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Sample records for agamous lineage genes

  1. Functional diversification of AGAMOUS lineage genes in regulating tomato flower and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Irvin L; McQuinn, Ryan; Giovannoni, James J; Irish, Vivian F

    2010-06-01

    AGAMOUS clade genes encode MADS box transcription factors that have been shown to play critical roles in many aspects of flower and fruit development in angiosperms. Tomato possesses two representatives of this lineage, TOMATO AGAMOUS (TAG1) and TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 (TAGL1), allowing for an analysis of diversification of function after gene duplication. Using RNAi (RNA interference) silencing, transgenic tomato lines that specifically down-regulate either TAGL1 or TAG1 transcript accumulation have been produced. TAGL1 RNAi lines show no defects in stamen or carpel identity, but show defects in fruit ripening. In contrast TAG1 RNAi lines show defects in stamen and carpel development. In addition TAG1 RNAi lines produce red ripe fruit, although they are defective in determinacy and produce ectopic internal fruit structures. e2814, an EMS- (ethyl methane sulphonate) induced mutation that is temperature sensitive and produces fruit phenotypes similar to that of TAG1 RNAi lines, was also characterized. Neither TAG1 nor TAGL1 expression is disrupted in the e2814 mutant, suggesting that the gene corresponding to the e2814 mutant represents a distinct locus that is likely to be functionally downstream of TAG1 and TAGL1. Based on these analyses, possible modes by which these gene duplicates have diversified in terms of their functions and regulatory roles are discussed.

  2. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 Novel U A UNKNOWN LCN2_LACLA 2e-08 21% ref|NP_241318.1| lantibiotic mersa...cidin modifying enzyme [Bacillus halodurans C-125] dbj|BAB04171.1| lantibiotic mersacidin modifying

  3. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  4. [Advances in lineage-specific genes].

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    Huanping, Zhang; Tongming, Yin

    2015-06-01

    Lineage-specific genes (LSGs) are defined as genes found in one particular taxonomic group but have no significant sequence similarity with genes from other lineages, which compose about 10%?20% of the total genes in the genome of a focal organism. LSGs were first uncovered in the yeast genome in 1996. The development of the whole genome sequencing leads to the emergence of studies on LSGs as a hot topic in comparative genomics. LSGs have been extensively studied on microbial species, lower marine organisms, plant (such as Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Populus), insects, primate, etc; the biological functions of LSGs are important to clarify the evolution and adaptability of a species. In this review, we summarize the progress of LSGs studies, including LSGs identification, gene characterization, origin and evolution of LSGs, biological function, and expression analysis of LSGs. In addition, we discuss the existing problems and future directions for studies in this area. Our purpose is to provide some unique insights into the researches of LSGs.

  5. Role for the banana AGAMOUS-like gene MaMADS7 in regulation of fruit ripening and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juhua; Liu, Lin; Li, Yujia; Jia, Caihong; Zhang, Jianbin; Miao, Hongxia; Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-11-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important roles in organ development. In plants, most studies on MADS-box genes have mainly focused on flower development and only a few concerned fruit development and ripening. A new MADS-box gene named MaMADS7 was isolated from banana fruit by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) based on a MADS-box fragment obtained from a banana suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. MaMADS7 is an AGAMOUS-like MADS-box gene that is preferentially expressed in the ovaries and fruits and in tobacco its protein product localizes to the nucleus. This study found that MaMADS7 expression can be induced by exogenous ethylene. Ectopic expression of MaMADS7 in tomato resulted in broad ripening phenotypes. The expression levels of seven ripening and quality-related genes, ACO1, ACS2, E4, E8, PG, CNR and PSY1 in MaMADS7 transgenic tomato fruits were greatly increased while the expression of the AG-like MADS-box gene TAGL1 was suppressed. Compared with the control, the contents of β-carotene, lycopene, ascorbic acid and organic acid in transformed tomato fruits were increased, while the contents of glucose and fructose were slightly decreased. MaMADS7 interacted with banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene 1 (MaACO1) and tomato phytoene synthase gene (LePSY1) promoters. Our results indicated that MaMADS7 plays an important role in initiating endogenous ethylene biosynthesis and fruit ripening.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Mouse Otic Sensory Lineage Genes

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    Byron H. Hartman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate embryogenesis gives rise to all cell types of an organism through the development of many unique lineages derived from the three primordial germ layers. The otic sensory lineage arises from the otic vesicle, a structure formed through invagination of placodal non-neural ectoderm. This developmental lineage possesses unique differentiation potential, giving rise to otic sensory cell populations including hair cells, supporting cells, and ganglion neurons of the auditory and vestibular organs. Here we present a systematic approach to identify transcriptional features that distinguish the otic sensory lineage (from early otic progenitors to otic sensory populations from other major lineages of vertebrate development. We used a microarray approach to analyze otic sensory lineage populations including microdissected otic vesicles (embryonic day 10.5 as well as isolated neonatal cochlear hair cells and supporting cells at postnatal day 3. Non-otic tissue samples including periotic tissues and whole embryos with otic regions removed were used as reference populations to evaluate otic specificity. Otic populations shared transcriptome-wide correlations in expression profiles that distinguish members of this lineage from non-otic populations. We further analyzed the microarray data using comparative and dimension reduction methods to identify individual genes that are specifically expressed in the otic sensory lineage. This analysis identified and ranked top otic sensory lineage-specific transcripts including Fbxo2, Col9a2, and Oc90, and additional novel otic lineage markers. To validate these results we performed expression analysis on select genes using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Fbxo2 showed the most striking pattern of specificity to the otic sensory lineage, including robust expression in the early otic vesicle and sustained expression in prosensory progenitors and auditory and vestibular hair cells and supporting

  7. Gene pair signatures in cell type transcriptomes reveal lineage control

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    Heinäniemi, Merja; Nykter, Matti; Kramer, Roger; Wienecke-Baldacchino, Anke; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Zhou, Joseph Xu; Kreisberg, Richard; Kauffman, Stuart A.; Huang, Sui; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    The distinct cell types of multicellular organisms arise due to constraints imposed by gene regulatory networks on the collective change of gene expression across the genome, creating self-stabilizing expression states, or attractors. We compiled a resource of curated human expression data comprising 166 cell types and 2,602 transcription regulating genes and developed a data driven method built around the concept of expression reversal defined at the level of gene pairs, such as those participating in toggle switch circuits. This approach allows us to organize the cell types into their ontogenetic lineage-relationships and to reflect regulatory relationships among genes that explain their ability to function as determinants of cell fate. We show that this method identifies genes belonging to regulatory circuits that control neuronal fate, pluripotency and blood cell differentiation, thus offering a novel large-scale perspective on lineage specification. PMID:23603899

  8. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

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    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  9. Transcriptional Activity of the MADS Box ARLEQUIN/TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 Gene Is Required for Cuticle Development of Tomato Fruit.

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    Giménez, Estela; Dominguez, Eva; Pineda, Benito; Heredia, Antonio; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael; Angosto, Trinidad

    2015-07-01

    Fruit development and ripening entail key biological and agronomic events, which ensure the appropriate formation and dispersal of seeds and determine productivity and yield quality traits. The MADS box gene Arlequin/tomato Agamous-like1 (hereafter referred to as TAGL1) was reported as a key regulator of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) reproductive development, mainly involved in flower development, early fruit development, and ripening. It is shown here that silencing of the TAGL1 gene (RNA interference lines) promotes significant changes affecting cuticle development, mainly a reduction of thickness and stiffness, as well as a significant decrease in the content of cuticle components (cutin, waxes, polysaccharides, and phenolic compounds). Accordingly, overexpression of TAGL1 significantly increased the amount of cuticle and most of its components while rendering a mechanically weak cuticle. Expression of the genes involved in cuticle biosynthesis agreed with the biochemical and biomechanical features of cuticles isolated from transgenic fruits; it also indicated that TAGL1 participates in the transcriptional control of cuticle development mediating the biosynthesis of cuticle components. Furthermore, cell morphology and the arrangement of epidermal cell layers, on whose activity cuticle formation depends, were altered when TAGL1 was either silenced or constitutively expressed, indicating that this transcription factor regulates cuticle development, probably through the biosynthetic activity of epidermal cells. Our results also support cuticle development as an integrated event in the fruit expansion and ripening processes that characterize fleshy-fruited species such as tomato.

  10. Heritable and lineage-specific gene knockdown in zebrafish embryo.

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    Mei Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reduced expression of developmentally important genes and tumor suppressors due to haploinsufficiency or epigenetic suppression has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of various malignancies. However, methodology that allows spatio-temporally knockdown of gene expression in various model organisms such as zebrafish has not been well established, which largely limits the potential of zebrafish as a vertebrate model of human malignant disorders. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here, we report that multiple copies of small hairpin RNA (shRNA are expressed from a single transcript that mimics the natural microRNA-30e precursor (mir-shRNA. The mir-shRNA, when microinjected into zebrafish embryos, induced an efficient knockdown of two developmentally essential genes chordin and alpha-catenin in a dose-controllable fashion. Furthermore, we designed a novel cassette vector to simultaneously express an intronic mir-shRNA and a chimeric red fluorescent protein driven by lineage-specific promoter, which efficiently reduced the expression of a chromosomally integrated reporter gene and an endogenously expressed gata-1 gene in the developing erythroid progenitors and hemangioblasts, respectively. SIGNIFICANCE: This methodology provides an invaluable tool to knockdown developmental important genes in a tissue-specific manner or to establish animal models, in which the gene dosage is critically important in the pathogenesis of human disorders. The strategy should be also applicable to other model organisms.

  11. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

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    O'Halloran Damien M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylyl cyclases (GCs are responsible for the production of the secondary messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which plays important roles in a variety of physiological responses such as vision, olfaction, muscle contraction, homeostatic regulation, cardiovascular and nervous function. There are two types of GCs in animals, soluble (sGCs which are found ubiquitously in cell cytoplasm, and receptor (rGC forms which span cell membranes. The complete genomes of several vertebrate and invertebrate species are now available. These data provide a platform to investigate the evolution of GCs across a diverse range of animal phyla. Results In this analysis we located GC genes from a broad spectrum of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and reconstructed molecular phylogenies for both sGC and rGC proteins. The most notable features of the resulting phylogenies are the number of lineage specific rGC and sGC expansions that have occurred during metazoan evolution. Among these expansions is a large nematode specific rGC clade comprising 21 genes in C. elegans alone; a vertebrate specific expansion in the natriuretic receptors GC-A and GC-B; a vertebrate specific expansion in the guanylyl GC-C receptors, an echinoderm specific expansion in the sperm rGC genes and a nematode specific sGC clade. Our phylogenetic reconstruction also shows the existence of a basal group of nitric oxide (NO insensitive insect and nematode sGCs which are regulated by O2. This suggests that the primordial eukaryotes probably utilized sGC as an O2 sensor, with the ligand specificity of sGC later switching to NO which provides a very effective local cell-to-cell signalling system. Phylogenetic analysis of the sGC and bacterial heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding protein domain supports the hypothesis that this domain originated from a cyanobacterial source. Conclusion The most salient feature of our phylogenies is the number of lineage specific expansions

  12. Expression and function of Dlx genes in the osteoblast lineage.

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    Li, Haitao; Marijanovic, Inga; Kronenberg, Mark S; Erceg, Ivana; Stover, Mary Louise; Velonis, Dimitrios; Mina, Mina; Heinrich, Jelica Gluhak; Harris, Stephen E; Upholt, William B; Kalajzic, Ivo; Lichtler, Alexander C

    2008-04-15

    Our laboratory and others have shown that overexpression of Dlx5 stimulates osteoblast differentiation. Dlx5(-/-)/Dlx6(-/-) mice have more severe craniofacial and limb defects than Dlx5(-/-), some of which are potentially due to defects in osteoblast maturation. We wished to investigate the degree to which other Dlx genes compensate for the lack of Dlx5, thus allowing normal development of the majority of skeletal elements in Dlx5(-/-) mice. Dlx gene expression in cells from different stages of the osteoblast lineage isolated by FACS sorting showed that Dlx2, Dlx5 and Dlx6 are expressed most strongly in less mature osteoblasts, whereas Dlx3 is very highly expressed in differentiated osteoblasts and osteocytes. In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of endogenous Dlx3 mRNA within osteoblasts and osteocytes. Dlx3 strongly upregulates osteoblastic markers with a potency comparable to Dlx5. Cloned chick or mouse Dlx6 showed stimulatory effects on osteoblast differentiation. Our results suggest that Dlx2 and Dlx6 have the potential to stimulate osteoblastic differentiation and may compensate for the absence of Dlx5 to produce relatively normal osteoblastic differentiation in Dlx5 knockout mice, while Dlx3 may play a distinct role in late stage osteoblast differentiation and osteocyte function.

  13. Consistent and contrasting properties of lineage-specific genes in the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium and Theileria

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    Kissinger Jessica C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lineage-specific genes, the genes that are restricted to a limited subset of related organisms, may be important in adaptation. In parasitic organisms, lineage-specific gene products are possible targets for vaccine development or therapeutics when these genes are absent from the host genome. Results In this study, we utilized comparative approaches based on a phylogenetic framework to characterize lineage-specific genes in the parasitic protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. Genes from species in two major apicomplexan genera, Plasmodium and Theileria, were categorized into six levels of lineage specificity based on a nine-species phylogeny. In both genera, lineage-specific genes tend to have a higher level of sequence divergence among sister species. In addition, species-specific genes possess a strong codon usage bias compared to other genes in the genome. We found that a large number of genus- or species-specific genes are putative surface antigens that may be involved in host-parasite interactions. Interestingly, the two parasite lineages exhibit several notable differences. In Plasmodium, the (G + C content at the third codon position increases with lineage specificity while Theileria shows the opposite trend. Surface antigens in Plasmodium are species-specific and mainly located in sub-telomeric regions. In contrast, surface antigens in Theileria are conserved at the genus level and distributed across the entire lengths of chromosomes. Conclusion Our results provide further support for the model that gene duplication followed by rapid divergence is a major mechanism for generating lineage-specific genes. The result that many lineage-specific genes are putative surface antigens supports the hypothesis that lineage-specific genes could be important in parasite adaptation. The contrasting properties between the lineage-specific genes in two major apicomplexan genera indicate that the mechanisms of generating lineage-specific genes

  14. Isolation and characterization of an AGAMOUS homologue from cocoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaidamsari, T.; Sugiarit, H.; Santoso, D.; Angenent, G.C.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2006-01-01

    We report the cloning of a cDNA from TcAG, an AG (Arabidopsis thaliana MADS-box C-type transcription factor gene AGAMOUS) homologue from cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). TcAG was in the cocoa flower expressed primarily in stamens and ovaries, comparable to AG in Arabidopsis. Additionally, we found that T

  15. Sequencing of Sylvilagus VDJ genes reveals a new VHa allelic lineage and shows that ancient VH lineages were retained differently in leporids.

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    Pinheiro, Ana; Melo-Ferreira, José; Abrantes, Joana; Martinelli, Nicola; Lavazza, Antonio; Alves, Paulo C; Gortázar, Christian; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-12-01

    Antigen recognition by immunoglobulins depends upon initial rearrangements of heavy chain V, D, and J genes. In leporids, a unique system exists for the VH genes usage that exhibit highly divergent lineages: the VHa allotypes, the Lepus sL lineage and the VHn genes. For the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), four VHa lineages have been described, the a1, a2, a3 and a4. For hares (Lepus sp.), one VHa lineage was described, the a2L, as well as a more ancient sL lineage. Both genera use the VHn genes in a low frequency of their VDJ rearrangements. To address the hypothesis that the VH specificities could be associated with different environments, we sequenced VDJ genes from a third leporid genus, Sylvilagus. We found a fifth and equally divergent VHa lineage, the a5, and an ancient lineage, the sS, related to the hares' sL, but failed to obtain VHn genes. These results show that the studied leporids employ different VH lineages in the generation of the antibody repertoire, suggesting that the leporid VH genes are subject to strong selective pressure likely imposed by specific pathogens.

  16. Isolation and characterization of the AGAMOUS homologous gene NTAG in Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. Chinensis Roem)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zheng-ke; Gao Jian; Li Lu-bin; Peng Zhen-hua

    2006-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae, a monocot plant family, consists of many important ornamental bulb flower species. Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis Roem), its flowers developed at high temperatures and bloomed at lower temperatures during the Chinese Spring Festival, is a traditional Chinese flower with high economic and ornamental value. To study its flower development,a full length cDNA containing MADS box domain from narcissus was isolated by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate oligo-nucleotide primers derived from a conserved MADS- and K-box domain sequence. The 5' and the 3'regions of the gene were amplified using the PCR protocol for the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The 690 bp open reading frame encodes 230 amino acid residues. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of NTAG with the sequence of other MADS box proteins showed 91.3% amino acid identities with HAG (Hyacinthus orientalis). Sequence analysis and alignment showed significant similarity with other AG homologues. RNA blot analysis indicated that the narcissus NTAG gene was expressed only in reproductive organs, especially in stamens and carpels. These results indicated that the NTAG gene was an AG homologue and that the AG genes appeared to be structurally and functionally conserved between dicots and monocots.

  17. LCGbase: A Comprehensive Database for Lineage-Based Co-regulated Genes.

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    Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Yubin; Fan, Zhonghua; Liu, Guiming; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Animal genes of different lineages, such as vertebrates and arthropods, are well-organized and blended into dynamic chromosomal structures that represent a primary regulatory mechanism for body development and cellular differentiation. The majority of genes in a genome are actually clustered, which are evolutionarily stable to different extents and biologically meaningful when evaluated among genomes within and across lineages. Until now, many questions concerning gene organization, such as what is the minimal number of genes in a cluster and what is the driving force leading to gene co-regulation, remain to be addressed. Here, we provide a user-friendly database-LCGbase (a comprehensive database for lineage-based co-regulated genes)-hosting information on evolutionary dynamics of gene clustering and ordering within animal kingdoms in two different lineages: vertebrates and arthropods. The database is constructed on a web-based Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP framework and effective interactive user-inquiry service. Compared to other gene annotation databases with similar purposes, our database has three comprehensible advantages. First, our database is inclusive, including all high-quality genome assemblies of vertebrates and representative arthropod species. Second, it is human-centric since we map all gene clusters from other genomes in an order of lineage-ranks (such as primates, mammals, warm-blooded, and reptiles) onto human genome and start the database from well-defined gene pairs (a minimal cluster where the two adjacent genes are oriented as co-directional, convergent, and divergent pairs) to large gene clusters. Furthermore, users can search for any adjacent genes and their detailed annotations. Third, the database provides flexible parameter definitions, such as the distance of transcription start sites between two adjacent genes, which is extendable to genes that flanking the cluster across species. We also provide useful tools for sequence alignment, gene

  18. Heritable and Lineage-Specific Gene Knockdown in Zebrafish Embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Mei; Fu, Yan-Fang; Du, Ting-Ting; Jing, Chang-Bin; Fu, Chun-Tang; Chen, Yi; Jin, Yi; Deng, Min; Liu, Ting Xi

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reduced expression of developmentally important genes and tumor suppressors due to haploinsufficiency or epigenetic suppression has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of various malignancies. However, methodology that allows spatio-temporally knockdown of gene expression in var

  19. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-05-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0001 ATATCGCTGCACAATcaccaccatcaccatcaccaccatcatcatcaccacAGCTACCATGGGGC...GCCGGGCAGTGGCGCCCCCTCCcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaccagGCGTCCCAGCAGACGTCGGGCGGCCGGCACCACCACCACCACCAGGGCAGCAGCCG

  20. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 ATTCGACTTCAGCTCGAGGAGGAAAAGGTTTCGATTCGATCTGTGACCGATGCACGGATCAagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcag...catcagcagcatcagcagcatcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagctgcagcagcag...catcagctgcagcagcatcatcagcatcatcagcatcatcagcatcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcatcagcatcagcatcagcatcagcatcagcaacagcaCAAGCAGAAACAGTGTACGATAGCA ...

  1. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-07-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0076 caacagaaccaacagcttcagcagcagcagctgcaacagaaactacagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaacagaaccgacagcttcag...cagcagcagctgcaacagaaactgcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagctgcagcagcagcag...cagcggcagcagcagcagcagcagcaacagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaAAGCCTACA ...

  2. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 CCCCCAcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcag...cagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaacaccagcagcagcggcagcgcctgccgcagcgacagcagcagcagcaacaacaccagTAGCGGCCATATGCTACACAGGCGCAGCGCCGTGA ...

  3. Lineage-Specific Expansion of the Chalcone Synthase Gene Family in Rosids.

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    Kattina Zavala

    Full Text Available Rosids are a monophyletic group that includes approximately 70,000 species in 140 families, and they are found in a variety of habitats and life forms. Many important crops such as fruit trees and legumes are rosids. The evolutionary success of this group may have been influenced by their ability to produce flavonoids, secondary metabolites that are synthetized through a branch of the phenylpropanoid pathway where chalcone synthase is a key enzyme. In this work, we studied the evolution of the chalcone synthase gene family in 12 species belonging to the rosid clade. Our results show that the last common ancestor of the rosid clade possessed six chalcone synthase gene lineages that were differentially retained during the evolutionary history of the group. In fact, of the six gene lineages that were present in the last common ancestor, 7 species retained 2 of them, whereas the other 5 only retained one gene lineage. We also show that one of the gene lineages was disproportionately expanded in species that belonged to the order Fabales (soybean, barrel medic and Lotus japonicas. Based on the available literature, we suggest that this gene lineage possesses stress-related biological functions (e.g., response to UV light, pathogen defense. We propose that the observed expansion of this clade was a result of a selective pressure to increase the amount of enzymes involved in the production of phenylpropanoid pathway-derived secondary metabolites, which is consistent with the hypothesis that suggested that lineage-specific expansions fuel plant adaptation.

  4. Evolutionary history of the reprimo tumor suppressor gene family in vertebrates with a description of a new reprimo gene lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Ignacio A; Zavala, Kattina; Hoffmann, Federico G; Vandewege, Michael W; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Amigo, Julio D; Owen, Gareth I; Opazo, Juan C

    2016-10-10

    Genes related to human diseases should be natural targets for evolutionary studies, since they could provide clues regarding the genetic bases of pathologies and potential treatments. Here we studied the evolution of the reprimo gene family, a group of tumor-suppressor genes that are implicated in p53-mediated cell cycle arrest. These genes, especially the reprimo duplicate located on human chromosome 2, have been associated with epigenetic modifications correlated with transcriptional silencing and cancer progression. We demonstrate the presence of a third reprimo lineage that, together with the reprimo and reprimo-like genes, appears to have been differentially retained during the evolutionary history of vertebrates. We present evidence that these reprimo lineages originated early in vertebrate evolution and expanded as a result of the two rounds of whole genome duplications that occurred in the last common ancestor of vertebrates. The reprimo gene has been lost in birds, and the third reprimo gene lineage has been retained in only a few distantly related species, such as coelacanth and gar. Expression analyses revealed that the reprimo paralogs are mainly expressed in the nervous system. Different vertebrate lineages have retained different reprimo paralogs, and even in species that have retained multiple copies, only one of them is heavily expressed.

  5. A six nuclear gene phylogeny of Citrus (Rutaceae taking into account hybridization and lineage sorting.

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    Chandrika Ramadugu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genus Citrus (Rutaceae comprises many important cultivated species that generally hybridize easily. Phylogenetic study of a group showing extensive hybridization is challenging. Since the genus Citrus has diverged recently (4-12 Ma, incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphisms is also likely to cause discrepancies among genes in phylogenetic inferences. Incongruence of gene trees is observed and it is essential to unravel the processes that cause inconsistencies in order to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the species. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 We generated phylogenetic trees using haplotype sequences of six low copy nuclear genes. (2 Published simple sequence repeat data were re-analyzed to study population structure and the results were compared with the phylogenetic trees constructed using sequence data and coalescence simulations. (3 To distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting, we developed and utilized a coalescence simulation approach. In other studies, species trees have been inferred despite the possibility of hybridization having occurred and used to generate null distributions of the effect of lineage sorting alone (by coalescent simulation. Since this is problematic, we instead generate these distributions directly from observed gene trees. Of the six trees generated, we used the most resolved three to detect hybrids. We found that 11 of 33 samples appear to be affected by historical hybridization. Analysis of the remaining three genes supported the conclusions from the hybrid detection test. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified or confirmed probable hybrid origins for several Citrus cultivars using three different approaches-gene phylogenies, population structure analysis and coalescence simulation. Hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting were identified primarily based on differences among gene phylogenies with reference to null expectations via coalescence

  6. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kun; Huang, Beibei; Zou, Ming; Lu, Dandan; He, Shunping; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid growth of sequencing technology, a number of genomes and transcriptomes of various species have been sequenced, contributing to the study of lineage-specific genes (LSGs). We identified two sets of LSGs using BLAST: one included Caenorhabditis elegans species-specific genes (1423, SSGs), and the other consisted of Caenorhabditis genus-specific genes (4539, GSGs). The subsequent characterization and analysis of the SSGs and GSGs showed that they have significant differences in evolution and that most LSGs were generated by gene duplication and integration of transposable elements (TEs). We then performed temporal expression profiling and protein function prediction and observed that many SSGs and GSGs are expressed and that genes involved with sex determination, specific stress, immune response, and morphogenesis are over-represented, suggesting that these specific genes may be related to the Caenorhabditis nematodes' special ability to survive in severe and extreme environments.

  7. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya, E-mail: sathiyapandi@gmail.com; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  8. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  9. Molecular phylogenetic lineage of Plagiopogon and Askenasia (Protozoa, Ciliophora) revealed by their gene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An; Yi, Zhenzhen; Lin, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xiaozhong; Al-Farraj, Saleh A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.

    2015-08-01

    Prostomates and haptorians are two basal groups of ciliates with limited morphological characteristics available for taxonomy. Morphologically, the structures used to identify prostomates and haptorians are similar or even identical, which generate heavy taxonomic and phylogenetic confusion. In present work, phylogenetic positions lineage of two rare genera, Plagiopogon and Askenasia, were investigated. Three genes including small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (hereafter SSU rDNA), internal transcribed spacer region (ITS region), and large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA) were analyzed, 10 new sequences five species each. Our findings included 1) class Prostomatea and order Haptorida are multiphyletic; 2) it may not be appropriate to place order Cyclotrichiida in subclass Haptoria, and the systematic lineage of order Cyclotrichiida needs to be verified further; 3) genus Plagiopogon branches consistently within a clade covering most prostomes and is basal of clade Colepidae, implying its close lineage to Prostomatea; and 4) Askenasia is phylogenetically distant from the subclass Haptoria but close to classes Prostomatea, Plagiopylea and Oligohymenophorea. We supposed that the toxicyst of Askenasia may be close to taxa of prostomes instead of haptorians, and the dorsal brush is a more typical morphological characteristics of haptorians than toxicysts.

  10. Widespread Discordance of Gene Trees with Species Tree inDrosophila: Evidence for Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Moses, Alan M.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-28

    The phylogenetic relationship of the now fully sequencedspecies Drosophila erecta and D. yakuba with respect to the D.melanogaster species complex has been a subject of controversy. All threepossible groupings of the species have been reported in the past, thoughrecent multi-gene studies suggest that D. erecta and D. yakuba are sisterspecies. Using the whole genomes of each of these species as well as thefour other fully sequenced species in the subgenus Sophophora, we set outto investigate the placement of D. erecta and D. yakuba in the D.melanogaster species group and to understand the cause of the pastincongruence. Though we find that the phylogeny grouping D. erecta and D.yakuba together is the best supported, we also find widespreadincongruence in nucleotide and amino acid substitutions, insertions anddeletions, and gene trees. The time inferred to span the two keyspeciation events is short enough that under the coalescent model, theincongruence could be the result of incomplete lineage sorting.Consistent with the lineage-sorting hypothesis, substitutions supportingthe same tree were spatially clustered. Support for the different treeswas found to be linked to recombination such that adjacent genes supportthe same tree most often in regions of low recombination andsubstitutions supporting the same tree are most enriched roughly on thesame scale as linkage disequilibrium, also consistent with lineagesorting. The incongruence was found to be statistically significant androbust to model and species choice. No systematic biases were found. Weconclude that phylogenetic incongruence in the D. melanogaster speciescomplex is the result, at least in part, of incomplete lineage sorting.Incomplete lineage sorting will likely cause phylogenetic incongruence inmany comparative genomics datasets. Methods to infer the correct speciestree, the history of every base in the genome, and comparative methodsthat control for and/or utilize this information will be

  11. Data in support of genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two sets of LSGs were identified using BLAST: Caenorhabditis elegans species-specific genes (SSGs, 1423, and Caenorhabditis genus-specific genes (GSGs, 4539. The data contained in this article show SSGs and GSGs have significant differences in evolution and that most of them were formed by gene duplication and integration of transposable elements (TEs. Subsequent observation of temporal expression and protein function presents that many SSGs and GSGs are expressed and that genes involved with sex determination, specific stress, immune response, and morphogenesis are most represented. The data are related to research article “Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans” in Journal of Genomics [1].

  12. Cytochrome b gene haplotypes characterize chromosomal lineages of anoa, the Sulawesi dwarf buffalo (Bovidae: Bubalus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, A; Seibold, I; Nötzold, G; Wink, M

    1999-01-01

    Partial mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences reveal two deeply differentiated mtDNA lineages in anoa dwarf buffaloes (Bubalus depressicornis) from the studbook herd in European zoos. Three matrilinear lineages of lowland anoas (depressicornis type) contributed three rather similar sequence haplotypes, but one remarkably distinct haplotype was observed exclusively in mountain anoas (quarlesi type) descended from one founder female. The carriers of the distinctive mtDNA haplotype were also distinguished by several chromosomal and phenotypic peculiarities too. The differentiation between the mtDNA lineages of anoa approached or even surpassed the genetic divergence between some uncontested species of wild cattle. The depth of this haplotype divergence in anoas is discussed against the background of the phylogenetic age of these paleoendemic inhabitants of a predator-free island refugium, Sulawesi, who are among the most plesiomorphic living bovines. The studbook breeding of captive anoas as a safeguard against extinction might profit from such population genetic markers. These cytochrome b gene sequences were unable to resolve the phylogeny of nine bovine taxa robustly, except the divergence of Bubalus, Synceros, Bison, and Bos (sensu lato) genera.

  13. E2F4 modulates differentiation and gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells during commitment to the lymphoid lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enos, Megan E; Bancos, Simona A; Bushnell, Timothy; Crispe, Ian N

    2008-03-15

    The E2F4 protein is involved in gene repression and cell cycle exit, and also has poorly understood effects in differentiation. We analyzed the impact of E2F4 deficiency on early steps in mouse hematopoietic development, and found defects in early hematopoietic progenitor cells that were propagated through common lymphoid precursors to the B and T lineages. In contrast, the defects in erythromyeloid precursor cells were self-correcting over time. This suggests that E2F4 is important in early stages of commitment to the lymphoid lineage. The E2F4-deficient progenitor cells showed reduced expression of several key lymphoid-lineage genes, and overexpression of two erythromyeloid lineage genes. However, we did not detect effects on cell proliferation. These findings emphasize the significance of E2F4 in controlling gene expression and cell fate.

  14. Maternal acute lymphoctic leukemia with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia gene occurring during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Nassar, Amr; Saleh, Abu J; Almhareb, Fahed; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Walter, Claudia; Bakr, Mohammad; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease during pregnancy, accounting for about 15% of all cases of pregnancy-associated leukemia. Although mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangement is the dominant genetic aberration in infantile acute leukemia, the occurrence of MLL gene rearrangement in maternal ALL occurring during pregnancy has not been reported. Out of 31 cases of maternal leukemia diagnosed during pregnancy at our institution, 5 were ALL cases. Three of the 5 patients had MLL gene rearrangement. The data for these 5 patients are presented in this report. We believe that the association of MLL gene rearrangement with maternal leukemia is biologically plausible and this observation needs to be validated in a larger cohort of pregnancy-associated maternal leukemia cases.

  15. A Gene Regulatory Network Cooperatively Controlled by Pdx1 and Sox9 Governs Lineage Allocation of Foregut Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shih, Hung Ping; Seymour, Philip A; Patel, Nisha A;

    2015-01-01

    The generation of pancreas, liver, and intestine from a common pool of progenitors in the foregut endoderm requires the establishment of organ boundaries. How dorsal foregut progenitors activate pancreatic genes and evade the intestinal lineage choice remains unclear. Here, we identify Pdx1 and Sox...... pancreatic fate and sheds light on the gene regulatory circuitry that governs the development of distinct organs from multi-lineage-competent foregut progenitors....

  16. Negative regulation of miRNA-9 on oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Yang; Hong Cui; Ting Cao

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays a key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and myelin repair. miRNA-9 is involved in the occurrence of many related neurological disorders. Bioin-formatics analysis demonstrated that miRNA-9 complementarily, but incompletely, bound oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1, but whether miRNA-9 regulates oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 remains poorly understood. Whole brain slices of 3-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and divided into four groups:control group;oxygen-glucose deprivation group (treatment with 8% O2+ 92%N2 and sugar-free medium for 60 minutes);transfection control group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with control plasmid) and miRNA-9 transfection group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with miRNA-9 plasmid). From the third day of transfection, and with increasing culture days, oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression increased in each group, peaked at 14 days, and then decreased at 21 days. Real-time quantitative PCR results, however, demonstrated that oligoden-drocyte lineage gene 1 expression was lower in the miRNA-9 transfection group than that in the transfection control group at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after transfection. Results suggested that miRNA-9 possibly negatively regulated oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 in brain tissues during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  17. Comparative genomics of rhizobia nodulating soybean suggests extensive recruitment of lineage-specific genes in adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang Fu; Zhou, Yuan Jie; Zhang, Yan Ming; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Li, Dong Fang; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, Luz B; Li, Ying Rui; Chen, Wen Xin

    2012-05-29

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been widely studied as the model of mutualistic evolution and the essential component of sustainable agriculture. Extensive genetic and recent genomic studies have led to the hypothesis that many distinct strategies, regardless of rhizobial phylogeny, contributed to the varied rhizobium-legume symbiosis. We sequenced 26 genomes of Sinorhizobium and Bradyrhizobium nodulating soybean to test this hypothesis. The Bradyrhizobium core genome is disproportionally enriched in lipid and secondary metabolism, whereas several gene clusters known to be involved in osmoprotection and adaptation to alkaline pH are specific to the Sinorhizobium core genome. These features are consistent with biogeographic patterns of these bacteria. Surprisingly, no genes are specifically shared by these soybean microsymbionts compared with other legume microsymbionts. On the other hand, phyletic patterns of 561 known symbiosis genes of rhizobia reflected the species phylogeny of these soybean microsymbionts and other rhizobia. Similar analyses with 887 known functional genes or the whole pan genome of rhizobia revealed that only the phyletic distribution of functional genes was consistent with the species tree of rhizobia. Further evolutionary genetics revealed that recombination dominated the evolution of core genome. Taken together, our results suggested that faithfully vertical genes were rare compared with those with history of recombination including lateral gene transfer, although rhizobial adaptations to symbiotic interactions and other environmental conditions extensively recruited lineage-specific shell genes under direct or indirect control through the speciation process.

  18. Neural crest and mesoderm lineage-dependent gene expression in orofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Vasker; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Singh, Saurabh; Johnson, Charles; Philipose, John T; Warner, Courtney P; Greene, Robert M; Pisano, M Michele

    2007-06-01

    The present study utilizes a combination of genetic labeling/selective isolation of pluripotent embryonic progenitor cells, and oligonucleotide-based microarray technology, to delineate and compare the "molecular fingerprint" of two mesenchymal cell populations from distinct lineages in the developing embryonic orofacial region. The first branchial arches-bi-lateral tissue primordia that flank the primitive oral cavity-are populated by pluripotent mesenchymal cells from two different lineages: neural crest (neuroectoderm)- and mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells. These cells give rise to all of the connective tissue elements (bone, cartilage, smooth and skeletal muscle, dentin) of the orofacial region (maxillary and mandibular portion), as well as neurons and glia associated with the cranial ganglia, among other tissues. In the present study, neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells were selectively isolated from the first branchial arch of gestational day 9.5 mouse embryos using laser capture microdissection (LCM). The two different embryonic cell lineages were distinguished through utilization of a novel two component transgenic mouse model (Wnt1Cre/ZEG) in which the neural crest cells and their derivatives are indelibly marked (i.e., expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) throughout the pre- and post-natal lifespan of the organism. EGFP-labeled neural crest-derived, and non-fluorescent mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells from the first branchial arch were visualized in frozen tissue sections from gestational day 9.5 mouse embryos and independently isolated by LCM under epifluorescence optics. RNA was extracted from the two populations of LCM-procured cells, and amplified by double-stranded cDNA synthesis and in vitro transcription. Gene expression profiles of the two progenitor cell populations were generated via hybridization of the cell-type specific cRNA samples to oligo-based GeneChip microarrays. Comparison of gene expression

  19. A general scenario of Hox gene inventory variation among major sarcopterygian lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chaolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes are known to play a key role in shaping the body plan of metazoans. Evolutionary dynamics of these genes is therefore essential in explaining patterns of evolutionary diversity. Among extant sarcopterygians comprising both lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods, our knowledge of the Hox genes and clusters has largely been restricted in several model organisms such as frogs, birds and mammals. Some evolutionary gaps still exist, especially for those groups with derived body morphology or occupying key positions on the tree of life, hindering our understanding of how Hox gene inventory varied along the sarcopterygian lineage. Results We determined the Hox gene inventory for six sarcopterygian groups: lungfishes, caecilians, salamanders, snakes, turtles and crocodiles by comprehensive PCR survey and genome walking. Variable Hox genes in each of the six sarcopterygian group representatives, compared to the human Hox gene inventory, were further validated for their presence/absence by PCR survey in a number of related species representing a broad evolutionary coverage of the group. Turtles, crocodiles, birds and placental mammals possess the same 39 Hox genes. HoxD12 is absent in snakes, amphibians and probably lungfishes. HoxB13 is lost in frogs and caecilians. Lobe-finned fishes, amphibians and squamate reptiles possess HoxC3. HoxC1 is only present in caecilians and lobe-finned fishes. Similar to coelacanths, lungfishes also possess HoxA14, which is only found in lobe-finned fishes to date. Our Hox gene variation data favor the lungfish-tetrapod, turtle-archosaur and frog-salamander relationships and imply that the loss of HoxD12 is not directly related to digit reduction. Conclusions Our newly determined Hox inventory data provide a more complete scenario for evolutionary dynamics of Hox genes along the sarcopterygian lineage. Limbless, worm-like caecilians and snakes possess similar Hox gene inventories to animals with

  20. Effect of Incomplete Lineage Sorting On Tree-Reconciliation-Based Inference of Gene Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Louxin

    2014-01-01

    In the tree reconciliation approach to infer the duplication history of a gene family, the gene (family) tree is compared to the corresponding species tree. Incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) gives rise to stochastic variation in the topology of a gene tree and hence likely introduces false duplication events when a tree reconciliation method is used. We quantify the effect of ILS on gene duplication inference in a species tree in terms of the expected number of false duplication events inferred from reconciling a random gene tree, which occurs with a probability predicted in coalescent theory, and the species tree. We computationally examine the relationship between the effect of ILS on duplication inference in a species tree and its topological parameters. Our findings suggest that ILS may cause non-negligible bias on duplication inference, particularly on an asymmetric species tree. Hence, when gene duplication is inferred via tree reconciliation or any other approach that takes gene tree topology into account, the ILS-induced bias should be examined cautiously.

