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Sample records for african medical staff

  1. South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Medical Journal is published by the South African Medical Association, which represents ... G Watermeyer, S Thomson, 399-402 ... Assessing the value of Western Cape Provincial Government health administrative data and ...

  2. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. ... Lecturer/Consultant Surgeon, Paediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, .... mind and the results obtained were however satisfying.

  3. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The East African Medical Journal is intended for publication of papers on ... research on problems relevant to East Africa and other African countries will receive special ... Analysis of survival patterns of TB‐HIV co‐infected patients in relation to ...

  4. Research Productivity of ]unior Academic Staff at a Tertiary Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Productivity of ]unior Academic Staff at a Tertiary Medical College in South West, Nigeria. OA Lesi, OO Orenuga, A Roberts, OO Abudu. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  5. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  6. Archives: Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 28 of 28 ... Archives: Pan African Medical Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Pan African Medical Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 28 of 28 Items ...

  7. Medical futility and end-of-life care | Sidler | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treating physician is responsible for guiding this process by demonstrating sensitivity and compassion, respecting the values of patients, their families and the medical staff. The need for training to equip medical staff to take responsibility as empathetic participants in end-of-life decision-making is underscored. South African ...

  8. Exposure of Medical Staff during Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvay, M.; Turak, O.

    2013-01-01

    The medical staff during interventional procedures receives significant doses on their hands, or parts of their body not covered with protective shielding equipment, as they are close to X-rays field. It can be stated, that interventional radiology and cardiology have one of the highest doses among the X-ray diagnostic procedures. The radiologist use X-ray machine directly in the interventional procedures. The occupational dose is measured only by one Kodak film badge worn under the lead apron for the estimation of the effective dose in Hungary. Our lecture presents the results of dose measurements on eye lens, hands, knees using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters on the medical staff of two Hungarian hospitals. Results suggest that wearing only one film badge (or other dosemeter system) under the lead apron does not provide proper information on the real occupational dose of medical staff.(author)

  9. Exploring a motivation of medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, Anatoliy G

    2018-06-08

    This paper aims to identify the true motivators (needs) of medical staff, compare them with the current labor incentives, and detect possible differences in motivators for main groups of medical staff. Observing personnel of 5 hospitals and students of the medical institute by special questionnaires, the author confirmed the hypothesis of different motivators for groups of medical staff with different ages, professions, and gender. The author used special questionnaires to collect the data. Study results confirmed the hypothesis of different motivators for groups of medical staff with different ages, professions, and gender. The author also found significant differences between the motivation of Ukrainian health workers and their colleagues from other countries. The main conclusion is that no matter how we would like to satisfy gender and age equality, all people are individual and what is good for an elderly male doctor cannot be acceptable for a young female nurse. Therefore, forming the motivation system for employees of medical institutions, it is necessary to take into account the age, gender, professions, and other characteristics of each employee. In this way, we can achieve the highest health-care performance. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Świętoń, Dominik; Muc, Adam; Mockałło, Gabor; Dzierżanowski, Jarosław; Szurowska, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  11. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paris, France, K. C. Takarinda, BSc, MSc, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung ... Kenya and T. Galgalo, MSc, African Field Epidemiology Network. ... times more likely to develop active TB than those ... isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), intensified TB case ... The capital city, where this study took place, had a.

  12. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Rosocha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a well-known method from statistical thermodynamics. We define hard constraints, which are linked to legal and working regulations, and minimize the violations of soft constraints, which are related to the quality of work, psychic, and work-life balance of staff.Findings: On a sample of 60 physicians and nurses from gynecology department we generated monthly schedules and optimized their preferences in terms of soft constraints. Our results indicate that the final value of objective function optimized by proposed algorithm is more than 18-times better in violations of soft constraints than initially generated random schedule that satisfied hard constraints.Research Limitation/implication: Even though the global optimality of final outcome is not guaranteed, desirable solutionwas obtained in reasonable time. Originality/Value of paper: We show that designed algorithm is able to successfully generate schedules regarding hard and soft constraints. Moreover, presented method is significantly faster than standard schedule generation and is able to effectively reschedule due to the local neighborhood search characteristics of simulated annealing.

  13. Chief of staff finance | Lillie | Scientia Militaria: South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 2 (1982) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Chief of staff finance. Ashley C ...

  14. Equity development programmes for academic staff at South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current academic staff profile in South African Higher Education reflects much of the skewdness of the past. The central dilemma faced by these institutions is how to achieve an equitable ratio in the short and medium terms. In response to government concerns expressed through the National Plan on Higher Education, ...

  15. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. M. Gakuya, BVM, MSc, M.N.Kyule, BVM, MSc, PhD, P.B. Gathura, BVM, MSc, PhD, Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of. Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya and S. Kariuki, BVM, MSc, PhD, CentreforMicrobiology Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, P.O. Box54840, ...

  16. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical staff. 482.22... Functions § 482.22 Condition of participation: Medical staff. The hospital must have an organized medical staff that operates under bylaws approved by the governing body and is responsible for the quality of...

  17. Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliasova, Yuliia

    2017-01-01

    The article covers current problems of professional training of junior medical staff. The main disadvantages of Ukrainian system of medical education that impede the intention of improving quality of professional training of junior medical staff have been analyzed. European experience in organizing medical education, namely, in Great Britain,…

  18. Elected medical staff leaders: who needs 'em?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R E

    1994-03-01

    Authority, influence, and power are not synonyms. In working with elected medical staff leaders, a physician executive who chooses to exert authority may soon find him- or herself relatively powerless. But one who chooses to downplay authority, to influence through persuasion, and to coach leaders to lead effectively soon generates support for his or her ideas. The need to coax, cajole, explain, persuade, and "seek input" frustrates many leaders in all kinds of organizations. It would be much easier just to order people about. It's so tempting to think: "Who needs 'em? I'm the 'chief physician.' I know what needs to be done. Let's weigh anchor, take her out, and do what it takes to sail those rough, uncharted seas." If you really enjoy sailing a large ship in rough seas without a crew, go right ahead. Or if you think it makes sense to run an organization with only an executive staff and no knowledgeable middle managers, by all means let clinician leaders know that, now that you're aboard, they're just window-dressing. If you can make this approach work, well and good. Your life will be much less complicated, each day will have far fewer frustrations, and progress toward established goals will be much faster. However, given the reality of traditionally thinking physicians, it would be best to keep an up-dated resume in the locked lower left-hand drawer of your desk.

  19. Snake and staff symbolism, and healing | Retief | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 92, No 7 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  20. Medical ethics education: thoughts on a South African medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Higher Education ... emphasised the place of bioethics within the emerging integrated medical curricula in southern Africa. ... There has been little development of African syllabi in bioethics that reflect the plasticity of ...

  1. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs’ decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed u...

  2. Scientific Communication | Okolo | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 92, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Staff/population ratios in South African public sector mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To document existing staff/population ratios per 100 000 population in South African public sector mental health services. Design. Cross-sectional survey. ... The staff/population ratios per 100 000 population for selected personnel categories (with the interprovincial ranges in brackets) were as follows: total nursing staff 15.6 ...

  4. Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching hospitals in Nigeria. ... Nigeria, were visited and relevant information was collated through personal ... The design and development of the system employs 3-tier web architecture.

  5. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: "degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients." This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from "physical health statuses," "socioeconomic statuses," and "cultural background" subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of "characteristics of the mission" and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  6. Occupational doses in medical staff during hemodynamic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Thessa C.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of an occupational radiation program for workers is to keep radiation exposures under control and to assure that radiation protection principles are followed. Due to different types of interventionist medical exams, usually the medical staffs are highly exposed to radiation, which it emphasizes that it is required safety procedures for dose reduction. In this work, studies were concerned with individual doses of medical staff that are directly engaged to interventionist procedures at hemodynamic services. Dose values from a data bank of the CDTN Individual Monitoring Service (IMS) were analyzed and measurements with film type and thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters were performed for comparison purposes. Additionally, the influence of the use of a lead apron on the individual dose was investigated. Results suggested that the medical staff does not care about wearing the routine personal dosimeter and that the registered doses may not be representative to the actual annual effective doses. They also showed that effective doses are highly dependent on the characteristics and conditions of the lead apron that is worn by the medical staff. It is concluded that it is important to have personal dosimetric system up-graded for reliable measurements, to define an adequate algorithm for determining the effective dose and to train the medical staff to follow the basic radiation protection principle of optimization. (author)

  7. Archives: South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 351 ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access ...

  8. Archives: East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 228 ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access ...

  9. Medical staff organization in nursing homes: scale development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul R; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent; Caprio, Thomas; Caprio, Anthony; Dauenhauer, Jason; Lima, Julie

    2009-09-01

    To construct a multidimensional self-report scale to measure nursing home (NH) medical staff organization (NHMSO) dimensions and then pilot the scale using a national survey of medical directors to provide data on its psychometric properties. Instrument development process consisting of the proceedings from the Nursing Home Physician Workforce Conference and focus groups followed by cognitive interviews, which culminated in a survey of a random sample of American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) affiliated medical directors. Analyses were conducted on surveys matched to Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from freestanding nonpediatric nursing homes. A total of 202 surveys were available for analysis and comprised the final sample. Dimensions were identified that measured the extent of medical staff organization in nursing homes and included staff composition, appointment process, commitment (physiciancohesion; leadership turnover/capability), departmentalization (physician supervision, autonomy and interdisciplinary involvement), documentation, and informal dynamics. The items developed to measure each dimension were reliable (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.81 to 0.65).Intercorrelations among the scale dimensions provided preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the scale. This report, for the first time ever, defines and validates NH medical staff organization dimensions, a critical first step in determining the relationship between physician practice and the quality of care delivered in the NH.

  10. Radiation education required for medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugida, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the present state and problems of radiation education in the training course for health professionals. Firstly, the following are introduced: Revised version of 'Medical education model and core curriculum ? Guidelines for educational contents (FY2010),' and the contents of pre-graduation education of education curriculum at the Department of Radiation Biology and Health, University of Occupational and Environmental Health (UOEH). Next, the author describes his educational experience at the Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences (Nursing) of UOEH, and stresses the need for radiation education in order to eliminate the anxiety of nurses against radiation. In addition, he also describes the present state and problems with respect to exposure and radiation risk due to the Fukushima nuclear accident. (A.O.)

  11. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  12. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical staff. 416.45....45 Condition for coverage—Medical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical privileges. Members of the medical staff must be...

  13. Worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic and administrative staff at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuli Ngonyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was twofold. Firstly it investigated the relationship between worker participation and job satisfaction amongst academic staff and administrative staff at a South African university. Secondly it investigated if there is a statistically significant difference between worker participation levels of academic and non-academic staff. Most empirical work on worker participation has focused on workers in the industrial and manufacturing sectors of the economy, with limited focus on worker participation in the services sector. This study aims to address this gap through this exploratory study of the impact of worker participation on job satisfaction at a South African University.

  14. Workplace violence against medical staff in healthcare facilities in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, M; Morris, E; Sobers-Grannum, N

    2016-10-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests increasing workplace violence against healthcare workers in the Caribbean, but the prevalence is largely undocumented. To determine the prevalence of workplace violence reported by medical staff at primary care clinics in Barbados. A study utilizing a modified version of the standard World Health Organization Workplace Violence Questionnaire, designed to assess the incidence, types and features of workplace violence. All nursing and physician staff on duty at the island's eight primary care clinics during the study period were invited to participate. Of the 102 respondents (72% response rate), 63% of nursing and physician staff at the polyclinics in Barbados reported at least one episode of violence in the past year. The majority reported being exposed to verbal abuse (60%) and 19% reported being exposed to bullying. Seven percent of the staff reported incidents of sexual harassment, 3% physical violence and another 3% reported racial harassment. Patients emerged as the main perpetrators of violence (64%). Logistic regression showed statistically significant associations between gender and workplace violence. Females and nurses were more predisposed to experience violent incidents than males and physicians. Over a half of medical staff surveyed reported experiencing some type of violence in the past year, female gender being a significant predictor of abuse. Adequate documentation and implementing clear policies and violence prevention programmes in health institutions are crucial steps towards addressing this issue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget.

  16. Cultural Awareness Among Nursing Staff at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Jennifer; Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Madigan, Catherine K; Li, Yin

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to identify areas for targeted improvement in regard to cultural awareness and competence among nursing staff and in the work environment. Many facilities have initiated programs to facilitate cultural competence development among nursing staff; however, there has been little examination of the effect of these initiatives, assessment of experienced nurses' cultural awareness, or investigation of nurse leader's role in promoting cultural competence in the literature. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a cultural awareness survey was modified and electronically distributed to all registered nurses and assistive personnel at an academic medical center. The modified survey instrument showed good reliability and validity among the study population. Most nursing staff exhibited a moderate to high level of cultural awareness and held positive opinions about nursing leadership and the work environment with regard to cultural issues. In increasingly diverse work environments, assessing the cultural awareness of nursing staff enables nurse leaders to evaluate efforts in promoting cultural competence and to identify specific areas in which to target staff development efforts and leadership training.

  17. Medical Education in Decentralized Settings: How Medical Students Contribute to Health Care in 10 Sub-Saharan African Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Zohray; van Schalkwyk, Susan; Couper, Ian; Pattanaik, Swaha; Turay, Khadija; Sagay, Atiene S; Baingana, Rhona; Baird, Sarah; Gaede, Bernhard; Iputo, Jehu; Kibore, Minnie; Manongi, Rachel; Matsika, Antony; Mogodi, Mpho; Ramucesse, Jeremais; Ross, Heather; Simuyeba, Moses; Haile-Mariam, Damen

    2017-12-01

    African medical schools are expanding, straining resources at tertiary health facilities. Decentralizing clinical training can alleviate this tension. This study assessed the impact of decentralized training and contribution of undergraduate medical students at health facilities. Participants were from 11 Medical Education Partnership Initiative-funded medical schools in 10 African countries. Each school identified two clinical training sites-one rural and the other either peri-urban or urban. Qualitative and quantitative data collection tools were used to gather information about the sites, student activities, and staff perspectives between March 2015 and February 2016. Interviews with site staff were analyzed using a collaborative directed approach to content analysis, and frequencies were generated to describe site characteristics and student experiences. The clinical sites varied in level of care but were similar in scope of clinical services and types of clinical and nonclinical student activities. Staff indicated that students have a positive effect on job satisfaction and workload. Respondents reported that students improved the work environment, institutional reputation, and introduced evidence-based approaches. Students also contributed to perceived improvements in quality of care, patient experience, and community outreach. Staff highlighted the need for resources to support students. Students were seen as valuable resources for health facilities. They strengthened health care quality by supporting overburdened staff and by bringing rigor and accountability into the work environment. As medical schools expand, especially in low-resource settings, mobilizing new and existing resources for decentralized clinical training could transform health facilities into vibrant service and learning environments.

  18. An exploration of stereotype perceptions amongst support staff within a South African higher education institution

    OpenAIRE

    Given R.B. Moloto; Lizelle Brink; J. Alewyn Nel

    2014-01-01

    Orientation: After the 1994 democratic elections, South African organisations had to replace discriminatory policies with new policies to integrate all people and to embrace diversity. As a consequence stereotypes may be more prevalent in diverse working environments. Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the experience of stereotypes amongst the support staff within a higher education institution. Motivation for this study: Changes within South African worki...

  19. A survey of Sub-Saharan African medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa suffers a disproportionate share of the world's burden of disease while having some of the world's greatest health care workforce shortages. Doctors are an important component of any high functioning health care system. However, efforts to strengthen the doctor workforce in the region have been limited by a small number of medical schools with limited enrolments, international migration of graduates, poor geographic distribution of doctors, and insufficient data on medical schools. The goal of the Sub-Saharan African Medical Schools Study (SAMSS) is to increase the level of understanding and expand the baseline data on medical schools in the region. Methods The SAMSS survey is a descriptive survey study of Sub-Saharan African medical schools. The survey instrument included quantitative and qualitative questions focused on institutional characteristics, student profiles, curricula, post-graduate medical education, teaching staff, resources, barriers to capacity expansion, educational innovations, and external relationships with government and non-governmental organizations. Surveys were sent via e-mail to medical school deans or officials designated by the dean. Analysis is both descriptive and multivariable. Results Surveys were distributed to 146 medical schools in 40 of 48 Sub-Saharan African countries. One hundred and five responses were received (72% response rate). An additional 23 schools were identified after the close of the survey period. Fifty-eight respondents have been founded since 1990, including 22 private schools. Enrolments for medical schools range from 2 to 1800 and graduates range from 4 to 384. Seventy-three percent of respondents (n = 64) increased first year enrolments in the past five years. On average, 26% of respondents' graduates were reported to migrate out of the country within five years of graduation (n = 68). The most significant reported barriers to increasing the number of graduates, and improving

  20. A survey of Sub-Saharan African medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Candice; Buch, Eric; Wassermann, Travis; Frehywot, Seble; Mullan, Fitzhugh; Omaswa, Francis; Greysen, S Ryan; Kolars, Joseph C; Dovlo, Delanyo; El Gali Abu Bakr, Diaa Eldin; Haileamlak, Abraham; Koumare, Abdel Karim; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2012-02-24

    Sub-Saharan Africa suffers a disproportionate share of the world's burden of disease while having some of the world's greatest health care workforce shortages. Doctors are an important component of any high functioning health care system. However, efforts to strengthen the doctor workforce in the region have been limited by a small number of medical schools with limited enrolments, international migration of graduates, poor geographic distribution of doctors, and insufficient data on medical schools. The goal of the Sub-Saharan African Medical Schools Study (SAMSS) is to increase the level of understanding and expand the baseline data on medical schools in the region. The SAMSS survey is a descriptive survey study of Sub-Saharan African medical schools. The survey instrument included quantitative and qualitative questions focused on institutional characteristics, student profiles, curricula, post-graduate medical education, teaching staff, resources, barriers to capacity expansion, educational innovations, and external relationships with government and non-governmental organizations. Surveys were sent via e-mail to medical school deans or officials designated by the dean. Analysis is both descriptive and multivariable. Surveys were distributed to 146 medical schools in 40 of 48 Sub-Saharan African countries. One hundred and five responses were received (72% response rate). An additional 23 schools were identified after the close of the survey period. Fifty-eight respondents have been founded since 1990, including 22 private schools. Enrolments for medical schools range from 2 to 1800 and graduates range from 4 to 384. Seventy-three percent of respondents (n = 64) increased first year enrolments in the past five years. On average, 26% of respondents' graduates were reported to migrate out of the country within five years of graduation (n = 68). The most significant reported barriers to increasing the number of graduates, and improving quality, related to

  1. A survey of Sub-Saharan African medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Candice

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-Saharan Africa suffers a disproportionate share of the world's burden of disease while having some of the world's greatest health care workforce shortages. Doctors are an important component of any high functioning health care system. However, efforts to strengthen the doctor workforce in the region have been limited by a small number of medical schools with limited enrolments, international migration of graduates, poor geographic distribution of doctors, and insufficient data on medical schools. The goal of the Sub-Saharan African Medical Schools Study (SAMSS is to increase the level of understanding and expand the baseline data on medical schools in the region. Methods The SAMSS survey is a descriptive survey study of Sub-Saharan African medical schools. The survey instrument included quantitative and qualitative questions focused on institutional characteristics, student profiles, curricula, post-graduate medical education, teaching staff, resources, barriers to capacity expansion, educational innovations, and external relationships with government and non-governmental organizations. Surveys were sent via e-mail to medical school deans or officials designated by the dean. Analysis is both descriptive and multivariable. Results Surveys were distributed to 146 medical schools in 40 of 48 Sub-Saharan African countries. One hundred and five responses were received (72% response rate. An additional 23 schools were identified after the close of the survey period. Fifty-eight respondents have been founded since 1990, including 22 private schools. Enrolments for medical schools range from 2 to 1800 and graduates range from 4 to 384. Seventy-three percent of respondents (n = 64 increased first year enrolments in the past five years. On average, 26% of respondents' graduates were reported to migrate out of the country within five years of graduation (n = 68. The most significant reported barriers to increasing the number of

  2. California decides that medical staff bylaws are not contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Michael A

    2002-03-01

    The point of conflict between the majority and minority views is the existence of consideration. There is no question that hospitals are required to adopt medical staff bylaws, nor is there any doubt hornbook law states the performance of a pre-existing duty does not constitute consideration. Therefore, the issue of law is whether the hospital's grant of privileges and the physician's agreement to abide by the bylaws is separate or different "consideration" sufficient to justify the creation of a contract.

  3. Pediatrics patient in computed tomography: risk awareness among medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arandjic, D.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Kosutic, D.; Lazarevic, Dj.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation about risk awareness in pediatrics computed tomography among medical staff are presented. Questionnaires were distributed along seven hospitals, 84 people were enrolled in this investigation. The results showed awareness of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in computed tomography. However, there is still widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks in case of pediatric patients. (author) [sr

  4. Cognitive emotions: depression and anxiety in medical students and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Isra; Banu, Haseena; Al-Fageer, Reem; Al-Suwaidi, Reem

    2009-09-01

    Medical students represent a highly educated population under significant pressures. They encounter multiple emotions during the transformation from insecure student to young knowledgeable physician. During the transition to clinical settings in the third year, the student may experience a loss of external control and may counter this with an increase in depression and/or anxiety symptoms. Studies suggest that mental health worsens after students begin medical school and remains poor throughout training. It is not just the undergraduate study period, which brings about these changes; it may continue later in internship, postgraduate study, and in physicians' practical life, and it may reach burnout level. The greater the psychosocial health, the greater is the well-being and the capacity for adaptation and overcoming problems and common life frustrations in family, relationships, and work. Medical students and practicing physicians, in comparison with the general population and that of other professions, are exposed to academic and professional stress and therefore are vulnerable to psychosocial health problems and certain specific dysfunctions that may compromise their physical, mental, and social health. Our study examines the phenomenology of depression and anxiety in medical doctors in 3 government hospitals, 3 primary health care centers and the students (all years) and staff of Dubai Medical College for Girls (DMCG). This cross-sectional study was conducted in November 2008. One hundred sixty-five medical students of DMCG and 93 doctors (including medical staff of DMCG) completed a set of 2 questionnaires regarding Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) & Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results were analyzed using SPSS 11, and adequate statistical significant tests were done. A P value of students, 28.6% showed depression and 28.7% showed anxiety. Of medical staff, 7.8% showed depression and 2.2% of them showed anxiety. The second-year medical students exhibited the

  5. South African Medical Journal - Vol 106, No 6 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. ... Central Drug Authority's position statement on cannabis · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... An overview of cancer research in South African academic and research institutions, 2013 - 2014 ...

  6. staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in south african public sector mental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alan J Flisher, MSc, MMed (Psych), PhD, FCPsych (SA), DCH service. ... Within the shifting ground of human resources in psychiatric care, it has become important ..... therefore provided the cruder overall figure of staff to total beds. Third, this ...

  7. "Hi Mommy": Parental Preferences of Greetings by Medical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks-Gallo, Lisa; Aron, Chaim Zev; Messina, Catherine R

    2018-04-01

    The therapeutic alliance between pediatricians and parents begins at the initial encounter. The manner in which pediatricians greet family members influences this relationship. This study evaluated whether parents are addressed using generic titles and investigated perceptions of parents regarding how they are addressed by medical staff. Written surveys of 137 parents of pediatric inpatients collected opinions about greetings during medical encounters. Parents were asked if they have been addressed as Mom/Dad/Mommy/Daddy during past medical encounters and which generic titles they would prefer. Using a Likert-type scale, the parents' perceptions of various salutations were assessed and compared. In this sample, 86% of parents were previously called Mom/Dad/Mommy/Daddy. Parents preferred to be addressed as Mom or Dad over other generic titles. Many disliked being addressed as Mommy/Daddy, Ma'am/Sir, or without a name, suggesting that providers should avoid the use of these salutations.

  8. CEO must have authority to coordinate governance, management, medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R L

    1984-04-01

    As hospitals attempt to survive in today's new competitive environment, they will find that the traditional organizational structure does not work. This structure can be characterized as a three-legged stool. Governance, management, and medical staff existed in relative harmony, with each able to attend to its own distinct, separate responsibilities. The medical staff regulated itself, the governing board had no serious difficulties in coping with the institution's finances, and the CEO was concerned solely with the physical plant and hospital personnel. In a riskless economic environment, this three-legged stool could remain stable. In the coming years,however, a hospital will need a clear-cut, identifiable leader if it is to survive. To centralize authority primarily in the CEO's hands will be a difficult step for nonprofit hospitals, particularly those sponsored by religious institutions, because of their tradition of operating much as a charitable social agency rather than a business. But this step must be taken, even to the extent of naming the CEO as chairman of the board, for a leader is required who has the authority to make quick decisions in the competitive marketplace. Timeliness is of strategic importance in such an environment, and governing boards increasingly will find it impossible to make timely decisions on a collective basis. Moreover, CEOs will have to coordinate the activities of management, medical staff, and the governing board. They will need to play a strong role in ensuring that target levels in DRG costs are met, and they will need the authority to mediate in issues in which the hospital's economic interests are pitted against physicians'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Academic staff recruitment and retention challenges at the University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic staff recruitment and retention challenges at the University of Botswana medical school. ... To document the medical school's staff recruitment and retention trends and challenges, and to propose ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  10. South African medical schools: Current state of selection criteria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selection of medical students at South African (SA) medical schools must promote ... groups, while ensuring optimal student throughput and success, and training future ... In keeping = with international practices, a variety of academic and ...

  11. Needs, conditions of intervention and staff in medical physics for medical imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvat, Cecile; Dieudonne, Arnaud; Guilhem, Marie-Therese; Le Du, Dominique; Pierrat, Noelle; Isambert, Aurelie; Valero, Marc; Blanchard, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    This guide proposes information on the types and quantification of medical physics tasks to be performed when performing medical imagery using ionizing radiations. It gives recommendations about the commitment of medical physicists (with or without support staff) and the required staff in nuclear medicine and, more generally in imagery (interventional radiology, scanography, conventional radiology). It first gives an overview of the situation in France in 2012 in terms of observations made by the ASN during inspections, and of results of a survey conducted among medical physicists involved in medical imagery. It indicates the current regulatory requirements, and international and national recommendations, and describes the commitment in imagery of medical physicists in three countries (Spain, Belgium and Germany). It analyses and describes the fields of intervention of medical physicists in imagery and identifies associated tasks in France (in equipment purchasing, equipment installation, equipment routine usage, patient care, nuclear medicine or internal vectorized radiotherapy, or staff training). Recommendations of a work-group about sizing criteria are proposed

  12. Job sharing at a children's hospital: evaluation by medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, J P; Martin, C J

    1996-01-13

    To evaluate job sharing for registrars at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, by seeking responses from members of the relevant medical teams. A questionnaire was sent to all 126 medical staff within the hospital (and three managers in medical administration) asking their views on job sharing for registrars. Whether job sharing should continue, who should do it, at what stage of training, and the effects on patient care. Among the 77 respondents (60%) there was broad support for the continuation of job sharing at the hospital: only 5 of 37 consultants and 2 of 19 non-job sharing registrars rejected the idea (with a further 4 consultants uncertain). 43% Of the consultants who had worked with job sharing registrars thought continuity of care was adversely affected. The committee for physician training of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians emphasises that advanced training should be flexible, with a wide range of opportunities for individuals to plan an appropriate training programme in line with their personal goals. This study has shown that job sharing for registrars at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children allows this choice. Action on concerns over any adverse effects on patient care should resolve any persisting disquiet.

  13. Medication reconciliation in nursing homes: thematic differences between RN and LPN staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsmeier, Amy A; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill R; Pepper, Ginette A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe medication reconciliation practices in nursing homes with a specific focus on nursing staff involvement in the process. The study was conducted in eight Midwestern nursing homes and included 46 onsite observations of resident transfers to the nursing home. Informal interviews of nursing staff performing medication reconciliation were conducted during each observation. Findings suggest nursing home nursing staff, including both RN and licensed practical nurse (LPN) staff, were primarily responsible for performing medication reconciliation; however, these staff often varied in how they processed resident transfer information to identify medication order discrepancies. Patterns of differences were found related to their perceptions about medication reconciliation, as well as their actions when performing the process. RN staff were more often focused on resident safety and putting the "big picture" together, whereas LPN staff were more often focused on the administrative assignment and "completing the task." Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the FPI staff member who directly supervises the assignment. ... FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT... Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. The SOI is responsible for ensuring that appropriate...

  15. Editorial: Mercury and thermometers | Myers | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. South African Medical Journal Vol. 95(10) 2005: 772-774. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  16. Mental strain among staff at medical rehabilitation clinics in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Mirjam

    2011-01-20

    The aim of the study is to compare the frequency of mental strain effects on employees in somatic and psychosomatic rehabilitation clinics as well as between the different occupational groups. Associations between mental strain effects and working conditions, cooperation in the team and employee satisfaction are also investigated. The present study is cross-sectional with a descriptive-explorative design. It is composed of a survey with standardized questionnaires (Human Service Workload, Questionnaire on Teamwork and Questionnaire on Staff Satisfaction in Medical Rehabilitation) and global items, and was conducted among all employees of twelve rehabilitation teams (five somatic and seven psychosomatic rehabilitation clinics (n=549)). The response rate of the survey averaged 45% (n=252). One in four participants reported being emotionally exhausted. There were significantly more emotionally exhausted employees working in the psychosomatic (31%) than in the somatic rehabilitation clinics (16%) (X(2)=7.403, df=1, pemployee satisfaction (r=-.38 to r=-.50, pintrinsic motivation, dissatisfaction). The results clearly show that the employees in medical rehabilitation clinics have a high stress level at work, a situation which is also known in other health care organizations. Observations of strong associations between cooperation in the team and strain effects confirm the positive impact of social support in the daily work routine. Correlation between the subjective appraisal of working conditions and the impact of strain is mostly high. It can be assumed that the strain effects can be influenced positively with supportive team and human resource development (person-related interventions) and interventions that enhance working conditions (condition-related interventions).

  17. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  18. Psychotherapy in general practice | Beyers | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 47, No 8 (1973) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Depression in general practice | Lans | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 85, No 6 (1995) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. South African Medical Journal - Vol 76, No 8 (1989)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. ... Cannabis - its clinical effects · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ... Editorial Cancer balance sheet and good news · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  1. Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 16, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 16, No 1 (2014) .... Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005-2007 · EMAIL FREE FULL .... Maladie de Leo-Buerger faisant suite à une intoxication au cannabis · EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  2. South African Medical Journal - Vol 47, No 8 (1973)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. ... Official Announcement re Contracting Out · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT .... Health care of children · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  3. South African Medical Journal - Vol 32, No 3 (1958)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. ... Sodium and potassium balance · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... The life and work of William Harvey · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  4. Editorial | Weyer | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebola virus disease in West Africa – South African perspectives. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  5. The African Hospitalist Fellowship | Daniels | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Paediatric Fellowship Programme is rolling out a training course for newly qualified paediatricians to equip them with the leadership skills to function in complex general paediatric settings. The care of children in Africa carries its own unique demands, from the layering effects of multiple conditions through to ...

  6. The role of the psychiatrist: job satisfaction of medical directors and staff psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, J; Stueve, A; McQuistion, H L

    2001-12-01

    In a previous survey of Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowship alumni, medical directors reported experiencing higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. To further this inquiry, the authors conducted an expanded survey among the membership of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (AACP). We mailed a questionnaire to all AACP members. Respondents categorized their positions as staff psychiatrist, program medical director or agency medical director, and rated their overall job satisfaction. The form also included a number of demographic and job characteristic items. Of 479 questionnaires mailed, a total of 286 individuals returned questionnaires (61%-12 forms were undeliverable). As in our previous survey, medical directors experience significantly higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. Program and agency medical directors do not differ significantly. In addition, job satisfaction is strongly and negatively correlated with age for staff psychiatrists but not for medical directors. This survey strengthens the previously reported advantage medical directors have over staff psychiatrists regarding job satisfaction. The finding that job satisfaction decreases with increasing age of staff psychiatrists but not medical directors is particularly interesting, suggesting that staff psychiatrist positions may come to be regarded as "dead-end" over time. Psychiatrists are advised to seek promotions to program medical director positions early in their careers, since these positions are far more available, and provide equal job satisfaction, compared to agency medical director positions.

  7. Roles of Medical Record and Statistic Staff on Research at the Tawanchai Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaranit, Rumpan; Chantachum, Vasana; Lekboonyasin, Orathai; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2015-08-01

    The medical record and statistic staffs play a crucial role behind the achievements of treatment and research of physicians, nurses and other health care professionals. The medical record and statistic staff are in charge of keeping patient medical records; creating databases; presenting information; sorting patient's information; providing patient medical records and related information for various medical teams and researchers; Besides, the medical record and statistic staff have collaboration with the Center of Cleft Lip-Palate, Khon Kaen University in association with the Tawanchai Project. The Tawanchai Center is an organization, involving multidisciplinary team which aims to continuing provide care for patients with cleft lip and palate and craniofacial deformities who need a long term of treatment since newborns until the age of 19 years. With support and encouragement from the Tawanchai team, the medical record and statistic staff have involved in research under the Tawanchai Centre since then and produced a number of publications locally and internationally.

  8. Book Reviews | Garisch | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Alloa, Scotland: Diadem Books, 2014. ISBN 978-1-291-95246-9. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  9. 'n Beroepsplig om te genees! | Smit | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rules of South African law are analysed, especially any possible rules whic.h may impose a duty upon a medical practitioner to heal in cases where the patient refuses treatment. The conclusion is reached that a refusal of medical treatment expressed on behalf of a minor child or an unconscious patient might safely be ...

