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Sample records for agamous controls giant

  1. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-05-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0001 ATATCGCTGCACAATcaccaccatcaccatcaccaccatcatcatcaccacAGCTACCATGGGGC...GCCGGGCAGTGGCGCCCCCTCCcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaccagGCGTCCCAGCAGACGTCGGGCGGCCGGCACCACCACCACCACCAGGGCAGCAGCCG

  2. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 ATTCGACTTCAGCTCGAGGAGGAAAAGGTTTCGATTCGATCTGTGACCGATGCACGGATCAagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcag...catcagcagcatcagcagcatcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcatcagctgcagcagcag...catcagctgcagcagcatcatcagcatcatcagcatcatcagcatcagcagcatcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcatcagcatcagcatcagcatcagcatcagcaacagcaCAAGCAGAAACAGTGTACGATAGCA ...

  3. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-07-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0076 caacagaaccaacagcttcagcagcagcagctgcaacagaaactacagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaacagaaccgacagcttcag...cagcagcagctgcaacagaaactgcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagctgcagcagcagcag...cagcggcagcagcagcagcagcagcaacagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaAAGCCTACA ...

  4. Exon: CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0045 CCCCCAcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcag...cagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcagcaacaccagcagcagcggcagcgcctgccgcagcgacagcagcagcagcaacaacaccagTAGCGGCCATATGCTACACAGGCGCAGCGCCGTGA ...

  5. Efficacy of glyphosate and five surfactants for controlling giant salvinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, J.F.; Allert, A.L.; Riddle, J.S.; Gladwin, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta Mitchell) is a non-native, invasive aquatic fern that was recently introduced to the southern United States. The aggressive nature of the species has led to concerns over its potential adverse impacts to native plants, fish, and invertebrates. We conducted a study to determine the efficacy of glyphosate [isopropylamine salt of N-(phosphono-methyl)glycine] and several surfactants for control of giant salvinia. Studies were conducted over a 42-day period using static renewals (twice weekly) with 4% Hoagland's medium (10 mg/L N equivalent) in replicated 2-L containers. Five concentrations of glyphosate (0, 0.45, 0.91, 1.82, and 3.60% v:v) and five surfactants (0.25% concentration, v:v; Optima???, Kinetic???, Mon 0818???, Cygnet Plus???, and LI-700???) were applied with a pressurized sprayer as a single surface application in a fully nested experimental design. Untreated giant salvinia grew rapidly and exhibited an increase of 800% wet weight biomass over the 42-day test duration. Glyphosate, with and without surfactants, exhibited efficacy at concentrations as low as 0.45% of the commercial formulation. Glyphosate with Optima was the only mixture that resulted in complete mortality of plants with no regrowth.

  6. Neural control of small intestinal giant migrating contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterson, M F; Sarna, S K

    1994-04-01

    We investigated the neural mechanisms of control of giant migrating contractions (GMCs) in five conscious dogs. After control recordings, a Thiry-Vella loop was prepared from the middle segment, and the remaining two segments were reanastomosed. GMCs were stimulated by intravenous administration of fentanyl and erythromycin lactobionate, oral administration of loperamide and erythromycin stearate, and gastric or intraluminal administration of cider vinegar in the loop. In the intact state, the agents stimulated GMCs in all three segments, and they propagated uninterruptedly from the point of their origin to the terminal ileum. The propagation velocity of GMCs increased, whereas that of migrating motor complexes (MMCs) decreased distally. After Thiry-Vella loop formation, the agents stimulated GMCs independently in the three segments, and they propagated only to the end of the segment in which they started. In the intact small intestine, the GMCs produced ascending and descending inhibition of spontaneous phase II contractions but did not interrupt the caudad propagation of the ongoing MMC. After Thiry-Vella loop formation, the ascending inhibition was unaltered, but the descending inhibition occurred only in the segment containing the GMC. We conclude that the propagation of GMCs in the small intestine is controlled by the enteric nerves. The extrinsic nerves control the ascending inhibition produced by GMCs, whereas the enteric nerves control the descending inhibition.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTROL METHODOLOGY OF THE GIANT MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATOR BASED ON MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhenyuan; Yang Xing; Shi Chun; Guo Dongming

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of the magnetostriction generating mechanism, the control model of giant magnetostriction material based on magnetic field and the control method with magnetic flux density are developed. Furthermore, this control method is used to develop a giant magnetostrictive micro-displacement actuator (GMA) and its driving system. Two control methods whose control variables are current intensity and magnetic flux density are compared with each other by experimental studies. Finally, effective methods on improving the linearity and control precision of micro-displacement actuator and reducing the hysteresis based on the controlling magnetic flux density are obtained.

  8. Research on Giant Magnetostrictive Actuator for Turning Vibration Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetostriction is a phenomenon in which a magneti c field is used to produce a change in size of some materials. This property has b een known in elements such as nickel, iron and cobalt. Because the rare-ear th alloy Terfenol-D can offer much larger strains than nickel, iron, cobalt, an d other smart materials such as piezoelectric materials, it is called giant magn etostrictive material. Making use of the giant magnetostrictive material, the gi ant magnetostrictive actuator has higher bandwidth and r...

  9. Selective assemblies of giant tetrahedra via precisely controlled positional interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Wang, Jing; Mei, Shan; Dong, Xuehui; Li, Yiwen; Li, Mingxuan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Aida, Takuzo; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Yue, Kan; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of rigid building blocks with explicit shape and symmetry is substantially influenced by the geometric factors and remains largely unexplored. We report the selective assembly behaviors of a class of precisely defined, nanosized giant tetrahedra constructed by placing different polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecular nanoparticles at the vertices of a rigid tetrahedral framework. Designed symmetry breaking of these giant tetrahedra introduces precise positional interactions and results in diverse selectively assembled, highly ordered supramolecular lattices including a Frank-Kasper A15 phase, which resembles the essential structural features of certain metal alloys but at a larger length scale. These results demonstrate the power of persistent molecular geometry with balanced enthalpy and entropy in creating thermodynamically stable supramolecular lattices with properties distinct from those of other self-assembling soft materials.

  10. Gene : CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 Novel U A UNKNOWN LCN2_LACLA 2e-08 21% ref|NP_241318.1| lantibiotic mersa...cidin modifying enzyme [Bacillus halodurans C-125] dbj|BAB04171.1| lantibiotic mersacidin modifying

  11. Isolation and characterization of an AGAMOUS homologue from cocoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaidamsari, T.; Sugiarit, H.; Santoso, D.; Angenent, G.C.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2006-01-01

    We report the cloning of a cDNA from TcAG, an AG (Arabidopsis thaliana MADS-box C-type transcription factor gene AGAMOUS) homologue from cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). TcAG was in the cocoa flower expressed primarily in stamens and ovaries, comparable to AG in Arabidopsis. Additionally, we found that T

  12. Modeling and Control for Giant Magnetostrictive Actuators with Rate-Dependent Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate-dependent hysteresis in giant magnetostrictive materials is a major impediment to the application of such material in actuators. In this paper, a relevance vector machine (RVM model is proposed for describing the hysteresis nonlinearity under varying input current. It is possible to construct a unique dynamic model in a given rate range for a rate-dependent hysteresis system using the sinusoidal scanning signals as the training set input signal. Subsequently, a proportional integral derivative (PID control scheme combined with a feedforward compensation is implemented on a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA for real-time precise trajectory tracking. Simulations and experiments both verify the effectiveness and the practicality of the proposed modeling and control methods.

  13. Design and Application of a DSP Controller for Giant Magnetostrictive Smart Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-guang; Mao Jian-qin

    2006-01-01

    It is proposed a digital signal processing (DSP) controller used in the control system of six degree-of-freedom (DOF) giant magnetostrictive smart structure (GMSS). Also are presented the controller design and its implementation, the embedded adaptive least mean-square (LMS) control algorithm and the real-time experiments of GMSS. Three programs are embedded in this controller. Of them are the adaptive LMS control algorithm and the other two which are used to search for the optimal values for the initial weight vectors. Moreover, the work flow and the control approach of the GMSS with the DSP controller are introduced. The experimental results indicate that the DSP controller has better control precision and real-time property, and the damping effect is up to 20 dB-30 dB.

  14. Dual Control of Giant Field-like Spin Torque in Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.-H.; Chu, F.-C.; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    We predict a giant field-like spin torque, , in spin-filter (SF) barrier tunnel junctions in sharp contrast to existing junctions based on nonmagnetic passive barriers. We demonstrate that has linear bias behavior, is independent of the SF thickness, and has odd parity with respect to the SF’s exchange splitting. Thus, it can be selectively controlled via external bias or external magnetic field which gives rise to sign reversal of via magnetic field switching. The underlying mechanism is the interlayer exchange coupling between the noncollinear magnetizations of the SF and free ferromagnetic electrode via the nonmagnetic insulating (I) spacer giving rise to giant spin-dependent reflection at the SF/I interface. These findings suggest that the proposed field-like-spin-torque MRAM may provide promising dual functionalities for both ‘reading’ and ‘writing’ processes which require lower critical current densities and faster writing and reading speeds.

  15. Performance of orange oil in the control of carmine cochineal in giant cactus pear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanildo Cavalcanti de Albuquerque

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction, in 2001, the carmine cochineal (Dactylopius opuntiae already decimated some 100.000 hectares of giant cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica in semi-arid region of Paraiba. This study aimed to evaluate the behavior of five concentrations of orange oil, applied in cladodes on the death of D. opuntiae in field conditions. The research was carried out in a field of giant cactus pear infested by carmine cochineal on the site rigideira, Monteiro County, State of Paraíba. The trial design used was blocks at random (DBR composed of six treatments [doses of 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7% of orange oil (Prev-am] and water as control and five repetitions. The orange oil known like Prev-Am (Sodium tetraborohydrate decahydrate was effective against to carmine cochineal as early as the dose of 0.3% and higher potential for efficiency were observed at doses of 0.6 and 0.7%. After 48 hours of application of the product, which was observed at doses applied adults and nymphs of the insect, was dried according to the product action that acts by contact. The product had no lethal effect on ladybugs (Cycloneda sanguinea and Scymnus intrusus, but was lethal to larvae of Baccha sp. at a dose of 0.7%.

  16. Novel duplication pattern of the mitochondrial control region in Cantor's Giant softshell turtle Pelochelys cantorii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Hai-Gang; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2016-11-15

    Cantor's Giant Softshell Turtle, Pelochelys cantorii has become one of the most critically endangered species in the world. When comparative analyses of the P. cantorii complete mitochondrial genome sequences were conducted, we discovered a duplication of a segment of the control region in the mitochondrial genome of P. cantorii. The duplication is characterized by two copies of conserved sequence box 2 (CSB2) and CSB3 in a single control region. In contrast to previous reports of duplications involving the control regions of other animals, this particular pattern of duplications appears to be unique to P. cantorii. Copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 show many of the conserved sequence features typically found in mitochondrial control regions, and rare differences were found between the paralogous copies. Using the primer design principle of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the reference sequence of the duplicated CSBs, specific primers were designed to amplify the duplicated CSBs. These primers were validated among different individuals and populations of P. cantorii. This unique duplication structure suggests the two copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 may have arisen through occasional tandem duplication and subsequent concerted evolution.

  17. ANALISIS POTENSI EKONOMI DAERAH DALAM PENGEMBANGAN KOMODITI UNGGULAN KABUPATEN AGAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolamalinda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Globalization requires areas within the national territory to compete in the free trade competitively with products from countries all over the world. Regional economic development is expected to produce superior quality products that can compete in competition, both domestically and abroad. Agam as areas that have the potential of tourism and culture has the potential to perform on the world market with superior commodity sub-sectors of the manufacturing industry. This article analyzes the election of regional commodity Agam using LQ analysis, specialization index, Shift share and SWOT analysis. The analysis finds that subsekctor processing industry has a competitive advantage and thus likely to be developed to increase the region's economy. Commodity embroidery as a creative industry is a commodity that is mapped able to compete on the sub-sectors of the processing industry because the rich local cultural values and Islamic values. A variety of programs and government policies are needed to support these commodities to appear on the international market.

  18. Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants: automatic vertical alignment of nematic liquid crystal for the remote-controllable optical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Lee, Sang-A; Kang, Dong-Gue; Park, Minwook; Choi, Yu-Jin; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2015-03-25

    Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants (abbreviated as CELAnD-OH) were specifically designed and synthesized for the automatic vertical alignment (VA) layer of nematic (N) liquid crystal (LC), which can be applied for the fabrication of remote-controllable optical devices. Without the conventional polymer-based LC alignment process, a perfect VA layer was automatically constructed by directly adding the 0.1 wt % CELA1D-OH in the N-LC media. The programmed CELA1D-OH giant surfactants in the N-LC media gradually diffused onto the substrates of LC cell and self-assembled to the expanded monolayer structure, which can provide enough empty spaces for N-LC molecules to crawl into the empty zones for the construction of VA layer. On the other hand, the CELA3D-OH giant surfactants forming the condensed monolayer structure on the substrates exhibited a planar alignment (PA) rather than a VA. Upon tuning the wavelength of light, the N-LC alignments were reversibly switched between VA and PA in the remote-controllable LC optical devices. Based on the experimental results, it was realized that understanding the interactions between N-LC molecules and amphiphilic giant surfactants is critical to design the suitable materials for the automatic LC alignment.

  19. Giant voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy in heavy metal/ferromagnet/insulator junctions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    The realization of the MeRAM is based on the voltage control of the interfacial magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) of heavy-metal/ferromagnet/insulator (HM/FM/I) nanojunctions, where the non-magnetic HM contact electrode (Ta, Pd, Pt, Au) has strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Employing ab initio electronic structure calculations we have investigated the effect of electric-field (E-field) and epitaxial strain on the MCA of Ta/FeCo/MgO heterostructure. We predict that uniaxial strain leads to a wide range of interesting voltage behavior of the MCA ranging from linear behavior with positive or negative magnetoelectronic coefficient, to non-monotonic ⋁-shape or inverse-⋀-shape E-field dependence with asymmetric magnetoelectronic coefficients. The calculations reveal that under a 4% compressive strain on MgO reaches the giant value of 1126 fJ/(V.m). The underlying mechanism is the synergistic effects of strain and E-field on the orbital characters, the energy level shifts of the SOC d-states, and the dielectric constant of MgO. These results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of highly sensitive E-field-controlled MCA through strain engineering, which in turn open a viable pathway towards tailoring magnetoelectric properties for spintronic applications. * nick.kioussis@csun.edu This research was supported by NSF Grant No. ERC-TANMS-1160504

  20. Performance of orange oil in the control of carmine cochineal in giant cactus pear.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Since its introduction, in 2001, the carmine cochineal (Dactylopius opuntiae) already decimated some 100.000 hectares of giant cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) in semi-arid region of Paraiba. This study aimed to evaluate the behavior of five concentrations of orange oil, applied in cladodes on the death of D. opuntiae in field conditions. The research was carried out in a field of giant cactus pear infested by carmine cochineal on the site rigideira, Monteiro County, State of Paraíba. The ...

  1. Controlled Electrochemical Synthesis Of Giant Magnetostrictive Iron-Gallium Alloy Thin Films And Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kotha Sai Madhukar

    Magnetostrictive Galfenol (Fe1-xGax, x = 10%--40%) alloys have generated tremendous interest in recent times because of their potential as functional materials in various micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS)-based transducers and sensors. Among the giant magnetostrictive alloys, Terfenol-D (Tb1-xDyxFe2) has the largest magnetostriction, but its brittle nature limits its applications. In contrast, the next best magnetostrictive alloy, Galfenol, is highly malleable and ductile while having the tensile strength of Iron. Electrochemistry is an economical route to fabricate 'very thick' films (upto several microns) or high-aspect ratio structures like nanowire arrays. However, the highly electropositive nature of gallium makes it very difficult to electrodeposit from aqueous solutions, similar in behavior to other non-ideal elements like molybdenum, phosphorus, tungsten etc. As a result, Fe1-xGa x alloy plating has been severely plagued by non-repeatability in compositions from growth to growth, lack of uniformity in filling of pores when growing nanowires in nanoporous templates, undesired secondary hydrogen evolution reactions etc. In this study, a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between various deposition parameters (pH, overpotential, concentration, hydrodynamic conditions) was achieved, leading to an understanding of the deposition mechanism itself, thus allowing excellent control and ability to tune the alloy compositions. Arrays of nanowires were fabricated with alternating segments of the magnetostrictive alloy Fe1-xGax and Cu in nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. A novel rotating disk electrode-template (designed in-house) was used to optimize the nanowire length distributions by controlling the various aspects of electrodeposition like nucleation, kinetics and mass-transfer. Extensive structural characterization was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron

  2. Cognitively inspired reinforcement learning architecture and its application to giant-swing motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uragami, Daisuke; Takahashi, Tatsuji; Matsuo, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Many algorithms and methods in artificial intelligence or machine learning were inspired by human cognition. As a mechanism to handle the exploration-exploitation dilemma in reinforcement learning, the loosely symmetric (LS) value function that models causal intuition of humans was proposed (Shinohara et al., 2007). While LS shows the highest correlation with causal induction by humans, it has been reported that it effectively works in multi-armed bandit problems that form the simplest class of tasks representing the dilemma. However, the scope of application of LS was limited to the reinforcement learning problems that have K actions with only one state (K-armed bandit problems). This study proposes LS-Q learning architecture that can deal with general reinforcement learning tasks with multiple states and delayed reward. We tested the learning performance of the new architecture in giant-swing robot motion learning, where uncertainty and unknown-ness of the environment is huge. In the test, the help of ready-made internal models or functional approximation of the state space were not given. The simulations showed that while the ordinary Q-learning agent does not reach giant-swing motion because of stagnant loops (local optima with low rewards), LS-Q escapes such loops and acquires giant-swing. It is confirmed that the smaller number of states is, in other words, the more coarse-grained the division of states and the more incomplete the state observation is, the better LS-Q performs in comparison with Q-learning. We also showed that the high performance of LS-Q depends comparatively little on parameter tuning and learning time. This suggests that the proposed method inspired by human cognition works adaptively in real environments.