  1. The lineage-specific evolution of aquaporin gene clusters facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Nigel Finn

    Full Text Available A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16. The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

  2. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Joseph F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1 in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH subtype 1G (Ush1g, both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF, a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways.

  3. Metalaxyl Resistance in Phytophthora infestans: Assessing Role of RPA190 Gene and Diversity Within Clonal Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Michael E H; Small, Ian M; Fry, William E; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-12-01

    Prior work has shown that the inheritance of resistance to metalaxyl, an oomycete-specific fungicide, is complex and may involve multiple genes. Recent research indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene encoding RPA190, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, confers resistance to metalaxyl (or mefenoxam) in some isolates of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Using both DNA sequencing and high resolution melt assays for distinguishing RPA190 alleles, we show here that the SNP is absent from certain resistant isolates of P. infestans from North America, Europe, and Mexico. The SNP is present in some members of the US-23 and US-24 clonal lineages, but these tend to be fairly sensitive to the fungicide based on artificial media and field test data. Diversity in the level of sensitivity, RPA190 genotype, and RPA190 copy number was observed in these lineages but were uncorrelated. Controlled laboratory crosses demonstrated that RPA190 did not cosegregate with metalaxyl resistance from a Mexican and British isolate. We conclude that while metalaxyl may be used to control many contemporary strains of P. infestans, an assay based on RPA190 will not be sufficient to diagnose the sensitivity levels of isolates.

  4. Identification of Genes Expressed in the Migrating Primitive Myeloid Lineage of Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricola, Zachary N.; Jagpal, Amrita K.; Allbee, Andrew W.; Prewitt, Allison R.; Shifley, Emily T.; Rankin, Scott A.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Kenny, Alan P.

    2017-01-01

    Background During primitive hematopoiesis in Xenopus, cebpa and spib expressing myeloid cells emerge from the anterior ventral blood island. Primitive myeloid cells migrate throughout the embryo and are critical for immunity, healing, and development. Although definitive hematopoiesis has been studied extensively, molecular mechanisms leading to the migration of primitive myelocytes remain poorly understood. We hypothesized these cells have specific extracellular matrix modifying and cell motility gene expression. Results In situ hybridization screens of transcripts expressed in Xenopus foregut mesendoderm at stage 23 identified seven genes with restricted expression in primitive myeloid cells: destrin; coronin actin binding protein, 1a; formin-like 1; ADAM metallopeptidase domain 28; cathepsin S; tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1; and protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 6. A detailed in situ hybridization analysis revealed these genes are initially expressed in the aVBI but become dispersed throughout the embryo as the primitive myeloid cells become migratory, similar to known myeloid markers. Morpholino-mediated loss-of-function and mRNA-mediated gain-of-function studies revealed the identified genes are downstream of Spib.a and Cebpa, key transcriptional regulators of the myeloid lineage. Conclusions We have identified genes specifically expressed in migratory primitive myeloid progenitors, providing tools to study how different gene networks operate in these primitive myelocytes during development and immunity. PMID:26264370

  5. Gene flow between sexual and facultatively asexual lineages of an aphid species and the maintenance of reproductive mode variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, F; Plantegenest, M; Bonhomme, J; Simon, J-C

    2008-06-01

    Many organisms considered as strictly clonal may in fact experience some rare events of sexual reproduction with their sexual relatives. However, the rate of sexual-asexual gene flow has rarely been assessed mainly because its evaluation is difficult to achieve in the field. In the cyclically parthenogenetic aphid Rhopalosiphum padi, two main sets of lineages, differing in their investment in sexual reproduction and in their genetic attributes, co-exist even at a very fine scale: the 'sexual' lineages which have a full commitment to the sexual reproduction, and the 'facultatively asexual' lineages, which allocate investment in the sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction. This system offers a unique opportunity to tackle the genetic interactions between two contrasting reproductive modes. Here, we provide evidence that gene flow occurred between sexual and facultatively asexual lineages of R. padi. We carefully examined the shuffling in phenotypic and genotypic variation following a sexual reproduction event that took place in the field. Combining genotypic data and phenotypic measurements showed that this gene mixing led to the production of a wide array of reproductive modes, including strictly asexual lineages. Finally, we discuss the central role played by facultatively asexual lineages on the maintenance of reproductive mode variation.

  6. The polyphenol oxidase gene family in land plants: Lineage-specific duplication and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Lan T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs are enzymes that typically use molecular oxygen to oxidize ortho-diphenols to ortho-quinones. These commonly cause browning reactions following tissue damage, and may be important in plant defense. Some PPOs function as hydroxylases or in cross-linking reactions, but in most plants their physiological roles are not known. To better understand the importance of PPOs in the plant kingdom, we surveyed PPO gene families in 25 sequenced genomes from chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants. The PPO genes were then analyzed in silico for gene structure, phylogenetic relationships, and targeting signals. Results Many previously uncharacterized PPO genes were uncovered. The moss, Physcomitrella patens, contained 13 PPO genes and Selaginella moellendorffii (spike moss and Glycine max (soybean each had 11 genes. Populus trichocarpa (poplar contained a highly diversified gene family with 11 PPO genes, but several flowering plants had only a single PPO gene. By contrast, no PPO-like sequences were identified in several chlorophyte (green algae genomes or Arabidopsis (A. lyrata and A. thaliana. We found that many PPOs contained one or two introns often near the 3’ terminus. Furthermore, N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis using ChloroP and TargetP 1.1 predicted that several putative PPOs are synthesized via the secretory pathway, a unique finding as most PPOs are predicted to be chloroplast proteins. Phylogenetic reconstruction of these sequences revealed that large PPO gene repertoires in some species are mostly a consequence of independent bursts of gene duplication, while the lineage leading to Arabidopsis must have lost all PPO genes. Conclusion Our survey identified PPOs in gene families of varying sizes in all land plants except in the genus Arabidopsis. While we found variation in intron numbers and positions, overall PPO gene structure is congruent with the phylogenetic

  7. Recombination in pe/ppe genes contributes to genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody E.

    2016-02-29

    Background Approximately 10 % of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is made up of two families of genes that are poorly characterized due to their high GC content and highly repetitive nature. The PE and PPE families are typified by their highly conserved N-terminal domains that incorporate proline-glutamate (PE) and proline-proline-glutamate (PPE) signature motifs. They are hypothesised to be important virulence factors involved with host-pathogen interactions, but their high genetic variability and complexity of analysis means they are typically disregarded in genome studies. Results To elucidate the structure of these genes, 518 genomes from a diverse international collection of clinical isolates were de novo assembled. A further 21 reference M. tuberculosis complex genomes and long read sequence data were used to validate the approach. SNP analysis revealed that variation in the majority of the 168 pe/ppe genes studied was consistent with lineage. Several recombination hotspots were identified, notably pe_pgrs3 and pe_pgrs17. Evidence of positive selection was revealed in 65 pe/ppe genes, including epitopes potentially binding to major histocompatibility complex molecules. Conclusions This, the first comprehensive study of the pe and ppe genes, provides important insight into M. tuberculosis diversity and has significant implications for vaccine development.

  8. Molecular characterisation of lineage IV peste des petits ruminants virus using multi gene sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Senthil; Babu, Aravindh; Sundarapandian, G; Roy, Parimal; Thangavelu, A; Kumar, K Siva; Arumugam, R; Chandran, N D J; Muniraju, Murali; Mahapatra, Mana; Banyard, Ashley C; Manohar, B Murali; Parida, Satya

    2014-11-07

    Peste des petits ruminants is responsible for an economically important plague of small ruminants that is endemic across much of the developing world. Here we describe the detection and characterisation of a PPR virus from a recent outbreak in Tamil Nadu, India. We demonstrate the isolation of PPR virus from rectal swab and highlight the potential spread of disease to in-contact animals through faecal materials and use of faecal material as non-invasive method of sampling for susceptible wild ruminants. Finally we have performed a comprehensive 'multi-gene' assessment of lineage IV isolates of PPRV utilising sequence data from our study and publically available partial N, partial F and partial H gene data. We describe the effects of grouping PPRV isolates utilising different gene loci and conclude that the variable part of N gene at C terminus gives the best phylogenetic assessment of PPRV isolates with isolates generally clustering according to geographical isolation. This assessment highlights the importance of careful gene targeting with RT-PCR to enable thorough phylogenetic analysis.

  9. An experimental test for lineage-specific position effects on alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Mark L.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    1998-01-01

    Independent transgene insertions differ in expression based on their location in the genome; these position effects are of interest because they reflect the influence of genome organization on gene regulation. Position effects also represent potentially insurmountable obstacles to the rigorous functional comparison of homologous genes from different species because (i) quantitative variation in expression of each gene across genomic positions (generalized position effects, or GPEs) may overwhelm differences between the genes of interest, or (ii) divergent genes may be differentially sensitive to position effects, reflecting unique interactions between each gene and its genomic milieu (lineage-specific position effects, or LSPEs). We have investigated both types of position-effect variation by applying our method of transgene coplacement, which allows comparisons of transgenes in the same position in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report an experimental test for LSPE in Drosophila. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes of D. melanogaster and Drosophila affinidisjuncta differ in both tissue distribution and amounts of ADH activity. Despite this striking regulatory divergence, we found a very high correlation in overall ADH activity between the genes of the two species when placed in the same genomic position as assayed in otherwise Adh-null adults and larvae. These results argue against the influence of LSPE for these sequences, although the effects of GPE are significant. Our new findings validate the coplacement approach and show that it greatly magnifies the power to detect differences in expression between transgenes. Transgene coplacement thus dramatically extends the range of functional and evolutionary questions that can be addressed by transgenic technology. PMID:9861000

  10. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs are passed from ancestral to descendant primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hummelshøj

    Full Text Available The ficolins recognize carbohydrates and acetylated compounds on microorganisms and dying host cells and are able to activate the lectin pathway of the complement system. In humans, three ficolin genes have been identified: FCN1, FCN2 and FCN3, which encode ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3, respectively. Rodents have only two ficolins designated ficolin-A and ficolin-B that are closely related to human ficolin-1, while the rodent FCN3 orthologue is a pseudogene. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 have so far only been observed in humans. Thus, we performed a systematic investigation of the FCN genes in non-human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non-human primates and the human FCN genes. Several variations in the FCN genes were found in more than one primate specie suggesting that they were carried from one species to another including humans. The amino acid diversity of the ficolins among human and non-human primate species was estimated by calculating the Shannon entropy revealing that all three proteins are generally highly conserved. Ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 showed the highest diversity, whereas ficolin-3 was more conserved. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were present in non-human primate sera with the same characteristic oligomeric structures as seen in human serum. Taken together all the FCN genes show the same characteristics in lower and higher primates. The existence of trans-species polymorphisms suggests that different FCN allelic lineages may be passed from ancestral to descendant species.

  11. Phylogenetics of Lophotrochozoan bHLH Genes and the Evolution of Lineage-Specific Gene Duplicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    The gain and loss of genes encoding transcription factors is of importance to understanding the evolution of gene regulatory complexity. The basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) genes encode a large superfamily of transcription factors. We systematically classify the bHLH genes from five mollusc, two annelid and one brachiopod genomes, tracing the pattern of bHLH gene evolution across these poorly studied Phyla. In total, 56–88 bHLH genes were identified in each genome, with most identifiable as members of previously described bilaterian families, or of new families we define. Of such families only one, Mesp, appears lost by all these species. Additional duplications have also played a role in the evolution of the bHLH gene repertoire, with many new lophotrochozoan-, mollusc-, bivalve-, or gastropod-specific genes defined. Using a combination of transcriptome mining, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization we compared the expression of several of these novel genes in tissues and embryos of the molluscs Crassostrea gigas and Patella vulgata, finding both conserved expression and evidence for neofunctionalization. We also map the positions of the genes across these genomes, identifying numerous gene linkages. Some reflect recent paralog divergence by tandem duplication, others are remnants of ancient tandem duplications dating to the lophotrochozoan or bilaterian common ancestors. These data are built into a model of the evolution of bHLH genes in molluscs, showing formidable evolutionary stasis at the family level but considerable within-family diversification by tandem gene duplication. PMID:28338988

  12. Multiple horizontal transfers of nuclear ribosomal genes between phylogenetically distinct grass lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahelka, Václav; Krak, Karol; Kopecký, David; Fehrer, Judith; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Hobza, Roman; Blavet, Nicolas; Blattner, Frank R.

    2017-01-01

    The movement of nuclear DNA from one vascular plant species to another in the absence of fertilization is thought to be rare. Here, nonnative rRNA gene [ribosomal DNA (rDNA)] copies were identified in a set of 16 diploid barley (Hordeum) species; their origin was traceable via their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence to five distinct Panicoideae genera, a lineage that split from the Pooideae about 60 Mya. Phylogenetic, cytogenetic, and genomic analyses implied that the nonnative sequences were acquired between 1 and 5 Mya after a series of multiple events, with the result that some current Hordeum sp. individuals harbor up to five different panicoid rDNA units in addition to the native Hordeum rDNA copies. There was no evidence that any of the nonnative rDNA units were transcribed; some showed indications of having been silenced via pseudogenization. A single copy of a Panicum sp. rDNA unit present in H. bogdanii had been interrupted by a native transposable element and was surrounded by about 70 kbp of mostly noncoding sequence of panicoid origin. The data suggest that horizontal gene transfer between vascular plants is not a rare event, that it is not necessarily restricted to one or a few genes only, and that it can be selectively neutral. PMID:28137844

  13. Detecting lineage-specific adaptive evolution of brain-expressed genes in human using rhesus macaque as outgroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Wang, Jun;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genetic analysis between human and chimpanzee may detect genetic divergences responsible for human-specific characteristics. Previous studies have identified a series of genes that potentially underwent Darwinian positive selection during human evolution. However, without a closely...... related species as outgroup, it is difficult to identify human-lineage-specific changes, which is critical in delineating the biological uniqueness of humans. In this study, we conducted phylogeny-based analyses of 2633 human brain-expressed genes using rhesus macaque as the outgroup. We identified 47...... candidate genes showing strong evidence of positive selection in the human lineage. Genes with maximal expression in the brain showed a higher evolutionary rate in human than in chimpanzee. We observed that many immune-defense-related genes were under strong positive selection, and this trend was more...

  14. Lineage relationship of prostate cancer cell types based on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Carol B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumor heterogeneity is a major factor in disease management. Heterogeneity could be due to multiple cancer cell types with distinct gene expression. Of clinical importance is the so-called cancer stem cell type. Cell type-specific transcriptomes are used to examine lineage relationship among cancer cell types and their expression similarity to normal cell types including stem/progenitor cells. Methods Transcriptomes were determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis for the following cell types. Putative prostate progenitor cell populations were characterized and isolated by expression of the membrane transporter ABCG2. Stem cells were represented by embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells. The cancer cell types were Gleason pattern 3 (glandular histomorphology and pattern 4 (aglandular sorted from primary tumors, cultured prostate cancer cell lines originally established from metastatic lesions, xenografts LuCaP 35 (adenocarcinoma phenotype and LuCaP 49 (neuroendocrine/small cell carcinoma grown in mice. No detectable gene expression differences were detected among serial passages of the LuCaP xenografts. Results Based on transcriptomes, the different cancer cell types could be clustered into a luminal-like grouping and a non-luminal-like (also not basal-like grouping. The non-luminal-like types showed expression more similar to that of stem/progenitor cells than the luminal-like types. However, none showed expression of stem cell genes known to maintain stemness. Conclusions Non-luminal-like types are all representatives of aggressive disease, and this could be attributed to the similarity in overall gene expression to stem and progenitor cell types.

  15. Diversification and gene flow in nascent lineages of island and mainland North American tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Andreas S; Maher, Sean P; Arbogast, Brian S; Kenagy, G J

    2014-04-01

    Pleistocene climate cycles and glaciations had profound impacts on taxon diversification in the Boreal Forest Biome. Using population genetic analyses with multilocus data, we examined diversification, isolation, and hybridization in two sibling species of tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus douglasii and Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) with special attention to the geographically and genetically enigmatic population of T. hudsonicus on Vancouver Island, Canada. The two species differentiated only about 500,000 years ago, in the Late Pleistocene. The island population is phylogenetically nested within T. hudsonicus according to our nuclear analysis but within T. douglasii according to mitochondrial DNA. This conflict is more likely due to historical hybridization than to incomplete lineage sorting, and it appears that bidirectional gene flow occurred between the island population and both species on the mainland. This interpretation of our genetic analyses is consistent with our bioclimatic modeling, which demonstrates that both species were able to occupy this region throughout the Late Pleistocene. The divergence of the island population 40,000 years ago suggests that tree squirrels persisted in a refugium on Vancouver Island at the last glacial maximum, 20,000 years ago. Our observations demonstrate how Pleistocene climate change and habitat shifts have created incipient divergence in the presence of gene flow. Sequence data have been archived in GenBank—accession numbers: KF882736–KF885216.

  16. Clustering of two genes putatively involved in cyanate detoxification evolved recently and independently in multiple fungal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, M Holly; McGary, Kriston L; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Slot, Jason C; Geiser, David M; Sink, Stacy; O'Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-03-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC's closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture.

  17. Lineage-Specific and Non-specific Cytokine-Sensing Genes Respond Differentially to the Master Regulator STAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianke; Willi, Michaela; Shin, Ha Youn; Hennighausen, Lothar; Wang, Chaochen

    2016-12-20

    STAT5, a member of the family of signal transducers and activators of transcription, senses cytokines and controls the biology of cell lineages, including mammary, liver, and T cells. Here, we show that STAT5 activates lineage-specific and widely expressed genes through different mechanisms. STAT5 preferentially binds to promoter sequences of cytokine-responsive genes expressed across cell types and to putative enhancers of lineage-specific genes. While chromatin accessibility of STAT5-based enhancers was dependent on cytokine exposure, STAT5-responsive promoters of widely expressed target genes were generally constitutively accessible. While the contribution of STAT5 to enhancers is well established, its role on promoters is poorly understood. To address this, we focused on Socs2, a widely expressed cytokine-sensing gene. Upon deletion of the STAT5 response elements from the Socs2 promoter in mice, cytokine induction was abrogated, while basal activity remained intact. Our data suggest that promoter-bound STAT5 modulates cytokine responses and enhancer-bound STAT5 is mandatory for gene activation.

  18. Pangenome evidence for extensive interdomain horizontal transfer affecting lineage core and shell genes in uncultured planktonic thaumarchaeota and euryarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Philippe; Zivanovic, Yvan; Moreira, David; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; López-García, Purificación

    2014-06-12

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important force in evolution, which may lead, among other things, to the adaptation to new environments by the import of new metabolic functions. Recent studies based on phylogenetic analyses of a few genome fragments containing archaeal 16S rRNA genes and fosmid-end sequences from deep-sea metagenomic libraries have suggested that marine planktonic archaea could be affected by high HGT frequency. Likewise, a composite genome of an uncultured marine euryarchaeote showed high levels of gene sequence similarity to bacterial genes. In this work, we ask whether HGT is frequent and widespread in genomes of these marine archaea, and whether HGT is an ancient and/or recurrent phenomenon. To answer these questions, we sequenced 997 fosmid archaeal clones from metagenomic libraries of deep-Mediterranean waters (1,000 and 3,000 m depth) and built comprehensive pangenomes for planktonic Thaumarchaeota (Group I archaea) and Euryarchaeota belonging to the uncultured Groups II and III Euryarchaeota (GII/III-Euryarchaeota). Comparison with available reference genomes of Thaumarchaeota and a composite marine surface euryarchaeote genome allowed us to define sets of core, lineage-specific core, and shell gene ortholog clusters for the two archaeal lineages. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of all gene clusters showed that 23.9% of marine Thaumarchaeota genes and 29.7% of GII/III-Euryarchaeota genes had been horizontally acquired from bacteria. HGT is not only extensive and directional but also ongoing, with high HGT levels in lineage-specific core (ancient transfers) and shell (recent transfers) genes. Many of the acquired genes are related to metabolism and membrane biogenesis, suggesting an adaptive value for life in cold, oligotrophic oceans. We hypothesize that the acquisition of an important amount of foreign genes by the ancestors of these archaeal groups significantly contributed to their divergence and ecological success.

  19. Assessment and reconstruction of novel HSP90 genes: duplications, gains and losses in fungal and animal lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula N Pantzartzi

    Full Text Available Hsp90s, members of the Heat Shock Protein class, protect the structure and function of proteins and play a significant task in cellular homeostasis and signal transduction. In order to determine the number of hsp90 gene copies and encoded proteins in fungal and animal lineages and through that key duplication events that this family has undergone, we collected and evaluated Hsp90 protein sequences and corresponding Expressed Sequence Tags and analyzed available genomes from various taxa. We provide evidence for duplication events affecting either single species or wider taxonomic groups. With regard to Fungi, duplicated genes have been detected in several lineages. In invertebrates, we demonstrate key duplication events in certain clades of Arthropoda and Mollusca, and a possible gene loss event in a hymenopteran family. Finally, we infer that the duplication event responsible for the two (a and b isoforms in vertebrates occurred probably shortly after the split of Hyperoartia and Gnathostomata.

  20. Evolutionary Convergence of Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Independent Lineages of C4 Grasses1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Christopher R.; Smith-Unna, Richard D.; Woodfield, Helen; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of almost all C4 lineages separate the reactions of photosynthesis into the mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The extent to which messenger RNA profiles of M and BS cells from independent C4 lineages resemble each other is not known. To address this, we conducted deep sequencing of RNA isolated from the M and BS of Setaria viridis and compared these data with publicly available information from maize (Zea mays). This revealed a high correlation (r = 0.89) between the relative abundance of transcripts encoding proteins of the core C4 pathway in M and BS cells in these species, indicating significant convergence in transcript accumulation in these evolutionarily independent C4 lineages. We also found that the vast majority of genes encoding proteins of the C4 cycle in S. viridis are syntenic to homologs used by maize. In both lineages, 122 and 212 homologous transcription factors were preferentially expressed in the M and BS, respectively. Sixteen shared regulators of chloroplast biogenesis were identified, 14 of which were syntenic homologs in maize and S. viridis. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a third C4 grass, we found that 82% of these trans-factors were also differentially expressed in either M or BS cells. Taken together, these data provide, to our knowledge, the first quantification of convergence in transcript abundance in the M and BS cells from independent lineages of C4 grasses. Furthermore, the repeated recruitment of syntenic homologs from large gene families strongly implies that parallel evolution of both structural genes and trans-factors underpins the polyphyletic evolution of this highly complex trait in the monocotyledons. PMID:24676859

  1. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 in cultured brain slices after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cui; Weijuan Han; Lijun Yang; Yanzhong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expressed in oligodendrocytes may trigger the repair of neuronal myelin impairment, and play a crucial role in myelin repair. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor, is of great significance in premature infants with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. There is little evidence of direct regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α on oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. In this study, brain slices of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Then, slices were transfected with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α or oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. The expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 were significantly up-regulated in rat brains prior to transfection, as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Eight hours after transfection of slices with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression was upregulated, and reached a peak 24 hours after transfection. Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 transfection induced no significant differences in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α levels in rat brain tissues with oxygen-glucose deprivation. These experimental findings indicate that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α can regulate oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression in hypoxic brain tissue, thus repairing the neural impairment.

  2. Fleshy seeds form in the basal Angiosperm Magnolia grandiflora and several MADS-box genes are expressed as fleshy seed tissues develop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovisetto, Alessandro; Masiero, Simona; Rahim, Md Abdur; Mendes, Marta Adelina Miranda; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    One successful mechanism of seed dispersal in plants involves production of edible fleshy structures which attract frugivorous animals and transfer this task to them. Not only Angiosperms but also Gymnosperms may use the fleshy fruit habit for seed dispersal, and a similar suite of MADS-box genes may be expressed as these structures form. Magnolia grandiflora produces dry follicles which, at maturity, open to reveal brightly colored fleshy seeds. This species thus also employs endozoochory for seed dispersal, although it produces dry fruits. Molecular analysis reveals that genes involved in softening and color changes are expressed at late stages of seed development, when the fleshy seed sarcotesta softens and accumulates carotenoids. Several MADS-box genes have also been studied and results highlight the existence of a basic genetic toolkit which may be common to all fleshy fruit-like structures, independently of their anatomic origin. According to their expression patterns, one of two AGAMOUS genes and the three SEPALLATA genes known so far in Magnolia are of particular interest. Duplication of AGAMOUS already occurs in both Nymphaeales and Magnoliids, although the lack of functional gene analysis prevents comparisons with known duplications in the AGAMOUS lineage of core Eudicots.

  3. Demographic history of Canary Islands male gene-pool: replacement of native lineages by European

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorim António

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin and prevalence of the prehispanic settlers of the Canary Islands has attracted great multidisciplinary interest. However, direct ancient DNA genetic studies on indigenous and historical 17th–18th century remains, using mitochondrial DNA as a female marker, have only recently been possible. In the present work, the analysis of Y-chromosome polymorphisms in the same samples, has shed light on the way the European colonization affected male and female Canary Island indigenous genetic pools, from the conquest to present-day times. Results Autochthonous (E-M81 and prominent (E-M78 and J-M267 Berber Y-chromosome lineages were detected in the indigenous remains, confirming a North West African origin for their ancestors which confirms previous mitochondrial DNA results. However, in contrast with their female lineages, which have survived in the present-day population since the conquest with only a moderate decline, the male indigenous lineages have dropped constantly being substituted by European lineages. Male and female sub-Saharan African genetic inputs were also detected in the Canary population, but their frequencies were higher during the 17th–18th centuries than today. Conclusion The European colonization of the Canary Islands introduced a strong sex-biased change in the indigenous population in such a way that indigenous female lineages survived in the extant population in a significantly higher proportion than their male counterparts.

  4. Ancestral Gene Flow and Parallel Organellar Genome Capture Result in Extreme Phylogenomic Discord in a Lineage of Angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Ryan A; Mandel, Jennifer R; Freudenstein, John V

    2016-09-16

    While hybridization has recently received a resurgence of attention from systematists and evolutionary biologists, there remains a dearth of case studies on ancient, diversified hybrid lineages-clades of organisms that originated through reticulation. Studies on these groups are valuable in that they would speak to the long-term phylogenetic success of lineages following gene flow between species. We present a phylogenomic view of Heuchera, long known for frequent hybridization, incorporating all three independent genomes: targeted nuclear (~400,000 bp), plastid (~160,000 bp), and mitochondrial (~470,000 bp) data. We analyze these data using multiple concatenation and coalescence strategies. The nuclear phylogeny is consistent with previous work and with morphology, confidently suggesting a monophyletic Heuchera By contrast, analyses of both organellar genomes recover a grossly polyphyletic Heuchera,consisting of three primary clades with relationships extensively rearranged within these as well. A minority of nuclear loci also exhibit phylogenetic discord; yet these topologies remarkably never resemble the pattern of organellar loci and largely present low levels of discord inter alia Two independent estimates of the coalescent branch length of the ancestor of Heuchera using nuclear data suggest rare or nonexistent incomplete lineage sorting with related clades, inconsistent with the observed gross polyphyly of organellar genomes (confirmed by simulation of gene trees under the coalescent). These observations, in combination with previous work, strongly suggest hybridization as the cause of this phylogenetic discord. [Ancient hybridization; chloroplast capture; incongruence; phylogenomics; reticulation.].

  5. Fuzzy boundaries: color and gene flow patterns among parapatric lineages of the western shovel-nosed snake and taxonomic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dustin A.; Fisher, Robert N.; Vandergast, Amy G.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate delineation of lineage diversity is increasingly important, as species distributions are becoming more reduced and threatened. During the last century, the subspecies category was often used to denote phenotypic variation within a species range and to provide a framework for understanding lineage differentiation, often considered incipient speciation. While this category has largely fallen into disuse, previously recognized subspecies often serve as important units for conservation policy and management when other information is lacking. In this study, we evaluated phenotypic subspecies hypotheses within shovel-nosed snakes on the basis of genetic data and considered how evolutionary processes such as gene flow influenced possible incongruence between phenotypic and genetic patterns. We used both traditional phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses to infer range-wide genetic structure and spatially explicit analyses to detect possible boundary locations of lineage contact. Multilocus analyses supported three historically isolated groups with low to moderate levels of contemporary gene exchange. Genetic data did not support phenotypic subspecies as exclusive groups, and we detected patterns of discordance in areas where three subspecies are presumed to be in contact. Based on genetic and phenotypic evidence, we suggested that species-level diversity is underestimated in this group and we proposed that two species be recognized, Chionactis occipitalis and C. annulata. In addition, we recommend retention of two subspecific designations within C. annulata (C. a. annulata and C. a. klauberi) that reflect regional shifts in both genetic and phenotypic variation within the species. Our results highlight the difficultly in validating taxonomic boundaries within lineages that are evolving under a time-dependent, continuous process.

  6. Restricted Gene Flow among Lineages of Thrips tabaci Supports Genetic Divergence Among Cryptic Species Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Alana L.; Nault, Brian A.; Vargo, Edward L.; Kennedy, George G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative influence of population- versus species-level genetic variation is important to understand patterns of phenotypic variation and ecological relationships that exist among and within morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species and subspecies. In the case of cryptic species groups that are pests, such knowledge is also essential for devising effective population management strategies. The globally important crop pest Thrips tabaci is a taxonomically difficult group of putatively cryptic species. This study examines population genetic structure of T. tabaci and reproductive isolation among lineages of this species complex using microsatellite markers and mitochondrial COI sequences. Overall, genetic structure supports T. tabaci as a cryptic species complex, although limited interbreeding occurs between different clonal groups from the same lineage as well as between individuals from different lineages. These results also provide evidence that thelytoky and arrhenotoky are not fixed phenotypes among members of different T. tabaci lineages that have been generally associated with either reproductive mode. Possible biological and ecological factors contributing to these observations are discussed. PMID:27690317

  7. Mixed lineage kinase 3 gene mutations in mismatch repair deficient gastrointestinal tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velho, S.; Oliveira, C.; Paredes, J.; Sousa, S.; Leite, M.; Matos, P.; Milanezi, F.; Ribeiro, A.S.; Mendes, N.; Licastro, D.; Karhu, A.; Oliveira, M.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hamelin, R.; Carneiro, F.; Lindblom, A.; Peltomaki, P.; Castedo, S.; Schwartz Jr, S.; Jordan, P.; Aaltonen, L.A.; Hofstra, R.M.; Suriano, G.; Stupka, E.; Fialho, A.M.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a serine/threonine kinase, regulating MAPkinase signalling, in which cancer-associated mutations have never been reported. In this study, 174 primary gastrointestinal cancers (48 hereditary and 126 sporadic forms) and 7 colorectal cancer cell lines were screened for

  8. Mixed lineage kinase 3 gene mutations in mismatch repair deficient gastrointestinal tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velho, Sergia; Oliveira, Carla; Paredes, Joana; Sousa, Sonia; Leite, Marina; Matos, Paulo; Milanezi, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Mendes, Nuno; Licastro, Danilo; Karhu, Auli; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hamelin, Richard; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindblom, Annika; Peltomaki, Paivi; Castedo, Sergio; Schwartz, Simo; Jordan, Peter; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Suriano, Gianpaolo; Stupka, Elia; Fialho, Arsenio M.; Seruca, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a serine/threonine kinase, regulating MAPkinase signalling, in which cancer-associated mutations have never been reported. In this study, 174 primary gastrointestinal cancers (48 hereditary and 126 sporadic forms) and 7 colorectal cancer cell lines were screened for

  9. Gene Expression Ratios Lead to Accurate and Translatable Predictors of DR5 Agonism across Multiple Tumor Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anupama; Growney, Joseph D; Wilson, Nick S; Emery, Caroline M; Johnson, Jennifer A; Ward, Rebecca; Monaco, Kelli A; Korn, Joshua; Monahan, John E; Stump, Mark D; Mapa, Felipa A; Wilson, Christopher J; Steiger, Janine; Ledell, Jebediah; Rickles, Richard J; Myer, Vic E; Ettenberg, Seth A; Schlegel, Robert; Sellers, William R; Huet, Heather A; Lehár, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Death Receptor 5 (DR5) agonists demonstrate anti-tumor activity in preclinical models but have yet to demonstrate robust clinical responses. A key limitation may be the lack of patient selection strategies to identify those most likely to respond to treatment. To overcome this limitation, we screened a DR5 agonist Nanobody across >600 cell lines representing 21 tumor lineages and assessed molecular features associated with response. High expression of DR5 and Casp8 were significantly associated with sensitivity, but their expression thresholds were difficult to translate due to low dynamic ranges. To address the translational challenge of establishing thresholds of gene expression, we developed a classifier based on ratios of genes that predicted response across lineages. The ratio classifier outperformed the DR5+Casp8 classifier, as well as standard approaches for feature selection and classification using genes, instead of ratios. This classifier was independently validated using 11 primary patient-derived pancreatic xenograft models showing perfect predictions as well as a striking linearity between prediction probability and anti-tumor response. A network analysis of the genes in the ratio classifier captured important biological relationships mediating drug response, specifically identifying key positive and negative regulators of DR5 mediated apoptosis, including DR5, CASP8, BID, cFLIP, XIAP and PEA15. Importantly, the ratio classifier shows translatability across gene expression platforms (from Affymetrix microarrays to RNA-seq) and across model systems (in vitro to in vivo). Our approach of using gene expression ratios presents a robust and novel method for constructing translatable biomarkers of compound response, which can also probe the underlying biology of treatment response.

  10. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  11. A third broad lineage of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in teleost fish; MHC class II linkage and processed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus; Katagiri, Takayuki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Ototake, Mitsuru; Aoki, Takashi; Hashimoto, Keiichiro; Shiina, Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Most of the previously studied teleost MHC class I molecules can be classified into two broad lineages: "U" and "Z/ZE." However, database reports on genes in cyprinid and salmonid fishes show that there is a third major lineage, which lacks detailed analysis so far. We designated this lineage "L" because of an intriguing linkage characteristic. Namely, one zebrafish L locus is closely linked with MHC class II loci, despite the extensively documented nonlinkage of teleost class I with class II. The L lineage consists of highly variable, nonclassical MHC class I genes, and has no apparent orthologues outside teleost fishes. Characteristics that distinguish the L lineage from most other MHC class I are (1) absence of two otherwise highly conserved tryptophan residues W51 and W60 in the alpha1 domain, (2) a low GC content of the alpha1 and alpha2 exons, and (3) an HINLTL motif including a possible glycosylation site in the alpha3 domain. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) we analyzed several intact L genes in detail, including their genomic organization and transcription pattern. The gene Onmy-LAA is quite different from the genes Onmy-LBA, Onmy-LCA, Onmy-LDA, and Onmy-LEA, while the latter four are similar and categorized as "Onmy-LBA-like." Whereas the Onmy-LAA gene is organized like a canonical MHC class I gene, the Onmy-LBA-like genes are processed and lack all introns except intron 1. Onmy-LAA is predominantly expressed in the intestine, while the Onmy-LBA-like transcripts display a rather homogeneous tissue distribution. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an MHC class I lineage with multiple copies of processed genes, which are intact and transcribed. The present study significantly improves the knowledge of MHC class I variation in teleosts.

