccr2 and the Cx3cl1-Cx3cr1 chemokine pathways.Alterations in these pathways have been implicated in controlling myeloid cell activation during normal ageing and in age-related retinal degenerations, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD).We review the evidence for how altered chemokine signalling in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions regulate local and systemic myeloid cell responses in the retina and how this may contribute to or attenuate pathology in inherited and age-related retinal diseases. We discuss the role of environmental factors (e.g. light exposure) and the influence of genetic factors on the manifestation of pathology in experimental models and in human patients and how we envisage harnessing this knowledge for the development of targeted, more broadly applicable anti-inflammatory treatment strategies for a wide range of retinal degenerations.

  12. The Impact of Age-Related Dysregulation of the Angiotensin System on Mitochondrial Redox Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya eVajapey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with the accumulation of various deleterious changes in cells. According to the free radical and mitochondrial theory of aging, mitochondria initiate most of the deleterious changes in aging and govern life span. The failure of mitochondrial reduction-oxidation (redox homeostasis and the formation of excessive free radicals are tightly linked to dysregulation in the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS. A main rate-controlling step in RAS is renin, an enzyme that hydrolyzes angiotensinogen to generate angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is further converted to Angiotensin II (Ang II by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE. Ang II binds with equal affinity to two main angiotensin receptors—type 1 (AT1R and type 2 (AT2R. The binding of Ang II to AT1R activates NADPH oxidase, which leads to increased generation of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species (ROS. This Ang II-AT1R–NADPH-ROS signal triggers the opening of mitochondrial KATP channels and mitochondrial ROS production in a positive feedback loop. Furthermore, RAS has been implicated in the decrease of many of ROS scavenging enzymes, thereby leading to detrimental levels of free radicals in the cell.AT2R is less understood, but evidence supports an anti-oxidative and mitochondria-protective function for AT2R. The overlap between age related changes in RAS and mitochondria, and the consequences of this overlap on age-related diseases are quite complex. RAS dysregulation has been implicated in many pathological conditions due to its contribution to mitochondrial dysfunction. Decreased age-related, renal and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction was seen in patients treated with angiotensin receptor blockers. The aim of this review is to: (a report the most recent information elucidating the role of RAS in mitochondrial redox hemostasis and (b discuss the effect of age-related activation of RAS on generation of free radicals.

  13. Assessing quality of life in the treatment of patients with age-related macular degeneration: clinical research findings and recommendations for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzawa M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitsuko Yuzawa,1 Kyoko Fujita,1 Erika Tanaka,2 Edward C Y Wang21Department of Ophthalmology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Surugadai, Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bayer Yakuhin Ltd, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The importance of incorporating quality-of-life (QoL assessments into medical practice is growing as health care practice shifts from a “disease-based” to a “patient-centered” model. The prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD is increasing in today’s aging population. The purpose of this paper is: (1 to discuss, by reviewing the current literature, the impact of AMD on patients’ QoL and the utility of QoL assessments in evaluating the impact of AMD and its treatment; and (2 to make a recommendation for incorporating QoL into clinical practice.Methods: We conducted a PubMed and an open Internet search to identify publications on the measurement of QoL in AMD, as well as the impact of AMD and the effect of treatment on QoL. A total of 28 articles were selected.Results: AMD has been found to cause a severity-dependent decrement in QoL that is comparable to systemic diseases such as cancer, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. QoL impairment manifests as greater social dependence, difficulty with daily living, higher rates of clinical depression, increased risk of falls, premature admission to nursing homes, and suicide. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25 is the most widely used eye disease-specific QoL instrument in AMD. It has been shown to correlate significantly with visual acuity (VA. QoL reflects aspects of AMD including psychological well-being, functional capacity, and the ability to perform patients’ valued activities, which are not captured by a single, numerical VA score.Conclusion: The literature shows that the adverse impact of AMD on QoL is comparable to serious systemic disease. Eye disease

  14. Ocular surface damage of Graves disease patients without eye symptoms%无眼征Graves病患者的眼表损害

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 何彦津

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ocular surface damage and the changes of tear film function in Graves disease ( GD) patients without eye symptoms, and investigate the function of ocular inflammation in the pathogenesis of dry eye. Methods A total of 38 patients(76 eyes) with GD without eye symptoms and 30 healthy controls(60 eyes) were included in this study. The palpebral fissure height,degree of proptosis, ocular surface disease index(OSDI) ,Schirmer I tear test,break-up time(BUT) ,corneal fluorescence staining (FL) , and conjunctival impression cytology (IC) were assessed. The results were compared between the patient and the control groups. Results The OS-DI score was 43. 34 ± 10. 32 in the GD group and 22. 56 ±11.21 in the control group, there was significant difference (P < 0. 01). The value of Schirmer I test was (13.2 ± 7.1) mm in the GD group and (22.4 ± 4. 5) mm in the control group, there was significant difference^<0.01). BUT was(7.2±2. l)s in the GD group and( 10. 4 ±2. 9)s in the control group,there was significant difference(P < 0. 01). In the cornea! fluorescence staining test,20 eyes were positive in the GD group and 6 eyes in the control group, there was statistical difference(P = 0.016). Conjunctival impress cytology showed grade 0 was in 26 eyes(36.11% ),grade 1 in 23 eyes(31.94% ),grade 2 in 17 eyes(23.61% ), grade 3 in 6 eyes(8. 33% ) in GD group,whereas grade 0 in 39 eyes(65.00% ) .grade 1 in 13 eyes(21. 67% ), grade 2 in 6 eyes ( 10. 00% ), grade 3 in 2 eyes ( 3. 33% ) in control group,there was significant difference(P=0. 008). There was no statistical difference in interpalpebral distance and protosis between two groups( t = 0.482, -0.357 ;P = 0.632,0.723). Conclusion Dry eye and ocular surface damage appear in GD without eye symptoms, which may be associated with the ocular surface inflammation.%目的 评价无眼征的Graves病(Graves disease,GD)患者的眼表损害以及泪膜功能变化,了解眼表炎症在干眼