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 ref|XP_001647749.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT32417.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001647749.1 1e-87 55% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 ref|XP_001653188.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39936.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653188.1 2e-73 55% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0017 ref|XP_001647749.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT32417.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001647749.1 1e-64 59% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0006 ref|XP_001653188.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor...) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39936.1| neuropeptide y receptor (npy-r) (pr4 receptor) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653188.1 7e-99 54% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|YP_858652.1| O-antigen polymerase [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrop...hila ATCC 7966] gb|ABK39666.1| O-antigen polymerase [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ATCC 7966] YP_858652.1 1e-162 84% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0082 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0082 ref|XP_001568166.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania brazilie...nsis] emb|CAM43270.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania braziliensis] XP_001568166.1 6e-15 33% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0032 ref|XP_001568167.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania brazilie...nsis] emb|CAM43271.1| proteophosphoglycan ppg4 [Leishmania braziliensis] XP_001568167.1 3e-40 29% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0039 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 2e-38 75% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0112 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0112 ref|XP_001596058.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN99420.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001596058.1 2e-21 82% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0035 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 1e-42 90% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0052 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 6e-51 91% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 ref|XP_001598793.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN91479.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001598793.1 2e-41 88% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0029 ref|XP_001589660.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN93515.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001589660.1 3e-41 97% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 2e-31 49% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0025 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 7e-31 50% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 2e-10 30% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 2e-10 33% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 7e-12 27% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0057 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 9e-11 35% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0037 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 5e-11 28% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 ref|YP_661398.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Pseudoalter...omonas atlantica T6c] gb|ABG40344.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Pseudoalteromonas atlantica T6c] YP_661398.1 5e-57 45% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 ref|YP_610695.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein [Ps...eudomonas entomophila L48] emb|CAK17912.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein [Pseudomonas] YP_610695.1 1e-130 84% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 ref|YP_001170621.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein ...[Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501] gb|ABP77779.1| putrescine ABC transporter, permease protein [Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501] YP_001170621.1 1e-128 86% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0003 ref|XP_001650244.1| sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transp...orter [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48229.1| sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter [Aedes aegypti] XP_001650244.1 1e-111 77% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0048 ref|XP_001352669.1| GA20395-PA [Drosophila pseudoobscura] gb|EAL3...0167.1| GA20395-PA [Drosophila pseudoobscura] gb|AAV40852.1| Rh-like protein [Drosophila pseudoobscura] XP_001352669.1 3e-96 67% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|ZP_01061096.1| copper/silver efflux P-type ATPase [Flavobacte...rium sp. MED217] gb|EAQ49147.1| copper/silver efflux P-type ATPase [Leeuwenhoekiella blandensis MED217] ZP_01061096.1 1e-128 60% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] g...b|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 1e-178 80% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0050 ref|XP_001657779.1| D7 protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT41...994.1| D7 protein, putative [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABM68616.1| AAEL006424-PA [Aedes aegypti] XP_001657779.1 7e-19 27% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0002 ref|XP_001658302.1| sodium/solute symporter [Aedes aegypti] gb|EA...T47697.1| sodium/solute symporter [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABM68585.1| AAEL001198-PA [Aedes aegypti] XP_001658302.1 1e-143 68% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0100 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0100 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] g...b|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 2e-60 37% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0059 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0059 ref|YP_857839.1| pts system N-acetylglucosamine-specific eiicba component (eiicba-nag)(eii...N-acetylglucosamine-specific eiicba component (eiicba-nag)(eii-nag) [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ATCC 7966] YP_857839.1 0.0 99% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|ZP_01120431.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_08655 [Robiginital...ea biformata HTCC2501] gb|EAR16959.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_08655 [Robiginitalea biformata HTCC2501] ZP_01120431.1 4e-31 32% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 ref|ZP_01121627.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_11202 [Robiginital...ea biformata HTCC2501] gb|EAR14889.1| hypothetical protein RB2501_11202 [Robiginitalea biformata HTCC2501] ZP_01121627.1 1e-62 41% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0088 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0088 sp|P82149|NT53_DROME Lethal(2)neighbour of tid protein 2 (NOT53) ...emb|CAA64533.1| Not53 protein [Drosophila melanogaster] emb|CAA71168.1| lethal(2)neighbour of tid [Drosophila melanogaster] P82149 1e-123 61% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0141 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0141 ref|ZP_01444683.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. ...HTCC2601] gb|EAU45064.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01444683.1 0.038 24% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 ref|NP_309677.1| putative tail fiber protein [Escherichia coli O1...57:H7 str. Sakai] dbj|BAB35073.1| putative tail fiber protein [Escherichia coli O157:H7 str. Sakai] NP_309677.1 3e-18 34% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0117 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0117 ref|YP_001314462.1| Monosaccharide-transporting ATPase [Sinorhizobium medica...e WSM419] gb|ABR64529.1| Monosaccharide-transporting ATPase [Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419] YP_001314462.1 2.4 30% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 ref|XP_001645325.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwalto...zyma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO17467.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001645325.1 9e-06 24% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0008 ref|XP_001645325.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwalto...zyma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO17467.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_1058p4 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001645325.1 0.0 46% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 ref|XP_001642520.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_325p1 [Vanderwaltoz...yma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO14662.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_325p1 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001642520.1 1.3 25% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0087 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0087 ref|XP_001643844.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_499p14 [Vanderwalto...zyma polyspora DSM 70294] gb|EDO15986.1| hypothetical protein Kpol_499p14 [Vanderwaltozyma polyspora DSM 70294] XP_001643844.1 4e-20 23% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0072 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 4e-59 30% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 0.001 26% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0102 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 1e-11 24% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0063 ref|YP_001034807.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus ...sanguinis SK36] gb|ABN44257.1| Platelet-binding glycoprotein [Streptococcus sanguinis SK36] YP_001034807.1 2e-30 23% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 ref|YP_234795.1| Major facilitator superfamily [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringa...e B728a] gb|AAY36757.1| Major facilitator superfamily [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a] YP_234795.1 1e-147 93% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0018 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0018 ref|YP_234515.1| hypothetical protein Psyr_1426 [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringa...e B728a] gb|AAY36477.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a] YP_234515.1 4e-23 23% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|YP_236998.1| quinoprotein [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ...B728a] gb|AAY38960.1| quinoprotein [Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a] YP_236998.1 1.2 29% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_001453764.1| hypothetical protein CKO_02205 [Citrobacter k...oseri ATCC BAA-895] gb|ABV13328.1| hypothetical protein CKO_02205 [Citrobacter koseri ATCC BAA-895] YP_001453764.1 2e-65 50% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 ref|YP_001454621.1| hypothetical protein CKO_03094 [Citrobacter k...oseri ATCC BAA-895] gb|ABV14185.1| hypothetical protein CKO_03094 [Citrobacter koseri ATCC BAA-895] YP_001454621.1 1e-79 61% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0020 ref|NP_822673.1| integral membrane protein [Streptomyces avermitil...is MA-4680] dbj|BAC69208.1| putative integral membrane protein [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] NP_822673.1 2e-04 24% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0125 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0125 ref|NP_525103.2| bunched CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] sp|Q24523|BUN2_DROME Protein bunched, class 2 isoform (Protein shortsighted) gb|AAF53201.2| CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_525103.2 6e-62 37% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0058 ref|NP_525103.2| bunched CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] sp|Q24523|BUN2_DROME Protein bunched, class 2 isoform (Protein shortsighted) gb|AAF53201.2| CG5461-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_525103.2 2e-14 32% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01560354.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_5869 [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV62210.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_5869 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560354.1 0.002 26% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01561792.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV60539.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01561792.1 0.004 27% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0023 ref|YP_776807.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Burkholderia... cepacia AMMD] gb|ABI90473.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD] YP_776807.1 3e-98 61% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01567096.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV54827.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01567096.1 3e-05 26% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0063 ref|YP_332515.1| putative lipoprotein [Burkholderia pseudomallei ...1710b] gb|ABA48419.1| putative lipoprotein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_332515.1 7e-12 31% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0138 ref|ZP_02029487.1| hypothetical protein BIFADO_01945 [Bifidobacterium adolescent...is L2-32] gb|EDN81820.1| hypothetical protein BIFADO_01945 [Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32] ZP_02029487.1 3e-07 24% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0048 ref|YP_001164099.1| potassium efflux system [Yersinia pestis Pest...oides F] gb|ABP41126.1| potassium efflux system [Yersinia pestis Pestoides F] YP_001164099.1 1e-106 53% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 ref|YP_001012824.1| Leucyl aminopeptidase, AmpS [Hyperthermus but...ylicus DSM 5456] gb|ABM80479.1| Leucyl aminopeptidase, AmpS [Hyperthermus butylicus DSM 5456] YP_001012824.1 0.37 29% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|ZP_01789747.1| hypothetical protein CGSHiAA_08330 [Haemophilus influenza...e PittAA] gb|EDK08473.1| hypothetical protein CGSHiAA_08330 [Haemophilus influenzae PittAA] ZP_01789747.1 2e-14 23% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|YP_863633.1| prenyltransferase family protein [Gramella forse...tii KT0803] emb|CAL68566.1| prenyltransferase family protein [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_863633.1 8e-30 31% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_862949.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL67882.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_862949.1 1e-135 66% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|YP_860564.1| NorM-like multidrug efflux protein [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL65497.1| NorM-like multidrug efflux protein [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_860564.1 3e-53 43% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|YP_956869.1| conserved hypothetical protein, membrane [Gramel...la forsetii KT0803] emb|CAL65134.1| conserved hypothetical protein, membrane [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_956869.1 3e-65 41% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_861225.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL66158.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_861225.1 1e-132 64% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_861383.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella for...setii KT0803] emb|CAL66316.1| copper-translocating P-type ATPase [Gramella forsetii KT0803] YP_861383.1 1e-129 62% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 ref|XP_001523004.1| hypothetical protein MGCH7_ch7g1090 [Magnaporth...e grisea 70-15] gb|EAQ71683.1| hypothetical protein MGCH7_ch7g1090 [Magnaporthe grisea 70-15] XP_001523004.1 0.59 29% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0104 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0104 ref|XP_001404421.1| hypothetical protein MGG_13192 [Magnaporthe g...risea 70-15] gb|EDJ96181.1| hypothetical protein MGG_13192 [Magnaporthe grisea 70-15] XP_001404421.1 0.083 31% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 ref|ZP_01647447.1| oxidoreductase-like [Salinispora arenicola CNS...205] gb|ABV97571.1| oxidoreductase domain protein [Salinispora arenicola CNS-205] ZP_01647447.1 0.71 29% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 ref|YP_001478696.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV41568.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001478696.1 1e-164 82% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_001477899.1| protein of unknown function DUF340 membrane [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV40771.1| protein of unknown function DUF340 membrane [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001477899.1 4e-67 53% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0002 ref|YP_001477392.1| sugar transporter [Serratia proteamaculans 56...8] gb|ABV40264.1| sugar transporter [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001477392.1 1e-08 25% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 ref|YP_001193285.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family [Flavobac...terium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ03966.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193285.1 1e-123 62% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|YP_001295245.1| Prenyltransferase family protein [Flavobacter...ium psychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL42427.1| Prenyltransferase family protein [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001295245.1 4e-31 34% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|YP_001295229.1| hypothetical protein FP0297 [Flavobacterium p...sychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL42411.1| Protein of unknown function [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001295229.1 4e-70 43% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|ZP_01734073.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_06975 [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ95423.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_06975 [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01734073.1 5e-72 44% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0038 ref|ZP_01732766.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, putative [Flavob...acteria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ95835.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, putative [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01732766.1 9e-60 41% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 ref|YP_001296724.1| Protein of unknown function YfkH [Flavobacter...ium psychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL43921.1| Protein of unknown function YfkH [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001296724.1 3e-31 32% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|ZP_01105157.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_03125 [Flavobacter...iales bacterium HTCC2170] gb|EAR02242.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_03125 [Flavobacteriales bacterium HTCC2170] ZP_01105157.1 1e-68 43% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0035 ref|ZP_01732843.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_00795 [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ95912.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_00795 [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01732843.1 7e-31 30% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 ref|YP_001193612.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Flavobac...terium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ04293.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193612.1 3e-63 49% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|YP_001197147.1| Urea transporter [Flavobacterium johnsoniae U...W101] gb|ABQ07828.1| Urea transporter [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001197147.1 4e-69 48% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_001195410.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavob...acterium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ06091.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001195410.1 1e-129 64% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0043 ref|YP_001297326.1| hypothetical protein FP2472 [Flavobacterium p...sychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL44525.1| Hypothetical protein [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001297326.1 2e-06 24% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 ref|YP_001195652.1| protein of unknown function DUF81 [Flavobacte...rium johnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ06333.1| protein of unknown function DUF81 [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001195652.1 4e-97 65% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|YP_001197343.1| MATE efflux family protein [Flavobacterium jo...hnsoniae UW101] gb|ABQ08024.1| MATE efflux family protein [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001197343.1 6e-52 43% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|ZP_01732967.1| multidrug resistance protein [Flavobacteria ba...cterium BAL38] gb|EAZ96036.1| multidrug resistance protein [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01732967.1 9e-51 38% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|ZP_01203383.1| multidrug efflux pump, matE family [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BBFL7] gb|EAS18538.1| multidrug efflux pump, matE family [Flavobacteria bacterium BBFL7] ZP_01203383.1 3e-50 43% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|ZP_01107412.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_08224 [Flavobacter...iales bacterium HTCC2170] gb|EAR00476.1| hypothetical protein FB2170_08224 [Flavobacteriales bacterium HTCC2170] ZP_01107412.1 2e-32 36% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 ref|ZP_02007270.1| protein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane [Ralstonia pick...ettii 12D] gb|EDN41481.1| protein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane [Ralstonia pickettii 12D] ZP_02007270.1 0.063 23% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0027 ref|ZP_00232264.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Listeria monocyt...ogenes str. 4b H7858] gb|EAL07894.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Listeria monocytogenes str. 4b H7858] ZP_00232264.1 1e-07 38% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0080 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0080 ref|ZP_01467057.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Stigmatella au...rantiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU62171.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01467057.1 4e-06 30% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0123 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0123 ref|XP_973273.1| PREDICTED: similar to Putative gustatory receptor 21a [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23143.2| gustatory receptor candidate 10 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...72.3| gustatory receptor candidate 39 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_973273.1 1e-135 60% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0026 ref|NP_001076809.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium cast...aneum] gb|ABE02225.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] gb|ABN79650.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076809.1 5e-71 44% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0064 ref|XP_974025.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG13788-PB, isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23157.2| gustatory receptor candidate 24 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_974025.1 0.002 20% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0059 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0059 ref|XP_968580.1| PREDICTED: hypothetical protein [Tribolium casta...neum] emb|CAL23149.2| gustatory receptor candidate 16 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_968580.1 0.11 22% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 ref|NP_001076796.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium ca...staneum] gb|ABN79651.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076796.1 1e-111 66% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0115 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0115 ref|XP_973273.1| PREDICTED: similar to Putative gustatory receptor 21a [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23143.2| gustatory receptor candidate 10 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...72.3| gustatory receptor candidate 39 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_973273.1 9e-83 40% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0045 ref|NP_001076795.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 2 [Tribolium ca...staneum] gb|ABN79652.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 2 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076795.1 1e-113 68% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 ref|NP_001076793.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] gb|ABN79654.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076793.1 1e-114 62% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0046 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0046 ref|NP_001076796.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium ca...staneum] gb|ABN79651.1| cardioactive peptide receptor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076796.1 1e-121 68% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0098 ref|NP_001076792.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform A [Tribolium... castaneum] gb|ABN79653.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform A [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076792.1 1e-121 67% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0128 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0128 ref|XP_972629.1| PREDICTED: similar to Probable gustatory receptor 64e [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23162.2| gustatory receptor candidate 29 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...40.2| gustatory receptor candidate 7 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_972629.1 4e-42 29% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0099 ref|NP_001076793.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] gb|ABN79654.1| ecdysis triggering hormone receptor isoform B [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076793.1 4e-47 44% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0065 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0065 ref|XP_975520.1| PREDICTED: similar to CG13788-PB, isoform B [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23188.2| gustatory receptor candidate 55 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_975520.1 9e-17 31% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0052 ref|XP_972629.1| PREDICTED: similar to Probable gustatory receptor 64e [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAL23162.2| gustatory receptor candidate 29 [Tribolium castaneum] emb|CAL231...40.2| gustatory receptor candidate 7 [Tribolium castaneum] XP_972629.1 4e-42 29% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|YP_001192547.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavobacterium john...soniae UW101] gb|ABQ03228.1| heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001192547.1 1e-129 62% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|YP_001193977.1| hypothetical protein Fjoh_1626 [Flavobacterium john...soniae UW101] gb|ABQ04658.1| hypothetical protein Fjoh_1626 [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193977.1 5e-72 44% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0041 ref|YP_001193736.1| UbiA prenyltransferase [Flavobacterium johnso...niae UW101] gb|ABQ04417.1| UbiA prenyltransferase [Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101] YP_001193736.1 4e-31 33% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0050 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-35 42% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01909055.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_23714 [Plesiocysti...s pacifica SIR-1] gb|EDM78078.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_23714 [Plesiocystis pacifica SIR-1] ZP_01909055.1 5e-05 36% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 ref|ZP_01905410.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_21714 [Plesiocysti...s pacifica SIR-1] gb|EDM81578.1| hypothetical protein PPSIR1_21714 [Plesiocystis pacifica SIR-1] ZP_01905410.1 1.2 40% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0049 ref|ZP_01274777.1| Surface protein from Gram-positive cocci, anch...or region [Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23] gb|EAS88254.1| Surface protein from Gram-positive cocci, anchor region [Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23] ZP_01274777.1 2e-39 52% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0068 ref|YP_574435.1| flavin-containing monooxygenase FMO [Chromohalobacter salex...igens DSM 3043] gb|ABE59736.1| flavin-containing monooxygenase FMO [Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043] YP_574435.1 7.1 30% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0112 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0112 ref|ZP_01465266.1| hypothetical protein STIAU_3860 [Stigmatella aura...ntiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU63984.1| hypothetical protein STIAU_3860 [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01465266.1 8.6 33% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 ref|ZP_01423834.1| Lanthionine synthetase C-like [Herpetosiphon aura...ntiacus ATCC 23779] gb|EAU19386.1| Lanthionine synthetase C-like [Herpetosiphon aurantiacus ATCC 23779] ZP_01423834.1 2e-20 25% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 ref|YP_001433581.1| protein of unknown function DUF296 [Roseiflexus caste...nholzii DSM 13941] gb|ABU59563.1| protein of unknown function DUF296 [Roseiflexus castenholzii DSM 13941] YP_001433581.1 0.11 35% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|YP_001430593.1| Adenylosuccinate synthase [Roseiflexus casten...holzii DSM 13941] gb|ABU56575.1| Adenylosuccinate synthase [Roseiflexus castenholzii DSM 13941] YP_001430593.1 4.6 27% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0003 ref|ZP_01235768.1| Putative cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein CcmF [Vibrio angus...tum S14] gb|EAS64028.1| Putative cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein CcmF [Vibrio angustum S14] ZP_01235768.1 9e-71 68% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 ref|ZP_01236824.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio angus...tum S14] gb|EAS62911.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio angustum S14] ZP_01236824.1 2e-53 56% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 ref|YP_333983.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1710b_2591 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1710b] gb|ABA48937.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1710b_2591 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_333983.1 5e-11 27% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0021 ref|YP_331887.1| Planctomycete extracellular domain protein [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1710b] gb|ABA51048.1| Planctomycete extracellular domain protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_331887.1 0.005 31% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0021 ref|ZP_01571862.1| 200 kDa antigen p200, putative [Burkholderia m...ultivorans ATCC 17616] gb|EAV64386.1| 200 kDa antigen p200, putative [Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616] ZP_01571862.1 0.82 25% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0064 ref|YP_335617.1| haemagluttinin family protein [Burkholderia pseu...domallei 1710b] gb|ABA51851.1| haemagluttinin family protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] YP_335617.1 0.0 31% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0044 ref|ZP_01559561.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia a...mbifaria MC40-6] gb|EAV47895.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia ambifaria MC40-6] ZP_01559561.1 0.83 27% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|YP_553299.1| Putative diguanylate cyclase (GGDEF domain) [Burkholder...ia xenovorans LB400] gb|ABE33949.1| Putative diguanylate cyclase (GGDEF domain) [Burkholderia xenovorans LB400] YP_553299.1 3e-20 29% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 ref|XP_001650650.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap...1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48196.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001650650.1 1e-172 69% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0094 ref|XP_001650651.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap...1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48197.1| rab6 gtpase activating protein, gapcena (rabgap1 protein) [Aedes aegypti] XP_001650651.1 1e-172 69% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 ref|YP_001129521.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Hynobius arisanens...is] gb|ABO20776.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Hynobius arisanensis] YP_001129521.1 0.43 24% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 ref|YP_001126159.1| Lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Geob...acillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] gb|ABO67414.1| Lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] YP_001126159.1 1e-17 24% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0029 ref|NP_241318.1| lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Bacillu...s halodurans C-125] dbj|BAB04171.1| lantibiotic mersacidin modifying enzyme [Bacillus halodurans C-125] NP_241318.1 3e-26 26% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0067 ref|NP_709711.1| similar to protein of glp regulon [Shigella flex...neri 2a str. 301] gb|AAN45418.1| similar to protein of glp regulon [Shigella flexneri 2a str. 301] NP_709711.1 2e-79 62% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0020 ref|YP_311760.1| putative transport protein [Shigella sonnei Ss04...6] gb|AAZ89525.1| putative transport protein [Shigella sonnei Ss046] YP_311760.1 1e-120 62% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 gb|AAP56247.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP1 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56248.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP2 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56247.1 0.0 86% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 0.0 86% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 0.0 86% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0015 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 0.0 86% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0008 gb|AAP56247.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP1 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56248.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP2 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56247.1 0.0 86% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0005 gb|AAP56249.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP3 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56250.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP4 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56249.1 1e-178 81% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0007 gb|AAP56247.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP1 [Culex pipi...ens pallens] gb|AAP56248.1| deltamethrin resistance-associated NYD-OP2 [Culex pipiens pallens] AAP56247.1 0.0 86% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|ZP_02018486.1| acriflavin resistance protein [Methylobacterium extorque...ns PA1] gb|EDN54609.1| acriflavin resistance protein [Methylobacterium extorquens PA1] ZP_02018486.1 2.7 30% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0043 ref|XP_804109.1| calpain cysteine peptidase [Trypanosoma cruzi st...rain CL Brener] gb|EAN82258.1| calpain cysteine peptidase, putative [Trypanosoma cruzi] XP_804109.1 0.99 29% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0097 ref|YP_001263414.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas... wittichii RW1] gb|ABQ69276.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas wittichii RW1] YP_001263414.1 4.6 27% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 ref|ZP_01302230.1| putative manganese transport protein MntH [Sphingomonas... sp. SKA58] gb|EAT10059.1| putative manganese transport protein MntH [Sphingomonas sp. SKA58] ZP_01302230.1 1e-100 52% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0168 ref|YP_001263414.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas... wittichii RW1] gb|ABQ69276.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Sphingomonas wittichii RW1] YP_001263414.1 0.77 31% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0031 ref|YP_294122.1| hypothetical protein EhV364 [Emiliania huxleyi v...irus 86] emb|CAI65791.1| putative membrane protein [Emiliania huxleyi virus 86] YP_294122.1 8e-16 44% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|YP_001140043.1| O-antigen ligase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO88295.1| O-antigen ligase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001140043.1 1e-145 76% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 ref|YP_001142086.1| transporter, NadC family [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO90338.1| transporter, NadC family [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001142086.1 0.76 25% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|YP_001141367.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO89619.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001141367.1 1e-165 88% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_001142445.1| membrane protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO90697.1| membrane protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001142445.1 1e-130 93% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0010 ref|YP_001141362.1| amino acid permease [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO89614.1| amino acid permease [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001141362.1 1e-132 96% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0064 ref|YP_001143407.1| sulfatase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO91659.1| sulfatase [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001143407.1 0.0 87% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0021 ref|YP_001140588.1| Na+/H antiporter NhaA [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO88840.1| Na+/H antiporter NhaA [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001140588.1 1e-123 94% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|YP_001142002.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO90254.1| GGDEF domain protein [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001142002.1 6e-21 30% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0045 ref|ZP_01051647.1| Heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Tenac...ibaculum sp. MED152] gb|EAQ41075.1| Heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase [Polaribacter dokdonensis MED152] ZP_01051647.1 1e-132 63% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0034 ref|NP_001040306.1| presenilin-like signal peptide peptidase [Bom...byx mori] gb|ABD36167.1| presenilin-like signal peptide peptidase [Bombyx mori] NP_001040306.1 1e-135 65% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0035 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.009 23% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0093 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0093 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 40% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0057 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 37% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0010 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0053 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0053 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0091 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0091 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 1e-163 38% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0155 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0155 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0094 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0094 ref|ZP_00373744.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila... ananassae] gb|EAL58741.1| SD27140p [Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila ananassae] ZP_00373744.1 0.0 39% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0069 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0069 ref|XP_001652791.1| GDP-fucose transporter, putative [Aedes aegyp...ti] gb|EAT40804.1| GDP-fucose transporter, putative [Aedes aegypti] XP_001652791.1 1e-129 83% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 ref|NP_001040188.1| KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention ...receptor 2a [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36213.1| KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention receptor 2a [Bombyx mori] NP_001040188.1 3e-45 47% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0107 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0107 ref|YP_001112131.1| protein of unknown function UPF0118 [Desulfoto...maculum reducens MI-1] gb|ABO49306.1| protein of unknown function UPF0118 [Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1] YP_001112131.1 1.8 23% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0113 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0113 ref|XP_001418476.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO96769.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001418476.1 2.9 25% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0122 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0122 ref|XP_001415961.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94253.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415961.1 4e-25 32% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 ref|NP_001011605.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Apis mellifera] ...sp|O61303|OPSUV_APIME Opsin, ultraviolet-sensitive (AMUVOP) (BUVOPS) gb|AAC13418.1| ultraviolet-sensitive op

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0054 ref|YP_001165892.1| hypothetical protein Saro_3506 [Novosphingobium... aromaticivorans DSM 12444] gb|ABP64366.1| hypothetical protein Saro_3506 [Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444] YP_001165892.1 0.99 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0012 ref|YP_001363161.1| DNA internalization-related competence protei...n ComEC/Rec2 [Kineococcus radiotolerans SRS30216] gb|ABS04897.1| DNA internalization-related competence prot

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0119 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0119 ref|ZP_00982898.1| COG0477: Permeases of the major facilitator su...perfamily [Burkholderia dolosa AUO158] gb|EAY72007.1| Major facilitator superfamily (MFS_1) transporter [Burkholderia dolosa AUO158] ZP_00982898.1 0.36 24% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0176 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0176 ref|ZP_01771797.1| Hypothetical protein COLAER_00786 [Collinsella... aerofaciens ATCC 25986] gb|EBA40261.1| Hypothetical protein COLAER_00786 [Collinsella aerofaciens ATCC 25986] ZP_01771797.1 0.14 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0005 ref|NP_724962.2| starry night CG11895-PA [Drosophila melanogaster...] sp|Q9V5N8|STAN_DROME Protocadherin-like wing polarity protein stan precursor (Protein starry night) (Prote

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 ref|NP_938793.1| Putative cytochrome C biogenesis protein [Corynebacterium diphtheria...e NCTC 13129] emb|CAE48916.1| Putative cytochrome C biogenesis protein [Corynebacterium diphtheriae] NP_938793.1 1.6 24% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0028 ref|ZP_01117607.1| hypothetical protein PI23P_05432 [Polaribacter... irgensii 23-P] gb|EAR13914.1| hypothetical protein PI23P_05432 [Polaribacter irgensii 23-P] ZP_01117607.1 7e-71 44% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0017 ref|ZP_01119288.1| CAAX amino terminal protease family protein [Polar...ibacter irgensii 23-P] gb|EAR11475.1| CAAX amino terminal protease family protein [Polaribacter irgensii 23-P] ZP_01119288.1 3e-13 27% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0026 ref|XP_001659082.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [A...edes aegypti] gb|EAT39962.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [Aedes aegypti] XP_001659082.1 6e-92 51% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0077 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0077 ref|XP_001659082.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [A...edes aegypti] gb|EAT39962.1| substance P receptor (long form), putative [Aedes aegypti] XP_001659082.1 1e-141 74% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0071 ref|NP_001035057.1| pteropsin [Apis mellifera] tpg|DAA05735.1| TP...A_exp: pteropsin [Apis mellifera] tpg|DAA05736.1| TPA_exp: pteropsin [Apis mellifera] NP_001035057.1 3e-73 46% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0035 ref|YP_441277.1| hypothetical protein BTH_I0721 [Burkholderia thail...andensis E264] gb|ABC36322.1| membrane protein, putative [Burkholderia thailandensis E264] YP_441277.1 0.063 24% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0061 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0061 ref|YP_443145.1| fosmidomycin resistance protein [Burkholderia thail...andensis E264] gb|ABC36646.1| fosmidomycin resistance protein [Burkholderia thailandensis E264] YP_443145.1 1e-117 64% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01562088.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2302 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV60091.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2302 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01562088.1 4e-04 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 ref|ZP_01564777.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_4887 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV57364.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_4887 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01564777.1 5e-05 28% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0071 ref|NP_476722.1| shotgun CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|Q...24298|CADE_DROME DE-cadherin precursor (Protein shotgun) gb|AAF46659.1| CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_476722.1 0.0 40% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0070 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0070 ref|NP_476722.1| shotgun CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|Q...24298|CADE_DROME DE-cadherin precursor (Protein shotgun) gb|AAF46659.1| CG3722-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_476722.1 0.0 42% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0002 ref|YP_050752.1| hypothetical protein ECA2661 [Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptic...a SCRI1043] emb|CAG75561.1| putative membrane protein [Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica SCRI1043] YP_050752.1 2e-66 53% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 ref|XP_001652261.1| transient receptor potential cation channel p...rotein painless [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT41530.1| transient receptor potential cation channel protein painless [Aedes aegypti] XP_001652261.1 1e-102 38% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0028 ref|XP_001652262.1| transient receptor potential cation channel p...rotein painless [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT41531.1| transient receptor potential cation channel protein painless [Aedes aegypti] XP_001652262.1 1e-102 38% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0024 ref|NP_001089174.1| putative transient receptor potential channel... [Xenopus laevis] emb|CAE09056.1| putative transient receptor potential channel [Xenopus laevis] NP_001089174.1 1e-158 42% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0022 ref|YP_087435.1| RfaL protein [Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL...55E] gb|AAU36850.1| RfaL protein [Mannheimia succiniciproducens MBEL55E] YP_087435.1 5e-17 26% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0034 ref|YP_752172.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Shewanella frigid...imarina NCIMB 400] gb|ABI73333.1| major facilitator superfamily MFS_1 [Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400] YP_752172.1 2e-55 45% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0179 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0179 ref|NP_542440.1| bride of sevenless CG8285-PA [Drosophila melanog...aster] sp|P22815|BOSS_DROME Protein bride of sevenless precursor emb|CAA39373.1| bride of sevenless protein

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01512956.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia phytofirm...ans PsJN] gb|EAV02438.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01512956.1 0.070 25% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|ZP_01507056.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans... PsJN] gb|EAV08201.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01507056.1 6e-21 28% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 ref|ZP_01508657.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Burkholderia phytofirm...ans PsJN] gb|EAV06352.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01508657.1 0.024 29% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0060 ref|ZP_01512692.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans... PsJN] gb|EAV02625.1| diguanylate cyclase [Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN] ZP_01512692.1 2e-23 29% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|YP_001099812.1| putative Urea transporter [Herminiimonas arse...nicoxydans] emb|CAL61685.1| putative Urea transporter [Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans] YP_001099812.1 4e-36 33% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0016 ref|NP_935992.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio vulnificus... YJ016] dbj|BAC95963.1| putative multidrug resistance protein [Vibrio vulnificus YJ016] NP_935992.1 4e-51 56% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0042 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0042 ref|ZP_00591264.1| Potassium efflux system protein [Prosthecochlo...ris aestuarii DSM 271] gb|EAN23634.1| Potassium efflux system protein [Prosthecochloris aestuarii DSM 271] ZP_00591264.1 1e-75 46% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0076 ref|ZP_01979394.1| hypothetical protein A5A_0268 [Vibrio cholerae... MZO-2] gb|EDM53680.1| hypothetical protein A5A_0268 [Vibrio cholerae MZO-2] ZP_01979394.1 0.49 25% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0040 ref|ZP_01882627.1| multidrug resistance protein [Pedobacter sp. B...AL39] gb|EDM38378.1| multidrug resistance protein [Pedobacter sp. BAL39] ZP_01882627.1 3e-50 42% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0044 ref|ZP_01884120.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family protein [Pedo...bacter sp. BAL39] gb|EDM36559.1| Mn2+/Fe2+ transporter, NRAMP family protein [Pedobacter sp. BAL39] ZP_01884120.1 1e-119 55% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0073 ref|ZP_01886744.1| hypothetical protein PBAL39_17149 [Pedobacter ...sp. BAL39] gb|EDM34019.1| hypothetical protein PBAL39_17149 [Pedobacter sp. BAL39] ZP_01886744.1 1e-114 75% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0012 ref|YP_304864.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1321 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ70284.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1321 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_304864.1 0.39 34% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0028 ref|YP_305972.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71392.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305972.1 9e-19 35% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 ref|ZP_01444683.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. ...HTCC2601] gb|EAU45064.1| tail fiber protein, putative [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01444683.1 1e-17 36% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0103 ref|ZP_01443014.1| hypothetical protein R2601_13804 [Roseovarius ...sp. HTCC2601] gb|EAU46901.1| hypothetical protein R2601_13804 [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01443014.1 5.5 35% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0165 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0165 ref|XP_309589.1| putative glyco-protein hormone fsh-like receptor... (AGAP004035-PA) [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] gb|EAA05376.2| putative glyco-protein hormone fsh-like receptor (AGAP004035-PA) [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] XP_309589.1 0.0 93% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0033 ref|NP_788686.1| tincar CG31247-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] ref|NP_788687.1| tincar CG31247-PD, isoform D [Drosophila melanogaster] gb|AAO41572.1| CG31247-PA, is

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|YP_300356.1| hypothetical protein SSP0266 [Staphylococcus saprophytic...us subsp. saprophyticus ATCC 15305] dbj|BAE17411.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus ATCC 15305] YP_300356.1 2e-35 29% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0030 ref|ZP_00769372.1| Binding-protein-dependent transport systems in...ner membrane component [Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl] gb|EAO57514.1| Binding-protein-dependent transport systems

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0056 ref|ZP_01637716.1| binding-protein-dependent transport systems in...ner membrane component [Pseudomonas putida W619] gb|EAX19985.1| binding-protein-dependent transport systems

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0040 ref|ZP_01520645.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_4667 [Comamonas... testosteroni KF-1] gb|EAV14383.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_4667 [Comamonas testosteroni KF-1] ZP_01520645.1 8e-05 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0104 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0104 ref|ZP_01519290.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_1042 [Comamonas... testosteroni KF-1] gb|EAV15567.1| hypothetical protein CtesDRAFT_1042 [Comamonas testosteroni KF-1] ZP_01519290.1 8e-04 33% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0028 ref|YP_719270.1| possible large adhesin [Haemophilus somnus 129PT...] gb|ABI25333.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Haemophilus somnus 129PT] YP_719270.1 1e-27 34% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0058 ref|NP_001076809.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium cast...aneum] gb|ABE02225.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] gb|ABN79650.1| adipokinetic hormone receptor [Tribolium castaneum] NP_001076809.1 1e-112 60% ...