  12. An LTR Retrotransposon-Derived Gene Displays Lineage-Specific Structural and Putative Species-Specific Functional Variations in Eutherians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Masahito; Koga, Akihiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the 11 eutherian-specific genes acquired from a sushi-ichi retrotransposon is the CCHC type zinc-finger protein-encoding gene SIRH11/ZCCHC16. Its contribution to eutherian brain evolution is implied because of its involvement in cognitive function in mice, possibly via the noradrenergic system. Although, the possibility that Sirh11/Zcchc16 functions as a non-coding RNA still remains, dN/dS ratios in pairwise comparisons between its orthologs have provided supportive evidence that it acts as a protein. It became a pseudogene in armadillos (Cingulata) and sloths (Pilosa), the only two extant orders of xenarthra, which prompted us to examine the lineage-specific variations of SIRH11/ZCCHC16 in eutherians. We examined the predicted SIRH11/ZCCHC16 open reading frame (ORF) in 95 eutherian species based on the genomic DNA information in GenBank. A large variation in the SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORF was detected in several lineages. These include a lack of a CCHC RNA-binding domain in its C-terminus, observed in gibbons (Hylobatidae: Primates) and megabats (Megachiroptera: Chiroptera). A lack of the N-terminal half, on the other hand, was observed in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini: Primates) and species belonging to New World and African Hystricognaths (Caviomorpha and Bathyergidae: Rodents) along with Cetacea and Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla). Among the hominoids, interestingly, three out of four genera of gibbons have lost normal SIRH11/ZCCHC16 function by deletion or the lack of the CCHC RNA-binding domain. Our extensive dN/dS analysis suggests that such truncated SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORFs are functionally diversified even within lineages. Combined, our results show that SIRH11/ZCCHC16 may contribute to the diversification of eutherians by lineage-specific structural changes after its domestication in the common eutherian ancestor, followed by putative species-specific functional changes that enhanced fitness and occurred as a consequence of complex natural selection events

  13. Drosophila olfactory local interneurons and projection neurons derive from a common neuroblast lineage specified by the empty spiracles gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Kei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encoding of olfactory information in insects occurs in the antennal lobe where the olfactory receptor neurons interact with projection neurons and local interneurons in a complex sensory processing circuitry. While several studies have addressed the developmental mechanisms involved in specification and connectivity of olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons in Drosophila, the local interneurons are far less well understood. Results In this study, we use genetic marking techniques combined with antibody labelling and neuroblast ablation to analyse lineage specific aspects of local interneuron development. We find that a large set of local interneurons labelled by the GAL4-LN1 (NP1227 and GAL4-LN2 (NP2426 lines arise from the lateral neuroblast, which has also been shown to generate uniglomerular projection neurons. Moreover, we find that a remarkable diversity of local interneuron cell types with different glomerular innervation patterns and neurotransmitter expression derives from this lineage. We analyse the birth order of these two distinct neuronal types by generating MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker clones at different times during larval life. This analysis shows that local interneurons arise throughout the proliferative cycle of the lateral neuroblast beginning in the embryo, while uniglomerular projection neurons arise later during the second larval instar. The lateral neuroblast requires the function of the cephalic gap gene empty spiracles for the development of olfactory interneurons. In empty spiracles null mutant clones, most of the local interneurons and lateral projection neurons are lacking. These findings reveal similarities in the development of local interneurons and projection neurons in the olfactory system of Drosophila. Conclusion We find that the lateral neuroblast of the deutocerebrum gives rise to a large and remarkably diverse set of local interneurons as well as to

  14. Sub-functionalization to ovule development following duplication of a floral organ identity gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimba, Kelsey D; Di Stilio, Verónica S

    2015-09-01

    Gene duplications result in paralogs that may be maintained due to the gain of novel functions (neo-functionalization) or the partitioning of ancestral function (sub-functionalization). Plant genomes are especially prone to duplication; paralogs are particularly widespread in the floral MADS box transcription factors that control organ identity through the ABC model of flower development. C class genes establish stamen and carpel identity and control floral meristem determinacy, and are largely conserved across the angiosperm phylogeny. Originally, an additional D class had been identified as controlling ovule identity; yet subsequent studies indicated that both C and D lineage genes more commonly control ovule development redundantly. The ranunculid Thalictrum thalictroides has two orthologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana C class gene AGAMOUS (AG), ThtAG1 and ThtAG2 (Thalictrum thalictroides AGAMOUS1/2). We previously showed that ThtAG1 exhibits typical C class function; here we examine the role of its paralog, ThtAG2. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that ThtAG2 falls within the C lineage, together with ThtAG1, and is consistent with previous findings of a Ranunculales-specific duplication in this clade. However, ThtAG2 is not expressed in stamens, but rather solely in carpels and ovules. This female-specific expression pattern is consistent with D lineage genes, and with other C lineage genes known to be involved in ovule identity. Given the divergent expression of ThtAG2, we tested the hypothesis that it has acquired ovule identity function. Molecular evolution analyses showed evidence of positive selection on ThtAG2-a pattern that supports divergence of function by sub-functionalization. Down-regulation of ThtAG2 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in homeotic conversions of ovules into carpel-like structures. Taken together, our results suggest that, although ThtAG2 falls within the C lineage, it has diverged to acquire "D function" as an ovule identity gene

  15. Reprogramming of human peripheral blood monocytes to erythroid lineage by blocking of the PU-1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Masoumeh; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    In hematopoietic system development, PU.1 and GATA-1 as lineage-specific transcription factors (TF) are expressed in common myeloid progenitors. The cross antagonism between them ascertains gene expression programs of monocytic and erythroid cells, respectively. This concept in transdifferentiation approaches has not been well considered yet, especially in intralineage conversion systems. To demonstrate whether PU.1 suppression induces monocyte lineage conversion into red blood cells, a combination of three PU.1-specific siRNAs was implemented to knock down PU.1 gene expression and generate the balance in favor of GATA-1 expression to induce erythroid differentiation. For this purpose, monocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood and transfected by PU.1 siRNAs. In transfected monocytes, the rate of PU.1 expression in mRNA level was significantly decreased until 0.38 ± 0.118 when compared to untreated monocytes at 72 h (p value ≤0.05) which resulted in significant overexpression of GATA1 of 16.1 ± 0.343-fold compared to the untreated group (p value ≤0.01). Subsequently, overexpression of hemoglobin (α 13.26 ± 1.34-fold; p value≤0.0001) and β-globin (37.55 ± 16.56-fold; p value≤0.0001) was observed when compared to control groups. The results of western immunoblotting confirm those findings too. While, reduced expression of monocyte, CD14 gene, was observed in qRT-PCR and flow cytometry results. Our results suggest that manipulating the ratio of the two TFs in bifurcation differentiation pathways via applying siRNA technology can possibly change the cells' fate as a safe way for therapeutics application.

  16. Genomic characterization of the LEED..PEEDs, a gene family unique to the medicago lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Diana I; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Young, Nevin D

    2014-08-25

    The LEED..PEED (LP) gene family in Medicago truncatula (A17) is composed of 13 genes coding small putatively secreted peptides with one to two conserved domains of negatively charged residues. This family is not present in the genomes of Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, or the IRLC species Cicer arietinum. LP genes were also not detected in a Trifolium pratense draft genome or Pisum sativum nodule transcriptome, which were sequenced de novo in this study, suggesting that the LP gene family arose within the past 25 million years. M. truncatula accession HM056 has 13 LP genes with high similarity to those in A17, whereas M. truncatula ssp. tricycla (R108) and M. sativa have 11 and 10 LP gene copies, respectively. In M. truncatula A17, 12 LP genes are located on chromosome 7 within a 93-kb window, whereas one LP gene copy is located on chromosome 4. A phylogenetic analysis of the gene family is consistent with most gene duplications occurring prior to Medicago speciation events, mainly through local tandem duplications and one distant duplication across chromosomes. Synteny comparisons between R108 and A17 confirm that gene order is conserved between the two subspecies, although a further duplication occurred solely in A17. In M. truncatula A17, all 13 LPs are exclusively transcribed in nodules and absent from other plant tissues, including roots, leaves, flowers, seeds, seed shells, and pods. The recent expansion of LP genes in Medicago spp. and their timing and location of expression suggest a novel function in nodulation, possibly as an aftermath of the evolution of bacteroid terminal differentiation or potentially associated with rhizobial-host specificity.

  17. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Blom, Jochen; Manning, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation.

  18. Identification and functional characterization of the miRNA-gene regulatory network in chronic myeloid leukemia lineage negative cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatheeswaran, S.; Pattnayak, N. C.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is maintained by leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which are resistant to the existing TKI therapy. Hence a better understanding of the CML LSCs is necessary to eradicate these cells and achieve complete cure. Using the miRNA-gene interaction networks from the CML lin(-) cells we identified a set of up/down-regulated miRNAs and corresponding target genes. Association studies (Pearson correlation) from the miRNA and gene expression data showed that miR-1469 and miR-1972 have significantly higher number of target genes, 75 and 50 respectively. We observed that miR-1972 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest and miR-1469 moderately arrested G1 cell cycle when overexpressed in KCL22 cells. We have earlier shown that a combination of imatinib and JAK inhibitor I can significantly bring down the proliferation of CML lineage negative cells. Here we observed that imatinib and JAK inhibitor I combination restored the expression pattern of the down-regulated miRNAs in primary CML lin(-) cells. Thus effective manipulation of the deregulated miRNAs can restore the miRNA-mRNA networks that can efficiently inhibit CML stem and progenitor cells and alleviate the disease.

  19. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwang Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2–b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages.

  20. Allelic Lineages of the Ficolin Genes (FCNs) Are Passed from Ancestral to Descendant Primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Tina; Nissen, Janna; Fog, Lea Munthe

    2011-01-01

    -human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non...

  1. High diversity of genetic lineages and virulence genes in nasal Staphylococcus aureus isolates from donkeys destined to food consumption in Tunisia with predominance of the ruminant associated CC133 lineage

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    Gharsa Haythem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine the genetic lineages and the incidence of antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants of nasal Staphylococcus aureus isolates of healthy donkeys destined to food consumption in Tunisia. Results Nasal swabs of 100 donkeys obtained in a large slaughterhouse in 2010 were inoculated in specific media for S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA recovery. S. aureus was obtained in 50% of the samples, being all of isolates methicillin-susceptible (MSSA. Genetic lineages, toxin gene profile, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms were determined in recovered isolates. Twenty-five different spa-types were detected among the 50 MSSA with 9 novel spa-types. S. aureus isolates were ascribed to agr type I (37 isolates, III (7, II (4, and IV (2. Sixteen different sequence-types (STs were revealed by MLST, with seven new ones. STs belonging to clonal clomplex CC133 were majority. The gene tst was detected in 6 isolates and the gene etb in one isolate. Different combinations of enterotoxin, leukocidin and haemolysin genes were identified among S. aureus isolates. The egc-cluster-like and an incomplete egc-cluster-like were detected. Isolates resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, fusidic acid, streptomycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, tetracycline, or chloramphenicol were found and the genes blaZ, erm(A, erm(C, tet(M, fusC were identified. Conclusions The nares of donkeys frequently harbor MSSA. They could be reservoirs of the ruminant-associated CC133 lineage and of toxin genes encoding TSST-1 and other virulence traits with potential implications in public health. CC133 seems to have a broader host distribution than expected.

  2. Limited inter- and intra-patient sequence diversity of the genetic lineage A human metapneumovirus fusion gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Anders;

    2005-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with respiratory tract illness especially in young children. Two hMPV genetic lineages, A and B, and four sublineages A1, A2 and B1, B2 have been defined. Infection with hMPV occurs through membrane fusion mediated by the hMPV fusion (F) protein. In this...... diversity observed lay emphasis on the hMPV F gene as a putative target for future vaccine development....... been infected with at least two viruses. Several independent viruses contained premature stop codons in exactly identical positions resulting in truncated fusion proteins. Possibly this is a mechanism for immune system evasion. The F protein is a major antigenic determinant, and the limited sequence...

  3. Limited inter- and intra-patient sequence diversity of the genetic lineage a human metapneumovirus fusion gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, T.N.; Madsen, C.D.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm;

    2005-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with respiratory tract illness especially in young children. Two hMPV genetic lineages, A and B, and four sublineages A1, A2 and B1, B2 have been defined. Infection with hMPV occurs through membrane fusion mediated by the hMPV fusion (F) protein. In this...... diversity observed lay emphasis on the hMPV F gene as a putative target for future vaccine development....... been infected with at least two viruses. Several independent viruses contained premature stop codons in exactly identical positions resulting in truncated fusion proteins. Possibly this is a mechanism for immune system evasion. The F protein is a major antigenic determinant, and the limited sequence...

  4. The Evaluation of Nerve Growth Factor Over Expression on Neural Lineage Specific Genes in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Mortazavi Yousef

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Treatment and repair of neurodegenerative diseases such as brain tumors, spinal cord injuries, and functional disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, are challenging problems. A common treatment approach for such disorders involves the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as an alternative cell source to replace injured cells. However, use of these cells in hosts may potentially cause adverse outcomes such as tumorigenesis and uncontrolled differentiation. In attempt to generate mesenchymal derived neural cells, we have infected MSCs with recombinant lentiviruses that expressed nerve growth factor (NGF and assessed their neural lineage genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we cloned the NGF gene sequence into a helper dependent lentiviral vector that contained the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene. The recombinant vector was amplified in DH5 bacterial cells. Recombinant viruses were generated in the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 packaging cell line with the helper vectors and analyzed under fluorescent microscopy. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells were infected by recombinant viruses for three days followed by assessment of neural differentiation. We evaluated expression of NGF through measurement of the NGF protein in culture medium by ELISA; neural specific genes were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results We observed neural morphological changes after three days. Quantitative PCR showed that expressions of NESTIN, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 genes increased following induction of NGF overexpression, whereas expressions of endogenous NGF and brain derived neural growth factor (BDNF genes reduced. Conclusion Ectopic expression of NGF can induce neurogenesis in MSCs. Direct injection of MSCs may cause tumorigenesis and an undesirable outcome. Therefore an alternative choice to overcome this

  5. Detection of Gene Flow from Sexual to Asexual Lineages in Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Ping; Fail, Jozsef; Shelton, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    Populations of Thrips tabaci are known to have two sympatric but genetically isolated reproductive modes, arrhenotoky (sexual reproduction) and thelytoky (asexual reproduction). Herein, we report behavioral, ecological and genetic studies to determine whether there is gene flow between arrhenotokous and thelytokous T. tabaci. We did not detect significant preference by arrhenotokous males to mate with females of a particular reproductive mode, nor did we detect significant behavioral differences between arrhenotokous males mated with arrhenotokous or thelytokous females in their pre-copulation, copulation duration and mating frequency. Productive gene transfer resulting from the mating between the two modes was experimentally confirmed. Gene transfer from arrhenotokous T. tabaci to thelytokous T. tabaci was further validated by confirmation of the passage of the arrhenotokous male-originated nuclear gene (histone H3 gene) allele to the F2 generation. These behavioral, ecological and genetic studies confirmed gene transfer from the sexual arrhenotokous mode to the asexual thelytokous mode of T. tabaci in the laboratory. These results demonstrate that asexual T. tabaci populations may acquire genetic variability from sexual populations, which could offset the long-term disadvantage of asexual reproduction.

  6. Detection of Gene Flow from Sexual to Asexual Lineages in Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae.

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    Xiao-Wei Li

    Full Text Available Populations of Thrips tabaci are known to have two sympatric but genetically isolated reproductive modes, arrhenotoky (sexual reproduction and thelytoky (asexual reproduction. Herein, we report behavioral, ecological and genetic studies to determine whether there is gene flow between arrhenotokous and thelytokous T. tabaci. We did not detect significant preference by arrhenotokous males to mate with females of a particular reproductive mode, nor did we detect significant behavioral differences between arrhenotokous males mated with arrhenotokous or thelytokous females in their pre-copulation, copulation duration and mating frequency. Productive gene transfer resulting from the mating between the two modes was experimentally confirmed. Gene transfer from arrhenotokous T. tabaci to thelytokous T. tabaci was further validated by confirmation of the passage of the arrhenotokous male-originated nuclear gene (histone H3 gene allele to the F2 generation. These behavioral, ecological and genetic studies confirmed gene transfer from the sexual arrhenotokous mode to the asexual thelytokous mode of T. tabaci in the laboratory. These results demonstrate that asexual T. tabaci populations may acquire genetic variability from sexual populations, which could offset the long-term disadvantage of asexual reproduction.

  7. The Anopheles gambiae odorant binding protein 1 (AgamOBP1 mediates indole recognition in the antennae of female mosquitoes.

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    Harald Biessmann

    Full Text Available Haematophagous insects are frequently carriers of parasitic diseases, including malaria. The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is the major vector of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and is thus responsible for thousands of deaths daily. Although the role of olfaction in A. gambiae host detection has been demonstrated, little is known about the combinations of ligands and odorant binding proteins (OBPs that can produce specific odor-related responses in vivo. We identified a ligand, indole, for an A. gambiae odorant binding protein, AgamOBP1, modeled the interaction in silico and confirmed the interaction using biochemical assays. RNAi-mediated gene silencing coupled with electrophysiological analyses confirmed that AgamOBP1 binds indole in A. gambiae and that the antennal receptor cells do not respond to indole in the absence of AgamOBP1. This case represents the first documented instance of a specific A. gambiae OBP-ligand pairing combination, demonstrates the significance of OBPs in odor recognition, and can be expanded to the identification of other ligands for OBPs of Anopheles and other medically important insects.

  8. Role of RNA splicing in mediating lineage-specific expression of the von Willebrand factor gene in the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Janes, Lauren; Beeler, David; Spokes, Katherine C; Smith, Joshua; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Oettgen, Peter; Aird, William C

    2013-05-23

    We previously demonstrated that the first intron of the human von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required for gene expression in the endothelium of transgenic mice. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that RNA splicing plays a role in mediating vWF expression in the vasculature. To address this question, we used transient transfection assays in human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes with intron-containing and intronless human vWF promoter-luciferase constructs. Next, we generated knockin mice in which LacZ was targeted to the endogenous mouse vWF locus in the absence or presence of the native first intron or heterologous introns from the human β-globin, mouse Down syndrome critical region 1, or hagfish coagulation factor X genes. In both the in vitro assays and the knockin mice, the loss of the first intron of vWF resulted in a significant reduction of reporter gene expression in endothelial cells but not megakaryocytes. This effect was rescued to varying degrees by the introduction of a heterologous intron. Intron-mediated enhancement of expression was mediated at a posttranscriptional level. Together, these findings implicate a role for intronic splicing in mediating lineage-specific expression of vWF in the endothelium.

  9. Dissemination of cephalosporin resistance genes between Escherichia coli strains from farm animals and humans by specific plasmid lineages.

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    Mark de Been

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Third-generation cephalosporins are a class of β-lactam antibiotics that are often used for the treatment of human infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli. Worryingly, the incidence of human infections caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli is increasing worldwide. Recent studies have suggested that these E. coli strains, and their antibiotic resistance genes, can spread from food-producing animals, via the food-chain, to humans. However, these studies used traditional typing methods, which may not have provided sufficient resolution to reliably assess the relatedness of these strains. We therefore used whole-genome sequencing (WGS to study the relatedness of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from humans, chicken meat, poultry and pigs. One strain collection included pairs of human and poultry-associated strains that had previously been considered to be identical based on Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, plasmid typing and antibiotic resistance gene sequencing. The second collection included isolates from farmers and their pigs. WGS analysis revealed considerable heterogeneity between human and poultry-associated isolates. The most closely related pairs of strains from both sources carried 1263 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs per Mbp core genome. In contrast, epidemiologically linked strains from humans and pigs differed by only 1.8 SNPs per Mbp core genome. WGS-based plasmid reconstructions revealed three distinct plasmid lineages (IncI1- and IncK-type that carried cephalosporin resistance genes of the Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL- and AmpC-types. The plasmid backbones within each lineage were virtually identical and were shared by genetically unrelated human and animal isolates. Plasmid reconstructions from short-read sequencing data were validated by long-read DNA sequencing for two strains. Our findings failed to demonstrate evidence for recent clonal transmission of

  10. Housekeeping gene stability influences the quantification of osteogenic markers during stem cell differentiation to the osteogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Posada, Olga M; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Sarassa, Carlos; Hansford, Derek J; Agudelo-Florez, Piedad; López, Luis E

    2010-04-01

    Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) relies on a housekeeping or normalizer gene whose expression remains constant throughout the experiment. RT-qPCR is commonly used for characterization of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no studies validating the expression stability of the genes used as normalizers during hBMSCs differentiation. This work aimed to study the stability of the housekeeping genes beta-actin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and ribosomal protein L13A (RPL13A) during the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Their stability was evaluated via RT-qPCR in 14 and 20 day differentiation assays to the osteogenic lineage. Different normalization strategies were evaluated to quantify the osteogenic markers collagen type I, bone sialoprotein and osteonectin. Cell differentiation was confirmed via alizarin red staining. The results demonstrated up-regulation of beta-actin with maximum fold changes (MFC) of 4.38. GAPDH and RPL13A were not regulated by osteogenic media after 14 days and presented average fold changes lower than 2 in 20 day cultures. RPL13A (MFC < 2) had a greater stability when normalizing as a function of culture time compared with GAPDH (MFC gene in osteogenic differentiation studies of hBMSCs. This work highlights the importance of validating the normalizer genes used for stem cells characterization via RT-qPCR.

  11. Rates of evolution in stress-related genes are associated with habitat preference in two Cardamine lineages

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    Ometto Lino

    2012-01-01

    and in the levels of selective pressure between the C. impatiens and C. resedifolia lineages. The within-species analyses also revealed evolutionary patterns associated with habitat preference of two Cardamine species. We conclude that the selective pressures associated with the habitats typical of C. resedifolia may have caused the rapid evolution of genes involved in cold response.

  12. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H(+) + 2e(-)) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment.

  13. Hydrogenase gene distribution and H2 consumption ability within the Thiomicrospira lineage

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    Moritz eHansen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H22H+ + 2e- for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in T. crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes, and genetic lineages of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in healthy dogs in tunisia.

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    Gharsa, Haythem; Ben Slama, Karim; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Lozano, Carmen; Klibi, Naouel; Jouini, Ahlem; Messadi, Lilia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2013-08-01

    Nasal swabs of 100 healthy dogs were obtained in 2011 in Tunisia and tested for Staphylococcus pseudintermedius recovery. Antimicrobial resistance profile and virulence gene content were determined. Multilocus-sequence-typing (MLST) and SmaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were investigated. S. pseudintermedius was recovered in 55 of the 100 tested samples (55 %), and one isolate per sample was further studied. All 55 S. pseudintermedius isolates were susceptible to methicillin (MSSP) but showed resistance to the following antimicrobials (% resistant isolates/resistance gene): penicillin (56.4/blaZ), tetracycline (40/tetM), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (23.7), fusidic acid (9), kanamycin (3.7/aph(3´)-Ia), erythromycin-clindamycin (1.8/erm(B)), streptomycin (1.8/ant(6)-Ia), chloramphenicol (1.8) and ciprofloxacin (1.8). The following toxin genes were identified (% of isolates): lukS/F-I (98.2), expA (5.5), se-int (98.2), sec canine (1.8), siet (100), sea (5.5), seb (3.6), sec (10.9), sed (54.5), sei (5.5), sej (29.1), sek (3.6), ser (9.1), and hlg v (38.2). Ten different sequence-types were detected among 11 representative MSSP isolates: ST20, ST44, ST69, ST70, ST78, ST100, ST108, ST160, ST161, and ST162, the last three ones revealing novel alleles or allele combinations. Eleven different PFGE-patterns were identified in these isolates. The nares of healthy dogs could be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistant and virulent MSSP, highlighting the presence of the recently described exfoliating gene expA and several enterotoxin genes.

  15. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) within the European marine environment

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    Snow, M.; Cunningham, C.O.; Melvin, W.T.; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    A ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay (RPA) has been used to detect nucleotide sequence variation within the nucleoprotein gene of 39 viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates of European marine origin. The classification of VHSV isolates based on RPA cleavage patterns permitted the identification of ten distinct groups of viruses based on differences at the molecular level. The nucleotide sequence of representatives of each of these groupings was determined and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This revealed grouping of the European marine isolates of VHSV into three genotypes circulating within distinct geographic areas. A fourth genotype was identified comprising isolates originating from North America. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that VHSV isolates recovered from wild caught fish around the British Isles were genetically related to isolates responsible for losses in farmed turbot. Furthermore, a relationship between naturally occurring marine isolates and VHSV isolates causing mortality among rainbow trout in continental Europe was demonstrated. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus within the European marine environment. Virus Res. 63, 35-44. Available from: 

  16. Differentially expressed genes in Bordetella pertussis strains belonging to a lineage which recently spread globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, Daan; Hermans, Peter W M; Bootsma, Hester J; Zomer, Aldert; Heuvelman, Kees; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Mooi, Frits R

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious, acute respiratory disease in humans caused by the Gram-negative pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis has resurged in the face of intensive vaccination and this has coincided with the emergence of strains carrying a particular allele for the pertussis toxin promoter, ptxP3, which is associated with higher levels of pertussis toxin (Ptx) production. Within 10 to 20 years, ptxP3 strains have nearly completely replaced the previously dominant ptxP1 strains resulting in a worldwide selective sweep. In order to identify B. pertussis genes associated with the selective sweep, we compared the expression of genes in ptxP1 and ptxP3 strains that are under control of the Bordetella master virulence regulatory locus (bvgASR). The BvgAS proteins comprise a two component sensory transduction system which is regulated by temperature, nicotinic acid and sulfate. By increasing the sulfate concentration, it is possible to change the phase of B. pertussis from virulent to avirulent. Until recently, the only distinctive phenotype of ptxP3 strains was a higher Ptx production. Here we identify additional phenotypic differences between ptxP1 and ptxP3 strains which may have contributed to its global spread by comparing global transcriptional responses under sulfate-modulating conditions. We show that ptxP3 strains are less sensitive to sulfate-mediated gene suppression, resulting in an increased production of the vaccine antigens pertactin (Prn) and Ptx and a number of other virulence genes, including a type III secretion toxin, Vag8, a protein involved in complement resistance, and lpxE involved in lipid A modification. Furthermore, enhanced expression of the vaccine antigens Ptx and Prn by ptxP3 strains was confirmed at the protein level. Identification of genes differentially expressed between ptxP1 and ptxP3 strains may elucidate how B. pertussis has adapted to vaccination and allow the improvement of pertussis vaccines by identifying novel

  17. Differentially expressed genes in Bordetella pertussis strains belonging to a lineage which recently spread globally.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daan de Gouw

    Full Text Available Pertussis is a highly contagious, acute respiratory disease in humans caused by the Gram-negative pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis has resurged in the face of intensive vaccination and this has coincided with the emergence of strains carrying a particular allele for the pertussis toxin promoter, ptxP3, which is associated with higher levels of pertussis toxin (Ptx production. Within 10 to 20 years, ptxP3 strains have nearly completely replaced the previously dominant ptxP1 strains resulting in a worldwide selective sweep. In order to identify B. pertussis genes associated with the selective sweep, we compared the expression of genes in ptxP1 and ptxP3 strains that are under control of the Bordetella master virulence regulatory locus (bvgASR. The BvgAS proteins comprise a two component sensory transduction system which is regulated by temperature, nicotinic acid and sulfate. By increasing the sulfate concentration, it is possible to change the phase of B. pertussis from virulent to avirulent. Until recently, the only distinctive phenotype of ptxP3 strains was a higher Ptx production. Here we identify additional phenotypic differences between ptxP1 and ptxP3 strains which may have contributed to its global spread by comparing global transcriptional responses under sulfate-modulating conditions. We show that ptxP3 strains are less sensitive to sulfate-mediated gene suppression, resulting in an increased production of the vaccine antigens pertactin (Prn and Ptx and a number of other virulence genes, including a type III secretion toxin, Vag8, a protein involved in complement resistance, and lpxE involved in lipid A modification. Furthermore, enhanced expression of the vaccine antigens Ptx and Prn by ptxP3 strains was confirmed at the protein level. Identification of genes differentially expressed between ptxP1 and ptxP3 strains may elucidate how B. pertussis has adapted to vaccination and allow the improvement of pertussis vaccines by

  18. Mixed heterolobosean and novel gregarine lineage genes from culture ATCC 50646: Long-branch artefacts, not lateral gene transfer, distort α-tubulin phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Contradictory and confusing results can arise if sequenced 'monoprotist' samples really contain DNA of very different species. Eukaryote-wide phylogenetic analyses using five genes from the amoeboflagellate culture ATCC 50646 previously implied it was an undescribed percolozoan related to percolatean flagellates (Stephanopogon, Percolomonas). Contrastingly, three phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA alone, did not place it within Percolozoa, but as an isolated deep-branching excavate. I resolve that contradiction by sequence phylogenies for all five genes individually, using up to 652 taxa. Its 18S rRNA sequence (GQ377652) is near-identical to one from stained-glass windows, somewhat more distant from one from cooling-tower water, all three related to terrestrial actinocephalid gregarines Hoplorhynchus and Pyxinia. All four protein-gene sequences (Hsp90; α-tubulin; β-tubulin; actin) are from an amoeboflagellate heterolobosean percolozoan, not especially deeply branching. Contrary to previous conclusions from trees combining protein and rRNA sequences or rDNA trees including Eozoa only, this culture does not represent a major novel deep-branching eukaryote lineage distinct from Heterolobosea, and thus lacks special significance for deep eukaryote phylogeny, though the rDNA sequence is important for gregarine phylogeny. α-Tubulin trees for over 250 eukaryotes refute earlier suggestions of lateral gene transfer within eukaryotes, being largely congruent with morphology and other gene trees.

  19. Zonal induction of mixed lineage kinase ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression in regenerating mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douziech, M; Grondin, G; Loranger, A; Marceau, N; Blouin, R

    1998-08-28

    ZPK/DLK/MUK is a serine/theronine kinase believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. To further explore the suggested participation of ZPK/DLK/MUK in this process, we examined the expression and cellular localization of ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNA in regenerating mouse liver following partial hepatectomy by ribonuclease protection assay and in situ hybridization. The steady-state level of APK/DLKMUK mRNA was very low in normal and sham-operated mouse livers, whereas a marked and transient increase was observed in the regenerating liver. While ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNAs were rarely detected in hepatocytes from all zones of the normal liver, hepatocytes of regenerating liver exhibit a gradient of expression ranging from low in the periportal zone, to intermediate in the mid-zone, to high in the pericentral zone. These findings demonstrate a transient stimulation of ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression that correlates with the growth response of hepatocyte subpopulations in regenerating liver.

  20. Mice lacking both mixed-lineage kinase genes Mlk1 and Mlk2 retain a wild type phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Nicolas; Tremblay, Michel; Robinson, Fiona; Kaplan, David R; Trusko, Steven P; Moss, Tom

    2008-04-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases of the mixed-lineage kinase (MLK) family have been shown to activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, and to regulate the other two principal MAPK cascades, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Although there is growing evidence for their involvement in neuronal cell death leading to neurodegenerative disorders, little in vivo data is available for the members of this family of kinases. Here, we report that the inactivation of mouse Mlk1 and Mlk2 genes. Mlk1(-/-) and Mlk2(-/-) mice were found to be viable and healthy. Surprisingly, mice carrying the compound Mlk1/Mlk2 null mutations were also found to be viable, fertile and to have a normal life span. The nervous system, testis and kidney, the major sites of MLK1 and 2 expression, all appear normal, as do other organs where these kinases were found to be more weakly expressed. Surprisingly, developmental neuronal programmed cell death, another potential target for MLK family members, was also found to be unaffected. Our results suggest that there is extensive functional redundancy between MLK1/MLK2 and the other member of the family, MLK3, which is also not required for survival in mouse.

  1. Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

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    Nidal Ghosheh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs- derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4 which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models.

  2. Identification of a cell lineage-specific gene coding for a sea urchin alpha 2(IV)-like collagen chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposito, J Y; Suzuki, H; Geourjon, C; Garrone, R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1994-05-06

    We report the isolation of several overlapping cDNAs from an embryonic library of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus coding for a novel sea urchin collagen chain. The conceptual amino acid translation of the cDNAs indicated that the protein displays the structural features of a vertebrate type IV-like collagen alpha chain. In addition to a putative 31-residue signal peptide, the sea urchin molecule contains a 14-residue amino-terminal non-collagenous segment, a discontinuous 1,477-amino acid triple helical domain, and a 225-residue carboxyl-terminal domain rich in cysteines. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous regions of the echinoid molecule are remarkably similar to the 7 S and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of vertebrate type IV collagen. The sequence similarity and distinct structural features of the 7 S and NC1 domains strongly suggest that the sea urchin polypeptide is evolutionarily related to the alpha 2(IV) class of collagen chains. Finally, in situ hybridizations revealed that expression of this collagen gene is restricted to the mesenchyme cell lineage of the developing sea urchin embryo.

  3. "Mid-G" region sequences of the glycoprotein gene of Austrian infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus isolates form two lineages within European isolates and are distinct from American and Asian lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Schachner, Oskar; Dürrwald, Ralf; Latif, Muna; Nowotny, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is one of the most important pathogens of salmonid fish. In this study a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the genetic evolution and variety of Austrian IHNV strains, as well as selected strains ensuring worldwide coverage, is presented. The phylogenetic investigation is based on sequences comprising the "mid-G" region of the G gene, and it includes all currently available IHNV sequences of the G gene with a length of at least 615 bp. Austrian IHNVs are located--together with other European IHNV isolates--in two clusters of genogroup M (M-Eur1 and M-Eur2) and are clearly separated from American and Asian lineages. The genetic clustering, however, could not be linked to certain clinical symptoms or significant differences in the mortality rates.

  4. Functional clustering and lineage markers: insights into cellular differentiation and gene function from large-scale microarray studies of purified primary cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Raza, Sobia; Baillie, J Kenneth; Freeman, Thomas C

    2010-06-01

    Very large microarray datasets showing gene expression across multiple tissues and cell populations provide a window on the transcriptional networks that underpin the differences in functional activity between biological systems. Clusters of co-expressed genes provide lineage markers, candidate regulators of cell function and, by applying the principle of guilt by association, candidate functions for genes of currently unknown function. We have analysed a dataset comprising pure cell populations from hemopoietic and non-hemopoietic cell types (http://biogps.gnf.org). Using a novel network visualisation and clustering approach, we demonstrate that it is possible to identify very tight expression signatures associated specifically with embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal cells and hematopoietic lineages. Selected examples validate the prediction that gene function can be inferred by co-expression. One expression cluster was enriched in phagocytes, which, alongside endosome-lysosome constituents, contains genes that may make up a 'pathway' for phagocyte differentiation. Promoters of these genes are enriched for binding sites for the ETS/PU.1 and MITF families. Another cluster was associated with the production of a specific extracellular matrix, with high levels of gene expression shared by cells of mesenchymal origin (fibroblasts, adipocytes, osteoblasts and myoblasts). We discuss the limitations placed upon such data by the presence of alternative promoters with distinct tissue specificity within many protein-coding genes.

  5. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP

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    Ehrendorfer Friedrich

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae. It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. Results In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. Conclusions The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg.

  6. The carriage of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanle; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2015-01-01

    C-negative, sdrD-negative, and sdrE-positive gene profile relative to other four CCs isolates. All ST1 and ST5, 95.2% (20/21) of ST188 and 95.2% (20/21) of ST630 isolates were positive for sdrC. Taken together, our investigation indicated that different S. aureus lineages were associated with specific patterns of carriage of sdr genes.

  7. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

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    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  8. Nucleotide mismatches between the VP7 gene and the primer are associated with genotyping failure of a specific lineage from G1 rotavirus strains

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    Espinola Emilio E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years it was reported that the accumulation of point mutations in VP4 and VP7 genes of rotavirus strains was the main cause of the failure of the G or P-typing. Failures in the correct genotyping of G1, G2, G8, G9 and G10 rotavirus strains were reported in the most commonly used reverse transcription (RT-PCR strategies. Collecting VP7 gene sequences of G1 rotavirus strains from databases we found that 74 (61.2 % out of 121 G1 strains from lineage I showed the four specific mismatches at the 5' end of the 9T1-1 primer, previously associated with the failure of G1-typing. Thus, a great percentage of the G1 strains from lineage I worldwide reported could not have been typed if the Das's RT-PCR strategy were used. This analysis shows that the failure on the detection of the G1 strains could be due to the diversification of rotavirus strains in phylogenetic lineages. Therefore, the use of different RT-PCR strategies with different primer binding locations on the VP7 gene or new typing methodologies -like microarrays procedures- could be a better option to avoid the failure of the G-typing of rotavirus strains detected during surveillance programs.

  9. Misregulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila hybrids is lineage-specific and driven by the combined effects of sterility and fast male regulatory divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, S; Civetta, A

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid male sterility is a common outcome of crosses between different species. Gene expression studies have found that a number of spermatogenesis genes are differentially expressed in sterile hybrid males, compared with parental species. Late-stage sperm development genes are particularly likely to be misexpressed, with fewer early-stage genes affected. Thus, a link has been posited between misexpression and sterility. A more recent alternative explanation for hybrid gene misexpression has been that it is independent of sterility and driven by divergent evolution of male-specific regulatory elements between species (faster male hypothesis). The faster male hypothesis predicts that misregulation of spermatogenesis genes should be independent of sterility and approximately the same in both hybrids, whereas sterility should only affect gene expression in sterile hybrids. To test the faster male hypothesis vs. the effect of sterility on gene misexpression, we analyse spermatogenesis gene expression in different species pairs of the Drosophila phylogeny, where hybrid male sterility occurs in only one direction of the interspecies cross (i.e. unidirectional sterility). We find significant differences among genes in misexpression with effects that are lineage-specific and caused by sterility or fast male regulatory divergence.

  10. Prevalent Exon-Intron Structural Changes in the APETALA1/FRUITFULL, SEPALLATA, AGAMOUS-LIKE6, and FLOWERING LOCUS C MADS-Box Gene Subfamilies Provide New Insights into Their Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianxian; Duan, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Xuehao; Ye, Lingling; Kong, Hongzhi; Xu, Guixia; Shan, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    AP1/FUL, SEP, AGL6, and FLC subfamily genes play important roles in flower development. The phylogenetic relationships among them, however, have been controversial, which impedes our understanding of the origin and functional divergence of these genes. One possible reason for the controversy may be the problems caused by changes in the exon-intron structure of genes, which, according to recent studies, may generate non-homologous sites and hamper the homology-based sequence alignment. In this study, we first performed exon-by-exon alignments of these and three outgroup subfamilies (SOC1, AG, and STK). Phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on these matrices show improved resolution and better congruence with species phylogeny. In the context of these phylogenies, we traced evolutionary changes of exon-intron structures in each subfamily. We found that structural changes have occurred frequently following gene duplication and speciation events. Notably, exons 7 and 8 (if present) suffered more structural changes than others. With the knowledge of exon-intron structural changes, we generated more reasonable alignments containing all the focal subfamilies. The resulting trees showed that the SEP subfamily is sister to the monophyletic group formed by AP1/FUL and FLC subfamily genes and that the AGL6 subfamily forms a sister group to the three abovementioned subfamilies. Based on this topology, we inferred the evolutionary history of exon-intron structural changes among different subfamilies. Particularly, we found that the eighth exon originated before the divergence of AP1/FUL, FLC, SEP, and AGL6 subfamilies and degenerated in the ancestral FLC-like gene. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the AP1/FUL, FLC, SEP, and AGL6 subfamilies.

  11. Enrichment of brain-related genes on the mammalian X chromosome is ancient and predates the divergence of synapsid and sauropsid lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemkemer, Claus; Kohn, Matthias; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Fundele, Reinald H; Hameister, Horst

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed an enrichment of reproduction- and brain-related genes on the human X chromosome. In the present study, we investigated the evolutionary history that underlies this functional specialization. To do so, we analyzed the orthologous building blocks of the mammalian X chromosome in the chicken genome. We used Affymetrix chicken genome microarrays to determine tissue-selective gene expression in several tissues of the chicken, including testis and brain. Subsequently, chromosomal distribution of genes with tissue-selective expression was determined. These analyzes provided several new findings. Firstly, they showed that chicken chromosomes orthologous to the mammalian X chromosome exhibited an increased concentration of genes expressed selectively in brain. More specifically, the highest concentration of brain-selectively expressed genes was found on chicken chromosome GGA12, which shows orthology to the X chromosomal regions with the highest enrichment of non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (MRX) genes. Secondly, and in contrast to the first finding, no enrichment of testis-selective genes could be detected on these chicken chromosomes. These findings indicate that the accumulation of brain-related genes on the prospective mammalian X chromosome antedates the divergence of sauropsid and synapsid lineages 315 million years ago, whereas the accumulation of testis-related genes on the mammalian X chromosome is more recent and due to adaptational changes.