  10. Home Medication Cabinets and Medication Taking Behavior of the Staffs in a University in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chengbin; Ye, Juan; Dong, Yuzhen; Xu, Chunmei

    2018-01-01

    Background: A growing sum of medicines is stored in home medication cabinets in China, with the behavior of self-medication increasing. Although responsible self-medication can help prevent and treat ailments that do not need professional consultation, it bears the risk of misuse of medicines issued on prescription due to inadequate prescription medicine administration. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the condition and safety of medication storage and intended self-medication in a University in China. Method: The study was conducted over 10 month period (May 2015-March 2016) and involved a random sample of households. The questionnaire survey and personal insight into household medicine supplies was performed by a team of trained pharmacy staffs. Interviewees (N = 398, aged 16-88 y) were visited door to door and the home medication cabinets were catalogued after the participants were interviewed. Results: The majority (89.71%) households have home medicine cabinets. The total number of medicine items in the 398 households was 5600, with a median of 14 per household. The most frequently encountered categories of registered medicines were cough and cold medcines (47.8%), antibacterials for systemic use (30.0%), topical products for joint and muscular pain(26.1%), vitamins (23.2%), medication for functional gastrointestinal disorders (23.2%), oral and external forms have not kept separately(55.1%). The most treatment related problems recorded were curative effect not ideal (57.9%). 68% of the sample population would choose doctors as medication consultation object about medicines purchased. Conclusion: Large sum of medicines were found per household, with a high prevalence of cough and cold medcines. Public services in China, mainly government and health organizations, need put more effort on educating people on how to store medicines, as well as finding a way to raise awareness of the public in promoting behavioral change about medication

  11. [Status of subjective well-being for medical staff in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yunlong; Liu, Yan; Xu, Shaorong; Zhao, Min; Li, Junping; Xiong, Yan

    2016-06-28

    To investigate the status of subjective well-being (SWB) for medical staffs who contact with patients directly in a tertiary hospital.
 Staffs from a tertiary hospital in Hunan province were investigated the SWB Scale (SWBS-cc20) from 2012 to 2014.
 The scores of SWB for medical staffs are high (81.67±12.33). Among the 10 sub-dimensions of SWB, medical staffs performed the best in family atmosphere, personal growth, and interpersonal adaptation, while performed the worst in physical health, mental health and material contentment. Title, job nature, education and occupation significantly affected the status of SWB. Staffs who directly connected with patients have less scores of SWB than those who do not (t=-4.80, Pmental health (OR=1.315, 95% CI 1.023 to 1.690, Phealth (OR=1.313, 95% CI 1.029 to 1.677, Pmental health and physical health.

  12. Book Reviews: Boekbesprekings | Polson | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the book reviews. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions ...

  13. Boekbesprekings: Book Reviews | Graham | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the book reviews. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions ...

  14. Book Reviews : Boekbesprekings | Spact | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the book reviews. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions ...

  15. Editorial | Peer | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Turning up the volume on hearing loss in South Africa. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms ...

  16. Bilingualism | Editorial | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the editorial. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  17. Book Reviews | Talmud | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book 1. Book Title: A manual of adverse drug interactions. Book Authors: J.P. Griffin and P.F. D'Arcy (Eds.) Fifth Edition. Pp. xiii + 649. LG395/US$244. EIseuier Science. 1997. ISBN 0-444-82406-5. Book 2. Book Title: South African cookbook for food allergies and food intolerance. Book Author: Hilda Lategan. Pp. 145.

  18. Examination of occupational exposure to medical staff (primarily nurses) during 131I medical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masayoshi; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Ito, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a new amendment to protect against radiation damage to humans has been enacted based on a 1990 recommendation by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Consequently, the dose limits of occupational exposure to medical staff were cut down sharply compared with conventional readjustments. This amended bill, however, may be triggering a reduction in the number of applicants, which hope to engage in radiotherapy. This being the case, we measured the dose levels of the occupational exposure to medical staff (doctor's group, nuclear medicine technologist's group, nurse's group and pharmacist's group) from 1999 to 2002. Moreover, we investigated what the main factor is in nurse's occupational exposure to 131 I. The highest doses of occupational exposure were 3.640 mSv to doctors, 7.060 mSv to nuclear medicine technologists, 1.486 mSv to nurses and 0.552 mSv to pharmacists. According to our results, it was clear that the highest doses in each group were far below the legally mandated upper limits of exposure doses. Although we investigated the correlations between the factors of nurse's occupational exposure to 131 I with the number of inpatients, the amount of 131 I and the number of servicing times for patients, there were no correlations found. Furthermore, to analyzing the factors in detail, it became clear that the main factor in the nurse's occupational exposure was due to the existence of patients who needed many more servicing times for their care than ordinary patients. (author)

  19. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which…

  20. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  1. 78 FR 59038 - Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... FDA intends to apply its regulatory oversight to only those mobile apps that are medical devices and...] Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability...) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Mobile Medical Applications.'' The FDA is...

  2. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Myroslava

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists' professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical…

  3. Concussion knowledge and management practices among coaches and medical staff in Irish professional rugby teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, M R; Coughlan, G F; Hart, E C; McCarthy, C

    2015-06-01

    Self-reported concussion rates among U-20 and elite rugby union players in Ireland are 45-48%. Half of these injuries go unreported. Accurate knowledge of concussion signs and symptoms and appropriate management practices among coaches and medical staff is important to improve the welfare of players. Examine concussion knowledge among coaches, and management techniques among medical staff of professional Irish rugby teams. Surveys were administered to 11 coaches and 12 medical staff at the end of the 2010-2011 season. Coaches demonstrated an accurate knowledge of concussion with a good understanding of concussion-related symptoms. Medical staff reported using a variety of methods for assessing concussion and making return-to-play decisions. Reliance on subjective clinical methods was evident, with less reliance on objective postural stability performance. Overall, the coaches in this investigation have accurate knowledge of concussion and medical staff use effective techniques for managing this injury. On-going education is needed to assist coaches in identifying concussion signs and symptoms. It is recommended that medical staff increase their reliance on objective methods for assessment and return-to-play decision making.

  4. Responsibility for quality improvement and patient safety: hospital board and medical staff leadership challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeschel, Christine A; Wachter, Robert M; Pronovost, Peter J

    2010-07-01

    Concern about the quality and safety of health care persists, 10 years after the 1999 Institute of Medicine report To Err is Human. Despite growing awareness of quality and safety risks, and significant efforts to improve, progress is difficult to measure. Hospital leaders, including boards and medical staffs, are accountable to improve care, yet they often address this duty independently. Shared responsibility for quality and patient safety improvement presents unique challenges and unprecedented opportunities for boards and medical staffs. To capitalize on the pressure to improve, both groups may benefit from a better understanding of their synergistic potential. Boards should be educated about the quality of care provided in their institutions and about the challenges of valid measurement and accurate reporting. Boards strengthen their quality oversight capacity by recruiting physicians for vacant board seats. Medical staff members strengthen their role as hospital leaders when they understand the unique duties of the governing board. A quality improvement strategy rooted in synergistic efforts by the board and the medical staff may offer the greatest potential for safer care. Such a mutually advantageous approach requires a clear appreciation of roles and responsibilities and respect for differences. In this article, we review these responsibilities, describe opportunities for boards and medical staffs to collaborate as leaders, and offer recommendations for how boards and medical staff members can address the challenges of shared responsibility for quality of care.

  5. Evaluation of Patient and Medical Staff Satisfaction regarding Healthcare Services in Wuhan Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Runtang; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Yunquan; Yu, Yong; Luo, Yi; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yanxia; Hao, Yuantao; Hu, Ying; Yu, Chuanhua

    2018-04-17

    Satisfaction evaluation is widely used in healthcare systems to improve healthcare service quality to obtain better health outcomes. The aim of this study was to measure employee work satisfaction and patient satisfaction status in Wuhan, China. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 14 medical institutions. The final valid sample comprised a total of 696 medical staff and 668 patients. The overall satisfaction levels of medical staff and patients were 58.28 ± 14.60 (10.47–100.00) and 65.82 ± 14.66 (8.62–100.00), respectively. The factors affecting medical staff satisfaction, ranking in sequence from most to least satisfied, were: the work itself, working environment and atmosphere, hospital management, practicing environment, and job rewards. Patient satisfaction factors, from most to least affecting, were ranked as follows: physician-patient relationship and communication, service organization and facilities, continuity and collaboration of medical care, access to relevant information and support, and healthcare and related services, respectively. The overall satisfaction evaluation of medical staff was average. Healthcare policy makers and medical institution management staff should focus on job rewards and working environment. This would allow them to increase their work happiness and sense of belonging, which in turn would allow them to provide better medical services to patients. The overall patient evaluation was satisfactory, with patients satisfied at all levels of the satisfaction evaluation.

  6. Evaluation of Patient and Medical Staff Satisfaction regarding Healthcare Services in Wuhan Public Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Yu, Yong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yanxia; Hao, Yuantao; Hu, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Satisfaction evaluation is widely used in healthcare systems to improve healthcare service quality to obtain better health outcomes. The aim of this study was to measure employee work satisfaction and patient satisfaction status in Wuhan, China. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 14 medical institutions. The final valid sample comprised a total of 696 medical staff and 668 patients. The overall satisfaction levels of medical staff and patients were 58.28 ± 14.60 (10.47–100.00) and 65.82 ± 14.66 (8.62–100.00), respectively. The factors affecting medical staff satisfaction, ranking in sequence from most to least satisfied, were: the work itself, working environment and atmosphere, hospital management, practicing environment, and job rewards. Patient satisfaction factors, from most to least affecting, were ranked as follows: physician-patient relationship and communication, service organization and facilities, continuity and collaboration of medical care, access to relevant information and support, and healthcare and related services, respectively. The overall satisfaction evaluation of medical staff was average. Healthcare policy makers and medical institution management staff should focus on job rewards and working environment. This would allow them to increase their work happiness and sense of belonging, which in turn would allow them to provide better medical services to patients. The overall patient evaluation was satisfactory, with patients satisfied at all levels of the satisfaction evaluation. PMID:29673134

  7. An exploration of stereotype perceptions amongst support staff within a South African higher education institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Given R.B. Moloto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: After the 1994 democratic elections, South African organisations had to replace discriminatory policies with new policies to integrate all people and to embrace diversity. As a consequence stereotypes may be more prevalent in diverse working environments. Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the experience of stereotypes amongst the support staff within a higher education institution. Motivation for this study: Changes within South African working environments, and specifically higher education institutions, resulted in more diverse management teams and a more culturally diverse workforce. With this in mind, the experience of stereotypes may become more prevalent within South African working environments. Many researchers have focused on stereotypes; however, studies on stereotypes within South Africa are limited, especially within higher education institutions. Research approach, design and method: The research approach was qualitative and a case study design was employed. A combination of both quota and convenience sampling was used. The sample consisted of (N = 30 support staff within a higher education institution in South Africa. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Main findings: The results indicated that the participants do experience stereotypes within their workplace and also hold stereotypes of other people within their workplace. The most prevalent stereotypes mentioned by participants were age, gender, racial and occupational stereotypes. There is also an indication that stereotypes have cognitive, emotional and behavioural effects on the stereotyped. Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should do away with stereotyping by embracing and managing diversity and dealing with stereotypes, specifically within higher education institutions. When managers are aware of stereotypes and the effects thereof in the organisation, they can make every effort to eradicate the

  8. Lesotho medical congress | Editorial | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the editorial. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  9. journeys through an African Medical school.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sets the scene for the events that led to the creation of the. College of Medicine. What is remarkable about “A heart for the Work” is that. Claire Wendland allows the ... medical training in a resource poor environment. It should be required reading for anyone involved in training medical students in any context and environment.

  10. Medicalization of HIV and the African Response

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    disorder, and having it treated to improve the experience and quality of life of the affected individual, is a key benefit of medicalization. Numerous examples exist where medicalization of certain problems previously confined to socio- cultural circles has helped in finding solutions. For example, Alzheimer's, a previously ...

  11. Rationing medical education | Walsh | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at the prospect of rationing, the truth is that rationing has always occurred in one form or another in medical education and in healthcare more broadly. Different types of rationing exist in healthcare professional education. For example rationing may ...

  12. South African Medical Journal - Vol 47, No 6 (1973)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevention of Food Poisoning in Hospital Patients · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... JP Kotze, MJ Weight, WA de Klerk, IV Menne, MJA Weight ... A Study of Bacterial Cultures and their Antibiotic Sensitivities in a Paediatric ... Raad : South African Medical and Dental Council · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ...

  13. Multiple sclerosis in South Africa | Modi | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 98, No 5 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  14. Adhesive intestinal obstruction | Kuremu | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 83, No 6 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  15. Standardisation of spirometry | Stewart | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 79, No 4 (1991) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  16. South African Medical Journal - Vol 32, No 4 (1958)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Half-yearly meeting of the South African Medical and Dental Council · EMAIL FREE ... for Hashimoto's Disease and related considerations · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... The seasonal incidence of cardiac infarction at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape ... Cholecystectomy in patients with coronary heart disease · EMAIL FREE ...

  17. Editorial : Clinical drug interactions | Kokwaro | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 78, No 10 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Clinical drug interactions. G. O. Kokwaro. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (10): 505-506). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  18. Anorexia nervosa in Kenya | Njenga | East African Medical Journal

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    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 4 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  19. Meta-analysis in epidemiology | Yach | South African Medical Journal

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    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 78, No 7 (1990) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  20. Primary breast sarcoma: case report | Hassan | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 7 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  1. Human Cryptosporidiosis: A Review | Ayuo | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 86, No 2 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  2. The epidemic of childhood obesity | du Toit | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 93, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. The epidemic of childhood obesity. G du Toit, M-T van der Merwe. Abstract.

  3. Prostatic fossa calculus | El Abiad | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  4. Caffeine Content of Tea and Coffee | Kaplan | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 47, No 3 (1973) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  5. The late administration of surfactant | Ballot | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 85, No 7 (1995) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  6. Flat Foot II | Dommisse | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 45, No 7 (1971) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  7. South African Medical Journal - Vol 90, No 10 (2000)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. ... FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Paul Roux, Lesley Henley, Mark Cotton, Brian Eley, 1008-1011 ... A model for estimating mental health service needs in South Africa · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  8. Giant vesical calculus | Laubscher | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 68, No 6 (1983) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  9. Sexuality in Nigerian older adults | Olatayo | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  10. Adolescence: The age of Proteus | Coovadia | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 7 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  11. Did Adolf Hitler have syphilis? | Retief | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 95, No 10 (2005) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  12. Congenital syphilis - who is at risk? | Venter | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 78, No 8 (1989) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  13. Intravascular catheter sepsis | Mer | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 89, No 10 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  14. Scope and geographical distribution of African medical journals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A search was done for relevant African medical journals on electronic databases, library catalogues and internet sites, and a list was compiled of active journals. A survey was conducted via ... Fifty-one journals were published in English, 7 in French and 1 in Portuguese. Most journals were owned by an association ...

  15. South African Medical Journal - Vol 92, No 5 (2002)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malingering in clinical practice with specific reference to psychiatry and psychology · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Frans J Hugo, Frances Hemp, 354. Academic achievement and creative thinking in Souh African medical students - An empirical ...

  16. A Committee on Well-Being of Medical Students and House Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Harvey M.

    1983-01-01

    A committee was established in a university medical center to address socioemotional aspects of medical training and to enhance the learning environment. Problem areas identified for program development included poor communication, stress on self and relationships, need for advocacy, and lack of support for house staff members. (MSE)

  17. The new system of education and training of medical staff in radiation protection in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, B.; Preza, K.; Titka, V.; Shehi, G.

    2001-01-01

    The present situation as regarding the education and training of medical staff in radiological protection is discussed. In particular the protection of patients, children and pregnant women were the most sensible topics in some courses held in recent years. Emphasis is given on a number of courses and course units dealing with radiation safety problems in the medical field and their content. (author)

  18. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  19. Workplace violence and its effect on burnout and turnover attempt among Chinese medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiying; Lin, Shaowei; Ruan, Qishuang; Li, Huangyuan; Wu, Siying

    2016-11-01

    The present study was to evaluate workplace violence and examine its effect on job burnout and turnover attempt among medical staff in China. A total of 2,020 medical employees were selected from Fujian province by using stratified cluster sampling method. The Chinese version of the Workplace Violence Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey were used to measure the workplace violence and job burnout, respectively. Other potential influencing factors for job burnout and turnover attempt were collected using a structured questionnaire. The incidence of workplace violence among medical staff was 48.0%. Workplace violence had a positive correlation with emotional exhaustion and cynicism and a negative correlation with professional efficacy. Workplace violence, marital status, employment type, working time (≥ 10 h/day), performance recognition, and life satisfaction were significant predictors for turnover attempt among Chinese medical staff.

  20. Medication administration errors in assisted living: scope, characteristics, and the importance of staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Love, Karen; Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David; Carder, Paula C

    2011-06-01

    To compare rates of medication errors committed by assisted living staff with different training and to examine characteristics of errors. Observation of medication preparation and passes, chart review, interviews, and questionnaires. Stratified random sample of 11 assisted living communities in South Carolina (which permits nonnurses to administer medications) and Tennessee (which does not). All staff who prepared or passed medications: nurses (one registered nurse and six licensed practical nurses (LPNs)); medication aides (n=10); and others (n=19), including those with more and less training. Rates of errors related to medication, dose and form, preparation, route, and timing. Medication preparation and administration were observed for 4,957 administrations during 83 passes for 301 residents. The error rate was 42% (20% when omitting timing errors). Of all administrations, 7% were errors with moderate or high potential for harm. The odds of such an error by a medication aide were no more likely than by a LPN, but the odds of one by staff with less training was more than two times as great (odds ratio=2.10, 95% confidence interval=1.27-3.49). A review of state regulations found that 20 states restrict nonnurses to assisting with self-administration of medications. Medication aides do not commit more errors than LPNs, but other nonnurses who administered a significant number of medications and assisted with self-administration committed more errors. Consequently, all staff who handle medications should be trained to the level of a medication aide. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Satisfaction of staff of Swiss insurance companies with medical appraisals: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyr Niklaus

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high quality of timely delivered medical appraisals is crucial for social and other insurances to judge possible occupational reintegration measures for patients with medical conditions who are in danger to lose their job. However, little is known about the satisfaction of staff of insurance companies with medical appraisals that they have commissioned. Our questionnaire survey prospectively included all medical appraisals arriving at Swiss insurances from FEB to APR 2008. We assessed the satisfaction of the commissioner with medical appraisals performed by medical assessors. In addition, we evaluated the contribution of several factors to overall satisfaction. The unit of sample was the medical appraisal. Findings We analysed 3165 medical appraisals, 2444 (77% of them from the public disability insurance, 678 (22% from private accident, liability and loss of income insurances and 43 (1% from other insurances. Overall satisfaction of staff of insurance companies in Switzerland was high, but satisfaction of the disability insurance with appraisals was generally lower compared to satisfaction of private insurances. The staff of the disability insurance judged time for preparation as too long in 30%. For staff of private insurance companies 20% of appraisals were not "worth its price". Well-grounded and comprehensible conclusions were the single most important factor for high overall satisfaction (OR 10.1; 95%-CI: 1.1-89.3. Conclusions From the viewpoint of staff of insurance companies, a relevant part of medical appraisals arrives too late. Medical assessors have to take the specific needs of insurances into account, to perform more appraisals with sound conclusions in due time.

  2. Book Reviews | Naidu | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review 1. Book Title: The Histogenesis of Thyroid Cancer. Book Author: N Simionescu. Illustrated. £9.0.0. London: William Heinemann Medical Books. 1970. Book Review 2. Book Title: The Hypertensive Vascular Crisis. An experimental study. Book Author: F.B. Byrom. Illustrated. £1.10.0. London: William Heinemann ...

  3. Book Reviews | Naidu | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review 1. Book Title: Medical Radionuclides: Radiation Dose and Effects. Book Authors: R. J. Cloutier, C. L. Edwards & W. S. Snyder (Ed.) Pp. ix + 528. Illustrated. $3.00. Oak Ridge, Tenn.: US Atomic Energy Commission. 1970. Available from Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, ...

  4. The role of medical staff in providing patients rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Izetbegovic, Sebija

    2014-01-01

    Among the priority basic human rights, without a doubt, are the right to life and health-social protection. The process of implementation of human rights in the everyday life of an ordinary citizen in the post-war recovery of Bosnia and Herzegovina faces huge objective and subjective difficulties. Citizens need to be affordable adequate healthcare facilities that will be open to all on equal terms. The term hospital activity implies a set of measures, activities and procedures that are undertaken for the purpose of treatment, diagnosis and medical rehabilitation of patients in the respective health institutions. Principles of hospital care should include: Comprehensiveness (Hospital care is available to all citizens equally); Continuity (Provided is continuous medical care to all users); Availability (Provided approximately equal protection of rights for all citizens). Education of health professionals: The usual threats to patient safety include medical errors, infections occurred in the hospital, unnecessary exposure to high doses of radiation and the use of the wrong drug. Everyday continuing education in the profession of a doctor is lifelong.

  5. Evaluation of knowledge regarding Shaken Baby Syndrome among parents and medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Urszula; Tyrala, Kinga; Paniczek, Monika; Ledwon, Martyna; Josko-Ochojska, Jadwiga

    2016-06-08

    Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS), currently functioning as Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), is a form of violence against children mainly under 2 years of age. The number of SBS might be underestimated, as many cases of violence remain unreported. The aim of the study was evaluation of the state of knowledge of the SBS phenomenon, its scale and diagnostic methods among parents, medical staff and medical students. 639 people were examined: 39% of parents, 32,5% medical staff members and 28,5% of medical students. 82% were women. The average age was 34,9 years (SD=9,78). 70% of them had children. The research tool was an anonymous survey. The 34 questions concerned numerous aspects of violence against children as well as knowledge about SBS. According to 90% of the interviewees shaking a baby may be dangerous but 43% have ever heard about shaken baby syndrome. 'SBS is a form of violence' said 88% of respondents but 57% realize that one-time shaking can lead to death and only 19% indicated men as aggressors. 16% of medical staff members did not know how long it takes for the consequences of shaking a baby to be revealed. Majority of the medical staff members working with children have never heard about SBS. Only half of the surveyed understands the connection of shaking with vision loss or child's death. Among the long-term consequences of shaking a baby the greatest knowledge concerns emotional consequences of shaking.

  6. Evaluation of medical staff and patient satisfaction of Chinese hospitals and measures for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Huang, Chengyu; Lu, Xiangchan; Chen, Siyuan; Zhao, Pan; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    Our goal is to establish criteria for evaluating satisfaction of medical staff and patients of Chinese hospitals and propose measures for improvement. A survey was conducted among medical staff and patients of infectious disease hospitals in three locations, i.e., Shanghai, Chongqing, and Nanning. The analyses included item analysis, factor analysis, reliability analysis, Pearson correlation and one-way analysis of variance. For the patient group, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) = 0.973, Cronbach's α = 0.962 and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.583 to 0.795. For the medical staff group, KMO = 0.972, Cronbach's α = 0.970, and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.603 to 0.854. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the patient group were 0.74 to 1.34, 0.81 to 1.17, 0.78 to 1.07, 0.89 to 1.34, and 0.71 to 1.10. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the medical staff group were 0.17 to 1.03, ‒ 0.16 to 0.60, ‒ 0.18 to 0.74, 0.23 to 0.72, and ‒ 0.39 to 0.37. The clinicians were less satisfied with the hospitals than the patients. Medical staff and patients in Shanghai were relatively more satisfied. Improving the evaluation criteria and survey methods with respect to medical staff and patient satisfaction with Chinese hospitals may increase clinician and patient satisfaction and improve the health care environment in China.

  7. Addressing social responsibility in medical education: the African way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwizera, Enoch N; Iputo, Jehu E

    2011-01-01

    Indigenous sub-Saharan societies have, over the millennia, lived and socialised within the unwritten 'rules' of the 'Ubuntu' or similar philosophies that emphasises holistic 'humanness', and which is a form of 'social responsibility'. This article looks into some relevant social responsibility aspects of medical education in the South African context, with particular emphasis on how these aspects have been addressed. Apartheid was, by its very nature, incompatible with social responsibility for the majority of South Africans, but one medical school that was a non-complicit product of apartheid succeeded in fulfilling a socially responsible mission. Thus, this article implicitly identifies what South Africa, Africa and the global Health Professions Education community could learn from these trail-blazing experiences.

  8. Staff perceptions of organisational values in a large South African manufacturing company: exploring socio-demographic differences

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Nico; Coetzee, Melinde

    2011-01-01

    Orientation: Companies’ concerns about increasing their competitiveness, responsiveness and adaptability in a globalised, highly complex and turbulent business environment have led to a renewed interest in the role of corporate values and culture in improving organisational effectiveness and performance. Research purpose: The objective of the study was to explore the perceptions of men and women staff members, as well as members of various race and age groups, in a large South African manu...

  9. A chapter of early medical africana | Norwich | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reference is also made to an interestino original medical volume to which Ten Rhyne contributed the use of acupuncture and scarification for the treatment of podagra (gout). A description of the physical methods used by the Hottentots of that period is illustrated from original engravings contained in the famous Kolbe ...

  10. Cytogenetics in medical practice | Nelson | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cytogenetics and tissue culture laboratory is an essential component of a medical genetics department. Chromosome analysis provides a definite answer in many cases where clinical diagnosis is in doubt, and supplies information on which counselling may be based. Cultured cells from different body tissues may be the ...

  11. Analysis of chromosomal aberration in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lin; Zhao Fengling; Wang Xi'ai; Wang Ping; Jiang Feng; Lu Yumin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chromosomal aberrations in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation and to speculate its possible causation. Methods: The hospital staffs, including 6 females and 1 male,worked in a clinical laboratory where a CT room was located downstairs. The thickness of precast slab between these two rooms was 6 cm. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of seven staffs were examined for conventional chromosomal aberrations. Results: The frequencies of dicentrics in the peripheral lymphocytes of 4 females were from 0.40% to 1.60% that was significantly higher than the spontaneous frequency of dicentrics (0.03%, χ 2 =36.79, P<0.05). The translocation was observed in the lymphocytes from all subjects with frequencies from 0.33% to 1.20%, obviously higher than its spontaneous frequency of 0.01% (χ 2 =42.90, P<0.05). Conclusion: These staffs suffer from ionizing radiation. (authors)

  12. Workplace violence against medical staff of Chinese children's hospitals: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Yan, Chun-Mei; Shi, Lei; Mu, Hui-Tong; Li, Xin; Li, An-Qi; Zhao, Cheng-Song; Sun, Tao; Gao, Lei; Fan, Li-Hua; Mu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    In China, medical staff of children's hospitals are commonly exposed to violence. However, few studies on medical violence are conducted in the settings of children's hospitals. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences, and potential risk factors of workplace violence (WPV) against medical staff of children's hospitals. A retrospective cross-sectional design was used. A self-administered questionnaire was utilized to collect data on 12 children's hospitals. The questionnaires were distributed to a stratified proportional random sample of 2,400 medical staff; 1,932 valid questionnaires were collected. A chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were conducted. A total of 68.6% of respondents had experienced at least one WPV incident involving non-physical and/or physical violence in the past year. The perpetrators were mainly family members of patients (94.9%). Most of the WPV occurred during the day shift (70.7%) and in wards (41.8%). Males were 1.979 times (95% CI, 1.378 to 2.841) more likely than females to experience physical violence. Emergency departments were more exposed to physical violence than other departments. Oncology was 2.733 times (95% CI, 1.126 to 6.633) more exposed to non-physical violence than the emergency department. As a result of WPV, victims felt aggrieved and angry, work enthusiasm declined, and work efficiency was reduced. However, only 5.6% of the victims received psychological counseling. Medical staff are at high risk of violence in China's children's hospitals. Hospital administrators and related departments should pay attention to the consequences of these incidents. There is a need for preventive measures to protect medical staff and provide a safer workplace environment. Our results can provide reference information for intervention strategies and safety measures.

  13. 75 FR 17143 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0495] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Documents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  14. 76 FR 43689 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0530] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  15. 75 FR 44267 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-N-0495] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Document; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  16. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  17. Toxic effects of formalin-treated cadaver on medical students, staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Formaldehyde can be toxic, allergenic and carcinogenic. Evaporation of formaldehyde from formalin-treated cadavers in the anatomy dissection rooms can produce high exposure. This study was conducted to assess acute and chronic toxic effects of formalin-treated cadavers on medical students, staff ...

  18. [Turnover of Non-medical Staff in Outpatient Oncology Practices: Is Building Social Capital a Solution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloede, T D; Ernstmann, N; Baumann, W; Groß, S E; Ansmann, L; Nitzsche, A; Neumann, M; Wirtz, M; Schmitz, S; Schulz-Nieswandt, F; Pfaff, H

    2015-11-01

    While a lot is known about potential and actual turnover of non-medical hospital staff, only few data exist for the outpatient setting. In addition, little is known about actual instruments which leaders can use to influence staff turnover in physician practices. In the literature, the social capital of an organisation, which means the amount of trust, common values and reciprocal behaviour in the organisation, has been discussed as a possible field of action. In the present study, staff turnover as perceived by outpatient haematologists and oncologists is presented and analysed as to whether social capital is associated with that staff turnover. In conclusion, measures to increase the social capital of a practice are presented. The present study is based on data gathered in a questionnaire-based survey with members of the Professional Organisation of -Office-Based Haematologists and Oncologists (N=551). The social capital of the practice was captured from the haematologists and oncologists using an existing and validated scale. To analyse the impact of the practice's social capital on staff turnover, as perceived by the physicians, bivariate correlations and linear regression analyses were calculated. In total, 152 haematologists and oncologists participated in the study which represents a response rate of 28%. In the regression analyses, social capital appears as a significant and strong predictor of staff turnover (beta=-0.34; pturnover although the underlying study design does not allow for drawing causal conclusions regarding this relationship. To create social capital in their practice, outpatient physicians may apply measures that facilitate social interaction among staff, foster trust and facilitate cooperation. Such measures may already be applied when hiring and training new staff, but also continuously when leading employees and when organising work tasks, e.g., by establishing regular team meetings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Evaluation of radiation doses in patient and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Deoknam; Kim, Kie Hwan; Park, Kyung; Kim, Jung-Su; Han, Seonggyu; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-01-01

    The radiation exposure dose must be optimised because the hazard resulting from an interventional radiology procedure is long term depending on the patient. The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses received by the patients and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Data were collected during 126 ERCP procedures, including the dose-area product (DAP), entrance dose (ED), effective dose (E), fluoroscopy time (T) and number of digital radiographs (F). The medical staff members each wore a personal thermoluminescence dosemeter to monitor exposure during ERCP procedures. The mean DAP, ED, E and T were 47.06 Gy cm 2 , 196.06 mGy, 8.93 mSv, 7.65 min and 9.21 images, respectively. The mean dose to the staff was 0.175 mSv and that to the assistant was 0.069 mSv. The dose to the medical staff was minimal when appropriate protective measures were used. The large variation in the patient doses must be further investigated. (authors)

  20. Health physics limitations for radiation protection of patients and medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golikov, V.Ya.; Ermolina, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    Norm-setting documents regulating the requirements to radiation safety during medical x-ray and radiological procedures are reviewed. Besides the Federal Law On Radiation Safety of the Population and Radiation Safety Norms-96, the authors comment on the norm-setting documents issued later and supplementing the above documents. The authors emphasize the obligatory licensing during medical use of ionizing radiation sources. Effective dose is introduced as the criterion of radiation safety of the patients and staff during prophylactic x-ray examinations. Principles of normsetting, validation, and optimization of medical exposures and criteria of radiation safety of patients are discussed

  1. Assimilating South African medical students trained in Cuba into the South African medical education system: reflections from an identity perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Donda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In terms of the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration programme, an agreement between the governments of South Africa and Cuba, cohorts of South African students receive their initial five years medical training at a Cuban university before returning to South Africa for a six to twelve months orientation before integration into the local final year class. It is common for these students to experience academic difficulty on their return. Frequently this is viewed merely as a matter of a knowledge deficit. Discussion We argue that the problem arises from a fundamental divergence in the outcomes of the Cuban and South African medical curricula, each of which is designed with a particular healthcare system in mind. Using the discrepancy theory of identity proposed by Higgins in 1987, we discuss the challenges experienced by the returning Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration students in terms of a potential crisis of identity and suggest interventions which may prove valuable in promoting academic success and successful integration. Conclusions Though providing additional training to address the gap in skills and knowledge in returning students is an important part of their successful reintegration, this could be insufficient on its own and must be complemented by a range of measures designed to ameliorate the discrepancies in identity which arise from the transition from one educational model to another.

  2. Assimilating South African medical students trained in Cuba into the South African medical education system: reflections from an identity perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donda, B M; Hift, R J; Singaram, V S

    2016-10-24

    In terms of the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration programme, an agreement between the governments of South Africa and Cuba, cohorts of South African students receive their initial five years medical training at a Cuban university before returning to South Africa for a six to twelve months orientation before integration into the local final year class. It is common for these students to experience academic difficulty on their return. Frequently this is viewed merely as a matter of a knowledge deficit. We argue that the problem arises from a fundamental divergence in the outcomes of the Cuban and South African medical curricula, each of which is designed with a particular healthcare system in mind. Using the discrepancy theory of identity proposed by Higgins in 1987, we discuss the challenges experienced by the returning Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration students in terms of a potential crisis of identity and suggest interventions which may prove valuable in promoting academic success and successful integration. Though providing additional training to address the gap in skills and knowledge in returning students is an important part of their successful reintegration, this could be insufficient on its own and must be complemented by a range of measures designed to ameliorate the discrepancies in identity which arise from the transition from one educational model to another.

  3. Alternative dispute resolution and the physician--the use of mediation to resolve hospital-medical staff conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J L; Stong, R A

    1993-01-01

    The use of adversarial methods to resolve disputes arising out of medical staff matters can be time-consuming, costly, and disruptive to the hospital-medical staff relationship. As this article suggests, mediation is the preferred method of alternative dispute resolution for reaching mutually acceptable solutions with minimal harm to relationships.