  3. Giant kerr nonlinearity, controlled entangled photons and polarization phase gates in coupled quantum-well structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengjie; Huang, Guoxiang

    2011-11-07

    We study linear and nonlinear propagations of probe and signal pulses in a multiple quantum-well structure with a four-level, double Λ-type configuration. We show that slow, mutually matched group velocities and giant Kerr nonlinearity of the probe and the signal pulses may be achieved with nearly vanishing optical absorption. Based on these properties we demonstrate that two-qubit quantum polarization phase gates can be constructed and highly entangled photon pairs may be produced. In addition, we show that coupled slow-light soliton pairs with very low generation power can be realized in the system.

  4. Giant electromechanical coupling of relaxor ferroelectrics controlled by polar nanoregion vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Michael E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Sahul, Raffi; Parshall, Daniel E.; Lynn, Jeffrey W.; Christianson, Andrew D.; Stonaha, Paul J.; Specht, Eliot D.; Budai, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Relaxor-based ferroelectrics are prized for their giant electromechanical coupling and have revolutionized sensor and ultrasound applications. A long-standing challenge for piezoelectric materials has been to understand how these ultrahigh electromechanical responses occur when the polar atomic displacements underlying the response are partially broken into polar nanoregions (PNRs) in relaxor-based ferroelectrics. Given the complex inhomogeneous nanostructure of these materials, it has generally been assumed that this enhanced response must involve complicated interactions. By using neutron scattering measurements of lattice dynamics and local structure, we show that the vibrational modes of the PNRs enable giant coupling by softening the underlying macrodomain polarization rotations in relaxor-based ferroelectric PMN-xPT {(1 − x)[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3] – xPbTiO3} (x = 30%). The mechanism involves the collective motion of the PNRs with transverse acoustic phonons and results in two hybrid modes, one softer and one stiffer than the bare acoustic phonon. The softer mode is the origin of macroscopic shear softening. Furthermore, a PNR mode and a component of the local structure align in an electric field; this further enhances shear softening, revealing a way to tune the ultrahigh piezoelectric response by engineering elastic shear softening. PMID:27652338

  5. Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Guillot, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    We review the interior structure and evolution of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and giant exoplanets with particular emphasis on constraining their global composition. Compared to the first edition of this review, we provide a new discussion of the atmospheric compositions of the solar system giant planets, we discuss the discovery of oscillations of Jupiter and Saturn, the significant improvements in our understanding of the behavior of material at high pressures and the consequences for interior and evolution models. We place the giant planets in our Solar System in context with the trends seen for exoplanets.

  6. Effectively control negative thermal expansion of single-phase ferroelectrics of PbTiO3-(Bi,La)FeO3 over a giant range

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qingzhen; Hu, Lei; Song, Xiping; Deng, Jinxia; Yu, Ranbo; Xing, Xianran

    2013-01-01

    Control of negative thermal expansion is a fundamentally interesting topic in the negative thermal expansion materials in order for the future applications. However, it is a challenge to control the negative thermal expansion in individual pure materials over a large scale. Here, we report an effective way to control the coefficient of thermal expansion from a giant negative to a near zero thermal expansion by means of adjusting the spontaneous volume ferroelectrostriction (SVFS) in the syste...

  7. Non-linear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of giant magnetostrictive film subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z. W., E-mail: zhuzhiwen@tju.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics, Tianjin University, 300072, Tianjin (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Non-linear Dynamics and Chaos Control, 300072, Tianjin (China); Zhang, W. D., E-mail: zhangwenditju@126.com; Xu, J., E-mail: xujia-ld@163.com [Department of Mechanics, Tianjin University, 300072, Tianjin (China)

    2014-03-15

    The non-linear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of a giant magnetostrictive film (GMF) subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation were studied. Non-linear differential items were introduced to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of the GMF, and the non-linear dynamic model of the GMF subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation was developed. The stochastic stability was analysed, and the probability density function was obtained. The condition of stochastic Hopf bifurcation and noise-induced chaotic response were determined, and the fractal boundary of the system's safe basin was provided. The reliability function was solved from the backward Kolmogorov equation, and an optimal control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that the system stability varies with the parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the process; the area of the safe basin decreases when the noise intensifies, and the boundary of the safe basin becomes fractal; the system reliability improved through stochastic optimal control. Finally, the theoretical and numerical results were proved by experiments. The results are helpful in the engineering applications of GMF.

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0019 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0019 ref|NP_725630.1| vegetable CG6657-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melan...ogaster] ref|NP_524685.2| vegetable CG6657-PB, isoform B [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|Q9V7W1|PIGV_DROME GPI ...mannosyltransferase 2 (GPI mannosyltransferase II) (GPI-MT-II) (Protein vegetable) gb|AAF57928.1| CG6657-PA,

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0016 ref|NP_477376.1| CG4585-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] dbj|BAA32689....1| unnamed protein product [Drosophila melanogaster] dbj|BAA32692.1| unnamed protein product [Drosophila me...lanogaster] gb|AAF47081.1| CG4585-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] gb|AAL28300.1| GH20310p [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_477376.1 1e-132 58% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0178 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0178 ref|XP_001651711.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti...] ref|XP_001660238.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT32550.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti...] gb|EAT38553.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1 [Aedes aegypti] XP_001651711.1 1e-176 74% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0038 ref|NP_824326.1| ABC transporter integral membrane protein BldKA [Streptomyces avermitil...is MA-4680] dbj|BAB69357.1| transport integral membrane protein BldKA [Streptomyces avermitil...is] dbj|BAC70861.1| putative peptide ABC transporter permease protein [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] NP_824326.1 0.94 30% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0022 ref|NP_523974.3| fear-of-intimacy CG6817-PA [Drosophila melanogas...ter] sp|Q9VSL7|FOI_DROME Zinc transporter foi precursor (Protein fear-of-intimacy) (Protein kastchen) gb|AAF50401.3| CG6817-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] NP_523974.3 1e-111 44% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|ZP_01563785.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV58290.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia cenocepacia ...MC0-3] gb|EAY65940.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia cenocepacia PC184] ZP_01563785.1 4.6 26% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0111 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0111 ref|NP_001029470.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndro...me 2 [Bos taurus] sp|Q3SWX0|NIPA2_BOVIN Non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2 hom...olog gb|AAI04628.1| Non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 2 [Bos taurus] NP_001029470.1 2e-72 51% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0116 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0116 ref|YP_081361.1| gluconate permease [Bacillus licheniformis ATCC ...14580] ref|YP_093794.1| GntP [Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580] gb|AAU25723.1| gluconate permease [Bacillus lichen...iformis ATCC 14580] gb|AAU43101.1| GntP [Bacillus licheniformis DSM 13] YP_081361.1 1.8 41% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0014 ref|NP_476702.1| rickets CG8930-PA, isoform A [Drosophila melanog...aster] ref|NP_599102.1| rickets CG8930-PB, isoform B [Drosophila melanogaster] ref|NP_599103.1| rickets CG89...30-PC, isoform C [Drosophila melanogaster] ref|NP_599104.1| rickets CG8930-PD, isoform D [Drosophila melanog

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0130 ref|XP_307101.2| AGAP012756-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] ref|...XP_319412.2| AGAP010224-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] gb|EAA13938.2| AGAP010224-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST...] gb|EAA02917.2| AGAP012756-PA [Anopheles gambiae str. PEST] XP_307101.2 3e-47 50% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0079 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0079 ref|XP_525054.2| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 6 [P...an troglodytes] ref|XP_001169314.1| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 3 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_0...01169359.1| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 4 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001169380.1| PREDICTED: hedgehog acyltransferase isoform 5 [Pan troglodytes] XP_525054.2 4e-33 25% ...

  19. Complexity in Climatic Controls on Plant Species Distribution: Satellite Data Reveal Unique Climate for Giant Sequoia in the California Sierra Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Eric Kindseth

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTComplexity in Climatic Controls on Plant Species Distribution: Satellite Data Reveal Unique Climate for Giant Sequoia in the California Sierra NevadabyEric Kindseth WallerDoctor of Philosophy in Environmental Science, Policy, and ManagementUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Dennis D. Baldocchi, ChairA better understanding of the environmental controls on current plant species distribution is essential if the impacts of such diverse challenges as invasive species, changing fir...

  20. Functional diversification of AGAMOUS lineage genes in regulating tomato flower and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Irvin L; McQuinn, Ryan; Giovannoni, James J; Irish, Vivian F

    2010-06-01

    AGAMOUS clade genes encode MADS box transcription factors that have been shown to play critical roles in many aspects of flower and fruit development in angiosperms. Tomato possesses two representatives of this lineage, TOMATO AGAMOUS (TAG1) and TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 (TAGL1), allowing for an analysis of diversification of function after gene duplication. Using RNAi (RNA interference) silencing, transgenic tomato lines that specifically down-regulate either TAGL1 or TAG1 transcript accumulation have been produced. TAGL1 RNAi lines show no defects in stamen or carpel identity, but show defects in fruit ripening. In contrast TAG1 RNAi lines show defects in stamen and carpel development. In addition TAG1 RNAi lines produce red ripe fruit, although they are defective in determinacy and produce ectopic internal fruit structures. e2814, an EMS- (ethyl methane sulphonate) induced mutation that is temperature sensitive and produces fruit phenotypes similar to that of TAG1 RNAi lines, was also characterized. Neither TAG1 nor TAGL1 expression is disrupted in the e2814 mutant, suggesting that the gene corresponding to the e2814 mutant represents a distinct locus that is likely to be functionally downstream of TAG1 and TAGL1. Based on these analyses, possible modes by which these gene duplicates have diversified in terms of their functions and regulatory roles are discussed.

  1. Controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles by a magnetic microactuator and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an integrated micro-chip for the controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A unique magnetic micro-actuator consisting of square-shaped conductors is used to manipulate the MPs towards a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing element which rapidly detects the majority of MPs trapped around the square-shaped conductors. The ability to precisely transport a small number of MPs in a controlled manner over long distances by magnetic forces enables the rapid concentration of a majority of MPs to the sensing zone for detection. This is especially important in low concentration samples. The conductors are designed in such a manner so as to increase the capture efficiency as well as the precision and speed of transportation. By switching current to different conductors, MPs can be manipulated and immobilized on the innermost conductor where the GMR sensor is located. This technique rapidly guides the MPs towards the sensing zone. Secondly, for optimum measurement capability with high spatial resolution the GMR sensor is fabricated directly underneath and all along the innermost conductor to detect the stray fields originating from the MPs. Finally, a microfluidic channel is fabricated on top of this micro-chip. Experiments inside the microchannel were carried out and the MPs were successfully trapped at the sensing area. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications.

  2. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or medical history, but the habit of picking his teeth and “poking” the gingiva. The oral lesion consisted of an asymptomatic, rounded, pink colored, smooth surface, soft tissue injury with fibrous consistency and approximated size of 1.5 cm located in the attached gingiva between the upper left permanent lateral incisor and the primary canine of the same side. Excisional biopsy was performed through curettage and removal of the periosteum, periodontal ligament, and curettage of the involved teeth with vestibular access. The histopathological analysis led to the diagnosis of PGCG. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the PGCG resulted in a more conservative surgery and a reduced risk for tooth and bone loss and recurrence of the lesion. After four years of control, patient had no relapse of the lesion and good gingival and osseous health.

  3. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Cristhiane Almeida; Anhesini, Brunna Haddad; Aguilera, Jéssica Marques Gomes da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or medical history, but the habit of picking his teeth and “poking” the gingiva. The oral lesion consisted of an asymptomatic, rounded, pink colored, smooth surface, soft tissue injury with fibrous consistency and approximated size of 1.5 cm located in the attached gingiva between the upper left permanent lateral incisor and the primary canine of the same side. Excisional biopsy was performed through curettage and removal of the periosteum, periodontal ligament, and curettage of the involved teeth with vestibular access. The histopathological analysis led to the diagnosis of PGCG. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the PGCG resulted in a more conservative surgery and a reduced risk for tooth and bone loss and recurrence of the lesion. After four years of control, patient had no relapse of the lesion and good gingival and osseous health. PMID:27999690

  4. Giant strain control of magnetoelectric effect in Ta|Fe|MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-09-01

    The exploration of electric field controlled magnetism has come under scrutiny for its intriguing magnetoelectric phenomenon as well as technological advances in spintronics. Herein, the tremendous effect of an epitaxial strain on voltage-controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (VPMA) is demonstrated in a transition-metal|ferromagnet|MgO (TM|FM|MgO) heterostructure from first-principles electronic structure computation. By tuning the epitaxial strain in Ta|Fe|MgO as a model system of TM|FM|MgO, we find distinctly different behaviours of VPMA from V- to Λ-shape trends with a substantially large magnetoelectric coefficient, up to an order of 103 fJV‑1m‑1. We further reveal that the VPMA modulation under strain is mainly governed by the inherently large spin-orbit coupling of Ta 5d–Fe 3d hybridized orbitals at the TM|FM interface, although the Fe 3d–O 2p hybridization at the FM|MgO interface is partly responsible in determining the PMA of Ta|Fe|MgO. These results suggest that the control of epitaxial strain enables the engineering of VPMA, and provides physical insights for the divergent behaviors of VPMA and magnetoelectric coefficients found in TM|FM|MgO experiments.

  5. Giant strain control of magnetoelectric effect in Ta|Fe|MgO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-09-06

    The exploration of electric field controlled magnetism has come under scrutiny for its intriguing magnetoelectric phenomenon as well as technological advances in spintronics. Herein, the tremendous effect of an epitaxial strain on voltage-controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (VPMA) is demonstrated in a transition-metal|ferromagnet|MgO (TM|FM|MgO) heterostructure from first-principles electronic structure computation. By tuning the epitaxial strain in Ta|Fe|MgO as a model system of TM|FM|MgO, we find distinctly different behaviours of VPMA from V- to Λ-shape trends with a substantially large magnetoelectric coefficient, up to an order of 10(3) fJV(-1)m(-1). We further reveal that the VPMA modulation under strain is mainly governed by the inherently large spin-orbit coupling of Ta 5d-Fe 3d hybridized orbitals at the TM|FM interface, although the Fe 3d-O 2p hybridization at the FM|MgO interface is partly responsible in determining the PMA of Ta|Fe|MgO. These results suggest that the control of epitaxial strain enables the engineering of VPMA, and provides physical insights for the divergent behaviors of VPMA and magnetoelectric coefficients found in TM|FM|MgO experiments.

  6. Giant strain control of magnetoelectric effect in Ta/Fe/MgO

    CERN Document Server

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of electric field controlled magnetism has come under scrutiny for its intriguing magnetoelectric phenomenon as well as technological advances in spintronics. Herein, the tremendous effect of an epitaxial strain on voltage-controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (VPMA) is demonstrated in a transition-metal/ferromagnet/MgO (TM/FM/MgO) heterostructure from first-principles electronic structure computation. By tuning the epitaxial strain in Ta/Fe/MgO as a model system of TM/FM/MgO, we find distinctly different behaviours of VPMA from V- to {\\Lambda}-shape trends with a substantially large magnetoelectric coefficient, up to an order of 1000 fJ/Vm. We further reveal that the VPMA modulation under strain is mainly governed by the inherently large spin-orbit coupling of Ta 5d-Fe 3d hybridized orbitals at the TM/FM interface, although the Fe 3d-O 2p hybridization at the FM/MgO is partly responsible in determining the PMA of Ta/Fe/MgO. These results suggest that the control of epitaxial strain ena...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0010 ref|ZP_00895641.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02002081 [Burkholderia pse...udomallei 1106b] ref|ZP_01214082.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02000720 [Burkholderia pseudomallei... 1710a] ref|ZP_01318224.1| hypothetical protein Bpse1_03002406 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1655] ref|ZP_01324...763.1| hypothetical protein BpseP_03001411 [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur] re...f|ZP_01330574.1| hypothetical protein BpseS_03001271 [Burkholderia pseudomallei S13] ref|ZP_01335179.1| hypothetical protein Bpse

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0081 gb|AAQ03363.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb|AA...Q03365.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb|AAQ03367.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argente...us] gb|AAQ03373.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb|AAQ03375.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argente...us] gb|AAQ03385.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] gb...|AAQ03387.1| ATPase synthase subunit 6 [Brycon argenteus] AAQ03363.1 0.33 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0007 ref|NP_372811.1| similar to urea transporter [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus... Mu50] ref|NP_375400.1| hypothetical protein SA2081 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N31...5] ref|YP_001247667.1| Urea transporter [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus JH9] ref|YP_001317466.1| Urea t...ransporter [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus JH1] ref|YP_001442861.1| hypothet...ical protein SAHV_2271 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Mu3] dbj|BAB43379.1| SA2081 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0070 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0070 ref|YP_961710.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related pr...otein [Shewanella sp. W3-18-1] ref|ZP_01705111.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related proteins [Sh...ewanella putrefaciens 200] ref|YP_001181982.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related protein [Shewan...ella putrefaciens CN-32] gb|ABM23156.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-rel...ated protein [Shewanella sp. W3-18-1] gb|EAY54633.1| multiple antibiotic resistance (MarC)-related proteins

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0108 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0108 ref|YP_001255294.1| membrane protein [Clostridium botulinum A str.... ATCC 3502] ref|YP_001385037.1| membrane-spanning protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. ATCC 19397] ref|YP_...001388507.1| membrane-spanning protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. Hall] emb|CAL84356.1| putative membrane protein [Clostridium bot...g protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. ATCC 19397] gb|ABS36178.1| membrane-spanning protein [Clostridium botulinum A str. Hall] YP_001255294.1 6.0 24% ... ...ulinum A str. ATCC 3502] gb|ABS33222.1| membrane-spannin

  12. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato; Cristhiane Almeida Leite; Brunna Haddad Anhesini; Jéssica Marques Gomes da Silva Aguilera; Álvaro Henrique Borges

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or ...

  13. Effectively control negative thermal expansion of single-phase ferroelectrics of PbTiO3-(Bi,La)FeO3 over a giant range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qingzhen; Hu, Lei; Song, Xiping; Deng, Jinxia; Yu, Ranbo; Xing, Xianran

    2013-01-01

    Control of negative thermal expansion is a fundamentally interesting topic in the negative thermal expansion materials in order for the future applications. However, it is a challenge to control the negative thermal expansion in individual pure materials over a large scale. Here, we report an effective way to control the coefficient of thermal expansion from a giant negative to a near zero thermal expansion by means of adjusting the spontaneous volume ferroelectrostriction (SVFS) in the system of PbTiO3-(Bi,La)FeO3 ferroelectrics. The adjustable range of thermal expansion contains most negative thermal expansion materials. The abnormal property of negative or zero thermal expansion previously observed in ferroelectrics is well understood according to the present new concept of spontaneous volume ferroelectrostriction. The present studies could be useful to control of thermal expansion of ferroelectrics, and could be extended to multiferroic materials whose properties of both ferroelectricity and magnetism are coupled with thermal expansion.

  14. Role for the banana AGAMOUS-like gene MaMADS7 in regulation of fruit ripening and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juhua; Liu, Lin; Li, Yujia; Jia, Caihong; Zhang, Jianbin; Miao, Hongxia; Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-11-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important roles in organ development. In plants, most studies on MADS-box genes have mainly focused on flower development and only a few concerned fruit development and ripening. A new MADS-box gene named MaMADS7 was isolated from banana fruit by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) based on a MADS-box fragment obtained from a banana suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. MaMADS7 is an AGAMOUS-like MADS-box gene that is preferentially expressed in the ovaries and fruits and in tobacco its protein product localizes to the nucleus. This study found that MaMADS7 expression can be induced by exogenous ethylene. Ectopic expression of MaMADS7 in tomato resulted in broad ripening phenotypes. The expression levels of seven ripening and quality-related genes, ACO1, ACS2, E4, E8, PG, CNR and PSY1 in MaMADS7 transgenic tomato fruits were greatly increased while the expression of the AG-like MADS-box gene TAGL1 was suppressed. Compared with the control, the contents of β-carotene, lycopene, ascorbic acid and organic acid in transformed tomato fruits were increased, while the contents of glucose and fructose were slightly decreased. MaMADS7 interacted with banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene 1 (MaACO1) and tomato phytoene synthase gene (LePSY1) promoters. Our results indicated that MaMADS7 plays an important role in initiating endogenous ethylene biosynthesis and fruit ripening.

  15. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  16. Isostasy-controlled thinning-upward cycles in the Mediterranean?; a comparison with the Zechstein salt giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Belt, Frank J. G.; De Boer, Poppe L.

    2014-05-01

    The desiccated deep-basin model, originally developed for the Mediterranean salt giant, deviated significantly from existing models and it has never been satisfactorily translated into a general concept. With time, however, Mediterranean models evolved towards moderate basin depths and the view that deposition took place in a flooded basin has gained reputation. These new insights have bridged the gap with general evaporite models and open possibilities of integrating concepts developed for other salt giants into the model. Recent modelling work (Van den Belt & De Boer, 2012) based on the Zechstein salt basin has shown that the thickness and composition of subsequent evaporite cycles can be explained by a model that involves a repetition of a three-stage process of 1) progressive narrowing of an ocean corridor in response to sulphate-platform progradation, resulting in 2) brine concentration and rapid infilling of the basin with halite and potash salts, the load of which causes 3) isostatic creation of accommodation space for the next cycle. Isostatic theory predicts that each cycle has approximately half the thickness of the previous one, e.g. 1.0 > 0.50 > 0.25 > 0.125 followed by a number of (coalesced) smaller cycles with a joint thickness of 0.125. The sequence in the basin centre then adds up to 2, which is two times the original basin depth. For the Zechstein case actual cycle thickness well matches these predicted values with cycle thicknesses of about 1.06 > 0.54 > 0.18 > 0.10 and 0.12. The cycle build-up of the Mediterranean salt giant is less well known, because of limited deep drilling. There are at least two cycles, a thin upper overlying a thick lower unit, but comparison of Zechstein patterns with Mediterranean sections has shown that more cycles may be present. Typical cycle boundaries include K/Mg-salt interbeds in halite units, and halite interbeds in sulphate units. Interestingly, analysis has shown that such indicators in Mediterranean sections

  17. The Anopheles gambiae odorant binding protein 1 (AgamOBP1 mediates indole recognition in the antennae of female mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Biessmann

    Full Text Available Haematophagous insects are frequently carriers of parasitic diseases, including malaria. The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is the major vector of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and is thus responsible for thousands of deaths daily. Although the role of olfaction in A. gambiae host detection has been demonstrated, little is known about the combinations of ligands and odorant binding proteins (OBPs that can produce specific odor-related responses in vivo. We identified a ligand, indole, for an A. gambiae odorant binding protein, AgamOBP1, modeled the interaction in silico and confirmed the interaction using biochemical assays. RNAi-mediated gene silencing coupled with electrophysiological analyses confirmed that AgamOBP1 binds indole in A. gambiae and that the antennal receptor cells do not respond to indole in the absence of AgamOBP1. This case represents the first documented instance of a specific A. gambiae OBP-ligand pairing combination, demonstrates the significance of OBPs in odor recognition, and can be expanded to the identification of other ligands for OBPs of Anopheles and other medically important insects.