  12. Genetic diversity, seasonality and transmission network of human metapneumovirus: identification of a unique sub-lineage of the fusion and attachment genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Chan, Yoke Fun; Oong, Xiang Yong; Ng, Liang Jie; Nor’E, Siti Sarah; Ng, Kim Tien; Chan, Kok Gan; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Pang, Yong Kek; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is an important viral respiratory pathogen worldwide. Current knowledge regarding the genetic diversity, seasonality and transmission dynamics of HMPV among adults and children living in tropical climate remains limited. HMPV prevailed at 2.2% (n = 86/3,935) among individuals presented with acute respiratory tract infections in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia between 2012 and 2014. Seasonal peaks were observed during the northeast monsoon season (November–April) and correlated with higher relative humidity and number of rainy days (P < 0.05). Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion and attachment genes identified the co-circulation of three known HMPV sub-lineages, A2b and B1 (30.2% each, 26/86) and B2 (20.9%, 18/86), with genotype shift from sub-lineage B1 to A2b observed in 2013. Interestingly, a previously unrecognized sub-lineage of A2 was identified in 18.6% (16/86) of the population. Using a custom script for network construction based on the TN93 pairwise genetic distance, we identified up to nine HMPV transmission clusters circulating as multiple sub-epidemics. Although no apparent major outbreak was observed, the increased frequency of transmission clusters (dyads) during seasonal peaks suggests the potential roles of transmission clusters in driving the spread of HMPV. Our findings provide essential information for therapeutic research, prevention strategies, and disease outbreak monitoring of HMPV. PMID:27279080

  13. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Benítez-Galeano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36 in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1 the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2 the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program.

  14. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Galeano, María José; Rubio, Leticia; Bertalmío, Ana; Maeso, Diego; Rivas, Fernando; Colina, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23). Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36) in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD) and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1) the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2) the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program. PMID:26205407

  15. Lineage-specific group II intron gains and losses of the mitochondrial rps3 gene in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Teresa M R; Quagliariello, Carla

    2010-08-01

    According to PCR assays and sequencing, we now report the shared presence of two rps3 introns, namely the rps3i74 and the rps3i249, in the mitochondria of all the classes representing the surviving lineages of gymnosperms, and unveil several lineages experiencing intron loss. Interestingly, the rps3 intron gains and losses within the four groups of gymnosperms let us sort out the Pinaceae and the non-Pinaceae into intron (+)- and intron (-)-lineages, respectively. Worthy of mention is also the finding that only Gnetum within the Gnetales harbours both the rps3 introns. This intron distribution pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the two rps3 introns were likely present in the common ancestor of the seed plants and, then, independently lost in the non-Pinaceae during gymnosperm evolution. The derived secondary structural model of the novel group IIA intron improves our understanding of the significance and origin of the extraordinary length polymorphisms observed among rps3i249 orthologs. Despite the remarkable structural plasticity to adopt and reject introns, the rps3 mRNAs undergo accurate processing by splicing and extensive editing in gymnosperm mitochondria. This study provides additional insights into the evolutionarily high dynamics of mitochondrial introns which may come and go in closely related plant species. The turnover of the mitochondrial rps3 group II introns seen among lineages of seed plants further suggests that these introns might be an additional signature to discriminate between particularly cryptical taxonomic groups for which there is a need of a further evaluation of their evolutionary affiliation.

  16. Expansion of banana (Musa acuminata) gene families involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signalling after lineage-specific whole-genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Bocs, Stéphanie; Garsmeur, Olivier; D'Hont, Angélique; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2014-05-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are widespread in plants, and three lineage-specific WGDs occurred in the banana (Musa acuminata) genome. Here, we analysed the impact of WGDs on the evolution of banana gene families involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signalling, a key pathway for banana fruit ripening. Banana ethylene pathway genes were identified using comparative genomics approaches and their duplication modes and expression profiles were analysed. Seven out of 10 banana ethylene gene families evolved through WGD and four of them (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS), ethylene-insensitive 3-like (EIL), ethylene-insensitive 3-binding F-box (EBF) and ethylene response factor (ERF)) were preferentially retained. Banana orthologues of AtEIN3 and AtEIL1, two major genes for ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis, were particularly expanded. This expansion was paralleled by that of EBF genes which are responsible for control of EIL protein levels. Gene expression profiles in banana fruits suggested functional redundancy for several MaEBF and MaEIL genes derived from WGD and subfunctionalization for some of them. We propose that EIL and EBF genes were co-retained after WGD in banana to maintain balanced control of EIL protein levels and thus avoid detrimental effects of constitutive ethylene signalling. In the course of evolution, subfunctionalization was favoured to promote finer control of ethylene signalling.

  17. Regulation of early T-lineage gene expression and developmental progression by the progenitor cell transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champhekar, Ameya; Damle, Sagar S; Freedman, George; Carotta, Sebastian; Nutt, Stephen L; Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2015-04-15

    The ETS family transcription factor PU.1 is essential for the development of several blood lineages, including T cells, but its function in intrathymic T-cell precursors has been poorly defined. In the thymus, high PU.1 expression persists through multiple cell divisions in early stages but then falls sharply during T-cell lineage commitment. PU.1 silencing is critical for T-cell commitment, but it has remained unknown how PU.1 activities could contribute positively to T-cell development. Here we employed conditional knockout and modified antagonist PU.1 constructs to perturb PU.1 function stage-specifically in early T cells. We show that PU.1 is needed for full proliferation, restricting access to some non-T fates, and controlling the timing of T-cell developmental progression such that removal or antagonism of endogenous PU.1 allows precocious access to T-cell differentiation. Dominant-negative effects reveal that this repression by PU.1 is mediated indirectly. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis identifies novel targets of PU.1 positive and negative regulation affecting progenitor cell signaling and cell biology and indicating distinct regulatory effects on different subsets of progenitor cell transcription factors. Thus, in addition to supporting early T-cell proliferation, PU.1 regulates the timing of activation of the core T-lineage developmental program.

  18. The split genes of Nanoarchaeum equitans have not originated in its lineage and have been merged in another Nanoarchaeota: a reply to Podar et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2014-05-21

    I reply to the suggestion of Podar et al. (2013) that the split genes of Nanoarchaeun equitans are a derived character, showing that their analysis is mistaken. In particular, I show that the split genes both proteins and tRNAs have not been split in N. equitans and have been on the contrary merged in the nanoarchaeon sequenced recently by Podar et al. (2013). This implies that the main argument of Podar et al. (2013) that there should be: "a unique propensity for splitting in the Nanoarchaeota that is most dramatically manifested in the Nanoarchaeum equitans lineage" is false. On the other hand, the analysis seems to favor the hypothesis that the split genes are an ancestral character. This would strengthen to greater extent a model for the origin of the tRNA molecule.

  19. Epigenetic Control of the Bone-master Runx2 Gene during Osteoblast-lineage Commitment by the Histone Demethylase JARID1B/KDM5B*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Adriana; Aguilar, Rodrigo; Henriquez, Berta; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; van Zundert, Brigitte; Allende, Miguel L.; Montecino, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor Runx2 controls bone development and osteoblast differentiation by regulating expression of a significant number of bone-related target genes. Here, we report that transcriptional activation and repression of the Runx2 gene via its osteoblast-specific P1 promoter (encoding mRNA for the Runx2/p57 isoform) is accompanied by selective deposition and elimination of histone marks during differentiation of mesenchymal cells to the osteogenic and myoblastic lineages. These epigenetic profiles are mediated by key components of the Trithorax/COMPASS-like and Polycomb group complexes together with histone arginine methylases like PRMT5 and lysine demethylases like JARID1B/KDM5B. Importantly, knockdown of the H3K4me2/3 demethylase JARID1B, but not of the demethylases UTX and NO66, prevents repression of the Runx2 P1 promoter during myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells. The epigenetically forced expression of Runx2/p57 and osteocalcin, a classical bone-related target gene, under myoblastic-differentiation is accompanied by enrichment of the H3K4me3 and H3K27ac marks at the Runx2 P1 promoter region. Our results identify JARID1B as a key component of a potent epigenetic switch that controls mesenchymal cell fate into myogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:26453309

  20. Current versus historical population sizes in vertebrate species with high gene flow: a comparison based on mitochondrial DNA lineages and inbreeding theory for neutral mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avise, J C; Ball, R M; Arnold, J

    1988-07-01

    Using inbreeding theory as applied to neutral alleles inherited maternally, we generate expected probability distributions of times to identity by descent for random pairs of mitochondrial genotypes within a population or within an entire species characterized by high gene flow. For comparisons with these expectations, empirical distributions of times to most recent common ancestry were calculated (by conventional mtDNA clock calibrations) from mtDNA haplotype distances observed within each of three vertebrate species--American eels, hardhead catfish, and redwinged blackbirds. These species were chosen for analysis because census population size in each is currently large and because both genetic and life-history data are consistent with the postulate that historical gene flow within these species has been high. The observed molecular distances among mtDNA lineages were two to three orders of magnitude lower than predicted from census sizes of breeding females, suggesting that rate of mtDNA evolution is decelerated in these species and/or that long-term effective population size is vastly smaller than present-day population size. Several considerations point to the latter possibility as most likely. The genetic structure of any species is greatly influenced by historical demography; even for species that are currently abundant, mtDNA gene lineages appear to have been channeled through fairly small numbers of ancestors.

  1. Gene structure of the two-domain taurocyamine kinase from Paragonimus westermani: evidence for a distinct lineage of trematode phosphagen kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarilla, Blanca R; Tokuhiro, Shinji; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Uda, Kouji; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Acosta, Luz P; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2013-07-11

    Taurocyamine kinase (TK) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphate between ATP and taurocyamine. Annelid TKs were suggested to have evolved from a CK ancestor. However, TKs from the lung fluke Paragonimus westermani comprised another lineage. Construction of phylogenetic tree and comparison of exon/intron organization showed that P. westermani TK and other trematode TKs evolved from a molluscan arginine kinase (AK) gene. Exon shuffling probably caused the changes in amino acid sequence thereby changing the affinity from AK to TK. The present study provides new insights on the evolution of phosphagen kinases found in trematodes.

  2. A spruce gene map infers ancient plant genome reshuffling and subsequent slow evolution in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extant conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavy Nathalie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed plants are composed of angiosperms and gymnosperms, which diverged from each other around 300 million years ago. While much light has been shed on the mechanisms and rate of genome evolution in flowering plants, such knowledge remains conspicuously meagre for the gymnosperms. Conifers are key representatives of gymnosperms and the sheer size of their genomes represents a significant challenge for characterization, sequencing and assembling. Results To gain insight into the macro-organisation and long-term evolution of the conifer genome, we developed a genetic map involving 1,801 spruce genes. We designed a statistical approach based on kernel density estimation to analyse gene density and identified seven gene-rich isochors. Groups of co-localizing genes were also found that were transcriptionally co-regulated, indicative of functional clusters. Phylogenetic analyses of 157 gene families for which at least two duplicates were mapped on the spruce genome indicated that ancient gene duplicates shared by angiosperms and gymnosperms outnumbered conifer-specific duplicates by a ratio of eight to one. Ancient duplicates were much more translocated within and among spruce chromosomes than conifer-specific duplicates, which were mostly organised in tandem arrays. Both high synteny and collinearity were also observed between the genomes of spruce and pine, two conifers that diverged more than 100 million years ago. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that much genomic evolution has occurred in the seed plant lineage before the split between gymnosperms and angiosperms, and that the pace of evolution of the genome macro-structure has been much slower in the gymnosperm lineage leading to extent conifers than that seen for the same period of time in flowering plants. This trend is largely congruent with the contrasted rates of diversification and morphological evolution observed between these two groups of seed

  3. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  4. ANALISIS POTENSI EKONOMI DAERAH DALAM PENGEMBANGAN KOMODITI UNGGULAN KABUPATEN AGAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolamalinda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Globalization requires areas within the national territory to compete in the free trade competitively with products from countries all over the world. Regional economic development is expected to produce superior quality products that can compete in competition, both domestically and abroad. Agam as areas that have the potential of tourism and culture has the potential to perform on the world market with superior commodity sub-sectors of the manufacturing industry. This article analyzes the election of regional commodity Agam using LQ analysis, specialization index, Shift share and SWOT analysis. The analysis finds that subsekctor processing industry has a competitive advantage and thus likely to be developed to increase the region's economy. Commodity embroidery as a creative industry is a commodity that is mapped able to compete on the sub-sectors of the processing industry because the rich local cultural values and Islamic values. A variety of programs and government policies are needed to support these commodities to appear on the international market.

  5. Sequence of a complete chicken BG haplotype shows dynamic expansion and contraction of two gene lineages with particular expression patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Jan; Chattaway, John A.; Chan, Andrew C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Many genes important in immunity are found as multigene families. The butyrophilin genes are members of the B7 family, playing diverse roles in co-regulation and perhaps in antigen presentation. In humans, a fixed number of butyrophilin genes are found in and around the major histocompatibility c...... the BG region. Thus, the BG genes in chickens are undergoing much more rapid evolution compared to their homologues in mammals, for reasons yet to be understood....

  6. Sequence of a complete chicken BG haplotype shows dynamic expansion and contraction of two gene lineages with particular expression patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Jan; Chattaway, John A; Chan, Andrew C Y;

    2014-01-01

    Many genes important in immunity are found as multigene families. The butyrophilin genes are members of the B7 family, playing diverse roles in co-regulation and perhaps in antigen presentation. In humans, a fixed number of butyrophilin genes are found in and around the major histocompatibility c...

  7. Genetic lineages, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus of meat samples in Spain: analysis of immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Daniel; Gómez, Paula; Lozano, Carmen; Estepa, Vanesa; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the rate of contamination by Staphylococcus aureus in 100 meat samples obtained during 2011-2012 in La Rioja (Northern Spain), to analyze their content in antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, as well as in immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes, and to type recovered isolates. Seven of 100 samples (7%) contained S. aureus: 6 samples harbored methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 1 pork sample harbored methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The MRSA isolate corresponded to the ST398 genetic lineage with a multidrug resistance profile and the absence of human IEC genes, which pointed to a typical livestock-associated MRSA profile. MRSA isolate was ascribed to the spa-type t011, agr-type I, and SCCmec-V and showed resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, and streptomycin, in addition to β-lactams. The remaining six MSSA strains belonged to different sequence types and clonal complexes (three isolates ST45/CC45, one ST617/CC45, one ST5/CC5, and one ST109/CC9), being susceptible to most antibiotics tested but showing a wide virulence gene profile. Five of the six MSSA strains (except ST617/CC45) contained the enterotoxin egc-cluster or egc-like-cluster genes, and strain ST109/CC9 contained eta gene (encoding exfoliatin A). The presence of human IEC genes in MSSA strains (types B and D) points to a possible contamination of meat samples from an undefined human source. The presence of S. aureus with enterotoxin genes and MRSA in food samples might have implications in public health. The IEC system could be a good marker to follow the S. aureus contamination source in meat food products.

  8. Lineage-specific fragmentation and nuclear relocation of the mitochondrial cox2 gene in chlorophycean green algae (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Salinas, Elizabeth; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Li, Zhongkui; Fucíková, Karolina; Brand, Jerry J; Lewis, Louise A; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-07-01

    In most eukaryotes the subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase (COX2) is encoded in intact mitochondrial genes. Some green algae, however, exhibit split cox2 genes (cox2a and cox2b) encoding two polypeptides (COX2A and COX2B) that form a heterodimeric COX2 subunit. Here, we analyzed the distribution of intact and split cox2 gene sequences in 39 phylogenetically diverse green algae in phylum Chlorophyta obtained from databases (28 sequences from 22 taxa) and from new cox2 data generated in this work (23 sequences from 18 taxa). Our results support previous observations based on a smaller number of taxa, indicating that algae in classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Trebouxiophyceae contain orthodox, intact mitochondrial cox2 genes. In contrast, all of the algae in Chlorophyceae that we examined exhibited split cox2 genes, and could be separated into two groups: one that has a mitochondrion-localized cox2a gene and a nucleus-localized cox2b gene ("Scenedesmus-like"), and another that has both cox2a and cox2b genes in the nucleus ("Chlamydomonas-like"). The location of the split cox2a and cox2b genes was inferred using five different criteria: differences in amino acid sequences, codon usage (mitochondrial vs. nuclear), codon preference (third position frequencies), presence of nucleotide sequences encoding mitochondrial targeting sequences and presence of spliceosomal introns. Distinct green algae could be grouped according to the form of cox2 gene they contain: intact or fragmented, mitochondrion- or nucleus-localized, and intron-containing or intron-less. We present a model describing the events that led to mitochondrial cox2 gene fragmentation and the independent and sequential migration of cox2a and cox2b genes to the nucleus in chlorophycean green algae. We also suggest that the distribution of the different forms of the cox2 gene provides important insights into the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of Chlorophyceae.

  9. The complex translocation (9;14;14 involving IGH and CEBPE genes suggests a new subgroup in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Zerrouki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL are associated with specific chromosomal rearrangements. The complex translocation t(9;14;14, a variant of the translocation (14;14(q11;q32, is a rare but recurrent chromosomal abnormality involving the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (CEBPE genes in B-lineage ALL (B-ALL and may represent a new B-ALL subgroup. We report here the case of a 5-year-old girl with B-ALL, positive for CD19, CD38 and HLA-DR. A direct technique and G-banding were used for chromosomal analysis and fluorescentin situ hybridization (FISH with BAC probes was used to investigate a possible rearrangement of the IGH andCEBPE genes. The karyotype exhibit the chromosomal aberration 46,XX,del(9(p21,t(14;14(q11;q32. FISH with dual-color break-apartIGH-specific and CEPBE-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC probes showed a complex t(9;14;14 associated with a deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A and paired box gene 5 (PAX5 at 9p21-13 and duplication of the fusion gene IGH-CEBPE.

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages I and II harboring different carbapenem-hydrolyzing-β-lactamase genes are widespread among hospitalized burn patients in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdian, Somayeh; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Pakzad, Iraj; Ghanbari, Fatemeh; Soroush, Setareh; Azimi, Lila; Rastegar-Lari, Abdolaziz; Giannouli, Maria; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze antimicrobial resistance patterns and their encoding genes and genotypic diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn patients in Tehran, Iran. The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase- and blaOXA-encoding genes among 37 multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii strains isolated from patients hospitalized in a teaching hospital in Tehran was evaluated. Susceptibility to 7 antibiotics was tested by disk agar diffusion and to polymyxin B and colistin was tested by E-test, according to CLSI guidelines. All isolates were then analyzed by PCR for the presence of blaIMP, blaVIM, blaSIMblaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, and blaOXA-58-like carbapenemase genes, and blaOXA-51-like, blaTEM, blaSHV, blaPER, blaVEB, and blaGIM genes. Genotyping of A. baumannii strains was performed by repetitive sequence-based (REP)-PCR and cluster analysis of REP-PCR profiles. A. baumannii isolates were assigned to international clones by multiplex PCR sequence group analysis. Twenty-five A. baumannii isolates were classified as MDR, and 12 were classified as extensively drug resistant. All isolates were susceptible to colistin and polymyxin B. Eighty-one percent of the isolates was resistant to imipenem or meropenem and harbored at least one or both of the blaOXA-23-like or blaOXA-24-like carbapenemase genes. Co-existence of different resistance genes was found among carbapenem-resistant isolates. Multiplex PCR sequence group analysis most commonly assigned A. baumannii isolates to international clones I (18/37; 48.6%) and II (18/37; 48.6%). An alarming increase in resistance to carbapenems and the spread of blaOXA-23-like and/or blaOXA-24-like carbapenemase genes was observed among A. baumannii strains belonging to clonal lineages I and II, isolated from burn patients in Tehran.

  11. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs) are passed from ancestral to descendant primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Tina; Nissen, Janna; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2011-01-01

    -human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non...

  12. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-04-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gi=18896463 /ug=Aga.18967 /len=462 3e-12 73% MIKLYCFQLCACISAFCAFAMCKRVEMKCSFSLSLSLSLCLSLSLSLSLSVSLSVSLSVSLSVSLSVSLSVSLSLSLSLSLSLSLS...MCLSLSLSLSLSLSLSPCLSLFLSLYLSLSLSISLYLSLFLSLCLSLTVSLSLSLSLSISLSISLYLSLSISISISISISISLSFSLSLSLSLSLSLSLSLSVSLSVSLS...LSLSLSLSLSLSLSLSLYLSLYLSLYLSLSLSLSLSLSLSLSLSLSLTLSLSLSLSLSLSLS

  15. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-02-0153 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ' /gb=BM609629 /gi=18907733 /ug=Aga.36101 /len=688 3e-13 30% MFCDFCDFYDCRKNFCDFCDCRKMFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCNFCDFCDFCDCRKNFC...DFCDCRKNLCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCVFCDCRKNFCDCSKNFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFFDCRKHFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNLCEFCDFCDFCDCRKNFC...DFCDCRKSFCDFCDCRINFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCVCRKHFCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCFFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFC...DFCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKSFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFC...DFCDFCDCRKNFCKFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDFCDYRKNFCDFCDFCDCRKNFCDFCDCRKNFC

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cds=p(1,3606) /gb=AJ535205 /gi=27227575 /ug=Aga.35084 /len=3606 9e-51 24% MSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMS...SASTSEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTSGTTRTT...PTRPTPTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMS...SASTPEPSTKPGTTRTTPTRPTTTESTDTTMSSASTTEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTEST...DTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDTTMSSASTPEPSTTPGTTRTTPTRPTSTESTDT

  17. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-04-0078 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 439 /ug=Aga.1901 /len=2137 2e-40 28% MMTPTSPTIPTSPTSSSSPTIRTSPSVPTSPSTPQTSSSTTESTTASSTTSTSMTTSISPTIPSSPTSLSSPTTRTSPSAPTSPSTPQTTISTTES...TTAVTMNSDSSSSSTESTTPSSTTSTSMTTPTSPTIPTSPTSPSSPTIRTSPSATTSPSTPKTSSSTTESTTASSTTSISPTI...PSSPTSLSSPTTRTSPSAPTSPSTPETTISTTESTTAVTMTSDSTSSSTESTTVSSTTPETTSSITESTTAVTMTSDSSSSSTESTTASSTTPATTSSTTEST...TVSSTTSETTSSRTESTTAITMTSDSTSSSTESTTASSTTSTSMTTSISPTIPSSPTSLSSPTTRTSPSAPTSPSTPETISSTTEST...TASSTISTSMTTSISPTIPSSPTSPSSSTTRTTPSAPTSPSTPETTSSTTESTASSTTSTSMTTPTSPTIPSSPTSPSSPTTRTSPSAPTSPTTPETISSTTESTTA

  18. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-03-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available female salivary glands 0-2 days after emergence Anopheles gambiae cDNA, mRNA seq...WFDRAIWIVYRSLPILVNISYFYKAYRLILFPEDNTSAASVIASVWGFTEGTLRICLIELRYGTLASIMSFLNERSYRQQDSLVRQQRATLFGENNRIQLILVATMLM

  19. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-02-0165 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ef|XP_309589.1| putative glyco-protein hormone fsh-like receptor (AGAP004035-PA) [Anopheles gambiae str. PES...T] gb|EAA05376.2| putative glyco-protein hormone fsh-like receptor (AGAP004035-PA) [Anopheles gambiae str. P

  20. Protection provided by a recombinant ALVAC(®)-WNV vaccine expressing the prM/E genes of a lineage 1 strain of WNV against a virulent challenge with a lineage 2 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, J M; Siger, L; Cupillard, L; Powers, B; Bakonyi, T; Boyum, S; Nowotny, N; Bowen, R

    2011-06-20

    The emergence of lineage 2 strains of WNV in Europe as a cause of clinical disease and mortality in horses raised the question whether the existing WNV vaccines, all based on lineage 1 strains, protect against circulating lineage 2 strains of WNV. In the present paper we have determined the level of cross protection provided by the recombinant ALVAC(®)-WNV vaccine in a severe challenge model that produces clinical signs of WNV type 2 disease. Ten horses were vaccinated twice at 4 weeks interval with one dose of the ALVAC-WNV vaccine formulated at the minimum protective dose. A further 10 horses served as controls. Two weeks after the second vaccination, all horses were challenged intrathecally with a recent neurovirulent lineage 2 strain of WNV. The challenge produced viraemia in 10 out of 10 and encephalitis in 9 out of 10 control horses. Three horses had to be euthanized for humane reasons. In contrast, none of the vaccinated horses developed WNV disease and only 1 vaccinated horse became viraemic at a single time point at low titre. The prevalence of WNV disease and viraemia were significantly lower in the vaccinated horses than in the control horses (Pvaccine will provide veterinarians with an effective tool to control infections caused by lineage 1 and 2 strains of WNV.

  1. Gene expression regulation and lineage evolution: the North and South tale of the hybrid polyploid Squalius alburnoides complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Irene; Schartl, Manfred; Brito, Miguel; Vacas, Joana Malta; Coelho, Maria Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of hybrid polyploid vertebrates, their viability and their perpetuation over evolutionary time have always been questions of great interest. However, little is known about the impact of hybridization and polyploidization on the regulatory networks that guarantee the appropriate quantitative and qualitative gene expression programme. The Squalius alburnoides complex of hybrid fish is an attractive system to address these questions, as it includes a wide variety of diploid and polyploid forms, and intricate systems of genetic exchange. Through the study of genome-specific allele expression of seven housekeeping and tissue-specific genes, we found that a gene copy silencing mechanism of dosage compensation exists throughout the distribution range of the complex. Here we show that the allele-specific patterns of silencing vary within the complex, according to the geographical origin and the type of genome involved in the hybridization process. In southern populations, triploids of S. alburnoides show an overall tendency for silencing the allele from the minority genome, while northern population polyploids exhibit preferential biallelic gene expression patterns, irrespective of genomic composition. The present findings further suggest that gene copy silencing and variable expression of specific allele combinations may be important processes in vertebrate polyploid evolution. PMID:20554543

  2. Rapid discrimination of Acinetobacter baumannii international clone II lineage by pyrosequencing SNP analyses of bla(OXA-51-like) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mari; Suzuki, Satowa; Suzuki, Masato; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Shibayama, Keigo

    2013-08-01

    We found that Acinetobacter baumannii international clone II generally possesses unique GTA sequence at nucleotide positions 106-108 in the bla(OXA-51-like) genes. We exploited this to develop an easy and rapid method for discrimination of international clone II from other A. baumannii by employing pyrosequencing analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  3. Mice with DNA repair gene Ercc1 deficiency in a neural crest lineage are a model for late-onset Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfridge, Jim; Song, Liang; Brownstein, David G; Melton, David W

    2010-06-04

    The Ercc1 gene is essential for nucleotide excision repair and is also important in recombination repair and the repair of interstrand crosslinks. We have previously used a floxed Ercc1 allele with a keratinocyte-specific Cre recombinase transgene to inactivate Ercc1 in the epidermal layer of the skin and so generate a mouse model for UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Now, in an attempt to generate a model for UV-induced melanoma, we have used the floxed Ercc1 allele in combination with a Cre transgene under the control of the tyrosinase gene promoter to produce mice with Ercc1-deficient melanocytes that are hypersensitive to UV irradiation. These animals developed normally, but died when 4-6 months old with severe colonic obstruction. Melanocytes are derived from the neural crest and the tyrosinase promoter is also expressed in additional neural crest-derived lineages, including the progenitors of the parasympathetic nervous system that innervates the gastrointestinal tract and controls gut peristalsis. A functional enteric nervous system developed in floxed Ercc1 mice with the tyrosinase Cre transgene, but was found to have degenerated in the colons of affected mice. We suggest that accumulating unrepaired endogenous DNA damage in the Ercc1-deficient colonic parasympathetic ganglia leads to the degeneration of this network and results in a colonic obstructive disorder that resembles late-onset Hirschsprung disease in man.

  4. Myeloidcell—lineage and premylocytic—stage—specific—expression of the mouse myeloperoxidase gene is controlled at initiation as well as elongation levels of transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJINGDE

    1999-01-01

    The myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important microbicidal protein present at high concentration in the primary granule of mature granulocyte and its expression is regulated in both myeloidcell-lineage and premyelocytic-stagespecific manners.A better understanding of the underlying control mechanisms should provide insights into the temporal and co-ordinate regulation of the gene expression during granulopoiesis.We have identified its promoter by mapping the start(s) of transcription using various molecular approaches together with demonstrating the promoter function of the relevant DNA segment in a transient transfection reporter assay.Besides the major start of transcription mapped at G residue,11 nucleotide upstream of the 3' end of exon 0,the usage of that is specific to the MPO expressing cell lines,we have shown that irrespective of the MPO-expression status of the hematopoietic cells,transcription occurs broadly within a two kb region upstream of the 5' proximity of the gene,and is largely terminated in intron 2.These data support a model of the premyelocytic-stage-specific MPO expression,the control of which is operated at initiation as well as elongation levels of transcription.

  5. The MADS domain protein DIANA acts together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C

    2008-08-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein-beta-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt.

  6. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of the Main Lineages of Nymphalinae (Nymphalidae: Lepidoptera) Based on the Partial Mitochondrial COI Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; CAO Tian-wen; ZHONG Yang; REN Zhu-mei; GUO Ya-ping; MA En-bo

    2008-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the subfamily Nymphalinae (sensu Chou 1994) were analyzed based on 1488bp of mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence data obtained from 24 individuals, along with those of eight species obtained from GenBank. The base compositions of this COI fragment varied among the individuals as follows: T 39.9%, C 14.6%, A 32.2%, and G 13.4%, with a strong AT bias (72.1%), as usually found in insect mitochondrial genomes. The A+T contents of the third, second, and first codon positions of the COI fragments in this study was 92.4, 62.2, and 61.4%, respectively. The phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by neighbor-joining (NJ), maximum likelihood (ML), and Bayesian methods by using Byblia anvatara as outgroup. Phylogenetic analyses based on the COI gene sequence data created very similar topologies, which were producing trees with two main clades A and B, and five subclades. The data indicated that the tribes Nymphalini and Hypolimni (sensu Chou 1994) are not monophyletic groups, and the genus Junonia should be removed from Nymphalini to Hypolimni (=Junoniini). On the basis of the data, the Symbrenthia and Araschnia had a relative distant relationship with the rest of Nymphalini. The relationships of species in the Nymphalini were confirmed via the NJ, ML, and Bayesian methods, namely ((((Nymphalis+Kaniska)+Polygonia)+Aglais)+Vanessa)+(Symbrenthia+Araschnia). This investigation provides a little novel information for Chinese researches of butterflies.

  7. Lateral transfer of tetrahymanol-synthesizing genes has allowed multiple diverse eukaryote lineages to independently adapt to environments without oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takishita Kiyotaka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sterols are key components of eukaryotic cellular membranes that are synthesized by multi-enzyme pathways that require molecular oxygen. Because prokaryotes fundamentally lack sterols, it is unclear how the vast diversity of bacterivorous eukaryotes that inhabit hypoxic environments obtain, or synthesize, sterols. Here we show that tetrahymanol, a triterpenoid that does not require molecular oxygen for its biosynthesis, likely functions as a surrogate of sterol in eukaryotes inhabiting oxygen-poor environments. Genes encoding the tetrahymanol synthesizing enzyme squalene-tetrahymanol cyclase were found from several phylogenetically diverged eukaryotes that live in oxygen-poor environments and appear to have been laterally transferred among such eukaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste and Eugene Koonin.

  8. Fixed differences in the paralytic gene define two lineages within the Lutzomyia longipalpis complex producing different types of courtship songs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M M A Lins

    Full Text Available The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae, the most important vector of American visceral leishmaniasis, is widely distributed in Latin America. There is currently a consensus that it represents a species complex, however, the number and distribution of the different siblings is still uncertain. Previous analyses have indicated that Brazilian populations of this vector can be divided into two main groups according to the type of courtship song (Burst vs. Pulse males produce during copulation. Nevertheless, no diagnostic differences have been observed between these two groups with most molecular markers used to date. We analyzed the molecular divergence in a fragment of the paralytic (para gene, a locus involved in the control of courtship songs in Drosophila, among a number of Lu. longipalpis populations from Brazil producing Burst and Pulse-type songs. Our results revealed a very high level of divergence and fixed differences between populations producing the two types of songs. We also compared Lu. longipalpis with a very closely related species, Lutzomyia cruzi, which produces Burst-type songs. The results indicated a higher number of fixed differences between Lu. cruzi and the Pulse-type populations of Lu. longipalpis than with those producing Burst-type songs. The data confirmed our previous assumptions that the presence of different sibling species of the Lu. longipalpis complex in Brazil can be divided into two main groups, one representing a single species and a second more heterogeneous group that probably represents a number of incipient species. We hypothesize that para might be one of the genes directly involved in the control of the courtship song differences between these two groups or that it is linked to other loci associated with reproductive isolation of the Brazilian species.

  9. Plant F-box protein evolution is determined by lineage-specific timing of major gene family expansion waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Navarro-Quezada

    Full Text Available F-box proteins (FBPs represent one of the largest and fastest evolving gene/protein families in the plant kingdom. The FBP superfamily can be divided in several subfamilies characterized by different C-terminal protein-protein interaction domains that recruit targets for proteasomal degradation. Hence, a clear picture of their phylogeny and molecular evolution is of special interest for the general understanding of evolutionary histories of multi-domain and/or large protein families in plants. In an effort to further understand the molecular evolution of F-box family proteins, we asked whether the largest subfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana, which carries a C-terminal F-box associated domain (FBA proteins shares evolutionary patterns and signatures of selection with other FBPs. To address this question, we applied phylogenetic and molecular evolution analyses in combination with the evaluation of transcriptional profiles. Based on the 2219 FBA proteins we de novo identified in 34 completely sequenced plant genomes, we compared their evolutionary patterns to a previously analyzed large subfamily carrying C-terminal kelch repeats. We found that these two large FBP subfamilies generally tend to evolve by massive waves of duplication, followed by sequence conservation of the F-box domain and sequence diversification of the target recruiting domain. We conclude that the earlier in evolutionary time a major wave of expansion occurred, the more pronounced these selection signatures are. As a consequence, when performing cross species comparisons among FBP subfamilies, significant differences will be observed in the selective signatures of protein-protein interaction domains. Depending on the species, the investigated subfamilies comprise up to 45% of the complete superfamily, indicating that other subfamilies possibly follow similar modes of evolution.

  10. The uncoupling protein 1 gene (UCP1 is disrupted in the pig lineage: a genetic explanation for poor thermoregulation in piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Berg

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Piglets appear to lack brown adipose tissue, a specific type of fat that is essential for nonshivering thermogenesis in mammals, and they rely on shivering as the main mechanism for thermoregulation. Here we provide a genetic explanation for the poor thermoregulation in pigs as we demonstrate that the gene for uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 was disrupted in the pig lineage. UCP1 is exclusively expressed in brown adipose tissue and plays a crucial role for thermogenesis by uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. We used long-range PCR and genome walking to determine the complete genome sequence of pig UCP1. An alignment with human UCP1 revealed that exons 3 to 5 were eliminated by a deletion in the pig sequence. The presence of this deletion was confirmed in all tested domestic pigs, as well as in European wild boars, Bornean bearded pigs, wart hogs, and red river hogs. Three additional disrupting mutations were detected in the remaining exons. Furthermore, the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions was clearly elevated in the pig sequence compared with the corresponding sequences in humans, cattle, and mice, and we used this increased rate to estimate that UCP1 was disrupted about 20 million years ago.

  11. High cell density and latent membrane protein 1 expression induce cleavage of the mixed lineage leukemia gene at 11q23 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim Sai-Peng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is commonly found in Southern China and South East Asia. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is well associated with NPC and has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Moreover, various chromosome rearrangements were reported in NPC. However, the underlying mechanism of chromosome rearrangement remains unclear. Furthermore, the relationship between EBV and chromosome rearrangement with respect to the pathogenesis of NPC has not been established. We hypothesize that during virus- or stress-induced apoptosis, chromosomes are initially cleaved at the base of the chromatin loop domain structure. Upon DNA repair, cell may survive with rearranged chromosomes. Methods In this study, cells were seeded at various densities to induce apoptosis. Genomic DNA extracted was processed for Southern hybridization. In order to investigate the role of EBV, especially the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, LMP1 gene was overexpressed in NPC cells and chromosome breaks were analyzed by inverse polymerase chain (IPCR reaction. Results Southern analysis revealed that high cell density resulted in cleavage of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL gene within the breakpoint cluster region (bcr. This high cell density-induced cleavage was significantly reduced by caspase inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK. Similarly, IPCR analysis showed that LMP1 expression enhanced cleavage of the MLL bcr. Breakpoint analysis revealed that these breaks occurred within the matrix attachment region/scaffold attachment region (MAR/SAR. Conclusions Since MLL locates at 11q23, a common deletion site in NPC, our results suggest a possibility of stress- or virus-induced apoptosis in the initiation of chromosome rearrangements at 11q23. The breakpoint analysis results also support the role of chromatin structure in defining the site of chromosome rearrangement.