  15. [Future methods of treatment in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    In the present time the treatment of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) begins to develop. Many medical therapies are presently tested in the two types of ARMD, geographic atrophy and exudative ARMD. In atrophic ARMD, new drugs are aimed to spare photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium, to prevent oxidative damage on the retina and to suppress the inflammation process. In exudative ARMD, new therapies are already in use and in progress, especially the anti-VEGF factors, and others try to improve visual prognosis in targeting other mechanism or cells involved in the angiogenesis process. This article reviews and summarizes the available data, presented in several scientific meetings, congresses or given directly by the companies involved.

  16. Counteracting age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus; Reitelseder, Søren; Højfeldt, Grith;

    2016-01-01

    at both societal and individual levels. Only a few longitudinal studies have been reported, but whey protein supplementation seems to improve muscle mass and function, and its combination with heavy strength training appears even more effective. However, heavy resistance training may reduce adherence...... to training, thereby attenuating the overall benefits of training. We hypothesize that light load resistance training is more efficient when both adherence and physical improvement are considered longitudinally. We launched the interdisciplinary project on Counteracting Age-related Loss of Skeletal Muscle....... Moreover, we will evaluate changes in physical performance, muscle fiber type and acute anabolic response to whey protein ingestion, sensory adaptation, gut microbiome, and a range of other measures, combined with questionnaires on life quality and qualitative interviews with selected subjects. The CALM...

  17. Age-related differences in arithmetic strategy sequential effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I review a series of new findings concerning how age-related changes in strategic variations are modulated by sequential effects. Sequential effects refer to how strategy selection and strategy execution on current problems are influenced by which strategy is used on immediately preceding problems. Two sequential effects during strategy selection (i.e., strategy revisions and strategy perseverations) and during strategy execution (i.e., strategy switch costs and modulations of poorer strategy effects) are presented. I also discuss how these effects change with age during adulthood. These phenomena are important, as they shed light on arithmetic processes and how these processes change with age during adulthood. In particular, they speak to the role of executive control while participants select and execute arithmetic strategies. Finally, I discuss the implications of sequential effects for theories of strategies and of arithmetic.

  18. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity

  19. Age-related differences in multiple task monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Ivo; Del Missier, Fabio; Mäntylä, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Coordinating multiple tasks with narrow deadlines is particularly challenging for older adults because of age related decline in cognitive control functions. We tested the hypothesis that multiple task performance reflects age- and gender-related differences in executive functioning and spatial ability. Young and older adults completed a multitasking session with four monitoring tasks as well as separate tasks measuring executive functioning and spatial ability. For both age groups, men exceeded women in multitasking, measured as monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of young adults' monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability was related to sex differences. For older adults, age and executive functioning, but not spatial ability, predicted multitasking performance. These results suggest that executive functions contribute to multiple task performance across the adult life span and that reliance on spatial skills for coordinating deadlines is modulated by age.

  20. The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelle, Jonathan E; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway from the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending feedback. In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural systems supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general executive systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences: even relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive effects that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased listening effort during speech comprehension. PMID:27262177

  1. Differences in Central Corneal Thickness between Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography and Ultrasound Pachymetry in Patients with Dry Eye Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Celebi, Ali Riza Cenk; Mirza, G. Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare central corneal thickness (CCT) values via Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) and ultrasonic pachymetry in patients with severe dry eye disease (DED) to determine the level of agreement between these 2 methods. Methods. The paired samples t-test was used to compare CCT values in severe DED patients. Matching analysis between methods was performed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Intrasession reliability of the measurement methods was calcu...

  2. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the McGuire event in 1987 relating to failure of the center pole weld in one of its reactor trip breakers, activities were initiated by the NRC to investigate the probable causes. A review of operating experience suggested that the burning of coils, jamming of the operating mechanism, and deterioration of the contacts dominated the breakers failures. Although failures of the pole shaft weld were not included as one of the generic problems, the NRC augmented inspection team had suspected that these welds were substandard which led them to crack prematurely. A DS-416 low voltage air circuit breaker manufactured by Westinghouse was mechanically cycled to identify age-related degradations. This accelerated aging test was conducted for over 36,000 cycles during nine months. Three separate pole shafts, one with a 60 degree weld, one with a 120 degree and one with a 180 degree were used to characterize the cracking in the pole level welds. In addition, three different operating mechanisms and several other parts were replaced as they became inoperable. The testing yielded many useful results. The burning of the closing coils was found to be the effect of binding in the linkages that are connected to this device. Among the seven welds on the pole shaft, number-sign 1 and number-sign 3 were the critical ones which cracked first to cause misalignment of the pole levers, which, in turn, had led to many problems with the operating mechanism including the burning of coils, excessive wear in certain parts, and overstressed linkages. Based on these findings, a maintenance program is suggested to alleviate the age-related degradations that occur due to mechanical cycling of this type of breaker. 3 refs., 39 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa's ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  4. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular (VOR and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC, it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarises and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  5. Natural history of age-related lobular involution and impact on breast cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Radisky, Derek C.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Frank, Ryan D.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Winham, Stacey; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Nassar, Aziza; Vachon, Celine M.; Denison, Lori A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Degnim, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related lobular involution (LI) is a physiological process in which the terminal duct lobular units of the breast regress as a woman ages. Analyses of breast biopsies from women with benign breast disease (BBD) have found that extent of LI is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer development. Here we assess the natural course of LI within individual women, and the impact of progressive LI on breast cancer risk. The Mayo Clinic BBD cohort consists of 13,455 women with BBD fro...