  4. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  5. Modeling the acceptance of clinical information systems among hospital medical staff: an extended TAM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melas, Christos D; Zampetakis, Leonidas A; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Recent empirical research has utilized the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to advance the understanding of doctors' and nurses' technology acceptance in the workplace. However, the majority of the reported studies are either qualitative in nature or use small convenience samples of medical staff. Additionally, in very few studies moderators are either used or assessed despite their importance in TAM based research. The present study focuses on the application of TAM in order to explain the intention to use clinical information systems, in a random sample of 604 medical staff (534 physicians) working in 14 hospitals in Greece. We introduce physicians' specialty as a moderator in TAM and test medical staff's information and communication technology (ICT) knowledge and ICT feature demands, as external variables. The results show that TAM predicts a substantial proportion of the intention to use clinical information systems. Findings make a contribution to the literature by replicating, explaining and advancing the TAM, whereas theory is benefited by the addition of external variables and medical specialty as a moderator. Recommendations for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Job characteristic perception and intrinsic motivation in medical record department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Bahrami, Soosan; Torki, Sedighe

    2013-01-01

    Human resources are key factors in service organizations like hospitals. Therefore, motivating human recourses to achieve the objectives of an organization is important. Job enrichment is a strategy used to increase job motivation in staffs. The goal of the current study is to determine the relationship between job characteristics and intrinsic motivation in medical record staff in hospitals related to Medical Science University in Isfahan in 2011-2012 academic year. The type of the study is descriptive and corelational of multi variables. The population of the study includes all the medical record staffs of medical record department working in Medical Science hospitals of Isfahan. One hundred twentyseven subjects were selected by conducting a census. In the present study, data collected by using two questionnaires of job characteristics devised by Hackman and Oldeham, and of intrinsic motivation. Content validity was confirmed by experts and its reliability was calculated through coefficient of Cronbach's alpha (r1 = 0.84- r2 = 0.94). The questionnaires completed were entered into SPSS(18) software; furthermore, statistical analysis done descriptively (frequency percent, mean, standard deviation, Pierson correlation coefficient,...) and inferentially (multiple regression, MANOVA, LSD). A significant relationship between job characteristics as well as its elements (skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback) and intrinsic motivation was noticed. (p intrinsic motivation was significant and job feedback had the most impact upon the intrinsic motivation. No significant difference was noticed among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to age, gender, level of education, and the kind of educational degree in hospitals. However, there was a significant difference among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to the unit of service and the years of servicein hospitals. The findings show that all job

  7. [Monitoring of hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in infectious disease hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Manxia; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Yimei

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the status and risk factors for hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in an infectious disease hospital, and to provide a scientific basis for targeted preventive and control measures. The occupational exposure of 395 medical workers in our hospital was monitored from January 2012 to December 2014, among whom 79 individuals with occupational exposure were subjected to intervention and the risk factors for occupational exposure were analyzed. The high-risk group was mainly the nursing staff (69.6%). The incidence of hematogenous occupational exposure was high in medical personnel with a working age under 3 years, aged under 25 years, and at the infection ward, accounting for 63.3%, 72.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, Treponema pallidum, and human immunodeficiency virus were the primary exposure sources. Sharp injury was the major way of injury (91.1%), with needle stick injury accounting for the highest proportion (86.1%). Injury occurred on the hand most frequently (91.1%). The high-risk links were improper disposal during or after pulling the needle, re-capturing the needle, and processing waste, accounting for 46.8%, 17.7%, and 12.7%, respectively. Seventy-nine professionals with occupational exposure were not infected. The main risk factor for hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in the infectious disease hospital is needle stick injury. Strengthening the occupational protection education in medical staff in infectious disease hospital, implementing protective measures, standardizing operating procedures in high-risk links, and enhancing the supervision mechanism can reduce the incidence of occupational exposure and infection after exposure.

  8. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrou, Persefoni; Kontodimopoulos, Nick; Niakas, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co...

  9. Health effects assessment of staff involved in medical practices of radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, I.A.; Lacob, O. [Institute of Public Health Iasi, Radiation Hygiene Lab. (Romania); Roman, I.; Havarneanu, D. [Institute of Public Health Iasi, Occupational Medicine Dept. (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    This study aimed, starting from new national recommendation appearance, to detect health effects of medical staff from six counties of Moldavia region involved in radiation practices and to create a national register data for radiation-induce cancer. Staff involved in medical ionizing radiation uses in Romania - health care level I are monitored on recent new recommendations for three years. The micro nuclei high levels and morphological lymphocytes changes vs. clinical diagnostic can be considered as early possible malignant signs. The micro nuclei test, although unspecific, as a new exam in our legislation can bring useful information on staff exposure and provides a guidance to occupational physician in making his medical recommendations. This cytogenetic test does not seem to correlate with smoking habit or length of exposure. Micro nuclei test both in oral mucous epithelial cells and peripheral culture lymphocytes can be considered of much specificity and correlates with a recent acute exposure level. The conclusions of individual health status surveillance and assessment of personal dose equivalent are very useful data for recording in the radiation cancer-induced register.

  10. Health effects assessment of staff involved in medical practices of radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.A.; Lacob, O.; Roman, I.; Havarneanu, D.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed, starting from new national recommendation appearance, to detect health effects of medical staff from six counties of Moldavia region involved in radiation practices and to create a national register data for radiation-induce cancer. Staff involved in medical ionizing radiation uses in Romania - health care level I are monitored on recent new recommendations for three years. The micro nuclei high levels and morphological lymphocytes changes vs. clinical diagnostic can be considered as early possible malignant signs. The micro nuclei test, although unspecific, as a new exam in our legislation can bring useful information on staff exposure and provides a guidance to occupational physician in making his medical recommendations. This cytogenetic test does not seem to correlate with smoking habit or length of exposure. Micro nuclei test both in oral mucous epithelial cells and peripheral culture lymphocytes can be considered of much specificity and correlates with a recent acute exposure level. The conclusions of individual health status surveillance and assessment of personal dose equivalent are very useful data for recording in the radiation cancer-induced register

  11. [Analysis medical staff opinion according to quality management in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łopacińska, Iwona

    2012-10-01

    The practice of documenting the credibility of quality management system of companies in the medical sector in Poland does not have a long history. In the recent years hospitals have started to work in a system similar to a competitive market with features specific for medical service preserved. As a result quality focused activity instruments were introduced to the medical service market, such as ISO family of standards. The aim of the work objective was to get to know the opinion of medical staff about the changes resulting in the quality management system implementation. The answers of a team of 200 medical staff from two Polish hospitals were analysed. The respondents were employed in medical institutions before and after the introduction of ISO 9001. A large number of participants claimed that standardization in work organization made a significant improvement (45.50%, n = 91), but part of them (36.50%, n = 73) claimed that this new organization improved the situation not very much. And a small group (18,00%, n = 36) said that the organization did not change after the introduction of standardization. Nurses and medical rescue workers more often claimed (the result being statistically significant) that their work organization improved after the standardization implementation (48.54%), differently from doctors (27.59%, p = 0.008). Doctors in the research often claimed that the changes after the introduction of standardization caused an increase in the requirements of their professional qualifications (79.13%), but the nurses and medical rescue workers found it a bit less (74.85%). Most participants (87.50%, n = 175) claimed that the changes which appeared as a result of the introduction of standardization motivated them to compete against others health care institutions. Medical staff in the research claimed that the changes after the introduction of standardization resulted in work organization improvement. Nurses and medical rescue workers more often claimed

  12. Staff perceptions of organisational values in a large South African manufacturing company: exploring socio-demographic differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Martins

    2011-11-01

    Research purpose: The objective of the study was to explore the perceptions of men and women staff members, as well as members of various race and age groups, in a large South African manufacturing company about the current enactment of organisational values and the importance of these values. Motivation for the study: The challenge of managing multi-cultural work forces from different gender, race and generational backgrounds makes an understanding of how peoples’ values align with those of their organisations, as reflected in their cultures, necessary. Research design, approach and method: Using an organisational values scale, the researchers conducted a quantitative survey on a random sample of 988 participants employed in a large South African manufacturing company. Main findings: ANOVAs and post hoc multiple comparison of means tests revealed that gender, race and age have a significant effect on some of the dimensions of organisational values and that these biographical groups differ significantly in their perceptions of the importance of certain organisational values as well as how their organisations enact them. Practical/mangerial implications: The findings highlight the importance of understanding staff perceptions in creating greater commitment to organisational values as important aspects of an effective organisational culture. Contribution/value-add: This study is original research that contributes new knowledge to the field of organisational psychology and management practices.

  13. African American Medical Culture in the Antebellum South: As Remembered in the WPA Narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This project examines the oral accounts of former slaves, as recorded in the WPA narratives in the 1930s, to study the development of African American medical culture in the Antebellum South. Through an examination of these transcribed memories, my research investigates how African American praxes with medicinal flora, healing techniques, and spiritual harmony, reflected their ethnomedical and cosmological ideologies. The duality of these ideologies represents an African American medical iden...

  14. Views of Health Information Management Staff on the Medical Coding Software in Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimiafar, Khalil; Hemmati, Fatemeh; Banaye Yazdipour, Alireza; Sarbaz, Masoumeh

    2018-01-01

    Systematic evaluation of Health Information Technology (HIT) and users' views leads to the modification and development of these technologies in accordance with their needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of Health Information Management (HIM) staff on the quality of medical coding software. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between May to July 2016 in 26 hospitals (academic and non-academic) in Mashhad, north-eastern Iran. The study population consisted of the chairs of HIM departments and medical coders (58 staff). Data were collected through a valid and reliable questionnaire. The data were analyzed using the SPSS version 16.0. From the views of staff, the advantages of coding software such as reducing coding time had the highest average (Mean=3.82) while cost reduction had the lowest average (Mean =3.20), respectively. Meanwhile, concern about losing job opportunities was the least important disadvantage (15.5%) to the use of coding software. In general, the results of this study showed that coding software in some cases have deficiencies. Designers and developers of health information coding software should pay more attention to technical aspects, in-work reminders, help in deciding on proper codes selection by access coding rules, maintenance services, link to other relevant databases and the possibility of providing brief and detailed reports in different formats.

  15. THE QUALITY OF THE MEDICAL STAFF AND THE EFFICIENCY OF OUTPATIENT CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Виталий Анатольевич Чирков

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main results obtained in the course of complex social and health study to study and compare the qualitative characteristics of the medical staff and the effectiveness of providing primary health care urban population.Comparative characteristics of these indices revealed that the highest category had only 22.5% of the respondents, 35% - the first category, 3.7% - 38.8%, and the second - the categories did not have. Among the respondents, an overwhelming majority of 94.4% were non-degree, 5.6% - have a PhD degree in medical sciences. Passed the initial training in internship 80% residency - 20%.Ranking the areas of health services revealed that the lowest averages are obtained in such sections of the medical organization, such as the rehabilitation and prevention, satisfactory - in relation to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. From this we can conclude that a low enough health care workers evaluation of services provided in their institution, which also indicates low self-esteem results of their own activities. Thus, the average score on the activities of the agencies as a whole was 3,4 ± 0,17.Thus, the lack of an integrated system of quality assurance staff in outpatient clinics leads to poor quality of health services provided to patients. The existing problems related to the lack of differentiated pay, as well as the insufficient information and resourcing of staff of medical institutions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-10-35

  16. Factors influencing the perception of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice in Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiping; Li, Meina; Dai, Zhixin; Deng, Qiangyu; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Dual practice is defined as a physician's performance of medical activities in different health care institutions (two or more) simultaneously. This study aimed to examine the perception and acceptance of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice and explore the possible factors affecting people's perception. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 13 public hospitals in Shanghai. Participants included medical staff and outpatients. We distributed 1,000 questionnaires to each participant group, and the response rates were 66.7% and 69.4%, respectively. Statistical differences in variables were tested, and multinomial logistic regression methods were employed for statistical analysis. The study included two parts: medical staff survey and outpatient survey. The results of medical staff survey showed that 63.0% of the respondents supported dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the publicity activities of dual practice and hospitals' human resource management system were important factors affecting the willingness of the medical staff. The results of outpatient survey showed that 44.5% of respondents believed that dual practice could reduce difficulty in consulting a doctor. Regarding the perceived benefits of dual practice, the proportion of outpatients who believed that dual practice could meet the demand for health convenience, minor illness, and chronic disease were 45.4%, 42.4%, and 53.7%, respectively. Additionally, demographic characteristics significantly influenced the perception of outpatients. This study confirmed that both medical staff and outpatients generally held positive attitudes toward dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the existence of publicity activities and more flexible

  17. CANCER SCREENING AWARENESS AMONG NURSING STAFF IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Shanthilal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cervical and breast cancers are the common malignancies among female population in India. Though there are approved screening methods available to prevent and detect these cancers at an early stage, there is a lack of awareness about cancer screening among general public as well as the health care professionals. This study is aimed to identify the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP among the nursing staff regarding cancer screening in these two diseases. METHOD A cross-sectional interview based survey was conducted among 303 female nursing staff working in a government medical college hospital from November 2015 to December 2015. Ethical committee approval was taken. Verbal informed consent was sought from the study subjects. Nursing staff who gave consent to participate in the study were enrolled. There were no specific inclusion or exclusion criteria for the study subjects. A structured pretested questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP was used to collect the data. The questions were open-ended. Recall and recognition type of questions were used. The data was entered into MS Excel worksheet and analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS Total of 303 nurses included in the study. The age ranged from 21 to 64 years. Median age is 38 years. Only 24.4% (74/303 of Nurses were aware of cancer screening and many of them were aware of Pap smear (55.1%, 167/303 and mammogram (66.3%, 201/303 as investigational tools in diagnosing cancer. Only 17 out of 303 (5.6% nurses had Pap smear test done with an average of 1.23% Pap smear per individual. Mammogram screening was done in 13% (15/115 of the eligible nurses with an average of 1.2% mammogram per individual. The most common reason for not undergoing screening as expressed was they did not feel the need to be screened unless they were symptomatic (55%, they are too young for screening (14.8%, shyness (11.1%, fear (11.1% and lack of time (7.4%. However, 90% of them

  18. Ergonomic Intervention Effect in Reducing Musculoskeletal Disorders in Staff of Shiraz Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Pakshir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: High percentage of musculoskeletal disorders occurs due to awkward working posture and poor workstation design. So this study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of musculoskeletal disorders , evaluate workstations and investigate the effectiveness of ergonomic interventional measures among medical school staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS.   Methods: In this interventional study, 200 employees of different units of medical school of SUMS participated. They were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Data were collected via anonymous questionnaire, RULA and QEC techniques as well as an ergonomic workstation checklist that was used to evaluate working conditions.   Results: The results showed that after conducting interventional program for the experimental group there was a significant relationship between employees' increased awareness of ergonomics and workstation improvement (p≤0.05. Additionally, the prevalence rate of reported musculoskeletal disorders in experimental group was significantly reduced following intervention (p≤0.05. After corrective measures, level of risk was decreased and working postures were improved. A significant relationship was observed between risk levels and neck and shoulder pain in the experimental group (p≤0.05 . Following the intervention, workstations scores were increased significantly. Conclusion: On the basis of the findings of this study, it could be noted that the ergonomic interventional program was effective to improve working posture and workstations as well as to reduce the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among the staff.

  19. Aromatherapy alleviates endothelial dysfunction of medical staff after night-shift work: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenei; Fukuda, Shota; Maeda, Kumiko; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Kono, Yasushi; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2011-02-01

    Night-shift work causes mental stress and lifestyle changes, and is recognized as a risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with impaired endothelial function. Aromatherapy is becoming popular as a complementary therapy that is beneficial for mental relaxation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on the endothelial function of medical staff after night-shift work. This study consisted of 19 healthy medical personnel (19 men, mean age 32 ± 7 years), including 11 physicians and 8 technicians. Aromatherapy was performed for 30 min by inhalation of the essential oil of lavender. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was measured three times in each subject: on a regular workday, and after night-shift work before and immediately after aromatherapy. A control study was performed to assess the effect of a 30-min rest without aromatherapy. The mean value of sleep time during night-shift work was 3.3 ± 1.3 h. FMD after night-shift work was lower than on a regular workday (10.4 ± 1.8 vs. 12.5 ± 1.7%, Pnight-shift work impaired endothelial function in medical staff, an effect that was alleviated by short-term aromatherapy.

  20. Exposure doses of the patient and the medical staff during urological X-ray examens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Loehr, H.; Haug, P.; Schuett, B.

    1977-01-01

    During 32 intravenous urografies and 48 angiografies of the kidney and the suprarenal glands the X-ray doses at the patient's skin and gonades were determined. During the angiografies the doses were mesured at the hands. the gonades and the front (eyes) of the medical staff. The results are discussed. Because the X-ray doses are relatively high, the number of the pictures and the exposure time is to be reduced to the minimum. Clinical experience and special knowledge is the best X-ray protection. (orig.) [de

  1. Impact of supply problems of preservative-free glaucoma medications on patients and hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shima; Theodossiades, Julia; Chapman, Kristin; Murdoch, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic ocular disease, which is usually managed with long-term daily medical therapy, in the form of eye drops. Patients who are intolerant to preservatives in topical medicines require preservative-free versions. From early 2011 patients attending Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK, started to report recurring problems with the supply of the following preservative-free glaucoma medications: Timolol 0.25% (Timoptol 0.25%, MSD UK); Dorzolamide (Trusopt, MSD UK); Dorzolamide and Timolol 0.5% (Cosopt, MSD UK). This study investigates the impact of the supply problems of these medications at Moorfields Eye Hospital from a patient, administrative and clinical perspective. Information was sought by interviewing both patients and hospital staff, and by a retrospective case note review between April 2010 and May 2013. Many hospital roles, both administrative and clinical, were involved in attempting to resolve the impact of the supply problems. All staff reported a considerable increase in their workload. At the peak of the problem, the glaucoma secretaries received about 150 enquiries per week. A review of 83 sets of patient notes, retrieved from a random sample of 125 patients, showed that 22% encountered a supply problem. Of these, more than one-third attended Moorfields Eye Hospital Accident & Emergency (A&E) for repeat supplies and 89% eventually had their medication changed. In telephone interviews with 39 of a random sample of 50 patients (a subset of the 83 notes retrieved), 59% of the interviewees reported a supply problem. Of these, one-third attended Moorfields Eye Hospital A&E for repeat supplies and half eventually required an alternative medication. Some patients reported going to considerable lengths to obtain ongoing supplies in the community. This study shows that medication supply problems can have a major impact on patients and hospital services. Supply problems occur across many fields of medicine and with increasing frequency. The

  2. Risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankova-Mileva, I.; Vassileva, J.; Djounova, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present the risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation compared to those of non-radiation workers. Cataract is the most common degenerative opacity of the crystalline lens developing with aging. Other risk factors for cataract are: infrared and ultraviolet radiation, systemic diseases (diabetes, hypertonic disease), eye diseases (glaucoma, high myopia), drugs (steroids), etc. High risk of developing cataract we find among staff occupationally exposed to radiation during operations - interventional cardiologists and neurosurgeons. This study includes 30 people between 33 and 60 years of age working in neurosurgical department and control group (the same amount and age of people not exposed to radiation in their work). After visual acuity measurement, the lens was examined by retroillumination method (red reflex) and using a bio microscope. The patients were asked for presence of ocular and systemic diseases, eye trauma, drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse and for how many years they work in this department. There was one case with cataract among neurosurgeons. The doctor doesn't have eye or systemic diseases, doesn't take any drugs and is not alcohol or tobacco abuser. In the control group there were two persons with subcapsular cataract but they have diabetes. Radiation is one of the risk factors for cataract. Continuing of this epidemiological survey will provide further knowledge on the potential risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract among neurosurgical staff and will contribute for optimization of radiation protection. (authors)

  3. Occupational exposure of medical staff due to diagnostic X-ray examinations in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergel, E.; Feige, S.; Haeusler, U.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of the Council directive 96/29 EURATOM and the corresponding national Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Protection Ordinance coming subsequently into effect led to a changed situation regarding the occupational radiation protection in the medical sector. To reduce the occupational exposure of veterinarians and assisting staff in veterinary radiography is particularly challenging as, in opposite to human radiological examination, the presence of staff is indispensable to restrain the patient. Beyond that the relevant literature reports about too high and/or about unnecessary radiation exposures. To gain a comprehensive knowledge upon the possible exposure of involved staff, the variety of typical examination methods in veterinary clinics and at practitioners had been investigated during the daily routine. Dose measurements were performed for different employees during the examinations taking into account several places of exposure (lens, thyroid, chest, hand, gonad, and feet). Veterinary X-ray diagnostic examinations for pets as well as in equine radiography had been accounted for this study. In total, 101 examination methods, 4.484 accompanied examinations and 53.892 single dose readings resulted in a reliable statistical base to set up a 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' allowing the dose assessment for a variable number and kind of examinations. The 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' is believed to be a useful tool for optimization of occupational radiation exposure of veterinarians by appraising the height of a possible dose, forcing a review of the status quo and triggering the improvement of personal protection by establishing adequate measures. (orig.)

  4. Investigation of radiation protection of medical staff performing medical diagnostic examinations by using PET/CT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrzesień, Małgorzata; Napolska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is now one of the most important methods in the diagnosis of cancer diseases. Due to the rapid growth of PET/CT centres in Poland in less than a decade, radiation protection and, consequently, the assessment of worker exposure to ionising radiation, emitted mainly by the isotope 18 F, have become essential issues. The main aim of the study was to analyse the doses received by workers employed in the Medical Diagnostic Centre. The analysis comprises a physicist, three nurses, three physicians, three technicians, as well as two administrative staff employees. High-sensitivity thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were used to measure the doses for medical staff. The personnel was classified into categories, among them employees having direct contact with the ‘source of radiation’— 18 FDG. The TLDs were placed on the fingertips of both hands and they were also attached at the level of eye lenses, thyroid and gonads depending on the assigned category. The highest dose of radiation was observed during the administration of the 18 FDG to the patients. In the case of the physicist, the highest dose was recorded during preparation of the radiopharmaceutical— 18 FDG. The body parts most exposed to ionizing radiation are the fingertips of the thumb, index and middle finger. (paper)

  5. Investigation of radiation protection of medical staff performing medical diagnostic examinations by using PET/CT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesień, Małgorzata; Napolska, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is now one of the most important methods in the diagnosis of cancer diseases. Due to the rapid growth of PET/CT centres in Poland in less than a decade, radiation protection and, consequently, the assessment of worker exposure to ionising radiation, emitted mainly by the isotope (18)F, have become essential issues. The main aim of the study was to analyse the doses received by workers employed in the Medical Diagnostic Centre. The analysis comprises a physicist, three nurses, three physicians, three technicians, as well as two administrative staff employees. High-sensitivity thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were used to measure the doses for medical staff. The personnel was classified into categories, among them employees having direct contact with the 'source of radiation'-(18)FDG. The TLDs were placed on the fingertips of both hands and they were also attached at the level of eye lenses, thyroid and gonads depending on the assigned category. The highest dose of radiation was observed during the administration of the (18)FDG to the patients. In the case of the physicist, the highest dose was recorded during preparation of the radiopharmaceutical-(18)FDG. The body parts most exposed to ionizing radiation are the fingertips of the thumb, index and middle finger.

  6. Perception of electronic medical records (EMRs by nursing staff in a teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Pera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, in India, many healthcare organizations and their managements appreciate the advantages of electronic medical records, but they often use them. The current push for universal health coverage in India with National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and National Urban Health Mission (NUHM helping toward healthcare reforms highlights the importance of implementing information technology as a means of cutting costs and improving efficiency in healthcare field. The quality of documentation of patient care rendered at healthcare destinations is very important to showcase the growing stature of healthcare in India. Aims: As maintaining the medical records is very important, storage and retrieval of the information is also important for future patient care. In this regard, implementation of electronic medical records in hospitals is essential. Through this study, we wanted to highlight the perceptions of healthcare personnel, who are in the core team of delivering healthcare, toward implementation of electronic medical records. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among doctors (post-graduates and staff nurses. The sample size for post-graduate students and nurses was 164 and 296, respectively, in this study. The study was carried out during the period from January to June 2013, and a survey was conducted with the help of a validated, pre-tested questionnaire in a tertiary care medical college hospital in India. Results: The results showed that 75% of the study population are comfortable working with electronic medical records. They mentioned that display of diagnosis, medications, and allergies of patients on the records was most important. Their perception was that electronic medical records improve timely decision-making and patient care due to immediate access to the patient′s disease history. Conclusion: The major problems faced by nurses, as per our study, are delay in services due to dispersion of records

  7. [On gods, snakes and staffs--the emblem of the medical profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinerson, David; Salzer, Liat; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinnat

    2014-10-01

    The commonly accepted emblems of the Medical Profession are the staff of the Greek god of medicine--Asklepios (or Asclepius], on which one serpent is entwined. Later, around the 16th century C.E., the wand of the herald of the Greek Gods, e.g., Hermes, on which two snakes are entwined and facing each other, became popular as the emblem of the medical profession. We elaborate on the history of the evolution of these emblems as symbols of medicine, including earlier influences from the times of the ancient Egyptians and Babylonians, which were followed by Judeo-Christian traditions and concepts. The relevance of the use of the wand of Hermes as an emblem of our profession is further discussed.

  8. South African medical schools: Current state of selection criteria and medical students' demographic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, L J; van Zyl, G J; St Clair Gibson, A; Viljoen, M; Iputo, J E; Mammen, M; Chitha, W; Perez, A M; Hartman, N; Fonn, S; Green-Thompson, L; Ayo-Ysuf, O A; Botha, G C; Manning, D; Botha, S J; Hift, R; Retief, P; van Heerden, B B; Volmink, J

    2015-12-16

    Selection of medical students at South African (SA) medical schools must promote equitable and fair access to students from all population groups, while ensuring optimal student throughput and success, and training future healthcare practitioners who will fulfil the needs of the local society. In keeping with international practices, a variety of academic and non-academic measures are used to select applicants for medical training programmes in SA medical schools. To provide an overview of the selection procedures used by all eight medical schools in SA, and the student demographics (race and gender) at these medical schools, and to determine to what extent collective practices are achieving the goals of student diversity and inclusivity. A retrospective, quantitative, descriptive study design was used. All eight medical schools in SA provided information regarding selection criteria, selection procedures, and student demographics (race and gender). Descriptive analysis of data was done by calculating frequencies and percentages of the variables measured. Medical schools in SA make use of academic and non-academic criteria in their selection processes. The latter include indices of socioeconomic disadvantage. Most undergraduate medical students in SA are black (38.7%), followed by white (33.0%), coloured (13.4%) and Indian/Asian (13.6%). The majority of students are female (62.2%). The number of black students is still proportionately lower than in the general population, while other groups are overrepresented. Selection policies for undergraduate medical programmes aimed at redress should be continued and further refined, along with the provision of support to ensure student success.

  9. The impact of night-shift work on platelet function in healthy medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomoko; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Tokuoka, Suzumi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kawahara, Takuya; Daimon, Masao; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2018-04-18

    Rotating shift work has been reported to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation are among the leading causes of thrombus formation in patients with myocardial infarction or stroke. Endothelial function has been shown to be impaired immediately after night-shift work; however, it is not known whether platelets are also activated. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute impact of night-shift work on platelet function. This observational study included 11 healthy medical staff members (seven women, median age 32 years). We examined each subject's platelet aggregation rates and the serum concentrations of eicosanoid mediators after night-shift work and on day-shift work without preceding night-shift work (baseline). Platelet aggregation did not differ from baseline levels after night-shift work. However, serum cyclooxygenase (COX)-metabolized eicosanoid mediators, particularly thromboxane (Tx) B 2 (a stable metabolite of TxA 2 and the most important marker of platelet activation), were significantly higher after the night-shift than at baseline (median 65.3 vs 180.4 ng/ml). Although platelet aggregation did not increase, there was an increase in serum COX-metabolized eicosanoid mediators such as TxB 2 in healthy medical staff after night-shift work. This platelet hypersensitivity may be one of the mechanisms underlying the significant association between night-shift work and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  10. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrou, Persefoni; Kontodimopoulos, Nick; Niakas, Dimitris

    2010-11-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67) and nurses (N = 219) participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E) outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p job satisfaction compared to the nursing staff. Surgical sector nurses and those >55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested.

  11. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Ferrari, P.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of Medical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kVp, filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses. (authors)

  12. Resident and Staff Satisfaction of Pediatric Graduate Medical Education Training on Transition to Adult Care of Medically Complex Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Matthew; Cole, Brandon; Flake, Eric; Roy, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    This study aims to describe the quantity and satisfaction current residents and experienced pediatricians have with graduate medical education on transitioning medically complex patients to adult care. There is an increasing need for transitioning medically complex adolescents to adult care. Over 90% now live into adulthood and require transition to adult healthcare providers. The 2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs found that only 40% of youth 12-17 yr receive the necessary services to appropriately transition to adult care. Prospective, descriptive, anonymous, web-based survey of pediatric residents and staff pediatricians at Army pediatric residency training programs was sent in March 2017. Questions focused on assessing knowledge of transition of care, satisfaction with transition training, and amount of education on transition received during graduate medical education training. Of the 145 responders (310 potential responders, 47% response rate), transition was deemed important with a score of 4.3 out of 5. The comfort level with transition was rated 2.6/5 with only 4.2% of participants receiving formal education during residency. The most commonly perceived barriers to implementing a curriculum were time constraints and available resources. Of the five knowledge assessment questions, three had a correct response rate of less than 1/3. The findings show the disparity between the presence of and perceived need for a formal curriculum on transitioning complex pediatric patients to adult care. This study also highlighted the knowledge gap of the transition process for novice and experienced pediatricians alike.

  13. Staff and patient accounts of PRN medication administration and non-pharmacological interventions for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Krystle; Ham, Elke; Hilton, N Zoe

    2018-05-31

    Most psychiatric inpatients will receive psychotropic PRN medication during their hospital stay for agitation, anxiety, and/or insomnia. While helpful in some cases, caution is warranted with regard to PRN use due to inherent risks of additional medication; therefore, experts advise that non-pharmacological interventions should be attempted first where indicated. However, research to date highlights that, in practice, non-pharmaceutical approaches are attempted in a minority of cases. While some information is known about the practice of PRN administration and the use of and barriers to implementing non-pharmacological interventions for treating acute psychiatric symptoms, full understanding of this practice is hampered by poor or altogether missing documentation of the process. This study used interviews with patients and staff from two psychiatric hospitals to collect first-person accounts of administering PRN medication for anxiety, thereby addressing the limitations of relying on documented notation found in previous research. Our results indicate that nurses are engaging in non-pharmacological interventions more often than had previously been captured in research. However, the types of strategies suggested are not typically evidence based and further, only happening approximately half the time. The barriers to providing such care are centred on two main beliefs about client choice and efficacy of these non-medical strategies. Implications for research and practice are discussed. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Effectiveness of an e-Learning Platform for Image Interpretation Education of Medical Staff and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Negishi, Tohru; Watanabe, Haruyuki

    2018-05-09

    Medical staff must be able to perform accurate initial interpretations of radiography to prevent diagnostic errors. Education in medical image interpretation is an ongoing need that is addressed by text-based and e-learning platforms. The effectiveness of these methods has been previously reported. Here, we describe the effectiveness of an e-learning platform used for medical image interpretation education. Ten third-year medical students without previous experience in chest radiography interpretation were provided with e-learning instructions. Accuracy of diagnosis using chest radiography was provided before and after e-learning education. We measured detection accuracy for two image groups: nodular shadow and ground-glass shadow. We also distributed the e-learning system to the two groups and analyzed the effectiveness of education for both types of image shadow. The mean correct answer rate after the 2-week e-learning period increased from 34.5 to 72.7%. Diagnosis of the ground glass shadow improved significantly more than that of the mass shadow. Education using the e-leaning platform is effective for interpretation of chest radiography results. E-learning is particularly effective for the interpretation of chest radiography images containing ground glass shadow.

  15. Radiation Dose to Patients and Medical Staff in Different Procedures of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide information on developing technologies and clinical techniques for Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging using ionizing radiation and their associated radiation dose to patients and medical staff. A thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) was used in this study to analyze the historic records of the external radiation doses to staff members working in our nuclear medicine department in 7 procedures, including elution of 99mTc from "9"9"mMo/"9"9"mTc generators, syringe preparation, radiopharmacy kit preparation, injection, accompanying patients, SPECT/CT scan, oral "1"3"1I preparation. These dosimeters was worn by the staff members at the level of the chest on the front part of the body. A retrospective review of 110 clinical studies of various nuclear medicine procedures ("9"9"mTc–MIBI–Tetrofosmin, "9"9"mTc–MDP bone scan, "9"9"mTc–Tektrotyd, "9"9"mTc–Thyroid imaging, "9"9"mTc–Nanocoll, "1"3"1I–Nal (diagnostic application 185 MBq) obtained on hybrid SPECT/CT systems was performed to calculate the effective radiation dose to patients. The results from this study showed that annual effective radiation doses to nuclear medicine department staff members were within permissible levels. The contribution of total effective radiation dose from SPECT component were calculated using the activity of the injected radiopharmaceutical and dose tables published by the conversion factors listed in ICRP 53 and ICRP 80. The radiation dose for CT was calculated by Dose Length Product method. According to the results of this study the dose in each procedure depends on different factors such as the education and experience of the staff members, usage of shielding and taking the radiation protection requirements into consideration. When SPECT–CT is being performed, all measures should be taken to reduce both the radiopharmaceutical dose and the CT effective dose following the ALARA principle. (author)

  16. Spread of Staphylococcus aureus between medical staff and high-frequency contact surfaces in a large metropolitan hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-sha Shi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Cross-contamination of S. aureus or MRSA on medical workers' hands and contact surfaces was demonstrated within and between departments of a large metropolitan hospital. Improvements are needed in medical staff hygiene habits and in the cleaning of high-frequency contact surfaces to help prevent and control nosocomial infections.

  17. Professional Ethics and Organizational Commitment Among the Education Department Staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Imani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concepts such as organizational commitment and employees’ and managers’ ethics provide decision-makers and policy makers with potentially useful information which can result in increasing organizational efficiency and effectiveness. This study aimed to explore the relationship between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the staff working in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. The study population consisted of all staff working as educational experts in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (N = 65. Data collection instruments used in this study were two standard questionnaires on professional ethics and organizational commitment. SPSS software version 21 was used to analyze the data. Results: According to the results, mean scores obtained for professional ethics and organizational commitment were (91.57± 9.13 (95% CI, 89.23-93.91 and (64.89 ± 10.37 (95% CI, 62.2367.54, respectively. A significant relationship was observed between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the educational experts working in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (correlation coefficient = 0.405 (P = 0.001 (at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between professional ethics and work experience (P = 0.043. The highest level of professional ethics observed was associated with those participants having a work experience of ranging from 6 to 10 years. Individuals with fulltime employment scored the highest in organizational commitment. Conclusion: Educational experts possessed a high level of professional ethics. The finding provides the grounds for promoting organizational commitment, which will lead to higher levels of organizational effectiveness.