  12. Phylogenomics of the Zygomycete lineages: Exploring phylogeny and genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Zygomycete lineages mark the major transition from zoosporic life histories of the common ancestors of Fungi and the earliest diverging chytrid lineages (Chytridiomycota and Blastocladiomycota). Genome comparisons from these lineages may reveal gene content changes that reflect the transition to...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 ref|XP_001647749.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT32417.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001647749.1 1e-87 55% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 ref|XP_001653188.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39936.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653188.1 2e-73 55% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 ref|XP_001647749.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT32417.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001647749.1 1e-64 59% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 ref|XP_001653188.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39936.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653188.1 7e-99 54% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|YP_858652.1| O-antigen polymerase [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrop...hila ATCC 7966] gb|ABK39666.1| O-antigen polymerase [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ATCC 7966] YP_858652.1 1e-162 84% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0082 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0082 ref|XP_001568166.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania brazilie...nsis] emb|CAM43270.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania braziliensis] XP_001568166.1 6e-15 33% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0032 ref|XP_001568167.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania brazilie...nsis] emb|CAM43271.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania braziliensis] XP_001568167.1 3e-40 29% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0039 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 2e-38 75% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0112 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0112 ref|XP_001596058.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN99420.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001596058.1 2e-21 82% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0035 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 1e-42 90% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0052 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 6e-51 91% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 ref|XP_001598793.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN91479.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001598793.1 2e-41 88% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 3e-41 97% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 2e-31 49% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 7e-31 50% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 2e-10 30% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 2e-10 33% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 7e-12 27% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 9e-11 35% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 5e-11 28% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 ref|YP_661398.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Pseudoalter...omonas atlantica T6c] gb|ABG40344.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Pseudoalteromonas atlantica T6c] YP_661398.1 5e-57 45% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 ref|YP_610695.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein [Ps...eudomonas entomophila L48] emb|CAK17912.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein [Pseudomonas] YP_610695.1 1e-130 84% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 ref|YP_001170621.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein ...[Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501] gb|ABP77779.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein [Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501] YP_001170621.1 1e-128 86% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0003 ref|XP_001650244.1| sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transp...orter [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48229.1| sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter [Aedes aegypti] XP_001650244.1 1e-111 77% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0048 ref|XP_001352669.1| GA20395-PA [Drosophila pseudoobscura] gb|EAL3...0167.1| GA20395-PA [Drosophila pseudoobscura] gb|AAV40852.1| Rh-like protein [Drosophila pseudoobscura] XP_001352669.1 3e-96 67% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|ZP_01061096.1| copper/silver efflux P-type ATPase [Flavobacte...rium sp. MED217] gb|EAQ49147.1| copper/silver efflux P-type ATPase [Leeuwenhoekiella blandensis MED217] ZP_01061096.1 1e-128 60% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] g...b|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 1e-178 80% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0050 ref|XP_001657779.1| D7 protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT41...994.1| D7 protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABM68616.1| AAEL006424-PA [Aedes aegypti] XP_001657779.1 7e-19 27% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0002 ref|XP_001658302.1| sodium/solute symporter [Aedes aegypti] gb|EA...T47697.1| sodium/solute symporter [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABM68585.1| AAEL001198-PA [Aedes aegypti] XP_001658302.1 1e-143 68% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0100 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0100 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] g...b|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 2e-60 37% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0059 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0059 ref|YP_857839.1| pts system N-acetylglucosamine-specific eiicba component (eiicba-nag)(eii...N-acetylglucosamine-specific eiicba component (eiicba-nag)(eii-nag) [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ATCC 7966] YP_857839.1 0.0 99% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|ZP_01120431.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_08655 [Robiginital...ea biformata HTCC2501] gb|EAR16959.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_08655 [Robiginitalea biformata HTCC2501] ZP_01120431.1 4e-31 32% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 ref|ZP_01121627.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_11202 [Robiginital...ea biformata HTCC2501] gb|EAR14889.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_11202 [Robiginitalea biformata HTCC2501] ZP_01121627.1 1e-62 41% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0088 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0088 sp|P82149|NT53_DROME Lethal(2)neighbour of tid protein 2 (NOT53) ...emb|CAA64533.1| Not53 protein [Drosophila melanogaster] emb|CAA71168.1| lethal(2)neighbour of tid [Drosophila melanogaster] P82149 1e-123 61% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0141 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0141 ref|ZP_01444683.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. ...HTCC2601] gb|EAU45064.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01444683.1 0.038 24% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 ref|NP_309677.1| putative tail fiber protein [Escherichia coli O1...57:H7 str. Sakai] dbj|BAB35073.1| putative tail fiber protein [Escherichia coli O157:H7 str. Sakai] NP_309677.1 3e-18 34% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0117 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0117 ref|YP_001314462.1| Monosaccharide-transporting ATPase [Sinorhizobium medica...e WSM419] gb|ABR64529.1| Monosaccharide-transporting ATPase [Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419] YP_001314462.1 2.4 30% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 ref|XP_001645325.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwalto...zyma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO17467.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001645325.1 9e-06 24% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0008 ref|XP_001645325.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwalto...zyma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO17467.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001645325.1 0.0 46% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 ref|XP_001642520.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_325p1 [Vanderwaltoz...yma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO14662.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_325p1 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001642520.1 1.3 25% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0087 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0087 ref|XP_001643844.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_499p14 [Vanderwalto...zyma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO15986.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_499p14 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001643844.1 4e-20 23% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0072 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 4e-59 30% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 0.001 26% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 1e-11 24% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0063 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 2e-30 23% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 ref|YP_234795.1| Major facilitator superfamily [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringa...e B728a] gb|AAY36757.1| Major facilitator superfamily [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a] YP_234795.1 1e-147 93% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0018 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0018 ref|YP_234515.1| hypothetical protein Psyr_1426 [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringa...e B728a] gb|AAY36477.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a] YP_234515.1 4e-23 23% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|YP_236998.1| quinoprotein [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ...B728a] gb|AAY38960.1| quinoprotein [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a] YP_236998.1 1.2 29% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_001453764.1| hypothetical protein CKO_02205 [Citrobacter k...oseri ATCC BAA-895] gb|ABV13328.1| hypothetical protein CKO_02205 [Citrobacter koseri ATCC BAA-895] YP_001453764.1 2e-65 50% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 ref|YP_001454621.1| hypothetical protein CKO_03094 [Citrobacter k...oseri ATCC BAA-895] gb|ABV14185.1| hypothetical protein CKO_03094 [Citrobacter koseri ATCC BAA-895] YP_001454621.1 1e-79 61% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0020 ref|NP_822673.1| integral membrane protein [Streptomyces avermitil...is MA-4680] dbj|BAC69208.1| putative integral membrane protein [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] NP_822673.1 2e-04 24% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0125 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0125 ref|NP_525103.2| bunched CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] sp|Q24523|BUN2_DROME Protein bunched, class 2 isoform (Protein shortsighted) gb|AAF53201.2| CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_525103.2 6e-62 37% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0058 ref|NP_525103.2| bunched CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] sp|Q24523|BUN2_DROME Protein bunched, class 2 isoform (Protein shortsighted) gb|AAF53201.2| CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_525103.2 2e-14 32% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01560354.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_5869 [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV62210.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_5869 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560354.1 0.002 26% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01561792.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV60539.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01561792.1 0.004 27% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 ref|YP_776807.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Burkholderia... cepacia AMMD] gb|ABI90473.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD] YP_776807.1 3e-98 61% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01567096.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV54827.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01567096.1 3e-05 26% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0063 ref|YP_332515.1| putative lipoprotein [Burkholderia pseudomallei ...1710b] gb|ABA48419.1| putative lipoprotein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_332515.1 7e-12 31% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 ref|ZP_02029487.1| hypothetical protein BIFADO_01945 [Bifidobacterium adolescent...is L2-32] gb|EDN81820.1| hypothetical protein BIFADO_01945 [Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32] ZP_02029487.1 3e-07 24% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0048 ref|YP_001164099.1| potassium efflux system [Yersinia pestis Pest...oides F] gb|ABP41126.1| potassium efflux system [Yersinia pestis Pestoides F] YP_001164099.1 1e-106 53% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 ref|YP_001012824.1| Leucyl aminopeptidase, AmpS [Hyperthermus but...ylicus DSM 5456] gb|ABM80479.1| Leucyl aminopeptidase, AmpS [Hyperthermus butylicus DSM 5456] YP_001012824.1 0.37 29% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|ZP_01789747.1| hypothetical protein CGSHiAA_08330 [Haemophilus influenza...e PittAA] gb|EDK08473.1| hypothetical protein CGSHiAA_08330 [Haemophilus influenzae PittAA] ZP_01789747.1 2e-14 23% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|YP_863633.1| prenyltransferase family protein [Gramella forse...tii KT0803] emb|CAL68566.1| prenyltransferase family protein [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_863633.1 8e-30 31% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_862949.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL67882.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_862949.1 1e-135 66% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|YP_860564.1| NorM-like multidrug efflux protein [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL65497.1| NorM-like multidrug efflux protein [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_860564.1 3e-53 43% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|YP_956869.1| conserved hypothetical protein, membrane [Gramel...la forsetii KT0803] emb|CAL65134.1| conserved hypothetical protein, membrane [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_956869.1 3e-65 41% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_861225.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL66158.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_861225.1 1e-132 64% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_861383.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL66316.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_861383.1 1e-129 62% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 ref|XP_001523004.1| hypothetical protein MGCH7_ch7g1090 [Magnaporth...e grisea 70-15] gb|EAQ71683.1| hypothetical protein MGCH7_ch7g1090 [Magnaporthe grisea 70-15] XP_001523004.1 0.59 29% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0104 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0104 ref|XP_001404421.1| hypothetical protein MGG_13192 [Magnaporthe g...risea 70-15] gb|EDJ96181.1| hypothetical protein MGG_13192 [Magnaporthe grisea 70-15] XP_001404421.1 0.083 31% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 ref|ZP_01647447.1| oxidoreductase-like [Salinispora arenicola CNS...205] gb|ABV97571.1| oxidoreductase domain protein [Salinispora arenicola CNS-205] ZP_01647447.1 0.71 29% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 ref|YP_001478696.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV41568.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001478696.1 1e-164 82% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_001477899.1| protein of unknown function DUF340 membrane [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV40771.1| protein of unknown function DUF340 membrane [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001477899.1 4e-67 53% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0002 ref|YP_001477392.1| sugar transporter [Serratia proteamaculans 56...8] gb|ABV40264.1| sugar transporter [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001477392.1 1e-08 25% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 ref|YP_001193285.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family [Flavobac...terium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ03966.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193285.1 1e-123 62% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|YP_001295245.1| Prenyltransferase family protein [Flavobacter...ium psychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL42427.1| Prenyltransferase family protein [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001295245.1 4e-31 34% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|YP_001295229.1| hypothetical protein FP0297 [Flavobacterium p...sychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL42411.1| Protein of unknown function [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001295229.1 4e-70 43% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|ZP_01734073.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_06975 [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ95423.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_06975 [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01734073.1 5e-72 44% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 ref|ZP_01732766.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, putative [Flavob...acteria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ95835.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, putative [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01732766.1 9e-60 41% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 ref|YP_001296724.1| Protein of unknown function YfkH [Flavobacter...ium psychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL43921.1| Protein of unknown function YfkH [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001296724.1 3e-31 32% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|ZP_01105157.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_03125 [Flavobacter...iales bacterium HTCC2170] gb|EAR02242.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_03125 [Flavobacteriales bacterium HTCC2170] ZP_01105157.1 1e-68 43% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 ref|ZP_01732843.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_00795 [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ95912.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_00795 [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01732843.1 7e-31 30% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 ref|YP_001193612.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Flavobac...terium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ04293.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193612.1 3e-63 49% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|YP_001197147.1| Urea transporter [Flavobacterium johnsoniae U...W101] gb|ABQ07828.1| Urea transporter [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001197147.1 4e-69 48% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_001195410.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavob...acterium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ06091.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001195410.1 1e-129 64% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0043 ref|YP_001297326.1| hypothetical protein FP2472 [Flavobacterium p...sychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL44525.1| Hypothetical protein [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001297326.1 2e-06 24% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 ref|YP_001195652.1| protein of unknown function DUF81 [Flavobacte...rium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ06333.1| protein of unknown function DUF81 [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001195652.1 4e-97 65% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|YP_001197343.1| MATE efflux family protein [Flavobacterium jo...hnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ08024.1| MATE efflux family protein [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001197343.1 6e-52 43% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|ZP_01732967.1| multidrug resistance protein [Flavobacteria ba...cterium BAL38] gb|EAZ96036.1| multidrug resistance protein [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01732967.1 9e-51 38% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|ZP_01203383.1| multidrug efflux pump, matE family [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BBFL7] gb|EAS18538.1| multidrug efflux pump, matE family [Flavobacteria bacterium BBFL7] ZP_01203383.1 3e-50 43% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|ZP_01107412.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_08224 [Flavobacter...iales bacterium HTCC2170] gb|EAR00476.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_08224 [Flavobacteriales bacterium HTCC2170] ZP_01107412.1 2e-32 36% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 ref|ZP_02007270.1| protein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane [Ralstonia pick...ettii 12D] gb|EDN41481.1| protein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane [Ralstonia pickettii 12D] ZP_02007270.1 0.063 23% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 ref|ZP_00232264.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Listeria monocyt...ogenes str. 4b H7858] gb|EAL07894.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Listeria monocytogenes str. 4b H7858] ZP_00232264.1 1e-07 38% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0080 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0080 ref|ZP_01467057.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Stigmatella au...rantiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU62171.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01467057.1 4e-06 30% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0123 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0123 ref|XP_973273.1| PREDICTED: similar to Putative gustatory receptor 21a [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23143.2| gustatory receptor candidate 10 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...72.3| gustatory receptor candidate 39 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_973273.1 1e-135 60% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0026 ref|NP_001076809.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium cast...aneum] gb|ABE02225.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] gb|ABN79650.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076809.1 5e-71 44% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0064 ref|XP_974025.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG13788-PB, isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23157.2| gustatory receptor candidate 24 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_974025.1 0.002 20% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0059 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0059 ref|XP_968580.1| PREDICTED: hypothetical protein [Tribolium casta...neum] emb|CAL23149.2| gustatory receptor candidate 16 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_968580.1 0.11 22% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 ref|NP_001076796.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium ca...staneum] gb|ABN79651.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076796.1 1e-111 66% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0115 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0115 ref|XP_973273.1| PREDICTED: similar to Putative gustatory receptor 21a [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23143.2| gustatory receptor candidate 10 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...72.3| gustatory receptor candidate 39 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_973273.1 9e-83 40% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 ref|NP_001076795.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 2 [Tribolium ca...staneum] gb|ABN79652.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 2 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076795.1 1e-113 68% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 ref|NP_001076793.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] gb|ABN79654.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076793.1 1e-114 62% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0046 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0046 ref|NP_001076796.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium ca...staneum] gb|ABN79651.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076796.1 1e-121 68% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 ref|NP_001076792.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform A [Tribolium... castaneum] gb|ABN79653.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform A [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076792.1 1e-121 67% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0128 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0128 ref|XP_972629.1| PREDICTED: similar to Probable gustatory receptor 64e [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23162.2| gustatory receptor candidate 29 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...40.2| gustatory receptor candidate 7 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_972629.1 4e-42 29% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0099 ref|NP_001076793.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] gb|ABN79654.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076793.1 4e-47 44% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0065 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0065 ref|XP_975520.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG13788-PB, isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23188.2| gustatory receptor candidate 55 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_975520.1 9e-17 31% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0052 ref|XP_972629.1| PREDICTED: similar to Probable gustatory receptor 64e [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23162.2| gustatory receptor candidate 29 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...40.2| gustatory receptor candidate 7 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_972629.1 4e-42 29% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_001192547.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavobacterium john...soniae UW101] gb|ABQ03228.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001192547.1 1e-129 62% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|YP_001193977.1| hypothetical protein Fjoh_1626 [Flavobacterium john...soniae UW101] gb|ABQ04658.1| hypothetical protein Fjoh_1626 [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193977.1 5e-72 44% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|YP_001193736.1| UbiA prenyltransferase [Flavobacterium johnso...niae UW101] gb|ABQ04417.1| UbiA prenyltransferase [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193736.1 4e-31 33% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0050 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-35 42% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01909055.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_23714 [Plesiocysti...s pacifica SIR-1] gb|EDM78078.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_23714 [Plesiocystis pacifica SIR-1] ZP_01909055.1 5e-05 36% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 ref|ZP_01905410.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_21714 [Plesiocysti...s pacifica SIR-1] gb|EDM81578.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_21714 [Plesiocystis pacifica SIR-1] ZP_01905410.1 1.2 40% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0049 ref|ZP_01274777.1| Surface protein from Gram-positive cocci, anch...or region [Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23] gb|EAS88254.1| Surface protein from Gram-positive cocci, anchor region [Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23] ZP_01274777.1 2e-39 52% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0068 ref|YP_574435.1| flavin-containing monooxygenase FMO [Chromohalobacter salex...igens DSM 3043] gb|ABE59736.1| flavin-containing monooxygenase FMO [Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043] YP_574435.1 7.1 30% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0112 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0112 ref|ZP_01465266.1| hypothetical protein STIAU_3860 [Stigmatella aura...ntiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU63984.1| hypothetical protein STIAU_3860 [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01465266.1 8.6 33% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 ref|ZP_01423834.1| Lanthionine synthetase C-like [Herpetosiphon aura...ntiacus ATCC 23779] gb|EAU19386.1| Lanthionine synthetase C-like [Herpetosiphon aurantiacus ATCC 23779] ZP_01423834.1 2e-20 25% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 ref|YP_001433581.1| protein of unknown function DUF296 [Roseiflexus caste...nholzii DSM 13941] gb|ABU59563.1| protein of unknown function DUF296 [Roseiflexus castenholzii DSM 13941] YP_001433581.1 0.11 35% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|YP_001430593.1| Adenylosuccinate synthase [Roseiflexus casten...holzii DSM 13941] gb|ABU56575.1| Adenylosuccinate synthase [Roseiflexus castenholzii DSM 13941] YP_001430593.1 4.6 27% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0003 ref|ZP_01235768.1| Putative cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein CcmF [Vibrio angus...tum S14] gb|EAS64028.1| Putative cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein CcmF [Vibrio angustum S14] ZP_01235768.1 9e-71 68% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 ref|ZP_01236824.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio angus...tum S14] gb|EAS62911.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio angustum S14] ZP_01236824.1 2e-53 56% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 ref|YP_333983.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1710b_2591 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1710b] gb|ABA48937.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1710b_2591 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_333983.1 5e-11 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0021 ref|YP_331887.1| Planctomycete extracellular domain protein [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1710b] gb|ABA51048.1| Planctomycete extracellular domain protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_331887.1 0.005 31% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0021 ref|ZP_01571862.1| 200 kDa antigen p200, putative [Burkholderia m...ultivorans ATCC 17616] gb|EAV64386.1| 200 kDa antigen p200, putative [Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616] ZP_01571862.1 0.82 25% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0064 ref|YP_335617.1| haemagluttinin family protein [Burkholderia pseu...domallei 1710b] gb|ABA51851.1| haemagluttinin family protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_335617.1 0.0 31% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 ref|ZP_01559561.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia a...mbifaria MC40-6] gb|EAV47895.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia ambifaria MC40-6] ZP_01559561.1 0.83 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|YP_553299.1| Putative diguanylate cyclase (GGDEF domain) [Burkholder...ia xenovorans LB400] gb|ABE33949.1| Putative diguanylate cyclase (GGDEF domain) [Burkholderia xenovorans LB400] YP_553299.1 3e-20 29% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 ref|XP_001650650.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap...1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48196.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001650650.1 1e-172 69% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 ref|XP_001650651.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap...1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48197.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001650651.1 1e-172 69% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 ref|YP_001129521.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Hynobius arisanens...is] gb|ABO20776.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Hynobius arisanensis] YP_001129521.1 0.43 24% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 ref|YP_001126159.1| Lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Geob...acillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] gb|ABO67414.1| Lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] YP_001126159.1 1e-17 24% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 ref|NP_241318.1| lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Bacillu...s halodurans C-125] dbj|BAB04171.1| lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Bacillus halodurans C-125] NP_241318.1 3e-26 26% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 ref|NP_709711.1| similar to protein of glp regulon [Shigella flex...neri 2a str. 301] gb|AAN45418.1| similar to protein of glp regulon [Shigella flexneri 2a str. 301] NP_709711.1 2e-79 62% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 ref|YP_311760.1| putative transport protein [Shigella sonnei Ss04...6] gb|AAZ89525.1| putative transport protein [Shigella sonnei Ss046] YP_311760.1 1e-120 62% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 gb|AAP56247.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP1 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56248.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP2 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56247.1 0.0 86% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 0.0 86% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 0.0 86% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 0.0 86% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 gb|AAP56247.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP1 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56248.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP2 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56247.1 0.0 86% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0005 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 1e-178 81% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 gb|AAP56247.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP1 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56248.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP2 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56247.1 0.0 86% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|ZP_02018486.1| acriflavin resistance protein [Methylobacterium extorque...ns PA1] gb|EDN54609.1| acriflavin resistance protein [Methylobacterium extorquens PA1] ZP_02018486.1 2.7 30% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 ref|XP_804109.1| calpain cysteine peptidase [Trypanosoma cruzi st...rain CL Brener] gb|EAN82258.1| calpain cysteine peptidase, putative [Trypanosoma cruzi] XP_804109.1 0.99 29% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 ref|YP_001263414.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas... wittichii RW1] gb|ABQ69276.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas wittichii RW1] YP_001263414.1 4.6 27% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 ref|ZP_01302230.1| putative manganese transport protein MntH [Sphingomonas... sp. SKA58] gb|EAT10059.1| putative manganese transport protein MntH [Sphingomonas sp. SKA58] ZP_01302230.1 1e-100 52% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 ref|YP_001263414.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas... wittichii RW1] gb|ABQ69276.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas wittichii RW1] YP_001263414.1 0.77 31% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0031 ref|YP_294122.1| hypothetical protein EhV364 [Emiliania huxleyi v...irus 86] emb|CAI65791.1| putative membrane protein [Emiliania huxleyi virus 86] YP_294122.1 8e-16 44% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|YP_001140043.1| O-antigen ligase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO88295.1| O-antigen ligase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001140043.1 1e-145 76% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 ref|YP_001142086.1| transporter, NadC family [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO90338.1| transporter, NadC family [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001142086.1 0.76 25% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|YP_001141367.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO89619.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001141367.1 1e-165 88% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_001142445.1| membrane protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO90697.1| membrane protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001142445.1 1e-130 93% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0010 ref|YP_001141362.1| amino acid permease [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO89614.1| amino acid permease [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001141362.1 1e-132 96% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0064 ref|YP_001143407.1| sulfatase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO91659.1| sulfatase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001143407.1 0.0 87% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0021 ref|YP_001140588.1| Na+/H antiporter NhaA [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO88840.1| Na+/H antiporter NhaA [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001140588.1 1e-123 94% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|YP_001142002.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO90254.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001142002.1 6e-21 30% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|ZP_01051647.1| Heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Tenac...ibaculum sp. MED152] gb|EAQ41075.1| Heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Polaribacter dokdonensis MED152] ZP_01051647.1 1e-132 63% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0034 ref|NP_001040306.1| presenilin-like signal peptide peptidase [Bom...byx mori] gb|ABD36167.1| presenilin-like signal peptide peptidase [Bombyx mori] NP_001040306.1 1e-135 65% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0035 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.009 23% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0093 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0093 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 40% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0057 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 37% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0010 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0053 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0053 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0091 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0091 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 1e-163 38% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0155 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0155 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0094 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0094 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0069 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0069 ref|XP_001652791.1| GDP-fucose transporter, putative [Aedes aegyp...ti] gb|EAT40804.1| GDP-fucose transporter, putative [Aedes aegypti] XP_001652791.1 1e-129 83% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 ref|NP_001040188.1| KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention ...receptor 2a [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36213.1| KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention receptor 2a [Bombyx mori] NP_001040188.1 3e-45 47% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0107 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0107 ref|YP_001112131.1| protein of unknown function UPF0118 [Desulfoto...maculum reducens MI-1] gb|ABO49306.1| protein of unknown function UPF0118 [Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1] YP_001112131.1 1.8 23% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0113 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0113 ref|XP_001418476.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO96769.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001418476.1 2.9 25% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0122 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0122 ref|XP_001415961.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94253.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415961.1 4e-25 32% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 ref|NP_001011605.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Apis mellifera] ...sp|O61303|OPSUV_APIME Opsin, ultraviolet-sensitive (AMUVOP) (BUVOPS) gb|AAC13418.1| ultraviolet-sensitive op

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 ref|YP_001165892.1| hypothetical protein Saro_3506 [Novosphingobium... aromaticivorans DSM 12444] gb|ABP64366.1| hypothetical protein Saro_3506 [Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444] YP_001165892.1 0.99 27% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0012 ref|YP_001363161.1| DNA internalization-related competence protei...n ComEC/Rec2 [Kineococcus radiotolerans SRS30216] gb|ABS04897.1| DNA internalization-related competence prot

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0119 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0119 ref|ZP_00982898.1| COG0477: Permeases of the major facilitator su...perfamily [Burkholderia dolosa AUO158] gb|EAY72007.1| Major facilitator superfamily (MFS_1) transporter [Burkholderia dolosa AUO158] ZP_00982898.1 0.36 24% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0176 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0176 ref|ZP_01771797.1| Hypothetical protein COLAER_00786 [Collinsella... aerofaciens ATCC 25986] gb|EBA40261.1| Hypothetical protein COLAER_00786 [Collinsella aerofaciens ATCC 25986] ZP_01771797.1 0.14 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0005 ref|NP_724962.2| starry night CG11895-PA [Drosophila melanogaster...] sp|Q9V5N8|STAN_DROME Protocadherin-like wing polarity protein stan precursor (Protein starry night) (Prote

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 ref|NP_938793.1| Putative cytochrome C biogenesis protein [Corynebacterium diphtheria...e NCTC 13129] emb|CAE48916.1| Putative cytochrome C biogenesis protein [Corynebacterium diphtheriae] NP_938793.1 1.6 24% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|ZP_01117607.1| hypothetical protein PI23P_05432 [Polaribacter... irgensii 23-P] gb|EAR13914.1| hypothetical protein PI23P_05432 [Polaribacter irgensii 23-P] ZP_01117607.1 7e-71 44% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0017 ref|ZP_01119288.1| CAAX amino terminal protease family protein [Polar...ibacter irgensii 23-P] gb|EAR11475.1| CAAX amino terminal protease family protein [Polaribacter irgensii 23-P] ZP_01119288.1 3e-13 27% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0026 ref|XP_001659082.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [A...edes aegypti] gb|EAT39962.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [Aedes aegypti] XP_001659082.1 6e-92 51% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0077 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0077 ref|XP_001659082.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [A...edes aegypti] gb|EAT39962.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [Aedes aegypti] XP_001659082.1 1e-141 74% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0071 ref|NP_001035057.1| pteropsin [Apis mellifera] tpg|DAA05735.1| TP...A_exp: pteropsin [Apis mellifera] tpg|DAA05736.1| TPA_exp: pteropsin [Apis mellifera] NP_001035057.1 3e-73 46% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 ref|YP_441277.1| hypothetical protein BTH_I0721 [Burkholderia thail...andensis E264] gb|ABC36322.1| membrane protein, putative [Burkholderia thailandensis E264] YP_441277.1 0.063 24% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0061 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0061 ref|YP_443145.1| fosmidomycin resistance protein [Burkholderia thail...andensis E264] gb|ABC36646.1| fosmidomycin resistance protein [Burkholderia thailandensis E264] YP_443145.1 1e-117 64% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01562088.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2302 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV60091.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2302 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01562088.1 4e-04 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 ref|ZP_01564777.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_4887 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV57364.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_4887 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01564777.1 5e-05 28% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0071 ref|NP_476722.1| shotgun CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|Q...24298|CADE_DROME DE-cadherin precursor (Protein shotgun) gb|AAF46659.1| CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_476722.1 0.0 40% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0070 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0070 ref|NP_476722.1| shotgun CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|Q...24298|CADE_DROME DE-cadherin precursor (Protein shotgun) gb|AAF46659.1| CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_476722.1 0.0 42% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_050752.1| hypothetical protein ECA2661 [Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptic...a SCRI1043] emb|CAG75561.1| putative membrane protein [Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica SCRI1043] YP_050752.1 2e-66 53% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 ref|XP_001652261.1| transient receptor potential cation channel p...rotein painless [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT41530.1| transient receptor potential cation channel protein painless [Aedes aegypti] XP_001652261.1 1e-102 38% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 ref|XP_001652262.1| transient receptor potential cation channel p...rotein painless [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT41531.1| transient receptor potential cation channel protein painless [Aedes aegypti] XP_001652262.1 1e-102 38% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0024 ref|NP_001089174.1| putative transient receptor potential channel... [Xenopus laevis] emb|CAE09056.1| putative transient receptor potential channel [Xenopus laevis] NP_001089174.1 1e-158 42% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|YP_087435.1| RfaL protein [Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL...55E] gb|AAU36850.1| RfaL protein [Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL55E] YP_087435.1 5e-17 26% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 ref|YP_752172.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Shewanella frigid...imarina NCIMB 400] gb|ABI73333.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400] YP_752172.1 2e-55 45% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0179 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0179 ref|NP_542440.1| bride of sevenless CG8285-PA [Drosophila melanog...aster] sp|P22815|BOSS_DROME Protein bride of sevenless precursor emb|CAA39373.1| bride of sevenless protein

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01512956.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia phytofirm...ans PsJN] gb|EAV02438.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01512956.1 0.070 25% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|ZP_01507056.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans... PsJN] gb|EAV08201.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01507056.1 6e-21 28% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 ref|ZP_01508657.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Burkholderia phytofirm...ans PsJN] gb|EAV06352.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01508657.1 0.024 29% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|ZP_01512692.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans... PsJN] gb|EAV02625.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01512692.1 2e-23 29% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|YP_001099812.1| putative Urea transporter [Herminiimonas arse...nicoxydans] emb|CAL61685.1| putative Urea transporter [Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans] YP_001099812.1 4e-36 33% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 ref|NP_935992.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio vulnificus... YJ016] dbj|BAC95963.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio vulnificus YJ016] NP_935992.1 4e-51 56% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0042 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0042 ref|ZP_00591264.1| Potassium efflux system protein [Prosthecochlo...ris aestuarii DSM 271] gb|EAN23634.1| Potassium efflux system protein [Prosthecochloris aestuarii DSM 271] ZP_00591264.1 1e-75 46% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0076 ref|ZP_01979394.1| hypothetical protein A5A_0268 [Vibrio cholerae... MZO-2] gb|EDM53680.1| hypothetical protein A5A_0268 [Vibrio cholerae MZO-2] ZP_01979394.1 0.49 25% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|ZP_01882627.1| multidrug resistance protein [Pedobacter sp. B...AL39] gb|EDM38378.1| multidrug resistance protein [Pedobacter sp. BAL39] ZP_01882627.1 3e-50 42% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 ref|ZP_01884120.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family protein [Pedo...bacter sp. BAL39] gb|EDM36559.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family protein [Pedobacter sp. BAL39] ZP_01884120.1 1e-119 55% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 ref|ZP_01886744.1| hypothetical protein PBAL39_17149 [Pedobacter ...sp. BAL39] gb|EDM34019.1| hypothetical protein PBAL39_17149 [Pedobacter sp. BAL39] ZP_01886744.1 1e-114 75% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0012 ref|YP_304864.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1321 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ70284.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1321 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_304864.1 0.39 34% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0028 ref|YP_305972.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71392.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305972.1 9e-19 35% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 ref|ZP_01444683.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. ...HTCC2601] gb|EAU45064.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01444683.1 1e-17 36% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0103 ref|ZP_01443014.1| hypothetical protein R2601_13804 [Roseovarius ...sp. HTCC2601] gb|EAU46901.1| hypothetical protein R2601_13804 [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01443014.1 5.5 35% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0165 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0165 ref|XP_309589.1| putative glyco-protein hormone fsh-like receptor... (AGAP004035-PA) [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] gb|EAA05376.2| putative glyco-protein hormone fsh-like receptor (AGAP004035-PA) [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] XP_309589.1 0.0 93% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0033 ref|NP_788686.1| tincar CG31247-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] ref|NP_788687.1| tincar CG31247-PD, isoform D [Drosophila melanogaster] gb|AAO41572.1| CG31247-PA, is

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|YP_300356.1| hypothetical protein SSP0266 [Staphylococcus saprophytic...us subsp. saprophyticus ATCC 15305] dbj|BAE17411.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus ATCC 15305] YP_300356.1 2e-35 29% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0030 ref|ZP_00769372.1| Binding-protein-dependent transport systems in...ner membrane component [Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl] gb|EAO57514.1| Binding-protein-dependent transport systems

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 ref|ZP_01637716.1| binding-protein-dependent transport systems in...ner membrane component [Pseudomonas putida W619] gb|EAX19985.1| binding-protein-dependent transport systems

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0040 ref|ZP_01520645.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_4667 [Comamonas... testosteroni KF-1] gb|EAV14383.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_4667 [Comamonas testosteroni KF-1] ZP_01520645.1 8e-05 27% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0104 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0104 ref|ZP_01519290.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_1042 [Comamonas... testosteroni KF-1] gb|EAV15567.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_1042 [Comamonas testosteroni KF-1] ZP_01519290.1 8e-04 33% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 ref|YP_719270.1| possible large adhesin [Haemophilus somnus 129PT...] gb|ABI25333.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Haemophilus somnus 129PT] YP_719270.1 1e-27 34% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0058 ref|NP_001076809.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium cast...aneum] gb|ABE02225.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] gb|ABN79650.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076809.1 1e-112 60% ...

  13. Lineage diversification of fringe-toed lizards (Phrynosomatidae: Uma notata complex) in the Colorado Desert: Delimiting species in the presence of gene flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottscho, Andrew D.; Wood, Dustin A.; Vandergast, Amy; Lemos Espinal, Julio A.; Gatesy, John; Reeder, Tod

    2017-01-01

    Multi-locus nuclear DNA data were used to delimit species of fringe-toed lizards of theUma notata complex, which are specialized for living in wind-blown sand habitats in the deserts of southwestern North America, and to infer whether Quaternary glacial cycles or Tertiary geological events were important in shaping the historical biogeography of this group. We analyzed ten nuclear loci collected using Sanger sequencing and genome-wide sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data collected using restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. A combination of species discovery methods (concatenated phylogenies, parametric and non-parametric clustering algorithms) and species validation approaches (coalescent-based species tree/isolation-with-migration models) were used to delimit species, infer phylogenetic relationships, and to estimate effective population sizes, migration rates, and speciation times. Uma notata, U. inornata, U. cowlesi, and an undescribed species from Mohawk Dunes, Arizona (U. sp.) were supported as distinct in the concatenated analyses and by clustering algorithms, and all operational taxonomic units were decisively supported as distinct species by ranking hierarchical nested speciation models with Bayes factors based on coalescent-based species tree methods. However, significant unidirectional gene flow (2NM >1) from U. cowlesi and U. notata into U. rufopunctata was detected under the isolation-with-migration model. Therefore, we conservatively delimit four species-level lineages within this complex (U. inornata, U. notata, U. cowlesi, and U. sp.), treating U. rufopunctata as a hybrid population (U. notata x cowlesi). Both concatenated and coalescent-based estimates of speciation times support the hypotheses that speciation within the complex occurred during the late Pleistocene, and that the geological evolution of the Colorado River delta during this period was an important process shaping the observed phylogeographic patterns.

  14. Diversification of two lineages of symbiotic Photobacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Urbanczyk

    Full Text Available Understanding of processes driving bacterial speciation requires examination of closely related, recently diversified lineages. To gain an insight into diversification of bacteria, we conducted comparative genomic analysis of two lineages of bioluminescent symbionts, Photobacterium leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis'. The two lineages are evolutionary and ecologically closely related. Based on the methods used in bacterial taxonomy for classification of new species (DNA-DNA hybridization and ANI, genetic relatedness of the two lineages is at a cut-off point for species delineation. In this study, we obtained the whole genome sequence of a representative P. leiognathi strain lrivu.4.1, and compared it to the whole genome sequence of 'P. mandapamensis' svers.1.1. Results of the comparative genomic analysis suggest that P. leiognathi has a more plastic genome and acquired genes horizontally more frequently than 'P. mandapamensis'. We predict that different rates of recombination and gene acquisition contributed to diversification of the two lineages. Analysis of lineage-specific sequences in 25 strains of P. leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis' found no evidence that bioluminescent symbioses with specific host animals have played a role in diversification of the two lineages.

  15. Diversification of two lineages of symbiotic Photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Urbanczyk, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Ogura, Yoshitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of processes driving bacterial speciation requires examination of closely related, recently diversified lineages. To gain an insight into diversification of bacteria, we conducted comparative genomic analysis of two lineages of bioluminescent symbionts, Photobacterium leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis'. The two lineages are evolutionary and ecologically closely related. Based on the methods used in bacterial taxonomy for classification of new species (DNA-DNA hybridization and ANI), genetic relatedness of the two lineages is at a cut-off point for species delineation. In this study, we obtained the whole genome sequence of a representative P. leiognathi strain lrivu.4.1, and compared it to the whole genome sequence of 'P. mandapamensis' svers.1.1. Results of the comparative genomic analysis suggest that P. leiognathi has a more plastic genome and acquired genes horizontally more frequently than 'P. mandapamensis'. We predict that different rates of recombination and gene acquisition contributed to diversification of the two lineages. Analysis of lineage-specific sequences in 25 strains of P. leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis' found no evidence that bioluminescent symbioses with specific host animals have played a role in diversification of the two lineages.

  16. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L; Sessions, R Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2003-07-08

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity.

  17. Lineage specific recombination rates and microevolution in Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nightingale Kendra K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a saprotroph as well as an opportunistic human foodborne pathogen, which has previously been shown to consist of at least two widespread lineages (termed lineages I and II and an uncommon lineage (lineage III. While some L. monocytogenes strains show evidence for considerable diversification by homologous recombination, our understanding of the contribution of recombination to L. monocytogenes evolution is still limited. We therefore used STRUCTURE and ClonalFrame, two programs that model the effect of recombination, to make inferences about the population structure and different aspects of the recombination process in L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed using sequences for seven loci (including the house-keeping genes gap, prs, purM and ribC, the stress response gene sigB, and the virulence genes actA and inlA for 195 L. monocytogenes isolates. Results Sequence analyses with ClonalFrame and the Sawyer's test showed that recombination is more prevalent in lineage II than lineage I and is most frequent in two house-keeping genes (ribC and purM and the two virulence genes (actA and inlA. The relative occurrence of recombination versus point mutation is about six times higher in lineage II than in lineage I, which causes a higher genetic variability in lineage II. Unlike lineage I, lineage II represents a genetically heterogeneous population with a relatively high proportion (30% average of genetic material imported from external sources. Phylograms, constructed with correcting for recombination, as well as Tajima's D data suggest that both lineages I and II have suffered a population bottleneck. Conclusion Our study shows that evolutionary lineages within a single bacterial species can differ considerably in the relative contributions of recombination to genetic diversification. Accounting for recombination in phylogenetic studies is critical, and new evolutionary models that

  18. Phylogenetic lineages in Entomophthoromycota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryganskyi, A.P.; Humber, R.A.; Smith, M.E.; Hodge, K.; Huang, B.; Voigt, K.; Vilgalys, R.