  18. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  19. Phase control studies in Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} giant magnetocaloric compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belo, J.H. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Pereira, A.M., E-mail: ampereira@fc.up.pt [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Ventura, J.; Oliveira, G.N.P. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Araujo, J.P., E-mail: jearaujo@fc.up.pt [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Tavares, P.B.; Fernandes, L. [Departamento de Quimica and CQ-VR, Universidade de Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); Algarabel, P.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Magen, C. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon-ARAID, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Morellon, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of time dependence of O(I) to M phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the optimal annealing time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New method for phase amount estimation (O(I) and M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of annealing on the MCE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of the nature of the magnetic transition through the Arrot plot representation. - Abstract: A systematic set of annealings on arc-melted synthesized Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} sample was performed. Through powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetometry measurements we monitored the effect of varying the annealing time with constant temperature (T = 1473 K) on the formation of the monoclinic (M) crystallographic phase fraction, which is the one responsible for the giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE) in this compound. The conversion of the orthorhombic O(I) crystallographic phase into M was achieved, resulting in a significant increase of the M mass fraction. Such conversion led to a change in the magnetic transition nature, evolving from a second to a first order transition for the as-cast and annealed samples, respectively. An optimal annealing time range for the M phase conversion was identified to be within 80-120 min at T = 1473 K followed by a rapid quenching to liquid N{sub 2}. Furthermore, an increase up to {approx}50% of the magnetocaloric effect was obtained for the sample annealed during 120 min.

  20. Transcriptional Activity of the MADS Box ARLEQUIN/TOMATO AGAMOUS-LIKE1 Gene Is Required for Cuticle Development of Tomato Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Estela; Dominguez, Eva; Pineda, Benito; Heredia, Antonio; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael; Angosto, Trinidad

    2015-07-01

    Fruit development and ripening entail key biological and agronomic events, which ensure the appropriate formation and dispersal of seeds and determine productivity and yield quality traits. The MADS box gene Arlequin/tomato Agamous-like1 (hereafter referred to as TAGL1) was reported as a key regulator of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) reproductive development, mainly involved in flower development, early fruit development, and ripening. It is shown here that silencing of the TAGL1 gene (RNA interference lines) promotes significant changes affecting cuticle development, mainly a reduction of thickness and stiffness, as well as a significant decrease in the content of cuticle components (cutin, waxes, polysaccharides, and phenolic compounds). Accordingly, overexpression of TAGL1 significantly increased the amount of cuticle and most of its components while rendering a mechanically weak cuticle. Expression of the genes involved in cuticle biosynthesis agreed with the biochemical and biomechanical features of cuticles isolated from transgenic fruits; it also indicated that TAGL1 participates in the transcriptional control of cuticle development mediating the biosynthesis of cuticle components. Furthermore, cell morphology and the arrangement of epidermal cell layers, on whose activity cuticle formation depends, were altered when TAGL1 was either silenced or constitutively expressed, indicating that this transcription factor regulates cuticle development, probably through the biosynthetic activity of epidermal cells. Our results also support cuticle development as an integrated event in the fruit expansion and ripening processes that characterize fleshy-fruited species such as tomato.

  1. Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film-shape memory alloy composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhiwen, E-mail: zhuzhiwentju@163.com [Department of Mechanics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Control, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Qingxin, E-mail: zqxfirst@163.com; Xu, Jia, E-mail: xujia-ld@163.com [Department of Mechanics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-05-07

    Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film–shape memory alloy (GMF–SMA) composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation were studied. Van der Pol items were improved to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of both GMF and SMA, and the nonlinear dynamic model of a GMF–SMA composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation was developed. The probability density function of the dynamic response of the system was obtained, and the conditions of stochastic Hopf bifurcation were analyzed. The conditions of noise-induced chaotic response were obtained in the stochastic Melnikov integral method, and the fractal boundary of the safe basin of the system was provided. Finally, the chaos control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the parameter variation process. The boundary of the safe basin of the system has fractal characteristics, and its area decreases when the noise intensifies. The system reliability was improved through stochastic optimal control, and the safe basin area of the system increased.

  2. Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film-shape memory alloy composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Qingxin; Xu, Jia

    2014-05-01

    Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film-shape memory alloy (GMF-SMA) composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation were studied. Van der Pol items were improved to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of both GMF and SMA, and the nonlinear dynamic model of a GMF-SMA composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation was developed. The probability density function of the dynamic response of the system was obtained, and the conditions of stochastic Hopf bifurcation were analyzed. The conditions of noise-induced chaotic response were obtained in the stochastic Melnikov integral method, and the fractal boundary of the safe basin of the system was provided. Finally, the chaos control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the parameter variation process. The boundary of the safe basin of the system has fractal characteristics, and its area decreases when the noise intensifies. The system reliability was improved through stochastic optimal control, and the safe basin area of the system increased.

  3. Studies show giant panda could survive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is not a relic species, and it can survive, according to scientists. Employing microsatellite and mitochondrial control region (CR) sequences as genetic markers, CAS researchers have obtained some key information about the giant panda and its recent evolution history. Their discovery that the lovely creature still possesses high genetic diversity and evolution potentials challenges the hypothesis suggesting the giant panda is facing an"evolutionary dead-end." The research was reported in a recent issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution by a team of scientists led by Prof.WEI Fuwen of the CAS Institute of Zoology and Prof. Michael W.Bruford of Cardiff University.

  4. Giant Cell Tumor: Role of Conservative Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatolii Diedkov[1; Pavlo Kovalchuk[1; Marija Kukushkina[2; Sergey Bojchuk[1; Viktor Kostyuk[1

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is aggressive bone tumor. Surgical treatment is considered to be the only effective method of treatment ofthese tumors. The problem of inoperable patients with giant cell tumors is a challenge. A total of 8 patients had giant cell bone tumorsof pelvis and sacrum. 3 patients were treated by bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and embolization of tumor-nutrient arteries. 5patients received denosumab. The efficiency was assessed according to clinical data and CT scan control. Median follow up is 28months. All 8 patients had reduction of pain intensity. Treatment with denosumab demonstrated more than 30% tumor regression. Allof the patients are in remission.

  5. The Revitalization of Women’s Entrepreneurship Spirit In Micro Enterprises With Islamic Microfinance Institution (IMI (Study on The Contribution of BMTs Agam Madani in Agam sub-province, West Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesi Eka Puteri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the contribution of Islamic Microfinance Institutions (IMI in the process of empowerment of women microenterprises, and recommended a related policy.Method – This study is a field research in 2012, which focused in BMTs Agam Madani at Agam district. The data is sourced from the observation, documentation and questionnaires from 60 women micro-entrepreneurs samples who receive working capital financing. This paper uses simple regression model in order to observe relationship between working capital and the increasing of revenue. This model is to measure the amount of the multiplier effect in working capital-to increasing of revenue.Result – This paper found that IMI is a good model to develop society more prosperous by developing BMTs in each district. These BMT has thousands of micro enterprises member and could revitalized the spirit of entrepreneurship of minangkabau’s women. A research to 60 women’s micro entrepreneur samples showed the positive significant influence between lending to revenue. A multiplier effect equal to 0.068.The small number of multiplier effect implied that many factors determining their revenue, not lending only.Conclusion – This finding could explain that IMI could empower micro entrepreneur woman. This finding also recommend few strategies: 1 Revitalization of BMTs as micro catalyst by revitalization of structure of organization, products variation, human resource compentence, sharia monitoring, public cooperation and implementating local cultural value 2 Revitalization of government role as fasilitator, coordinator, initiator and mediator in developing micro sector. Keywords : Women’s Entrepreneurship, Micro Enterprises, Islamic Microfinance Institution, BMTs Agam Madani 

  6. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  7. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Saha

    2008-06-01

    Nanodielectrics is an emerging area of research because of its potential application in energy storage and transducers. One-dimensional metallic nanostructures with localized electronic wave functions show giant dielectric constant. Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal nanowires, which shows giant permittivity is also discussed.

  8. Towards an optimal semiquantitative approach in giant cell arteritis: an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, Florent L.; Bouvard, Gerard [CHU Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Boysson, Hubert de; Bienvenu, Boris [CHU Caen, Department of Internal Medicine, Caen (France); Parienti, Jean-Jacques [CHU Caen, Department of Biostatistics, Caen (France); Agostini, Denis [CHU Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); University of Caen Lower-Normandy, EA 4650, Caen (France)

    2014-01-15

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in western countries. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been shown to be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of extracranial GCA, but results of studies are inconsistent due to a lack of standardized {sup 18}F-FDG PET criteria. In this study, we compared different semiquantitative approaches using a controlled design to define the most efficient method. All patients with biopsy-proven GCA who had undergone an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan in our PET unit were reviewed and matched with a control group based on age and sex. Different semiquantitative arterial (ascending and descending thoracic aorta and aortic arch) to background (liver, lung and venous blood pool) SUV ratios were blindly compared between GCA patients and matched controls. We included 11 patients with biopsy-proven GCA cases and 11 matched controls. There were no differences between the groups with regard to body weight, injected radioactivity, blood glucose level or CRP. The arterial to venous blood pool ratios discriminated the two groups better than other methods when applied to the aortic arch and the descending thoracic aorta (p < 0.015). In particular, the highest aortic to highest blood pool SUV{sub max} ratio, when applied to the aortic arch, provided optimal diagnostic performance (sensitivity 81.8 %, specificity 91 %, AUC 0.87; p < 0.0001) using a cut-off value of 1.53. Among all tested {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT methods, the aortic to blood pool SUV{sub max} ratio outperformed the liver and lung ratios. We suggest the use of this ratio for the assessment of aortic inflammation in GCA patients. (orig.)

  9. Simultaneous measurements of magnesium, calcium and sodium influxes in perfused squid giant axons under membrane potential control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, E; Taylor, R E

    1975-10-01

    1. Giant axons from the squids Dosidicus gigas, Loligo forbesi and Loligo vulgaris were internally perfused with 550 or 275 mM KF plus sucrose and bathed in artificial sea water containing 45Ca, 28Mg or mixtures of 45Ca-28Mg or 45Ca-22Na. Resting influxes and extra influxes during voltage-clamp pulses were measured by collecting and counting the internal perfusate. 2. For Dosidicus axons in 10 mM-CaCl2 the resting influx of calcium was 0-016 +/- 0-007 p-mole/cm2 sec and a linear function of external concentration. For two experiments in 10 and 84-7 mM-CaCl2, 100 nM tetrodotoxin had no effect. Resting calcium influx in 10 mM-CaCl2 was 0-017 +/- 0-013 p-mole/cm2 sec for Loligo axons. 3. With 55 mM-MgCl2 outside the average resting magnesium influx was 0-124 +/- 0-080 p-mole/cm2 sec for Loligo axons. Discarding one aberrant point the value is 0-105 +/- 0-046 which is not significantly different from the resting calcium influx for Dosidicus fibres in 55 mM-CaCl2, given as 0-094 p-mole/cm2 sec by the regression line shown in Fig. 1. In two experiments 150 nM tetrodotoxin had no effect. 4. With 430 mM-NaCl outside 100 nM tetrodotoxin reduced the average resting influx of sodium in Dosidicus axon from 27-7 +/- 4-5 to 25-1 +/- 6-2 p-mole/cm2 sec and for Loligo fibres in 460 mM-NaCl from 50-5 +/- 4 to 20 +/- 8 p-mole/cm2 sec. 5. Using depolarizing pulses of various durations, the extra calcium influx occurred in two phases. The early phase was eliminated by external application of tetrodotoxin. The results of analysis are consistent with, but do not rigorously demonstrate, the conclusion that the tetrodotoxin sensitive calcium entry is flowing through the normal sodium channels (cf. Baker, Hodgkin & Ridgway, 1971). 6. Measurements of extra influxes using 22Na and 45Ca simultaneously indicate that the time courses of tetrodotoxin sensitive calcium and sodium entry are similar but not necessarily identical. It is very doubtful that any significant calcium entry occurs before

  10. 超磁致伸缩电液伺服阀驱动机构控制系统设计%Design of Control System of Giant Magnetostrictive Electro-hydraulic Servo Valve Driven Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨朝舒; 何忠波; 李冬伟; 薛光明

    2014-01-01

    为了实现超磁致伸缩电液伺服阀的快速、准确控制,论述了基于PWM控制的超磁致伸缩电液伺服阀的基本结构和工作原理,设计了基于PicoScope2203数字示波器和STC89C51单片机的超磁致伸缩材料电液伺服阀驱动机构的控制系统。结果表明:该控制系统具有控制精度高、控制迅速、集成度高、操作便捷等特点。%In order to achieve the speedy and precision control of electro⁃hydraulic servo valve based on giant magnetostrictive material, the basic structure and working principle of a kind of Electro⁃hydraulic Servo Valve based on giant magnetostrictive material with PWM control was discussed. A control system for the giant magnetostrictive electro⁃hydraulic servo valve driven machine based on PicoScope2203 Digital Oscilloscope and STC89C51 series MCU was designed. The results show that the control system has properties of high speed and precision, highly integrated and convenient for operation, and etc.

  11. Complexity in Climatic Controls on Plant Species Distribution: Satellite Data Reveal Unique Climate for Giant Sequoia in the California Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Eric Kindseth

    A better understanding of the environmental controls on current plant species distribution is essential if the impacts of such diverse challenges as invasive species, changing fire regimes, and global climate change are to be predicted and important diversity conserved. Climate, soil, hydrology, various biotic factors fire, history, and chance can all play a role, but disentangling these factors is a daunting task. Increasingly sophisticated statistical models relying on existing distributions and mapped climatic variables, among others, have been developed to try to answer these questions. Any failure to explain pattern with existing mapped climatic variables is often taken as a referendum on climate as a whole, rather than on the limitations of the particular maps or models. Every location has a unique and constantly changing climate so that any distribution could be explained by some aspect of climate. Chapter 1 of this dissertation reviews some of the major flaws in species distribution modeling and addresses concerns that climate may therefore not be predictive of, or even relevant to, species distributions. Despite problems with climate-based models, climate and climate-derived variables still have substantial merit for explaining species distribution patterns. Additional generation of relevant climate variables and improvements in other climate and climate-derived variables are still needed to demonstrate this more effectively. Satellite data have a long history of being used for vegetation mapping and even species distribution mapping. They have great potential for being used for additional climatic information, and for improved mapping of other climate and climate-derived variables. Improving the characterization of cloud cover frequency with satellite data is one way in which the mapping of important climate and climate-derived variables can be improved. An important input to water balance models, solar radiation maps could be vastly improved with a

  12. Bridging “green gap” of LEDs: Giant light output enhancement and directional control of LEDs via embedded nano-void photonic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Yu-Lin

    2015-11-23

    Green LEDs do not show the same level of performance as their blue and red cousins, greatly hindering the solid-state lighting development, which is so-called “green gap”. In this work, nano-void photonic crystals (NVPCs) were fabricated to embed within the GaN/InGaN green LEDs by using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and nano-sphere lithography techniques. The NVPCs act as an efficient scattering back-reflector to outcouple the guided and downward photons, which not only boosting light extraction efficiency of LEDs with an enhancement of 78% but also collimating the view angle of LEDs from 131.5゜to 114.0゜. This could be because the highly scattering nature of NVPCs which reduce the interference giving rise to Fabry-Perot resonance. Moreover, due to the threading dislocation suppression and strain relief by the NVPCs, the internal quantum efficiency was increased by 25% and droop behavior was reduced from 37.4% to 25.9%. The enhancement of light output power can be achieved as high as 151% at a driving current of 350 mA. Giant light output enhancement and directional control via NVPCs points the way towards a promising avenue of solid-state lighting.

  13. Peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padam Narayan Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma or the so-called "giant cell epulis" is the most common oral giant cell lesion. It normally presents as a soft tissue purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in a background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This lesion probably does not represent a true neoplasm, but rather may be reactive in nature, believed to be stimulated by local irritation or trauma, but the cause is not certainly known. This article reports a case of peripheral giant cell granuloma arising at the maxillary anterior region in a 22-year-old female patient. The lesion was completely excised to the periosteum level and there is no residual or recurrent swelling or bony defect apparent in the area of biopsy after a follow-up period of 6 months.

  14. Quantum Giant Magnons

    CERN Document Server

    Zarembo, K

    2008-01-01

    The giant magnons are classical solitons of the O(N) sigma-model, which play an important role in the AdS/CFT correspondence. We study quantum giant magnons first at large N and then exactly using Bethe Ansatz, where giant magnons can be interpreted as holes in the Fermi sea. We also identify a solvable limit of Bethe Ansatz in which it describes a weakly-interacting Bose gas at zero temperature. The examples include the O(N) model at large N, weakly interacting non-linear Schrodinger model, and nearly isotropic XXZ spin chain in the magnetic field.

  15. Giant Cell Fibroma

    OpenAIRE

    Tahere Nosratzehi; Lale Maleki

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell fibroma is a fibrous tumor which represents about 2 to 5% of all oral fibrotic proliferations. Compared to traumatic fibroma, giant (traumatic fibroma or irritation fibroma) cell fibroma occurs at a younger age. In about 60% of the cases the lesion is diagnosed within the first three decades of life and is slightly more in women. 50% of the cases is observed in the gum and will appear as a nodule with a papillary surface [1]. The giant cell fibroma is treated by conservative excisi...

  16. Dynamos of giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Busse, F H; 10.1017/S1743921307000920

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities and difficulties of applying the theory of magnetic field generation by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells to the Giant Planets are outlined. Recent progress in the understanding of the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Giant Planets suggests that the dynamo process occurs predominantly in regions of semiconductivity. In contrast to the geodynamo the magnetic field generation in the Giant Planets is thus characterized by strong radial conductivity variations. The importance of the constraint on the Ohmic dissipation provided by the planetary luminosity is emphasized. Planetary dynamos are likely to be of an oscillatory type, although these oscillations may not be evident from the exterior of the planets.

  17. The Giant Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  18. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  19. Giant distal humeral geode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, M.M. [Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kennedy, J.; Hynes, D. [Department of Orthopaedics, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Murray, J.G.; O' Connell, D. [Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2000-03-30

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.)

  20. Seismology of Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaulme, Patrick; Schmider, Francois-Xavier; Guillot, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Seismology applied to giant planets could drastically change our understanding of their deep interiors, as it has happened with the Earth, the Sun, and many main-sequence and evolved stars. The study of giant planets' composition is important for understanding both the mechanisms enabling their formation and the origins of planetary systems, in particular our own. Unfortunately, its determination is complicated by the fact that their interior is thought not to be homogeneous, so that spectroscopic determinations of atmospheric abundances are probably not representative of the planet as a whole. Instead, the determination of their composition and structure must rely on indirect measurements and interior models. Giant planets are mostly fluid and convective, which makes their seismology much closer to that of solar-like stars than that of terrestrial planets. Hence, helioseismology techniques naturally transfer to giant planets. In addition, two alternative methods can be used: photometry of the solar light ref...

  1. Giant magnetostrictive materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU JingHua; JIANG ChengBao; XU HuiBin

    2012-01-01

    Giant magnetostrictive materials are a kind of functional materials developed since 1970s,known as their large magnetostrain and high energy density.In this paper,an introduction of magnetosttiction and the history of magnetostrictive materials are described firstly.Then we review the recent developments of both rare earth and non-rare earth magnetostrictive materials.Finally,the tendency of developing new giant magnetostrictive materials is presented.

  2. Red giant seismology: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser B.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The CoRoT and Kepler missions provide us with thousands of red-giant light curves that allow a very precise asteroseismic study of these objects. Before CoRoT and Kepler, the red-giant oscillation patterns remained obscure. Now, these spectra are much more clear and unveil many crucial interior structure properties. For thousands of red giants, we can derive from seismic data precise estimates of the stellar mass and radius, the evolutionary status of the giants (with a clear difference between clump and RGB stars, the internal differential rotation, the mass loss, the distance of the stars... Analyzing this amount of information is made easy by the identification of the largely homologous red-giant oscillation patterns. For the first time, both pressure and mixed mode oscillation patterns can be precisely depicted. The mixed-mode analysis allows us, for instance, to probe directly the stellar core. Fine details completing the red-giant oscillation pattern then provide further information on the interior structure, including differential rotation.

  3. Functional, motor developmental, and long-term outcome after the component separation technique in children with giant omphalocele: A case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, F.C. van; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Wijnen, R.M.H.; Klein, W.; Kruijen, I.; Pillen, S.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term functional and motor development and abdominal muscle quantity in children operated on for giant omphalocele (GOC) with the Component Separation Technique (CST). METHODS: Between 2004 and 2007, CST was applied in eleven co

  4. Rapidly rotating red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Gehan, Charlotte; Michel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Stellar oscillations give seismic information on the internal properties of stars. Red giants are targets of interest since they present mixed modes, which behave as pressure modes in the convective envelope and as gravity modes in the radiative core. Mixed modes thus directly probe red giant cores, and allow in particular the study of their mean core rotation. The high-quality data obtained by CoRoT and Kepler satellites represent an unprecedented perspective to obtain thousands of measurements of red giant core rotation, in order to improve our understanding of stellar physics in deep stellar interiors. We developed an automated method to obtain such core rotation measurements and validated it for stars on the red giant branch. In this work, we particularly focus on the specific application of this method to red giants having a rapid core rotation. They show complex spectra where it is tricky to disentangle rotational splittings from mixed-mode period spacings. We demonstrate that the method based on the id...

  5. Thermal Giant Gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A; Orselli, Marta; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    2012-01-01

    We study the giant graviton solution as the AdS_5 X S^5 background is heated up to finite temperature. The analysis employs the thermal brane probe technique based on the blackfold approach. We focus mainly on the thermal giant graviton corresponding to a thermal D3-brane probe wrapped on an S^3 moving on the S^5 of the background at finite temperature. We find several interesting new effects, including that the thermal giant graviton has a minimal possible value for the angular momentum and correspondingly also a minimal possible radius of the S^3. We compute the free energy of the thermal giant graviton in the low temperature regime, which potentially could be compared to that of a thermal state on the gauge theory side. Moreover, we analyze the space of solutions and stability of the thermal giant graviton and find that, in parallel with the extremal case, there are two available solutions for a given temperature and angular momentum, one stable and one unstable. In order to write down the equations of mot...

  6. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  7. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  8. Giant star seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Hekker, S

    2016-01-01

    The internal properties of stars in the red-giant phase undergo significant changes on relatively short timescales. Long near-interrupted high-precision photometric timeseries observations from dedicated space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler have provided seismic inferences of the global and internal properties of a large number of evolved stars, including red giants. These inferences are confronted with predictions from theoretical models to improve our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. Our knowledge and understanding of red giants have indeed increased tremendously using these seismic inferences, and we anticipate that more information is still hidden in the data. Unraveling this will further improve our understanding of stellar evolution. This will also have significant impact on our knowledge of the Milky Way Galaxy as well as on exo-planet host stars. The latter is important for our understanding of the formation and structure of planetary systems.

  9. Enhanced recovery after giant ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Brøndum, T L; Harling, H.;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Giant ventral hernia repair is associated with a high risk of postoperative morbidity and prolonged length of stay (LOS). Enhanced recovery (ERAS) measures have proved to lead to decreased morbidity and LOS after various surgical procedures, but never after giant hernia repair. The current...... study prospectively examined the results of implementation of an ERAS pathway including high-dose preoperative glucocorticoid, and compared the outcome with patients previously treated according to standard care (SC). METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent giant ventral hernia repair were included...... was 0.92. There were no differences when comparing readmission (5 vs. 2, P = 0.394), postoperative complications (7 vs. 4, P = 0. 458), or reoperation (5 vs. 1, P = 0.172) in ERAS versus controls. CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggests that an ERAS pathway including preoperative high...

  10. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  11. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  12. Giant prolactinomas in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgrange, Etienne; Raverot, Gerald; Bex, Marie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg/l and id......OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg....../l and identified 19 similar cases from the literature; a gender-based comparison of the frequency and age distribution was obtained from a literature review. RESULTS: The initial PubMed search using the term 'giant prolactinomas' identified 125 patients (13 women) responding to the inclusion criteria. The female...... in only 4/18 patients, and 7/18 patients were resistant to weekly doses ranging from 3.0 to 7.0 mg. CONCLUSION: Giant prolactinomas are rare in women, often resistant to dopamine agonists and seem to be distributed in two age groups, with a larger late-onset peak....

  13. [Giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzour, Mohamed Hicham; El Messaoudi, Yasser Arafat; Fekak, Hamid; Rabii, Redouane; Marnissi, Farida; Karkouri, Mehdi; Salam, Siham; Iraki, Moulay Ahmed; Joual, Abdenbi; Meziane, Fathi

    2006-02-01

    The authors report a case of giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma. The diagnosis was suspected after scanography and magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by the histological analysis of the extracted piece after surgical treatment. Postoperative evolution was favourable after one year without recurrence or distant metastasis. The authors discuss the pathologic and therapeutic aspects and the prognosis of retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

  14. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  16. Giant Otters in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenk C.

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  17. A giant graviton genealogy

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Yolanda; Prinsloo, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In this article we extend the construction of giant gravitons from holomorphic surfaces [arXiv:hep-th/0010206] to the ABJM correspondence. We construct a new class of 1/6-BPS M5-branes wrapping 5-manifolds in S^7/Z_k and supported by a large angular momentum in the orbifold space. These orbifold giant gravitons undergo a supersymmetry enhancement to 1/3-BPS and 1/2-BPS configurations in special cases. The compactification of M-theory on AdS_4 x S^7/Z_k to type IIA superstring theory on AdS_4 x CP^3 then gives rise to another new class of 1/6-BPS D4 and NS5-branes wrapping 4 and 5-manifolds in CP^3. The D4-branes carry a combination of D0-brane charge and angular momentum in the complex projective space, while the NS5-branes are supported only by D0-brane charge. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of a one-parameter family of 1/2-BPS M5-brane orbifold giant gravitons, and their D4 and NS5-brane CP^3 descendants.