  18. Attitude of staff of Kashan university of medical sciences concerning their annual performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Hosseini Golafshani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performance assessment in organizations can lead to healthy relationships in the workplace, and it also pays grounds for intellectual growth and improvement of staff performance. This study examines the attitudes of Staff of Kashan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services about their annual performance. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 714 staff were randomly selected. The data of this study were collected by a questionnaire, whose validity and credit were tested. Then, in two stages, samples of 52 and 56 persons were taken and by two-half method and calculating the homogeneity coefficient and the Cronbach's coefficient alpha and Kuder-Richardson coefficients in the second step get to the Cronbach's coefficient alpha 93% that final validity was acceptable. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS Inc. Released 2007. SPSS for Windows, Version 16.0. (Chicago, SPSS Inc.. Results: The results of this study showed that the mean and standard deviation of age of the employees were 37.16 ± 7.1 years and their working history was 12.4 ± 7.7 years. A total of 256 participants (35.8% considered the current evaluation as inappropriate or completely inappropriate performance assessment, 303 participants (42.4% almost appropriate, 155 participants (21.7% suitable or perfectly suitable. About 47.9% of participants rated the best period of evaluation yearly, and 552 participants (77.3% of the statistical society were considered assessment in the presence of the employee appropriate. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the attitude of more than 50% of employees was positive about the annual performance assessment.

  19. Occupational exposure of medical staff due to diagnostic X-ray examinations in veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mergel, E.; Feige, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS) (Germany); Haeusler, U. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The implementation of the Council directive 96/29 EURATOM and the corresponding national Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Protection Ordinance coming subsequently into effect led to a changed situation regarding the occupational radiation protection in the medical sector. To reduce the occupational exposure of veterinarians and assisting staff in veterinary radiography is particularly challenging as, in opposite to human radiological examination, the presence of staff is indispensable to restrain the patient. Beyond that the relevant literature reports about too high and/or about unnecessary radiation exposures. To gain a comprehensive knowledge upon the possible exposure of involved staff, the variety of typical examination methods in veterinary clinics and at practitioners had been investigated during the daily routine. Dose measurements were performed for different employees during the examinations taking into account several places of exposure (lens, thyroid, chest, hand, gonad, and feet). Veterinary X-ray diagnostic examinations for pets as well as in equine radiography had been accounted for this study. In total, 101 examination methods, 4.484 accompanied examinations and 53.892 single dose readings resulted in a reliable statistical base to set up a 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' allowing the dose assessment for a variable number and kind of examinations. The 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' is believed to be a useful tool for optimization of occupational radiation exposure of veterinarians by appraising the height of a possible dose, forcing a review of the status quo and triggering the improvement of personal protection by establishing adequate measures. (orig.)

  20. Medical and Psychological Risk Factors for Incident Hypertension in Type 1 Diabetic African-Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique S. Roy

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions. The development of hypertension in African-Americans living with type 1 diabetes appears to be multifactorial and includes both medical (overt proteinuria as well as psychological (high hostility risk factors.

  1. Awareness and knowledge among internal medicine house-staff for dose adjustment of commonly used medications in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Sikander; Kumar, Neeru; Vasudeva, Amita; Shaikh, Gulvahid; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Shah, Hitesh; Malieckal, Deepa; Fogel, Joshua; Sidhu, Gurwinder; Rubinstein, Sofia

    2017-01-17

    Drug dosing errors result in adverse patient outcomes and are more common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). As internists treat the majority of patients with CKD, we study if Internal Medicine house-staff have awareness and knowledge about the correct dosage of commonly used medications for those with CKD. A cross-sectional survey was performed and included 341 participants. The outcomes were the awareness of whether a medication needs dose adjustment in patients with CKD and whether there was knowledge for the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) a medication needs to be adjusted. The overall pattern for all post-graduate year (PGY) groups in all medication classes was a lack of awareness and knowledge. For awareness, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and rheumatologic medication classes but not for analgesic, cardiovascular, and neuropsychotropic medication classes. For knowledge, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, cardiovascular, endocrine, and gastrointestinal, medication classes but not for analgesic, neuropsychotropic, and rheumatologic medication classes. Internal Medicine house-staff across all levels of training demonstrated poor awareness and knowledge for many medication classes in CKD patients. Internal Medicine house-staff should receive more nephrology exposure and formal didactic educational training during residency to better manage complex treatment regimens and prevent medication dosing errors.

  2. Medical staff radiation exposure in electrophysiology procedures: First results during biventricular ICD implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Pier Luca; Bianchini, David; Corazza, Ivan; Compagnone, Gaetano; Ferrari, Paolo; Gualdrini, Gianfranco; Zannoli, Romano

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) requires a very long fluoroscopy time due to the need to monitor the placement of the device and electrodes inside the patient’s body at every step of the procedure. Aim of this study was to analyse staff X-ray exposure during the intervention, measuring H p (10) values with electronic dosimeters worn by medical staff. The scattered X-ray field was characterized using a spectrometric CdTe (cadmium-telluride) detector to define the radiation field impinging on the operator and thereby identify the correct dosimeter position for accurate measurement (i.e., above or under the shielding apron). In particular, knowledge of the X-ray spectrum yields information on photon flux and the energy distribution of the X-rays. Dosimetric data were then recorded in a series of 20 consecutive patients, obtaining a first set of H p (10) data that can be used to estimate the risk for the electrophysiologist performing this procedure.

  3. Possibilities of utilizing blended-learning in the area of language education of medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Šulistová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the presentation of teaching materials created within the IMED-KOMM-EU "Intercultural medical communication inEurope" internet project, having taken place under the leadership of the Institute for Intercultural Communication inGermany(Ansbach,Berlin,Jena,Erfurt. Project target was creating, testing, valorisation and permanent extending of the mentioned teaching materials, testing and certification technologies (ECL for intercultural professional communication of foreign physicians and other medical staff. The target groups involving the already practising professionals, as well as students, should be able to utilize the existing possibilities of communication withinEuropeand to perform their professional activity or studies in the languages, in which the materials are elaborated. As a result, five complete courses of blended-learning were created, which are generally easily accessible at mutually connected web sites in Czech, Slovak, German, Bulgarian and Hungarian. Their core are modules orientated on practice with complex exercises online and offline focused on the medical communication, including the manuals for teachers.

  4. Self-medication with antibiotics in the Republic of Srpska community pharmacies: pharmacy staff behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković-Peković, Vanda; Grubiša, Nataša

    2012-10-01

    Self-medication with antibiotics adds to the global risk of increased spread of bacterial resistance. Attitudes and behavior of health professionals also may reinforce self-medication with antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine whether self-medication with antibiotics is possible in our community pharmacies and to what extent, and to evaluate the behavior and service of pharmacy health professionals regarding non-prescription antibiotic dispensation. An observational, cross-section study was conducted, and pseudo-patient methodology was used to establish the kind of professional service provided in case of patient's explicit demand to buy an antibiotic for treatment of self-diagnosed upper respiratory tract infection. Of the total 318 community pharmacies, 131 (41%) were visited and included in the study. Non-prescription antibiotics were dispensed in 76 (58%) pharmacies. Counseling and symptomatic therapy was offered in 88 (67%) pharmacies. In 25% of pharmacies, no symptomatic therapy was offered; instead, only an antibiotic was sold. Amoxicillin was sold in 85% of cases and, mostly, the one of 1.30 Euro per pack. Both oral and written use instructions were given in 78% cases, whereas none was given in 3% of cases. Self-medication with antibiotics occurs in our community pharmacies, despite being illegal. Pharmacy staff behavior can be a factor that puts patients at risk for self-medication with antibiotics. Community pharmacies are failing their tasks in enhancing rational use of antibiotics. Such a practice may be a consequence of weak enforcement and control over the legislation and professional standards. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Anorexia nervosa in Kenya | Njenga | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anorexia nervosa is a rare disorder in Africans, inspite of posing a serious public health hazard in the West. Whereas it is possible that African psychiatrists lack the skills to diagnose the disorder, other possible explanations for its apparent rarity must be sought in view of emerging evidence, which suggests a ...

  6. Fibroadenoma in women in Ghana | Bewtra | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fibroadenoma is the commonest benign tumor of female breast. It is particularly common in young women in Africa. Method: This paper describes the clinicopathologic features of fibroadenoma of breast in African women from central Ghana and compares them to the data from African-American women.

  7. Salmonella sepsis in African children | Graham | Malawi Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella sepsis in African children. SM Graham. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  8. Benefits and Barriers of E-Learning for Staff Training in a Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Stefan; Behrends, Marianne; Haack, Claudia; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are a feasible solution to fulfill the various requirements for e-learning based training in a medical university. Using the LMS ILIAS, the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology has designed an e-learning unit about data protection, which has been used by 73% of the department's employees in the first three months. To increase the use of e-learning for staff training, it is necessary to identify barriers and benefits, which encourage the use of e-learning. Therefore, we started an online survey to examine how the employees evaluate this learning opportunity. The results show that 87% of the employees had no technical problems and also competence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was no barrier. If anything, reported issues were time shortages and tight schedules. Therefore, short learning modules (less than 20 minutes) are preferred. Furthermore, temporal flexibility for learning is important for 83% of employees.

  9. Teamwork and delegation in medical homes: primary care staff perspectives in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Gala; Stewart, Greg L; Lampman, Michelle; Pelak, Mary; Solimeo, Samantha L

    2014-07-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) relies on a team approach to patient care. For organizations engaged in transitioning to a PCMH model, identifying and providing the resources needed to promote team functioning is essential. To describe team-level resources required to support PCMH team functioning within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and provide insight into how the presence or absence of these resources facilitates or impedes within-team delegation. Semi-structured interviews with members of pilot teams engaged in PCMH implementation in 77 primary care clinics serving over 300,000 patients across two VHA regions covering the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest United States. A purposive sample of 101 core members of pilot teams, including 32 primary care providers, 42 registered nurse care managers, 15 clinical associates, and 12 clerical associates. Investigators from two evaluation sites interviewed frontline primary care staff separately, and then collaborated on joint analysis of parallel data to develop a broad, comprehensive understanding of global themes impacting team functioning and within-team delegation. We describe four themes key to understanding how resources at the team level supported ability of primary care staff to work as effective, engaged teams. Team-based task delegation was facilitated by demarcated boundaries and collective identity; shared goals and sense of purpose; mature and open communication characterized by psychological safety; and ongoing, intentional role negotiation. Our findings provide a framework for organizations to identify assets already in place to support team functioning, as well as areas in need of improvement. For teams struggling to make practice changes, our results indicate key areas where they may benefit from future support. In addition, this research sheds light on how variation in medical home implementation and outcomes may be associated with variation in team-based task delegation.

  10. Creating a segregated medical profession: African American physicians and organized medicine, 1846-1910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert B; Washington, Harriet A; Olakanmi, Ololade; Savitt, Todd L; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Eddie; Wynia, Matthew K; Blanchard, Janice; Boulware, L Ebony; Braddock, Clarence; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Crawley, LaVera; LaVeist, Thomas A; Maxey, Randall; Mills, Charles; Moseley, Kathryn L; Williams, David R

    2009-06-01

    An independent panel of experts, convened by the American Medical Association (AMA) Institute for Ethics, analyzed the roots of the racial divide within American medical organizations. In this, the first of a 2-part report, we describe 2 watershed moments that helped institutionalize the racial divide. The first occurred in the 1870s, when 2 medical societies from Washington, DC, sent rival delegations to the AMA's national meetings: an all-white delegation from a medical society that the US courts and Congress had formally censured for discriminating against black physicians; and an integrated delegation from a medical society led by physicians from Howard University. Through parliamentary maneuvers and variable enforcement of credentialing standards, the integrated delegation was twice excluded from the AMA's meetings, while the all-white society's delegations were admitted. AMA leaders then voted to devolve the power to select delegates to state societies, thereby accepting segregation in constituent societies and forcing African American physicians to create their own, separate organizations. A second watershed involved AMA-promoted educational reforms, including the 1910 Flexner report. Straightforwardly applied, the report's population-based criterion for determining the need for phySicians would have recommended increased training of African American physicians to serve the approximately 9 million African Americans in the segregated south. Instead, the report recommended closing all but 2 African American medical schools, helping to cement in place an African American educational system that was separate, unequal, and destined to be insufficient to the needs of African Americans nationwide.

  11. Evaluating the attendance of medical staff and room occupancy during palliative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [University of Bochum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bochum (Germany); Marienhospital Herne, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Franziskus-Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bielefeld (Germany); Popp, Wolfgang [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, Horst [DEGRO, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Attendance of staff and use of resources during treatment have an impact on costs. For palliative radiotherapy, no reliable data are available on the subject. Therefore, the measurement of selected variables (staff absorbance and room occupancy) based on daily palliative irradiation was the aim of our prospective study. The analysis is part of a larger study conducted by the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A total of 172 palliative radiation treatments were followed up prospectively between October 2009 and March 2010. The study was performed at two experienced radiotherapy departments (Herne and Bielefeld) and evaluated the attendance of medical personnel and room occupancy related to the selected steps of the treatment procedure: treatment planning and daily application of radiation dose. Computed tomography for treatment planning engaged the unit for 19 min (range: 17-22 min). The localization of target volume required on average 28 min of a technician's working time. The mean attendance of the entire staff (radiation oncologist, physicist, technician) for treatment planning was 159 min, while the total room occupancy was 140 min. Depending on the type of treatment, the overall duration of a radiotherapy session varied on average between 8 and 18 min. The staff was absorbed by the first treatment session (including portal imaging) for 8-27 min. Mean room occupancy was 18 min (range: 6-65 min). The longest medical staff attendance was observed during an initial irradiation session (mean: 11 min). Radiotherapy sessions with weekly performed field verifications occupied the rooms slightly longer (mean: 10 min, range: 4-25 min) than daily radiotherapy sessions (mean: 9 min, range: 3-29 min). We observed that the patients' symptoms, their condition, and their social environment confounded the time schedule. Target localization, treatment planning, and performance of palliative radiotherapy absorb resources to an extent comparable to

  12. Occupational radiation exposure of medical staff performing 90Y-loaded microsphere radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laffont, Sophie; Ardisson, Valerie; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Rohou, Tanguy; Edeline, Julien; Pracht, Marc; Sourd, Samuel Le; Lepareur, Nicolas; Garin, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Radioembolization of liver cancer with 90 Y-loaded microspheres is increasingly used but data regarding hospital staff exposure are scarce. We evaluated the radiation exposure of medical staff while preparing and injecting 90 Y-loaded glass and resin microspheres especially in view of the increasing use of these products. Exposure of the chest and finger of the radiopharmacist, nuclear medicine physician and interventional radiologist during preparation and injection of 78 glass microsphere preparations and 16 resin microsphere preparations was monitored. Electronic dosimeters were used to measure chest exposure and ring dosimeters were used to measure finger exposure. Chest exposure was very low for both products used (<10 μSv from preparation and injection). In our experience, finger exposure was significantly lower than the annual limit of 500 mSv for both products. With glass microspheres, the mean finger exposure was 13.7 ± 5.2 μSv/GBq for the radiopharmacist, and initially 17.9 ± 5.4 μSv/GBq for the nuclear medicine physician reducing to 13.97 ± 7.9 μSv/GBq with increasing experience. With resin microspheres, finger exposure was more significant: mean finger exposure for the radiopharmacist was 295.1 ± 271.9 μSv/GBq but with a reduction with increasing experience to 97.5 ± 35.2 μSv/GBq for the six most recent dose preparations. For administration of resin microspheres, the greatest mean finger exposure for the nuclear medicine physician (the most exposed operator) was 235.5 ± 156 μSv/GBq. Medical staff performing 90 Y-loaded microsphere radioembolization procedures are exposed to safe levels of radiation. Exposure is lower than that from treatments using 131 I-lipiodol. The lowest finger exposure is from glass microspheres. With resin microspheres finger exposure is acceptable but could be optimized in accordance with the ALARA principle, and especially in view of the increasing use of radioembolization. (orig.)

  13. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  14. Colonialism, Biko and AIDS: reflections on the principle of beneficence in South African medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braude, Hillel David

    2009-06-01

    This paper examines the principle of beneficence in the light of moral and epistemological concerns that have crystallized in the South African context around clinical care. Three examples from the South African experience affecting the development of bioethics are examined: medical colonialism, the death in detention of Steve Biko, and the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Michael Gelfand's book [(1948). The sick African: a clinical study. Cape Town: Stewart Printing Company.] on African medical conditions captures the ambiguous nature of colonial medicine that linked genuine medical treatment with the civilizing mission. Biko's death was a key historical event that deeply implicated the medical profession under apartheid. The present HIV/AIDS epidemic presents the gravest social and political crisis for South African society. All three experiences influence the meaning and relevance of beneficence as a bioethics principle in the South African context. This paper argues for a South African bioethics informed by a critical humanism that takes account of the colonial past, and that does not model itself on an "original wound" or negation, but on positive care-giving practices.

  15. Factors influencing the perception of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiping; Li, Meina; Dai, Zhixin; Deng, Qiangyu; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dual practice is defined as a physician’s performance of medical activities in different health care institutions (two or more) simultaneously. This study aimed to examine the perception and acceptance of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice and explore the possible factors affecting people’s perception. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 13 public hospitals in Shanghai. Participants included medical staff and outpatients. We distributed 1,000 questionnaires to each participant group, and the response rates were 66.7% and 69.4%, respectively. Statistical differences in variables were tested, and multinomial logistic regression methods were employed for statistical analysis. Results The study included two parts: medical staff survey and outpatient survey. The results of medical staff survey showed that 63.0% of the respondents supported dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the publicity activities of dual practice and hospitals’ human resource management system were important factors affecting the willingness of the medical staff. The results of outpatient survey showed that 44.5% of respondents believed that dual practice could reduce difficulty in consulting a doctor. Regarding the perceived benefits of dual practice, the proportion of outpatients who believed that dual practice could meet the demand for health convenience, minor illness, and chronic disease were 45.4%, 42.4%, and 53.7%, respectively. Additionally, demographic characteristics significantly influenced the perception of outpatients. Conclusion This study confirmed that both medical staff and outpatients generally held positive attitudes toward dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the existence of

  16. Medical Decision-Making Processes and Online Behaviors Among Cannabis Dispensary Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C Peiper

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most cannabis patients engage with dispensary staff, like budtenders, for medical advice on cannabis. Yet, little is known about these interactions and how the characteristics of budtenders affect these interactions. This study investigated demographics, workplace characteristics, medical decision-making, and online behaviors among a sample of budtenders. Methods: Between June and September 2016, a cross-sectional Internet survey was administered to budtenders in the San Francisco Bay Area and Greater Los Angeles. A total of 158 budtenders fully responded to the survey. A series of comparisons were conducted to determine differences between trained and untrained budtenders. Results: Among the 158 budtenders, 56% had received formal training to become a budtender. Several demographic differences were found between trained and untrained budtenders. For workplace characteristics, trained budtenders were more likely to report budtender as their primary job (74% vs 53%, practice more than 5 years (34% vs 11%, and receive sales commission (57% vs 16%. Trained budtenders were significantly less likely to perceive medical decision-making as very important (47% vs 68% and have a patient-centered philosophy (77% vs 89%. Although trained budtenders had significantly lower Internet usage, they were significantly more likely to exchange information with patients through e-mail (58% vs 39%, text message (46% vs 30%, mobile app (33% vs 11%, video call (26% vs 3%, and social media (51% vs 23%. Conclusions: Budtenders who are formally trained exhibit significantly different patterns of interaction with medical cannabis patients. Future studies will use multivariate methods to better determine which factors independently influence interactions and how budtenders operate after the introduction of regulations under the newly passed Proposition 64 that permits recreational cannabis use in California.

  17. Integration of foreign and local medical staff in a disaster area: the Honduras and El Salvador experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Yehezkel

    2003-06-01

    International medical aid after natural disasters may take various forms, ranging from self-sufficient military forces to single experts or specialists who function primarily as advisers. A model integrating foreign and local medical staff has not previously been reported. In response to the call for international aid by the Honduran and El Salvadorian governments in the wake of Hurricane Mitch in November 1998 and the San Salvador earthquake in January 2001, Israel sent medical supplies and 10 member teams of medical professionals to each country. The aim of the present paper is to describe the unique Israeli approach to providing healthcare in disaster areas by integrating foreign and local medical staff, and to discuss its advantages and disadvantages. The paper focuses on the experience of the two emergency medicine physicians on the team who were assigned to the Atlantida General Hospital in La Ceiba, Honduras. The same team in San Salvador subsequently applied the same approach.

  18. Optimization of working conditions of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments. Optimizatsiya uslovij truda meditsinskogo personala radiodiagnosticheskikh otdelenij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, A S [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Gigieny Truda i Professional' nykh Zabolevanij

    1989-01-01

    The study was undertaken to analyze the characteristics of the work of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments during use of {sup 99m}Tc isotope generators. The data on the functional load of physicians and paramedical staff were given along with the description of radiation doses and dose rates at various stages of work. The measures on optimization of labour conditions by means of the appropriate department's design, improvement of the regime of nurses' work and adequate allocation and utilization of medical equipment were developed.

  19. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontodimopoulos Nick

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67 and nurses (N = 219 participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p 55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested.

  20. The Perspective of the Staff Regarding Facility Revitalization at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Jimmy G

    2004-01-01

    ...). The response rate for the questionnaire was 40.69%, Analysis of collected data revealed that most respondents believe major facility revitalization must occur at WRAMC, staff awareness of the Master Facility Plan is lacking and staff education...

  1. Statistical problems in medical research | Okeh | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 25 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. South African Medical Journal - Vol 99, No 5 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related fears, perceived risk and preventive behaviours among South African adults · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. L Myer, DJ Stein, AT Grimsrud, A Herman, S Seedat, ...

  3. South African Medical Journal - Vol 45, No 10 (1971)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gunshot wounds of the South African War · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ... Advances in resectional hepatic surgery · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Pitfalls in the interpretation of blood chemistry results · EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  4. South African Medical Journal Suid~Afrikaanse Tydskrif VIr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Dermatology, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital. An African male ... chiefly of superficial layers of epidermis, showing a very thick layer of keratin .... There was no disturbance of the architecture of the liver cell ...

  5. Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 17, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... lesions in a group of sub-Saharan African patients on maintenance hemodialysis ... Perceived barriers to the implementation of Isoniazid preventive therapy for ... Adherence to antiepileptic drugs among children attending a tertiary health ...

  6. South African Medical Journal - Vol 89, No 2 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Validation of a food frequency questionnaire in older South Africans · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Karen E Charlton, Estelle V Lambert, 184-189 ...

  7. South African Medical' Journal Suid,Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching in this country. For this issue articles ... training ana qualifications abroad (chiefly but not exclusively in Great ... Africans, in both the English and Afrikaans languages, and one ... found it possible to develop their postgraduate teaching.

  8. Current issues in medical education | Al Shehri | West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 4 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. The Iatroref study: medical errors are associated with symptoms of depression in ICU staff but not burnout or safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Perrin, Marion; Soufir, Lilia; Vesin, Aurélien; Blot, François; Maxime, Virginie; Beuret, Pascal; Troché, Gilles; Klouche, Kada; Argaud, Laurent; Azoulay, Elie; Timsit, Jean-François

    2015-02-01

    Staff behaviours to optimise patient safety may be influenced by burnout, depression and strength of the safety culture. We evaluated whether burnout, symptoms of depression and safety culture affected the frequency of medical errors and adverse events (selected using Delphi techniques) in ICUs. Prospective, observational, multicentre (31 ICUs) study from August 2009 to December 2011. Burnout, depression symptoms and safety culture were evaluated using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), CES-Depression scale and Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, respectively. Of 1,988 staff members, 1,534 (77.2 %) participated. Frequencies of medical errors and adverse events were 804.5/1,000 and 167.4/1,000 patient-days, respectively. Burnout prevalence was 3 or 40 % depending on the definition (severe emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and low personal accomplishment; or MBI score greater than -9). Depression symptoms were identified in 62/330 (18.8 %) physicians and 188/1,204 (15.6 %) nurses/nursing assistants. Median safety culture score was 60.7/100 [56.8-64.7] in physicians and 57.5/100 [52.4-61.9] in nurses/nursing assistants. Depression symptoms were an independent risk factor for medical errors. Burnout was not associated with medical errors. The safety culture score had a limited influence on medical errors. Other independent risk factors for medical errors or adverse events were related to ICU organisation (40 % of ICU staff off work on the previous day), staff (specific safety training) and patients (workload). One-on-one training of junior physicians during duties and existence of a hospital risk-management unit were associated with lower risks. The frequency of selected medical errors in ICUs was high and was increased when staff members had symptoms of depression.

  10. Psychosocial work environment and burnout among emergency medical and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribà-Agüir, V; Martín-Baena, D; Pérez-Hoyos, S

    2006-11-01

    The prevalence of burnout syndrome is increasing among doctors and nurses. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between the psychosocial work environment and burnout syndrome among emergency medical and nursing staff in Spain. A secondary aim was to determine if the effect of this psychosocial work environment on burnout was different for doctors and nurses. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by means of a mail questionnaire among 945 emergency doctors and nursing staff of Spain. The outcome variable was three dimensions of burnout syndrome [emotional exhaustion (EE), personal accomplishment (PA), depersonalisation (DP)]. The explanatory variable was that psychosocial work environment evaluated according to Karasek and Johnson's demand-control model. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated by logistical regression. The probability of high EE was greater among those exposed to high psychological demands, OR 4.66 (2.75-7.90), low job control, OR 1.65 (1.04-2.63), and low supervisors' social support, OR 1.64 (1.01-2.59). Emotional exhaustion dimension was negatively influenced by low control only among doctors. Those exposed to low job control had a higher risk of low PA, OR 2.55 (1.66-3.94). There was no evidence of negative effect of psychosocial risk factors on the DP. Prevalence of EE and PA was higher among doctors and nurses. The presence of risk factors derived from work organisation within the work place (psychosocial risk factors) increases the probability of presenting burnout syndrome and, above all, EE.

  11. High beta radiation exposure of medical staff measures for optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, I.; Rimpler, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: New therapies applying beta radionuclides have been introduced in medicine in recent years, especially in nuclear medicine, e. g. radio-synoviorthesis, radioimmunotherapy and palliative pain therapy. The preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, their dispensary as well as injection require the handling of vials and syringes with high activities of beta emitters at small distances to the skin. Thus the medical staff may be exposed to a high level of beta radiation. Hence the local skin dose, Hp(0,07), was measured at these workplaces with thin-layer thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD (LiF:Mg,P,Cu) fixed to the tip of the fingers at both hands of the personnel. In addition, official beta/photon ring dosemeters were worn at the first knuckle of the index finger. Very high local skin doses were measured at the tip of index finger and thumb. The findings indicate that the exposure of the staff can exceed the annual dose limit for skin of 500 mSv when working at a low protection standard. By the use of appropriate shieldings and tools (e.g. tweezers or forceps) the exposure was reduced of more than one order of magnitude. The German dosimetry services provide official beta/photon ring dosemeters for routine monitoring of the extremity exposure of occupationally exposed persons. But even monitoring with these official dosemeters does not provide suitable results to control compliance with the dose limit in the majority of cases because they can mostly not be worn at the spot of highest beta exposure (finger tip). Therefore, a study was performed to identify the difference of readings of official ring dosemeters and the maximum local skin dose at the finger tips. At workplaces of radio-synoviorthesis a correction factor of 3 was determined provided that the staff worked at high radiation protection standard and the ring dosemeters were worn at the first knuckle of the index finger. The correction factor increases significantly when the radiation

  12. Survey of Quality of Life and Influencing Factors in Alborz University of Medical Sciences Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Quality of life is a concept beyond the physical health. It is an important index in health research that its independent quantification as an important outcome is essential. Work environment consists of physical, mental and social stimuli and each of these factors can cause stress. These stresses and pressures have inappropriate effects on physical–emotional welfare, health and its function. Therefore, this study was performed on the Faculty of Medicine of Karaj staffs in 1390 to investigate their quality of life and the governing factors. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive and sectional study, a group of 100 of Faculty of Medicine and of Alborz University of Medical Sciences employees were participated. Sampling was done as census. Data collection was performed by means of the questionnaire of standard of quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF and the questionnaire of demographic information collected. Results: The results show that 51 percent of the employees have reported their quality of life in the average range and 6% in poor range. Furthermore, in the physical aspect of quality of life, 34% of the results are good, 59% moderate and the remaining 7% are poor. Likewise, in the quality of life from psychological aspect, 33% of the results are good, 64 percent moderate, and only 3% are poor. The data for the social relationships aspect are 28% good, 59% moderate, and 13% poor. Finally, in the quality of life from environmental health aspect, 36% of the staffs reported good, 55% moderate, and 9% poor condition. Pearson’s test results show that there is a meaningful correlation between the quality of life and the lower number of children, and also increasing years of service (P=0.00. However, the quality of life does not show any significant relationship with age and income. ANOVA test results indicate that there is a significant relationship between quality of life and the type of employment (P=0.017. Conclusion: Quality

  13. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  15. Minimum Benefits for HIV/AIDS in South African Medical Schemes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the Minister of Health in respect of the extent of prescribed minimum benefits for HIV/AIDS. Medical schemes are required to provide the PMBs to their members without limits or co-payments. Keywords: Medical schemes; HIV; AIDS; benefits; prescribed minimum benefits. South African Actuarial Journal: 2003 3: 77-112 ...

  16. Analysis of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sohrabi, Mozaffar Cheshmeh; Zare, Firoozeh; Hassnazadeh, Akbar; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Numerous researches conducted on about the quality of perception of media messages shows that the people are not passive receivers but they have the ability of understanding, interpreting and accepting or rejecting messages. In order to make clear the relationship of information and communication technologies with social changes and to gain a broader vision from this scope, sociological theories about information and communication technologies' usage, especially appropriation approach can be very useful. So, keeping in mind the important role of Databases in the qualitative expansion of education, research, diagnosis, remedy and medical services presentation, this research was carried out with the aim of status determination of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach in 2012. This is an applicative research of an analytical-descriptive type, which was carried out by measurement approach. The statistical society of this research was composed of the academic staffs of the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences in 2012 and finally 390 academic staffs were selected according to the Cochran's formula were selected. The research tool are searcher's made questionnaire, which was composed of nine separate parts. Its validity was accepted by the specialists and its reliability was calculated and found to be 0.961 by Cronbakh's alpha. Database appropriation score in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences with 65.020% was in a good status and data bases dis appropriation score with 71.484 was in a high status. According to the findings of this research, Librarians and politicians in this scope-with determination of the academic staff's positive and negative points in usage and appropriation would be capable of accurately diagnozing and analyzing the chances and challenges of the academic staffs members in using databases and would also be capable of

  17. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1056] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  18. 77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1056] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  19. Perceptions of University Mission Statement and Person-Environment Fit by Osteopathic Medical School Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppre, Beth Anne Edwards

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how university medical school faculty and staff perceive the institution's mission statement, in conjunction with their person-environment fit, can provide administration with useful insight into: employee's match to the institution's mission statement, employee level of organizational commitment, and reasons for retention. This…

  20. [Effective Techniques to Reduce Radiation Exposure to Medical Staff during Assist of X-ray Computed Tomography Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Ryuichi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Miyachi, Yusuke; Tateishi, Satoshi; Uno, Yoshinori; Amakawa, Kazutoshi; Ohura, Hiroki; Orita, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    Medical staffs like radiological technologists, doctors, and nurses are at an increased risk of exposure to radiation while assisting the patient in a position or monitor contrast medium injection during computed tomography (CT). However, methods to protect medical staff from radiation exposure and protocols for using radiological protection equipment have not been standardized and differ among hospitals. In this study, the distribution of scattered X-rays in a CT room was measured by placing electronic personal dosimeters in locations where medical staff stands beside the CT scanner gantry while assisting the patient and the exposure dose was measured. Moreover, we evaluated non-uniform exposure and revealed effective techniques to reduce the exposure dose to medical staff during CT. The dose of the scattered X-rays was the lowest at the gantry and at the examination table during both head and abdominal CT. The dose was the highest at the trunk of the upper body of the operator corresponding to a height of 130 cm during head CT and at the head corresponding to a height of 150 cm during abdominal CT. The maximum dose to the crystalline lens was approximately 600 μSv during head CT. We found that the use of volumetric CT scanning and X-ray protective goggles, and face direction toward the gantry reduced the exposure dose, particularly to the crystalline lens, for which lower equivalent dose during CT scan has been recently recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 118.

  1. Predicting medical staff intention to use an online reporting system with modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Chiu; Hsu, Hui-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to report incident events using an online information system (IS) may be different from those of a paper-based reporting system. The nationwide online Patient-Safety Reporting System (PSRS) contains a value judgment behind use of the system, similar to the Value of Perceived Consequence (VPC), which is seldom discussed in ISs applications of other disciplines. This study developed a more adequate research framework by integrating the VPC construct into the well-known Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model as a theoretical base to explore the predictors of medical staff's intention to use online PSRS. The results showed that management support was an important factor to influence medical staff's intention of using PSRS. The effects of factors such as performance expectancy, perceived positive, and perceived negative consequence on medical staff's intention of using PSRS were moderated by gender, age, experience, and occupation. The results proved that the modified UTAUT model is significant and useful in predicting medical staff's intention of using the nationwide online PSRS.

  2. The ethics of improving African traditional medical practice: scientific or African traditional research methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyika, Aceme

    2009-11-01

    The disease burden in Africa, which is relatively very large compared with developed countries, has been attributed to various factors that include poverty, food shortages, inadequate access to health care and unaffordability of Western medicines to the majority of African populations. Although for 'old diseases' knowledge about the right African traditional medicines to treat or cure the diseases has been passed from generation to generation, knowledge about traditional medicines to treat newly emerging diseases has to be generated in one way or another. In addition, the existing traditional medicines have to be continuously improved, which is also the case with Western scientific medicines. Whereas one school of thought supports the idea of improving medicines, be they traditional or Western, through scientific research, an opposing school of thought argues that subjecting African traditional medicines to scientific research would be tantamount to some form of colonization and imperialism. This paper argues that continuing to use African traditional medicines for old and new diseases without making concerted efforts to improve their efficacy and safety is unethical since the disease burden affecting Africa may continue to rise in spite of the availability and accessibility of the traditional medicines. Most importantly, the paper commends efforts being made in some African countries to improve African traditional medicine through a combination of different mechanisms that include the controversial approach of scientific research on traditional medicines.