  6. Lifelong expression of apolipoprotein D in the human brainstem: correlation with reduced age-related neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Navarro

    Full Text Available The lipocalin apolipoprotein D (Apo D is upregulated in peripheral nerves following injury and in regions of the central nervous system, such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, during aging and progression of certain neurological diseases. In contrast, few studies have examined Apo D expression in the brainstem, a region necessary for survival and generally less prone to age-related degeneration. We measured Apo D expression in whole human brainstem lysates by slot-blot and at higher spatial resolution by quantitative immunohistochemistry in eleven brainstem nuclei (the 4 nuclei of the vestibular nuclear complex, inferior olive, hypoglossal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and Roller`s nucleus. In contrast to cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, apolipoprotein D was highly expressed in brainstem tissue from subjects (N = 26, 32-96 years of age with no history of neurological disease, and expression showed little variation with age. Expression was significantly stronger in somatomotor nuclei (hypoglossal, oculomotor, facial than visceromotor or sensory nuclei. Both neurons and glia expressed Apo D, particularly neurons with larger somata and glia in the periphery of these brainstem centers. Immunostaining was strongest in the neuronal perinuclear region and absent in the nucleus. We propose that strong brainstem expression of Apo D throughout adult life contributes to resistance against neurodegenerative disease and age-related degeneration, possibly by preventing oxidative stress and ensuing lipid peroxidation.

  7. Cytokine profile of autologous platelet-derived eye drops in patients with ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, C G; Nuzzolo, E R; Orlando, N; Metafuni, E; Bianchi, M; Chiusolo, P; Zini, G; Teofili, L

    2016-02-01

    Ocular chronic GVHD is efficaciously treated with autologous platelet-derived eye drops. We investigated the cytokine content of eye drops produced using a non-gelified lysate obtained from autologous platelet-rich plasma in six patients with ocular GVHD. In both the responding (n = 4) and the resistant (n = 2) patients, the eye drops were significantly enriched with various growth factors, in amounts proportional with the platelet counts. In contrast, chemokine ligand and interleukin levels were similar to those of plasma. The non-responding patients showed the highest levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10. These findings provide possible explanations for beneficial or detrimental effects of eye drops. PMID:26383050

  8. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  9. Study of uncorrected refractory error, cataract and selected diseases of eye in urban and rural area near Chennai, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrof Raja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncorrected refractory error and cataract are leading causes of preventable blindness in India. Objectives: To estimate prevalence and risk factors associated with uncorrected refractory error, cataract and selected eye diseases in urban and rural area near Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in urban and rural areas near Chennai during May–August 2009. EPI 30-cluster sampling method was used and individuals in age group 5–70 years were selected with 450 subjects in both areas. Detail ophthalmic examination was done and socio-economic history for risk factors was obtained by trained interviewer. Data was analysed using SPSS version 15.0 software. To compare data sets chi-square test was used and Odds ratios calculated to assess association of risk factor. Results: 33.3% of the rural population had uncorrected refractory error as compared to 22.2% urban population (p<0.001; 24.2% rural population were having cataract compared to 13.1% urban population (p<0.001. Prevalence of pterygium and external hordeolum were 3% and 1% among total study population. Prevalence of internal hordeolum, corneal opacity and blepharitis were less than 1%. Subjects residing in rural area with low standard of living and using wood or cow-dung as cooking fuel were at significant higher risk of developing cataract (OR:2.43 and 2.88 respectively. They were also at significant higher risk of having refractory error (OR: 2.35 for low standard of living and 2.08 for wood or cow-dung as cooking fuel. Conclusion: Prevalence of uncorrected refractory error and cataract was high especially in rural area in the present study.

  10. Combined Transpupillary Thermotherapy with Subtenon Triamcinolone Injection in Treatment of Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Exudative Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naseripour

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: In spite of several treatment methods which are being used to treat exudative age-related macular degeneration (ARMD like laser therapy, Intravitreal steroids injections or anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF, no method has been yet presented as the best treatment way. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of combined transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT with subtenon triamcinolone acetonide (TA injection in treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV in patients with ARMD. Materials & Methods: In this clinical trial, 63 eyes of 57 patients with CNV secondary to exudative age-related macular degeneration (ARMD were studied. All CNVs (including 20 predominantly classic and 43 predominantly occult lesions were treated with diode laser (810nm. In 20 eyes with predominantly classic CNVs, 20 mg and 40 mg subtenon triamcinolone was injected in 12 and 8 eyes respectively. The patients were followed for a mean of 9.1 months (ranging from 5.5 to 16 months. The average number of treatment sessions was 1.25. In 43 eyes with occult CNV, 20 mg and 40 mg subtenon triamcinolone was injected in 31 eyes and in 12 eyes respectively. Mean follow up time was 12 months (4.5 to 23 months. Mean treatment times was 1.17. A variable spot size of 0.8, 1.2, 2 and 3 mm was used depending on the size of CNV and treatment was given in one area for 1 minute. Thermotherapy was adminstered through a contact lens at a power range between 120-560 mw. At the end of treatment, each patient randomly received 20 mg or 40 mg subtenon triamcinolone acetonide injection in superotemporal quadrant. Outcome was assessed with clinical and angiographic examination.collected data were analyzed by one-sample and paired –sample T test, using SPSS software. Results: At the end of the study in first group, visual acuity remained stable (0 to ± one line in 14 out of 20 (70 % of eyes, improved (> one line in 2 of 20 (10 % eyes and showed a