  18. File list: InP.Plc.50.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Plc.50.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Input control Placenta Trophoblast gian...t cells SRX344647,SRX344648 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Plc.50.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Plc.10.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Plc.10.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Input control Placenta Trophoblast gian...t cells SRX344648,SRX344647 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Plc.10.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Plc.05.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Plc.05.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Input control Placenta Trophoblast gian...t cells SRX344647,SRX344648 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Plc.05.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.Plc.20.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Plc.20.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Input control Placenta Trophoblast gian...t cells SRX344647,SRX344648 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Plc.20.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  2. The MADS domain protein DIANA acts together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C

    2008-08-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein-beta-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt.

  3. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L; Sessions, R Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2003-07-08

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity.

  4. Giant electric field control of magnetism and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT multiferroic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Wang, X.; Xie, L.; Hu, Z.; Lin, H.; Zhou, Z.; Nan, T.; Yang, X.; Howe, B. M.; Jones, J. G.; Brown, G. J.; Sun, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    It has been challenging to achieve combined strong magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures. Electric field induced large effective field of 175 Oe and narrow FMR linewidth of 40 Oe were observed in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT heterostructures with substrate clamping effect minimized through removing the Si substrate. As a comparison, FeCoSiB/PMN-PT heterostructures with FeCoSiB film directly deposited on PMN-PT showed a comparable voltage induced effective magnetic field but a significantly larger FMR linewidth of 283 Oe. These multiferroic heterostructures exhibiting combined giant magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth offer great opportunities for integrated voltage tunable RF magnetic devices.

  5. Two-year intervention trial to control of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy) and striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) in nursery ponds in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, H; Thien, P C; Nga, H T N; Clausen, J H; Dalsgaard, A; Murrell, K D

    2015-12-01

    Fish-borne zoonotic trematode parasites (FZT) pose a food safety and public health problem in Vietnam. The transmission cycle is complex as domestic animals, especially dogs, cats, fish-eating birds and pigs together with humans serve as reservoir hosts and contribute to FZT egg contamination of aquaculture ponds and the environment. This intervention trial was conducted to determine the effectiveness of various on-farm interventions, including reduction in FZT egg contamination through treatment of infected people and domestic animals, reduction in snail density through mud removal from aquaculture ponds prior to fish stocking, and various other measures in reducing FZT infection in juvenile striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy). Interventions were implemented on 5 farms for each fish species during production cycles in 2009 and 2010 while 5 similar farms for each species served as control. For both fish species, both prevalence and intensity of infection did not differ significantly between intervention and non-intervention farms prior to the interventions. The interventions significantly reduced both prevalence and intensity of FZT infection in the juvenile fish compared to control ponds. For giant gourami, odds of infection in intervention ponds was 0.13 (95% CL: 0.09-0.20; p<0.001) of that in non-intervention ponds after the 2009 trial and 0.07 (0.03-0.14; p<0.001) after the 2010 trial. For striped catfish, these figures were 0.17 (0.08-0.35; p<0.001) after the 2009 trial while after the 2010 trial all ponds with interventions were free from infection. Metacercariae intensity (no. of metacercariae/fish) in giant gourami from intervention ponds was 0.16 (0.11-0.23; p<0.001) of that in fish from non-intervention ponds after the 2009 trial and 0.07 (0.04-0.15; p<0.001) after the 2010 trial; for striped catfish these figures were 0.18 (0.09-0.36; p<0.001) and 0.00 (confidence limits not estimated), respectively. The

  6. A recepção de Agamêmnon nas terras da Rainha: as versões de Browning, Rattigan, Asquith e Figgis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Miranda Nogueira Coelho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo são analisados aspectos da peça de Terence Rattigan The Browning Version, de 1948, cujo título faz referência à famosa tradução inglesa da tragédia Agamêmnon, feita por Robert Browning, em 1877. Analiso também os dois filmes homônimos, The Browning Version (Nunca te amei, dirigidos por Anthony Asquith, em 1951, e por Mike Figgis, em 1994, ambos baseados na peça de Rattigan.

  7. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  8. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  9. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  10. Scheme Design for the Giant Forging Hydraulic Press Active Synchronous Control System%巨型模锻液压机主动同步控制方案的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘忠伟

    2012-01-01

    The synchronous control system is the essential device to the giant forging hydraulic press. Its synchronization control performance will directly determine product quality. The main causes of working cylinder asynchronism and its effect on synchronous control performance were analyzed. According to the practical problems of synchronous control application, an active synchronism control scheme was proposed based on multi-point driver.%同步控制系统是巨型模锻液压机上必备的关键装置,其同步控制性能的好坏将直接决定产品的质量.在分析主工作缸不同步的成因及对同步控制性能影响的基础上,根据巨型模锻液压机同步控制的实际应用问题,提出一种基于多点驱动的主动同步控制方案.

  11. Design and experimental study of a novel giant magnetostrictive actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guangming; Zhang, Peilin; He, Zhongbo; Li, Dongwei; Huang, Yingjie; Xie, Wenqiang

    2016-12-01

    Giant magnetostrictive actuator has been widely used in precise driving occasions for its excellent performance. However, in driving a switching valve, especially the ball-valve in an electronic controlled injector, the actuator can't exhibit its good performance for limits in output displacement and responding speed. A novel giant magnetostrictive actuator, which can reach its maximum displacement for being exerted with no bias magnetic field, is designed in this paper. Simultaneously, elongating of the giant magetostrictive material is converted to shortening of the actuator's axial dimension with the help of an output rod in "T" type. Furthermore, to save responding time, the driving voltage with high opening voltage while low holding voltage is designed. Responding time and output displacement are studied experimentally with the help of a measuring system. From measured results, designed driving voltage can improve the responding speed of actuator displacement quite effectively. And, giant magnetostrictive actuator can output various steady-state displacements to reach more driving effects.

  12. Giant Pandas and Their Conservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GarethDavey

    2004-01-01

    IT is paradoxical that themost well-known conservation symbol in the world,the giant panda, is a criti-cally endangered species.The estimated 1,600 thatremain live in the high-altitude for-ests of southwest China (within theprovinces of Sichuan, Gansu andShaanxi). Giant pandas are popularand elicit affection and admiration

  13. Famine Threatens the Giant Panda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Large swathes of arrow bamboo groves at and above 2,700 meters in the Piankou Nature Reserve in Sichuan's Mianyang are producing purple blooms, and some groves have started to wither and die. An absence of bamboo means famine for giant pandas living there. Sichuan has consequently activated its giant panda contingency plan.

  14. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  15. Rapidly Evolving Giant Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Lang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma, also known as “fibrous histiocytoma”, is a benign dermal or subcutaneous poorly circumscribed proliferation of spindle-shaped fibroblasts and macrophages in the dermis. Although it is commonly present as a brownish nodule the legs of females, it may also arise on the upper extremities, trunk, and rarely on the head. The exact pathogenesis is unclear. However, it is widely believed that the originating insult to the dermis is a folliculitis, an arthropod bite, or an unspecified initial inflammatory condition. Giant dermatofibromas of greater than 5 cm in diameter are rare, with only 22 cases reported in the literature. We present a case of a rapidly evolving pedunculated mass in the groin of a male patient. Histological examination confirmed this to be a giant dermatofibroma. Though this specimen cannot is not confirmed as such, the cellular subtype is sometimes present as a larger lesion with anecdotal reports of local recurrence and distant metastases. The clinical and radiological features which were somewhat suspicious of malignancy are considered in the context of the definitive pathological diagnosis of a benign lesion.

  16. Reinflating Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  17. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  18. Pygmies, Giants, and Skins

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarewicz, J

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of neutron-rich matter is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of energetic heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova all depend critically on the nuclear-matter EOS. In this contribution I focus on the EOS of cold baryonic matter with special emphasis on its impact on the structure, dynamics, and composition of neutron stars. In particular, I discuss how laboratory experiments on neutron skins as well as on Pygmy and Giant resonances can help us elucidate the structure of these fascinating objects.

  19. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  20. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  1. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  2. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, M S; Seager, S; Barman, T; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan; Seager, Sara; Barman, Travis

    2006-01-01

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum--and hence its detectability and evolution--lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of extrasolar giant planets and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a ...

  3. Landscape of the lost giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  4. Annular Elastolytic Giant Cell Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandpur Sujay

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and histopathological features of annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma in a 42â€"year-old female patient are described. The condition presented as annular erythematous plaques over sun- exposed skin sparing the face. Histopathology revealed dense granulomatous infiltrate consisting of numerous giant cells and lymphohistiocytes without any palisading arrangement or necrobiosis. The features differentiating it from other similar granulomatous disorders are discussed.

  5. Giant hepatocellular adenoma; case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitella, F.A.; Coutinho, A.M.N.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Costa, P.L.A.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Sapienza, M.T.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Radiologia. Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatocellular adenoma is a benign hepatic tumor identified mainly in women during fertility age, with estimated incidence of 4/1000 inhabitants. It is usually unique, well circumscribed, with or without a capsule, size varying from 1 to 30 cm, with possible central areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Case Report: A 37-year-old female patient presenting with no comorbities, use of hormonal birth control pills for 18 years, a condition of reduction in the consistency of feces, increase in number of daily defecations, abdominal cramps, and a stuffed sensation after meals for two years. A palpable abdominal mass extending from the right hypochondriac to the right iliac fossa was noticed four months ago. A computerized tomography (CT) showed an extensive hepatic mass on the right which was considered, within the diagnostic hypotheses, hepatic adenomatosis, without ruling out secondary lesions. A hepatic scintillography with {sup 99m}Tc-DISIDA showed an extensive exophytic area from segment V to the right iliac fossa with arterialized blood flow and hepatocytic activity, as well as a hepatic nodule in segment VII with hepatocytic activity consistent with the hepatic adenomas hypothesis. The biopsy confirmed the hepatic adenoma diagnosis and the patient was submitted to a partial hepatectomy and cholecystectomy with good clinical evolution. Conclusion: Nuclear Medicine may supplement the assessment of hepatic nodules, including giant masses, thus suggesting new hypotheses and direction to therapeutic conduct. (author)

  6. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Brendan P

    2016-01-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order adaptive optics systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young ($\\approx$5--300~Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1--3.0~\\Msun, the overall occurrence rate of 5--13~\\Mjup \\ companions at orbital distances ...

  7. Rotation of Giant Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kissin, Yevgeni

    2015-01-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5 and $5\\,M_\\odot$, taking into account mass loss on the giant branches and the partitioning of angular momentum between the outer and inner envelope. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag as well as the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles $\\Omega(r)$ is considered in the deep convective envelope, ranging from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force on the inward pumping of angular momentum, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core ro...

  8. Giant high occipital encephalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Encephaloceles are rare embryological mesenchymal developmental anomalies resulting from inappropriate ossification in skull through with herniation of intracranial contents of the sac. Encephaloceles are classified based on location of the osseous defect and contents of sac. Convexity encephalocele with osseous defect in occipital bone is called occipital encephalocele. Giant occipital encephaloceles can be sometimes larger than the size of baby skull itself and they pose a great surgical challenge. Occipital encephaloceles (OE are further classified as high OE when defect is only in occipital bone above the foramen magnum, low OE when involving occipital bone and foramen magnum and occipito-cervical when there involvement of occipital bone, foramen magnum and posterior upper neural arches. Chiari III malformation can be associated with high or low occipital encephaloceles. Pre-operatively, it is essential to know the size of the sac, contents of the sac, relation to the adjacent structures, presence or absence of venous sinuses/vascular structures and osseous defect size. Sometimes it becomes imperative to perform both CT and MRI for the necessary information. Volume rendered CT images can depict the relation of osseous defect to foramen magnum and provide information about upper neural arches which is necessary in classifying these lesions.

  9. Bringing Low the Giants

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Their work goes on unseen, because they a hundred metres beneath your feet. But while the race against the clock to build the LHC has begun on the surface, teams underground are feverishly engaged to dismantle LEP and its experiments. Four months after the start of dismantling, the technical coordinators of the different experiments discuss the progress of work. Little men attack the giant ALEPH. The barrel and its two endcaps have been removed to the end of the cavern and stripped of their cables. The breaking up of the detector can now begin. At ALEPH, counting rooms removed all in one go Jean-Paul Fabre, technical coordinator at ALEPH:'After making safe the structure, the first step was to remove the wiring and cables. Some 210 cubic metres were brought out. Then the counting rooms all round the detector were taken out. They were brought up from the cavern all in one go, up through the shaft, which is 10 metres wide and 150 metres deep. They made it with 15 centimetres to spare. They have been emptied of...

  10. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  11. IL-4 induces the formation of multinucleated giant cells and expression of β5 integrin in central giant cell lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghbali, Amirala; Rafieyan, Sona; Mohamed-Khosroshahi, Leila; Baradaran, Behzad; Shanehbandi, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Background It is now well established that IL-4 has a central role in the development of monocytes to multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) by inducing the expression of integrins on the surface of monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of IL-4 in induction of β5 integrin expression in the peripheral blood samples of patients with giant cell granuloma. Material and Methods Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood samples of patients with central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and healthy controls using human Monocyte Isolation Kit II. Isolated monocytes were then cultured in the absence or presence of IL-4 (10 and 20 ng/mL), and following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, Real-time PCR was performed to determine the level of β5 integrin expression. The formation of CGCGs and morphological analyses were done under light microscopy. For confirmation of CGCGs, immunocytochemistry technique was also carried out by anti-RANK (receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand) antibody. Results In both patient and control groups, β5 levels were significantly enhanced by increasing the IL-4 dose from 10 to 20 ng/mL. In addition, these differences were significant between patient and control groups without IL-4 treatment. On the other hand, the number of cells which expressed RANK and therefore the number of giant cells were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison to controls, as assessed by immunohistochemistry evaluations. Conclusions In this study, we showed an elevation in the expression levels of β5 integrin when stimulated by IL-4. It is strongly indicated that this integrin acts as an important mediator during macrophage to macrophage fusion and development of giant cells. Key words:β5 integrin, giant cell, Il-4, monocyte, rank. PMID:27918730

  12. Sequencing and analysis of the giant panda genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HuanMing

    2010-01-01

    @@ The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is loved all over the world and is considered a symbol of China, as illustrated by its being one of the mascots for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.It is also one of the world's most endangered animals and a flagship species for conservation.Using next-generation sequencing technology (Illumina Genome Analyzer) and our in-house assembly software, we have generated the first map of the giant panda genome sequence.This map will provide an unparalleled amount of information to aid in understanding the genetic and biological nature of this unique species and will contribute significantly to disease control and conservation efforts for this endangered species.In March 2008, the giant panda genome sequencing and analysis project was started at the Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) in Shenzhen with collaborators from the Kunming Institute of Zoology and the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding.On 21 Jan.2010, this collaboration resulted in the publication, as a cover story in the journal Nature, of the sequencing and analysis of the giant panda genome.

  13. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  14. Giant intravesical calculus during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-del Barco, Laura; Rodriguez-Colorado, Silvia; Dueñas-Garcia, Omar Felipe; Avilez-Cevasco, Juan Carlos

    2008-10-01

    Urolithiasis is commonly found during pregnancy; but the presence of a giant vesical calculus during pregnancy is a very rare entity, associated with several potential obstetric complications. A 25-year-old primigravida at 25 weeks of gestational age was referred to our tertiary care unit because she presented a giant hyperechoic intravesical mass and inability to pass urine with suprapubic pain since 2 days. An open cystolithotomy revealed a huge intravesical calculus. The patient continued with her pregnancy until full term without adverse perinatal outcomes.

  15. Giant fields in southwest Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-20

    According to Petroleos Mexicanos southeastern Mexico's Isthmus Saline basin holds five new giant fields - Tonala-El Burro, El Plan, Cinco Presidentes, Oraggio, and Magallanes - producing oil and gas from Tertiary sandstones. Numerous normal faults resulting from salt intrusion have given rise to multiple blocks, each with its own reservoir conditions. Previously discovered basins in the area include the Macuspana, which holds three giant gas- and condensate-producing fields: Jose Colomo, Chilapilla, and Hormiquero. The 3100-mi/sup 2/ Campeche marine platform, extending offshore nearby, contains the Cantarell complex, Mexico's most productive hydrocarbon province.

  16. Multiphonon giant resonances in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumann, T. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernchemie; Bortignon, P.F. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Emling, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    We review the present knowledge of multiphonon giant resonances in nuclei. Theoretical concepts approaching the intrinsic structure and excitation mechanisms of multi-phonon states are discussed. The available experimental results are summarized, including a brief description of applied techniques. This review emphasizes electromagnetic excitations of double dipole resonances. Open questions and possible routes toward a solution are addressed. (orig.)

  17. Michigan has a sleeping giant

    CERN Multimedia

    Brock, Raymond; Nichols, Sue

    2007-01-01

    "That giant is 750 miles of fiber optic cable that lassoes its three biggest research universities and Van Andel Institute to the future. Its mission: to uncover the nature of the Big Bang by connecton U.S. physicists to their huge experiment ATLAS in Geneva.." (4 pages)

  18. Giant lipomas of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Giant lipomas of the hand are very rare and may cause compressions and other complications. Thus, they require a careful preoperative evaluation in order to make a proper differential diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 8-11

  19. A Giant or a Dwarf?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Herman

    2005-01-01

    EU may appear to be a giant when it can act on behalf of a united Europe, but usually it is hampered by conflicting member state interests. The EU economic and administrative resources for foreign and trade policy are quite small (on level with one of its major member states) and the hopes in man...

  20. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin-valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Z H; Wu, Di; Vardeny, Z Valy; Shi, Jing

    2004-02-26

    A spin valve is a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic (spacer) materials whose electrical resistance depends on the spin state of electrons passing through the device and so can be controlled by an external magnetic field. The discoveries of giant magnetoresistance and tunnelling magnetoresistance in metallic spin valves have revolutionized applications such as magnetic recording and memory, and launched the new field of spin electronics--'spintronics'. Intense research efforts are now devoted to extending these spin-dependent effects to semiconductor materials. But while there have been noteworthy advances in spin injection and detection using inorganic semiconductors, spin-valve devices with semiconducting spacers have not yet been demonstrated. pi-conjugated organic semiconductors may offer a promising alternative approach to semiconductor spintronics, by virtue of their relatively strong electron-phonon coupling and large spin coherence. Here we report the injection, transport and detection of spin-polarized carriers using an organic semiconductor as the spacer layer in a spin-valve structure, yielding low-temperature giant magnetoresistance effects as large as 40 per cent.

  1. Two-year intervention trial to control of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy) and striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) in nursery ponds in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henry; Thien, P. C.; Nga, H. T. N.

    2015-01-01

    ponds prior to fish stocking, and various other measures in reducing FZT infection in juvenile striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy). Interventions were implemented on 5 farms for each fish species during production cycles in 2009 and 2010 while 5 similar...

  2. YKL-40 in giant cells and macrophages from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J S; Baslund, B; Garbarsch, C

    1999-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate whether macrophages and giant cells of patients with GCA produce YKL-40, and whether serum YKL-40 concentrations are elevated in these patients. METHODS: Serum YKL-40 was determined by radioimmunoassay in 19 patients with GCA and 8 patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) who......-matched controls (median 118 microg/liter), and the serum level of YKL-40 decreased to normal levels during prednisolone treatment (-38% after 1 month; PPMR had normal serum YKL-40 levels (median 158 microg/liter) and had no changes in the serum YKL-40 levels during prednisolone...

  3. Microsatellite DNA analysis proves nucleus of interspecies reconstructed blastocyst coming from that of donor giant panda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method for DNA isolation from early development of blastocyst and further analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA was developed in present study. Total DNA was prepared from interspecies reconstructed blastocyst and a giant panda specific microsatellite locus g010 was successfully amplified. DNA sequencing of the PCR product showed that two sequences of reconstructed blastocysts are the same as that of positive control giant panda. Our results prove that the nucleus of interspecies reconstructed blastocyst comes from somatic nucleus of donor giant panda.

  4. Asteroseismology of Red Giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrant, N J; Elsworth, Y P; Spreckley, S A; Stevens, I R

    2008-01-01

    Sun-like oscillations, that is p-modes excited stochastically by convective noise, have now been observed in a number of Red Giant stars. Compared to those seen in the Sun, these modes are of large amplitude and long period, making the oscillations attractive prospects for observation. However, the low Q-factor of these modes, and issues relating to the rising background at low frequencies, present some interesting challenges for identifying modes and determining the related asteroseismic parameters. We report on the analysis procedure adopted for peak-bagging by our group at Birmingham, and the techniques used to robustly ensure these are not a product of noise. I also show results from a number of giants extracted from multi-year observations with the SMEI instrument.

  5. Idiopathic giant right atrial aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh C Uppu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old boy with an incidental finding of massive cardiomegaly on a chest X-ray was diagnosed with a giant right atrial aneurysm upon further investigation with echocardiography. The patient underwent successful surgical reduction of the right atrium and closure of the patent foramen ovale to prevent thromboembolic complications and to lower the risk of atrial arrhythmias. The resected atrium had paper-thin walls and pathological features of interstitial fibrosis with endocardial thickening.

  6. Evaluation of stem injection for managing giant reed (Arundo donax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David F

    2014-01-01

    Giant reed is an emergent aquatic plant that may be weedy in riparian habitats. Two herbicides approved for controlling giant reed in the US are glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) and imazapyr (2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid). Foliar applications of these herbicides may be restricted in some areas, such as those, which are within the range of threatened or endangered species. We conducted two field experiments at sites in northern and central California. The first experiment evaluated the effects of three aquatic herbicides (glyphosate, imazapyr, and triclopyr [(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl)oxy]acetic acid) injected into all of the stems within a giant reed (5 mL stem(-1)). In this experiment, leaf chlorophyll content, the proportion of living stems, and the number of new stems produced during the year after treatment declined (>80%) following injection of either full strength glyphosate or imazapyr. The effects of injecting full strength triclopyr were considerably less. In a second experiment, different proportions (0, 10%, 25%, or 100%) of the stems within a plant were injected with full strength glyphosate. Results indicated that it was necessary to inject all of the stems within a clump to achieve the greatest reduction in the plant growth characteristics measured. These results imply that giant reed may be successfully controlled by injecting full strength glyphosate (5 mL stem(-1)) into all of the stems within a clump. While labor intensive and thus potentially more costly this method, offers a new method for managing giant reed in sensitive sites where foliar spray applications may be restricted.

  7. Giant optical manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedov, Vladlen G; Rode, Andrei V; Izdebskaya, Yana V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2010-09-10

    We demonstrate a new principle of optical trapping and manipulation increasing more than 1000 times the manipulation distance by harnessing strong thermal forces while suppressing their stochastic nature with optical vortex beams. Our approach expands optical manipulation of particles into a gas media and provides a full control over trapped particles, including the optical transport and pinpoint positioning of ∼100  μm objects over a meter-scale distance with ±10  μm accuracy.

  8. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  9. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R., E-mail: renan@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal RN (Brazil)

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  10. Kepler rapidly rotating giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A D; Bravo, J P; Paz-Chinchón, F; Chagas, M L das; Leão, I C; de Oliveira, G Pereira; da Silva, R Rodrigues; Roque, S; de Oliveira, L L A; da Silva, D Freire; De Medeiros, J R

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of sub-stellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present letter we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points for remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the Sun rotation. These giants are combined with 6 other recently listed in the literature for mid-IR diagnostic based on WISE information, from which a trend for an infrared excess is revealed for at least a half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  11. Electrodynamics in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets such as HD209458b are strongly ionized by the UV flux of their host stars. We show that photoionization on such planets creates a dayside ionosphere that extends from the thermosphere to the 100 mbar level. The resulting peak electron density near the 1 mbar level is higher than that encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the model conductivity is in fact comparable to the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. As a result, the momentum and energy balance in the upper atmosphere of HD209458b and similar planets can be strongly affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Despite much weaker ionization, electrodynamics is nevertheless also important on the giant planets of the solar system. We use a generic framework to constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in extrasolar planets, and compare the results with conductivites based on the same approach for Jupiter and Saturn. By using a generalized Ohm's law and assumed magnetic fields, we then demonstrate the basic effects of wind-driven ion drag in giant planet atmospheres. Our results show that ion drag is often significant in the upper atmosphere where it can also substantially alter the energy budget through resistive heating.

  12. Guiding the Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without doubt, be the backbone of future research and are likely to be as long-lived as their earlier counterparts, which have served the astronomical community so well over the past decades. The new surveys are now becoming possible, thanks to the new, extremely light-sensitive CCD-mosaics mounted on wide-field telescopes. The ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) A very successful, major step in this direction has recently been taken at ESO. It concerns an

  13. Emergent Properties of Giant Vesicles Formed by a Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly (PISA) Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Anders N.; Szymański, Jan K.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Giant micrometer sized vesicles are of obvious interest to the natural sciences as well as engineering, having potential application in fields ranging from drug delivery to synthetic biology. Their formation often requires elaborate experimental techniques and attempts to obtain giant vesicles from chemical media in a one-pot fashion have so far led to much smaller nanoscale structures. Here we show that a tailored medium undergoing controlled radical polymerization is capable of forming giant polymer vesicles. Using a protocol which allows for an aqueous reaction under mild conditions, we observe the macroscale consequences of amphiphilic polymer synthesis and the resulting molecular self-assembly using fluorescence microscopy. The polymerization process is photoinitiated by blue light granting complete control of the reaction, including on the microscope stage. The self-assembly process leads to giant vesicles with radii larger than 10 microns, exhibiting several emergent properties, including periodic growth and collapse as well as phototaxis.