  3. The African Genome Variation Project shapes medical genetics in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Carstensen, Tommy; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Pagani, Luca; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Karthikeyan, Savita; Iles, Louise; Pollard, Martin O.; Choudhury, Ananyo; Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Xue, Yali; Asimit, Jennifer; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Pomilla, Cristina; Kivinen, Katja; Rockett, Kirk; Kamali, Anatoli; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Asiki, Gershim; Seeley, Janet; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Jallow, Muminatou; Tollman, Stephen; Mekonnen, Ephrem; Ekong, Rosemary; Oljira, Tamiru; Bradman, Neil; Bojang, Kalifa; Ramsay, Michele; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Bekele, Endashaw; Motala, Ayesha; Norris, Shane A.; Pirie, Fraser; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Rotimi, Charles; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sandhu, Manjinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of Africa to studies of human origins and disease susceptibility, detailed characterisation of African genetic diversity is needed. The African Genome Variation Project (AGVP) provides a resource to help design, implement and interpret genomic studies in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and worldwide. The AGVP represents dense genotypes from 1,481 and whole genome sequences (WGS) from 320 individuals across SSA. Using this resource, we find novel evidence of complex, regionally distinct hunter-gatherer and Eurasian admixture across SSA. We identify new loci under selection, including for malaria and hypertension. We show that modern imputation panels can identify association signals at highly differentiated loci across populations in SSA. Using WGS, we show further improvement in imputation accuracy supporting efforts for large-scale sequencing of diverse African haplotypes. Finally, we present an efficient genotype array design capturing common genetic variation in Africa, showing for the first time that such designs are feasible. PMID:25470054

  4. Analysing post-apartheid gender and racial transformation in medical education in a South African province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Taskeen; Thomas, Leena S; Naidoo, Shan

    2013-01-24

    In light of global concerns about insufficient numbers of doctors, midwives, and nurses, the World Health Organization (WHO) has identified the scale-up of the production of medical professionals who are competent and responsive to community needs as urgent and necessary. Coincident with this imperative, South African medical schools have also had to consider redressing apartheid-era inequities in access to medical education and changing the racial and gender profile of medical graduates to be representative of the population. In this article, we explore progress and challenges with regard to transformation, defined as intentional and planned changes aimed at addressing historical disadvantages, in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. A cross-sectional, descriptive analysis was conducted using data on medical school admissions and graduations from the Health and Education Departments for the period 1999-2011. Admission and graduation statistics of 1999, 2005, 2008, and 2011 were analysed according to race and gender. The results show that there has been progress in transforming the race and gender composition of medical students and graduates, in line with the transformation strategies of the South African government. In 1999, black African enrolments and graduates were conspicuously low in two of the three medical schools in the Gauteng province. By 2011, an almost six-fold increase in black African student enrolments was seen in one medical school that was previously designated as a white institution. In contrast, at the historically black medical school, whites only represented 0.40% of enrolments in 1999 and 7.4% in 2011. Since 1999, the number and proportion of female medical enrolments and graduates has also increased substantially. While there has been progress with redressing historical disparities and inequities in terms of race and gender, further efforts are needed to ensure that student intakes and graduations are in line with the South African

  5. A Survey of Knowledge About and Perceived Barriers to Prostate Cancer Screening Among Medical Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarizadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer. Results of previous studies indicate the effectiveness of screening and early detection in reducing mortality from this disease. Objectives The purpose of this study was to survey the knowledge about prostate cancer and perceived barriers to prostate cancer screening among medical staff of two universities in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 120 employees over 40 years old at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences and Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, who were selected by using simple random sampling. The data collection tool was a researcher-created questionnaire based on the study of texts and other studies. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software and through analytical methods including descriptive and inferential statistics. Results The most common barriers to screening for prostate cancer were a lack of knowledge about where to go for tests and how screening tests are done (70.8%, a lack of emphasis on screening tests (59.1%, and a fear of thinking about the disease (50%. Results showed that there was no significant relationship between doing the serum antigen test and having knowledge regarding prostate cancer. But there was a significant association between prostate cancer screening and perceived barriers (P = 0.001. Conclusions Results showed that whereas knowledge by itself cannot guarantee men’s participation in prostate cancer screenings, perceived barriers can play an important role in discouraging men from cancer screening participation. Therefore, designing programs to address these barriers is very important.

  6. Radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures: a multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, Uwe; Brix, Gunnar; Czarwinski, Renate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures. Partial-body dose measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in 39 physicians and nine assistants conducting 73 interventional procedures of nine different types in 14 hospitals in Germany. Fluoroscopy time and the dose-area product (DAP) were recorded too. The median (maximum) equivalent body dose per procedure was 16 (2,500) μSv for an unshielded person; the partial-body dose per procedure was 2.8 (240) μSv to the eye lens, 4.1 (730) μSv to the thyroid, 44 (1,800) μSv to one of the feet and 75 (13,000) μSv to one of the hands. A weak correlation between fluoroscopy time or DAP and the mean TLD dose was observed. Generally, the doses were within an acceptable range from a radiation hygiene point of view. However, relatively high exposures were measured to the hand in some cases and could cause a partial-body dose above the annual dose limit of 500 mSv. Thus, the use of finger dosimeters is strongly recommended. (orig.)

  7. [Experimental intervention study of safe injection in basic-level hospitals in Hunan by medical staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Yinglan; Long, Yanfang; Zhou, Yang; Lu, Jingmei; Wu, Ying

    2013-07-01

    To experimentally intervene safe injection by medical staff in basic-level hospitals and observe the recent and long-term effect after the intervention and to provide practical measures to improve safe injection. We used random sampling methods to set up groups in county hospitals and township hospitals of Hunan Province, and offered lectures, delivered safe injection guide, brochure and on-site guidance in the experimental group. We surveyed the 2 groups after the intervention at 1 month and 6 months to compare the effect of unsafe injection behaviors and safe injection behaviors. One month after the intervention, the unsafe injection rate in the experimental group decreased from 27.8% to 21.7%, while in the control group injection the unsafe injection rate rose from 26.0% to 27.9%, with significant difference (Pinjection rate in the experimental group declined to 18.4% while the unsafe injection rate in the control group also dropped to 22.4%, with significant difference (Pinjection rate was decreased in the experimental group at different intervention points, with significant difference (Psafe injection behavior scores in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group after the intervention of 1 month and 6 month intervention (Psafe injection, distribution of safe injection guide, and comprehensive intervention model can significantly change the primary care practitioners' behaviors in unsafe injections and it is worth promoting.

  8. Violence by Proxy | Editorial | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality. 521 African Journals. Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Featuring journals from 32 Countries: Algeria (5); Benin (2); Botswana ...

  9. The African Genome Variation Project shapes medical genetics in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Carstensen, Tommy; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Pagani, Luca; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Karthikeyan, Savita; Iles, Louise; Pollard, Martin O; Choudhury, Ananyo; Ritchie, Graham R S; Xue, Yali; Asimit, Jennifer; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Young, Elizabeth H; Pomilla, Cristina; Kivinen, Katja; Rockett, Kirk; Kamali, Anatoli; Doumatey, Ayo P; Asiki, Gershim; Seeley, Janet; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Jallow, Muminatou; Tollman, Stephen; Mekonnen, Ephrem; Ekong, Rosemary; Oljira, Tamiru; Bradman, Neil; Bojang, Kalifa; Ramsay, Michele; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Bekele, Endashaw; Motala, Ayesha; Norris, Shane A; Pirie, Fraser; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Rotimi, Charles; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sandhu, Manjinder S

    2015-01-15

    Given the importance of Africa to studies of human origins and disease susceptibility, detailed characterization of African genetic diversity is needed. The African Genome Variation Project provides a resource with which to design, implement and interpret genomic studies in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide. The African Genome Variation Project represents dense genotypes from 1,481 individuals and whole-genome sequences from 320 individuals across sub-Saharan Africa. Using this resource, we find novel evidence of complex, regionally distinct hunter-gatherer and Eurasian admixture across sub-Saharan Africa. We identify new loci under selection, including loci related to malaria susceptibility and hypertension. We show that modern imputation panels (sets of reference genotypes from which unobserved or missing genotypes in study sets can be inferred) can identify association signals at highly differentiated loci across populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Using whole-genome sequencing, we demonstrate further improvements in imputation accuracy, strengthening the case for large-scale sequencing efforts of diverse African haplotypes. Finally, we present an efficient genotype array design capturing common genetic variation in Africa.

  10. South African Medical Journal - Vol 98, No 3 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington\\'s disease: Genetic heterogeneity in black African patients · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. D S Magazi, A Krause, V Bonev, M Moagi, Z Iqbal, M Dludla, C H van der Meyden, 200-203 ...

  11. South African Medical Journal - Vol 105, No 4 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care in 12 South African health districts · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. RC Pattinson, JD Makin, Y Pillay, N van den Broek, J Moodley, 256-260 ...

  12. South African Medical Journal - Vol 90, No 11 (2000)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Empiric treatment based on Helicobacter Pylori serology cannont substitute for early endoscopy in the management of dyspeptic rural black africans · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Stephen JD O'Keefe, B Salvador, J Nainkin, S Majiki, H Stevens, ...

  13. The Promotion of Drug Abuse - PO* | Allen | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  14. South African Medical Journal - Vol 97, No 8 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimating the burden of disease attributable to vitamin A deficiency in South Africa in 2000 · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. B Nojilana, R Norman, D Bradshaw, M E van Stuijvenberg, M A Dhansay, D Labadarios, South African Comparitive Risk ...

  15. The African Genome Variation Project shapes medical genetics in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Carstensen, Tommy; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Pagani, Luca; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Karthikeyan, Savita; Iles, Louise; Pollard, Martin O.; Choudhury, Ananyo; Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Xue, Yali; Asimit, Jennifer; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Pomilla, Cristina; Kivinen, Katja; Rockett, Kirk; Kamali, Anatoli; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Asiki, Gershim; Seeley, Janet; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Jallow, Muminatou; Tollman, Stephen; Mekonnen, Ephrem; Ekong, Rosemary; Oljira, Tamiru; Bradman, Neil; Bojang, Kalifa; Ramsay, Michele; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Bekele, Endashaw; Motala, Ayesha; Norris, Shane A.; Pirie, Fraser; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Rotimi, Charles; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sandhu, Manjinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of Africa to studies of human origins and disease susceptibility, detailed characterization of African genetic diversity is needed. The African Genome Variation Project provides a resource with which to design, implement and interpret genomic studies in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide. The African Genome Variation Project represents dense genotypes from 1,481 individuals and whole-genome sequences from 320 individuals across sub-Saharan Africa. Using this resource, we find novel evidence of complex, regionally distinct hunter-gatherer and Eurasian admixture across sub-Saharan Africa. We identify new loci under selection, including loci related to malaria susceptibility and hypertension. We show that modern imputation panels (sets of reference genotypes from which unobserved or missing genotypes in study sets can be inferred) can identify association signals at highly differentiated loci across populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Using whole-genome sequencing, we demonstrate further improvements in imputation accuracy, strengthening the case for large-scale sequencing efforts of diverse African haplotypes. Finally, we present an efficient genotype array design capturing common genetic variation in Africa.

  16. East African Medical Journal - Vol 83, No 9 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An overview of health financing patterns and the way forward in the who african region · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JM Kirigia, A Preker, G Carrin, C Mwikisa, AJ Diarra-Nama, S1-S28. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v83i9.9492 ...

  17. South African Medical Journal - Vol 98, No 7 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Prevalence of Hepatitis B Co infection in a South African (SA) Urban government HIV Clinic · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. C Firhaber, A Reyneke, D Schulz, B Malope, B Malope, P Macphail, E Sanne, AD Biseglie, 541-544 ...

  18. Solid medical waste management in Africa | Udofia | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Additional articles were included from open google search. Articles were selected for inclusion if they described SMW management activities such as waste segregation, collection, transport (on-site and/or off-site), temporary storage, treatment and final disposal; were located in an African country and were written in English; ...

  19. South African Medical Journal - Vol 45, No 1 (1971)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HC Falkson, EJ Schulz, Geoffrey Falkson. Plastics in Pharmacy and Medicine · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. TJ McCarthy. Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner's syndrome and phenotype in the South African Bantu · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ...

  20. Book Review: An Uneasy Story. | Cameron | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Uneasy Story. The Nationalising of South African Mission Hospitals 1960 - 1976. A Personal Account. By Dr Ronald Ingle. Foreword by Professor Dons Kritzinger. Pp. xiii+189. Published by the author. 2010. ISBN 978-0-620-47820-5. Illustrated. R230 (including postage). For overseas order options, contact the author.

  1. Books | van Coeverden de Groot | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the books. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use ...

  2. South African Medical Journal - Vol 98, No 12 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of African Potato (Hypoxis Hemerocallidea) on the Pharmacokinetics of Efavirenz · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. S Mogatle, M Skinner, E Mills, I Kanfer, 945-949. Performance data of screening mammography at a dedicated breast health ...

  3. East African Medical Journal - Vol 87, No 8 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of the ENPP1 rs997509 polymorphism with obesity in South African mixed ancestry learners · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T Matsha, B Fanampe, Y Yako, S Hassan, M Hoffmann, L Van der Merwe, RT Erasmus ...

  4. South African Medical Journal - Vol 89, No 9 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurements of iron status and survival in African iron overload · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A Patrick MacPhail, Eberhard M Mandishona, Peter D Bloom, Alan C Paterson, Tracey A Rouault, Victor R Gordeuk ...

  5. South African Medical Journal - Vol 104, No 11 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy: High-resolution melting curve analysis as an affordable diagnostic mutation scanning tool in a South African cohort · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AI Esterhuizen, JM Wilmshurst, RG Goliath, LJ Greenberg, 779-784.

  6. South African Medical Journal - Vol 92, No 7 (2002)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Community Epidemiology Network on drug use (SACENDU) project, phases 1 - 8- Cannabis and Mandrax · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Reinhard A Uebel, Cherylynn A Wium, 542-547 ...

  7. The Variance between Recommended and Nursing Staff Levels at Womack Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holcek, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    .... This study considered five possible rationales for the existing variances - workload changes, staff experience, observation patients, recovery patients, and outpatient procedures - for 117 work...

  8. Preparation and medical outcomes of Nepalese staff and porters compared with foreign nationals on the Annapurna trekking circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Christian M; Colleran, Shane; Zijp, Maarten; Lama, Lama Phuri; Sherpa, Nuru J; Kelly, Julia L; Sulzbach, Nina; Prior, Denise; Currin, Sally A; Currin, Simon; Nickol, Annabel H; Morrell, Mary J

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigates preparedness and medical problems in Nepalese staff and porters compared with foreign nationals trekking at altitude in the Nepal Himalaya. 331 Nepalese and 338 foreign nationals in 61 trekking groups were surveyed over 4 weeks on the Annapurna trekking circuit. Foreign nationals reported that 92% of trekking groups received altitude illness information and carried a medical kit. However, fewer than 30% knew the evacuation insurance status of the Nepalese staff and porters on their trek, 39% would not pay for an ill Nepalese national's helicopter evacuation, and 41% reported insufficient resources to carry an individual. Medical problems occurred in 44% of groups. A significantly higher proportion of Nepalese staff and porters were evacuated compared with foreign nationals. No significant differences in Nepalese and foreign national preparation were found between groups with and without medical problems. Medical problems were commonly encountered, yet many groups lacked resources to evacuate someone dangerously ill. Foreign and Nepalese nationals have a duty of care towards each other; recognizing that preparedness relies not only on a first aid kit, but also on knowledge of acclimatization and individuals' insurance is an important part of health and safety for individuals trekking at altitude.

  9. Equivalent doses of ionizing radiation received by medical staff at a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziuk, E.; Kowalczyk, A.; Siekierzynski, M.; Jazwinski, J.; Chas, J.; Janiak, M.K.; Palijczuk, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Total annual activity of I-131 used for the treatment of thyroid disorders at the Dept.of Nuclear Medicine, Central Clinical Hospital, Military University School of Medicine, in Warsaw, Poland, equal to 190 GBq; at the same time, total activity of Tc-99m utilized at the same Department for diagnostic purposes reached 1 TBq. As estimated from the radiometer readings, in extreme cases the equivalent at a couple of measurement points at this Department may exceed 200 mSv per year. Thus, in the present study we aimed to assess the potential risk of the exposure of medical personnel of the Department to ionizing radiation. Material and Methods: Polymethacrylate cases each housing four thermoluminescent dosimeters were continuously worn for one year by the nurses and doctors with the dosimeters being replaced by the new ones every three months. In addition, cases containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (three dosimeters per case) were placed in 20 different measurement points across the Department and the monitoring of the doses was carried out continuously for more than six years (from May 1995 to March 2002). Based on the quarterly readings of the dosimeters, equivalent doses were calculated for both the members of the personnel and the measurement space points. Results: The doses registered in the patient rooms ranged 5 to 90 mSv x y -1 , in the application room 10 to 15 mSv x y -1 , in the laboratory rooms 1.5 to 30 mSv x y -1 , and in the waiting room 2 to 6 mSv x y -1 ; no increment above the background level was detected in the nurses' station. Accordingly, the annual doses calculated from the dosimeters worn by the staff ranged 0.2 to 1.1 mSv x y -1 ; these latter findings were confirmed by direct readings from individual film dosimeters additionally worn by the staff members. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that it is unlikely for the personnel of the monitored Nuclear Medicine Department to receive doses of radiation exceeding 40% of the annual

  10. Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vu Geneeskunde: South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This division is administrative and financial, but at patient level there is no reason why complete amalgamation of all these services should ... a vaccination cam- paign with their staff operating from the clinic premises. ... in a shortage of beds and a curtailment of the period of hospitalization of maternity patients. Gradually the ...

  11. South African Medical Journal - Vol 88, No 11 (1998)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of the 'road-to-health' card based on perceptions of clinic staff and mothers · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. D Harrison, H de V. Heese, H Harker, M.D. Mann, 1424-1428 ...

  12. Supervision and feedback for junior medical staff in Australian emergency departments: findings from the emergency medicine capacity assessment study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiland Tracey J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical supervision and feedback are important for the development of competency in junior doctors. This study aimed to determine the adequacy of supervision of junior medical staff in Australian emergency departments (EDs and perceived feedback provided. Methods Semi-structured telephone surveys sought quantitative and qualitative data from ED Directors, Directors of Emergency Medicine Training, registrars and interns in 37 representative Australian hospitals; quantitative data were analysed with SPSS 15.0 and qualitative data subjected to content analysis identifying themes. Results Thirty six of 37 hospitals took part. Of 233 potential interviewees, 95 (40.1% granted interviews including 100% (36/36 of ED Directors, and 96.2% (25/26 of eligible DEMTs, 24% (19/81 of advanced trainee/registrars, and 17% (15/90 of interns. Most participants (61% felt the ED was adequately supervised in general and (64.2% that medical staff were adequately supervised. Consultants and registrars were felt to provide most intern supervision, but this varied depending on shift times, with registrars more likely to provide supervision on night shift and at weekends. Senior ED medical staff (64% and junior staff (79% agreed that interns received adequate clinical supervision. Qualitative analysis revealed that good processes were in place to ensure adequate supervision, but that service demands, particularly related to access block and overcrowding, had detrimental effects on both supervision and feedback. Conclusions Consultants appear to provide the majority of supervision of junior medical staff in Australian EDs. Supervision and feedback are generally felt to be adequate, but are threatened by service demands, particularly related to access block and ED overcrowding.

  13. East African Medical Journal - Vol 78, No 3 (2001)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV infection in elderly medical patients · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Dental caries and periodontal conditions among primary school children in ... Epidemiology of injury patients at Bugando Medical centre, Tanzania ...

  14. South African Medical Journal - Vol 84, No 7 (1994)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introverted medical school - time to rethink medical education · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A.B. Zwi, M. Zwarenstein, S. Tollman, D. Sanders ...

  15. Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 23, No 1 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceptions and uptake of health insurance for maternal care in rural Kenya: a .... Knowledge and awareness of medical doctors, medical students and nurses ..... Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis after elbow trauma: a case report of a ...

  16. Toxic effects of formalin-treated cadaver on medical students, staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha Selim Mohamed Elshaer

    2017-01-02

    Jan 2, 2017 ... Formalin-exposed staff reported symptoms of skin disorders as drying (75%), ..... rent research, 6.2% of the formalin-exposed staff had abnormal ..... Khaliq F, Tripathi P. Acute effects of formalin on pulmonary functions in gross.

  17. Cost of a dedicated ART clinic | Harling | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little evidence exists on the cost of running clinics for ART provision. Objectives. To determine the cost per patient-month enrolled in an ART programme and per patient-visit for a dedicated, public-sector ART clinic in a South African peri-urban setting in 2004/05 and 2005/06, as the clinic moved from a temporary to a ...

  18. Stroke awareness among Dubai emergency medical service staff and impact of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Fatima; Kasim, Zahra; Alrukn, Suhail; Khan, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emergency medical services (EMS) play a vital role in expediting hospital arrival in stroke patients. The objective of our study was to assess the level of awareness regarding pre-hospital identification and management of acute stroke among EMS Staff in Dubai and to evaluate the impact of an educational lecture on their knowledge. Ours was a cross-sectional study with a pre-test and post-test design. The intervention was an educational lecture, based on the updated guidelines in pre-hospital care of acute stroke. Participants were assessed before and after the intervention on various aspects of stroke care. Paired t test were used to compare the impact of the intervention. A total of 274 EMS workers participated in our study. The baseline knowledge of participants regarding stroke types was inadequate with only 68% correctly identifying these. 79% were able to name the cardinal stroke symptoms. Knowledge of stroke mimics was poor with only 6.6% identifying stroke mimics correctly. With respect to management, most participants were unable to correctly identify the points to illicit in the history of an acute stroke patient (25.2%) and also the steps in pre-hospital management (40%). All these aspects showed remarkable improvement post intervention. The baseline awareness of most aspects of acute stroke identification and management was poor in our EMS participants. Our educational lecture proved effective in improving this knowledge when tested immediately post intervention. However, there is a need to re-assess this at periodic intervals to identify the need for refresher courses on pre-hospital stroke management.

  19. Training medical staff for pediatric disaster victims: a comparison of different teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Solomon; Upperman, Jeffrey S; Ramirez, Marizen; Dorey, Fred; Nager, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the different types of healthcare worker training in pediatric disaster medicine knowledge over time and to analyze the effects of training type on healthcare workers' attitude toward pediatric disaster medicine. Prospective randomized controlled longitudinal study. Large, urban, tertiary academic children's hospital. Physicians and nurses employed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles randomly selected from a global hospital e-mail server over a 3-week time frame were invited to participate and receive an incentive on completion. Forty-three controls and 42 intervention subjects (22 lecture + tabletop exercise, 20 lecture only) completed the study. Subjects with disaster training in the prior 6 months were excluded. Subjects underwent a didactic lecture or a combination of didactic lecture and tabletop exercise. Preintervention and postintervention testing took place using a 37-question multiple-choice test on pediatric disaster medical topics. Posttesting took place immediately after intervention and then 1, 3, and 6 months after the intervention. Subjects also were surveyed before and after intervention regarding their attitudes toward pediatric disaster medicine. (1) Scores on a 37-question knowledge test and (2) Likert scores on self-perceptions of knowledge, comfort, and interest in pediatric disaster medicine. Regardless of intervention type, participant scores on a postintervention pediatric disaster medicine tests over a 6-month period increased and remained well above pretest means for intervention and control pretest scores. There were no differences in scores comparing type of intervention. However, subjects who underwent the tabletop simulation had a better sense of knowledge and comfort with the topics compared with those who only underwent a didactic lecture. Didactic lecture and tabletop exercises both increase healthcare worker's knowledge of pediatric disaster medical topics. This knowledge

  20. DELIRIUM RELATED DISTRESS EXPERIENCED BY PATIENTS, CAREGIVERS AND NURSING STAFF IN A MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Kumar Jayaswal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Delirium, a common neuropsychiatric syndrome in intensive care settings is a distressing experience for the patient, caregivers and nursing staff. Research on delirium experience has been scant and unsystematic. We set out to explore the extent of recall of delirium, differential distress it had on patients, caregivers and nursing staff and the extent to which it impacted recognition across the motoric subtypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out on all consecutively admitted patients in the medical ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients diagnosed with delirium using Confusion Assessment Method for ICU (CAM-ICU were administered the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS for differentiating the motor subtypes (hypoactive, hyperactive, mixed. Distress was assessed using the Delirium Experience Questionnaire (DEQ. RESULTS Of the 88 patients (31.43% who developed delirium, 60.2% recalled their experience. Recall was highest in the hyperactive subtype. 76% of patients, 94.3% of caregivers and 31.8% of nursing staff reported severe levels of distress. Motoric subtypes did not impact on the distress levels experienced by the patients or their caregivers, but influenced it significantly in the nursing staff (highest in hyperactive, least in hypoactive. Identification of delirium by nursing staff (13.4% was significantly influenced by the motor subtypes (highest in hyperactive, least in hypoactive. Linear regression analysis revealed that distress of ICU staff (F=1.36, p=0.018 and not the motoric subtypes (F=1.36, p=0.262 significantly predicted recognition of delirium. CONCLUSIONS Most patients who develop delirium and their caregivers experience high levels of distress. Under-recognition is significantly influenced by the distress it causes the ICU staff than the motor subtype of delirium.

  1. Radiant Ceiling Panels Combined with Localized Methods for Improved Thermal Comfort of Both Patient and Medical Staff in Patient Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Sakura; Barova, Mariya; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    2012-01-01

    The objectives were to identify whether ceiling installed radiant heating panels can provide thermal comfort to the occupants in a patient room, and to determine a method for optimal thermal environment to both patient and medical staff simultaneously. The experiments were performed in a climate...... mattress were used to provide local heating for the patient. The effects of the methods were identified by comparing the manikin based equivalent temperatures. The optimal thermal comfort level for both patient and medical staff would obtained when two conventional cotton blankets were used with extra...... chamber resembling a single-bed patient room under convective air conditioning alone or combined with the ceiling installed radiant heating panels. Two thermal manikins simulated a patient lying in the bed and a doctor standing next to the patient. Conventional cotton blanket, electric blanket, electric...

  2. ED accreditation update. Physicians, medical staff may report safety concerns without fear of disciplinary action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Educating your staff about The Joint Commission's requirements for concerns about hospital safety and quality of care requires the ED manager to set a tone of openness and cooperation, while at the same time emphasizing your department's role in addressing such concerns: * The ED should be the first place that staff members communicate quality and safety concerns. It is only when a problem is not addressed that they should take the issue to hospital administration and, if necessary, The Joint Commission. * A single event should not trigger a report to The Joint Commission, unless it is unusually serious. Otherwise, only a series of events should trigger a report. * Reassure your staff that you care about what is reported and will act quickly on it. Educate your staff about the reporting forms, and follow up with random audits to ensure compliance.

  3. Eye lens exposure to medical staff performing electrophysiology procedures: dose assessment and correlation to patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Bozovic, Predrag; Arandjic, Danijela; Antic, Vojislav; Selakovic, Jovana; Pavlovic, Sinisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the patient exposure and staff eye dose levels during implantation procedures for all types of pacemaker therapy devices performed under fluoroscopic guidance and to investigate potential correlation between patients and staff dose levels. The mean eye dose during pacemaker/defibrillator implementation was 12 μSv for the first operator, 8.7 μSv for the second operator/nurse and 0.50 μSv for radiographer. Corresponding values for cardiac re-synchronisation therapy procedures were 30, 26 and 2.0 μSv, respectively. Significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product was found for the first operator and radiographers, but not for other staff categories. The study revealed eye dose per procedure and eye dose normalised to patient dose indices for different staff categories and provided an input for radiation protection in electrophysiology procedures. (authors)

  4. Current issues in medical education | Al Shehri | West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This includes, development in computer assisted learning, virtual reality, the use of simulated subjects, e learning, and the new concept of Reusable Learning Objects (RLO's). Finally, it was realized, with the rapid development in medical education that medical education requires professional training. The assumption that ...

  5. South African medical students' perceptions and knowledge about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Education of medical students has been identified by the World Health Organization as an important aspect of antibiotic resistance (ABR) containment. Surveys from high-income countries consistently reveal that medical students recognise the importance of antibiotic prescribing knowledge, but feel ...

  6. Intravascular catheter sepsis | Mer | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravascular devices are an integral component of modern-day medical practice. They are used to administer intravenous fluids, medications, blood products and parenteral nutrition. In addition, they serve as a valuable monitor of the haemodynamic status of critically ill patients.

  7. Statistical Problems In Medical Research | Okeh | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the main role of a general practitioner as a biostatistician, I thought it would be of interest to enumerate statistical problems in assessing methods of medical diagnosis in general terms. In conducting and reporting of medical research, there are some common problems in using statistical methodology which may result ...

  8. Marital satisfaction: the differential impact of social support dependent on situation and gender in medical staff in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-05-12

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff.

  9. Marital Satisfaction: The Differential Impact of Social Support Dependent on Situation and Gender in Medical Staff in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff. PMID:23777731

  10. A purple swelling on the tongue | Panta | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hemangiomas are benign hamartomatous lesions that are slow growing, sessile or pedunculated, smooth or lobulated, red swellings which sometimes exhibit a bluish hue. Hemangiomas of the tongue need special attention due to their susceptability to trauma from masticatory forces. Pan African Medical Journal 2015; 21 ...

  11. Bullose diabétique | El Makrini | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therapeutically, no particular treatment seems necessary except local antiseptic care after the recess bubbles. Bullosis diabeticorum is a characteristic skin complication of diabetes. Its etiology is still unknown. Its evolution is benign and its management is essentially preventive. Pan African Medical Journal 2016; 23 ...

  12. Snake bite on scrotum – a case report | Arshad | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web ...

  13. Primary health care in the South African context – medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Both the South African Department of Health and the University of Cape Town (UCT) have committed to the primary health care (PHC) approach, which is best captured in the Declaration of Alma Ata. If medical students are to be trained in the PHC approach, it is important that they not only have a good ...

  14. Syndrome de moelle bas attachée | Badaoui | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  15. The relationship between knowledge of ergonomic science and the occupational health among nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Juibari, Leila; Sanagu, Akram; Farrokhi, Nafiseh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational hazards are much higher for nurses than many other jobs and neglecting this fact may reduce the quality of nursing services. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between knowledge of ergonomics and occupational health among the nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences. METHODS: It was a cross-sectional analytical study on 423 nursing staff working in various medical centers affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sc...

  16. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  17. Physicians’ leadership styles in rural primary medical care: How are they perceived by staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkhaug, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim. This study investigates which leadership styles can be identified among general practice lead physicians and how they are associated with and predicted by staff and context characteristics like profession, gender, age, work experience, and team size. Method/material. In a cross-sectional study self-administered questionnaires were distributed to staff physicians (42% females) and support staff (98% females) at 101 primary health care centres in North Norway. A total of 127 and 222, respectively, responded (response rate 59%). Items were ranked on Likert scales (range 1–5). Results. Analysis revealed three significantly different styles (mean scores/Cronbach's alpha): change style (3.36/0.898), task style (3.17/0.885), and relation style (2.88/0.900). The lead physicians were perceived as practising change style the most and relation style the least. Males experienced significantly more of all three styles. Support staff scored lowest for all styles. Age was negatively correlated with relation style and change style, while work experience was negatively correlated with change style. No significant association was found between styles and team size. Conclusion. Leadership in rural general practice can be identified in terms of task, relation, and change styles. Change style is the most perceived style. Males seem to be most attentive to leadership styles. However, within the staff physician group, there is less difference between genders. Support staff scores lowest for all styles; this might indicate either less need for leadership or dissatisfaction with leadership. Age and work experience seem to reduce employees’ attention to relation and change styles, indicating that maturity reduces needs for these leadership styles. Due to growing demands for leaders to take care of efficiency and change in general practice, more young female physicians, and more diverse staff groups, these findings may be useful to understand leadership and leadership

  18. Physicians' leadership styles in rural primary medical care: how are they perceived by staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hana, Jan; Kirkhaug, Rudi

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates which leadership styles can be identified among general practice lead physicians and how they are associated with and predicted by staff and context characteristics like profession, gender, age, work experience, and team size. METHOD/MATERIAL: In a cross-sectional study self-administered questionnaires were distributed to staff physicians (42% females) and support staff (98% females) at 101 primary health care centres in North Norway. A total of 127 and 222, respectively, responded (response rate 59%). Items were ranked on Likert scales (range 1-5). Analysis revealed three significantly different styles (mean scores/Cronbach's alpha): change style (3.36/0.898), task style (3.17/0.885), and relation style (2.88/0.900). The lead physicians were perceived as practising change style the most and relation style the least. Males experienced significantly more of all three styles. Support staff scored lowest for all styles. Age was negatively correlated with relation style and change style, while work experience was negatively correlated with change style. No significant association was found between styles and team size. Leadership in rural general practice can be identified in terms of task, relation, and change styles. Change style is the most perceived style. Males seem to be most attentive to leadership styles. However, within the staff physician group, there is less difference between genders. Support staff scores lowest for all styles; this might indicate either less need for leadership or dissatisfaction with leadership. Age and work experience seem to reduce employees' attention to relation and change styles, indicating that maturity reduces needs for these leadership styles. Due to growing demands for leaders to take care of efficiency and change in general practice, more young female physicians, and more diverse staff groups, these findings may be useful to understand leadership and leadership training for general practice.

  19. Building Trusting Relationships in the Medical Practice Team: Thirty Rules to Live By for You and Your Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A medical practice team without trust isn't really a team; it's just a group of individuals who work together in a medical practice, often making disappointing progress. This is true no matter how capable or talented the individuals are. Your staff may never reach its full potential if trust is not present. This article offers medical practice managers 30 rules for building trust in their practices: 15 rules that will help them in their leadership roles, and 15 rules to teach and discuss with their employees. It suggests a trust-building screening question to include in job interviews to determine if applicants have a high capacity for trust. It also describes Reina and Reina's "Three C's of Trust," a model that practice managers may find useful as they develop trust competencies in their staffs. This article also includes 10 inspiring quotes that will help medical practice employees build trust and five easy-to-facilitate trust-building exercises that managers can use with the medical practice team.

  20. Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 5, No 1 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specialty preferences among medical students in a Kenyan university · EMAIL FREE ... Current knowledge, attitudes and practices of women on breast cancer and ... Knowledge and practice of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV ...