    2013-01-01

    Entomophthoromycota is one of six major phylogenetic lineages among the former phylum Zygomycota. These early terrestrial fungi share evolutionarily ancestral characters such as coenocytic mycelium and gametangiogamy as a sexual process resulting in zygospore formation. Previous molecular studies ha

  19. Less pollen-mediated gene flow for more signatures of glacial lineages: congruent evidence from balsam fir cpDNA and mtDNA for multiple refugia in eastern and central North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cinget

    Full Text Available The phylogeographic structure and postglacial history of balsam fir (Abies balsamea, a transcontinental North American boreal conifer, was inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers. Genetic structure among 107 populations (mtDNA data and 75 populations (cpDNA data was analyzed using Bayesian and genetic distance approaches. Population differentiation was high for mtDNA (dispersed by seeds only, but also for cpDNA (dispersed by seeds and pollen, indicating that pollen gene flow is more restricted in balsam fir than in other boreal conifers. Low cpDNA gene flow in balsam fir may relate to low pollen production due to the inherent biology of the species and populations being decimated by recurrent spruce budworm epidemics, and/or to low dispersal of pollen grains due to their peculiar structural properties. Accordingly, a phylogeographic structure was detected using both mtDNA and cpDNA markers and population structure analyses supported the existence of at least five genetically distinct glacial lineages in central and eastern North America. Four of these would originate from glacial refugia located south of the Laurentide ice sheet, while the last one would have persisted in the northern Labrador region. As expected due to reduced pollen-mediated gene flow, congruence between the geographic distribution of mtDNA and cpDNA lineages was higher than in other North American conifers. However, concordance was not complete, reflecting that restricted but nonetheless detectable cpDNA gene flow among glacial lineages occurred during the Holocene. As a result, new cpDNA and mtDNA genome combinations indicative of cytoplasmic genome capture were observed.

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0019 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0019 ref|NP_725630.1| vegetable CG6657-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melan...ogaster] ref|NP_524685.2| vegetable CG6657-PB, isoform B [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|Q9V7W1|PIGV_DROME GPI ...mannosyltransferase 2 (GPI mannosyltransferase II) (GPI-MT-II) (Protein vegetable) gb|AAF57928.1| CG6657-PA,

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 ref|NP_477376.1| CG4585-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] dbj|BAA32689....1| unnamed protein product [Drosophila melanogaster] dbj|BAA32692.1| unnamed protein product [Drosophila me...lanogaster] gb|AAF47081.1| CG4585-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] gb|AAL28300.1| GH20310p [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_477376.1 1e-132 58% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0178 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0178 ref|XP_001651711.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti...] ref|XP_001660238.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT32550.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti...] gb|EAT38553.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti] XP_001651711.1 1e-176 74% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 ref|NP_824326.1| ABC transporter integral membrane protein BldKA [Streptomyces avermitil...is MA-4680] dbj|BAB69357.1| transport integral membrane protein BldKA [Streptomyces avermitil...is] dbj|BAC70861.1| putative peptide ABC transporter permease protein [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] NP_824326.1 0.94 30% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0022 ref|NP_523974.3| fear-of-intimacy CG6817-PA [Drosophila melanogas...ter] sp|Q9VSL7|FOI_DROME Zinc transporter foi precursor (Protein fear-of-intimacy) (Protein kastchen) gb|AAF50401.3| CG6817-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_523974.3 1e-111 44% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|ZP_01563785.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV58290.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia cenocepacia ...MC0-3] gb|EAY65940.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia cenocepacia PC184] ZP_01563785.1 4.6 26% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0111 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0111 ref|NP_001029470.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndro...me 2 [Bos taurus] sp|Q3SWX0|NIPA2_BOVIN Non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2 hom...olog gb|AAI04628.1| Non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 2 [Bos taurus] NP_001029470.1 2e-72 51% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0116 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0116 ref|YP_081361.1| gluconate permease [Bacillus licheniformis ATCC ...14580] ref|YP_093794.1| GntP [Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580] gb|AAU25723.1| gluconate permease [Bacillus lichen...iformis ATCC 14580] gb|AAU43101.1| GntP [Bacillus licheniformis DSM 13] YP_081361.1 1.8 41% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0014 ref|NP_476702.1| rickets CG8930-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] ref|NP_599102.1| rickets CG8930-PB, isoform B [Drosophila melanogaster] ref|NP_599103.1| rickets CG89...30-PC, isoform C [Drosophila melanogaster] ref|NP_599104.1| rickets CG8930-PD, isoform D [Drosophila melanog

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 ref|XP_307101.2| AGAP012756-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] ref|...XP_319412.2| AGAP010224-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] gb|EAA13938.2| AGAP010224-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST...] gb|EAA02917.2| AGAP012756-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] XP_307101.2 3e-47 50% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0079 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0079 ref|XP_525054.2| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 6 [P...an troglodytes] ref|XP_001169314.1| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 3 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_0...01169359.1| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 4 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001169380.1| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 5 [Pan troglodytes] XP_525054.2 4e-33 25% ...

  11. Genome duplication, subfunction partitioning, and lineage divergence: Sox9 in stickleback and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresko, William A; Yan, Yi-Lin; Baltrus, David A; Amores, Angel; Singer, Amy; Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Postlethwait, John H

    2003-11-01

    Teleosts are the most species-rich group of vertebrates, and a genome duplication (tetraploidization) event in ray-fin fish appears to have preceded this remarkable explosion of biodiversity. What is the relationship of the ray-fin genome duplication to the teleost radiation? Genome duplication may have facilitated lineage divergence by partitioning different ancestral gene subfunctions among co-orthologs of tetrapod genes in different teleost lineages. To test this hypothesis, we investigated gene expression patterns for Sox9 gene duplicates in stickleback and zebrafish, teleosts whose lineages diverged early in Euteleost evolution. Most expression domains appear to have been partitioned between Sox9a and Sox9b before the divergence of stickleback and zebrafish lineages, but some ancestral expression domains were distributed differentially in each lineage. We conclude that some gene subfunctions, as represented by lineage-specific expression domains, may have assorted differently in separate lineages and that these may have contributed to lineage diversification during teleost evolution.

  12. Parallel emergence of negative epistasis across experimental lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Peter C; Velicer, Gregory J

    2017-01-27

    Epistatic interactions can greatly impact evolutionary phenomena, particularly the process of adaptation. Here, we leverage four parallel experimentally evolved lineages to study the emergence and trajectories of epistatic interactions in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A social gene (pilA) necessary for effective group swarming on soft agar had been deleted from the common ancestor of these lineages. During selection for competitiveness at the leading edge of growing colonies, two lineages evolved qualitatively novel mechanisms for greatly increased swarming on soft agar, whereas the other two lineages evolved relatively small increases in swarming. By reintroducing pilA into different genetic backgrounds along the four lineages, we tested whether parallel lineages showed similar patterns of epistasis. In particular, we tested whether a pattern of negative epistasis between accumulating mutations and pilA previously found in the fastest lineage would be found only in the two evolved lineages with the fastest and most striking swarming phenotypes, or rather was due to common epistatic structure across all lineages arising from the generic fixation of adaptive mutations. Our analysis reveals the emergence of negative epistasis across all four independent lineages. Further, we present results showing that the observed negative epistasis is not due exclusively to evolving populations approaching a maximum phenotypic value that inherently limits positive effects of pilA reintroduction, but rather involves direct antagonistic interactions between accumulating mutations and the reintroduced social gene.

  13. The MADS Domain Protein DIANA Acts Together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to Specify the Central Cell in Arabidopsis Ovules[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein–β-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  14. Genome-Wide Identification of Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase Gene Family in Plant Lineage Shows Presence of Novel D-x-D and D-E-L Motifs in EF-Hand Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan K; Mohanta, Nibedita; Mohanta, Yugal K; Bae, Hanhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ions are considered ubiquitous second messengers in eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are modulated by various signals such as hormones and biotic and abiotic stresses. Modulation of Ca(2+) ion leads to stimulation of calcium dependent protein kinase genes (CPKs), which results in regulation of gene expression and therefore mediates plant growth and development as well as biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we reported the CPK gene family of 40 different plant species (950 CPK genes) and provided a unified nomenclature system for all of them. In addition, we analyzed their genomic, biochemical and structural conserved features. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the kinase domain, auto-inhibitory domain and EF-hands regions of regulatory domains are highly conserved in nature. Additionally, the EF-hand domains of higher plants were found to contain four D-x-D and two D-E-L motifs, while lower eukaryotic plants had two D-x-D and one D-x-E motifs in their EF-hands. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CPK genes are clustered into four different groups. By studying the CPK gene family across the plant lineage, we provide the first evidence of the presence of D-x-D motif in the calcium binding EF-hand domain of CPK proteins.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0010 ref|ZP_00895641.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02002081 [Burkholderia pse...udomallei 1106b] ref|ZP_01214082.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02000720 [Burkholderia pseudomallei... 1710a] ref|ZP_01318224.1| hypothetical protein Bpse1_03002406 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1655] ref|ZP_01324...763.1| hypothetical protein BpseP_03001411 [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur] re...f|ZP_01330574.1| hypothetical protein BpseS_03001271 [Burkholderia pseudomallei S13] ref|ZP_01335179.1| hypothetical protein Bpse

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 gb|AAQ03363.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb|AA...Q03365.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb|AAQ03367.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argente...us] gb|AAQ03373.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb|AAQ03375.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argente...us] gb|AAQ03385.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb...|AAQ03387.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] AAQ03363.1 0.33 26% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|NP_372811.1| similar to urea transporter [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus... Mu50] ref|NP_375400.1| hypothetical protein SA2081 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N31...5] ref|YP_001247667.1| Urea transporter [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus JH9] ref|YP_001317466.1| Urea t...ransporter [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus JH1] ref|YP_001442861.1| hypothet...ical protein SAHV_2271 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Mu3] dbj|BAB43379.1| SA2081 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0070 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0070 ref|YP_961710.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related pr...otein [Shewanella sp. W3-18-1] ref|ZP_01705111.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related proteins [Sh...ewanella putrefaciens 200] ref|YP_001181982.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related protein [Shewan...ella putrefaciens CN-32] gb|ABM23156.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-rel...ated protein [Shewanella sp. W3-18-1] gb|EAY54633.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related proteins

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0108 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0108 ref|YP_001255294.1| membrane protein [Clostridium botulinum A str.... ATCC 3502] ref|YP_001385037.1| membrane-spanning protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. ATCC 19397] ref|YP_...001388507.1| membrane-spanning protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. Hall] emb|CAL84356.1| putative membrane protein [Clostridium bot...g protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. ATCC 19397] gb|ABS36178.1| membrane-spanning protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. Hall] YP_001255294.1 6.0 24% ... ...ulinum A str. ATCC 3502] gb|ABS33222.1| membrane-spannin

  20. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Knud

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26 and their receptors (HCRII. Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF. Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish.

  1. Differential Protein Network Analysis of the Immune Cell Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Clancy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks.

  2. Sequencing analysis of 20,000 full-length cDNA clones from cassava reveals lineage specific expansions in gene families related to stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaki Yoshiyuki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cassava, an allotetraploid known for its remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses is an important source of energy for humans and animals and a raw material for many industrial processes. A full-length cDNA library of cassava plants under normal, heat, drought, aluminum and post harvest physiological deterioration conditions was built; 19968 clones were sequence-characterized using expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Results The ESTs were assembled into 6355 contigs and 9026 singletons that were further grouped into 10577 scaffolds; we found 4621 new cassava sequences and 1521 sequences with no significant similarity to plant protein databases. Transcripts of 7796 distinct genes were captured and we were able to assign a functional classification to 78% of them while finding more than half of the enzymes annotated in metabolic pathways in Arabidopsis. The annotation of sequences that were not paired to transcripts of other species included many stress-related functional categories showing that our library is enriched with stress-induced genes. Finally, we detected 230 putative gene duplications that include key enzymes in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways and could play a role in cassava stress response features. Conclusion The cassava full-length cDNA library here presented contains transcripts of genes involved in stress response as well as genes important for different areas of cassava research. This library will be an important resource for gene discovery, characterization and cloning; in the near future it will aid the annotation of the cassava genome.

  3. Lineages and virulence gene content among extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli strains of food origin in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouini, Ahlem; Slama, Karim Ben; Klibi, Naouel; Sallem, Rym Ben; Estepa, Vanesa; Vinué, Laura; Sáenz, Yolanda; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2013-02-01

    Nineteen extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Escherichia coli strains recovered from food samples in Tunisia were characterized by multilocus sequence typing and phylogenetic typing, and the virulence gene and plasmid content were also determined. These strains presented unrelated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and contained genes coding for the following ESBLs (the number of strains is in parentheses): CTX-M-1 (15), CTX-M-14 (2), CTX-M-8 (1), and SHV-5 (1). Twelve different sequence types (STs) were identified among the 19 ESBL-positive strains, which included two new STs (ST2022 in 2 bla(CTX-M-14)-containing strains and ST1970 in 2 bla(CTX-M-1)-containing strains). ST155 and ST602 were detected in four and three bla(CTX-M-1)-containing strains, respectively, and ST405 was detected in one bla(CTX-M-8)-producing strain. All ESBL-positive strains were ascribed to the phylogenetic groups A and B1. Most of the bla(CTX-M-1)-containing strains harbored an IncI1 plasmid, except for the four bla(CTX-M-1)-positive strains of beef origin and ST155, which harbored an IncN plasmid. The two bla(CTX-M-14)-containing strains contained an IncI1 plasmid. The virulence gene fimA was detected in all strains. Most strains also carried the aer gene, and six strains carried the eae gene. All strains were negative for the virulence genes sxt, papG-III, papC, hly, cnf1, and bfp. We conclude that ESBL-producing E. coli strains of food origin in Tunisia show high diversity and that plasmids harboring ESBL genes could be implicated in the dissemination of this resistance phenotype.

  4. An extended phylogenetic analysis reveals ancient origin of "non-green" phosphoribulokinase genes from two lineages of "green" secondary photosynthetic eukaryotes: Euglenophyta and Chlorarachniophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekimoto Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euglenophyta and Chlorarachniophyta are groups of photosynthetic eukaryotes harboring secondary plastids of distinct green algal origins. Although previous phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding Calvin cycle enzymes demonstrated the presence of genes apparently not derived from green algal endosymbionts in the nuclear genomes of Euglena gracilis (Euglenophyta and Bigelowiella natans (Chlorarachniophyta, the origins of these "non-green" genes in "green" secondary phototrophs were unclear due to the limited taxon sampling. Results Here, we sequenced five new phosphoribulokinase (PRK genes (from one euglenophyte, two chlorarachniophytes, and two glaucophytes and performed an extended phylogenetic analysis of the genes based on a phylum-wide taxon sampling from various photosynthetic eukaryotes. Our phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the PRK sequences form two genera of Euglenophyta formed a robust monophyletic group within a large clade including stramenopiles, haptophytes and a cryptophyte, and three genera of Chlorarachniophyta were placed within the red algal clade. These "non-green" affiliations were supported by the taxon-specific insertion/deletion sequences in the PRK alignment, especially between euglenophytes and stramenopiles. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of another Calvin cycle enzyme, plastid-targeted sedoheptulose-bisphosphatase (SBP, showed that the SBP sequences from two genera of Chlorarachniophyta were positioned within a red algal clade. Conclusions Our results suggest that PRK genes may have been transferred from a "stramenopile" ancestor to Euglenophyta and from a "red algal" ancestor to Chlorarachniophyta before radiation of extant taxa of these two "green" secondary phototrophs. The presence of two of key Calvin cycle enzymes, PRK and SBP, of red algal origins in Chlorarachniophyta indicate that the contribution of "non-green" algae to the plastid proteome in the "green" secondary phototrophs is

  5. Klumpfuss controls FMRFamide expression by enabling BMP signaling within the NB5-6 lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Losada-Perez, Maria; Gabilondo, Hugo; Molina, Isabel; Turiegano, Enrique; Torroja, Laura; Thor, Stefan; Benito-Sipos, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A number of transcription factors that are expressed within most, if not all, embryonic neuroblast (NB) lineages participate in neural subtype specification. Some have been extensively studied in several NB lineages (e.g. components of the temporal gene cascade) whereas others only within specific NB lineages. To what extent they function in other lineages remains unknown. Klumpfuss (Klu), the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) protein, is one such transcription factor. ...

  6. 乙型流感病毒Victoria系和Yamagata系HA1基因的分子进化研究%Molecular evolution of two lineages related to influenza B virus based on HA1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金青青; 茅海燕; 孙逸; 卢亦愚; 冯燕; 徐昌平; 莫世华

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨乙型流感病毒两大谱系的进化特征和进化规律.方法 从GenBank数据库下载1940-2012年乙型流感病毒流行株共126条,采用贝叶斯-马尔科夫链-蒙特卡洛(Bayesian-MCMC)和分子钟方法,对乙型流感病毒的HA1基因进行系统发育学分析,计算乙型流感病毒两大谱系可能的起源时间与分化时间.结果 1978-2010年乙型流感病毒Victoria系与Yamagata系的aa平均差异率为5.4%~ 10.2%,两谱系的aa差异和组间遗传距离随时间推移呈逐渐增大的趋势.与Victoria系毒株相比,Yamagata系全部毒株的163位aa及部分毒株的166位aa缺失,但是这些年来的乙型流感病毒HA1基因除个别位点外,尚未受到明显的正向选择压力.每年乙型流感病毒HA1基因的碱基替换速率为2.138×10-3(95%HPD:1.833×10-3~2.437×10-3)替代/位点,推算乙型流感病毒Victoria系和Yamagata系的最近共同祖先出现在1971年(95%HPD:1969-1972年),两大谱系的分化时间点分别为1973年(95%HPD:1971-1974年)和1977年(95%HPD:1975-1978年).结论 乙型流感Victoria系和Yamagata系均较以往发生大的变异,且两大谱系的差异日趋增大,将来有可能分化为不同的亚型,在流感监测中应密切关注这一变化及其流行病学意义.%Objective To study the evolutionary characteristics and rules of two lineages on influenza B virus.Methods A total of 126 HA1 sequences of strains isolated during 1940 to 2012were downloaded from the GenBank.Time of the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) and divergence of the two lineages were calculated based on the data from phylogenetic analysis of HA1gene,using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) and molecular clock method.Results The average amino acid variant ratios were ranged from 5.4% to 10.2% within the strains of influenza B virus isolated during 1978 to 2010.Compared with the Victoria-like strains,all Yamagatalike strains showed an amino acid deletion at

  7. Dual roles of lineage restricted transcription factors: the case of MITF in melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Carmit; Fisher, David E

    2011-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor, MITF, is a master regulator of melanocyte development, differentiation, migration, and survival.(1) A broad collection of studies have indicated that MITF directly regulates the transcription of genes involved in pigmentation, which are selective to the melanocyte lineage. In addition, MITF controls expression of genes which are expressed in multiple cell lineages, and may also play differential roles in activating vs. maintaining gene expression patterns. In this Point of View article, we discuss lineage restricted transcription factor activation of both tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes using melanocytes and MITF as a model system that may eventually provide insights into such processes in multiple cell lineages.

  8. Expanding the Entamoeba Universe: New Hosts Yield Novel Ribosomal Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Alison S; Busby, Eloise J; Levy, Abigail D; Komm, Natasha; Clark, C Graham

    2016-01-01

    Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. In addition, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered.

  9. Impact of tamoxifen on adipocyte lineage tracing: Inducer of adipogenesis and prolonged nuclear translocation of Cre recombinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng Ye

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: These findings highlight the potential for tamoxifen-induced adipogenesis, and the associated drawbacks of the use of tamoxifen in lineage tracing studies, explaining the discrepancy in lineage tracing results from different systems with temporal control of gene targeting.

  10. Sequence variation of the glycoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages within field isolates of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, A.; Bascuro, B.; Monnier, A.F.; Vende, P.; Winton, J.R.; de Kinkelin, P.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the genetic diversity of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), the sequence of the glycoprotein genes (G) of 11 North American and European isolates were determined. Comparison with the G protein of representative members of the family Rhabdoviridae suggested that VHSV was a different virus species from infectious haemorrhagic necrosis virus (IHNV) and Hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV). At a higher taxonomic level, VHSV, IHNV and HIRRV formed a group which was genetically closest to the genus Lyssavirus. Compared with each other, the G genes of VHSV displayed a dissimilar overall genetic diversity which correlated with differences in geographical origin. The multiple sequence alignment of the complete G protein, showed that the divergent positions were not uniformly distributed along the sequence. A central region (amino acid position 245-300) accumulated substitutions and appeared to be highly variable. The genetic heterogeneity within a single isolate was high, with an apparent internal mutation frequency of 1.2 x 10(-3) per nucleotide site, attesting the quasispecies nature of the viral population. The phylogeny separated VHSV strains according to the major geographical area of isolation: genotype I for continental Europe, genotype II for the British Isles, and genotype III for North America. Isolates from continental Europe exhibited the highest genetic variability, with sub-groups correlated partially with the serological classification. Neither neutralizing polyclonal sera, nor monoclonal antibodies, were able to discriminate between the genotypes. The overall structure of the phylogenetic tree suggests that VHSV genetic diversity and evolution fit within the model of random change and positive selection operating on quasispecies.

  11. Evidence of two lineages of the symbiont 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola' in Italian populations of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Claudia; Mazzon, Luca; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Simonato, Mauro; Squartini, Andrea; Girolami, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The close association between the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and bacteria has been known for more than a century. Recently, the presence of a host-specific, hereditary, unculturable symbiotic bacterium, designated 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola', has been described inside the cephalic organ of the fly, called the oesophageal bulb. In the present study, the 16S rRNA gene sequence variability of 'Ca. E. dacicola' was examined within and between 26 Italian olive fly populations sampled across areas where olive trees occur in the wild and areas where cultivated olive trees have been introduced through history. The bacterial contents of the oesophageal bulbs of 314 olive flies were analysed and a minimum of 781 bp of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. The corresponding host fly genotype was assessed by sequencing a 776 bp portion of the mitochondrial genome. Two 'Ca. E. dacicola' haplotypes were found (htA and htB), one being slightly more prevalent than the other (57%). The two haplotypes did not co-exist in the same individuals, as confirmed by cloning. Interestingly, the olive fly populations of the two main Italian islands, Sicily and Sardinia, appeared to be represented exclusively by the htB and htA haplotypes, respectively, while peninsular populations showed both bacterial haplotypes in different proportions. No significant correlation emerged between the two symbiont haplotypes and the 16 host fly haplotypes observed, suggesting evidence for a mixed model of vertical and horizontal transmission of the symbiont during the fly life cycle.

  12. Co-circulation of Peste-des-Petits-Ruminants Virus Asian lineage IV with Lineage II in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woma, T Y; Adombi, C M; Yu, D; Qasim, A M M; Sabi, A A; Maurice, N A; Olaiya, O D; Loitsch, A; Bailey, D; Shamaki, D; Dundon, W G; Quan, M

    2016-06-01

    Peste-des-petits-ruminants (PPR), a major small ruminant transboundary animal disease, is endemic in Nigeria. Strains of the causal agent, peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV), have been differentiated into four genetically distinct lineages based on the partial sequence of the virus nucleoprotein (N) or fusion (F) genes. Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus strains that were identified initially in Africa were grouped into lineages I, II and III and viruses from Asia were classified as lineage IV and referred to as the Asian lineage. Many recent reports indicate that the Asian lineage is now also present in Africa. With this in mind, this study was conducted to reassess the epidemiology of PPRV in Nigeria. A total of 140 clinical samples from 16 sheep and 63 goats with symptoms suggestive of PPR were collected from different states of Nigeria during a four-year period (2010-2013). They were analysed by the amplification of fragments of the N gene. Results for 33 (42%) animals were positive. The phylogenetic analysis of the N gene sequences with those available in GenBank showed that viruses that were detected belong to both lineage II and IV. Based on an analysis of the N gene sequences, the lineage IV isolates grouped into two clades, one being predominant in the north-eastern part of the country and the other found primarily in the southern regions of the country. This study reports the presence of PPRV Asian lineage IV in Nigeria for the first time.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of AGAMOUS sequences reveals the origin of the diploid and tetraploid forms of self-pollinating wild buckwheat, Fagopyrum homotropicum Ohnishi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyoshi, Mitsuyuki; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsako, Takanori; Li, Cheng-Yun; Ohnishi, Ohmi

    2012-09-01

    Fagopyrum homotropicum Ohnishi is a self-pollinating wild buckwheat species indigenous to eastern Tibet and the Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces of China. It is useful breeding material for shifting cultivated buckwheat (F. esculentum ssp. esculentum Moench) from out-crossing to self-pollinating. Despite its importance as a genetic resource in buckwheat breeding, the genetic variation of F. homotropicum is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of the diploid and tetraploid forms of F. homotropicum based on the nucleotide sequences of a nuclear gene, AGAMOUS (AG). Neighbor-joining analysis revealed that representative individuals clustered into three large groups (Group I, II and III). Each group contained diploid and tetraploid forms of F. homotropicum. We identified tetraploid plants that had two diverged AG sequences; one belonging to Group I and the other belonging to Group II, or one belonging to Group II and the other belonging to Group III. These results suggest that the tetraploid form originated from at least two hybridization events between deeply differentiated diploids. The results also imply that the genetic diversity contributed by tetraploidization of differentiated diploids may have allowed the distribution range of F. homotropicum to expand to the northern areas of China.

  14. Tools and Techniques for Wt1-Based Lineage Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilm, Bettina; Muñoz-Chapuli, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal expression pattern of Wt1 has been extensively studied in a number of animal models to establish its function and the developmental fate of the cells expressing this gene. In this chapter, we review the available animal models for Wt1-expressing cell lineage analysis, including direct Wt1 expression reporters and systems for permanent Wt1 lineage tracing. We describe the presently used constitutive or inducible genetic lineage tracing approaches based on the Cre/loxP system utilizing Cre recombinase expression under control of a Wt1 promoter.To make these systems accessible, we provide laboratory protocols that include dissection and processing of the tissues for immunofluorescence and histopathological analysis of the lineage-labeled Wt1-derived cells within the embryo/tissue context.

  15. Evolution of two prototypic T cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Hirano, Masayuki; Sutoh, Yoichi; Herrin, Brantley R; Cooper, Max D

    2015-07-01

    Jawless vertebrates, which occupy a unique position in chordate phylogeny, employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-based variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for antigen recognition. During the assembly of the VLR genes (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC), donor LRR-encoding sequences are copied in a step-wise manner into the incomplete germ-line genes. The assembled VLR genes are differentially expressed by discrete lymphocyte lineages: VLRA- and VLRC-producing cells are T-cell like, whereas VLRB-producing cells are B-cell like. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes resemble the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates that express the αβ or γδ T-cell receptors (TCR). Reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRα/TCRδ locus in jawed vertebrates, the close proximity of the VLRA and VLRC loci facilitates sharing of donor LRR sequences during VLRA and VLRC assembly. Here we discuss the insight these findings provide into vertebrate T- and B-cell evolution, and the alternative types of anticipatory receptors they use for adaptive immunity.

  16. Single-cell analysis defines the divergence between the innate lymphoid cell lineage and lymphoid tissue-inducer cell lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Chea, Sylvestre; Gudjonson, Herman; Constantinides, Michael G; Dinner, Aaron R; Bendelac, Albert; Golub, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    The precise lineage relationship between innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells is poorly understood. Using single-cell multiplex transcriptional analysis of 100 lymphoid genes and single-cell cultures of fetal liver precursor cells, we identified the common proximal precursor to these lineages and found that its bifurcation was marked by differential induction of the transcription factors PLZF and TCF1. Acquisition of individual effector programs specific to the ILC subsets ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 was initiated later, at the common ILC precursor stage, by transient expression of mixed ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 transcriptional patterns, whereas, in contrast, the development of LTi cells did not go through multilineage priming. Our findings provide insight into the divergent mechanisms of the differentiation of the ILC lineage and LTi cell lineage and establish a high-resolution 'blueprint' of their development.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of P5 P-type ATPases, a eukaryotic lineage of secretory pathway pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Asp, Torben; Holm, Preben Bach

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotes encompass a remarkable variety of organisms and unresolved lineages. Different phylogenetic analyses have lead to conflicting conclusions as to the origin and associations between lineages and species. In this work, we investigated evolutionary relationship of a family of cation pumps...... exclusive for the secretory pathway of eukaryotes by combining the identification of lineage-specific genes with phylogenetic evolution of common genes. Sequences of P5 ATPases, which are regarded to be cation pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), were identified in all eukaryotic lineages but not in any...

  18. A new loss-of-function allele 28y reveals a role of ARGONAUTE1 in limiting asymmetric division of stomatal lineage ground cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kezhen Yangy; Min Jiangy; Jie Le

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana L., stomata are produced through a series of divisions including asymmetric and symmetric divisions. Asymmetric entry division of meristemoid mother cellproduces two daughter cells, the smal er meristemoid and the larger sister cell, a stomatal lineage ground cell(SLGC). Stomatal lineage ground cells can differentiate into epidermal pavement cells but have the potential to divide asymmetrical y, spacing divisions, to create satel ite meristemoids. Peptide ligands and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) and ERECTA family receptors regulate the initiation of stomatal lineages, activity, and orientation of spacing divisions. Here, we reported that a natural mutant 28y displayed an increased stomatal density and index. Using map-based cloning, we identified mutation in ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) as the cause of 28y phenotypes. Time-lapse tracing of stomatal lineage cells reveals that stomatal overproduction in 28y is caused by the excessive asymmetric spacing division of SLGCs.Further genetic results demonstrated that AGO1 acts down-stream of TMM and negatively regulates the SPCH transcripts, but in a brassinosteroid-independent manner. Upregulation of AGAMOUS-LIKE16 (AGL16) in 28y mutants suggests that AGO1 is required to restrict AGL16-mediated stomatal spacing divisions, an miRNA pathway in addition to ligand-receptor signaling modules.

  19. Highly variable rates of genome rearrangements between hemiascomycetous yeast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemiascomycete yeasts cover an evolutionary span comparable to that of the entire phylum of chordates. Since this group currently contains the largest number of complete genome sequences it presents unique opportunities to understand the evolution of genome organization in eukaryotes. We inferred rates of genome instability on all branches of a phylogenetic tree for 11 species and calculated species-specific rates of genome rearrangements. We characterized all inversion events that occurred within synteny blocks between six representatives of the different lineages. We show that the rates of macro- and microrearrangements of gene order are correlated within individual lineages but are highly variable across different lineages. The most unstable genomes correspond to the pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Chromosomal maps have been intensively shuffled by numerous interchromosomal rearrangements, even between species that have retained a very high physical fraction of their genomes within small synteny blocks. Despite this intensive reshuffling of gene positions, essential genes, which cluster in low recombination regions in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tend to remain syntenic during evolution. This work reveals that the high plasticity of eukaryotic genomes results from rearrangement rates that vary between lineages but also at different evolutionary times of a given lineage.

  20. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Heijmans, K.; Airoldi, C.A.; Davies, B.; Angenent, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally cha

  1. The Revitalization of Women’s Entrepreneurship Spirit In Micro Enterprises With Islamic Microfinance Institution (IMI (Study on The Contribution of BMTs Agam Madani in Agam sub-province, West Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesi Eka Puteri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the contribution of Islamic Microfinance Institutions (IMI in the process of empowerment of women microenterprises, and recommended a related policy.Method – This study is a field research in 2012, which focused in BMTs Agam Madani at Agam district. The data is sourced from the observation, documentation and questionnaires from 60 women micro-entrepreneurs samples who receive working capital financing. This paper uses simple regression model in order to observe relationship between working capital and the increasing of revenue. This model is to measure the amount of the multiplier effect in working capital-to increasing of revenue.Result – This paper found that IMI is a good model to develop society more prosperous by developing BMTs in each district. These BMT has thousands of micro enterprises member and could revitalized the spirit of entrepreneurship of minangkabau’s women. A research to 60 women’s micro entrepreneur samples showed the positive significant influence between lending to revenue. A multiplier effect equal to 0.068.The small number of multiplier effect implied that many factors determining their revenue, not lending only.Conclusion – This finding could explain that IMI could empower micro entrepreneur woman. This finding also recommend few strategies: 1 Revitalization of BMTs as micro catalyst by revitalization of structure of organization, products variation, human resource compentence, sharia monitoring, public cooperation and implementating local cultural value 2 Revitalization of government role as fasilitator, coordinator, initiator and mediator in developing micro sector. Keywords : Women’s Entrepreneurship, Micro Enterprises, Islamic Microfinance Institution, BMTs Agam Madani 

  2. Incomplete Lineage Sorting: Consistent Phylogeny Estimation From Multiple Loci

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a simple algorithm for reconstructing phylogenies from multiple gene trees in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting, that is, when the topology of the gene trees may differ from that of the species tree. We show that our technique is statistically consistent under standard stochastic assumptions, that is, it returns the correct tree given sufficiently many unlinked loci. We also show that it can tolerate moderate estimation errors.

  3. Occurrence of different Canine distemper virus lineages in Italian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Andrea; De Lorenzo Dandola, Giorgia; Scagliarini, Alessandra; Prosperi, Santino; Battilani, Mara

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the sequence analysis of the H gene of 7 Canine distemper virus (CDV) strains identified in dogs in Italy between years 2002-2012. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the CDV strains belonged to 2 clusters: 6 viruses were identified as Arctic-like lineage and 1 as Europe 1 lineage. These data show a considerable prevalence of Arctic-like-CDVs in the analysed dogs. The dogs and the 3 viruses more recently identified showed 4 distinctive amino acid mutations compared to all other Arctic CDVs.

  4. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of lineages I, II, and III strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hain Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes infections with a high-mortality rate and has served as an invaluable model for intracellular parasitism. Here, we report complete genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 4a (L99 and 4b (CLIP80459, and transcriptomes of representative strains from lineages I, II, and III, thereby permitting in-depth comparison of genome- and transcriptome -based data from three lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lineage III, represented by the 4a L99 genome is known to contain strains less virulent for humans. Results The genome analysis of the weakly pathogenic L99 serotype 4a provides extensive evidence of virulence gene decay, including loss of several important surface proteins. The 4b CLIP80459 genome, unlike the previously sequenced 4b F2365 genome harbours an intact inlB invasion gene. These lineage I strains are characterized by the lack of prophage genes, as they share only a single prophage locus with other L. monocytogenes genomes 1/2a EGD-e and 4a L99. Comparative transcriptome analysis during intracellular growth uncovered adaptive expression level differences in lineages I, II and III of Listeria, notable amongst which was a strong intracellular induction of flagellar genes in strain 4a L99 compared to the other lineages. Furthermore, extensive differences between strains are manifest at levels of metabolic flux control and phosphorylated sugar uptake. Intriguingly, prophage gene expression was found to be a hallmark of intracellular gene expression. Deletion mutants in the single shared prophage locus of lineage II strain EGD-e 1/2a, the lma operon, revealed severe attenuation of virulence in a murine infection model. Conclusion Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of L. monocytogenes strains from three lineages implicate prophage genes in intracellular adaptation and indicate that gene loss and decay may have led to the emergence

  5. Separate introns gained within short and long soluble peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein genes during radiation of Symbiodinium (Dinophyceae) clade A and B lineages - PLoS One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we document introns in two Symbiodinium clades that were most likely gained following divergence of this genus from other peridinin-containing dinoflagellate lineages. Soluble peridinin-chlorophyll a-proteins (sPCP) occur in short and long forms in different species, and all...

  6. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  7. Broad phylogenomic sampling and the sister lineage of land plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Timme

    Full Text Available The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the sister lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum" as the sister lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1 the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2 the use of these data in determining the sister lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae.

  8. Distinct populations of adipogenic and myogenic Myf5-lineage progenitors in white adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong; Bi, Pengpeng; Zhang, Pengpeng; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-08-01

    Brown adipose tissues (BAT) are derived from a myogenic factor 5 (Myf5)-expressing cell lineage and white adipose tissues (WAT) predominantly arise from non-Myf5 lineages, although a subpopulation of adipocytes in some WAT depots can be derived from the Myf5 lineage. However, the functional implication of the Myf5- and non-Myf5-lineage cells in WAT is unclear. We found that the Myf5-lineage constitution in subcutaneous WAT depots is negatively correlated to the expression of classical BAT and newly defined beige/brite adipocyte-specific genes. Consistently, fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified Myf5-lineage adipo-progenitors give rise to adipocytes expressing lower levels of BAT-specific Ucp1, Prdm16, Cidea, and Ppargc1a genes and beige adipocyte-specific CD137, Tmem26, and Tbx1 genes compared with the non-Myf5-lineage adipocytes from the same depots. Ablation of the Myf5-lineage progenitors in WAT stromal vascular cell (SVC) cultures leads to increased expression of BAT and beige cell signature genes. Strikingly, the Myf5-lineage cells in WAT are heterogeneous and contain distinct adipogenic [stem cell antigen 1(Sca1)-positive] and myogenic (Sca1-negative) progenitors. The latter differentiate robustly into myofibers in vitro and in vivo, and they restore dystrophin expression after transplantation into mdx mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results demonstrate the heterogeneity and functional differences of the Myf5- and non-Myf5-lineage cells in the white adipose tissue.

  9. Evolutionary history and global spread of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Matthias; Blin, Camille; Mona, Stefano; Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Lecher, Sophie; Willery, Eve; Blum, Michael G B; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Mokrousov, Igor; Aleksic, Eman; Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Antierens, Annick; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Ballif, Marie; Barletta, Francesca; Beck, Hans Peter; Barry, Clifton E; Bonnet, Maryline; Borroni, Emanuele; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Cirillo, Daniela; Cox, Helen; Crowe, Suzanne; Crudu, Valeriu; Diel, Roland; Drobniewski, Francis; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Gagneux, Sébastien; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Hanekom, Madeleine; Hoffner, Sven; Jiao, Wei-wei; Kalon, Stobdan; Kohl, Thomas A; Kontsevaya, Irina; Lillebæk, Troels; Maeda, Shinji; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Rasmussen, Michael; Rastogi, Nalin; Samper, Sofia; Sanchez-Padilla, Elisabeth; Savic, Branislava; Shamputa, Isdore Chola; Shen, Adong; Sng, Li-Hwei; Stakenas, Petras; Toit, Kadri; Varaine, Francis; Vukovic, Dragana; Wahl, Céline; Warren, Robin; Supply, Philip; Niemann, Stefan; Wirth, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Beijing lineage are globally distributed and are associated with the massive spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis in Eurasia. Here we reconstructed the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this lineage by genetic analysis of 4,987 isolates from 99 countries and whole-genome sequencing of 110 representative isolates. We show that this lineage initially originated in the Far East, from where it radiated worldwide in several waves. We detected successive increases in population size for this pathogen over the last 200 years, practically coinciding with the Industrial Revolution, the First World War and HIV epidemics. Two MDR clones of this lineage started to spread throughout central Asia and Russia concomitantly with the collapse of the public health system in the former Soviet Union. Mutations identified in genes putatively under positive selection and associated with virulence might have favored the expansion of the most successful branches of the lineage.