  14. Giant piezoelectricity on Si for hyperactive MEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, S H; Park, J; Kim, D M; Aksyuk, V A; Das, R R; Bu, S D; Felker, D A; Lettieri, J; Vaithyanathan, V; Bharadwaja, S S N; Bassiri-Gharb, N; Chen, Y B; Sun, H P; Folkman, C M; Jang, H W; Kreft, D J; Streiffer, S K; Ramesh, R; Pan, X Q; Trolier-McKinstry, S; Schlom, D G; Rzchowski, M S; Blick, R H; Eom, C B

    2011-11-18

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) incorporating active piezoelectric layers offer integrated actuation, sensing, and transduction. The broad implementation of such active MEMS has long been constrained by the inability to integrate materials with giant piezoelectric response, such as Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PMN-PT). We synthesized high-quality PMN-PT epitaxial thin films on vicinal (001) Si wafers with the use of an epitaxial (001) SrTiO(3) template layer with superior piezoelectric coefficients (e(31,f) = -27 ± 3 coulombs per square meter) and figures of merit for piezoelectric energy-harvesting systems. We have incorporated these heterostructures into microcantilevers that are actuated with extremely low drive voltage due to thin-film piezoelectric properties that rival bulk PMN-PT single crystals. These epitaxial heterostructures exhibit very large electromechanical coupling for ultrasound medical imaging, microfluidic control, mechanical sensing, and energy harvesting.

  15. Rapid Formation of Ice Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, A P; Haghighipour, N; Boss, Alan P.; Wetherill, George W.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2002-01-01

    The existence of Uranus and Neptune presents severe difficulties for the core accretion model for the formation of ice giant planets. We suggest an alternative mechanism, namely disk instability leading to the formation of gas giant protoplanets, coagulation and settling of dust grains to form ice/rock cores at their centers, and photoevaporation of their gaseous envelopes by a nearby OB star, as a possible means of forming ice giant planets.

  16. The conjunction of factors that lead to formation of giant gold provinces and deposits in non-arc settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, David I.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Santosh, M.

    2016-01-01

    It is quite evident that it is not anomalous metal transport, nor unique depositional conditions, nor any single factor at the deposit scale, that dictates whether a mineral deposit becomes a giant or not. A hierarchical approach thus is required to progressively examine controlling parameters at successively decreasing scales in the total mineral system to understand the location of giant gold deposits in non-arc environments. For giant orogenic, intrusion-related gold systems (IRGS) and Carlin-type gold deposits and iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, there are common factors among all of these at the lithospheric to crustal scale. All are sited in giant gold provinces controlled by complex fundamental fault or shear zones that follow craton margins or, in the case of most Phanerozoic orogenic giants, define the primary suture zones between tectonic terranes. Giant provinces of IRGS, IOCG, and Carlin-type deposits require melting of metasomatized lithosphere beneath craton margins with ascent of hybrid lamprophyric to granitic magmas and associated heat flux to generate the giant province. The IRGS and IOCG deposits require direct exsolution of volatile-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, whereas the association of such melts with Carlin-type ores is more indirect and enigmatic. Giant orogenic gold provinces show no direct relationship to such magmatism, forming from metamorphic fluids, but show an indirect relationship to lamprophyres that reflect the mantle connectivity of controlling first-order structures.

  17. The Role of Clouds in Brown Dwarf and Extrasolar Giant Planet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, M S

    2001-01-01

    Clouds and hazes are important throughout our solar system and in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets. Among the brown dwarfs, clouds control the colors and spectra of the L-dwarfs; the disappearance of clouds helps herald the arrival of the T-dwarfs. The structure and composition of clouds will be among the first remote-sensing results from the direct detection of extrasolar giant planets.

  18. The MADS Domain Protein DIANA Acts Together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to Specify the Central Cell in Arabidopsis Ovules[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein–β-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of AGAMOUS sequences reveals the origin of the diploid and tetraploid forms of self-pollinating wild buckwheat, Fagopyrum homotropicum Ohnishi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyoshi, Mitsuyuki; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsako, Takanori; Li, Cheng-Yun; Ohnishi, Ohmi

    2012-09-01

    Fagopyrum homotropicum Ohnishi is a self-pollinating wild buckwheat species indigenous to eastern Tibet and the Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces of China. It is useful breeding material for shifting cultivated buckwheat (F. esculentum ssp. esculentum Moench) from out-crossing to self-pollinating. Despite its importance as a genetic resource in buckwheat breeding, the genetic variation of F. homotropicum is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of the diploid and tetraploid forms of F. homotropicum based on the nucleotide sequences of a nuclear gene, AGAMOUS (AG). Neighbor-joining analysis revealed that representative individuals clustered into three large groups (Group I, II and III). Each group contained diploid and tetraploid forms of F. homotropicum. We identified tetraploid plants that had two diverged AG sequences; one belonging to Group I and the other belonging to Group II, or one belonging to Group II and the other belonging to Group III. These results suggest that the tetraploid form originated from at least two hybridization events between deeply differentiated diploids. The results also imply that the genetic diversity contributed by tetraploidization of differentiated diploids may have allowed the distribution range of F. homotropicum to expand to the northern areas of China.

  20. Experimental Research on Output Performances of Giant Magnetostrictive Actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-ping; CHEN Zi-chen

    2007-01-01

    The paper introduces the performances of magnetostrictive actuators and its applications, discusses the design methods for the structure and internal magnetic circuit of a giant magnetostrictive actuator, and makes tests on the output displacement and force characteristics for an actuator using homemade magnetostrictive material. The experimental result shows that the actuator has satisfactory output precisions and ranges in transient and stable states, and can be used in lowfrequency vibration control system of precise equipment.

  1. GIANT OILFIELD DISCOVERED IN BOHAI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ PetroChina announced a discovery of a giant oilfield in the beginning of May, which has a reserve of one billion tons, or about 7.35 billion barrels, the largest discovery in China over four decades. Of the reserves, the basically proven oil in place is 405 million tons with the average thickness of oil formations ranging between 80 meters and 100 meters. The oilfield lies in the Nanpu block of PetroChina Jidong Oilfield Company in Caofeidian industrial zone, north China's Hebei province. The area is expected to enjoy a better chance of becoming a national oil strategic reserve base following the discovery of the Nanpu Oilfield.

  2. On the Shoulders of Giants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    On the shoulders of giantsI Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., MD and Todd E. Rasmussen, MD I n a letter dated February 5, 1676 (dated 1675 using the Julian...T.E.R.), Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX. Address for reprints: Basil A. Pruitt, Jr, MD, Division of Trauma, Department of Surgery, The University...default.htm. 20. Moore FD. Edward Delos Churchill (1895Y1972). Ann Surg. 1973; 177:507Y508. 21. The Board for the Study of the Severely Wounded. The

  3. Giant magneto-resistance devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Eiichi; Inomata, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    This book deals with the application of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) effects to electronic devices. It will appeal to engineers and graduate students in the fields of electronic devices and materials. The main subjects are magnetic sensors with high resolution and magnetic read heads with high sensitivity, required for hard-disk drives with recording densities of several gigabytes. Another important subject is novel magnetic random-access memories (MRAM) with non-volatile non-destructive and radiation-resistant characteristics. Other topics include future GMR devices based on bipolar spin transistors, spin field-effect transistors (FETs) and double-tunnel junctions.

  4. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.

  5. Giant Rings in the CMB Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Kovetz, Ely D; Itzhaki, Nissan

    2010-01-01

    We find a unique direction in the CMB sky around which giant rings have an anomalous mean temperature profile. This direction is in very close alignment with the afore measured anomalously large bulk flow direction. We argue that a cosmic defect seeded by a pre-inflationary particle could explain the giant rings, the large bulk flow and their alignment.

  6. Internal rotation of red giants by asteroseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mauro, M P; Ventura, R; Stello, D; Beck, P G; Davies, G; Elsworth, Y; Garcıa, R A; Hekker, S; Mosser, B; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Bloemen, S; Catanzaro, G; De Smedt, K; Tkachenko, A

    2012-01-01

    We present an asteroseismic approach to study the dynamics of the stellar interior in red-giant stars by asteroseismic inversion of the splittings induced by the stellar rotation on the oscillation frequencies. We show preliminary results obtained for the red giant KIC4448777 observed by the space mission Kepler.

  7. Giant Planet Formation, Evolution, and Internal Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Podolak, Morris; Boley, Aaron; Meru, Farzana; Nayakshin, Sergei; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mayer, Lucio; Alibert, Yann; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    The large number of detected giant exoplanets offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the formation mechanism, evolution, and interior structure of gas giant planets. The two main models for giant planet formation are core accretion and disk instability. There are substantial differences between these formation models, including formation timescale, favorable formation location, ideal disk properties for planetary formation, early evolution, planetary composition, etc. First, we summarize the two models including their substantial differences, advantages, and disadvantages, and suggest how theoretical models should be connected to available (and future) data. We next summarize current knowledge of the internal structures of solar- and extrasolar- giant planets. Finally, we suggest the next steps to be taken in giant planet exploration.

  8. An ecological basis for managing giant sequoia ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirto, Douglas D; Rogers, Robert R

    2002-07-01

    A strategy for management of giant sequoia groves is formulated using a conceptual framework for ecosystem management recently developed by Region Five of the USDA Forest Service. The framework includes physical, biological, and social dimensions. Environmental indicators and reference variability for key ecosystem elements are discussed in this paper. The selected ecosystem elements include: 1) attitudes, beliefs, and values; 2) economics and subsistence; 3) stream channel morphology; 4) sediment; 5) water; 6) fire; 7) organic debris; and 8) vegetation mosaic. Recommendations are made for the attributes of environmental indicators that characterize these elements. These elements and associated indicators will define and control management activities for the protection, preservation, and restoration of national forest giant sequoia ecosystems.

  9. GIANT MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATOR IN SERVO VALVE AND MICRO PIPE ROBOT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chuanli; Ding Fan; Zhang Yongshun; Li Qipeng

    2005-01-01

    Performance of giant magnetostrictive material (GMM) is introduced. Principle of work, basic structure and key techniques of giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA) are analyzed. Its dynamic models of magneto-mechanical coupling are established. The structure and principle of the pneumatic servo valve and the micro pipe robot with new homemade GMM are presented. The experiment is carried out under typical working conditions. The experiment results show that the GMM pneumatic servo valve has wide pressure control characteristics, good linearity, and fast response speed. The movement principles of the GMM robot system are reliably feasible and its maximal moving speed is about 8 mm/s. It is preferable to the driving frequency of the robot within 100~300 Hz.

  10. Lithium in Open Cluster Red Giants Hosting Substellar Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, Joleen K; Cunha, Katia; Carpenter, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    We have measured stellar parameters, [Fe/H], lithium abundances, rotation, and 12C/13C in a small sample of red giants in three open clusters that are each home to a red giant star that hosts a substellar companion (NGC2423 3, NGC4349 127, and BD+12 1917 in M67). Our goal is to explore whether the presence of substellar companions influences the Li content. Both 12C/13C and stellar rotation are measured as additional tracers of stellar mixing. One of the companion hosts, NGC2423 3, is found to be Li-rich with A(Li)_NLTE=1.56 dex, and this abundance is significantly higher than the A(Li) of the two comparison stars in NGC2423. All three substellar companion hosts have the highest A(Li) and 12C/13C when compared to the control red giants in their respective clusters; however, except for NGC2423 3, at least one control star has similarly high abundances within the uncertainties. Higher A(Li) could suggest that the formation or presence of planets plays a role in the degree of internal mixing on or before the red...

  11. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar system giant planets come in two flavours: gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes, and ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~cm sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. Unlike gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the solar system. Furthermore, unlike planetesimal-driven accretion scenarios, our model allows core formation and envelope attraction within disc life-times, provided that solids in protoplanetary discs are predominantly made up of pebbles. Our results imply that the outer regions of planetary systems, where the mass required to halt pebble accretion is large, are dominated by ice giants and that gas-giant exoplanets in wide orbits are enriched by more than 50 Earth masses of solids.

  12. Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-related genes in giant breast fibroadenoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozco Javier I

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant fibroadenoma is an uncommon variant of benign breast lesions. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions is known to be involved in the silencing of genes (for example, tumor-suppressor genes and appears to be an early event in the etiology of breast carcinogenesis. Only hypermethylation of p16INK4a has been reported in non-giant breast fibroadenoma. In this particular case, there are no previously published data on epigenetic alterations in giant fibroadenomas. Our previous results, based on the analysis of 49 cancer-related CpG islands have confirmed that the aberrant methylation is specific to malignant breast tumors and that it is completely absent in normal breast tissue and breast fibroadenomas. Case presentation A 13-year-old Hispanic girl was referred after she had noted a progressive development of a mass in her left breast. On physical examination, a 10 × 10 cm lump was detected and axillary lymph nodes were not enlarged. After surgical removal the lump was diagnosed as a giant fibroadenoma. Because of the high growth rate of this benign tumor, we decided to analyze the methylation status of 49 CpG islands related to cell growth control. We have identified the methylation of five cancer-related CpG islands in the giant fibroadenoma tissue: ESR1, MGMT, WT-1, BRCA2 and CD44. Conclusion In this case report we show for the first time the methylation analysis of a giant fibroadenoma. The detection of methylation of these five cancer-related regions indicates substantial epigenomic differences with non-giant fibroadenomas. Epigenetic alterations could explain the higher growth rate of this tumor. Our data contribute to the growing knowledge of aberrant methylation in breast diseases. In this particular case, there exist no previous data regarding the role of methylation in giant fibroadenomas, considered by definition as a benign breast lesion.

  13. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion.

  14. Photophoresis boosts giant planet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Teiser, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, a solid protoplanetary core begins to accrete gas directly from the nebula when its mass reaches about 5 earth masses. The protoplanet has at most a few million years to reach runaway gas accretion, as young stars lose their gas disks after 10 million years at the latest. Yet gas accretion also brings small dust grains entrained in the gas into the planetary atmosphere. Dust accretion creates an optically thick protoplanetary atmosphere that cannot efficiently radiate away the kinetic energy deposited by incoming planetesimals. A dust-rich atmosphere severely slows down atmospheric cooling, contraction, and inflow of new gas, in contradiction to the observed timescales of planet formation. Here we show that photophoresis is a strong mechanism for pushing dust out of the planetary atmosphere due to the momentum exchange between gas and dust grains. The thermal radiation from the heated inner atmosphere and core is sufficient to levitate dust grains and to ...

  15. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  16. Giant choledochal calculosis: Surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Bektas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gallstone disease is one of the most common surgical pathologies. Choledocholithiasis may occur in some of these cases and require surgical intervention. Although there are relatively non-invasive procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, this technique is usually unsuccessful in patients with stones larger than 10 mm. In our case, we aimed to report a giant choledochal stone (15 cm × 4.5 cm, which is rare in surgical practice and our treatment with open surgery. Case Report: The patient was a 59-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP had showed a hydropic gallbladder with an excessively dilated CBD and a 110 mm × 41 mm stone. In the operation, an excessively dilated CBD was seen and after choledochotomy and a very large calculus that filled CBD completely. Choledochotomy incision was carried forward and a T-tube choledochostomy with choledochoduodenostomy (CD was performed. The patient was discharged without any complications on postoperative 8 th day. Conclusion: Benign gallstone disease is a multifactorial process, with risk factors such as obesity, hemolytic diseases, diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. Risk factors for choledocholithiasis are similar to those for gallstone disease. MRCP is a non-invasive technique in detecting choledocholithiasis. The gold standard intervention for CBD stones is ERCP. Stones in CBD may reach very considerable dimensions without causing serious symptoms. The most common symptom is jaundice. During preoperative radiological examination, giant stones may be interfered with malignancies. Surgeons should obey conventional algorithms in diagnosis and open surgery must be kept in mind in earlier stages without being too insistent on endoscopic interventions.

  17. STUDIES ON THE INGESTION CHARACTERISTICS OF GIANT FRESHWATER PRAWN, CHINESE PRAWN AND GIANT TIGER PRAWN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The ingestion of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn had continuity and the ingestion high peak occurred at night. Light and temperature had significant effects on the daily ingestion rate (DIR) of giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Red light and blue light favorably induced favorable ingestion. In the adaptive range of temperature, the DIR increased with rising temperature and feeding frequency, but decreased with rising body weight.

  18. The conjunction of factors that lead to formation of giant gold provinces and deposits in non-arc settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Groves

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to their province scale similarities, the different giant gold deposit styles show contrasting critical controls at the district to deposit scale. For orogenic gold deposits, the giants appear to have formed by conjunction of a greater number of parameters to those that control smaller deposits, with resultant geometrical and lithostratigraphic complexity as a guide to their location. There are few giant IRGS due to their inferior fluid-flux systems relative to orogenic gold deposits, and those few giants are essentially preservational exceptions. Many Carlin-type deposits are giants due to the exceptional conjunction of both structural and lithological parameters that caused reactive and permeable rocks, enriched in syngenetic gold, to be located below an impermeable cap along antiformal “trends”. Hydrocarbons probably played an important role in concentrating metal. The supergiant Post-Betze deposit has additional ore zones in strain heterogeneities surrounding the pre-gold Goldstrike stock. All unequivocal IOCG deposits are giant or near-giant deposits in terms of gold-equivalent resources, partly due to economic factors for this relatively poorly understood, low Cu-Au grade deposit type. The supergiant Olympic Dam deposit, the most shallowly formed deposit among the larger IOCGs, probably owes its origin to eruption of volatile-rich hybrid magma at surface, with formation of a large maar and intense and widespread brecciation, alteration and Cu-Au-U deposition in a huge rock volume.

  19. AFSC/ABL: Female Giant Grenadier maturity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Giant grenadiers Albatrossia pectoralis are caught as bycatch in deep-sea commercial fisheries in relatively large numbers. The population appears to be stable,...

  20. Giant prostatic fossa with misleading radiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzl, A; Fuchs, G J

    1989-01-01

    The long-term complication of a perforation of the prostatic capsule during transurethral resection of the prostate is described. Calcifications in a giant prostatic fossa led to initially misleading radiologic findings.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R. Proteomic analysis in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms. Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46( ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  2. Giant planet and brown dwarf formation

    CERN Document Server

    Chabrier, G; Janson, M; Rafikov, R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dominant brown dwarf and giant planet formation processes, and finding out whether these processes rely on completely different mechanisms or share common channels represents one of the major challenges of astronomy and remains the subject of heated debates. It is the aim of this review to summarize the latest developments in this field and to address the issue of origin by confronting different brown dwarf and giant planet formation scenarios to presently available observational constraints. As examined in the review, if objects are classified as "Brown Dwarfs" or "Giant Planets" on the basis of their formation mechanism, it has now become clear that their mass domains overlap and that there is no mass limit between these two distinct populations. Furthermore, while there is increasing observational evidence for the existence of non-deuterium burning brown dwarfs, some giant planets, characterized by a significantly metal enriched composition, might be massive enough to ignite deuterium bur...

  3. Giant planets. Holweck prize lecture 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hide, R. (Meteorological Office, Bracknell (UK))

    1982-10-01

    The main characteristics of the giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, are outlined. Studies which have been made of the circulation of their atmospheres, the structure of their interiors and the origin of their magnetic fields are discussed.

  4. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Caner; Turker, Mesut; Celasun, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  5. Deformation effects in Giant Monopole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kvasil, J; Repko, A; Bozik, D; Kleinig, W; Reinhard, P -G

    2014-01-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) in Samarium isotopes (from spherical $^{144}$Sm to deformed $^{148-154}$Sm) is investigated within the Skyrme random-phase-approximation (RPA) for a variety of Skyrme forces. The exact RPA and its separable version (SRPA) are used for spherical and deformed nuclei, respectively. The quadrupole deformation is shown to yield two effects: the GMR broadens and attains a two-peak structure due to the coupling with the quadrupole giant resonance.

  6. Taxonomy of Indonesian giant clams (Cardiidae, Tridacninae)

    OpenAIRE

    UDHI EKO HERNAWAN

    2012-01-01

    Hernawan E. 2012. Taxonomy of Indonesian giant clams (Cardiidae, Tridacninae). Biodiversitas 13: 118-123. A taxonomic study was conducted on the giant clam’s specimens deposited in Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense (MZB), Cibinong Indonesia. Taxonomic overviews of the examined specimens are given with diagnostic characters, remarks, habitat and distribution. Discussion is focused on specific characters distinguishing each species. From seven species known to distribute in Indonesian waters, there ...

  7. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Sahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  8. Perianal Giant Condyloma Acuminatum: A Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Rare giant condyloma acuminatum (CA) reported by this paper is an interesting unusual case in China. Giant CA is a tumor that primarily affects the genital and perianal areas. Its feature is the high rate of local recurrence and transformation into squamous cell carcinoma. Making choice of wide surgical excision and using interferon as antiviral and immunoenhancement for CA after operation, we obtain satisfactory functional and cosmetic results.

  9. Bayesian Inference of Giant Exoplanet Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorngren, Daniel; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    The physical processes within a giant planet directly set its observed radius for a given mass, age, and insolation. The important aspects are the planet’s bulk composition and its interior thermal evolution. By studying many giant planets as an ensemble, we can gain insight into this physics. We demonstrate two novel examples here. We examine 50 cooler transiting giant planets, whose insolation is sufficiently low (T_eff < 1000 K) that they are not affected by the hot Jupiter radius inflation effect. For these planets, the thermal evolution is relatively well understood, and we show that the bulk planet metallicity increases with the total planet mass, which directly impacts plans for future atmospheric studies. We also examine the relation with stellar metallicity and discuss how these relations place new constraints on the core accretion model of planet formation. Our newest work seeks to quantify the flow of energy into hot Jupiters needed to explain their enlarged radii, in addition to their bulk composition. Because the former is related to stellar insolation and the latter is related to mass, we are able to create a hierarchical Bayesian model to disentangle the two effects in our sample of ~300 transiting giant planets. Our results show conclusively that the inflation power is not a simple fraction of stellar insolation: instead, the power increases with incident flux at a much higher rate. We use these results to test published models of giant planet inflation and to provide accurate empirical mass-radius relations for giant planets.

  10. Testing planet formation theories with Giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquini, Luca; Hatzes, A; Setiawan, J; Girardi, L; da Silva, L; De Medeiros, J R

    2008-01-01

    Planet searches around evolved giant stars are bringing new insights to planet formation theories by virtue of the broader stellar mass range of the host stars compared to the solar-type stars that have been the subject of most current planet searches programs. These searches among giant stars are producing extremely interesting results. Contrary to main sequence stars planet-hosting giants do not show a tendency of being more metal rich. Even if limited, the statistics also suggest a higher frequency of giant planets (at least 10 %) that are more massive compared to solar-type main sequence stars. The interpretation of these results is not straightforward. We propose that the lack of a metallicity-planet connection among giant stars is due to pollution of the star while on the main sequence, followed by dilution during the giant phase. We also suggest that the higher mass and frequency of the planets are due to the higher stellar mass. Even if these results do not favor a specific formation scenario, they su...

  11. Introduction to the Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Ji, H.

    2012-12-01

    In order to detect the fine structures of solar magnetic field and dynamic field, an 8 meter solar telescope has been proposed by Chinese solar community. Due to the advantages of ring structure in polarization detection and thermal control, the current design of CGST (Chinese Giant Solar Telescope) is an 8 meter ring solar telescope. The spatial resolution of CGST is equivalent to an 8 meter diameter telescope, and the light-gathering power equivalent to a 5 meter full aperture telescope. The integrated simulation of optical system and imaging ability such as optical design, MCAO, active maintenance of primary mirror were carried out in this paper. Mechanical system was analyzed by finite element method too. The results of simulation and analysis showed that the current design could meet the demand of most science cases not only in infrared band but also in near infrared band and even in visible band. CGST was proposed by all solar observatories in Chinese Academy of Sciences and several overseas scientists. It is supported by CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences) and NSFC (National Natural Science Foundation of China) as a long term astronomical project.

  12. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Lambrechts, Michiel; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In the Solar System giant planets come in two flavours: 'gas giants' (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes and 'ice giants' (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~ cm-sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. As opposed to gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the S...

  13. Migration of accreting giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crida, A.; Bitsch, B.; Raibaldi, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of 2D hydro simulations of giant planets in proto-planetary discs, which accrete gas at a more or less high rate. First, starting from a solid core of 20 Earth masses, we show that as soon as the runaway accretion of gas turns on, the planet is saved from type I migration : the gap opening mass is reached before the planet is lost into its host star. Furthermore, gas accretion helps opening the gap in low mass discs. Consequently, if the accretion rate is limited to the disc supply, then the planet is already inside a gap and in type II migration. We further show that the type II migration of a Jupiter mass planet actually depends on its accretion rate. Only when the accretion is high do we retrieve the classical picture where no gas crosses the gap and the planet follows the disc spreading. These results impact our understanding of planet migration and planet population synthesis models. The e-poster presenting these results in French can be found here: L'e-poster présentant ces résultats en français est disponible à cette adresse: http://sf2a.eu/semaine-sf2a/2016/posterpdfs/156_179_49.pdf.