  11. 甲状腺相关性眼病伴眼外肌肌腱受累1例%Thyroid eye disease with tendon involvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ng Guan Fook; Dinesh Kumar; Ang Ee Ling; Liza-Sharmini

    2012-01-01

    目的:报告1例甲状腺相关性眼病的非典型CT扫描表现.方法:一位64岁的中国女性出现复视3mo,无视力模糊.14a前她曾患甲状腺功能亢进症伴多结节甲状腺肿并行甲状腺切除术.眼科检查发现双眼下斜视并向上注视受限.左眼red desaturation并Ⅰ级相对性瞳孔传入障碍.T3,T4和促甲状腺激素(thyroid stimulating hormone,TSH)正常.TSH受体、抗体水平高,与Graves病一致.磁共振成像(magnetic resonance imaging,MRI)显示双下直肌弥漫性增大,肌腱受累.结果:给予几周期静脉注射甲基强的松龙继之以口服强的松后视力无提高,反之继续下降.行左眼眼眶减压术,术后其左眼视力有所改善.结论:有肌腱受累的眼外肌增大不能排除甲状腺相关性眼眶病(thyroid assciated orbitopathy,TAO)的可能.%AIM: To report an atypical CT scan finding of thyroid eye disease.METHODS: A 64 years old Chinese lady presented with diplopia for 3 months without blurring of vision. She had been diagnosed as thyrotoxicosis with multinodular goitre 14 years back and thyroidectomy was done 14 years ago. Eye examination revealed both eye hypotropia with restricted up gaze movement. There was presence of red desaturation on her left eye with grade I relative afferent pupillary defect. Hormone profile showed normal triiodothyronine (T3), tetraiodothyronine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH). TSH receptor antibody was high which was consistent with Graves disease. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) showed diffused enlargement of both inferior rectus muscle with tendon involvement.RESULTS: Few cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone were given but left eye vision deteriorated in spite of medical treatment. Left eye orbital decompression was done and her left eye visual acuity was improved after the surgery.CONCLUSION: Extraocular muscle enlargement with tendon involvement does not exclude possibility of thyroid associated

  12. IL10-driven STAT3 signalling in senescent macrophages promotes pathological eye angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rei; Sene, Abdoulaye; Santeford, Andrea; Gdoura, Abdelaziz; Kubota, Shunsuke; Zapata, Nicole; Apte, Rajendra S

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage dysfunction plays a pivotal role during neovascular proliferation in diseases of ageing including cancers, atherosclerosis and blinding eye disease. In the eye, choroidal neovascularization (CNV) causes blindness in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here we report that increased IL10, not IL4 or IL13, in senescent eyes activates STAT3 signalling that induces the alternative activation of macrophages and vascular proliferation. Targeted inhibition of both IL10 receptor-mediated signalling and STAT3 activation in macrophages reverses the ageing phenotype. In addition, adoptive transfer of STAT3-deficient macrophages into eyes of old mice significantly reduces the amount of CNV. Systemic and CD163(+) eye macrophages obtained from AMD patients also demonstrate STAT3 activation. Our studies demonstrate that impaired SOCS3 feedback leads to permissive IL10/STAT3 signalling that promotes alternative macrophage activation and pathological neovascularization. These findings have significant implications for our understanding of the pathobiology of age-associated diseases and may guide targeted immunotherapy. PMID:26260587

  13. Models of accelerated sarcopenia: critical pieces for solving the puzzle of age-related muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W; Anton, Stephen D; Judge, Andrew R; Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E; Carter, Christy S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M

    2010-10-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, is a significant public health concern that continues to grow in relevance as the population ages. Certain conditions have the strong potential to coincide with sarcopenia to accelerate the progression of muscle atrophy in older adults. Among these conditions are co-morbid diseases common to older individuals such as cancer, kidney disease, diabetes, and peripheral artery disease. Furthermore, behaviors such as poor nutrition and physical inactivity are well-known to contribute to sarcopenia development. However, we argue that these behaviors are not inherent to the development of sarcopenia but rather accelerate its progression. In the present review, we discuss how these factors affect systemic and cellular mechanisms that contribute to skeletal muscle atrophy. In addition, we describe gaps in the literature concerning the role of these factors in accelerating sarcopenia progression. Elucidating biochemical pathways related to accelerated muscle atrophy may allow for improved discovery of therapeutic treatments related to sarcopenia.

  14. Genetic markers in biological fluids for aging-related major neurocognitive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Chavira, S A; Fernandez, T; Nicolini, H; Diaz-Cintra, S; Prado-Alcala, R A

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related major neurocognitive disorder (NCD), formerly named dementia, comprises of the different acquired diseases whose primary deficit is impairment in cognitive functions such as complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, perceptual/motor skills, and social cognition, and that are related to specific brain regions and/or networks. According to its etiology, the most common subtypes of major NCDs are due to Alzheimer' s disease (AD), vascular disease (VaD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). These pathologies are frequently present in mixed forms, i.e., AD plus VaD or AD plus LBD, thus diagnosed as due to multiple etiologies. In this paper, the definitions, criteria, pathologies, subtypes and genetic markers for the most common age-related major NCD subtypes are summarized. The current diagnostic criteria consider cognitive decline leading to major NCD or dementia as a progressive degenerative process with an underlying neuropathology that begins before the manifestation of symptoms. Biomarkers associated with this asymptomatic phase are being developed as accurate risk factor and biomarker assessments are fundamental to provide timely treatment since no treatments to prevent or cure NCD yet exist. Biological fluid assessment represents a safer, cheaper and less invasive method compared to contrast imaging studies to predict NCD appearance. Genetic factors particularly have a key role not only in predicting development of the disease but also the age of onset as well as the presentation of comorbidities that may contribute to the disease pathology and trigger synergistic mechanisms which may, in turn, accelerate the neurodegenerative process and its resultant behavioral and functional disorders. PMID:25731625