  1. South African Medical Journal - Vol 68, No 16 (1983)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dagga (cannabis) usage among medical students in Johannesburg · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. S. M. Levin, C Berman, H Cobb, J McIlraith, 607-609 ...

  2. Validity of the SMS, Phone, and medical staff Examination sports injury surveillance system for time-loss and medical attention injuries in sports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Wedderkopp, N; Myklebust, Grete

    2018-01-01

    The accurate measurement of sport exposure time and injury occurrence is key to effective injury prevention and management. Current measures are limited by their inability to identify all types of sport-related injury, narrow scope of injury information, or lack the perspective of the injured...... by trained on-field observers and medical staff (comparison method). We followed 24 elite adolescent handball players over 12 consecutive weeks. Eighty-six injury registrations were obtained by the SPEx and comparison methods. Of them, 35 injury registrations (41%) were captured by SPEx only, 10 injury...... athlete. The aims of the study were to evaluate the proportion of injuries and the agreement between sport exposures reported by the SMS messaging and follow-up telephone part of the SMS, Phone, and medical staff Examination (SPEx) sports injury surveillance system when compared to measures obtained...

  3. Proposal for the conclusion of a partnership agreement, without competitive tendering, for the management of medical emergencies on the CERN site and the training of CERN's medical staff and firefighters in emergency situations

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Proposal for the conclusion of a partnership agreement, without competitive tendering, for the management of medical emergencies on the CERN site and the training of CERN's medical staff and firefighters in emergency situations

  4. Adequacy of pharmacological information provided in pharmaceutical drug advertisements in African medical journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical advertisement of drugs is a means of advocating drug use and their selling but not a substitute for drug formulary to guide physicians in safe prescribing. Objectives: To evaluate drug advertisements in Nigerian and other African medical journals for their adequacy of pharmacological information. Methods: Twenty four issues from each of West African Journal of Medicine (WAJM, East African Medical Journal (EAMJ, South African Medical Journal (SAMJ, Nigerian Medical Practitioner (NMP, Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine (NQJHM and Nigerian Postgraduate Medical Journal (NPMJ were reviewed. While EAMJ, SAMJ and NMP are published monthly, the WAJM, NQJHM and NPMJ are published quarterly. The monthly journals were reviewed between January 2005 and December 2006, and the quarterly journals between January 2001 and December 2006. The drug information with regards to brand/non-proprietary name, pharmacological data, clinical information, pharmaceutical information and legal aspects was evaluated as per World Health Organisation (WHO criteria. Counts in all categories were collated for each advertiser.Results: Forty one pharmaceutical companies made 192 advertisements. 112 (58.3% of these advertisements were made in the African medical journals. Pfizer (20.3% and Swipha (12.5% topped the list of the advertising companies. Four (2.1% adverts mentioned generic names only, 157 (81.8% mentioned clinical indications. Adults and children dosage (39.6%, use in special situations such as pregnancy and renal or liver problems (36.5%, adverse effects (30.2%, average duration of treatment (26.0%, and potential for interaction with other drugs (18.7% were less discussed. Pharmaceutical information such as available dosage forms and product and package information {summary of the generic and proprietary names, the formulation strength, active ingredient, route of administration, batch number, manufactured and expiry dates, and the

  5. Radiation protection of medical staff in the latest draft of the revised Euratom Basic Safety Standards directive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeonov, Georgi; Mundigl, Stefan; Janssens, Augustin

    2011-01-01

    The European Union has a long and successful history of legislating in the area of radiation protection of the public, workers and individuals submitted to medical exposure, the first Euratom “Basic Safety Standards” (BSS) adopted in 1959 and subsequently updated and supplemented with other Directives. The recent revision of this legislation aims to update it in the light of the latest knowledge and experience and to simplify it by consolidating the current legal acts into one Directive. The draft of the revised Euratom BSS Directive has been approved by the group of scientific experts under Euratom Treaty Article 31 and is currently undergoing the European Commission’s procedures. This draft contains several new or amended provisions relating to protection of medical staff, among them: (i) a streamlining of the annual dose limit provisions, (ii) enhancing the use of dose constraints in optimization of protection, and (iii) ensuring better recording and transfer of occupational dose data including in cases of trans-border movement of workers. The Community action to radiation protection of workers is not restricted to passing relevant legislation but also includes ‘soft action’ as issuing guidance, supporting research and stakeholders’ involvement, etc. In August 2010 the Commission issued a Communication to the Council and the European Parliament dealing with the issues in the medical uses of ionizing radiation, including those relating to radiation protection of medical staff.

  6. The Use of Communication Apps by Medical Staff in the Australian Health Care System: Survey Study on Prevalence and Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Amanda; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Claydon-Platt, Damian; Balakrishnan, Vikram; Smart, Philip

    2018-02-09

    The use of communication apps on mobile phones offers an efficient, unobtrusive, and portable mode of communication for medical staff. The potential enhancements in patient care and education appear significant, with clinical details able to be shared quickly within multidisciplinary teams, supporting rapid integration of disparate information, and more efficient patient care. However, sharing patient data in this way also raises legal and ethical issues. No data is currently available demonstrating how widespread the use of these apps are, doctor's attitudes towards them, or what guides clinician choice of app. The objective of this study was to quantify and qualify the use of communication apps among medical staff in clinical situations, their role in patient care, and knowledge and attitudes towards safety, key benefits, potential disadvantages, and policy implications. Medical staff in hospitals across Victoria (Australia) were invited to participate in an anonymous 33-question survey. The survey collected data on respondent's demographics, their use of communication apps in clinical settings, attitudes towards communication apps, perceptions of data "safety," and why one communication app was chosen over others. Communication apps in Victorian hospitals are in widespread use from students to consultants, with WhatsApp being the primary app used. The median number of messages shared per day was 12, encompassing a range of patient information. All respondents viewed these apps positively in quickly communicating patient information in a clinical setting; however, all had concerns about the privacy implications arising from sharing patient information in this way. In total, 67% (60/90) considered patient data "moderately safe" on these apps, and 50% (46/90) were concerned the use of these apps was inconsistent with current legislation and policy. Apps were more likely to be used if they were fast, easy to use, had an easy login process, and were already in

  7. Teaching medical ethics | Mielke | Central African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 46, No 3 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Teaching medical ethics. J Mielke. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL ...

  8. Medical Abortion: The Tunisian Experience | Hajri | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the Tunisian experience of medical abortion. The project started in 1998 with a small introductory study at the obstetric and gynaecology department of a university hospital and was later extended step by step to other family planning and public health centres that provided abortion services. The study was ...

  9. Basic counselling skills | Brand | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    George Bernard Shaw stated, 'The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place'. In the medical world, and especially one that involves children, this is unfortunately a reality. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  10. South African Medical Journal Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the examinee expects it; the doctor-be he an uncertain ... this type of work. Most medical officers ... essential hypertension can be compatible with long life and freedom from .... balance, easily upset by an increase in the nitrogenous content of ...

  11. South African Medical Journal - Vol 98, No 4 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article: Medical management of opioid dependence in South Africa · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. L Weich, C Perkel, N van Zyl, S T Rataemane, L Naidoo, 598-601 ...

  12. South African Medical Journal - Vol 87, No 2 (1997)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preparing future doctors to meet ethical challenges a training course in health and human rights for medical students · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. L London, G McCarthy, J van Heerden, S Wadee, N Walaza, T Winslow, 242-245 ...

  13. Giant vesical calculus | Laubscher | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An exceptional case of bladder stone is presented. The case is unusual as regards the size of the stone and the fact that the patient did··not seek medical assistance much earlier, as this was readily available. Furthermore, recovery after removal of the stone was remarkably quick, as evidenced by the clinical picture as well ...

  14. Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 21, No 1 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    De novo autoimmune hepatitis following liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis: an unusual cause of late grafts dysfunction · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL .... Prevalence and predictors of sub-optimal medication adherence among patients with severe mental illnesses in a tertiary psychiatric facility in Maiduguri, ...

  15. Case report: Kounis syndrome | Ntuli | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and ...

  16. Systemic ototoxicity: a review | Shine | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To review the literature pertaining to the ototoxic potential of three frequently prescribed systemic medications in the sub-Saharan setting; quinine, furosemide and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and risk factors and risk minimisation strategies regarding the ototoxicity ...

  17. South African Medical Journal - Vol 99, No 9 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential for medical error: Incorrectly completed request forms for thyroid function tests limit pathologists' advice to clinicians · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AE Zemlin, L Nutt, LJ Burgess, F Eiman, RT Erasmus ...

  18. Promoting the maintenance of satisfactory communication: strategies used by caregivers and medical staff with people suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Marie; Veilleux, Marie-Christine; Macoir, Joël

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this literature review was to determine communication strategies that foster interactions between individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and caregivers or medical staff. A search of PubMed and PsycINFO databases was conducted using combinations of the following terms: Alzheimer, family, caregiver, communication, language, treatment, intervention, therapy, communication strategies, functional communication and daily living activities. Studies were chosen based on the original language of the text, year of publication, peer-review status and specificity of the results regarding communication strategies in AD. This review covers 14 articles published between 1994 and 2014. The in-depth analysis of these studies shows that various communication strategies used by caregivers and medical staff are effective to promote interactions with people with AD at different stages of the disease. For caregivers, these strategies include producing short and syntactically simple sentences, relying on semantic memory rather than on episodic memory, providing more information and reformulate, removing potential distractions from the environment, specifying the topic of the conversation, using precise terms to identify communication breakdowns. Other strategies also appeared to be effective for medical staff, such as asking close-ended questions, providing response choices, verbalizing the actions performed during medical care and activities, paying attention to the needs expressed through verbal and non-verbal messages, adopting a supportive way of speaking. Furthermore, other communication strategies rather appear to be harmful to functional communication. These harmful strategies involve insisting that the person produce a specific word, asking him/her to repeat or tune out in case of communication breakdown. Finally, contradictory outcomes are reported for some strategies such as speaking slowly, repeating or rephrase questions and information. This article provides

  19. African-American Medical Personnel in the US Army in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Sanders

    2018-02-01

    In WWI, the United States was segregated by custom and law, and the Army obeyed the laws, reducing opportunities for Black medical professionals to serve their country in uniform. This article surveys African-American medical personnel serving in the US Army in World War I. It includes physicians, dentists, veterinarians, and other commissioned officers, as well as medical enlisted men. Overall, despite segregation and associated professional limitations, determined individuals still served with distinction in a variety of roles, opening doors for future advances. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Understanding Experiences of Diabetes Medications Among African Americans Living With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockwoldt, Denise; Staffileno, Beth A; Coke, Lola; Hamilton, Rebekah; Fogg, Lou; Calvin, Donna; Quinn, Lauretta

    2017-07-01

    African American (AA) adults are disproportionally affected by type 2 diabetes and are diagnosed at an earlier age, but are less adherent to diabetes medications compared with the general population. This qualitative study sought to describe the experiences of taking diabetes medications among midlife AA men and women with type 2 diabetes and to identify factors that influence these experiences. Fifteen AAs completed semistructured interviews. Using the Roy adaptation model, thematic analysis coded for both adaptive and ineffective experiences. Adaptive experiences included self-confidence in one's ability to control diabetes, a belief in the value of diabetes medication, assuming responsibility for one's health, developing a routine for taking medication, and positive relationships with the care team. Ineffective experiences for medication taking included: feeling powerless over diabetes, self-blame, and fear. One's self-concept as a person with diabetes, as well as assuming the role of "medication taker," were prominent themes.

  1. Implementation and Evaluation of a Pilot Training to Improve Transgender Competency Among Medical Staff in an Urban Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Pollard-Thomas, Paula; Pagano, William; Levitt, Nathan; Lopez, Evelyn I; Golub, Sarit A; Radix, Asa E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transgender individuals (TGI), who identify their gender as different from their sex assigned at birth, continue facing widespread discrimination and mistreatment within the healthcare system. Providers often lack expertise in adequate transgender (TG) care due to limited specialized training. In response to these inadequacies, and to increase evidence-based interventions effecting TG-affirmative healthcare, we implemented and evaluated a structural-level intervention in the form of a comprehensive Provider Training Program (PTP) in TG health within a New York City-based outpatient clinic serving primarily individuals of color and of low socioeconomic status. This pilot intervention aimed to increase medical staff knowledge of TG health and needs, and to support positive attitudes toward TGI. Methods: Three 2-h training sessions were delivered to 35 clinic staff across 4 months by two of the authors experienced in TG competency training; the training sessions included TG-related identity and barriers to healthcare issues, TG-specialized care, and creating TG-affirmative environments, medical forms, and billing procedures. We evaluated changes through pre-post intervention surveys by trainees. Results: Compared to pre-training scores, post-training scores indicated significant (1) decreases in negative attitudes toward TGI and increases in TG-related clinical skills, (2) increases in staff's awareness of transphobic practices, and (3) increases in self-reported readiness to serve TGI. The clinic increased its representation of general LGBT-related images in the waiting areas, and the staff provided highly positive training evaluations. Conclusion: This PTP in TG health shows promise in leading to changes in provider attitudes and competence, as well as clinic systems, especially with its incorporation in continuing education endeavors, which can, in turn, contribute to health disparities reductions among TG groups.

  2. The Use of Communication Apps by Medical Staff in the Australian Health Care System: Survey Study on Prevalence and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Claydon-Platt, Damian; Balakrishnan, Vikram; Smart, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Background The use of communication apps on mobile phones offers an efficient, unobtrusive, and portable mode of communication for medical staff. The potential enhancements in patient care and education appear significant, with clinical details able to be shared quickly within multidisciplinary teams, supporting rapid integration of disparate information, and more efficient patient care. However, sharing patient data in this way also raises legal and ethical issues. No data is currently available demonstrating how widespread the use of these apps are, doctor’s attitudes towards them, or what guides clinician choice of app. Objective The objective of this study was to quantify and qualify the use of communication apps among medical staff in clinical situations, their role in patient care, and knowledge and attitudes towards safety, key benefits, potential disadvantages, and policy implications. Methods Medical staff in hospitals across Victoria (Australia) were invited to participate in an anonymous 33-question survey. The survey collected data on respondent’s demographics, their use of communication apps in clinical settings, attitudes towards communication apps, perceptions of data “safety,” and why one communication app was chosen over others. Results Communication apps in Victorian hospitals are in widespread use from students to consultants, with WhatsApp being the primary app used. The median number of messages shared per day was 12, encompassing a range of patient information. All respondents viewed these apps positively in quickly communicating patient information in a clinical setting; however, all had concerns about the privacy implications arising from sharing patient information in this way. In total, 67% (60/90) considered patient data “moderately safe” on these apps, and 50% (46/90) were concerned the use of these apps was inconsistent with current legislation and policy. Apps were more likely to be used if they were fast, easy to use, had

  3. Radiation exposure for medical staff performing quantitative coronary perfusion PET with 13N-ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Skovgaard, Dorthe Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    with dipyridamole) and eight examinations consisted of three PET scans (additionally a scan after cold pressor testing). The two nuclear technologists and the physician attending the examinations were equipped with an electronic dosemeter over the chest and thermoluminescent dosimetry chips on the right index...... finger and wrist. RESULTS: The highest mean equivalent dose per examination for a staff member was 453 microSv (417-490 microSv) to the right index finger, 138 microSv (127-149 microSv) to the right wrist and 13 +/- 0.8 microSv to the chest. CONCLUSIONS: Myocardial perfusion PET with (13)N......-ammonia exposes the staff to radiation doses that are comparable to doses from (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose scans and the annual doses are well within the recommended upper limits for radiation workers....

  4. Is 'gut feeling' by medical staff better than validated scores in estimation of mortality in a medical intensive care unit? - The prospective FEELING-ON-ICU study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Anne; Pfister, Roman; Kuhr, Kathrin; Kochanek, Matthias; Michels, Guido

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the FEELING-ON-ICU study was to compare mortality estimations of critically ill patients based on 'gut feeling' of medical staff and by Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). Medical staff estimated patients' mortality risks via questionnaires. APACHE II, SAPS II and SOFA were calculated retrospectively from records. Estimations were compared with actual in-hospital mortality using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the ROC curve (AUC). 66 critically ill patients (60.6% male, mean age 63±15years (range 30-86)) were evaluated each by a nurse (n=66, male 32.4%) and a physician (n=66, male 67.6%). 15 (22.7%) patients died on the intensive care unit. AUC was largest for estimations by physicians (AUC 0.814 (95% CI 0.705-0.923)), followed by SOFA (AUC 0.749 (95% CI 0.629-0.868)), SAPS II (AUC 0.723 (95% CI 0.597-0.849)), APACHE II (AUC 0.721 (95% CI 0.595-0.847)) and nursing staff (AUC 0.669 (95% CI 0.529-0.810)) (p<0.05 for all results). The concept of physicians' 'gut feeling' was comparable to classical objective scores in mortality estimations of critically ill patients. Concerning practicability physicians' evaluations were advantageous to complex score calculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Masculinity, medical mistrust, and preventive health services delays among community-dwelling African-American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Wizdom Powell; Matthews, Derrick; Mohottige, Dinushika; Agyemang, Amma; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2010-12-01

    The contribution of masculinity to men's healthcare use has gained increased public health interest; however, few studies have examined this association among African-American men, who delay healthcare more often, define masculinity differently, and report higher levels of medical mistrust than non-Hispanic White men. To examine associations between traditional masculinity norms, medical mistrust, and preventive health services delays. A cross-sectional analysis using data from 610 African-American men age 20 and older recruited primarily from barbershops in the North, South, Midwest, and West regions of the U.S. (2003-2009). Independent variables were endorsement of traditional masculinity norms around self-reliance, salience of traditional masculinity norms, and medical mistrust. Dependent variables were self-reported delays in three preventive health services: routine check-ups, blood pressure screenings, and cholesterol screenings. We controlled for socio-demography, healthcare access, and health status. After final adjustment, men with a greater endorsement of traditional masculinity norms around self-reliance (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.60-0.98) were significantly less likely to delay blood pressure screening. This relationship became non-significant when a longer BP screening delay interval was used. Higher levels of traditional masculinity identity salience were associated with a decreased likelihood of delaying cholesterol screening (OR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.45-0.86). African-American men with higher medical mistrust were significantly more likely to delay routine check-ups (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.34-5.20), blood pressure (OR: 3.03; 95% CI: 1.45-6.32), and cholesterol screenings (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.03-4.23). Contrary to previous research, higher traditional masculinity is associated with decreased delays in African-American men's blood pressure and cholesterol screening. Routine check-up delays are more attributable to medical mistrust. Building on African-American men

  6. Relationship between stress-related psychosocial work factors and suboptimal health among Chinese medical staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-Zhi; Chu, Xi; Meng, Shi-Jiao; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Li-Juan; Yan, Yu-Xiang

    2018-03-06

    The study aimed to develop and validate a model to measure psychosocial factors at work among medical staff in China based on confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The second aim of the current study was to clarify the association between stress-related psychosocial work factors and suboptimal health status. The cross-sectional study was conducted using clustered sampling method. Xuanwu Hospital, a 3A grade hospital in Beijing. Nine hundred and fourteen medical staff aged over 40 years were sampled. Seven hundred and ninety-seven valid questionnaires were collected and used for further analyses. The sample included 94% of the Han population. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and the Suboptimal Health Status Questionnaires-25 were used to assess the psychosocial factors at work and suboptimal health status, respectively. CFA was conducted to establish the evaluating method of COPSOQ. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate the relationship between suboptimal health status and stress-related psychosocial work factors among Chinese medical staff. There was a strong correlation among the five dimensions of COPSOQ based on the first-order factor model. Then, we established two second-order factors including negative and positive psychosocial work stress factors to evaluate psychosocial factors at work, and the second-order factor model fit well. The high score in negative (OR (95% CI)=1.47 (1.34 to 1.62), Pwork factors increased and decreased the risk of suboptimal health, respectively. This relationship remained statistically significant after adjusting for confounders and when using different cut-offs of suboptimal health status. Among medical staff, the second-order factor model was a suitable method to evaluate the COPSOQ. The negative and positive psychosocial work stress factors might be the risk and protective factors of suboptimal health, respectively. Moreover, negative psychosocial work stress was the most associated

  7. Assess the Relationship between Workplace Spirituality and Organizational Commitment of Administrative Staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the hidden factors, however, influences the behavior of employees, their commitment to the organization and their jobs. Thus, identifying factors affecting the organizational commitment is an important task of managers that in this study, the role of workplace spirituality in its occurrence are discussed. Methods: The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between workplace spirituality and organizational commitment. This is a descriptive - correlation study that 151 Administrative Staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences was selected by random sampling method in December. The study instruments included workplace spirituality Questionnaire (Milliman et al. 2003 and organizational commitment (Linz, 2003. The scores were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient and multiple regression by Software SPSS17. Results: between workplace spirituality and its three components (meaningful work, a sense of solidarity and alignment values there was a significant positive correlation with the organizational commitment staff (p<0/01. Also, all three components of spirituality at work ability to predict organizational commitment staff (p<0/05. Conclusion: With the development of workplace spirituality, meaningful work, a sense of solidarity and alignment values in organizations, Can be accepted that organizational commitment of employees increases.

  8. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisling, McAleese; Aisling, Diamond; David, Curran

    2016-05-01

    Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twelve ambulance bases within one Trust locality in NI (N = 107). The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1972, 1978), Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS, Bride, 2004) and an assessment of need questionnaire were completed and explored using mixed method analysis. Results showed elevated levels of psychological distress within each profession except ambulance service clinical support officers (CSOs). Elevated levels of secondary trauma symptomatology were also found; the highest were within some nursing grades and junior doctors. Decreased enjoyment in job over time was significantly associated with higher scores. Analysis of qualitative data identified sources of stress to include low morale. A total of 65% of participants thought that work related stressors had negatively affected their mental health. Participants explored what they felt could decrease psychological distress including improved resources and psychoeducation. There were elevated levels of distress and secondary traumatic stress within this population as well as an expressed level of need, on both systemic and support levels.

  9. Aligning institutional priorities: engaging house staff in a quality improvement and safety initiative to fulfill Clinical Learning Environment Review objectives and electronic medical record Meaningful Use requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Meghan R; Foster, Carolyn C; Schleyer, Anneliese; Peterson, Gene N; Mandell, Samuel P; Rudd, Kristina E; Joyner, Byron D; Payne, Thomas H

    2016-02-01

    House staff quality improvement projects are often not aligned with training institution priorities. House staff are the primary users of inpatient problem lists in academic medical centers, and list maintenance has significant patient safety and financial implications. Improvement of the problem list is an important objective for hospitals with electronic health records under the Meaningful Use program. House staff surveys were used to create an electronic problem list manager (PLM) tool enabling efficient problem list updating. Number of new problems added and house staff perceptions of the problem list were compared before and after PLM intervention. The PLM was used by 654 house staff after release. Surveys demonstrated increased problem list updating (P = .002; response rate 47%). Mean new problems added per day increased from 64 pre-PLM to 125 post-PLM (P house staff in institutional quality and safety initiatives with tangible institutional benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Financial hardship, unmet medical need, and health self-efficacy among African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Mitchell, Jamie A; Shires, Deirdre A; Modlin, Charles S

    2015-06-01

    Health self-efficacy (the confidence to take care of one's health) is a key component in ensuring that individuals are active partners in their health and health care. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy among African American men and to determine if unmet medical need due to cost potentially mediates this association. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from a convenience sample of African American men who attended a 1-day annual community health fair in Northeast Ohio (N = 279). Modified Poisson regression models were estimated to obtain the relative risk of reporting low health self-efficacy. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, those reporting financial hardship were 2.91 times, RR = 2.91 (confidence interval [1.24, 6.83]; p financial hardship and low health self-efficacy was no longer statistically significant. Our results suggest that the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy can be explained by unmet medical need due to cost. Possible intervention efforts among African American men with low financial resources should consider expanding clinical and community-based health assessments to capture financial hardship and unmet medical need due to cost as potential contributors to low health self-efficacy. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  11. Staff eye doses in a large medical centre in Saudi Arabia: are they meeting the new ICRP recommendations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N.; Al-Gain, Ibrahim; Lobriguito, Aida M.

    2015-01-01

    A 5-y retrospective analysis of the cardiology staff eye doses was performed on 34 staff from different categories (cardiologists, nurses and technologists) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. KFSHRC is a tertiary medical centre with 800-bed capacity having more than 5000 cardiac catheterisation procedures performed annually. The aim of the study is to derive staff doses to the lens of the eyes using the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07) values from the annual TLD dose report for the years 2008-2012 and determine the category of staff with high estimated eye doses. The study also aims to investigate the causes for high doses and recommend dose-reduction techniques. The dose to the lens of the eye was estimated by using the ratio Hp(0.07) slab /H lens of 1.1 where Hp(0.07) values are the reported doses read from TLD badge worn at the collar level. The average annual eye dose of each category for the 5-y monitoring period was determined. Cardiologists tend to receive higher doses than the nurses by a factor of 2-4 and can exceed 5 mSv y -1 . No correlation exists between the eye doses of nurses and the cardiologists. There is a need to use a conversion coefficient in terms of eye lens dose per dose-area product for faster estimation of eye lens doses. However, there is a limitation on the use of the conversion coefficient because it will depend on the clinical procedure and the X-ray tube angulation. Further investigation on this limitation is needed. (authors)

  12. Stainable hepatic iron in 341 African American adults at coroner/medical examiner autopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acton Ronald T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of previous autopsy studies indicate that increased hepatic iron stores or hepatic iron overload is common in African Americans dying in hospitals, but there are no reports of hepatic iron content in other cohorts of African Americans. Methods We investigated the prevalence of heavy liver iron deposition in African American adults. Using established histochemical criteria, we graded Perls' acid ferrocyanide-reactive iron in the hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of 341 consecutive African American adults who were autopsied in the coroner/medical examiner office. Heavy staining was defined as grade 3 or 4 hepatocyte iron or grade 3 Kupffer cell iron. Results There were 254 men and 85 women (mean age ± 1 SD: 44 ± 13 y vs. 48 ± 14 y, respectively; p = 0.0255; gender was unstated or unknown in two subjects. Approximately one-third of subjects died of natural causes. Heavy staining was observed in 10.2% of men and 4.7% of women. 23 subjects had heavy hepatocyte staining only, six had heavy Kupffer cell staining only, and one had a mixed pattern of heavy staining. 15 subjects had histories of chronic alcoholism; three had heavy staining confined to hepatocytes. We analyzed the relationships of three continuous variables (age at death in years, hepatocyte iron grade, Kupffer cell iron grade and two categorical variables (sex, cause of death (natural and non-natural causes in all 341 subjects using a correlation matrix with Bonferroni correction. This revealed two positive correlations: hepatocyte with Kupffer cell iron grades (p Conclusions The present results confirm and extend previous observations that heavy liver iron staining is relatively common in African Americans. The pertinence of these observations to genetic and acquired causes of iron overload in African Americans is discussed.

  13. Basic trends in the medical observation of staff exposed to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingilizova, K.

    1991-01-01

    Some problems of the preliminary and regular medical examinations are discussed as well as the necessity of medical surveillance of the personnel after leaving the sphere of ionizing radiation. The main points which should be included in the preliminary anamnesis are pointed out, as well as the volume of the conventional clinical examinations and special investigations connected with the potential radiation hazards. The necessity of using suitable criteria for evaluation of the occupational fitness for particular cases is stressed. Some considerations are given about the frequency of the regular medical examinations and the type of the test included in them. 3 refs

  14. Basic trends in the medical observation of staff exposed to ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingilizova, K [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1991-01-01

    Some problems of the preliminary and regular medical examinations are discussed as well as the necessity of medical surveillance of the personnel after leaving the sphere of ionizing radiation. The main points which should be included in the preliminary anamnesis are pointed out, as well as the volume of the conventional clinical examinations and special investigations connected with the potential radiation hazards. The necessity of using suitable criteria for evaluation of the occupational fitness for particular cases is stressed. Some considerations are given about the frequency of the regular medical examinations and the type of the test included in them. 3 refs.

  15. Effectiveness of a simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program for the non-medical staff of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Tomoya; Iwami, Taku; Ogura, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hisatake; Sakai, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Kouji; Mano, Toshiaki; Fujino, Yuji; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2014-05-10

    The 2010 Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendations Statement recommended that short video/computer self-instruction courses, with minimal or no instructor coaching, combined with hands-on practice can be considered an effective alternative to instructor-led basic life support courses. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program for non-medical staff working at a university hospital. Before and immediately after a 45-min CPR training program consisting of instruction on chest compression and automated external defibrillator (AED) use with a personal training manikin, CPR skills were automatically recorded and evaluated. Participants' attitudes towards CPR were evaluated by a questionnaire survey. From September 2011 through March 2013, 161 participants attended the program. We evaluated chest compression technique in 109 of these participants. The number of chest compressions delivered after the program versus that before was significantly greater (110.8 ± 13.0/min vs 94.2 ± 27.4/min, p CPR training program on chest compression and AED use improved CPR quality and the attitude towards CPR and AED use of non-medical staff of a university hospital.

  16. The Relation between Perceived Organizational Justice and Job Satisfaction among the Staff of Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Perceived organizational justice refers to the staffs' feelings and perceptions concerning the justice and equity in behaviors and working relations. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between perceived organizational justice and job satisfaction. Methods: This descriptive analytical study was conducted in 2015 in Birjand University of Medical Sciences. The population included all the staff of Birjand University of Medical Sciences. A total of 205 individuals were selected using stratified random sampling method. To collect the data, Niehoff and Moorman’s Organizational Justice Questionnaire (1993 and Kendall Smith Job Satisfaction (1969 were used. The collected data were analyzed in SPSS 16 using Pearson correlation test. Results: In this study, 83 people (40.5 % were male and 122 of them (59.5 % were female. The results showed that organizational justice and its dimensions (distributive, procedural, and interactive justice were significantly correlated with job satisfaction (p < 0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, considering perceived organizational justice by academic leaders can lead to improve employees' job satisfaction.

  17. [Association between occupational stress and presenteeism among medical staff at grade A tertiary hospitals in Shanghai, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Junming; Hua, Yujie; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Li; Fu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the current status of occupational stress and presenteeism among medical staff at grade A tertiary hospitals in Shanghai, China, and to analyze the association between occupational stress and presenteeism. A total of 2356 healthcare workers from eight grade A tertiary hospitals in Shanghai were investigated by stratified random sampling. All the subjects were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires with informed consent. The occupational stress was assessed by the occupational stress core questionnaire. The presenteeism was evaluated by the Stanford Presenteeism Scale. In all subjects, the average score of presenteeism was 15.23 ± 3.89, and 72.5% felt occupational stress in self-evaluation. There were significant differences in the score of presenteeism between subjects with different ages, education levels, occupations, lengths of service, job titles, and shifts (all Poccupational stress, including job demand, control, social support, and demand-control ratio (Poccupational stress in medical staff from grade A tertiary hospitals is positively correlated with the level of presenteeism. It is important to promote social support to reduce the loss of work efficiency due to presenteeism.

  18. Training and development needs of medical record staff at the Korle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Library Journal ... Though the medical record services play an important role in health care delivery, indications are that the ... This neglect has far reaching implications for the quality of service required from the Ghana Health Service.

  19. 77 FR 125 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device Classification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... organization. These 16 Panels have largely been the driving force for CDRH's internal organizational structure...). The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent the Agency's current thinking on medical device...

  20. What is the job satisfaction and active participation of medical staff in public hospital reform: a study in Hubei province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengqian; Luo, Zhenni; Fang, Zi

    2015-05-16

    In China, public hospital reform has been underway for almost 5 years, and 311 pilot county hospitals are the current focus. This study aimed to assess the job satisfaction and active participation of medical staff in the reform. A total of 2268 medical staff members in pilot and non-pilot county hospitals in Hubei, China, were surveyed. Questionnaires were used to collect data. The Pearson chi-square statistical method was used to assess the differences between pilot and non-pilot county hospitals and identify the factors related to job satisfaction as well as the understanding and perception of the reform. Binary logistic regression was performed to determine the significant factors that influence the job satisfaction of medical staff in pilot county hospitals. Medical staff members in pilot county hospitals expressed higher satisfaction on current working situation, performance appraisal system, concern showed by leaders, hospital management, and compensation packages (P job and they have evidently less satisfaction on compensation packages and learning and training opportunities. The working hours and work stress were negatively related to the job satisfaction (P Satisfaction on the performance appraisal system, hospital management, compensation packages, and learning and training opportunities were positively related to job satisfaction (P pay attention to influencing factors of job satisfaction and focus on the reasonable demands of medical staff. In addition, the medical staff in pilot county hospitals exhibited a better understanding of the public hospital reform programme and showed more firm confidence, but there still were some medical staff members who hold negative attitude. The publicity and education of the public hospital reform still need improvement.

  1. Adverse Drug Events and Medication Errors in African Hospitals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B; Alhawassi, Tariq M; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-Anne E

    2018-03-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are universal problems contributing to patient harm but the magnitude of these problems in Africa remains unclear. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the literature on the extent of medication errors and adverse drug events, and the factors contributing to medication errors in African hospitals. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Global Health databases from inception to 31 August, 2017 and hand searched the reference lists of included studies. Original research studies of any design published in English that investigated adverse drug events and/or medication errors in any patient population in the hospital setting in Africa were included. Descriptive statistics including median and interquartile range were presented. Fifty-one studies were included; of these, 33 focused on medication errors, 15 on adverse drug events, and three studies focused on medication errors and adverse drug events. These studies were conducted in nine (of the 54) African countries. In any patient population, the median (interquartile range) percentage of patients reported to have experienced any suspected adverse drug event at hospital admission was 8.4% (4.5-20.1%), while adverse drug events causing admission were reported in 2.8% (0.7-6.4%) of patients but it was reported that a median of 43.5% (20.0-47.0%) of the adverse drug events were deemed preventable. Similarly, the median mortality rate attributed to adverse drug events was reported to be 0.1% (interquartile range 0.0-0.3%). The most commonly reported types of medication errors were prescribing errors, occurring in a median of 57.4% (interquartile range 22.8-72.8%) of all prescriptions and a median of 15.5% (interquartile range 7.5-50.6%) of the prescriptions evaluated had dosing problems. Major contributing factors for medication errors reported in these studies were individual practitioner factors (e.g. fatigue and inadequate knowledge

  2. The industrial panopticon: mining and the medical construction of migrant African labour in South Africa, 1900-1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, A

    1996-01-01

    Derived from a marxist/liberal humanist view of power, conventional critiques of the South African gold mining industry's medical apparatus see only its power to repress and negate the true bodily attributes and authentic person of the African mine worker. In so doing, they ignore the productive capacity of medical practice as a manifestation of what Foucault termed "disciplinary" power, by which the human body is manufactured and made manageable as an object of medical knowledge and industrial utilization. Accordingly, this paper offers just such a Foucaultian reading of South African mining medicine to demonstrate how it has operated to fabricate the bodies of African miners as visible objects possessed of distinct attributes that provoked particular strategies for their surveillance in health and disease.