  14. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  15. ON INFRARED EXCESSES ASSOCIATED WITH Li-RICH K GIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebull, Luisa M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and Infrared Science Archive (IRSA), Infrared Processing and Analysis Center - IPAC, 1200 E. California Blvd., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Carlberg, Joleen K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibbs, John C.; Cashen, Sarah; Datta, Ashwin; Hodgson, Emily; Lince, Megan [Glencoe High School, 2700 NW Glencoe Rd., Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); Deeb, J. Elin [Bear Creek High School, 9800 W. Dartmouth Pl., Lakewood, CO 80227 (United States); Larsen, Estefania; Altepeter, Shailyn; Bucksbee, Ethan; Clarke, Matthew [Millard South High School, 14905 Q St., Omaha, NE 68137 (United States); Black, David V., E-mail: rebull@ipac.caltech.edu [Walden School of Liberal Arts, 4230 N. University Ave., Provo, UT 84604 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Infrared (IR) excesses around K-type red giants (RGs) have previously been discovered using Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) data, and past studies have suggested a link between RGs with overabundant Li and IR excesses, implying the ejection of circumstellar shells or disks. We revisit the question of IR excesses around RGs using higher spatial resolution IR data, primarily from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Our goal was to elucidate the link between three unusual RG properties: fast rotation, enriched Li, and IR excess. Our sample of RGs includes those with previous IR detections, a sample with well-defined rotation and Li abundance measurements with no previous IR measurements, and a large sample of RGs asserted to be Li-rich in the literature; we have 316 targets thought to be K giants, about 40% of which we take to be Li-rich. In 24 cases with previous detections of IR excess at low spatial resolution, we believe that source confusion is playing a role, in that either (a) the source that is bright in the optical is not responsible for the IR flux, or (b) there is more than one source responsible for the IR flux as measured in IRAS. We looked for IR excesses in the remaining sources, identifying 28 that have significant IR excesses by ∼20 μm (with possible excesses for 2 additional sources). There appears to be an intriguing correlation in that the largest IR excesses are all in Li-rich K giants, though very few Li-rich K giants have IR excesses (large or small). These largest IR excesses also tend to be found in the fastest rotators. There is no correlation of IR excess with the carbon isotopic ratio, {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C. IR excesses by 20 μm, though relatively rare, are at least twice as common among our sample of Li-rich K giants. If dust shell production is a common by-product of Li enrichment mechanisms, these observations suggest that the IR excess stage is very short-lived, which is supported by theoretical calculations. Conversely, the

  16. On Infrared Excesses Associated with Li-Rich K Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, Luisa M.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Gibbs, John C.; Deeb, J. Elin; Larsen, Estefania; Black, David V.; Altepeter, Shailyn; Bucksbee, Ethan; Cashen, Sarah; Clarke, Matthew; Datta, Ashwin; Hodgson, Emily; Lince, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) excesses around K-type red giants (RGs) have previously been discovered using Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) data, and past studies have suggested a link between RGs with overabundant lithium and IR excesses, implying the ejection of circumstellar shells or disks. We revisit the question of IR excesses around RGs using higher spatial resolution IR data, primarily from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Our goal was to elucidate the link between three unusual RG properties: fast rotation, enriched lithium, and IR excess. Our sample of RGs includes those with previous IR detections, a sample with well-defined rotation and lithium abundance measurements with no previous IR measurements, and a large sample of RGs asserted to be lithium-rich in the literature; we have 316 targets thought to be K giants, about 40% of which we take to be Li-rich. In 24 cases with previous detections of IR excess at low spatial resolution, we believe that source confusion is playing a role, in that either (a) the source that is bright in the optical is not responsible for the IR flux, or (b) there is more than one source responsible for the IR flux as measured in IRAS. We looked for IR excesses in the remaining sources, identifying 28 that have significant IR excesses by approximately 20 micrometers (with possible excesses for 2 additional sources). There appears to be an intriguing correlation in that the largest IR excesses are all in Li-rich K giants, though very few lithium-rich K giants have IR excesses (large or small). These largest IR excesses also tend to be found in the fastest rotators. There is no correlation of IR excess with the carbon isotopic ratio, 12C/13C. IR excesses by 20 micrometers, though relatively rare, are at least twice as common among our sample of lithium-rich K giants. If dust shell production is a common by-product of Li enrichment mechanisms, these observations suggest that the IR excess stage is very short-lived, which is supported

  17. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  18. Active season microhabitat and vegetation selection by giant gartersnakes associated with a restored marsh in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Valcarcel, Patricia; Wylie, Glenn D.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Rosenberg, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of habitat selection can reveal important patterns to guide habitat restoration and management for species of conservation concern. Giant gartersnakes Thamnophis gigas are endemic to the Central Valley of California, where >90% of their historical wetland habitat has been converted to agricultural and other uses. Information about the selection of habitats by individual giant gartersnakes would guide habitat restoration by indicating which habitat features and vegetation types are likely to be selected by these rare snakes. We examined activity patterns and selection of microhabitats and vegetation types by adult female giant gartersnakes with radiotelemetry at a site composed of rice agriculture and restored wetlands using a paired case-control study design. Adult female giant gartersnakes were 14.7 (95% credible interval [CRI] = 9.4–23.7) times more likely to be active (foraging, mating, or moving) when located in aquatic habitats than when located in terrestrial habitats. Microhabitats associated with cover—particularly emergent vegetation, terrestrial vegetation, and litter—were positively selected by giant gartersnakes. Individual giant gartersnakes varied greatly in their selection of rice and rock habitats, but varied little in their selection of open water. Tules Schoenoplectus acutus were the most strongly selected vegetation type, and duckweed Lemna spp., water-primrose Ludwigia spp., forbs, and grasses also were positively selected at the levels of availability observed at our study site. Management practices that promote the interface of water with emergent aquatic and herbaceous terrestrial vegetation will likely benefit giant gartersnakes. Given their strong selection of tules, restoration of native tule marshes will likely provide the greatest benefit to these threatened aquatic snakes.

  19. Giant Goos-Hänchen shift via spontaneous generated coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin

    2015-11-01

    The influence of spontaneous generated coherence (SGC) on the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift in the reflected light is presented. A weak probe light is incident on a cavity containing three-level gaseous atomic medium consist of 85Rb atoms. The atom-field interaction follows electromagnetically induced transparency configuration, and the SGC modifies the dispersion and absorption properties of a system [Y. Niu and S. Gong, Phys. Rev. A 73, 053811 (2006)]. The SGC enhances the Kerr nonlinearity which leads to giant negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light. Further, the control of negative and positive GH shifts is achieved via manipulation of probe field detuning.

  20. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming, Yunnan 650091 (China); Reeves, K. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yuan, F., E-mail: mengy@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  1. Infrared spectral properties of M giants

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, G C; Ramirez, R M; Kraemer, K E; Engelke, C W

    2015-01-01

    We observed a sample of 20 M giants with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most show absorption structure at 6.6-6.8 um which we identify as water vapor, and in some cases, the absorption extends from 6.4 um into the SiO band at 7.5 um. Variable stars show stronger H2O absorption. While the strength of the SiO fundamental at 8 um increases monotonically from spectral class K0 to K5, the dependence on spectral class weakens in the M giants. As with previously studied samples, the M giants show considerable scatter in SiO band strength within a given spectral class. All of the stars in our sample also show OH band absorption, most noticeably in the 14-17 um region. The OH bands behave much like the SiO bands, increasing in strength in the K giants but showing weaker dependence on spectral class in the M giants, and with considerable scatter. An examination of the photometric properties reveals that the V-K color may be a better indicator of molecular band strength than the spectral class...

  2. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  3. Lithium-Rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Evan N; Zhang, Andrew J; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G; Cunha, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 +/- 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 +/- 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 +/- 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propo...

  4. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Lavvas, P. [Groupe de Spectroscopie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique UMR CNRS 7331, Université Reims Champagne-Ardenne, F-51687 Reims (France); Cho, J. Y-K., E-mail: tommi@lpl.arizona.edu [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of H and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion drag is important above the 10 mbar level where it can also significantly alter the energy balance through resistive heating. Due to frequent collisions of the electrons and ions with the neutral atmosphere, however, ion drag is largely negligible in the lower atmosphere below the 10 mbar level for a reasonable range of planetary magnetic moments. We find that the atmospheric conductivity decreases by several orders of magnitude in the night side of tidally locked planets, leading to a potentially interesting large-scale dichotomy in electrodynamics between the day and night sides. A combined approach that relies on UV observations of the upper atmosphere, phase curve and Doppler measurements of global dynamics, and visual transit observations to probe the alkali metals can potentially

  5. Design solutions for dome and main structure (mount) of giant telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murga, Gaizka; Bilbao, Armando; de Bilbao, Lander; Lorentz, Thomas E.

    2016-07-01

    During the last recent years, designs for several giant telescopes ranging from 20 to 40m in diameter are being developed: European Extremely Large Telescope Telescope (TMT). (E-ELT), Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) and Thirty Meter It is evident that simple direct up-scaling of solutions that were more or less successful in the 8 to 10m class telescopes can not lead to viable designs for the future giant telescopes. New solutions are required to provide adequate load sharing, to cope with the large-scale derived deflections and to provide the required compliance, or to respond to structure-mechanism control interaction issues, among others. From IDOM experience in the development of the Dome and Main Structure of the European Extremely Large Telescope and our participation in some other giant telescopes, this paper reviews several design approaches for the main mechanisms and key structural parts of enclosures and mounts/main structures for giant telescopes, analyzing pros and cons of the different alternatives and outlining the preferred design schemes. The assessment is carried out mainly from a technical and performance-based angle but it also considers specific logistical issues for the assembly of these large telescopes in remote and space-limited areas, together with cost and schedule related issues.

  6. Giant Uterine Leiomyoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Noel Marrero Quiala

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant uterine fibromyoma is a benign condition which has a very low incidence. Its management poses a challenge for the surgical team due to the volume of the surgical specimen and the variations in the distribution of the intra-abdominal organs caused by the uterine growth. The case of a 29-year-old patient misdiagnosed with giant hepatomegaly at admission is presented. Her symptoms included hard abdomen and feeling of heaviness. Successful completion of the interview, physical examination and imaging studies led to the correct diagnosis of giant uterine fibromyoma. Surgical treatment was applied. A total abdominal hysterectomy was performed with satisfactory results. This case is presented to the medical community for teaching purposes and due to its rarity.

  7. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  8. Trace Molecules in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, D. L.; Smith, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Chemical kinetics matters in the upper atmospheres of giant planets in our solar system and in extrasolar systems. The composition of a volume of gas depends not only on where it is, but also on how it got there. The giant planets in our own solar system still have much to teach us about what we will be observing on extrasolar giant planets and how to interpret what we observe. Some molecules, such as CO, C2H2, C2H6, PH3, and NH3, which we call tracer molecules, provide remotely observable signatures of vertical transport. PH3 and NH3 especially have complicated thermochemistry and chemical kinetics that, until recently, have been poorly understood. Based on analysis of recent literature, we have identified new chemical mechanisms for interconverting NH3 and N2 and for interconverting PH3 and NH4-H2PO4.

  9. Red-giant stars in eccentric binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red-giant stars and binary stars. We discuss the characterization of known eccentric system, containing a solar-like oscillating red-giant primary component. We also report several new binary systems that are candidates for hosting an oscillating companion. A powerful approach to study binary stars is to combine asteroseimic techniques with light curve fitting. Seismology allows us to deduce the properties of red giants. In addition, by modeling the ellipsoidal modulations we can constrain the parameters of the binary system. An valuable independent source are ground-bases, high-resolution spectrographs.

  10. Observations of Radio Giant Pulses with GAVRT

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Radio giant pulses provide a unique opportunity to study the pulsar radio emission mechanism in exquisite detail. Previous studies have revealed a wide range of properties and phenomena, including extraordinarily high brightness temperatures, sub-nanosecond emission features, and banded dynamic spectra. New measurements of giant pulse characteristics can help guide and test theoretical emission models. To this end, an extensive observation campaign has begun which will provide more than 500 hours on the Crab with a 34-meter antenna located in California, USA. The observations are being done as part of an educational outreach program called the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT). This antenna has a novel wide bandwidth receiver which provides up to 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the range of 2.5 to 14 GHz. These observations will provide detailed information about the variability, amplitude distribution, and detailed frequency structure of radio giant pulses. In addition, a database of pulses ...

  11. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-06-26

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m(2) for the definition of a "giant left atrium".

  12. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zhang, Andrew J. [The Harker School, 500 Saratoga Avenue, San Jose, CA 95129 (United States); Hong, Jerry [Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 (United States); Guo, Michelle [Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Guo, Rachel [Irvington High School, 41800 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  14. Kepler Asteroseismology of Red-giant Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler mission, launched in March 2009, has revolutionized asteroseismology, providing detailed observations of thousands of stars. This has allowed in-depth analyses of stars ranging from compact hot subdwarfs to red giants, and including the detection of solar-like oscillations in hundreds...... of stars on or near the main sequence. Here I mainly consider solar-like oscillations in red giants, where Kepler observations are yielding results of a perhaps unexpected richness. In addition to giving a brief overview of the observational and numerical results for these stars, I present a simple...

  15. Mass loss from giant and supergiant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1986-01-01

    The 12 m telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory has been used at the J = 2-1 transition of CO to increase the known list of giant and supergiant stars with observable circumstellar envelopes. The candidate objects were generally M-type giants and supergiants, chosen for their strong infrared luminosities. Of the 35 objects which were previously undetected, or only marginally detected, 10 were found to produce detectable CO emission. Physical parameters of the envelopes are derived by source modeling. Mass-loss rates vary from 10 to the -7th to 4 x 10 to the -5th solar mass/yr.

  16. Normalized spectra of 82 Kepler red giants (Thygesen+, 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Thygesen; S. Frandsen; H. Bruntt; T. Kallinger; M.F. Andersen; Y.E. Elsworth; S. Hekker; C. Karoff; D. Stello; K. Brogaard; C. Bruke; D.A. Caldwell; J.L. Christiansen

    2012-01-01

    Normalized spectra of 82 red giants in the Kepler Field. Target names are as found in the Kepler Input Catalogue (Kepler Mission Team 2009) Also included spectra of 10 well-studied bright giants observed for reference. 9 of the reference giants were chosen from the PASTEL catalogue (Soubiran et al.,

  17. Giant Panda habitat selection in the Foping Nature Reserve, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Toxopeus, A.G.; Skidmore, A.K.; Shao, X.; Dang, D.; Wang, T.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about habitat selection of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), especially about the relationship between giant panda presence and bamboo and tree structures. We presented data on giant panda habitat use and selection in Foping Nature Reserve (NR), China. We used 1,066 radiotrac

  18. The Mass-Metallicity Relation for Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Thorngren, Daniel P; Lopez, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    Exoplanet discoveries of recent years have provided a great deal of new data for studying the bulk compositions of giant planets. Here we identify 38 transiting giant planets ($20 M_\\oplus 50 M_\\oplus$) suggest significant amounts of heavy elements in H/He envelopes, rather than cores, such that metal-enriched giant planet atmospheres should be the rule.

  19. Normalized spectra of 82 Kepler red giants (Thygesen+, 2012) [Dataset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thygesen, A.O.; Frandsen, S.; Bruntt, H.; Kallinger, T.; Andersen, M.F.; Elsworth, Y.E.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Stello, D.; Brogaard, K.; Bruke, C.; Caldwell, D.A.; Christiansen, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Normalized spectra of 82 red giants in the Kepler Field. Target names are as found in the Kepler Input Catalogue (Kepler Mission Team 2009) Also included spectra of 10 well-studied bright giants observed for reference. 9 of the reference giants were chosen from the PASTEL catalogue (Soubiran et al.,

  20. MAPPING DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, Veselin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Apai, Daniel, E-mail: vkostov@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Astronomy, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing number of directly imaged giant exoplanets, the current atmosphere models are often not capable of fully explaining the spectra and luminosity of the sources. A particularly challenging component of the atmosphere models is the formation and properties of condensate cloud layers, which fundamentally impact the energetics, opacity, and evolution of the planets. Here we present a suite of techniques that can be used to estimate the level of rotational modulations these planets may show. We propose that the time-resolved observations of such periodic photometric and spectroscopic variations of extrasolar planets due to their rotation can be used as a powerful tool to probe the heterogeneity of their optical surfaces. In this paper, we develop simulations to explore the capabilities of current and next-generation ground- and space-based instruments for this technique. We address and discuss the following questions: (1) what planet properties can be deduced from the light curve and/or spectra, and in particular can we determine rotation periods, spot coverage, spot colors, and spot spectra?; (2) what is the optimal configuration of instrument/wavelength/temporal sampling required for these measurements?; and (3) can principal component analysis be used to invert the light curve and deduce the surface map of the planet? Our simulations describe the expected spectral differences between homogeneous (clear or cloudy) and patchy atmospheres, outline the significance of the dominant absorption features of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and CO, and provide a method to distinguish these two types of atmospheres. Assuming surfaces with and without clouds for most currently imaged planets the current models predict the largest variations in the J band. Simulated photometry from current and future instruments is used to estimate the level of detectable photometric variations. We conclude that future instruments will be able to recover not only the rotation periods

  1. The conjunction of factors that lead to formation of giant gold provinces and deposits in non-arc settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David I. Groves; Richard J. Goldfarb; M. Santosh

    2016-01-01

    It is quite evident that it is not anomalous metal transport, nor unique depositional conditions, nor any single factor at the deposit scale, that dictates whether a mineral deposit becomes a giant or not. A hierarchical approach thus is required to progressively examine controlling parameters at successively decreasing scales in the total mineral system to understand the location of giant gold deposits in non-arc environments. For giant orogenic, intrusion-related gold systems (IRGS) and Carlin-type gold deposits and iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, there are common factors among all of these at the litho-spheric to crustal scale. All are sited in giant gold provinces controlled by complex fundamental fault or shear zones that follow craton margins or, in the case of most Phanerozoic orogenic giants, define the primary suture zones between tectonic terranes. Giant provinces of IRGS, IOCG, and Carlin-type deposits require melting of metasomatized lithosphere beneath craton margins with ascent of hybrid lamp-rophyric to granitic magmas and associated heat flux to generate the giant province. The IRGS and IOCG deposits require direct exsolution of volatile-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, whereas the associa-tion of such melts with Carlin-type ores is more indirect and enigmatic. Giant orogenic gold provinces show no direct relationship to such magmatism, forming from metamorphic fluids, but show an indirect relationship to lamprophyres that reflect the mantle connectivity of controlling first-order structures. In contrast to their province scale similarities, the different giant gold deposit styles show contrasting critical controls at the district to deposit scale. For orogenic gold deposits, the giants appear to have formed by conjunction of a greater number of parameters to those that control smaller deposits, with resultant geometrical and lithostratigraphic complexity as a guide to their location. There are few giant IRGS due to their inferior fluid

  2. Dynamo-generated magnetic fields in fast rotating single giants

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantinova-Antova, Renada; Schröder, Klaus-Peter; Petit, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Red giants offer a good opportunity to study the interplay of magnetic fields and stellar evolution. Using the spectro-polarimeter NARVAL of the Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), Pic du Midi, France and the LSD technique, we began a survey of magnetic fields in single G-K-M giants. Early results include 6 MF-detections with fast rotating giants, and for the first time a magnetic field was detected directly in an evolved M-giant: EK Boo. Our results could be explained in the terms of $\\alpha$--$\\omega$ dynamo operating in these giants.

  3. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaktawat, Sameer Singh; Golka, Dariusz

    2007-12-08

    This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  4. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golka Dariusz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  5. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  6. [A rare clinical report of giant hemangiopericytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, A N; Shishkina, L V; Tailakov, Sh T; Dorosh, K V; Khromov, A P

    2014-01-01

    Authors show an example of a successful treatment of a patient with a giant intracranial hemangiopericytoma. Hemangiopericytoma are aggressive tumors with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Despite the malignant nature of these tumors often reach a large size with minor clinical signs. Surgical removal of the tumor is still the primary method of treatment.

  7. Anharmonic effects and double giant dipole resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Voronov, V V

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of recent results of the microscopic calculations to describe characteristics of the double giant dipole resonances (DGDR) is presented. A special attention is paid to a microscopic study of the anharmonic properties of the DGDR. It is found that the deviation of the energy centroid of the DGDR from the harmonic limit follows A sup - sup 1 dependence

  8. Chirp-driven giant phase space vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2016-06-01

    In a collisionless, unbounded, one-dimensional plasma, modelled using periodic boundary conditions, formation of steady state phase space coherent structures or phase space vortices (PSV) is investigated. Using a high resolution one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic advection scheme, the formation of giant PSV is addressed numerically. For an infinitesimal external drive amplitude and wavenumber k, we demonstrate the existence of a window of chirped external drive frequency that leads to the formation of giant PSV. The linear, small amplitude, external drive, when chirped, is shown to couple effectively to the plasma and increase both streaming of "untrapped" and "trapped" particle fraction. The steady state attained after the external drive is turned off and is shown to lead to a giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities, with excess density fraction, defined as the deviation from the Maxwellian background, Δ n / n 0 ≃ 20 % - 25 % . It is shown that the process depends on the chirp time duration Δt. The excess density fraction Δn/n0, which contains both trapped and untrapped particle contribution, is also seen to scale with Δt, only inhibited by the gradient of the distribution in velocity space. Both single step drive and multistep chirp processes are shown to lead to steady state giant PSV, with multiple extrema due to embedded holes and clumps, long after the external drive is turned off.

  9. Giant Cholesteatoma : Recommendations for Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geven, Leontien I.; Mulder, Jef J. S.; Graamans, Kees

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the management of five patients who presented with giant recurrent or residual cholesteatoma after periods of 2 to 50 years. Their case histories are highly diverse, but all provide evidence of the need for long-term follow-up.

  10. Giant viruses of amoebas: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eAherfi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the 12 past years, five new or putative virus families encompassing several members, namely Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, pandoraviruses, faustoviruses, and virophages were described. In addition, Pithovirus sibericum and Mollivirus sibericum represent type strains of putative new giant virus families. All these viruses were isolated using amoebal coculture methods. These giant viruses were linked by phylogenomic analyses to other large DNA viruses. They were then proposed to be classified in a new viral order, the Megavirales, on the basis of their common origin, as shown by a set of ancestral genes encoding key viral functions, a common virion architecture, and shared major biological features including replication inside cytoplasmic factories. Megavirales is increasingly demonstrated to stand in the tree of life aside Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and the megavirus ancestor is suspected to be as ancient as cellular ancestors. In addition, giant amoebal viruses are visible under a light microscope and display many phenotypic and genomic features not found in other viruses, while they share other characteristics with parasitic microbes. Moreoever, these organisms appear to be common inhabitants of our biosphere, and mimiviruses and marseilleviruses were isolated from human samples and associated to diseases. In the present review, we describe the main features and recent findings on these giant amoebal viruses and virophages.

  11. Giant omental lipoblastoma and CD56 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Miyano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of giant omental lipoblastoma in a 13-month-old boy, which was treated successfully by total excision. Tumor cells were positive for S100, CD34 and CD56. This is the first report of lipoblastoma expressing CD56, a fact that could be used to differentiate lipoblastoma from liposarcoma.

  12. Foreign Giants Take Gas Pipeline Stake Equally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ye

    2002-01-01

    @@ Oil giants Royal/Dutch, ExxonMobil and Russia's Gazprom have agreed to take 15 percent stakes each in China's US$5.6 billion natural gas pipeline project,clearing away the final obstacles blocking the kickoff of the repeatedly delayed project, according to the latest reports from news media in early July.

  13. Caring for the Giant Pandas' Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2010-01-01

    @@ A long-term partnership was formed in October by American corporation Broadcom, Broadcom Foundation,and the San Diego Zoo, together with China Wolong National Natural Reserve and the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) to study giant panda protection and breeding.

  14. Giant Magnetostrictive Material Exciter for Panel Loudspeaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui; ZHANG Yong-fa

    2008-01-01

    The exciter component in a panel loudspeaker has a profound effect on the overall performance of the system.The equivalent circuit analysis of the combination of giant magnetostrictive material exciter and distributed mode panel is introduced and how exciter parameters influence panel lffudspeaker's performance is discussed.NumericaI predictions are given in order to show how these influences are manifested.

  15. Rotation Curves of Giant LSB Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, T. E.; Impey, C. D.; Navarro, J. F.; van Gorkom, J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We present optical and H I rotation curves of a sample of giant, low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies including the prototype, Malin 1. The rotation curves of these diffuse systems are expected to more faithfully reflect the structure of their dark matter halos due to the reduced contribution of th

  16. Giant melanoma of the left thumb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeebregts, CJAM; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    2000-01-01

    A 74-year-old female patient is described with a giant melanoma of the left thenar and concomitant bilateral pulmonary metastases. Palliative treatment consisted of a two-staged procedure in order to save the limb from amputation. Firstly, perfusion with gamma-interferon, tumour necrosis factor-alph

  17. The operation of giant incisional hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Axelina; Krag, Christen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad;

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a common complication to laparotomy impacting negatively on quality of life, risk of emergency surgery and cosmesis. The operation of giant incisional hernia (cross diameter of hernia defect > 20 cm) is a high risk procedure and the surgical techniques are not based on high...

  18. Insights on a Giant Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Ulm, Arthur John

    2016-07-01

    Background Endovascular treatment with stent-assisted Guglielmi detachable coils is an accepted method for treating intracranial giant aneurysms that otherwise would require more invasive or destructive treatment or could not be treated at all. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information concerning inner postcoiling aneurysmal changes in human subjects over the long term. We report a postmortem analysis of a patient with a giant aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) who was treated endovascularly and studied pathologically 24 months after treatment. Materials and Method The head was removed at autopsy and prefixed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The brain was gently removed from the skull base after cutting the intracranial nerves and vascular structures. The giant VBJ aneurysm and its relationship with the brainstem, cranial nerves, and vessels were captured photographically and analyzed. Afterward, under operating microscope guidance, the vertebrobasilar system with the aneurysm was gently and carefully detached from the brainstem and carefully analyzed. Results No complete fibrous obliteration of the aneurysm lumen could be detected in our case, and no endothelialization had taken place 24 months after treatment. Conclusions Our findings agree with those of previous similar reports. Coiling, in particular in large or giant aneurysms, may be burdened by the risk of coil compaction and recanalization, but it has the advantage of not affecting the flow in the perforating arteries.