  15. Ayurvedic Drugs in Prevention and Management of Age Related Cognitive Decline: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyendra Kumar Tiwari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Age related cognitive decline is a term reserved for abnormal cognitive function less severe than dementia in person older than 50. It is considered as a prior condition to senile dementia. The term dementia signifies cognitive deterioration so severe that social and occupational functioning of an individual is markedly impaired to such an extent that he can no longer remain a fully independent and productive citizen. As the disease progresses, the personality of an individual also changes and subsequently, social withdrawal take a hold. Advanced dementia is characterized by progressive loss of personality and increasing disability to perform even a simplest task. According to World Health Organization, it is estimated that 5% of men and 6% of women of above 60 years of age affected with Alzheimer’s type of dementia worldwide. According to Alzheimer’s Disease International there are 35.6 million people living with dementia worldwide in 2010, increasing to 65.7 million by 2030 and 115.4 million by 2050. Degeneration of the cerebral neurons is one of the commonest and important causes of dementia with advancing age which leads to deterioration of quality of life in elderly. Therefore it is of prime importance to curb this progress of cognitive decline before it crosses the threshold to dementia. Ayuveda is full of evidences regarding use of single drugs or formulations in age related cognitive decline. The drugs either mentioned as Medhya rasayanas specifically or other having Medhya activity can be potentially used for prevention and management of age related cognitive decline.

  16. Dietary Curcumin Ameliorates Aging-Related Cerebrovascular Dysfunction through the AMPK/Uncoupling Protein 2 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Pu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to stroke, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases. One pathogenic mechanism underlying this effect is increased oxidative stress. Up-regulation of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 plays a crucial role in regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Dietary patterns are widely recognized as contributors to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary curcumin, which has an antioxidant effect, can improve aging-related cerebrovascular dysfunction via UCP2 up-regulation. Methods: The 24-month-old male rodents used in this study, including male Sprague Dawley (SD rats and UCP2 knockout (UCP2-/- and matched wild type mice, were given dietary curcumin (0.2%. The young control rodents were 6-month-old. Rodent cerebral artery vasorelaxation was detected by wire myograph. The AMPK/UCP2 pathway and p-eNOS in cerebrovascular and endothelial cells were observed by immunoblotting. Results: Dietary curcumin administration for one month remarkably restored the impaired cerebrovascular endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in aging SD rats. In cerebral arteries from aging SD rats and cultured endothelial cells, curcumin promoted eNOS and AMPK phosphorylation, up-regulated UCP2 and reduced ROS production. These effects of curcumin were abolished by either AMPK or UCP2 inhibition. Chronic dietary curcumin significantly reduced ROS production and improved cerebrovascular endothelium-dependent relaxation in aging wild type mice but not in aging UCP2-/- mice. Conclusions: Curcumin improves aging-related cerebrovascular dysfunction via the AMPK/UCP2 pathway.

  17. Age-related structural abnormalities in the human retina-choroid complex revealed by two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Giese, Guenter; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Yu, Jiayi; Bille, Josef F; Niemz, Markolf H

    2007-01-01

    The intensive metabolism of photoreceptors is delicately maintained by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroid. Dysfunction of either the RPE or choroid may lead to severe damage to the retina. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) from endogenous fluorophores in the human retina provides a novel opportunity to reveal age-related structural abnormalities in the retina-choroid complex prior to apparent pathological manifestations of age-related retinal diseases. In the photoreceptor layer, the regularity of the macular photoreceptor mosaic is preserved during aging. In the RPE, enlarged lipofuscin granules demonstrate significantly blue-shifted autofluorescence, which coincides with the depletion of melanin pigments. Prominent fibrillar structures in elderly Bruch's membrane and choriocapillaries represent choroidal structure and permeability alterations. Requiring neither slicing nor labeling, TPEF imaging is an elegant and highly efficient tool to delineate the thick, fragile, and opaque retina-choroid complex, and may provide clues to the trigger events of age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Age-related compaction of lens fibers affects the structure and optical properties of rabbit lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ghoul Walid M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of this investigation was to correlate particular age-related structural changes (compaction to the amount of scatter in rabbit lenses and to determine if significant fiber compaction occurred in the nuclear and inner cortical regions. Methods New Zealand White rabbits at 16–20 months old (adult; n = 10 and at 3.5–4 years old (aged; n = 10 were utilized for this study. Immediately after euthanising, scatter was assessed in fresh lenses by low power helium-neon laser scan analysis. Scatter data was analyzed both for whole lenses and regionally, to facilitate correlation with morphometric data. After functional analysis, lenses were fixed and processed for scanning electron microcopy (SEM; right eyes and light microscopy (LM; left eyes. Morphometric analysis of SEM images was utilized to evaluate compaction of nuclear fibers. Similarly, measurements from LM images were used to assess compaction of inner cortical fibers. Results Scatter was significantly greater in aged lenses as compared to adult lenses in all regions analyzed, however the difference in the mean was slightly more pronounced in the inner cortical region. The anterior and posterior elliptical angles at 1 mm (inner fetal nucleus were significantly decreased in aged vs. adult lenses (anterior, p = 0.040; posterior, p = 0.036. However, the average elliptical angles at 2.5 mm (outer fetal nucleus were not significantly different in adult and aged lenses since all lenses examined had comparable angles to inner fetal fibers of aged lenses, i.e. they were all compacted. In cortical fibers, measures of average cross-sectional fiber area were significantly different at diameters of both 6 and 7 mm as a function of age (p = 0.011 and p = 0.005, respectively. Accordingly, the estimated fiber volume was significantly decreased in aged as compared to adult lenses at both 6 mm diameter (p = 0.016 and 7 mm diameter (p = 0.010. Conclusion Morphometric data indicates