  3. Plasma concentrations of enrofloxacin in African grey parrots treated with medicated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, K; Aucoin, D P; Whitt, D A; Prus, S A

    1990-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of enrofloxacin were measured four times during a 7-day treatment period in African grey parrots that were fed with enrofloxacin-medicated drinking water. Water medicated at doubling doses of 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 mg/ml achieved mean concentrations (+/- SEM) of 0.10 (+/- 0.05), 0.12 (+/- 0.05), 0.12 (+/- 0.03), 0.15 (+/- 0.05), 0.30 (+/- 0.11), and 0.20 (+/- 0.06) micrograms/ml, respectively. A portion of the administered enrofloxacin was metabolized to an equipotent metabolite, ciprofloxacin. Mean ciprofloxacin concentrations paralleled enrofloxacin concentrations but were lower, ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 micrograms/ml. Acceptance of medicated water was adequate at lower doses; however, at doses of 1.5 and 3.0 mg/ml, acceptance was unsatisfactory, and mean weight loss in these groups was significantly higher than the control group. Based on the concentrations achieved in these preliminary trials and the susceptibility patterns of gram-negative bacteria isolated from psittacine birds, drinking water medicated with enrofloxacin at 0.19-0.75 mg/ml might be effective for treating highly susceptible gram-negative bacterial infections in African grey parrots.

  4. Competency-based Education and Training of medical staff. A Programm of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach: Concept - Implementation - Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasske, Eva; Beil, Michael; Keller, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach is to connect individual and organisational requirements in order to promote an appropriate and multi-locational development of medical competency in the face of the continuously evolving challenges of clinical practice. Integral processes in this are the reduction of organisational learning barriers and the successive integration of competency-oriented learning events in the structures of personnel and organisational development. The modular system for the further development of doctors' skills serves here as a supplementary and recommendation system for both existing curricula and those defined by regulatory organisations and professional associations. Methods: The Medical Academy's modular system has a two-dimensional structure. In addition to the axis of biography orientation, the model orients itself around issues relating to the needs of a doctor in any individual professional position, as well as with whom he comes into contact and where his primary challenges lie. In order to achieve better integration in day-to-day routine and a needs-specific orientation of content, the modular system provides a combination of "one, two or three day and two- three- or four-hour training units" depending upon the topic. The transfer of experiential knowledge with the aid of practical exercises is a central element of the didactic model. Results: Through the combined use of summative and formative assessment, the significance of a dialogue-orientated approach in both planning and in the organisational process was highlighted. In feedback discussions and quantitative evaluation sheets, participants identified in particular cross-generational knowledge sharing as a central element for the development of personal values alongside the interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge. The combination of specialist and interdisciplinary topics, for example on team processes or communication, is frequently emphasised, indicating that

  5. Can Opening ‘Ethics Files’ on Medical Staff Improve Patients’ Care?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare workers in Shanghai are walking the line after recent news that regulations issued by local health authorities will soon enforce the opening of an “ethics file” for each of the city’s 140,000 medical workers. According to the regulations, once

  6. The Confidentiality of Medical Secrets of Patients by the Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalkias Theodoros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article you will find a critical discussion about the significance of confidentiality of "medical secrets" (keeping the secrets of ill people by nurses. Special cases are mentioned regarding the need to keep, or reveal the secret.

  7. Need assessment of staffs' welfare services at tehran university of medical sciences: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Reza; Mafimoradi, Shiva; Hadi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing the human resources management literature shows an absence of attention given to the employee's benefits. Taking a look at functions of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences' wellbeing services system, it uncovers a gap between employees' real needs and what is delivered to meet their needs. So it requires an improved comprehensive system for delivering wellbeing services (financial, insurance, health care services, educational and training services, etc). Wellbeing need assessment can helps planners to identify vital needs of employee and response to them effectively. Moreover it can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the current services which are delivered. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess wellbeing services of staffs working in TUMS to (1) evaluate the satisfactory rate of services which are delivered, and (2) exploring those wellbeing needs which were not fulfilled by the organization. Being a cross-sectional and analytic-descriptive survey including 98 responding participants, it is conducted by a questionnaire collecting employees' demographic information, their satisfactory rate of the implemented services, and determines unfulfilled wellbeing needs which were not already covered. Results indicated that services related to financial, educational, non-financial, insurance, occupational health and tourism/recreational services were the most satisfactory services successively. 'Staff's unwillingness to receive services' and 'poor announcement' (unawareness on the wellbeing services),' were found to be the most frequent reasons for not receiving the existing wellbeing services. To increase the satisfaction rate and responsiveness to the real needs of the staff, the current delivery system of wellbeing services in the TUMS should be redesigned by defining new wellbeing packages.

  8. Tuberculosis and Migration: A Challenge for Medical Staff and Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Griesshammer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high number of asylum seekers enter Switzerland every year. They often originate from countries with a high TB prevalence. Our patient from Somalia presented with 2 lipoma-like tumors with pain on palpation on his left chest wall but no symptoms including coughing, fever, night-sweats, or loss of weight. CT scan then showed diffuse infiltrations of his lung and multiple abscesses on his left chest wall. Therefore contagious tuberculosis (TB was suspected and the patient was put in isolation. In the follow-up the diagnosis of open TB was proofed with bronchial secretion and EBUS-guided biopsy that showed acid-fast rods. This particular case shows how difficult the identification of patients with open TB can be, especially if there are no respiratory or systemic symptoms. Therefore awareness of possible infectious disease is paramount for ED Doctors treating patients from countries with high prevalence. Early and strict isolation measures can help to reduce risk of contagion among staff and patients.

  9. Opinion and knowledge among hospital medical staff regarding diagnosis of diabetes and proper usage of a specific test tube for glucose analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Dayan, Y; Bogaiov, A; Boaz, M; Landau, Z; Wainstein, J

    2014-02-01

    Accuracy of blood sugar values, as examined by glucose analysis, has significant importance on the diagnosis of diabetes and follow up of diabetes treatment. Usage of a designated test tube significantly improves the accuracy of measurement. Knowledge of the medical staff is a major determinant in the current usage of such a technology. The aim of the study was to assess the level of knowledge exhibited by medical staff in the diabetes field and specifically for the usage of a designated tube to test blood glucose level. A prospective study. The staff of the internal and surgical departments and outpatient clinics at the Wolfson Medical Center completed a questionnaire that assessed the level of knowledge about the designated glucose test tube, other randomly used test tubes, the parameters that influence the blood glucose values in a non-designated tube and the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of 160 questionnaires (50% from internal departments, 36% from surgical departments and 14% from outpatient clinics) were analysed. The majority of the staff members (65%) knew that diabetes is diagnosed by glucose levels in blood. Of the 35% that did not know, 91% were nurses. The majority (75%) knew that diabetes is diagnosed during fasting conditions; however, most of the staff indicated that 12 h is needed. Only 25% knew of the designated test tube, and most of the staff indicated that a regular chemistry tube was the tube of choice for them. The staff exhibited poor level of knowledge regarding the parameters that influence the quality of the test. Staff members are not aware of the various aspects of diabetes diagnosis and the designated test tube for glucose measurements, and most of them use a tube that gives inaccurate measurements, therefore there is an urgent need to improve diabetes knowledge among staff members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. How can hospitals better protect the privacy of electronic medical records? Perspectives from staff members of health information management departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Ming-Ling; Talley, Paul C; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Kuo, Kuang-Ming

    2017-05-01

    The adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) is expected to better improve overall healthcare quality and to offset the financial pressure of excessive administrative burden. However, safeguarding EMR against potentially hostile security breaches from both inside and outside healthcare facilities has created increased patients' privacy concerns from all sides. The aim of our study was to examine the influencing factors of privacy protection for EMR by healthcare professionals. We used survey methodology to collect questionnaire responses from staff members in health information management departments among nine Taiwanese hospitals active in EMR utilisation. A total of 209 valid responses were collected in 2014. We used partial least squares for analysing the collected data. Perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy and cues to action were found to have a significant association with intention to protect EMR privacy, while perceived susceptibility and perceived severity were not. Based on the findings obtained, we suggest that hospitals should provide continuous ethics awareness training to relevant staff and design more effective strategies for improving the protection of EMR privacy in their charge. Further practical and research implications are also discussed.

  11. Factors influencing biosafety level and lai among the staff of medical laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kozajda; Karolina Bródka; Irena Szadkowska-Stańczyk

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI), activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. Materials and Methods: The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionn...

  12. The differences between medical trust and mistrust and their respective influences on medication beliefs and ART adherence among African-Americans living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellowski, Jennifer A; Price, Devon M; Allen, Aerielle M; Eaton, Lisa A; Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between medical mistrust and trust and to determine if these measures differentially predict antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication adherence for African-American adults living with HIV. A total of 458 HIV positive African-Americans completed a cross-sectional survey. Self-reported ART adherence was collected using the visual-analog scale. The Beliefs About Medicines Questionnaire was used to assess medication necessity and concern beliefs. All measures of medical mistrust and trust were significantly negatively correlated, ranging from r = -.339 to -.504. Race-based medical mistrust significantly predicted medication necessity and concern beliefs, whereas general medical mistrust only significantly predicted medication concerns. Both measures of trust significantly predicted medication necessity beliefs and medication concerns. Higher levels of race-based medical mistrust predicted lower medication adherence, whereas, neither trust in own physician nor trust in health care provider significantly predicted medication adherence. However, trust in own physician significantly predicted medication necessity beliefs, which predicted medication adherence. Trust and mistrust are not simply opposites of one another. These findings provide evidence for the complexity of understanding the relationship between health care trust, mistrust and patient-related health beliefs and behaviours.

  13. A before and after study of medical students' and house staff members' knowledge of ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards on an acute care for elders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Samantha P; Cohen, Victor; Nelson, Marcia; Likourezos, Antonios; Goldman, William; Paris, Barbara

    2008-06-01

    The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) comprehensive set of quality assessment tools for ill older persons is a standard designed to measure overall care delivered to vulnerable elders (ie, those aged > or =65 years) at the level of a health care system or plan. The goal of this research was to quantify the pretest and posttest results of medical students and house staff participating in a pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention that focused on the ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards. This was a before and after study assessing the knowledge ofACOVE standards following exposure to an educational intervention led by a pharmacotherapist. It was conducted at the 29-bed Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit of Maimonides Medical Center, a 705-bed, independent teaching hospital located in Brooklyn, New York. Participants included all medical students and house staff completing a rotation on the ACE unit from August 2004 through May 2005 who completed both the pre-and posttests. A pharmacotherapist provided a 1-hour active learning session reviewing the evidence supporting the quality indicators and reviewed case-based questions with the medical students and house staff. Educational interventions also occurred daily through pharmacotherapeutic consultations and during work rounds. Medical students and house staff were administered the same 15-question, patient-specific, case-based, multiple-choice pre-and posttest to assess knowledge of the standards before and after receiving the intervention. A total of 54 medical students and house staff (median age, 28.58 years; 40 men, 14 women) completed the study. Significantly higher median scores were achieved on the multiple-choice test after the intervention than before (median scores, 14/15 [93.3%] vs 12/15 [80.0%], respectively; P = 0.001). A pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention improved the scores of medical students and house staff on a test evaluating knowledge of evidence

  14. Handoffs causing patient harm: a survey of medical and surgical house staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitch, Barrett T; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Zapol, Warren M; Marder, Jessica E; Karson, Andrew; Hutter, Matt; Campbell, Eric G

    2008-10-01

    Communication lapses at the time of patient handoffs are believed to be common, and yet the frequency with which patients are harmed as a result of problematic handoffs is unknown. Resident physicians were surveyed about their handoffpractices and the frequency with which they perceive problems with handoffs lead to patient harm. A survey was conducted in 2006 of all resident physicians in internal medicine and general surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) concerning the quality and effects of handoffs during their most recent inpatient rotations. Surveys were sent to 238 eligible residents; 161 responses were obtained (response rate, 67.6%). Fifty-nine percent of residents reported that one or more patients had been harmed during their most recent clinical rotation because of problematic handoffs, and 12% reported that this harm had been major. Overall quality of handoffs was reported to be fair or poor by 31% of residents. A minority of residents (26%) reported that handoffs usually or always took place in a quiet setting, and 37% reported that one or more interruptions during the receipt of handoffs occurred either most of the time or always. Although handoffs have long been recognized as potentially hazardous, further scrutiny of handoffs has followed recent reports that handoffs are often marked by missing, incomplete, or inaccurate information and are associated with adverse events. In this study, reports of harm to patients from problematic handoffs were common among residents in internal medicine and general surgery. Many best-practice recommendations for handoffs are not observed, although the extent to which improvement of these practices could reduce patient harm is not known. MGH has recently launched a handoff-safety educational program, along with other interventions designed to improve the safety and effectiveness of handoffs, for its house staff and clinical leadership.

  15. Identification and analysis of labor productivity components based on ACHIEVE model (case study: staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2014-12-15

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees' viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities.

  16. Identification and Analysis of Labor Productivity Components Based on ACHIEVE Model (Case Study: Staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees’ viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities. PMID:25560364

  17. Mobile technologies: expectancy, usage, and acceptance of clinical staff and patients at a university medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiger, Kristin; Hupka, Markus; von Jan, Ute; Wichelhaus, Daniel; Albrecht, Urs-Vito

    2014-10-21

    Despite their increasing popularity, little is known about how users perceive mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs in medical contexts. Available studies are often restricted to evaluating the success of specific interventions and do not adequately cover the users' basic attitudes, for example, their expectations or concerns toward using mobile devices in medical settings. The objective of the study was to obtain a comprehensive picture, both from the perspective of the patients, as well as the doctors, regarding the use and acceptance of mobile devices within medical contexts in general well as the perceived challenges when introducing the technology. Doctors working at Hannover Medical School (206/1151, response 17.90%), as well as patients being admitted to this facility (213/279, utilization 76.3%) were surveyed about their acceptance and use of mobile devices in medical settings. Regarding demographics, both samples were representative of the respective study population. GNU R (version 3.1.1) was used for statistical testing. Fisher's exact test, two-sided, alpha=.05 with Monte Carlo approximation, 2000 replicates, was applied to determine dependencies between two variables. The majority of participants already own mobile devices (doctors, 168/206, 81.6%; patients, 110/213, 51.6%). For doctors, use in a professional context does not depend on age (P=.66), professional experience (P=.80), or function (P=.34); gender was a factor (P=.009), and use was more common among male (61/135, 45.2%) than female doctors (17/67, 25%). A correlation between use of mobile devices and age (P=.001) as well as education (P=.002) was seen for patients. Minor differences regarding how mobile devices are perceived in sensitive medical contexts mostly relate to data security, patients are more critical of the devices being used for storing and processing patient data; every fifth patient opposed this, but nevertheless, 4.8% of doctors (10/206) use their devices for this

  18. Hemodialysis knowledge and medical adherence in African Americans diagnosed with end stage renal disease: results of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Janie R

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this three-group quasi-experimental research study was to describe the relationship between hemodialysis knowledge and perceived medical adherence to a prescribed treatment regimen in African Americans diagnosed with end stage renal disease and to determine if an educational intervention improved hemodialysis knowledge and medical adherence. Eighty-five African Americans participated in this study using the Life Options Hemodialysis Knowledge Test and the Medical Outcomes Study Measures of Patient Adherence tools. No significant correlation was found between hemodialysis knowledge and medical adherence. Paired sample t-tests revealed significantly higher hemodialysis knowledge scores in the post-test group compared to the pre-test group, t(26) = -3.79, p adherence. This study suggests that more education is needed to improve the knowledge level of African-American patients on hemodialysis.

  19. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  20. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest online library of ... AJOL works to change this, so that African-origin research output is available to Africans ... South African Medical Journal ... Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences.

  1. Shift Work and Related Health Problems among Medical and Diagnostic Staff of the General Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sajjadnia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Today, shift work is considered as a necessity in many jobs and for some 24-hour services the use of shift-work is growing. However, shift work can lead to physiological and psycho-social problems for shift workers. This study aimed to determine the effects of shift work on the associated health problems, together with the demographic and job characteristics underlying the problems, among the medical and diagnostic staff of the general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Method:This study was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical one. The study employed a sample of 205 employees from the medical and diagnostic staff using stratified sampling proportional to the size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using the Survey of Shift workers (SOS questionnaire, validity and reliability of which have already been confirmed. Finally, the collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software through ANOVA, Chi-square, Independent-Samples T-Test, as well as Pearson Correlation Coefficient. A P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that among the demographic and job characteristics studied, the individual, family and social problems had significant associations with work schedules, shift work and job satisfaction. In addition, there were significant associations between musculoskeletal disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; cardiovascular disorders and marital status and occupation; digestive disorders and the work schedules; sleep disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disorders and sleep disorders and age, job experience and shift work experience. And finally, there were significant associations among sleep disorders and age, job experience and the shift work experience. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, demographic characteristics such as age, marital

  2. Ból głowy wśród personelu medycznego = Headache among medical Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kozak-Putowska

    2016-06-01

    3.       Katedra Onkologii i Środowiskowej Opieki Zdrowotnej, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lublinie, Polska     Adres do korespondencji: Prof. dr hab. med. Joanna Iłżecka Samodzielna Pracownia Rehabilitacji Neurologicznej UM w Lublinie 20-081 Lublin ul. S. Staszica 4/6 tel. 505569275 e-mail: joanna.ilzecka@umlub.pl   Abstrakt Wprowadzenie. Ból głowy jest powszechną dolegliwością mogącą wynikać z procesu chorobowego toczącego się w organizmie, jak też być skutkiem negatywnych zachowań zdrowotnych, nieprawidłowego stylu życia lub szkodliwych warunków pracy. Cel pracy. Analiza częstości i przyczyn występowania bólu głowy wśród personelu medycznego i jego wpływ na funkcjonowanie w pracy i wypełnianie obowiązków zawodowych. Materiał i metody. Badaniami objęto 145 osób, pracujących w szpitalach w Lublinie oraz Warszawie. Narzędziem badawczym był anonimowy kwestionariusz ankiety. Wyniki i wnioski. Stwierdzono, że średnio połowa badanego personelu medycznego jest zdania, że praca zawodowa, którą wykonują jest przyczyną bólu głowy. Wynika to z sytuacji stresowych mających związek ze specyfiką pracy oraz szkodliwych warunków pracy. Główna przyczyna bólu głowy wśród personelu medycznego to kontakt ze środkami do dezynfekcji powierzchni i skóry oraz kontakt z różnorodnymi środkami medycznymi i lekami.   Słowa kluczowe: ból głowy, kadry medyczne szpitala, praca zawodowa.   Abstract Introduction. Headache is a common condition that may result from an ongoing disease process in the body as well as be the result of negative health behaviors, improper lifestyle or harmful working conditions. Purpose. The aim of the work was the analysis of the frequency and the causes of headache among medical staff and its impact on the functioning of the working and professional duties. Material and methodology. The study group consisted of 145 people, chosen randomly,  working in hospitals in Lublin and Warsaw. The study was

  3. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, S; Boivin, J; Dancet, E; de Klerk, C; Emery, M; Lewis-Jones, C; Thorn, P; Van den Broeck, U; Venetis, C; Verhaak, C M; Wischmann, T; Vermeulen, N

    2015-11-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Guideline Development, 120 recommendations were formulated that answered the 12 key questions on optimal management of routine psychosocial care by all fertility staff. The 2002 ESHRE Guidelines for counselling in infertility has been a reference point for best psychosocial care in infertility for years, but this guideline needed updating and did not focus on routine psychosocial care that can be delivered by all fertility staff. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field according to the 12-step process described in the ESHRE Manual for Guideline Development. After scoping the guideline and listing a set of 12 key questions in PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) format, thorough systematic searches of the literature were conducted; evidence from papers published until April 2014 was collected, evaluated for quality and analysed. A summary of evidence was written in a reply to each of the key questions and used as the basis for recommendations, which were defined by consensus within the guideline development group (GDG). Patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and the review phase of the guideline development. The guideline group, comprising psychologists, two medical doctors, a midwife, a patient representative and a methodological expert, met three times to discuss evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations. 120 recommendations that aim at guiding fertility clinic staff in providing optimal evidence-based routine psychosocial care to patients dealing with infertility and MAR. The guideline is written in two sections. The first section describes patients' preferences regarding the psychosocial

  4. Validity of the SMS, Phone, and medical staff Examination sports injury surveillance system for time-loss and medical attention injuries in sports.

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    Møller, M; Wedderkopp, N; Myklebust, G; Lind, M; Sørensen, H; Hebert, J J; Emery, C A; Attermann, J

    2018-01-01

    The accurate measurement of sport exposure time and injury occurrence is key to effective injury prevention and management. Current measures are limited by their inability to identify all types of sport-related injury, narrow scope of injury information, or lack the perspective of the injured athlete. The aims of the study were to evaluate the proportion of injuries and the agreement between sport exposures reported by the SMS messaging and follow-up telephone part of the SMS, Phone, and medical staff Examination (SPEx) sports injury surveillance system when compared to measures obtained by trained on-field observers and medical staff (comparison method). We followed 24 elite adolescent handball players over 12 consecutive weeks. Eighty-six injury registrations were obtained by the SPEx and comparison methods. Of them, 35 injury registrations (41%) were captured by SPEx only, 10 injury registrations (12%) by the comparison method only, and 41 injury registrations (48%) by both methods. Weekly exposure time differences (95% limits of agreement) between SPEx and the comparison method ranged from -4.2 to 6.3 hours (training) and -1.5 to 1.0 hours (match) with systematic differences being 1.1 hours (95% CI 0.7 to 1.4) and -0.2 (95% CI -0.3 to -0.2), respectively. These results support the ability of the SPEx system to measure training and match exposures and injury occurrence among young athletes. High weekly response proportions (mean 83%) indicate that SMS messaging can be used for player measures of injury consequences beyond time-loss from sport. However, this needs to be further evaluated in large-scale studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Surveying the factor structure and reliability of the Persian version of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JeffSPLL) in staff of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Alesheikh, Aytay; Pakravan, Soheila; Abdollahi, Mahbubeh; Damough, Mozhdeh; Anbaran, Zahra Khosravi; Farahani, Leila Amiri

    2017-10-01

    In medical sciences, commitment to lifelong learning has been expressed as an important element. Today, due to the rapid development of medical information and technology, lifelong learning is critical for safe medical care and development in medical research. JeffSPLL is one of the scales for measuring lifelong learning among the staff of medical sciences that has never been used in Iran. The aim of the present study was to determine the factor structure and reliability of the Persian version of JeffSPLL among Persian-speaking staff of universities of medical sciences in Iran. This study was a cross-sectional study, methodologically, that was conducted in 2012-2013. In this study, 210 staff members of Birjand University of Medical Sciences were selected. Data collection tool was the Persian version of JeffSPLL. To investigate the factor structure of this tool, confirmatory factor analysis was used and to evaluate the model fit, goodness-of-fit indices, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA), the ratio of chi-square to the degree of freedom associated with it, comparative fit index (CFI), and root mean square residual (RMR) were used. To investigate the reliability of tool, Cronbach's alpha was employed. Data analysis was conducted using LISREL8.8 and SPSS 20 software. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that RMSEA was close to 0.1, and CFI and GFI were close to one. Therefore, four-factor model was appropriate. Cronbach's alpha was 0.92 for the whole tool and it was between 0.82 and 0.89 for subscales. The present study verified the four-factor structure of the 19-item Persian version of JeffSPLL that included professional learning beliefs and motivation, scholarly activities, attention to learning opportunities, and technical skills in information seeking among the staff. In addition, this tool has acceptable reliability. Therefore, it was appropriate to assess lifelong learning in the Persian-speaking staff population.

  6. Factors influencing biosafety level and lai among the staff of medical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kozajda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI, activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. Materials and Methods: The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionnaires for laboratory workers and the managers. Results: 32.5% of the respondents (40 persons had an accident at least once. Needlestick or a broken glass injury covered 18.7% respondents (23 persons, while splashing the skin, mucous membranes or conjunctivae related to 22.8% (28 persons. Among the employees who had an accident, only 45% of the respondents (18 persons reported this to the manager. Microbes dominant in the biological material were known only to 57 respondents (46.3%, less than half could correctly give an example of a disease (57 persons, 46.3%. More than half of the respondents admitted that they do not know all of the possible routes of infection while working in the laboratory (68 persons, 55.3%. Conclusions: In the study population, a high incidence of accidents was observed, usually during blood sampling and transfer of biological material. Condition of the workers' equipment with personal protective measures and laboratory facilities in devices to reduce the risk of infection and procedures for handling the potentially infectious material should be considered as insufficient. Lack of basic knowledge of the employees about biohazards at workplaces was shown. Med Pr 2013;64(4:473–486

  7. Factors influencing biosafety level and LAI among the staff of medical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozajda, Anna; Bródka, Karolina; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI), activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionnaires for laboratory workers and the managers. 32.5% of the respondents (40 persons) had an accident at least once. Needlestick or a broken glass injury covered 18.7% respondents (23 persons), while splashing the skin, mucous membranes or conjunctivae related to 22.8% (28 persons). Among the employees who had an accident, only 45% of the respondents (18 persons) reported this to the manager. Microbes dominant in the biological material were known only to 57 respondents (46.3%), less than half could correctly give an example of a disease (57 persons, 46.3%). More than half of the respondents admitted that they do not know all of the possible routes of infection while working in the laboratory (68 persons, 55.3%). In the study population, a high incidence of accidents was observed, usually during blood sampling and transfer of biological material. Condition of the workers' equipment with personal protective measures and laboratory facilities in devices to reduce the risk of infection and procedures for handling the potentially infectious material should be considered as insufficient. Lack of basic knowledge of the employees about biohazards at workplaces was shown.

  8. Training of medical staff positively influences postoperative pain management at home in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepponen, K; Kokki, H; Ahonen, R

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how parents manage their child's postoperative pain at home following day-case surgery. The incidence of pain, different analgesics used and problems related to administering medications were the main interests of the study. A postal questionnaire was sent to the parents of 275 children who were under 8 years of age and had undergone an ear, nose and throat (ENT) day-case operation. The questionnaire was sent to the parents a week after discharge from hospital. Altogether, the parents of 227 children answered the questionnaire (response rate 83%). The study was divided into two phases (preintervention and postintervention), and incorporated a training program for doctors and nurses between these two phases. The training program aimed to improve the treatment practices of postoperative pain in children. Seventy-eight per cent of the children in the preintervention study and 75% in the postintervention study experienced at least mild pain after discharge. The training program for doctors and nurses affected the home treatment practices of postoperative pain. The proportion of parents treating their children increased from 68% to 80% after the training program (p = 0.028). Many parents faced problems while treating their children; for example, 19% (n = 30) of the children refused to take their medicine, and suppositories were regarded to be an especially unpleasant dosage form. However, no serious adverse effects were reported. We conclude that due to the pain experienced at home by the great majority of children following day-case ENT operations, parents need information on how to manage their child's pain. A training program for doctors and nurses can improve the treatment of children's pain even at home. Since some children dislike suppositories, it would be worth considering the use of small tablets or mixtures instead.

  9. The Impact of Everyday Discrimination and Racial Identity Centrality on African American Medical Student Well-Being: a Report from the Medical Student CHANGE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sylvia P; Hardeman, Rachel; Burke, Sara E; Cunningham, Brooke; Burgess, Diana J; van Ryn, Michelle

    2016-09-01

    Positive psychological well-being is an important predictor of and contributor to medical student success. Previous work showed that first-year African American medical students whose self-concept was highly linked to their race (high racial identity centrality) were at greater risk for poor well-being. The current study extends this work by examining (a) whether the psychological impact of racial discrimination on well-being depends on African American medical students' racial identity centrality and (b) whether this process is explained by how accepted students feel in medical school. This study used baseline data from the Medical Student Cognitive Habits and Growth Evaluation (CHANGE) Study, a large national longitudinal cohort study of 4732 medical students at 49 medical schools in the USA (n = 243). Regression analyses were conducted to test whether medical student acceptance mediated an interactive effect of discrimination and racial identity centrality on self-esteem and well-being. Both racial identity centrality and everyday discrimination were associated with negative outcomes for first-year African American medical students. Among participants who experienced higher, but not lower, levels of everyday discrimination, racial identity centrality was associated with negative outcomes. When everyday discrimination was high, but not low, racial identity was negatively related to perceived acceptance in medical school, and this in turn was related to increased negative outcomes. Our results suggest that discrimination may be particularly harmful for African American students who perceive their race to be central to their personal identity. Additionally, our findings speak to the need for institutional change that includes commitment and action towards inclusivity and the elimination of structural racism.

  10. Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Process and Lower Frequency of Medical Staff Visit Predicts Independently In-hospital Resuscitation Success in the Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chen Tsai

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the initial resuscitation success rate was not affected by age, a longer time interval between the last medical staffs’ visit and the onset of resuscitation did result in a worse success rate in elderly patients. Our data suggest that more frequent staff visits to the elderly population during hospitalization could alter initial resuscitation results.

  11. Extremity doses of medical staff involved in interventional radiology and cardiology: Correlations and annual doses (hands and legs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krim, S.; Brodecki, M.; Carinou, E.; Donadille, L.; Jankowski, J.; Koukorava, C.; Dominiek, J.; Nikodemova, D.; Ruiz-Lopez, N.; Sans-Merce, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.

    2011-01-01

    An intensive measurement campaign was launched in different hospitals in Europe within work package 1 of the ORAMED project (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff). Its main objective was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) and to optimize staff protection. The monitored procedures were divided in three main categories: cardiac, general angiography and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography(ERCP) procedures. Using a common measurement protocol, information such as the protective equipment used (lead table curtain, transparent lead glass ceiling screen, patient shielding, whole body shielding or special cabin etc.) as well as Kerma Area Product (KAP) values and access of the catheter were recorded. This study was performed with a final database of more than 1300 procedures performed in 34 European hospitals. Its objectives were firstly to determine if the measured extremity doses could be correlated to the KAP values; secondly to check if the doses to the eyes could be linked to the doses to the hands (finger or wrist positions) and finally if the doses to the fingers could be estimated based on the doses to the wrists. General correlations were very difficult to find and their strength was mostly influenced by three main parameters: the X-ray tube configuration, the room collective radioprotective equipment and the access of the catheter. The KAP value can provide a simple mean to estimate the extremity doses of the operator given that it is assessed correctly for the operator when he is actually using the X-ray tube. Moreover, this study showed that the doses to the left finger are strongly correlated to the doses to the left wrist when no ceiling shield is used. It is also possible to estimate the doses to the eyes given the doses to the left finger or left wrist but the X-ray tube configuration and the access have to be considered. The annual

  12. Knowledge, group-based medical mistrust, future expectations, and perceived disadvantages of medical genetic testing: perspectives of Black African immigrants/refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseh, A; Kelber, S; Millon-Underwood, S; Stevens, P; Townsend, L

    2014-01-01

    Reasons for low participation of ethnic minorities in genetic studies are multifactorial and often poorly understood. Based on published literature, participation in genetic testing is low among Black African immigrants/refugees although they are purported to bear disproportionate disease burden. Thus, research involving Black African immigrant/refugee populations that examine their perspectives on participating in genetic studies is needed. This report examines and describes the knowledge of medical genetics, group-based medical mistrust, and future expectations of genetic research and the influence of these measures on the perceived disadvantages of genetic testing among Black African immigrants/refugees. Using a cross-sectional survey design, a nonprobability sample (n = 212) of Black African immigrants/refugees was administered a questionnaire. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 61 years (mean = 38.91, SD = 9.78). The questionnaire consisted of 5 instruments: (a) sociodemographic characteristics, (b) Knowledge of Medical Genetics scale, (c) Group-Based Medical Mistrust Scale, (d) Future Expectations/Anticipated Consequences of Genetics Research scale, and (e) Perceived Disadvantages of Genetic Testing scale. Participants were concerned that genetic research may result in scientists 'playing God,' interfering with the natural order of life. In multivariate analyses, the perceived disadvantages of genetic testing increased as medical mistrust and anticipated negative impacts of genetic testing increased. Increase in genetic knowledge contributed to a decrease in perceived disadvantages. Our findings suggest that recruitment of Black African immigrants/refugees in genetic studies should address potential low knowledge of genetics, concerns about medical mistrust, the expectations/anticipated consequences of genetic research, and the perceived disadvantages of genetic testing.