  10. Four phenotypically and phylogenetically distinct lineages in Phytophthora lateralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasier, Clive M; Franceschini, Selma; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Webber, Joan F; Vannini, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Until recently Phytophthora lateralis was known only as the cause of dieback and mortality of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana in its native range in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Since the 1990s however disease outbreaks have occurred increasingly on ornamental C. lawsoniana in Europe; and in 2007 the pathogen was discovered in soil around old growth Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, where it may be endemic. When the phenotypes of over 150 isolates of P. lateralis from Taiwan, across the PNW (British Columbia to California) and from France, the Netherlands and the UK were compared three growth rate groups were resolved: one slow growing from Taiwan, one fast growing from the PNW and Europe, and one of intermediate growth from a small area of the UK. Within these growth groups distinct subtypes were identified based on colony patterns and spore metrics and further discriminated in a multivariate analysis. The assumption that the three main growth groups represented phylogenetic units was tested by comparative sequencing of two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes. This assumption was confirmed. In addition two phenotype clusters within the Taiwan growth group were also shown to be phylogenetically distinct. These four phenotypically and genotypically unique populations are informally designated as the PNW lineage, the UK lineage, the Taiwan J lineage, and the Taiwan K lineage. Their characteristics and distribution are described and their evolution, taxonomic, and plant health significance is discussed.

  11. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue.

  12. Multiple roles of NF1 in the melanocyte lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larribère, Lionel; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    NF1 is a tumour suppressor gene, germline mutations of which lead to neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome. Patients develop benign tumours from several types of cells including neural crest-derived cells. NF1 somatic mutations also occur in 15% of sporadic melanoma, a cancer originating from melanocytes. Evidence now suggests the involvement of NF1 mutations in melanoma resistance to targeted therapies. Although NF1 is ubiquitously expressed, genetic links between NF1 and genes involved in melanocyte biology have been described, implying the lineage-specific mechanisms. In this review, we summarize and discuss the latest advances related to the roles of NF1 in melanocyte biology and in cutaneous melanoma.

  13. Lineage pattern, trans-species polymorphism, and selection pressure among the major lineages of feline MHC-DRB peptide-binding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kun; Zhang, Zhihe; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Wenping; Xu, Xiao; Shen, Fujun; Yue, Bisong

    2010-05-01

    The long-term evolution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involves the birth-and-death process and independent divergence of loci during episodes punctuated by natural selection. Here, we investigated the molecular signatures of natural selection at exon-2 of MHC class II DRB gene which includes a part of the peptide-binding region (PBR) in seven of eight putative extant Felidae lineages. The DRB alleles in felids can be mainly divided into five lineages. Signatures of trans-species polymorphism among major allelic lineages indicate that balancing selection has maintained the MHC polymorphism for a long evolutionary time. Analysis based on maximum likelihood models of codon substitution revealed overall purifying selection acting on the feline DRB. Sites that have undergone positive selection and those that are under divergent selective pressure among lineages were detected and found to fall within the putative PBR. This study increased our understanding of the nature of selective forces acting on DRB during feline radiation.

  14. Evidence of two co-circulating genetic lineages of canine distemper virus in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzera, Yanina; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Sarute, Nicolás; Guasco, Soledad; Cardeillac, Arianne; Bonilla, Braulio; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Bedó, Gabriela; La Torre, José; Pérez, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the etiological agent of a multisystemic infection that affects different species of carnivores and is responsible for one of the main diseases suffered by dogs. Recent data have shown a worldwide increase in the incidence of the disease, including in vaccinated dog populations, which necessitates the analysis of circulating strains. The hemagglutinin (H) gene, which encodes the major antigenic viral protein, has been widely used to determine the degree of genetic variability and to associate CDVs in different worldwide circulating lineages. Here, we obtained the sequence of the first full-length H gene of field South American CDV strains and compared it with sequences of worldwide circulating field strains and vaccine viruses. In South America, we detect two co-circulating lineages with different prevalences: the Europe 1 lineage and a new South America 2 lineage. The Europe 1 lineage was the most prevalent in South America, and we suggest renaming it the Europe 1/South America 1 lineage. The South America 2 lineage was found only in Argentina and appears related to wild CDV strains. All South American CDV strains showed high amino-acid divergence from vaccine strains. This genetic variability may be a possible factor leading to the resurgence of distemper cases in vaccinated dog populations.

  15. Three reciprocally monophyletic mtDNA lineages elucidate the taxonomic status of Grant's gazelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline Deidre; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2008-01-01

    The intraspecific phylogeography of Grant's gazelles Nanger granti was assessed with mitochondrial DNA control region sequences. Samples of 177 individuals from 17 Kenyan and Tanzanian populations were analysed. Three highly divergent, reciprocally monophyletic lineages were found, with among group...... are discussed in reference to the four currently recognised subspecies. We suggest Grant's gazelles be raised to the superspecies Nanger (granti) comprising three taxonomic units corresponding to the three mtDNA lineages. There was no evidence of gene flow between the notata and granti lineages, despite...... (granti) petersii within the Grant's gazelles superspecies....

  16. Polycomb enables primitive endoderm lineage priming in embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Robert S; Hölzenspies, Jurriaan J; Roske, Fabian V; Bickmore, Wendy A; Brickman, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), like the blastocyst from which they are derived, contain precursors of the epiblast (Epi) and primitive endoderm (PrEn) lineages. While transient in vivo, these precursor populations readily interconvert in vitro. We show that altered transcription is the driver of these coordinated changes, known as lineage priming, in a process that exploits novel polycomb activities. We find that intragenic levels of the polycomb mark H3K27me3 anti-correlate with changes in transcription, irrespective of the gene’s developmental trajectory or identity as a polycomb target. In contrast, promoter proximal H3K27me3 is markedly higher for PrEn priming genes. Consequently, depletion of this modification stimulates the degree to which ESCs are primed towards PrEn when challenged to differentiate, but has little effect on gene expression in self-renewing ESC culture. These observations link polycomb with dynamic changes in transcription and stalled lineage commitment, allowing cells to explore alternative choices prior to a definitive decision. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14926.001 PMID:27723457

  17. Related giant viruses in distant locations and different habitats: Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus represents a third lineage of the Mimiviridae that is close to the megavirus lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosuf, Niyaz; Yutin, Natalya; Colson, Philippe; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Pagnier, Isabelle; Robert, Catherine; Azza, Said; Klose, Thomas; Wong, Jimson; Rossmann, Michael G; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-01-01

    The 1,021,348 base pair genome sequence of the Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus, a new member of the Mimiviridae family infecting Acanthamoeba polyphaga, is reported. The moumouvirus represents a third lineage beside mimivirus and megavirus. Thereby, it is a new member of the recently proposed Megavirales order. This giant virus was isolated from a cooling tower water in southeastern France but is most closely related to Megavirus chiliensis, which was isolated from ocean water off the coast of Chile. The moumouvirus is predicted to encode 930 proteins, of which 879 have detectable homologs. Among these predicted proteins, for 702 the closest homolog was detected in Megavirus chiliensis, with the median amino acid sequence identity of 62%. The evolutionary affinity of moumouvirus and megavirus was further supported by phylogenetic tree analysis of conserved genes. The moumouvirus and megavirus genomes share near perfect orthologous gene collinearity in the central part of the genome, with the variations concentrated in the terminal regions. In addition, genomic comparisons of the Mimiviridae reveal substantial gene loss in the moumouvirus lineage. The majority of the remaining moumouvirus proteins are most similar to homologs from other Mimiviridae members, and for 27 genes the closest homolog was found in bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes supported gene acquisition from diverse bacteria after the separation of the moumouvirus and megavirus lineages. Comparative genome analysis of the three lineages of the Mimiviridae revealed significant mobility of Group I self-splicing introns, with the highest intron content observed in the moumouvirus genome.

  18. Defining the Minimal Factors Required for Erythropoiesis through Direct Lineage Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Summary Erythroid cell commitment and differentiation proceed through activation of a lineage-restricted transcriptional network orchestrated by a group of well characterized genes. However, the minimal set of factors necessary for instructing red blood cell (RBC) development remains undefined. We employed a screen for transcription factors allowing direct lineage reprograming from fibroblasts to induced erythroid progenitors/precursors (iEPs). We show that Gata1, Tal1, Lmo2, and c-Myc (GTLM)...

  19. Pox neuro control of cell lineages that give rise to larval poly-innervated external sensory organs in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanrui; Boll, Werner; Noll, Markus

    2015-01-15

    The Pox neuro (Poxn) gene of Drosophila plays a crucial role in the development of poly-innervated external sensory (p-es) organs. However, how Poxn exerts this role has remained elusive. In this study, we have analyzed the cell lineages of all larval p-es organs, namely of the kölbchen, papilla 6, and hair 3. Surprisingly, these lineages are distinct from any previously reported cell lineages of sensory organs. Unlike the well-established lineage of mono-innervated external sensory (m-es) organs and a previously proposed model of the p-es lineage, we demonstrate that all wild-type p-es lineages exhibit the following features: the secondary precursor, pIIa, gives rise to all three support cells-socket, shaft, and sheath, whereas the other secondary precursor, pIIb, is neuronal and gives rise to all neurons. We further show that in one of the p-es lineages, that of papilla 6, one cell undergoes apoptosis. By contrast in Poxn null mutants, all p-es lineages have a reduced number of cells and their pattern of cell divisions is changed to that of an m-es organ, with the exception of a lineage in a minority of mutant kölbchen that retains a second bipolar neuron. Indeed, the role of Poxn in p-es lineages is consistent with the specification of the developmental potential of secondary precursors and the regulation of cell division but not apoptosis.

  20. Genotypic lineages and restriction fragment length polymorphism of canine distemper virus isolates in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtanakatikanon, Araya; Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Charoenvisal, Na Taya; Poovorawan, Yong; Prompetchara, Eakachai; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Techangamsuwan, Somporn

    2013-09-27

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause multisystemic disease in all families of terrestrial carnivores. Attenuated live vaccines have been used to control CDV in a variety of species for many decades, yet a number of CDV infections in vaccinated dogs are still observed. The aims of this study were to investigate the genetic diversity of CDV lineages based on phosphoprotein (P), hemagglutinin (H) and fusion protein (F) genes and to develop the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique for effective differentiation among individual wild-type and vaccine lineages in Thailand. Four commercial vaccine products, thirteen conjunctival swabs and various tissues from 9 necropsied dogs suspected of having CDV infections were included. Virus isolation was performed using Vero cell expressing canine signaling lymphocyte activation molecules (Vero-DST cells). Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on 3 gene regions from the dog derived specimens and the vaccines were carried out, then RFLP analysis upon F-gene amplified fragments was developed. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis were compared with other CDV lineages in Genbank. Phylogenetic relationships revealed that CDV field isolates were separated from the vaccine lineage and could be divided into two clusters; one of which belonged to the Asia-1 lineage and another, not related to any previous recognized lineages was proposed as 'Asia-4'. RFLP patterns demonstrating concordance with phylogenetic trees of the distemper virus allowed for differentiation between the Asia-1, Asia-4 and vaccine lineages. Thus, RFLP technique is able to effectively distinguish individual wild-type canine distemper virus from vaccine lineages in Thailand.

  1. “Mid-G” Region Sequences of the Glycoprotein Gene of Austrian Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Isolates Form Two Lineages within European Isolates and Are Distinct from American and Asian Lineages▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Schachner, Oskar; Dürrwald, Ralf; Latif, Muna; Nowotny, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is one of the most important pathogens of salmonid fish. In this study a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the genetic evolution and variety of Austrian IHNV strains, as well as selected strains ensuring worldwide coverage, is presented. The phylogenetic investigation is based on sequences comprising the “mid-G” region of the G gene, and it includes all currently available IHNV sequences of the G gene with a length of at least 615 bp. Austri...

  2. Detection of two zoonotic Babesia microti lineages, the Hobetsu and U.S. lineages, in two sympatric tick species, ixodes ovatus and Ixodes persulcatus, respectively, in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Qiang, Wei; Nakao, Minoru; Hirata, Haruyuki; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2012-05-01

    The species Babesia microti, commonly found in rodents, demonstrates a high degree of genetic diversity. Three lineages, U.S., Kobe, and Hobetsu, are known to have zoonotic potential, but their tick vector(s) in Japan remains to be elucidated. We conducted a field investigation at Nemuro on Hokkaido Island and at Sumoto on Awaji Island, where up to two of the three lineages occur with similar frequencies in reservoirs. By flagging vegetation at these spots and surrounding areas, 4,010 ticks, comprising six species, were collected. A nested PCR that detects the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia species revealed that Ixodes ovatus and I. persulcatus alone were positive. Lineage-specific PCR for rRNA-positive samples demonstrated that I. ovatus and I. persulcatus carried, respectively, the Hobetsu and U.S. parasites. No Kobe-specific DNA was detected. Infected I. ovatus ticks were found at multiple sites, including Nemuro and Sumoto, with minimum infection rates (MIR) of ∼12.3%. However, all I. persulcatus ticks collected within the same regions, a total of 535, were negative for the Hobetsu lineage, indicating that I. ovatus, but not I. persulcatus, was the vector for the lineage. At Nemuro, U.S. lineage was detected in 2 of 139 adult I. persulcatus ticks (MIR, 1.4%), for the first time, while 48 of I. ovatus ticks were negative for that lineage. Laboratory experiments confirmed the transmission of Hobetsu and U.S. parasites to hamsters via I. ovatus and I. persulcatus, respectively. Differences in vector capacity shown by MIRs at Nemuro, where the two species were equally likely to acquire either lineage of parasite, may explain the difference in distribution of Hobetsu throughout Japan and U.S. taxa in Nemuro. These findings are of importance in the assessment of the regional risk for babesiosis in humans.

  3. A highly divergent Puumala virus lineage in southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Ulrike M; Drewes, Stephan; Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Sadowska, Edyta T; Mikowska, Magdalena; Heckel, Gerald; Koteja, Paweł; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2017-01-16

    Puumala virus (PUUV) represents one of the most important hantaviruses in Central Europe. Phylogenetic analyses of PUUV strains indicate a strong genetic structuring of this hantavirus. Recently, PUUV sequences were identified in the natural reservoir, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), collected in the northern part of Poland. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of PUUV in bank voles from southern Poland. A total of 72 bank voles were trapped in 2009 at six sites in this part of Poland. RT-PCR and IgG-ELISA analyses detected three PUUV positive voles at one trapping site. The PUUV-infected animals were identified by cytochrome b gene analysis to belong to the Carpathian and Eastern evolutionary lineages of bank vole. The novel PUUV S, M and L segment nucleotide sequences showed the closest similarity to sequences of the Russian PUUV lineage from Latvia, but were highly divergent to those previously found in northern Poland, Slovakia and Austria. In conclusion, the detection of a highly divergent PUUV lineage in southern Poland indicates the necessity of further bank vole monitoring in this region allowing rational public health measures to prevent human infections.

  4. Transferable Vancomycin Resistance in a Community-Associated MRSA Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Flávia; Diaz, Lorena; Wollam, Aye; Panesso, Diana; Zhou, Yanjiao; Rincon, Sandra; Narechania, Apurva; Xing, Galen; Di Gioia, Thais S.R.; Doi, André; Tran, Truc T.; Reyes, Jinnethe; Munita, Jose M.; Carvajal, Lina P.; Hernandez-Roldan, Alejandra; Brandão, Denise; van der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Murray, Barbara E.; Planet, Paul J.; Weinstock, George M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the case of a patient from Brazil with a bloodstream infection caused by a strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that was susceptible to vancomycin (designated BR-VSSA) but that acquired the vanA gene cluster during antibiotic therapy and became resistant to vancomycin (designated BR-VRSA). Both strains belong to the sequence type (ST) 8 community-associated genetic lineage that carries the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) type IVa and the S. aureus protein A gene (spa) type t292 and are phylogenetically related to MRSA lineage USA300. A conjugative plasmid of 55,706 bp (pBRZ01) carrying the vanA cluster was identified and readily transferred to other staphylococci. The pBRZ01 plasmid harbors DNA sequences that are typical of the plasmid-associated replication genes rep24 or rep21 described in community-associated MRSA strains from Australia (pWBG745). The presence and dissemination of community-associated MRSA containing vanA could become a serious public health concern. PMID:24738669

  5. Optical imaging for stem cell differentiation to neuronal lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the prospect of stem cell therapy holds great promise for the recovery of injured tissues and effective treatment of intractable diseases. Tracking stem cell fate provides critical information to understand and evaluate the success of stem cell therapy. The recent emergence of in vivo noninvasive molecular imaging has enabled assessment of the behavior of grafted stem cells in living subjects. In this review, we provide an overview of current optical imaging strategies based on cell- or tissue-specific reporter gene expression and of in vivo methods to monitor stem cell differentiation into neuronal lineages. These methods use optical reporters either regulated by neuron-specific promoters or containing neuron-specific microRNA binding sites. Both systems revealed dramatic changes in optical reporter imaging signals in cells differentiating into a neuronal lineage. The detection limit of weak promoters or reporter genes can be greatly enhanced by adopting a yeast GAL4 amplification system or an engineering-enhanced luciferase reporter gene. Furthermore, we propose an advanced imaging system to monitor neuronal differentiation during neurogenesis that uses in vivo multiplexed imaging techniques capable of detecting several targets simultaneously.

  6. Recent reticulate evolution in the ecologically dominant lineage of coccolithophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mahdi eBendif

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophore family Noëlaerhabdaceae contains a number of taxa that are very abundant in modern oceans, including the cosmopolitan bloom-forming Emiliania huxleyi. Introgressive hybridization has been suggested to account for incongruences between nuclear, mitochondrial and plastidial phylogenies of morphospecies within this lineage, but the number of species cultured to date remains rather limited. Here, we present the characterization of 5 new Noëlaerhabdaceae culture strains isolated from samples collected in the south-east Pacific Ocean. These were analyzed morphologically using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetically by sequencing 5 marker genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, plastidial tufA, and mitochondrial cox1 and cox3 genes. Morphologically, one of these strains corresponded to Gephyrocapsa ericsonii and the four others to Reticulofenestra parvula. Ribosomal gene sequences were near identical between these new strains, but divergent from G. oceanica, G. muellerae and E. huxleyi. In contrast to the clear distinction in ribosomal phylogenies, sequences from other genomic compartments clustered with those of E. huxleyi strains with which they share an ecological range (i.e. warm temperate to tropical waters. These data provide strong support for the hypothesis of past (and potentially ongoing introgressive hybridization within this ecologically important lineage and for the transfer of R. parvula to Gephyrocapsa. These results have important implications for understanding the role of hybridization in speciation in vast ocean meta-populations of phytoplankton.

  7. Constrained body shape among highly genetically divergent allopatric lineages of the supralittoral isopod Ligia occidentalis (Oniscidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Carlos A; Mateos, Mariana; DeWitt, Thomas J; Hurtado, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple highly divergent lineages have been identified within Ligia occidentalis sensu lato, a rocky supralittoral isopod distributed along a ~3000 km latitudinal gradient that encompasses several proposed marine biogeographic provinces and ecoregions in the eastern Pacific. Highly divergent lineages have nonoverlapping geographic distributions, with distributional limits that generally correspond with sharp environmental changes. Crossbreeding experiments suggest postmating reproductive barriers exist among some of them, and surveys of mitochondrial and nuclear gene markers do not show evidence of hybridization. Populations are highly isolated, some of which appear to be very small; thus, the effects of drift are expected to reduce the efficiency of selection. Large genetic divergences among lineages, marked environmental differences in their ranges, reproductive isolation, and/or high isolation of populations may have resulted in morphological differences in L. occidentalis, not detected yet by traditional taxonomy. We used landmark-based geometric morphometric analyses to test for differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages of L. occidentalis, and among populations within these lineages. We analyzed a total of 492 individuals from 53 coastal localities from the southern California Bight to Central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. We conducted discriminant function analyses (DFAs) on body shape morphometrics to assess morphological variation among genetically differentiated lineages and their populations. We also tested for associations between phylogeny and morphological variation, and whether genetic divergence is correlated to multivariate morphological divergence. We detected significant differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages, and among populations within these lineages. Nonetheless, neither lineages nor populations can be discriminated on the basis of body shape, because correct classification rates of cross

  8. A recepção de Agamêmnon nas terras da Rainha: as versões de Browning, Rattigan, Asquith e Figgis

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    Maria Cecília Miranda Nogueira Coelho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo são analisados aspectos da peça de Terence Rattigan The Browning Version, de 1948, cujo título faz referência à famosa tradução inglesa da tragédia Agamêmnon, feita por Robert Browning, em 1877. Analiso também os dois filmes homônimos, The Browning Version (Nunca te amei, dirigidos por Anthony Asquith, em 1951, e por Mike Figgis, em 1994, ambos baseados na peça de Rattigan.

  9. Conversion of embryonic stem cells into extraembryonic lineages by CRISPR-mediated activators

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The recently emerged CRISPR/Cas9 technique has opened a new perspective on readily editing specific genes. When combined with transcription activators, it can precisely manipulate endogenous gene expression. Here, we enhanced the expression of endogenous Cdx2 and Gata6 genes by CRISPR-mediated activators, thus mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were directly converted into two extraembryonic lineages, i.e., typical trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) and extraembryonic endoderm cells (XENCs), which ...

  10. Single-cell analysis of mixed-lineage states leading to a binary cell fate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Andre; Venkatasubramanian, Meenakshi; Chaudhri, Viren K; Aronow, Bruce J; Salomonis, Nathan; Singh, Harinder; Grimes, H Leighton

    2016-09-29

    Delineating hierarchical cellular states, including rare intermediates and the networks of regulatory genes that orchestrate cell-type specification, are continuing challenges for developmental biology. Single-cell RNA sequencing is greatly accelerating such research, given its power to provide comprehensive descriptions of genomic states and their presumptive regulators. Haematopoietic multipotential progenitor cells, as well as bipotential intermediates, manifest mixed-lineage patterns of gene expression at a single-cell level. Such mixed-lineage states may reflect the molecular priming of different developmental potentials by co-expressed alternative-lineage determinants, namely transcription factors. Although a bistable gene regulatory network has been proposed to regulate the specification of either neutrophils or macrophages, the nature of the transition states manifested in vivo, and the underlying dynamics of the cell-fate determinants, have remained elusive. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing coupled with a new analytic tool, iterative clustering and guide-gene selection, and clonogenic assays to delineate hierarchical genomic and regulatory states that culminate in neutrophil or macrophage specification in mice. We show that this analysis captured prevalent mixed-lineage intermediates that manifested concurrent expression of haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor and myeloid progenitor cell genes. It also revealed rare metastable intermediates that had collapsed the haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor gene expression programme, instead expressing low levels of the myeloid determinants, Irf8 and Gfi1 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13). Genetic perturbations and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing revealed Irf8 and Gfi1 as key components of counteracting myeloid-gene-regulatory networks. Combined loss of these two determinants 'trapped' the metastable intermediate. We propose that mixed-lineage states are obligatory during cell-fate specification

  11. A continuum of cell states spans pluripotency and lineage commitment in human embryonic stem cells.

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    Shelley R Hough

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Commitment in embryonic stem cells is often depicted as a binary choice between alternate cell states, pluripotency and specification to a particular germ layer or extraembryonic lineage. However, close examination of human ES cell cultures has revealed significant heterogeneity in the stem cell compartment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated subpopulations of embryonic stem cells using surface markers, then examined their expression of pluripotency genes and lineage specific transcription factors at the single cell level, and tested their ability to regenerate colonies of stem cells. Transcript analysis of single embryonic stem cells showed that there is a gradient and a hierarchy of expression of pluripotency genes in the population. Even cells at the top of the hierarchy generally express only a subset of the stem cell genes studied. Many cells co-express pluripotency and lineage specific genes. Cells along the continuum show a progressively decreasing likelihood of self renewal as their expression of stem cell surface markers and pluripotency genes wanes. Most cells that are positive for stem cell surface markers express Oct-4, but only those towards the top of the hierarchy express the nodal receptor TDGF-1 and the growth factor GDF3. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings on gene expression in single embryonic stem cells are in concert with recent studies of early mammalian development, which reveal molecular heterogeneity and a stochasticity of gene expression in blastomeres. Our work indicates that only a small fraction of the population resides at the top of the hierarchy, that lineage priming (co-expression of stem cell and lineage specific genes characterizes pluripotent stem cell populations, and that extrinsic signaling pathways are upstream of transcription factor networks that control pluripotency.

  12. Phylogenetic evidence of a new canine distemper virus lineage among domestic dogs in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinal, Maria A; Díaz, Francisco J; Ruiz-Saenz, Julian

    2014-08-06

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral disease of carnivores affecting both wild and domestic populations. The hemagglutinin gene, encoding for the attachment protein that determines viral tropism, shows high heterogeneity among strains, allowing for the distinction of ten different lineages distributed worldwide according to a geographic pattern. We obtained the sequences of the full-length H gene of 15 wild-type CDV strains circulating in domestic dog populations from the Aburrá Valley, Colombia. A phylogenetic analysis of H gene nucleotide sequences from Colombian CDV viruses along with field isolates from different geographic regions and vaccine strains was performed. Colombian wild-type viruses formed a distinct monophyletic cluster clearly separated from the previously identified wild-type and vaccine lineages, suggesting that a novel genetic variant, quite different from vaccines and other lineages, is circulating among dog populations in the Aburrá Valley. We propose naming this new lineage as "South America 3". This information indicates that there are at least three different CDV lineages circulating in domestic and wild carnivore populations in South America. The first one, renamed Europe/South America 1, circulates in Brazil and Uruguay; the second, South America 2, appears to be restricted to Argentina; and the third, South America 3, which comprises all the strains characterized in this study, may also be circulating in other northern countries of South America.

  13. RT-PCR ANALYSIS OF E2A-PBX1, TEL-AML1, BCR-ABL AND MLL-AF4 FUSION GENE TRANSCRIPTS IN B-LINEAGE ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

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    Iuliu-Cristian Ivanov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents a heterogeneous group of hematological malignancies, defined by clonal proliferation of lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and molecular analysis for the detection of genetic anomalies are clinical standard procedures for diagnosis, sub-classification and post-therapeutic evaluation. Samples from 105 patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were immunophenotyped at diagnosis and were investigated by molecular analysis in order to identify the occurrence of four fusion genes: MLL-AF4, TEL-AML-1, BCR-ABL-p190, E2A-PBX-1. There were no associations found between the immunophenotype and the presence of any fusion genes evaluated. Both methods in combination remain a prerequisite for an improved subclassification of hematological malignancies, therapeutic decision, and evaluation of treatment response.

  14. GENOMIC INSIGHTS INTO EVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIPS AMONG HETEROKONT LINEAGES EMPHASIZING THE PHAEOPHYCEAE(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Naomi; Calhoun, Samantha; Moustafa, Ahmed; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Braun, Edward L

    2008-02-01

    Heterokonts comprise a large and diverse group of organisms unified by the heterokont biflagellate condition. Monophyly of many of these lineages is well established, but evolutionary relationships among the various lineages remain elusive. Among these lineages, the brown algae (Phaeophyceae) are a monophyletic, taxonomically diverse, and ecologically critical group common to marine environments. Despite their biological and scientific importance, consensus regarding brown algal phylogeny and taxonomic relationships is missing. Our long-term research goal is to produce a well-resolved taxon-rich phylogeny of the class to assess evolutionary patterns and taxonomic relationships among brown algal lineages and their relationship to other closely related heterokont groups. To accomplish this goal and augment existing loci for phaeophycean-wide systematic studies, we generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from several major brown algal lineages and from the heterokont lineage representing the closest sister group to brown algae. To date, we have successfully constructed cDNA libraries for two lineages (Choristocarpus tenellus Zanardini and Schizocladia ischiensis E. C. Henry, Okuda et H. Kawai) and in the library test phase obtained up to 1,600 ESTs per organism. Annotation results showed a gene discovery rate of 45%-50% for each library revealing 500-700 unique genes from each organism. We have identified several potential genes for phylogenetic inference and used these loci for preliminary molecular clock analyses. Our molecular clock analysis suggests that the basal divergence in brown algae occurred around the time of the pennate-centric diatom divergence. Here we report this analysis and other uses of ESTs in brown algal phylogenomics and the utility of these data for resolving the phylogeny of this group.

  15. Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Bain, Ruairidh A.; Cooke, Louise R.; Etherington, Graham J.; Deahl, Kenneth L.; Farrer, Rhys A.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Goss, Erica M.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Hein, Ingo; MacLean, Daniel; McNicol, James W.; Randall, Eva; Oliva, Ricardo F.; Pel, Mathieu A.; Shaw, David S.; Squires, Julie N.; Taylor, Moray C.; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G. A. A.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Lees, Alison K.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-01-01

    Pest and pathogen losses jeopardise global food security and ever since the 19th century Irish famine, potato late blight has exemplified this threat. The causal oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, undergoes major population shifts in agricultural systems via the successive emergence and migration of asexual lineages. The phenotypic and genotypic bases of these selective sweeps are largely unknown but management strategies need to adapt to reflect the changing pathogen population. Here, we used molecular markers to document the emergence of a lineage, termed 13_A2, in the European P. infestans population, and its rapid displacement of other lineages to exceed 75% of the pathogen population across Great Britain in less than three years. We show that isolates of the 13_A2 lineage are among the most aggressive on cultivated potatoes, outcompete other aggressive lineages in the field, and overcome previously effective forms of plant host resistance. Genome analyses of a 13_A2 isolate revealed extensive genetic and expression polymorphisms particularly in effector genes. Copy number variations, gene gains and losses, amino-acid replacements and changes in expression patterns of disease effector genes within the 13_A2 isolate likely contribute to enhanced virulence and aggressiveness to drive this population displacement. Importantly, 13_A2 isolates carry intact and in planta induced Avrblb1, Avrblb2 and Avrvnt1 effector genes that trigger resistance in potato lines carrying the corresponding R immune receptor genes Rpi-blb1, Rpi-blb2, and Rpi-vnt1.1. These findings point towards a strategy for deploying genetic resistance to mitigate the impact of the 13_A2 lineage and illustrate how pathogen population monitoring, combined with genome analysis, informs the management of devastating disease epidemics. PMID:23055926

  16. Genome analyses of an aggressive and invasive lineage of the Irish potato famine pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E L Cooke

    Full Text Available Pest and pathogen losses jeopardise global food security and ever since the 19(th century Irish famine, potato late blight has exemplified this threat. The causal oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, undergoes major population shifts in agricultural systems via the successive emergence and migration of asexual lineages. The phenotypic and genotypic bases of these selective sweeps are largely unknown but management strategies need to adapt to reflect the changing pathogen population. Here, we used molecular markers to document the emergence of a lineage, termed 13_A2, in the European P. infestans population, and its rapid displacement of other lineages to exceed 75% of the pathogen population across Great Britain in less than three years. We show that isolates of the 13_A2 lineage are among the most aggressive on cultivated potatoes, outcompete other aggressive lineages in the field, and overcome previously effective forms of plant host resistance. Genome analyses of a 13_A2 isolate revealed extensive genetic and expression polymorphisms particularly in effector genes. Copy number variations, gene gains and losses, amino-acid replacements and changes in expression patterns of disease effector genes within the 13_A2 isolate likely contribute to enhanced virulence and aggressiveness to drive this population displacement. Importantly, 13_A2 isolates carry intact and in planta induced Avrblb1, Avrblb2 and Avrvnt1 effector genes that trigger resistance in potato lines carrying the corresponding R immune receptor genes Rpi-blb1, Rpi-blb2, and Rpi-vnt1.1. These findings point towards a strategy for deploying genetic resistance to mitigate the impact of the 13_A2 lineage and illustrate how pathogen population monitoring, combined with genome analysis, informs the management of devastating disease epidemics.

  17. SUPERMAN, a regulator of floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, J L; Sakai, H; Jack, T; Weigel, D; Mayer, U; Meyerowitz, E M

    1992-03-01

    We describe a locus, SUPERMAN, mutations in which result in extra stamens developing at the expense of the central carpels in the Arabidopsis thaliana flower. The development of superman flowers, from initial primordium to mature flower, is described by scanning electron microscopy. The development of doubly and triply mutant strains, constructed with superman alleles and previously identified homeotic mutations that cause alterations in floral organ identity, is also described. Essentially additive phenotypes are observed in superman agamous and superman apetala2 double mutants. The epistatic relationships observed between either apetala3 or pistillata and superman alleles suggest that the SUPERMAN gene product could be a regulator of these floral homeotic genes. To test this, the expression patterns of AGAMOUS and APETALA3 were examined in superman flowers. In wild-type flowers, APETALA3 expression is restricted to the second and third whorls where it is required for the specification of petals and stamens. In contrast, in superman flowers, APETALA3 expression expands to include most of the cells that would normally constitute the fourth whorl. This ectopic APETALA3 expression is proposed to be one of the causes of the development of the extra stamens in superman flowers. The spatial pattern of AGAMOUS expression remains unaltered in superman flowers as compared to wild-type flowers. Taken together these data indicate that one of the functions of the wild-type SUPERMAN gene product is to negatively regulate APETALA3 in the fourth whorl of the flower. In addition, superman mutants exhibit a loss of determinacy of the floral meristem, an effect that appears to be mediated by the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA gene products.

  18. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  19. Determining Lineage Pathways from Cellular Barcoding Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leïla Perié

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular barcoding and other single-cell lineage-tracing strategies form experimental methodologies for analysis of in vivo cell fate that have been instrumental in several significant recent discoveries. Due to the highly nonlinear nature of proliferation and differentiation, interrogation of the resulting data for evaluation of potential lineage pathways requires a new quantitative framework complete with appropriate statistical tests. Here, we develop such a framework, illustrating its utility by analyzing data from barcoded multipotent cells of the blood system. This application demonstrates that the data require additional paths beyond those found in the classical model, which leads us to propose that hematopoietic differentiation follows a loss of potential mechanism and to suggest further experiments to test this deduction. Our quantitative framework can evaluate the compatibility of lineage trees with barcoded data from any proliferating and differentiating cell system.

  20. Independent origins of Indian caste and tribal paternal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaux, Richard; Aunger, Robert; Bentley, Gillian; Nasidze, Ivane; Sirajuddin, S M; Stoneking, Mark

    2004-02-03

    The origins of the nearly one billion people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent and following the customs of the Hindu caste system are controversial: are they largely derived from Indian local populations (i.e. tribal groups) or from recent immigrants to India? Archaeological and linguistic evidence support the latter hypothesis, whereas recent genetic data seem to favor the former hypothesis. Here, we analyze the most extensive dataset of Indian caste and tribal Y chromosomes to date. We find that caste and tribal groups differ significantly in their haplogroup frequency distributions; caste groups are homogeneous for Y chromosome variation and more closely related to each other and to central Asian groups than to Indian tribal or any other Eurasian groups. We conclude that paternal lineages of Indian caste groups are primarily descended from Indo-European speakers who migrated from central Asia approximately 3,500 years ago. Conversely, paternal lineages of tribal groups are predominantly derived from the original Indian gene pool. We also provide evidence for bidirectional male gene flow between caste and tribal groups. In comparison, caste and tribal groups are homogeneous with respect to mitochondrial DNA variation, which may reflect the sociocultural characteristics of the Indian caste society.

  1. SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 identify discrete lineages during early human cardiovascular development

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    Rhys J.P. Skelton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of human cardiogenesis would benefit from a detailed cell lineage fate map akin to that established for the haematopoietic lineages. Here we sought to define cell lineage relationships based on the expression of NKX2-5 and the cell surface markers VCAM1, SIRPA and CD34 during human cardiovascular development. Expression of NKX2-5GFP was used to identify cardiac progenitors and cardiomyocytes generated during the differentiation of NKX2-5GFP/w human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Cardiovascular cell lineages sub-fractionated on the basis of SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 expression were assayed for differentiation potential and gene expression. The NKX2-5posCD34pos population gave rise to endothelial cells that rapidly lost NKX2-5 expression in culture. Conversely, NKX2-5 expression was maintained in myocardial committed cells, which progressed from being NKX2-5posSIRPApos to NKX2-5posSIRPAposVCAM1pos. Up-regulation of VCAM1 was accompanied by the expression of myofilament markers and reduced clonal capacity, implying a restriction of cell fate potential. Combinatorial expression of NKX2-5, SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 can be used to define discrete stages of cardiovascular cell lineage differentiation. These markers identify specific stages of cardiomyocyte and endothelial lineage commitment and, thus provide a scaffold for establishing a fate map of early human cardiogenesis.

  2. Terminal and progenitor lineage-survival oncogenes as cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vias, Maria; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Mills, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Tumour classification has traditionally focused on differentiation and cellular morphology, and latterly on the application of genomic approaches. By combining chromatin immunoprecipitation with expression array, it has been possible to identify direct gene targets for transcription factors for nuclear hormone receptors. At the same time, there have been great strides in deriving stem and progenitor cells from tissues. It is therefore timely to propose that pairing the isolation of these cell subpopulations from tissues and tumours with these genomics approaches will reveal conserved gene targets for transcription factors. By focusing on transcription factors (lineage-survival oncogenes) with roles in both organogenesis and tumourigenesis at multiple organ sites, we suggest that this comparative genomics approach will enable developmental biology to be used more fully in relation to understanding tumour progression and will reveal new cancer markers. We focus here on neurogenesis and neuroendocrine differentiation in tumours.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of DENV-2 Asian-American genotype lineages in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Daiana; Romero, Hector; Fagundes de Carvalho, Luiz Max; Bello, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    The Asian/American (AS/AM) genotype of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) has been evolving in the Americas over the last 30 years, leading to several waves of dengue epidemics and to the emergence of different viral lineages in the region. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal dissemination pattern of the DENV-2 lineages at a regional level. We applied phylogenetic and phylogeographic analytical methods to a comprehensive data set of 582 DENV-2 E gene sequences of the AS/AM genotype isolated from 29 different American countries over a period of 30 years (1983 to 2012). Our study reveals that genetic diversity of DENV-2 AS/AM genotype circulating in the Americas mainly resulted from one single founder event and can be organized in at least four major lineages (I to IV), which emerged in the Caribbean region at the early 1980s and then spread and die out with different dynamics. Lineages I and II dominate the epidemics in the Caribbean region during the 1980s and early 1990 s, lineage III becomes the prevalent DENV-2 one in the Caribbean and South America during the 1990 s, whereas lineage IV dominates the epidemics in South and Central America during the 2000s. Suriname and Guyana seem to represent important entry points for DENV-2 from the Lesser Antilles to South America, whereas Venezuela, Brazil and Nicaragua were pointed as the main secondary hubs of dissemination to other mainland countries. Our study also indicates that DENV-2 AS/AM genotype was disseminated within South America following two main routes. The first route hits Venezuela and the western side of the Andes, while the second route mainly hits Brazil and the eastern side of the Andes. The phenomenon of DENV-2 lineage replacement across successive epidemic outbreaks was a common characteristic in all American countries, although the timing of lineage replacements greatly vary across locations.