  19. Tearful relations: oxidative stress, inflammation and eye diseases Relações lacrimejantes: estresse oxidativo, inflamação e doenças oculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tais Hitomi Wakamatsu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and ability the biological systems' defense mechanisms necessary to eliminate the stress. It has been accepted that oxidative stress is involved in many acute and chronic diseases and even in normal aging. Recently, increased awareness of oxidative stress damage and its relation with ocular surface diseases incite researchers to discover possible mechanisms in the development of dry eye disease. This review focuses on the evaluation of the influence of oxidative stress on eye diseases emphasizing its relation with the pathogenesis of dry eye disease.Estresse oxidativo é causado por um desequilíbrio entre a produção de espécies reativas do oxigênio e a habilidade dos mecanismos de defesa do sistema biológico necessários para eliminar este estresse. O estresse oxidativo tem sido aceito como um fator envolvido em várias doenças agudas, crônicas e até mesmo no envelhecimento fisiológico. Recentemente, o crescente conhecimento dos danos causados pelo estresse oxidativo e a sua relação com doenças da superfície ocular estimulou pesquisadores a descobrir possíveis mecanismos no desenvolvimento da doença do olho seco. Esta revisão tem como foco a avaliação da influência do estresse oxidativo nas doenças do olho e enfatiza a sua relação com a patogênese da doença do olho seco.

  20. Do Ames dwarf and calorie-restricted mice share common effects on age-related pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ikeno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1996, aging studies using several strains of long-lived mutant mice have been conducted. Among these studies, Ames dwarf mice have been extensively examined to seek clues regarding the role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis in the aging process. Interestingly, these projects demonstrate that Ames dwarf mice have physiological characteristics that are similar to those seen with calorie restriction, which has been the most effective experimental manipulation capable of extending lifespan in various species. However, this introduces the question of whether Ames dwarf and calorie-restricted (CR mice have an extended lifespan through common or independent pathways. To answer this question, we compared the disease profiles of Ames dwarf mice to their normal siblings fed either ad libitum (AL or a CR diet. Our findings show that the changes in age-related diseases between AL-fed Ames dwarf mice and CR wild-type siblings were similar but not identical. Moreover, the effects of CR on age-related pathology showed similarities and differences between Ames dwarf mice and their normal siblings, indicating that calorie restriction and Ames dwarf mice exhibit their anti-aging effects through both independent and common mechanisms.

  1. Age relations of cardiovascular risk factors in a traditional Melanesian society: the Kitava Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeberg, S; Berntorp, E; Nilsson-Ehle, P; Terént, A; Vessby, B

    1997-10-01

    This study examined cross-sectional age relations of blood pressure, anthropometric indexes, serum lipids, and hemostatic variables in 203 subsistence horticulturists aged 20-86 y in Kitava, Trobriand Islands, Papua New Guinea. The population is characterized by extreme leanness (despite food abundance), low blood pressure, low plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity, and rarity of cardiovascular disease. Tubers, fruit, fish, and coconut are dietary staples whereas dairy products, refined fat and sugar, cereals, and alcohol are absent and salt intake is low. Although diastolic blood pressure was not associated with age in Kitavans, systolic blood pressure increased linearly after 50 y of age in both sexes. Body mass index decreased with age in both sexes. Serum total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B increased in males between 20 and 50 y of age, whereas high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I decreased. There were no significant differences in these indexes with age in the few females studied. A slight linear age-related increase of lipoprotein(a) was present in males. Plasma fibrinogen, factor VII clotting activity, factor VIII clotting activity, and von Willebrand factor antigen increased with age in both sexes but plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity did not. The modest or absent relations between the indexes measured and age are apparently important explanations of the virtual nonexistence of stroke and ischemic heart disease in Kitava.

  2. Less efficient pattern separation may contribute to age-related spatial memory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Holden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory deficits have been well documented in older adults and may serve as an early indicator of mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease in some individuals. Pattern separation is a critical mechanism for reducing potential interference among similar memory representations to enhance memory accuracy. A small but growing literature indicates that spatial pattern separation may become less efficient as a result of normal aging, possibly due to age-related changes in subregions of the hippocampus. This decreased efficiency in spatial pattern separation may be a critical processing deficit that could be a contributing factor to spatial memory deficits and episodic memory impairment associated with aging. The present paper will review recently published studies in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents that have examined age-related changes in spatial pattern separation. The potential basic science, translational, and clinical implications from these studies are discussed to illustrate the need for future research to further examine the relationship between spatial pattern separation and brain changes associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease.

  3. The theory behind the age-related positivity effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The positivity effect refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather & Carstensen, 2005 scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have failed to observe age differences in the cognitive processing of emotional material. When findings are considered in theoretical context, a reliable pattern of evidence emerges that helps to refine conceptual tenets. In this article we articulate the operational definition and theoretical foundations of the positivity effect and review the empirical evidence based on studies of visual attention, memory, decision-making, and neural activation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions with emphasis on the conditions where a focus on positive information may benefit and/or impair cognitive performance in older people.