  19. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  20. Giant Viruses of Amoebas: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherfi, Sarah; Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    During the 12 past years, five new or putative virus families encompassing several members, namely Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, pandoraviruses, faustoviruses, and virophages were described. In addition, Pithovirus sibericum and Mollivirus sibericum represent type strains of putative new giant virus families. All these viruses were isolated using amoebal coculture methods. These giant viruses were linked by phylogenomic analyses to other large DNA viruses. They were then proposed to be classified in a new viral order, the Megavirales, on the basis of their common origin, as shown by a set of ancestral genes encoding key viral functions, a common virion architecture, and shared major biological features including replication inside cytoplasmic factories. Megavirales is increasingly demonstrated to stand in the tree of life aside Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya, and the megavirus ancestor is suspected to be as ancient as cellular ancestors. In addition, giant amoebal viruses are visible under a light microscope and display many phenotypic and genomic features not found in other viruses, while they share other characteristics with parasitic microbes. Moreover, these organisms appear to be common inhabitants of our biosphere, and mimiviruses and marseilleviruses were isolated from human samples and associated to diseases. In the present review, we describe the main features and recent findings on these giant amoebal viruses and virophages.

  1. Abundance differences among G and K giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challener, Sharon Lynn Montgomery

    Effective temperatures and surface gravities were derived for 52 G and K giants using model atmosphere. Of these, 33 were called very strong-lined (or VSL) stars primarily because of their CN line strength. We find that when compared to normal stars, the VSL stars show a mean iron overabundance of 0.15 dex. Contrary to earlier suggestions, none of the heavier elements (Z greater than 10) appear selectively enhanced. Red giants are believed to undergo mixing, thereby driving the surface abundances towards those of the stellar interior. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances are most sensitive to mixing as they are produced through nucleosynthesis at various depths beneath the star's surface. The CNO abundances (normalized to the iron abundances) of the VSLs appear on average to be normal for G and K giants. This result suggests that the strong CN absorption seen in VSLs is not the result of unusual mixing. Their general overabundance of metal appears instead to be innate, presumably reflecting the metallicity of the gaseous clouds from which they formed. This should be settled once the appropriate number of VSL dwarfs is found. The deviations from the normal population of giants are rather small, however, and certainly not of the magnitude envisioned by Spinrad and Taylor (1969). It is likely that VSLs are merely the stars lying in the tail of the normal abundance distribution.

  2. Standing on the shoulders of giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, the author explains that the journal Temperature stands on the shoulders of giants-prominent scientists of the past and current members of the Temperature community. Temperature also uses the best tools, such as Google Scholar profiles. The editorial includes a new puzzle: why does warm water freeze faster than cold water?

  3. Polarization Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present simulated spectra of the flux and degree of polarization of starlight that is reflected by extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular the polarization depends strongly on the structure of the planetary atmosphere, and appears to be a valuable tool for the characterization of EGPs.

  4. Modeling Impacts of Climate Change on Giant Panda Habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Songer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca are one of the most widely recognized endangered species globally. Habitat loss and fragmentation are the main threats, and climate change could significantly impact giant panda survival. We integrated giant panda habitat information with general climate models (GCMs to predict future geographic distribution and fragmentation of giant panda habitat. Results support a major general prediction of climate change—a shift of habitats towards higher elevation and higher latitudes. Our models predict climate change could reduce giant panda habitat by nearly 60% over 70 years. New areas may become suitable outside the current geographic range but much of these areas is far from the current giant panda range and only 15% fall within the current protected area system. Long-term survival of giant pandas will require the creation of new protected areas that are likely to support suitable habitat even if the climate changes.

  5. PERIPHERAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMAS OF ORAL CAVITY: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma or the so - called “giant cell epulis” is the most common oral giant cell lesion. Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant - cell hyperplasia, osteoclastoma, or giant cell reparative granuloma. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen . This lesion probably does not represent a true neoplasm, but rather may be reactive in nature, believed to be stimulated by local irritation or trauma, but the cause is not certainly known. The aim in publishing this study is to present the clinical, histopathological features and treatment of peripheral giant cell granulomas of various sizes in different age groups in jaws

  6. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the 1D stellar evolution code MESA. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code AREPO. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Differen...

  7. Control Effect of Evolution of North Sea Basin on Formation of Giant Oil-Gas Fields%北海盆地形成演化对大油气田的控制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘政; 何登发; 温志新; 李涤

    2012-01-01

    The North Sea basin underwent eight orogenic stages and gave rise to the frameworks that the metamorphic basement was formed in Caledonian stage; Pangaea following Paleo-Tethys closure shaped in Hercynian, and the coal-measure source rock deposited in the south- em North Sea basin; southern and northern North Sea basin continued subsidence in intra-craton stage, with early arid .climate and late large-scale marine transgression, forming favorable reserv0ir-cap rocks assemblage in south of it; regional extension environment gave rise to Viking, Central and Moray Firth grabens and troughs in rifting stage; uplifting of central North Sea basin e0mpanied with many a volca- nic activity in thermal uplift stage, providing large amount of provenances for development of the northern reservoir rocks; central dome sub- sidence in major rifting stage followed by being submerged, causing premium source rocks development in northern of it; relatively stable sedimentary environment in late rifting state allowed large amount of chalks to develop in the central and deposit marls in the northern, shaping regional cap rocks in the northern of this basin; and in post-rifting stage, Norway-Greenland Sea separation occurred, and sustained and stable deposition under previous structural framework provided favorable environment for oil and gas preservation. Finally, these result- ed in framework as giant gas fields dominantly distributed in the southern and giant oil fields in the northern, and contemporarily, "upper source-lower reservoir" and "lower source-upper reservoir" characteristics were found in Viking graben and Central graben, respectively.%分析了北海盆地的形成演化对大油气田形成的控制作用。研究认为,北海盆地经历了8个构造演化期,加里东运动期形成了主要变质岩基底;海西运动导致古特提斯洋关闭,形成联合古陆,同时沉积了盆地南部重要的煤系烃源岩;陆内克拉通期盆地南、

  8. A desert of gas giant planets beyond tens of au

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Direct imaging observations constrain the fraction of stars orbited by gas giant planets with separations greater than 10 au to about 0.01 only. This is widely believed to indicate that massive protoplanetary discs rarely fragment on planetary mass objects. I use numerical simulations of gas clumps embedded in massive gas discs to show that these observations are consistent with $\\sim 0.2 - 10$ planetary mass clumps per star being born in young gravitationally unstable discs. A trio of processes -- rapid clump migration, tidal disruption and runaway gas accretion -- destroys or transforms all of the simulated clumps into other objects, resulting in a desert of gas giants beyond separation of approximately 10 au. The cooling rate of the disc controls which of the three processes is dominant. For cooling rates faster than a few local dynamical times, clumps always grow rapidly and become massive brown dwarfs or low mass stars. For longer cooling times, post-collapse (high density) planets migrate inward to $\\si...

  9. Surgical treatment for giant incisional hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, A; Rosenberg, J; Bisgaard, T

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Repair for giant incisional hernias is a challenge due to unacceptable high morbidity and recurrence rates. Several surgical techniques are available, but all are poorly documented. This systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the existing literature on repair for giant...... incisional hernia. METHODS: Literature was identified through a systematic search on PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL. We only included studies with clearly defined surgical techniques and defect size of at least 15 cm. The heterogeneity of the studies precluded a meta-analysis. The analysis was based...... on the premises of a systematic review of the literature. RESULTS: We identified 14 studies (1,198 patients) including one randomised trial. Studies were mainly small and retrospective and highly heterogenic regarding design, outcome, inclusion, and exclusion criteria. The overall morbidity rate was median 32...

  10. The Metallicity Dependence of Giant Planet Incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    We describe three corrections that should be applied to the observed relative incidence of nearby stars hosting giant planets. These are diffusion in the stellar atmosphere, use of the [Ref] index in place of [Fe/H] for metallicity, and correction for local sampling with the W velocity. We have applied these corrections to a subset of the SPOCS exoplanet survey with uniform giant planet detectability. Fitting the binned data to a power law of the form, $\\alpha 10^{\\beta [Fe/H]}$, we derived $\\alpha = 0.022 \\pm 0.007$ and $\\beta = 3.0 \\pm 0.5$; this value of $\\beta$ is 50\\% larger than the value determined by \\citet{fv05}. While the statistical significance of this difference is marginal, given the small number statistics, these corrections should be included in future analyses that include larger samples.

  11. Giant radio galaxies and cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinämäki, Pekka

    2016-10-01

    Giant radio galaxies create the welldistinguishable class of sources.These sources are characterized with edge-brightened radio lobes withhighly collimated radio jets and large linear sizes which make themthe largest individual structures in the Universe. They are also knownto be hosted by elliptical/disturbed host galaxies and avoid clustersand high galaxy density regions. Because of GRG, large linear sizeslobes extend well beyond the interstellar media and host galaxyhalo the evolution of the radio lobes may depend on interactionwith this environment. Using our method to extract filamentarystructure of the galaxies in our local universe we study whetherradio lobe properties in some giant radio galaxies are determinedon an interaction of this filament ambient.

  12. A CASE REPORT OF GIANT GENITAL WARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Grimaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant genital warts (GGW represent a rare form of sexually transmitted disease caused by the human papillomavirus, arising more frequently in the vulvar and perianal regions as large exophytic cauliflower-like mass. Estimated rate of recurrence is 60 to 66%, while malignant transformation is possible and it has been reported in 30 to 56% of cases. A 45- years-old woman was admitted to our Structure of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Siena, Italy with an extensive cauliflower- like masses diffused on vulvar and perianal region. The patient was treated in general anaesthesia, with a wide en bloc excision up to free clinical edges and immediate reconstruction of the vulvar continuity. Buschke Lowenstein tumour or giant genital warts is a sporadic tumour with an elevate local recurrence rate. In some cases, surgery can be very difficult and it must be associated to other strategies. An accurate follow-up is always necessary

  13. Fingering Convection in Red Giants Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wachlin, F C; Althaus, L G

    2014-01-01

    Fingering (thermohaline) convection has been invoked for several years as a possible extra-mixing which could occur in Red Giant stars due to the modification of the chemical composition induced by nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning zone. Recent studies show however that this mixing is not sufficient to account for the needed surface abundances. A new prescription for fingering convection, based on 3D numerical simulations has recently been proposed (BGS). The resulting mixing coefficient is larger than the ones previously given in the literature. We compute models using this new coefficient and compare them to previous studies. We use the LPCODE stellar evolution code with the GNA generalized version of the mixing length theory to compute Red Giant models and we introduce fingering convection using the BGS prescription. The results show that, although the fingering zone now reaches the outer dynamical convective zone, the efficiency of the mixing is not enough to account for the observations. The fing...

  14. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J; Yelle, Roger V

    2014-04-28

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres.

  15. Spectroscopy of late type giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaenhauer, A.; Thevenin, F.

    1984-06-01

    An attempt to calibrate broadband RGU colors of late type giant stars in terms of the physical parameters of the objects is reported. The parameters comprise the effective temperature, surface gravity and global metal abundance with respect to the sun. A selection of 21 giant star candidates in the Basel fields Plaut 1, Centaurus III and near HD 95540 were examined to obtain a two color plot. Attention is focused on the G-R color range 1.5-2.15 mag, i.e., spectral types K0-K5. A relationship between R and the metallicity is quantified and shown to have a correlation coefficient of 0.93. No correlation is found between metallicity and gravity or R and the effective temperature.

  16. About a Case Report of Giant Hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Mediavilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Our objective is to report a case of an infrequent entity as the giant hydronephrosis. Case Report. We report the case of an 82-syear-old male referred for a poor general condition. A radiological study revealed a great left hydronephrosis secondary to an urothelial carcinoma. The patient died due to his poor general condition. A histological diagnosis revealed a transitional cell carcinoma of renal pelvis and ureter and atrophic renal parenchyma. Conclusion. Giant hydronephrosis represents a very often entity to be taken into account in cases with big cystic abdominal masses in absence of unilateral or bilateral kidney. Simple nephrectomy is the treatment of choice in most cases. Nevertheless, in cases of nonsubsidiary surgery, percutaneous drainage may be necessary.

  17. Giant colonic diverticulum: radiographic and MDCT characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeina, Abdel-Rauf; Mahamid, Ahmad; Nachtigal, Alicia; Ashkenazi, Itamar; Shapira-Rootman, Mika

    2015-12-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum (GCD), defined as a diverticulum larger than 4 cm, is a rare entity that is generally a manifestation of colonic diverticular disease. Because of its rarity and its variable and non-specific presentation, the diagnosis of GCD depends mainly on imaging findings. Knowledge of the spectrum of radiographic and CT features of the GCD is important in making the correct diagnosis and potentially preventing complications. This review focuses on imaging findings characteristic of GCD as well as its complications and radiographic mimics. Teaching points • Giant colonic diverticulum is a rare complication of diverticulosis.• The most common symptom is abdominal pain presenting in approximately 70 % of patients.• Diagnosis is based on imaging findings with plain abdominal radiographs and MDCT.• Treatment consists of en bloc resection of the diverticulum and affected adjacent colon.

  18. PERIPHERAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA- A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Agrawal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a benign inflammatory hyperplastictype of lesion of unknown etiology occurring in gingiva or alveolar ridge. It normally presentsas a soft tissue purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in a background ofmononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. A 75 years old male patientreported with a chief complaint of pain and swelling in lower right back region of mouth. Onintra-oral examination the swelling was red, firm and sessile with smooth surface texture. Theorthopantomogram (OPG revealed a well-demarcated radiolucency extending from distalaspect of mandibular canine to mesial aspect of mandibular first molar. The cone beamcomputed tomography also showed the features suggestive of soft tissue lesion causingcupping resorption of mandible. Excisional biopsy was performed under local anaesthesiaand tissue was examined histopathologically. The lesion was diagnosed as PGCG afterthorough clinical, radiologic and histopathologic examination.

  19. Giant Uterine Fibromyoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahiluma Santana Pedraza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The uterus is the common site for multiple benign and malignant conditions. Giant uterine fibromyoma is a benign tumor of low incidence. Its management poses a challenge for the surgical team because of the volume of the surgical specimen and the variations in the distribution of intra-abdominal organs caused by uterine growth. A case of a 43-year-old patient with a history of bronchial asthma and hypertension who presented with enlargement of the abdomen and vaginal bleeding is reported. The patient was attended by the General Surgery Department of the María Genoveva Guerrero Ramos Comprehensive Diagnostic Center in the Libertador Municipality, Capital District, Venezuela. Total abdominal hysterectomy and complementary appendectomy were performed. The histopathological study showed a giant uterine fibromyoma. Postoperative progress was satisfactory. It was decided to present the case due to its rarity.

  20. Interacting Giant Gravitons from Spin Matrix Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Harmark, Troels

    2016-01-01

    Using the non-abelian DBI action we find an effective matrix model that describes the dynamics of weakly interacting giant gravitons wrapped on three-spheres in the AdS part of AdS_5 x S^5 at high energies with two angular momenta on the S^5. In parallel we consider the limit of \\CN=4 super Yang-Mills theory near a certain unitarity bound where it reduces to the quantum mechanical theory called SU(2) Spin Matrix Theory. We show that the exact same matrix model that describes the giant gravitons on the string theory side also provides the effective description in the strong coupling and large energy limit of the Spin Matrix Theory. Thus, we are able to match non-supersymmetric dynamics of D-branes on AdS_5 x S^5 to a finite-N regime in \\CN=4 super Yang-Mills theory near a unitarity bound.

  1. Convection and Mixing in Giant Planet Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vazan, Allona; Kovetz, Attay; Podolak, Morris

    2015-01-01

    The primordial internal structures of gas giant planets are unknown. Often giant planets are modeled under the assumption that they are adiabatic, convective, and homogeneously mixed, but this is not necessarily correct. In this work, we present the first self-consistent calculation of convective transport of both heat and material as the planets evolve. We examine how planetary evolution depends on the initial composition and its distribution, whether the internal structure changes with time, and if so, how it affects the evolution. We consider various primordial distributions, different compositions, and different mixing efficiencies and follow the distribution of heavy elements in a Jupiter-mass planet as it evolves. We show that a heavy-element core cannot be eroded by convection if there is a sharp compositional change at the core-envelope boundary. If the heavy elements are initially distributed within the planet according to some compositional gradient, mixing occurs in the outer regions resulting in a...

  2. Taxonomy of Indonesian giant clams (Cardiidae, Tridacninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UDHI EKO HERNAWAN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hernawan E. 2012. Taxonomy of Indonesian giant clams (Cardiidae, Tridacninae. Biodiversitas 13: 118-123. A taxonomic study was conducted on the giant clam’s specimens deposited in Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense (MZB, Cibinong Indonesia. Taxonomic overviews of the examined specimens are given with diagnostic characters, remarks, habitat and distribution. Discussion is focused on specific characters distinguishing each species. From seven species known to distribute in Indonesian waters, there are six species, Tridacna squamosa Lamarck, 1819; T. gigas Linnaeus, 1758; T. derasa Roding, 1798; T. crocea Lamarck, 1819; T. maxima Roding,1798; and Hippopus hippopus Linnaeus, 1758. This study suggests the need for collecting specimen of H. porcellanus Rosewater, 1982. Important characters to distinguish species among Tridacninae are interlocking teeth on byssal orifice, life habits, presence of scales and inhalant siphon tentacles.

  3. Production of Generation-2 Mekong giant catfish (Pangasinodon gigas cultured with Spirulina sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriangsak Meng-umphan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment of Spirulina-supplemented pellet feed to 5-year-old F1 groups of Mekong giant catfish (Pangasinodon gigas from the brood stock and intended for use as breeders. The effects on their growth and maturation when cultured in an earthen pond were observed. Results revealed that, compared to control, there was more gain in weight while the feed conversion ratio was lower. The number of red blood cells was also higher while that of white blood cells was lower, compared to control. Out of 18 treated fish (9 males and 9 females, 6 males and 2 females gave sperms and eggs while none from control group did. It was concluded that Spirulina supplemented in pellet feed can improve growth and maturation performance to the brood stock of Mekong giant catfish.

  4. A case of giant prostatic hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Luke Wang; Paul Davis; Kevin McMillan

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common conditions experienced by aging males and a frequent cause of bladder outlet obstruction and macroscopic haematuria. Giant prostatic hyperplasia (GPH) is an extremely rare form of prostatic hyperplasia. We present a case of a patient with GPH of 800 mL. To our knowledge, this is the fourth largest prostatic hyperplasia ever reported in the literature.

  5. Giant eruptions of very massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or supernova-impostor events are far more mysterious than true supernovae. An extreme example can release as much radiative energy as a SN, ejecting several M_sun of material. These events involve continuous radiation-driven outflows rather than blast waves. They constitute one of the main unsolved problems in stellar astrophysics, but have received surprisingly little theoretical effort. Here I note some aspects that are not yet familiar to most astronomers.

  6. Giant Magneto-Impedance and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tannous, C

    2002-01-01

    The status of Giant Magneto-Impedance effect is reviewed in Wires, Ribbons and Multilayered Soft Ferromagnetic Thin Films. After establishing the theoretical framework for the description of the effect, and the constraints any material should have in order to show the effect, experimental work in Wires, Ribbons and Multilayered Thin Films is described. Existing and potential applications of the effect in Electronics and Sensing are highlighted.

  7. Giant Myoepithelioma of the Soft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oktay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoepitheliomas are benign salivary gland tumors and account for less than 1% of all salivary gland tumors. They are usually located in the parotid gland. The soft palate is very rare affected site. The differential diagnosis of myoepitheliomas should include reactive and neoplastic lesions. The treatment of myoepitheliomas is complete removal of the tumor. Herein, we report a case with giant myoepithelioma of the soft palate, reviewing the related literature.

  8. Muscle Giants: Molecular Scaffolds in Sarcomerogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Myofibrillogenesis in striated muscles is a highly complex process that depends on the coordinated assembly and integration of a large number of contractile, cytoskeletal, and signaling proteins into regular arrays, the sarcomeres. It is also associated with the stereotypical assembly of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the transverse tubules around each sarcomere. Three giant, muscle-specific proteins, titin (3–4 MDa), nebulin (600–800 kDa), and obscurin (~720–900 kDa), have been proposed to p...

  9. Asteroseismic age determination for dwarfs and giants

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, V Silva

    2015-01-01

    Asteroseismology can make a substantial contribution to our understanding of the formation history and evolution of our Galaxy by providing precisely determined stellar properties for thousands of stars in different regions of the Milky Way. We present here the different sets of observables used in determining asteroseismic stellar properties, the typical level of precision obtained, the current status of results for ages of dwarfs and giants and the improvements than can be expected in the near future in the context of Galactic archaeology.

  10. A case of giant prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is one of the most common conditions experienced by aging males and a frequent cause of bladder outlet obstruction and macroscopic haematuria. Giant prostatic hyperplasia (GPH is an extremely rare form of prostatic hyperplasia. We present a case of a patient with GPH of 800 mL. To our knowledge, this is the fourth largest prostatic hyperplasia ever reported in the literature.

  11. Giant gastric trichobezoar in a young female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibuowo, Abdulrazaq Akin; Saad, Anwar; Okonkwo, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Bezoars are concretions of undigested matter in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), most commonly in the stomach. The main predispositions to bezoar formation are, altered GIT anatomy or disordered GIT motility/physiology. Clinically, bezoars are classified according to their predominant component. Trichobezoars (composed mainly of hair) as a clinical entity are almost always associated with an underlying psychiatric disorder. We present below a case of giant gastric trichobezoar in a young female which was treated by gastrostomy and excision of the mass.

  12. Giant Leiomyosarcoma of the Urinary Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José G A; Klojda, Carlos A B; Araújo, Claudio P De; Pires, Lucas A S; Babinski, Marcio A

    2016-05-01

    The bladder leiomyosarcoma is a rare and agressive mesenchymal tumour, and adult women of reproductive age have a higher incidence of developing the bladder leiomyosarcoma. The pathophysiology of the disease is not certain, and its main symptoms are hematuria, dysuria and abdominal pain. There are not a considerable amount of cases described in the literature. We report a case of a giant leiomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in a 31-year-old woman.

  13. Giant intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis: Unusual MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Prachi

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of surgically proven giant neurocysticercosis (NCC. MR imaging revealed an unusually large solitary parenchymal cystic lesion showing signal intensity similar to CSF on all pulse sequences, with internal septations and a small nodule in the anterior aspect of this lesion compatible with this diagnosis. Identification of a scolex in a cystic lesion with CSF intensity plays a key role in the diagnosis of NCC. The presence of internal septations is an atypical feature.

  14. Red Giant evolution and specific problems

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, Alessandro; Girardi, Leo; Nanni, Ambra; Rubele, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the great effort made in the last decades to improve our understanding of stellar evolution, significant uncertainties still remain due to our poor knowledge of some complex physical processes that still require an empirical calibration, such as the efficiency of convective heat transport and interior mixing. Here we will review the impact of these uncertainties on the evolution of red giant stars.

  15. Giant velum interpositum meningioma in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Aliasgar V Moiyadi; Prakash Shetty

    2012-01-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare, but are relatively more often seen in children. Large size at presentation often obscures anatomical details. A particular subset of such tumors arising from the velum interpositum pose a significant surgical challenge. Thorough preoperative imaging, especially with respect to the course of the deep venous structures, provides useful evidence as to the origin. Preservation of venous anatomy at surgery is vital. We describe a 3-year-old girl with a giant ...

  16. Radio Mode Outbursts in Giant Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William; Churazov, Eugene; McNamara, Brian; David, Laurence; Murray, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Outbursts from active galactic nuclei (AGN) affect the hot atmospheres of isolated giant elliptical galaxies (gE's), as well as those in groups and clusters of galaxies. Chandra observations of a sample of nearby gE's show that the average power of AGN outbursts is sufficient to stop their hot atmospheres from cooling and forming stars, consistent with radio mode feedback models. The outbursts are intermittent, with duty cycles that increases with size.

  17. Simultaneous formation of Solar System giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Guilera, O M; Brunini, A; Benvenuto, O G

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, the so-called "Nice model" has got a significant importance in the study of the formation and evolution of the solar system. According to this model, the initial orbital configuration of the giant planets was much more compact than the one we observe today. We study the formation of the giant planets in connection with some parameters that describe the protoplanetary disk. The aim of this study is to establish the conditions that favor their simultaneous formation in line with the initial configuration proposed by the Nice model. We focus in the conditions that lead to the simultaneous formation of two massive cores, corresponding to Jupiter and Saturn, able to achieve the cross-over mass (where the mass of the envelope of the giant planet equals the mass of the core, and gaseous runway starts) while Uranus and Neptune have to be able to grow to their current masses. We compute the in situ planetary formation, employing the numerical code introduced in our previous work, for different d...

  18. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-04-14

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (10(5) copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication.

  19. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Ice Giant Interiors with Radially Varying Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Featherstone, Nicholas; Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    The internal dynamics of giant planets are controlled primarily by the interaction of convection, stratification, rotation, and magnetic fields. Within Uranus and Neptune, the ice giants, convection in the ionic ocean generates the planets' magnetic fields through dynamo action, while convection in the molecular envelope may generate the planets' zonal winds. Previous work has hypothesized the influence of rotation on convection to be relatively weak compared to that of buoyancy, leading to fluctuating fluid motions that are characterized by three-dimensional turbulence instead of columns aligned with the rotation axis (Aurnou et al., Icarus 190, 110-126, 2007; Soderlund et al., Icarus 224, 97-113, 2013). In this regime, convection generates a multipolar dynamo and zonal flows with a retrograde equatorial jet and a prograde high latitude jet in each hemisphere that look similar to those observed on the ice giants. However, the magnetic field strength and zonal wind speeds are overestimated in our models with constant electrical conductivity. Towards resolving this discrepancy, we hypothesize that incorporation of an electrically insulating outer molecular envelope will bring the magnetic field and zonal flows into quantitative agreement. We will present new simulations that include radial variations in electrical conductivity based on internal structure models in combination with material property estimates and will discuss the potential for coupling between dynamo action in the ionic ocean and zonal flow generation in the molecular envelope. In addition, we will highlight how these simulations will both contribute to and benefit from the next mission to an ice giant planet.