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of DENV-2 Asian-American genotype lineages in the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Mir

    Full Text Available The Asian/American (AS/AM genotype of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2 has been evolving in the Americas over the last 30 years, leading to several waves of dengue epidemics and to the emergence of different viral lineages in the region. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal dissemination pattern of the DENV-2 lineages at a regional level. We applied phylogenetic and phylogeographic analytical methods to a comprehensive data set of 582 DENV-2 E gene sequences of the AS/AM genotype isolated from 29 different American countries over a period of 30 years (1983 to 2012. Our study reveals that genetic diversity of DENV-2 AS/AM genotype circulating in the Americas mainly resulted from one single founder event and can be organized in at least four major lineages (I to IV, which emerged in the Caribbean region at the early 1980s and then spread and die out with different dynamics. Lineages I and II dominate the epidemics in the Caribbean region during the 1980s and early 1990 s, lineage III becomes the prevalent DENV-2 one in the Caribbean and South America during the 1990 s, whereas lineage IV dominates the epidemics in South and Central America during the 2000s. Suriname and Guyana seem to represent important entry points for DENV-2 from the Lesser Antilles to South America, whereas Venezuela, Brazil and Nicaragua were pointed as the main secondary hubs of dissemination to other mainland countries. Our study also indicates that DENV-2 AS/AM genotype was disseminated within South America following two main routes. The first route hits Venezuela and the western side of the Andes, while the second route mainly hits Brazil and the eastern side of the Andes. The phenomenon of DENV-2 lineage replacement across successive epidemic outbreaks was a common characteristic in all American countries, although the timing of lineage replacements greatly vary across locations.

  5. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity.

  6. Ixodes persulcatus Ticks as Vectors for the Babesia microti U.S. Lineage in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Morikawa, Shigeru; Hanaki, Ken-Ichi; Holman, Patricia J; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2016-11-15

    The U.S. lineage, one of the major clades in the Babesia microti group, is known as a causal agent of human babesiosis mostly in the northeastern and upper midwestern United States. This lineage, however, also is distributed throughout the temperate zone of Eurasia with several reported human cases, although convincing evidence of the identity of the specific vector(s) in this area is lacking. Here, the goal was to demonstrate the presence of infectious parasites directly in salivary glands of Ixodes persulcatus, from which U.S. lineage genetic sequences have been detected in Asia, and to molecularly characterize the isolates. Five PCR-positive specimens were individually inoculated into hamsters, resulting in infections in four; consequently, four strains were newly established. Molecular characterization, including 18S rRNA, β-tubulin, and CCT7 gene sequences, as well as Western blot analysis and indirect fluorescent antibody assay, revealed that all four strains were identical to each other and to the U.S. lineage strains isolated from rodents captured in Japan. The 18S rRNA gene sequence from the isolates was identical to those from I. persulcatus in Russia and China, but the genetic and antigenic profiles of the Japanese parasites differ from those in the United States and Europe. Together with previous epidemiological and transmission studies, we conclude that I. persulcatus is likely the principal vector for the B. microti U.S. lineage in Japan and presumably in northeastern Eurasia.

  7. Combinatorial decoding of the invariant C. elegans embryonic lineage in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Amanda L; Murray, John Isaac

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how a single cell, the zygote, can divide and differentiate to produce the diverse animal cell types is a central goal of developmental biology research. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans provides a system that enables a truly comprehensive understanding of this process across all cells. Its invariant cell lineage makes it possible to identify all of the cells in each individual and compare them across organisms. Recently developed methods automate the process of cell identification, allowing high-throughput gene expression characterization and phenotyping at single cell resolution. In this Review, we summarize the sequences of events that pattern the lineage including establishment of founder cell identity, the signaling pathways that diversify embryonic fate, and the regulators involved in patterning within these founder lineages before cells adopt their terminal fates. We focus on insights that have emerged from automated approaches to lineage tracking, including insights into mechanisms of robustness, context-specific regulation of gene expression, and temporal coordination of differentiation. We suggest a model by which lineage history produces a combinatorial code of transcription factors that act, often redundantly, to ensure terminal fate.

  8. Newly discovered deep-branching marine plastid lineages are numerically rare but globally distributed

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Choi, C.J.; Bachy, C.; Jaeger, G.S.; Poirier, C.; Sudek, L.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Mahadevan, A.; Giovannoni, S.J.; Worden, A.Z.

    evolutionary events 1, 2 and 3. While amassing data from ocean ecosystems for the Baselines Initiative (6,177 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences and 9.4 million high-quality 16S V1-V2 amplicons) we identified two deep-branching plastid lineages based...

  9. Commitment to the monocytic lineage occurs in the absence of the transcription factor PU.1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. Henkel; S.R. McKercher; P.J. Leenen (Pieter); R.A. Maki

    1999-01-01

    textabstractMice homozygous for the disruption of the PU.1 (Spi-1) gene do not produce mature macrophages. In determining the role of PU.1 in macrophage differentiation, the present study investigated whether or not there was commitment to the monocytic lineage in the a

  10. MLL-AF9-mediated immortalization of human hematopoietic cells along different lineages changes during ontogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horton, S J; Jaques, J; Woolthuis, C; van Dijk, J; Mesuraca, M; Huls, G; Morrone, G; Vellenga, E; Schuringa, J J

    2013-01-01

    The MLL-AF9 fusion gene is associated with aggressive leukemias of both the myeloid and lymphoid lineage in infants, whereas in adults, this translocation is mainly associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These observations suggest that differences exist between fetal and adult tissues in terms of t

  11. Lineage-specific evolution of Methylthioalkylmalate synthases (MAMs involved in glucosinolates biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifang eZhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Methylthioalkylmalate synthases (MAMs encoded by MAM genes are central to the diversification of the glucosinolates, which are important secondary metabolites in Brassicaceae species. However, the evolutionary pathway of MAM genes is poorly understood. We analyzed the phylogenetic and synteny relationships of MAM genes from 13 sequenced Brassicaceae species. Based on these analyses, we propose that the syntenic loci of MAM genes, which underwent frequent tandem duplications, divided into two independent lineage-specific evolution routes and were driven by positive selection after the divergence from Aethionema arabicum. In the lineage I species Capsella rubella, Camelina sativa, Arabidopsis lyrata, and A. thaliana, the MAM loci evolved three tandem genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates with different carbon chain-lengths. In lineage II species, the MAM loci encode enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of short-chain aliphatic glucosinolates. Our proposed model of the evolutionary pathway of MAM genes will be useful for understanding the specific function of these genes in Brassicaceae species.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) regulates expression of paneth cell lineage-specific genes in intestinal epithelial cells through both TCF4/beta-catenin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodrick, Brooks; Vidrich, Alda; Porter, Edith; Bradley, Leigh; Buzan, Jenny M; Cohn, Steven M

    2011-05-27

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) expression in the developing intestine is restricted to the undifferentiated epithelial cells within the lower portion of the crypt. We previously showed that mice lacking functional FGFR-3 have a significant decrease in the number of Paneth cells in the small intestine. Here, we used Caco2 cells to investigate whether FGFR-3 signaling can directly modulate expression of Paneth cell differentiation markers through its effects on TCF4/β-catenin or through other signaling pathways downstream of this receptor. Caco2 cells treated with FGFR-3 ligands or expressing FGFR-3(K650E), a constitutively active mutant, resulted in a significantly increased expression of genes characteristic of mature Paneth cells, including human α-defensins 5 and 6 (HD5 and HD6) and Paneth cell lysozyme, whereas enterocytic differentiation markers were reduced. Activation of FGFR-3 signaling sustained high levels of β-catenin mRNA expression, leading to increased TCF4/β-catenin-regulated transcriptional activity in Caco2 cells. Sustained activity of the TCF4/β-catenin pathway was required for the induction of Paneth cell markers. Activation of the MAPK pathway by FGFR-3 is also required for the induction of Paneth cell markers in addition to and independent of the effect of FGFR-3 on TCF4/β-catenin activity. These studies suggest that coordinate activation of multiple independent signaling pathways downstream of FGFR-3 is involved in regulation of Paneth cell differentiation.

  13. Short communication. Occurrence of different Canine distemper virus lineages in Italian dogs

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    Andrea Balboni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the sequence analysis of the H gene of 7 Canine distemper virus (CDV strains identified in dogs in Italy between years 2002-2012. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the CDV strains belonged to 2 clusters: 6 viruses were identified as Arctic‑like lineage and 1 as Europe 1 lineage. These data show a considerable prevalence of Arctic‑like‑CDVs in the analysed dogs. The dogs and the 3 viruses more recently identified showed 4 distinctive amino acid mutations compared to all other Arctic CDVs.

  14. Cardiovascular Development and the Colonizing Cardiac Neural Crest Lineage

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    Paige Snider

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that transgenic manipulation of mammalian neural crest-related gene expression and microsurgical removal of premigratory chicken and Xenopus embryonic cardiac neural crest progenitors results in a wide spectrum of both structural and functional congenital heart defects, the actual functional mechanism of the cardiac neural crest cells within the heart is poorly understood. Neural crest cell migration and appropriate colonization of the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract septum is thought to be highly dependent on genes that regulate cell-autonomous polarized movement (i.e., gap junctions, cadherins, and noncanonical Wnt1 pathway regulators. Once the migratory cardiac neural crest subpopulation finally reaches the heart, they have traditionally been thought to participate in septation of the common outflow tract into separate aortic and pulmonary arteries. However, several studies have suggested these colonizing neural crest cells may also play additional unexpected roles during cardiovascular development and may even contribute to a crest-derived stem cell population. Studies in both mice and chick suggest they can also enter the heart from the venous inflow as well as the usual arterial outflow region, and may contribute to the adult semilunar and atrioventricular valves as well as part of the cardiac conduction system. Furthermore, although they are not usually thought to give rise to the cardiomyocyte lineage, neural crest cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio can contribute to the myocardium and may have different functions in a species-dependent context. Intriguingly, both ablation of chick and Xenopus premigratory neural crest cells, and a transgenic deletion of mouse neural crest cell migration or disruption of the normal mammalian neural crest gene expression profiles, disrupts ventral myocardial function and/or cardiomyocyte proliferation. Combined, this suggests that either the cardiac neural crest

  15. Identification of Transcription Factors for Lineage-Specific ESC Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Piao, Yulan; Sharov, Alexei A.; Zsiros, Veronika; Yu, Hong; Nakazawa, Kazu; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A network of transcription factors (TFs) determines cell identity, but identity can be altered by overexpressing a combination of TFs. However, choosing and verifying combinations of TFs for specific cell differentiation have been daunting due to the large number of possible combinations of ∼2,000 TFs. Here, we report the identification of individual TFs for lineage-specific cell differentiation based on the correlation matrix of global gene expression profiles. The overexpression of identified TFs—Myod1, Mef2c, Esx1, Foxa1, Hnf4a, Gata2, Gata3, Myc, Elf5, Irf2, Elf1, Sfpi1, Ets1, Smad7, Nr2f1, Sox11, Dmrt1, Sox9, Foxg1, Sox2, or Ascl1—can direct efficient, specific, and rapid differentiation into myocytes, hepatocytes, blood cells, and neurons. Furthermore, transfection of synthetic mRNAs of TFs generates their appropriate target cells. These results demonstrate both the utility of this approach to identify potent TFs for cell differentiation, and the unanticipated capacity of single TFs directly guides differentiation to specific lineage fates. PMID:24371809

  16. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

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    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  17. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2015-09-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins.

  18. Defining the Minimal Factors Required for Erythropoiesis through Direct Lineage Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capellera-Garcia, Sandra; Pulecio, Julian; Dhulipala, Kishori; Siva, Kavitha; Rayon-Estrada, Violeta; Singbrant, Sofie; Sommarin, Mikael N E; Walkley, Carl R; Soneji, Shamit; Karlsson, Göran; Raya, Ángel; Sankaran, Vijay G; Flygare, Johan

    2016-06-14

    Erythroid cell commitment and differentiation proceed through activation of a lineage-restricted transcriptional network orchestrated by a group of well characterized genes. However, the minimal set of factors necessary for instructing red blood cell (RBC) development remains undefined. We employed a screen for transcription factors allowing direct lineage reprograming from fibroblasts to induced erythroid progenitors/precursors (iEPs). We show that Gata1, Tal1, Lmo2, and c-Myc (GTLM) can rapidly convert murine and human fibroblasts directly to iEPs. The transcriptional signature of murine iEPs resembled mainly that of primitive erythroid progenitors in the yolk sac, whereas addition of Klf1 or Myb to the GTLM cocktail resulted in iEPs with a more adult-type globin expression pattern. Our results demonstrate that direct lineage conversion is a suitable platform for defining and studying the core factors inducing the different waves of erythroid development.

  19. Novel evolutionary lineages in Labeobarbus (Cypriniformes; Cyprinidae) based on phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshera, Kebede A; Harris, Phillip M; Mayden, Richard L

    2016-03-22

    Phylogenetic relationships within Labeobarbus, the large-sized hexaploid cyprinids, were examined using cytochrome b gene sequences from a broad range of geographic localities and multiple taxa. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods revealed novel lineages from previously unsampled drainages in central (Congo River), eastern (Genale River) and southeastern (Revue and Mussapa Grande rivers) Africa. Relationships of some species of Varicorhinus in Africa (excluding 'V.' maroccanus) render Labeobarbus as paraphyletic. 'Varicorhinus' beso, 'V.' jubae, 'V.' mariae, 'V.' nelspruitensis, and 'V.' steindachneri are transferred to Labeobarbus. Bayesian estimation of time to most recent common ancestor suggested that Labeobarbus originated in the Late Miocene while lineage diversification began during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene and continued to the late Pleistocene. The relationships presented herein provide phylogenetic resolution within Labeobarbus and advances our knowledge of genetic diversity within the lineage as well as provides some interesting insight into the hydrographic and geologic history of Africa.

  20. Defining the Minimal Factors Required for Erythropoiesis through Direct Lineage Conversion

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    Sandra Capellera-Garcia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythroid cell commitment and differentiation proceed through activation of a lineage-restricted transcriptional network orchestrated by a group of well characterized genes. However, the minimal set of factors necessary for instructing red blood cell (RBC development remains undefined. We employed a screen for transcription factors allowing direct lineage reprograming from fibroblasts to induced erythroid progenitors/precursors (iEPs. We show that Gata1, Tal1, Lmo2, and c-Myc (GTLM can rapidly convert murine and human fibroblasts directly to iEPs. The transcriptional signature of murine iEPs resembled mainly that of primitive erythroid progenitors in the yolk sac, whereas addition of Klf1 or Myb to the GTLM cocktail resulted in iEPs with a more adult-type globin expression pattern. Our results demonstrate that direct lineage conversion is a suitable platform for defining and studying the core factors inducing the different waves of erythroid development.

  1. Lineage Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    at Stanford) express membrane-targeted tandem dimer Tomato (mT) fluorescent protein in all cells prior to Cre-mediated excision, and membrane...Tie-2 Cre x mT/mG excises dTomato ( red ) and switches on GFP expression in endothelial cells. A. CD31 immunostaining (cyan). B. VE-Cadherin...the smooth muscle genetic lineage marking of some but not all, vascular lining cells (see red unrecombined cells adjacent to green cells in Figure 5A

  2. Genetic Mosaics and the Germ Line Lineage

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    Mark E. Samuels

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mosaics provide information about cellular lineages that is otherwise difficult to obtain, especially in humans. De novo mutations act as cell markers, allowing the tracing of developmental trajectories of all descendants of the cell in which the new mutation arises. De novo mutations may arise at any time during development but are relatively rare. They have usually been observed through medical ascertainment, when the mutation causes unusual clinical signs or symptoms. Mutational events can include aneuploidies, large chromosomal rearrangements, copy number variants, or point mutations. In this review we focus primarily on the analysis of point mutations and their utility in addressing questions of germ line versus somatic lineages. Genetic mosaics demonstrate that the germ line and soma diverge early in development, since there are many examples of combined somatic and germ line mosaicism for de novo mutations. The occurrence of simultaneous mosaicism in both the germ line and soma also shows that the germ line is not strictly clonal but arises from at least two, and possibly multiple, cells in the embryo with different ancestries. Whole genome or exome DNA sequencing technologies promise to expand the range of studies of genetic mosaics, as de novo mutations can now be identified through sequencing alone in the absence of a medical ascertainment. These technologies have been used to study mutation patterns in nuclear families and in monozygotic twins, and in animal model developmental studies, but not yet for extensive cell lineage studies in humans.

  3. CRX is a diagnostic marker of retinal and pineal lineage tumors.

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    Sandro Santagata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CRX is a homeobox transcription factor whose expression and function is critical to maintain retinal and pineal lineage cells and their progenitors. To determine the biologic and diagnostic potential of CRX in human tumors of the retina and pineal, we examined its expression in multiple settings. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we show that Crx RNA and protein expression are exquisitely lineage restricted to retinal and pineal cells during normal mouse and human development. Gene expression profiling analysis of a wide range of human cancers and cancer cell lines also supports that CRX RNA is highly lineage restricted in cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of 22 retinoblastomas and 13 pineal parenchymal tumors demonstrated strong expression of CRX in over 95% of these tumors. Importantly, CRX was not detected in the majority of tumors considered in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumors (n = 78. The notable exception was medulloblastoma, 40% of which exhibited CRX expression in a heterogeneous pattern readily distinguished from that seen in retino-pineal tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings describe new potential roles for CRX in human cancers and highlight the general utility of lineage restricted transcription factors in cancer biology. They also identify CRX as a sensitive and specific clinical marker and a potential lineage dependent therapeutic target in retinoblastoma and pineoblastoma.

  4. A Molecular Assessment of Phylogenetic Relationships and LineageDiversification Within the Family Salamandridae (Amphibia, Caudata)

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    Weisrock, David W.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Macey, J. Robert; Litvinchuk, Spartak N.; Polymeni, Rosa; Ugurtas, Ismail H.; Zhao, Ermi; Larson, Allan

    2005-08-08

    Phylogenetic relationships among species of the salamanderfamily Salamandridae are investigated using nearly 3000 nucleotide basesof newly reported mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the mtDNA genicregion spanning the genes tRNALeu-COI. This study uses nearlycomprehensive species-level sampling to provide the first completephylogeny for the Salamandridae. Deep phylogenetic relationships amongthe three most divergent lineages in the family Salamandrina terdigitata,a clade comprising the "True" salamanders, and a clade comprising allnewts except S. terdigitata are difficult to resolve. However, mostrelationships within the latter two lineages are resolved with robustlevels of branch support. The genera Euproctus and Triturus arestatistically shown to be nonmonophyletic, instead each contains adiverse set of lineages positioned within the large newt clade. The genusParamesotriton is also resolve as a nonmonophyletic group, with the newlydescribed species P. laoensis constituting a divergent lineage placed ina sister position to clade containing all Pachytriton species and allremaining Paramesotriton species. Sequence divergences between P.laoensis and other Paramesotriton species are as great as those comparingP. laoensis and species of the genera Cynops and Pachytriton. Analyses oflineage diversification across the Salamandridae indicate that, despiteits exceptional diversity, lineage accumulation appears to have beenconstant across time, indicating that it does not represent a truespecies radiation.

  5. Aerobic lineage of the oxidative stress response protein rubrerythrin emerged in an ancient microaerobic, (hyperthermophilic environment

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    Juan Pablo Cardenas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubrerythrins (RBRs are non-heme di-iron proteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily (FLSF. They are involved in oxidative stress defense as peroxide scavengers in a wide range of organisms. The vast majority of RBRs, including classical forms of this protein, contain a C-terminal rubredoxin-like domain involved in electron transport that is used during catalysis in anaerobic conditions. Rubredoxin is an ancient and large protein family of short length (<100 residues that contains a Fe-S center involved in electron transfer. However, functional forms of the enzyme lacking the rubredoxin-like domain have been reported (e.g., sulerythrin and ferriperoxin. In this study, phylogenomic evidence is presented that suggests that a complete lineage of rubrerythrins, lacking the rubredoxin-like domain, arose in an ancient microaerobic and (hyperthermophilic environments in the ancestors of the Archaea Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. This lineage (termed the aerobic-type lineage subsequently evolved to become adapted to environments with progressively lower temperatures and higher oxygen concentrations via the acquisition of two co-localized genes, termed DUF3501 and RFO, encoding a conserved protein of unknown function and a predicted Fe-S oxidoreductase respectively. Proposed Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT events from these archaeal ancestors to Bacteria expanded the opportunities for further evolution of this RBR including adaption to lower temperatures. The second lineage (termed the cyanobacterial lineage is proposed to have evolved in cyanobacterial ancestors, maybe in direct response to the production of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis during the Great Oxygen Event (GOE. It is hypothesized that both lineages of RBR emerged in a largely anaerobic world with whiffs of oxygen and that their subsequent independent evolutionary trajectories allowed microorganisms to transition from this anaerobic world to an aerobic one.

  6. Lineage specific expression of Polycomb Group Proteins in human embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethe, Prasad; Pursani, Varsha; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2015-05-01

    Human embryonic (hES) stem cells are an excellent model to study lineage specification and differentiation into various cell types. Differentiation necessitates repression of specific genes not required for a particular lineage. Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are key histone modifiers, whose primary function is gene repression. PcG proteins form complexes called Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs), which catalyze histone modifications such as H2AK119ub1, H3K27me3, and H3K9me3. PcG proteins play a crucial role during differentiation of stem cells. The expression of PcG transcripts during differentiation of hES cells into endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm lineage is yet to be shown. In-house derived hES cell line KIND1 was differentiated into endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm lineages; followed by characterization using RT-PCR for HNF4A, CDX2, MEF2C, TBX5, SOX1, and MAP2. qRT-PCR and western blotting was performed to compare expression of PcG transcripts and proteins across all the three lineages. We observed that cells differentiated into endoderm showed upregulation of RING1B, BMI1, EZH2, and EED transcripts. Mesoderm differentiation was characterized by significant downregulation of all PcG transcripts during later stages. BMI1 and RING1B were upregulated while EZH2, SUZ12, and EED remained low during ectoderm differentiation. Western blotting also showed distinct expression of BMI1 and EZH2 during differentiation into three germ layers. Our study shows that hES cells differentiating into endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm lineages show distinct PcG expression profile at transcript and protein level.

  7. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotypes within lineages I and II. Serotypes within lineage III (4a and 4c) are commonly isolated from environmental and food specimens. We report the first complete genome sequence of a lineage III isolate, HCC2...

  8. Genetic structure of the paternal lineage of the Roma people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Béres, Judit; Nagy, Melinda; Chang, Yuet Meng

    2011-05-01

    According to written sources, Roma (Romanies, Gypsies) arrived in the Balkans around 1,000 years ago from India and have subsequently spread through several parts of Europe. Genetic data, particularly from the Y chromosome, have supported this model, and can potentially refine it. We now provide an analysis of Y-chromosomal markers from five Roma and two non-Roma populations (N = 787) in order to investigate the genetic relatedness of the Roma population groups to one another, and to gain further understanding of their likely Indian origins, the genetic contribution of non-Roma males to the Roma populations, and the early history of their splits and migrations in Europe. The two main sources of the Roma paternal gene pool were identified as South Asian and European. The reduced diversity and expansion of H1a-M82 lineages in all Roma groups imply shared descent from a single paternal ancestor in the Indian subcontinent. The Roma paternal gene pool also contains a specific subset of E1b1b1a-M78 and J2a2-M67 lineages, implying admixture during early settlement in the Balkans and the subsequent influx into the Carpathian Basin. Additional admixture, evident in the low and moderate frequencies of typical European haplogroups I1-M253, I2a-P37.2, I2b-M223, R1b1-P25, and R1a1-M198, has occurred in a more population-specific manner.

  9. West Nile virus lineage 2 as a cause of zoonotic neurological disease in humans and horses in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Marietjie; Swanepoel, Robert

    2010-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is widely distributed in South Africa, but since a few cases of neurological disease have been reported from this region, endemic lineage 2 strains were postulated to be of low virulence. Several cases of nonfatal encephalitis in humans as well as fatal cases in a foal, dog, and ostrich chicks have, however, been associated with lineage 2 WNV in South Africa. The pathogenesis of lineage 2 WNV strains was investigated using mouse neuroinvasive experiments, gene expression experiments, and genome sequence comparisons which indicated that lineage 2 strains that are highly pathogenic exist. To determine whether cases of WNV were being missed in South Africa, horses with fever and neurological disease were investigated. Several cases of WNV were identified, all associated with severe neurological disease, 85% of which had to be euthanized or died. All cases positive by RT-PCR were shown to belong to lineage 2 WNV by DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Two cases of occupational infection were investigated, including a case of zoonotic transmission to a veterinarian who performed an autopsy on one of the horses as well as a laboratory infection after a needle stick injury with a neuroinvasive lineage 2 strain. Both resulted in neurological disease. Cytokine expression was investigated in the second case to assess the immunopathogenesis of WNV. Collectively, these studies suggest that lineage 2 WNV may be significantly under estimated as a cause of neurological disease in South Africa.

  10. Phylogenetics and differentiation of Salmonella Newport lineages by whole genome sequencing.

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    Guojie Cao

    Full Text Available Salmonella Newport has ranked in the top three Salmonella serotypes associated with foodborne outbreaks from 1995 to 2011 in the United States. In the current study, we selected 26 S. Newport strains isolated from diverse sources and geographic locations and then conducted 454 shotgun pyrosequencing procedures to obtain 16-24 × coverage of high quality draft genomes for each strain. Comparative genomic analysis of 28 S. Newport strains (including 2 reference genomes and 15 outgroup genomes identified more than 140,000 informative SNPs. A resulting phylogenetic tree consisted of four sublineages and indicated that S. Newport had a clear geographic structure. Strains from Asia were divergent from those from the Americas. Our findings demonstrated that analysis using whole genome sequencing data resulted in a more accurate picture of phylogeny compared to that using single genes or small sets of genes. We selected loci around the mutS gene of S. Newport to differentiate distinct lineages, including those between invH and mutS genes at the 3' end of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1, ste fimbrial operon, and Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR associated-proteins (cas. These genes in the outgroup genomes held high similarity with either S. Newport Lineage II or III at the same loci. S. Newport Lineages II and III have different evolutionary histories in this region and our data demonstrated genetic flow and homologous recombination events around mutS. The findings suggested that S. Newport Lineages II and III diverged early in the serotype evolution and have evolved largely independently. Moreover, we identified genes that could delineate sublineages within the phylogenetic tree and that could be used as potential biomarkers for trace-back investigations during outbreaks. Thus, whole genome sequencing data enabled us to better understand the genetic background of pathogenicity and evolutionary history of S

  11. Emergence of Lineage IV Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Ethiopia: Complete Genome Sequence of an Ethiopian Isolate 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraju, M; Mahapatra, M; Ayelet, G; Babu, A; Olivier, G; Munir, M; Libeau, G; Batten, C; Banyard, A C; Parida, S

    2016-08-01

    Isolates of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) can be segregated genetically into four lineages. For decades, lineages I-III have been reported across Africa whilst lineage IV has predominantly circulated across Asia. However, the lineage distribution is currently changing in Africa. Importantly, full genome sequence data for African field isolates have been lacking. Here, we announce the first complete genome sequence of a field isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) from East Africa. This isolate was derived from the intestine of a goat suffering from severe clinical disease during the 2010 outbreak in Ethiopia. The full genome sequence of this isolate, PPRV Ethiopia/2010, clusters genetically with other lineage IV isolates of PPRV, sharing high levels of sequence identity across the genome. Further, we have carried out a phylogenetic analysis of all of the available African partial N gene and F gene PPRV sequences to investigate the epidemiology of PPRV with a focus on the emergence of different lineages of PPRV in Africa.

  12. Evolutionary impact of transposable elements on genomic diversity and lineage-specific innovation in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ian A; Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Levin, Perrine; Berger, Chloé Suzanne; Galiana, Delphine; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery, a growing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that transposable elements are important drivers of species diversity. These mobile elements exhibit a great variety in structure, size and mechanisms of transposition, making them important putative actors in organism evolution. The vertebrates represent a highly diverse and successful lineage that has adapted to a wide range of different environments. These animals also possess a rich repertoire of transposable elements, with highly diverse content between lineages and even between species. Here, we review how transposable elements are driving genomic diversity and lineage-specific innovation within vertebrates. We discuss the large differences in TE content between different vertebrate groups and then go on to look at how they affect organisms at a variety of levels: from the structure of chromosomes to their involvement in the regulation of gene expression, as well as in the formation and evolution of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes. In the process of doing this, we highlight how transposable elements have been involved in the evolution of some of the key innovations observed within the vertebrate lineage, driving the group's diversity and success.

  13. Molecular characterisation of dengue virus type 1 reveals lineage replacement during circulation in Brazilian territory

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    Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus infection found in tropical regions around the world. Dispersal of the vector and an increase in migratory flow between countries have led to large epidemics and severe clinical outcomes, such as dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. This study analysed the genetic variability of the dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1 in Brazil with regard to the full-length structural genes C/prM/M/E among 34 strains isolated during epidemics that occurred in the country between 1994-2011. Virus phylogeny and time of divergence were also evaluated with only the E gene of the strains isolated from 1994-2008. An analysis of amino acid differences between these strains and the French Guiana strain (FGA/89 revealed the presence of important nonsynonymous substitutions in the amino acid sequences, including residues E297 (Met→Thr and E338 (Ser→Leu. A phylogenetic analysis of E proteins comparing the studied isolates and other strains selected from the GenBank database showed that the Brazilian DENV-1 strains since 1982 belonged to genotype V. This analysis also showed that different introductions of strains from the 1990s represented lineage replacement, with the identification of three lineages that cluster all isolates from the Americas. An analysis of the divergence time of DENV-1 indicated that the lineage circulating in Brazil emerged from an ancestral lineage that originated approximately 44.35 years ago.

  14. There is no fitness but fitness, and the lineage is its bearer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Erol; Van Cleve, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    Inclusive fitness has been the cornerstone of social evolution theory for more than a half-century and has matured as a mathematical theory in the past 20 years. Yet surprisingly for a theory so central to an entire field, some of its connections to evolutionary theory more broadly remain contentious or underappreciated. In this paper, we aim to emphasize the connection between inclusive fitness and modern evolutionary theory through the following fact: inclusive fitness is simply classical Darwinian fitness, averaged over social, environmental and demographic states that members of a gene lineage experience. Therefore, inclusive fitness is neither a generalization of classical fitness, nor does it belong exclusively to the individual. Rather, the lineage perspective emphasizes that evolutionary success is determined by the effect of selection on all biological and environmental contexts that a lineage may experience. We argue that this understanding of inclusive fitness based on gene lineages provides the most illuminating and accurate picture and avoids pitfalls in interpretation and empirical applications of inclusive fitness theory.

  15. Runx1 deficiency permits granulocyte lineage commitment but impairs subsequent maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K P; Hu, Z; Ebrahem, Q; Negrotto, S; Lausen, J; Saunthararajah, Y

    2013-11-04

    First-hits in the multi-hit process of leukemogenesis originate in germline or hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), yet leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) usually have a lineage-committed phenotype. The molecular mechanisms underlying this compartment shift during leukemia evolution have not been a major focus of investigation and remain poorly understood. Here a mechanism underlying this shift was examined in the context of Runx1 deficiency, a frequent leukemia-initiating event. Lineage-negative cells isolated from the bone marrow of Runx1-haploinsufficient and wild-type control mice were cultured in granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor to force lineage commitment. Runx1-haploinsufficient cells demonstrated significantly greater and persistent exponential cell growth than wild-type controls. Not surprisingly, the Runx1-haploinsufficient cells were differentiation-impaired, by morphology and by flow-cytometric evaluation for granulocyte differentiation markers. Interestingly, however, this impaired differentiation was not because of decreased granulocyte lineage commitment, as RNA and protein upregulation of the master granulocyte lineage-commitment transcription factor Cebpa, and Hoxb4 repression, was similar in wild-type and Runx1-haploinsufficient cells. Instead, RNA and protein expression of Cebpe, a key driver of progressive maturation after lineage commitment, were significantly decreased in Runx1-haploinsufficient cells. Primary acute myeloid leukemia cells with normal cytogenetics and RUNX1 mutation also demonstrated this phenotype of very high CEBPA mRNA expression but paradoxically low expression of CEBPE, a CEBPA target gene. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses suggested a molecular mechanism for this phenotype: in wild-type cells, Runx1 binding was substantially greater at the Cebpe than at the Cebpa enhancer. Furthermore, Runx1 deficiency substantially diminished high-level Runx1 binding at the Cebpe enhancer, but lower-level binding at the Cebpa

  16. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlmann Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the developing midbrain. See research article http://www.neuraldevelopment.com/content/6/1/29

  17. Global phylogenomic analysis of nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals a deep-branching classic lineage that is distinct from multiple sporadic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Markus; Wüthrich, Daniel; Salter, Susannah J; Engel, Hansjürg; Campbell, Samuel; Sá-Leão, Raquel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Hermans, Peter; Sadowy, Ewa; Turner, Paul; Chewapreecha, Claire; Diggle, Mathew; Pluschke, Gerd; McGee, Lesley; Köseoğlu Eser, Özgen; Low, Donald E; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi; Endimiani, Andrea; Küffer, Marianne; Dupasquier, Mélanie; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Bruggmann, Rémy; Hanage, William P; Parkhill, Julian; Hathaway, Lucy J; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Bentley, Stephen D

    2014-12-04

    The surrounding capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as a major virulence factor and is targeted by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). However, nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (non-Ec-Sp) have also been isolated globally, mainly in carriage studies. It is unknown if non-Ec-Sp evolve sporadically, if they have high antibiotic nonsusceptiblity rates and a unique, specific gene content. Here, whole-genome sequencing of 131 non-Ec-Sp isolates sourced from 17 different locations around the world was performed. Results revealed a deep-branching classic lineage that is distinct from multiple sporadic lineages. The sporadic lineages clustered with a previously sequenced, global collection of encapsulated S. pneumoniae (Ec-Sp) isolates while the classic lineage is comprised mainly of the frequently identified multilocus sequences types (STs) ST344 (n = 39) and ST448 (n = 40). All ST344 and nine ST448 isolates had high nonsusceptiblity rates to β-lactams and other antimicrobials. Analysis of the accessory genome reveals that the classic non-Ec-Sp contained an increased number of mobile elements, than Ec-Sp and sporadic non-Ec-Sp. Performing adherence assays to human epithelial cells for selected classic and sporadic non-Ec-Sp revealed that the presence of a integrative conjugative element (ICE) results in increased adherence to human epithelial cells (P = 0.005). In contrast, sporadic non-Ec-Sp lacking the ICE had greater growth in vitro possibly resulting in improved fitness. In conclusion, non-Ec-Sp isolates from the classic lineage have evolved separately. They have spread globally, are well adapted to nasopharyngeal carriage and are able to coexist with Ec-Sp. Due to continued use of PCV, non-Ec-Sp may become more prevalent.

  18. The MADS domain protein DIANA together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Grossniklaus, U.; Angenent, G.C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independen

  19. Downregulation of the transcription factor KLF4 is required for the lineage commitment of T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaomin Wen; Haifeng Liu; Gang Xiao; Xiaolong Liu

    2011-01-01

    The roles of the reprogramming factors Oct4,Sox2,c-Myc and Klf4 in early T cell development are incompletely defined.Here,we show that Klf4 is the only reprogramming factor whose expression is downregulated when early thymic progenitors (ETPs) differentiate into T cells.Enforced expression of Klf4 in uncommitted progenitors severely impaired T cell development mainly at the DN2-to-DN3 transition when T cell lineage commitment occurs and affected the transcription of a variety of genes with crucial functions in early T cell development,including genes involved in microenvironmental signaling (IL-7Rα),Notch target genes (Deltexl),and essential T cell lineage regulatory or inhibitory genes (Bcllla,SpiB,and ldl).The survival of thymocytes and the rearrangement at the Tcrb locus were impaired in the presence of enforced Klf4 expression.The defects in the DN1-to-DN2 and DN2-to-DN3 transitions in Klf4 transgenic mice could not be rescued by the introduction of a TCR transgene,but was partially rescued by restoring the expression of IL-7Rα.Thus,our data indicate that the downregulation of Klf4 is a prerequisite for T cell lineage commitment.

  20. ETV6-RUNX1 Rearrangement in Tunisian Pediatric B-Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Gmidène

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Forty-one out of fifty-seven Tunisian children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, and without cytogenetically detectable recurrent abnormalities at the time of the diagnosis, were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for the t(12;21. This translocation leads ETV6-RUNX1 (previously TEL-AML1 fusion gene. 16 patients (28% had ETV6-RUNX1 rearrangement. In addition to this rearrangement, two cases showed a loss of the normal ETV6 allele, and three others showed an extra signal of the RUNX1 gene. Seven patients without ETV6-RUNX1 rearrangement showed extra signals of the RUNX1 gene. One out of the 7 patients was also associated with a t(3;12 identified by FISH. This is the first Tunisian study in which we report the incidence of t(12;21 among childhood B-lineage ALL and in which we have found multiple copies of RUNX1. Finally, our findings confirm that additional or secondary genetic changes are commonly encountered in pediatric B-lineage ALL with ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion which is envisaged to play a pivotal role in disease progression.