  4. Effect of NCAM on aged-related deterioration in vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Margaret Po-Shan; LeVatte, Terry L; O'Reilly, Amanda M; Smith, Benjamin J; Tremblay, François; Brown, Richard E; Clarke, David B

    2016-05-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in developmental processes and age-associated cognitive decline; however, little is known concerning the effects of NCAM in the visual system during aging. Using anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays, we analyzed age-related changes in visual function of NCAM deficient (-/-) and wild-type mice. Anatomical analyses indicated that aging NCAM -/- mice had fewer retinal ganglion cells, thinner retinas, and fewer photoreceptor cell layers than age-matched controls. Electroretinogram testing of retinal function in young adult NCAM -/- mice showed a 2-fold increase in a- and b-wave amplitude compared with wild-type mice, but the retinal activity dropped dramatically to control levels when the animals reached 10 months. In behavioral tasks, NCAM -/- mice had no visual pattern discrimination ability and showed premature loss of vision as they aged. Together, these findings demonstrate that NCAM plays significant roles in the adult visual system in establishing normal retinal anatomy, physiology and function, and in maintaining vision during aging. PMID:27103522

  5. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J M; Bivalacqua, T J; Lagoda, G A; Burnett, A L; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 'young' (4-month-old) and 'aged' (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH(4) precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  6. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993–2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  7. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  8. Age-related hearing loss increases cross-modal distractibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Sandmann, Pascale; Bendixen, Alexandra; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-10-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have provided evidence that changes in multisensory processing in auditory cortex cannot only be observed following extensive hearing loss, but also in moderately hearing-impaired subjects. How the reduced auditory input affects audio-visual interactions is however largely unknown. Here we used a cross-modal distraction paradigm to investigate multisensory processing in elderly participants with an age-related high-frequency hearing loss as compared to young and elderly subjects with normal hearing. During the experiment, participants were simultaneously presented with independent streams of auditory and visual input and were asked to categorize either the auditory or visual information while ignoring the other modality. Unisensory sequences without any cross-modal input served as control conditions to assure that all participants were able to perform the task. While all groups performed similarly in these unisensory conditions, hearing-impaired participants showed significantly increased error rates when confronted with distracting cross-modal stimulation. This effect could be observed in both the auditory and the visual task. Supporting these findings, an additional regression analysis indicted that the degree of high-frequency hearing loss significantly modulates cross-modal visual distractibility in the auditory task. These findings provide new evidence that already a moderate sub-clinical hearing loss, a common phenomenon in the elderly population, affects the processing of audio-visual information.

  9. Age-Related Changes in Demand-Withdraw Communication Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Sarah R; Haase, Claudia M; Levenson, Robert W

    2013-08-01

    Demand-withdraw communication is a set of conflict-related behaviors in which one partner blames or pressures while the other partner withdraws or avoids. The present study examined age-related changes in these behaviors longitudinally over the course of later life stages. One hundred twenty-seven middle-aged and older long-term married couples were observed at 3 time points across 13 years as they engaged in a conversation about an area of relationship conflict. Husbands' and wives' demand-withdraw behaviors (i.e., blame, pressure, withdrawal, avoidance) were objectively rated by trained coders at each time point. Data were analyzed using dyad-level latent growth curve models in a structural equation modeling framework. For both husbands and wives, the results showed a longitudinal pattern of increasing avoidance behavior over time and stability in all other demand and withdraw behaviors. This study supports the notion that there is an important developmental shift in the way that conflict is handled in later life. PMID:23913982

  10. Age-Related Deficits in Conjunctive Representation of Complex Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, Nichole; Marrone, Diano F.

    2014-01-01

    Although some evidence is consistent with the notion that distinct cortical systems support memory and perception, mounting evidence supports a representational-hierarchical view of cognition, which posits that distinctions lie in simple feature representations versus more complex conjunctive representations of many stimulus features simultaneously. Thus, typical memory tasks engage different regions from typical perception tasks because they inherently test information on opposing ends of this continuum. Memory deficits are reliably reported with age, but the tasks used to make these conclusions predominantly rely on conjunctive representations. To test the extent to which age-related deficits may be accounted for by perceptual processing, this study investigated discriminations involving conjunctive representations in older adults. Results show that adults aged 50 to 77 are impaired, relative to their younger counterparts, on discriminations requiring feature conjunctions, but not simple feature representations. These findings support recent data showing an agerelated decline in the ability to form conjunctive representations. Furthermore, these data suggest that some ‘mnemonic’ deficits associated with age may in fact be the result of deficits in perception rather than memory. PMID:25308561

  11. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  12. The Chromospheric Activity-Age Relation for M Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, N. M.; Oswalt, T. D.; Hawley, S. L.

    2000-12-01

    We present preliminary results from our study in which we use moderate resolution spectroscopy to determine the correlation between the chromospheric activity and age of M dwarf stars in wide binary systems. We have observed ~50 M dwarf stars from our sample with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. We measure the ratio of Hα luminosity to the bolometric luminosity (LHα /Lbol) of the M dwarf---a measure of activity that is proven to correlate well with age. This project is unique in that it will extend the chromospheric activity-age relation of low-mass main sequence stars beyond the ages provided by cluster methods. The ages so determined are also independent of the uncertainties in cluster age determinations. The technique has the potential to improve by at least a factor of two the precision and the range over which ages can currently be determined for main sequence stars. Work on this project is supported by the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program grant NGT-50290 (N.M.S.).

  13. Age-related changes in skin topography and microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Mac-Mary, Sophie; Marsaut, David; Sainthillier, Jean Marie; Nouveau, Stéphanie; Gharbi, Tijani; de Lacharriere, Olivier; Humbert, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    Skin topography and microvasculature undergo characteristic changes with age. Although several non-invasive bioengineering methods are currently available to measure them quantitatively, few publications have referred to their relationship with age in different anatomical sites. This study was carried out to observe the age-related changes of the skin topography and skin microcirculation. The microrelief was assessed with special processing software from scanning by interference fringe profilometry of silicone replicas performed on two sites (volar forearm and back of hand) on 50 female volunteers (aged 20-74 years who consisted of ten probands in each decade). The superficial vascular network of both sites was assessed by videocapillaroscopy, and the subpapillary vascular plexus was studied with laser Doppler flowmetry. Skin color, which is affected by blood flow, was observed by colorimeter. The skin roughness and the mean height between peak and valley increased with age. There were statistically significant differences between the evaluated sites. This study also shows that the capillary loops in the dermal papillae decrease but the subpapillary plexus increase with age. The interference fringe profilometry associated with videocapillaroscopy may be useful and accurate to measure the efficacy of medical or cosmetic products to delay skin aging.

  14. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993-2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic's structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  15. Age-related cerebral white matter changes on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of cerebral white matter on computed cranial tomography related to aging were studied in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and no abnormalities in the central nervous system were shown by physical examinations and CT scans. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39cm2) in the bilateral thalamus and twelve areas of deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. We also studied the association between brain CT numbers and brain atrophy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus. CT numbers of frontal white matter surrounding anterior horns decreased with aging in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. No significant correlation between age and brain CT numbers was found in any other region by multivariate analysis, because of the prominent effect of cranial bone CT numbers on brain CT numbers. Although no age-related changes of white matter CT numbers was found in 41 subjects aged 30 to 65 years, there were significant negative correlations between age and white matter CT numbers at all regions in 29 subjects aged 66 to 94 years. Brain atrophy was associated with brain CT numbers. No association was found for hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Brain CT numbers decreased with aging even in neurologically healthy persons in older age. Brain CT numbers also decreased as cerebral atrophy advanced. (author)

  16. Age-related cerebral white matter changes on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shotai; Koide, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Shimote, Kouichi; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1989-01-01

    Changes of cerebral white matter on computed cranial tomography related to aging were studied in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and no abnormalities in the central nervous system were shown by physical examinations and CT scans. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39cm/sup 2/) in the bilateral thalamus and twelve areas of deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. We also studied the association between brain CT numbers and brain atrophy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus. CT numbers of frontal white matter surrounding anterior horns decreased with aging in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. No significant correlation between age and brain CT numbers was found in any other region by multivariate analysis, because of the prominent effect of cranial bone CT numbers on brain CT numbers. Although no age-related changes of white matter CT numbers was found in 41 subjects aged 30 to 65 years, there were significant negative correlations between age and white matter CT numbers at all regions in 29 subjects aged 66 to 94 years. Brain atrophy was associated with brain CT numbers. No association was found for hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Brain CT numbers decreased with aging even in neurologically healthy persons in older age. Brain CT numbers also decreased as cerebral atrophy advanced. (author).

  17. Preventing Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  18. Current research of the relationship between arsenic and eye disease%砷与眼科疾病关系的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建国

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally,arsenic is thought to be a strong toxicant,especially arsenic trioxide (As2O3 ).As2O3 leads to the damage of ocular surface,such as cornea,conjunctiva etc.,and the evidence of its damage to retinal function also has been found.However,arsenic is a double-edged sword,because it possesses well- remedial effect on some eye diseases,including proliferative diabetic retinopathy,lens posterior capsular opaciffcation,keratopathy,meIanoma and bleb scarring.At present,there is still few research literature was seen about the active mechanism of arsenic agents on eye damage or therapeutic effect.Some relative studies are still in an experimental stage.This offers us the new research direction in clinical treatment of eye diseases.It is believed that arsenic will play an incalculable role on experiment and clinical treatment of eye diseases as further development and research of technology.The relationship between arsenic and eye disease is summed by consulting internal and external literature.%传统的认识认为砷是一种剧毒物质,尤其是As2O3,不仅能导致眼表的损害,还可影响视网膜的功能.随着研究的深入,目前认为砷是一把双刃剑,其对眼部疾病亦可发挥治疗作用,如砷类制剂对视网膜病变、后发性白内障、角膜病变、黑色素瘤、滤过泡瘢痕化等的治疗效果较好.总的来说,砷对眼部的损伤作用以及对眼病治疗作用的机制研究均较少,多数研究仍处于实验阶段,但这些研究为一些眼科疾病的临床治疗提供了新的研究方向,砷与眼部疾病的实验与临床研究结果正在引起更多的关注.就砷对眼部疾病的损伤和治疗作用进行综述.

  19. Advocacy for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  20. Age Related Bioenergetics Profiles in Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes Using Extracellular Flux Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy S Mdaki

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized and studied as a mediator of heart disease. Extracellular flux analysis (XF has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate cellular bioenergetics in the context of cardiac health and disease, however its use and interpretation requires improved understanding of the normal metabolic differences in cardiomyocytes (CM at various stages of maturation. This study standardized XF analyses methods (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test and palmitate oxidation test and established age related differences in bioenergetics profiles of healthy CMs at newborn (NB1, weaning (3WK, adult (10WK and aged (12-18MO time points. Findings show that immature CMs demonstrate a more robust and sustained glycolytic capacity and a relative inability to oxidize fatty acids when compared to older CMs. The study also highlights the need to recognize the contribution of CO2 from the Krebs cycle as well as lactate from anaerobic glycolysis to the proton production rate before interpreting glycolytic capacity in CMs. Overall, this study demonstrates that caution should be taken to assure that translatable developmental time points are used to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of cardiac disease. Specifically, XF analysis of newborn CMs should be reserved to study fetal/neonatal disease and older CMs (≥10 weeks should be used to investigate adult disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained will aid in improved investigation of developmentally programmed heart disease and stress the importance of discerning maturational differences in bioenergetics when developing mitochondrial targeted preventative and therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.