  13. Will the Traditional Health Practitioners Act (Act No 22, 2007 challenge the holy grails of South African medical doctors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Louw

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The South African healthcare establishment is primarily managed and overseen by medical doctors. This powerbase was established over many years, especially after the early 1930s. World War II gave doctors the final approval to take this supervisory and sole decision-making role regarding healthcare training, practice models and other health workers in South Africa. This phenomenon led initially to doctors having a certain jurisdiction to set the pace and to make the rules. This jurisdiction became more comprehensive and extent with time in South Africa to include a collection of unique medical traditions, customs, privileges, habits, healthcare rights and empowerment as well as exclusive medical training and practice models to become known as the holy grails of the South African medical doctors. The power of these holy grails has become untouchable to anyone outside the medical domain. Since the 1980s, some powers vested in these holy grails have been lost to the allied health professions and to other insiders of the HPCSA brotherhood itself. The recognition of traditional healers by means of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act (Act No 22, 2007 seems to challenge these holy grails of medical doctors. This may also create internal conflict in the South African medical brotherhood that can cost medical doctors more ground. Aims The study aimed to determine if the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 (2007 challenges the holy grails of South African medical doctors, subsequently affecting the long-established management and guardian system of the medical field within South Africa or the practice rights of medical doctors. Methods This is an exploratory and descriptive study that makes use of an historical approach by means of investigation and a literature review. The emphasis is on using current documentation like articles, books and newspapers as primary sources to reflect on the possible effect of the Traditional Health

  14. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery. QUIRO-DEGRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel-du Bois, A.; Milker-Zabel, S.; Debus, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Henzel, M.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [Essen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Background: The German Society of Radiation Oncology ('Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie', DEGRO) initiated a multicenter trial to develop and evaluate adequate modules to assert core processes and subprocesses in radiotherapy. The aim of this prospective evaluation was to methodical assess the required resources (technical equipment and medical staff) for stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery. Material and methods: At two radiotherapy centers of excellence (University Hospitals of Heidelberg and Marburg/Giessen), the manpower and time required for the implementation of intra- and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy was prospectively collected consistently over a 3-month period. The data were collected using specifically developed process acquisition tools and standard forms and were evaluated using specific process analysis tools. Results: For intracranial (extracranial) fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and radiosurgery (RS), a total of 1,925 (270) and 199 (36) records, respectively, could be evaluated. The approximate time needed to customize the immobilization device was median 37 min (89 min) for FRST and 31 min (26 min) for RS, for the contrast enhanced planning studies 22 and 27 min (25 and 28 min), for physical treatment planning 122 and 59 min (187 and 27 min), for the first and routine radiotherapy sessions for FSRT 40 and 13 min (58 and 31 min), respectively. The median time needed for the RS session was 58 min (45 min). The corresponding minimal manpower needed was 2 technicians for customization of the immobilization device, 2.5 technicians and 1 consultant for the contrast-enhanced planning studies, 1 consultant, 0.5 resident and 0.67 medical physics expert (MPE) for physical treatment planning, as well as 1 consultant, 0.5 resident, and 2.5 technicians for the first radiotherapy treatment and 2.33 technicians for routine radiotherapy sessions. Conclusion: For the first time, the resource requirements for a

  15. The influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on self-efficacy of medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Iwona; Rasińska, Renata; Głowacka, Maria Danuta

    2016-06-02

    Conditions of a healthy, friendly and safe work environment and proper work organisation increase self-efficacy and decrease or eliminate the factors causing the occurrence of burnout symptoms, all of which have a decisive impact on increasing the quality of work. The aim of the study was to analyse and assess the influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on the self-efficacy of medical staff. The study comprised randomly selected professionally-active nurses working on hospital wards (N=405) on the area of two provinces in Poland. The study used the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Copenhagen Burnout Inventory and a questionnaire concerning the factors that influence the process of work organisation at nursing positions in hospitals. Lower scores for self-efficacy resulted in a worse assessment of development opportunities and promotion prospects (r=-0.11), participation in the decision-making process (r=-0.11) and teamwork (r=-0.10). Lower self-efficacy contributed to the occurrence of burnout symptoms r∈[-0.19 - -0.17]. Properly shaped and used organisational factors are stimulating for professional efficiency and effectiveness, and consequently, for the quality of nursing work. Negative assessment of the factors in the work environment contributes to the occurrence of burnout symptoms and decrease in self-efficacy. Nurses with lower self-efficacy more often experienced symptoms of burnout.

  16. The Relationship Between Burnout Syndrome Among the Medical Staff and Work Conditions in the Polish Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głębocka, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Psychologists emphasize that people employed in social service organizations are vulnerable to chronic stress and burnout syndrome caused by a close and unsatisfied interpersonal relationship. However, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of diminished personal accomplishment can be attributed to other external factors. One of them is poor living and occupational conditions. According to a report by OECD, the healthcare system in Poland is the worst among the member countries. The aim of the present study was to define the relationship between occupational burnout and the rating of the Polish healthcare system among the medical staff. The study included 224 participants. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Dehumanized Behavior and the Głębocka and Rużyczka scale of Behavioral Indicators of Patient's Dehumanization were applied. The evaluations of the healthcare system were also collected. The results demonstrate that physicians were the group of most emotionally exhausted and, simultaneously, most life-satisfied persons, while nurses presented the highest level of dehumanization and the lowest level of satisfaction from life achievements. Only did physicians evaluate the healthcare system as a relatively good one. They were also more tolerant of latent dehumanization. A relationship between the dimensions of burnout and the evaluation of healthcare system were observed. The emotionally exhausted or prone to dehumanization persons were more likely to evaluate the Polish healthcare system negatively.

  17. Short Text Messages (SMS) as an Additional Tool for Notifying Medical Staff in Case of a Hospital Mass Casualty Incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timler, Dariusz; Bogusiak, Katarzyna; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Neskoromna-Jędrzejczak, Aneta; Gałązkowski, Robert; Szarpak, Łukasz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the effectiveness of short text messages (short message service, or SMS) as an additional notification tool in case of fire or a mass casualty incident in a hospital. A total of 2242 SMS text messages were sent to 59 hospital workers divided into 3 groups (n=21, n=19, n=19). Messages were sent from a Samsung GT-S8500 Wave cell phone and Orange Poland was chosen as the telecommunication provider. During a 3-month trial period, messages were sent between 3:35 PM and midnight with no regular pattern. Employees were asked to respond by telling how much time it would take them to reach the hospital in case of a mass casualty incident. The mean reaction time (SMS reply) was 36.41 minutes. The mean declared time of arrival to the hospital was 100.5 minutes. After excluding 10% of extreme values for declared arrival time, the mean arrival time was estimated as 38.35 minutes. Short text messages (SMS) can be considered an additional tool for notifying medical staff in case of a mass casualty incident.

  18. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

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    Christina M. Pettey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN, and African Americans (AAs are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years. Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group.

  19. What are incident reports telling us? A comparative study at two Australian hospitals of medication errors identified at audit, detected by staff and reported to an incident system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Li, Ling; Lehnbom, Elin C; Baysari, Melissa T; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Burke, Rosemary; Conn, Chris; Day, Richard O

    2015-02-01

    To (i) compare medication errors identified at audit and observation with medication incident reports; (ii) identify differences between two hospitals in incident report frequency and medication error rates; (iii) identify prescribing error detection rates by staff. Audit of 3291 patient records at two hospitals to identify prescribing errors and evidence of their detection by staff. Medication administration errors were identified from a direct observational study of 180 nurses administering 7451 medications. Severity of errors was classified. Those likely to lead to patient harm were categorized as 'clinically important'. Two major academic teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Rates of medication errors identified from audit and from direct observation were compared with reported medication incident reports. A total of 12 567 prescribing errors were identified at audit. Of these 1.2/1000 errors (95% CI: 0.6-1.8) had incident reports. Clinically important prescribing errors (n = 539) were detected by staff at a rate of 218.9/1000 (95% CI: 184.0-253.8), but only 13.0/1000 (95% CI: 3.4-22.5) were reported. 78.1% (n = 421) of clinically important prescribing errors were not detected. A total of 2043 drug administrations (27.4%; 95% CI: 26.4-28.4%) contained ≥ 1 errors; none had an incident report. Hospital A had a higher frequency of incident reports than Hospital B, but a lower rate of errors at audit. Prescribing errors with the potential to cause harm frequently go undetected. Reported incidents do not reflect the profile of medication errors which occur in hospitals or the underlying rates. This demonstrates the inaccuracy of using incident frequency to compare patient risk or quality performance within or across hospitals. New approaches including data mining of electronic clinical information systems are required to support more effective medication error detection and mitigation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association

  20. Junior medical students’ knowledge about and attitudes towards electroconvulsive therapy in a South African setting

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    Matthew B. Mausling

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a safe and effective treatment modality with a long history of use in psychiatry, it remains controversial owing to misconceptions and negative attitudes among the public and medical profession. The aim of this study was to explore the state of knowledge and attitudes towards ECT among a sample of South African medical students. Method: Prior to their theoretical psychiatry module, 131 second-year medical students responded to an anonymous online survey designed to assess the source and extent of their ECT knowledge as well as their attitude towards ECT and psychiatry in general. Results: The Internet (46.6% and TV and/or movies (30.5% were the principal sources of knowledge of ECT while ‘professional publication’ was the least common (0%. The students’ attitudes towards psychiatry were generally positive and nearly one-third (29.8% would consider specialising in the field. Overall, perception towards ECT was mixed, with many respondents approving of its use albeit only as a last resort. Notably, low ECT knowledge scores were associated with more negative attitudes towards this treatment modality and a lower perception of psychiatry as a medical speciality. Conclusion: The findings indicate that for these students, media is the main source of ECT knowledge. While they are generally knowledgeable about ECT, they still harbour some misconceptions and negative attitudes about the treatment. Knowledge appears able to amend these attitudes, thus underlining the importance of integrating accurate information about ECT into the preclinical medical curriculum rather than leaving it to mass media to forge warped perceptions and attitudes for these future clinicians.

  1. Starting Where the People Are: The African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF). Carnegie Quarterly, Volume XXXII, Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie Quarterly, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This issue of the "Carnegie Quarterly" describes three projects that are being conducted by the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF). The projects are the following: (1) building community participation in health care at Lake Kenyatta; (2) the role of community education in disease control among the Turkana people at…

  2. Measurement of {sup 131}I activity in thyroid of nuclear medical staff and internal dose assessment in a Polish nuclear medical hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brudecki, K.; Mietelski, J.W. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Kowalska, A.; Szczodry, A. [Holy Cross Cancer Center, Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine, Kielce (Poland); Zagrodzki, P. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Jagiellonian University, Department of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, Medical College, Krakow (Poland); Mroz, T. [Pedagogical University in Cracow, Krakow (Poland); Janowski, P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2017-03-15

    This paper presents results of {sup 131}I thyroid activity measurements in 30 members of the nuclear medicine personnel of the Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce, Poland. A whole-body spectrometer equipped with two semiconductor gamma radiation detectors served as the basic research instrument. In ten out of 30 examined staff members, the determined {sup 131}I activity was found to be above the detection limit (DL = 5 Bq of {sup 131}I in the thyroid). The measured activities ranged from (5 ± 2) Bq to (217 ± 56) Bq. The highest activities in thyroids were detected for technical and cleaning personnel, whereas the lowest values were recorded for medical doctors. Having measured the activities, an attempt has been made to estimate the corresponding annual effective doses, which were found to range from 0.02 to 0.8 mSv. The highest annual equivalent doses have been found for thyroid, ranging from 0.4 to 15.4 mSv, detected for a cleaner and a technician, respectively. The maximum estimated effective dose corresponds to 32% of the annual background dose in Poland, and to circa 4% of the annual limit for the effective dose due to occupational exposure of 20 mSv per year, which is in compliance with the value recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of 131I activity in thyroid of nuclear medical staff and internal dose assessment in a Polish nuclear medical hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudecki, K.; Mietelski, J.W.; Kowalska, A.; Szczodry, A.; Zagrodzki, P.; Mroz, T.; Janowski, P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of 131 I thyroid activity measurements in 30 members of the nuclear medicine personnel of the Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce, Poland. A whole-body spectrometer equipped with two semiconductor gamma radiation detectors served as the basic research instrument. In ten out of 30 examined staff members, the determined 131 I activity was found to be above the detection limit (DL = 5 Bq of 131 I in the thyroid). The measured activities ranged from (5 ± 2) Bq to (217 ± 56) Bq. The highest activities in thyroids were detected for technical and cleaning personnel, whereas the lowest values were recorded for medical doctors. Having measured the activities, an attempt has been made to estimate the corresponding annual effective doses, which were found to range from 0.02 to 0.8 mSv. The highest annual equivalent doses have been found for thyroid, ranging from 0.4 to 15.4 mSv, detected for a cleaner and a technician, respectively. The maximum estimated effective dose corresponds to 32% of the annual background dose in Poland, and to circa 4% of the annual limit for the effective dose due to occupational exposure of 20 mSv per year, which is in compliance with the value recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N.; Maurer, U.; Popp, W.; Sack, H.

    2014-01-01

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Maurer, U. [St.-Antonius-Hospital, Strahlentherapie, Eschweiler (Germany); Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [University of Essen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  6. A New Approach to Identify High Burnout Medical Staffs by Kernel K-Means Cluster Analysis in a Regional Teaching Hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Huang, Shian-Chang; Huang, Chih-Hsuan; Wu, Hsin-Hung

    2016-01-01

    This study uses kernel k-means cluster analysis to identify medical staffs with high burnout. The data collected in October to November 2014 are from the emotional exhaustion dimension of the Chinese version of Safety Attitudes Questionnaire in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. The number of effective questionnaires including the entire staffs such as physicians, nurses, technicians, pharmacists, medical administrators, and respiratory therapists is 680. The results show that 8 clusters are generated by kernel k-means method. Employees in clusters 1, 4, and 5 are relatively in good conditions, whereas employees in clusters 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 need to be closely monitored from time to time because they have relatively higher degree of burnout. When employees with higher degree of burnout are identified, the hospital management can take actions to improve the resilience, reduce the potential medical errors, and, eventually, enhance the patient safety. This study also suggests that the hospital management needs to keep track of medical staffs' fatigue conditions and provide timely assistance for burnout recovery through employee assistance programs, mindfulness-based stress reduction programs, positivity currency buildup, and forming appreciative inquiry groups. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  8. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  9. 77 FR 41413 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices: The Pre...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... feedback. It is also our intention to hold timely meetings with appropriate staff and managers present, if... sponsors. When final, this document will supersede ``Pre- IDE Program: Issues and Answers--Blue Book Memo...

  10. Increasing awareness of age-related fertility and elective fertility preservation among medical students and house staff: a pre- and post-intervention analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspach Will, Erica; Maslow, Bat-Sheva; Kaye, Leah; Nulsen, John

    2017-05-01

    To assess medical students' and house staff's knowledge and personal and professional perceptions of age-related fertility and fertility preservation before and after an educational intervention. Pre-/post intervention survey. University-based medical center. Medical students and house staff. An educational session on age-related fertility decline and elective fertility preservation. Knowledge scores and perceptions assessed immediately before and after the intervention. Sixty-five surveys were administered. Of the 53 respondents, 71.7% were married or in a committed relationship; 89.4% reported that they were delaying childbearing, with career and/or education being the most frequently listed reason (85.7%); 39.5% indicated that they had both personal and professional interest in fertility preservation but identified finances (62.5%) and time (59.4%) as barriers; 86.9% indicated previous exposure, with formal education (80.0%) and social media (40.0%) being the most common sources. Mean scores on a six-question knowledge-based assessment improved significantly following the presentation (54.6 ± 19.0% vs. 78.1 ± 16.0%), as did the number of participants who indicated that they might now recommend elective oocyte cryopreservation to others (71.1% vs. 54.3%). After the intervention, 97.8% thought that it was important for medical professionals to be informed about age-related fertility decline and elective oocyte cryopreservation. Despite professional and personal interest, knowledge of age-related fertility decline and elective fertility preservation is limited among medical students and house staff. This study highlights the need for formal education across all levels of training and specialties, with even brief interventions being of potential benefit. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How students perceive medical competences: a cross-cultural study between the medical course in Portugal and African Portuguese speaking countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Joselina; Severo, Milton; Fresta, Mário; Ismail, Mamudo; Ferreira, Maria Amélia; Barros, Henrique

    2011-05-25

    A global effort has been made in the last years to establish a set of core competences that define the essential professional competence of a physician. Regardless of the environment, culture or medical education conditions, a set of core competences is required for medical practice worldwide. Evaluation of educational program is always needed to assure the best training for medical students and ultimately best care for patients. The aim of this study was to determine in what extent medical students in Portugal and Portuguese speaking African countries, felt they have acquired the core competences to start their clinical practice. For this reason, it was created a measurement tool to evaluate self-perceived competences, in different domains, across Portuguese and Portuguese-speaking African medical schools. The information was collected through a questionnaire that defines the knowledge, attitudes and skills that future doctors should acquire. The Cronbach's Alpha and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were used to evaluate the reliability of the questionnaire. In order to remove possible confounding effect, individual scores were standardized by country. The order of the domain's scores was similar between countries. After standardization, Personal Attitudes and Professional Behavior showed median scores above the country global median and Knowledge alone showed median score below the country global median. In Portugal, Clinical Skills showed score below the global median. In Angola, Clinical Skills and General Skills showed a similar result. There were only significant differences between countries in Personal Attitudes (p speaking African medical schools was confirmed. Students have perceived their level of competence in personal attitudes in a high level and in opposite, knowledge and clinical skills with some weaknesses.

  12. Radiation protection of medical staff: a coordinated action by EURADOS on extremely dosimetry and the use of active personnel dosemeters (CONRAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of workers constitutes an integral part of any radiological protection program. However, unresolved issues in radiation protection of medical staff still remain. Research and establishment of guidelines are necessary on a variety of issues such as extremity dosimetry (fingers, eye lenses, etc), the use of double dosimetry above and below lead aprons, or the use of electronic personal dosimeters in interventional procedures. Medical practices are also evolving fast, and new techniques with ionising radiation emerge very regularly, thus implying the need of radiation protection measures for medical staff, and the implementation of new monitoring programs. In some medical applications of radiation there is an increased risk of high local exposures because of direct handling of sources or the use of beta-emitters. However, despite the large number of workers that are exposed in the medical field worldwide, only few measurements of extremity doses have been reported in the literature. Some activities of EURADOS Working Group 9 (WG9) were sponsored by the European Commission in the CONRAD project. This CONRAD project was aiming at the coordination of research on radiation protection at the workplace. Working group 9 has been involved in the coordination and promotion of European research in the field of Radiation Protection Dosimetry for Medical Staff. One of the objectives of this working group was to formulate the state of the art and to identify areas in which improvements were needed. For some of these medical applications the skin of the fingers is the limiting organ from the point of view of individual monitoring of external radiation. The wide variety of radiation field characteristics in a medical environment, and the difficulty of measuring a local dose that is representative for the maximum skin dose (usually with one single detector), makes it difficult to perform extremity dosimetry with an accuracy similar to whole-body dosimetry. Therefore a

  13. A New Approach to Identify High Burnout Medical Staffs by Kernel K-Means Cluster Analysis in a Regional Teaching Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yii-Ching Lee PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study uses kernel k-means cluster analysis to identify medical staffs with high burnout. The data collected in October to November 2014 are from the emotional exhaustion dimension of the Chinese version of Safety Attitudes Questionnaire in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. The number of effective questionnaires including the entire staffs such as physicians, nurses, technicians, pharmacists, medical administrators, and respiratory therapists is 680. The results show that 8 clusters are generated by kernel k-means method. Employees in clusters 1, 4, and 5 are relatively in good conditions, whereas employees in clusters 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 need to be closely monitored from time to time because they have relatively higher degree of burnout. When employees with higher degree of burnout are identified, the hospital management can take actions to improve the resilience, reduce the potential medical errors, and, eventually, enhance the patient safety. This study also suggests that the hospital management needs to keep track of medical staffs’ fatigue conditions and provide timely assistance for burnout recovery through employee assistance programs, mindfulness-based stress reduction programs, positivity currency buildup, and forming appreciative inquiry groups.

  14. Improving radiation awareness and feeling of personal security of non-radiological medical staff by implementing a traffic light system in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmaier, C.; Mayor, A.; Zuber, N.; Weishaupt, D. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Fodor, P. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

    2016-03-15

    Non-radiological medical professionals often need to remain in the scanning room during computed tomography (CT) examinations to supervise patients in critical condition. Independent of protective devices, their position significantly influences the radiation dose they receive. The purpose of this study was to assess if a traffic light system indicating areas of different radiation exposure improves non-radiological medical staff's radiation awareness and feeling of personal security. Phantom measurements were performed to define areas of different dose rates and colored stickers were applied on the floor according to a traffic light system: green = lowest, orange = intermediate, and red = highest possible radiation exposure. Non-radiological medical professionals with different years of working experience evaluated the system using a structured questionnaire. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation test were applied for statistical analysis. Fifty-six subjects (30 physicians, 26 nursing staff) took part in this prospective study. Overall rating of the system was very good, and almost all professionals tried to stand in the green stickers during the scan. The system significantly increased radiation awareness and feeling of personal protection particularly in staff with ? 5 years of working experience (p < 0.05). The majority of non-radiological medical professionals stated that staying in the green stickers and patient care would be compatible. Knowledge of radiation protection was poor in all groups, especially among entry-level employees (p < 0.05). A traffic light system in the CT scanning room indicating areas with lowest, in-termediate, and highest possible radiation exposure is much appreciated. It increases radiation awareness, improves the sense of personal radiation protection, and may support endeavors to lower occupational radiation exposure, although the best radiation protection always is to re-main outside the CT room during the scan.

  15. Improving radiation awareness and feeling of personal security of non-radiological medical staff by implementing a traffic light system in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmaier, C.; Mayor, A.; Zuber, N.; Weishaupt, D.; Fodor, P.

    2016-01-01

    Non-radiological medical professionals often need to remain in the scanning room during computed tomography (CT) examinations to supervise patients in critical condition. Independent of protective devices, their position significantly influences the radiation dose they receive. The purpose of this study was to assess if a traffic light system indicating areas of different radiation exposure improves non-radiological medical staff's radiation awareness and feeling of personal security. Phantom measurements were performed to define areas of different dose rates and colored stickers were applied on the floor according to a traffic light system: green = lowest, orange = intermediate, and red = highest possible radiation exposure. Non-radiological medical professionals with different years of working experience evaluated the system using a structured questionnaire. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation test were applied for statistical analysis. Fifty-six subjects (30 physicians, 26 nursing staff) took part in this prospective study. Overall rating of the system was very good, and almost all professionals tried to stand in the green stickers during the scan. The system significantly increased radiation awareness and feeling of personal protection particularly in staff with ? 5 years of working experience (p < 0.05). The majority of non-radiological medical professionals stated that staying in the green stickers and patient care would be compatible. Knowledge of radiation protection was poor in all groups, especially among entry-level employees (p < 0.05). A traffic light system in the CT scanning room indicating areas with lowest, in-termediate, and highest possible radiation exposure is much appreciated. It increases radiation awareness, improves the sense of personal radiation protection, and may support endeavors to lower occupational radiation exposure, although the best radiation protection always is to re-main outside the CT room during the scan.

  16. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. Methods A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. Results We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. Conclusions The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution. PMID:24450310

  17. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Stoyanov, Slavi; Burgoyne, Louise; Bennett, Deirdre; Sweeney, Catherine; Drachsler, Hendrik; Vanderperren, Katrien; Van Huffel, Sabine; McSweeney, John; Shorten, George; O'Flynn, Siun; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig; O'Tuathaigh, Colm

    2014-01-22

    Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution.

  18. The relationship between knowledge of ergonomic science and the occupational health among nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juibari, Leila; Sanagu, Akram; Farrokhi, Nafiseh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational hazards are much higher for nurses than many other jobs and neglecting this fact may reduce the quality of nursing services. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between knowledge of ergonomics and occupational health among the nursing staff affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences. METHODS: It was a cross-sectional analytical study on 423 nursing staff working in various medical centers affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences in 2008, selected by quota randomized sampling. Data collection instrument was Ergonomics Questionnaire, which consisted of 72 questions. Cronbach’s alpha for main sections of the questionnaire was 0.8, 0.8 and 0.9. Descriptive and analytical tests were used for data analysis and an alpha error of 5% was considered. RESULTS: Of all the subjects, 36.1% had 5-10 years of work experience, 61.9% had a good knowledge of ergonomic principles, and 83% were exposed to a mild level of occupational hazards. There was no significant relationship between knowledge of ergonomics and occupational health (p = 0.08). The relationships between knowledge of ergonomics and age, gender, marital status, work experience, the type, and the location of service were significant (p ergonomics can provide a healthier work environment for nurses and optimize human resource efficiency. PMID:21589793

  19. Relationship Between Self-Management Strategy and Self-Efficacy Among Staff of Ardabil Disaster and Emergency Medical Management Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Amini

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: In general, considering that job stress, safety behavior and self-management predictive self-efficacy of emergency staff. Individuals with high self-efficacy wait for the desired outcomes of their performance. So by giving stress management training and applying their safety principles and strategies, targeting can create a sense of self-efficacy such that a person can withstand persistent efforts to overcome obstacles. Improving working conditions also plays an effective role in increasing productivity.

  20. ٍEffective factors on the Incidence of medication errors from the nursing staff perspective in various department of Fasa Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Bizhani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available  Background and Objective: The incidence of medical errors is deemed one of the unavoidable cases of serious threats to the health and safety of patients. This study aimed to determine the factors influencing medication errors from the perspective of the nursing staff. Materials and Methods: This descriptive -analytic study recruited 80 nurses working in various wards in Fasa Hospital. The nurses were selected via the availability sampling method, and their perspective on factors affecting medication errors was gathered using a questionnaire designed for this study. The data were analyzed with SPSS-15 software.   Results: The most important causes of medication errors were work fatigue, low nurse-to-patient ratio, long working hours, high density of work in units, and doing other tasks. Other variables such as age and gender as well as factors effective on the incidence of medication errors are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: From the nurses’ standpoint, workload and the patient-to-nurse ratio were the most significant factors leading to medication errors.

  1. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  2. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: The Alcohol & Drug Abuse Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council - strengthening substance abuse research and policy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Charles; Morojele, Neo; Myers, Bronwyn; Plüddemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit (ADARU) was established at the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) at the beginning of 2001, although its origins lie in the activities of the Centre for Epidemiological Research in Southern Africa and other MRC entities. Initial challenges included attracting external funding, recruiting new staff, developing the skills of junior staff, publishing in international journals and building national and international collaborative networks. ADARU currently comprises a core staff of 33 members who work on 22 projects spanning substance use epidemiology and associated consequences, intervention studies with at-risk populations and services research. A large component of this portfolio focuses on the link between alcohol and other drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviour, with funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Junior staff members are encouraged to develop independent research interests and pursue PhD studies. Research outputs, such as the 20 papers that were published in 2010 and the 35 conference presentations from that year, form an important part of the unit's research translation activities. We engage actively with policy processes at the local, provincial, national and international levels, and have given particular attention to alcohol policy in recent years. The paper includes an analysis of major challenges currently facing the unit and how we are attempting to address them. It ends with some thoughts on what the unit intends doing to enhance the quality of its research, the capacity of its staff and its international standing. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. A Survey of Job Satisfaction among Staff of Jundishapur Medical Teaching Hospitals in Ahvaz; Based on Herzberg's Two-Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Amiri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Job satisfaction is the most important factor affecting the performance and productivity of the organization. The purpose of this study was to assess job satisfaction among staff of Jundishapur medical teaching hospitals; based on Herzberg's      two-factor model. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. The sample size of 147 was calculated. Stratified sampling method was used. The questionnaire used to collect data consisted of demographic characteristics and job satisfaction in a Likert scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (mean score and standard deviation and analytical statistics (Parametric test in SPSS16 software. Results: In survival factors, the highest average belonged to salary subscale with mean score     (3.35 ± 1.05. The other subscales were estimated relatively inappropriate .Regarding motivational factors; all subscales were estimated relatively inappropriate. The recognition subscale showed a significant association with age (P Conclusion: In order to enhance the efficiency of hospital staff, in addition to the domains that prevent staff from quitting their job, it needs to emphasize on their motivation as well.

  4. The effect of SAM on the South African Medical-Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Actuarial Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Implicit stereotyping and medical decisions: unconscious stereotype activation in practitioners' thoughts about African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Gordon B; Stone, Jeff; Childs, Amanda

    2012-05-01

    We investigated whether stereotypes unconsciously influence the thinking and behavior of physicians, as they have been shown to do in other professional settings, such as among law enforcement personnel and teachers. We conducted 2 studies to examine whether stereotypes are implicitly activated in physicians. Study 1 assessed what diseases and treatments doctors associate with African Americans. Study 2 presented these (and control terms) to doctors as part of a computerized task. Subliminal images of African American and White men appeared prior to each word, and reaction times to words were recorded. When primed with an African American face, doctors reacted more quickly for stereotypical diseases, indicating an implicit association of certain diseases with African Americans. These comprised not only diseases African Americans are genetically predisposed to, but also conditions and social behaviors with no biological association (e.g., obesity, drug abuse). We found implicit stereotyping among physicians; faces they never consciously saw altered performance. This suggests that diagnoses and treatment of African American patients may be biased, even in the absence of the practitioner's intent or awareness.

  6. Implementation of HbA1c Point of Care Testing in 3 German Medical Practices: Impact on Workflow and Physician, Staff, and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Karl-Heinz; Ardjomand, Payam; Göhring, Katharina; Klempt, Guido; Patzelt, Andreas; Redzich, Markus; Zebrowski, Mathias; Emmerich, Susanne; Schnell, Oliver

    2018-05-01

    Medical practices face challenges of time and cost pressures with scarce resources. Point-of-care testing (POCT) has the potential to accelerate processes compared to central laboratory testing and can increase satisfaction of physicians, staff members, and patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of introducing HbA1c POCT in practices specialized in diabetes. Three German practices that manage 400, 550, and 950 diabetes patients per year participated in this evaluation. The workflow and required time before and after POCT implementation (device: Alere Afinion AS100 Analyzer) was evaluated in each practice. Physician (n = 5), staff (n = 9), and patient (n = 298) satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and interviews. After POCT implementation the number of required visits scheduled was reduced by 80% (88% vs 17.6%, P < .0001), the number of venous blood collections by 75% (91% vs 23%, P < .0001). Of patients, 82% (vs 13% prior to POCT implementation) were able to discuss their HbA1c values with treating physicians immediately during their first visit ( P < .0001). In two of the practices the POCT process resulted in significant time savings of approximately 20 and 22 working days per 1000 patients per year (95% CI 2-46; 95% CI 10-44). All physicians indicated that POCT HbA1c implementation improved the practice workflow and all experienced a relief of burden for the office and the patients. All staff members indicated that they found the POCT measurement easy to perform and experienced a relief of burden. The majority (61.3%) of patients found the capillary blood collection more pleasant and 83% saw an advantage in the immediate availability of HbA1c results. The implementation of HbA1c POCT leads to an improved practice workflow and increases satisfaction of physicians, staff members and patients.

  7. Evaluation of the occupational X-rays dose of the medical staff in a cardiac catheterization laboratory using an acrylic phantom and semiconductor dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lung Fa; Kittipayak, Samrit; Yen, Shan Lin; Pan, Lung Kwang; Lin, Cheng Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The occupational X-rays doses of medical staff in a cardiac catheterization laboratory were evaluated. Four customized acrylic phantoms were used to simulate a patient, medical doctor, assistant, and radiologist to evaluate the in-situ X-rays exposure dose using semiconductor dosimeters. The exposure dose was measured under three scenarios that were preset to imply: no shielding, moderate shielding and complete shielding for the medical staff in the laboratory. The doses were applied by changing the dose area product (DAP) from 11,000 to 500,000mGy·cm(2) in 14 increments. The estimated annual occupational doses for doctors, assistants and radiologists in scenarios I, II, and III were: I) 35.03, 7.78, 1.95; II) 1.95, 0.78, 0.06; and III) 0.19, 0.10, 0.05cSv, respectively. The derived linear regression line of the exposure dose with respect to the DAP were extrapolated to obtain the minimum detectable level (MDL) of DAP for triggering the staff dosimeters. Accordingly, the minimum annual dose was estimated as 0.05cSv. Additional shielding provided measurable protection to the staff. The protective clothing used in scenarios II and III can reduce the original dose from scenario I to ∼3% (scenario II) and ∼0.5% (scenario III). The annual occupational dose also changed with the various X-rays energy settings. The annual dose increased to 126% when the preset X-rays energy was changed from 70 to 100kVp. The semiconductor dosimeter proved to be an adequate tool for measuring low doses and low dose rates under these circumstances. The dose can be reduce of I) 35.03, 7.78, 1.95; to II) 1.95, 0.78, 0.06 (∼3%); or III) 0.19, 0.10, 0.05 (∼0.5%)cSv, respectively according to different protective scenarios.

  8. 24/7 Presence of Medical Staff in the Labor Ward; No Day-Night Differences in Perinatal and Maternal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Sara; Cavaco-Gomes, João; Moucho, Marina; Severo, Milton; Mateus, Mário; Ramalho, Carla; Visser, Gerard H A; Montenegro, Nuno

    2017-05-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to assess possible day-night differences in perinatal and maternal labor outcomes in a hospital setting with no day-night differences in the presence of experienced medical staff. Design  This was a retrospective study conducted over 5 years between 2008 and 2012. Setting  This study was set at the obstetric delivery unit in a tertiary hospital. Population  A total of 9,143 singleton deliveries were assessed after 34 weeks of gestation and after exclusion of major congenital malformations, inductions of labor, and elective cesarean sections. Materials and Methods  Data were collected using the hospital electronic medical records. Time periods of 8 hours were defined (daytime between 8 am and 4 pm, evening time between 4 pm and 12 pm, and nighttime between 12 pm and 8 am). Differences between the three time periods were assessed using software R Core Team (2013). Main outcome measures were neonatal birth asphyxia, neonatal intensive care unit admission, and neonatal death. Results  There were no differences in perinatal and maternal outcomes in the course of the day, apart from a higher incidence of third- and fourth-degree tears during the evening. Neonatal outcome after obstetric emergencies (uterine rupture, partial placental abruption, and cord prolapse) also showed no day-night differences. Conclusion  Adverse nighttime-related outcomes may be avoided by the 24/7 presence of experienced medical staff. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. NUMBER AND STRUCTURE OF MEDICAL STAFF IN THE SIBERIAN CITIES IN THE GREAT PATRIOTIC WAR OF 1941-1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya A. Davidova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamics of the number of medical personnel Siberian cities in the Great Patriotic war is analyzed in the article. The author studies quantity and structure of senior and low-grade medical personnel of healthcare institutions, shows its impact on medical and sanitarian anti-epidemic work, as well as considers methods of decision of personnel problem in the region. The study is based on analysis of documents of the State Archive of the Russian Federation, the Russian State Archive of Socio-Political History, the Russian State Archive of Economy and the Regional Archives of the Siberian cities.

  10. Effect of workload on quality of work life among staff of the teaching hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marzban

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of work life is the reaction of employees to their work specially the individual results at work and mental health that affects their personal experience and work results. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of workload on quality of work life in staff of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Methods: This analytical study was conducted in 530 staff of four hospitals affiliated to the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences that were selected by Cochrane sampling method during 2014. The measurement tools were demographic questionnaire, Walton's quality of work life questionnaire (including 32 questions and eight dimensions, and the NASA TLX workload scale. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean scores of quality of work life and workload were 48.21±13.34 and 64.70±11.44, respectively. There was negative significant correlation between workload and quality of work life (r= -0.0161. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that high workload is one of the most important factors of reduced quality of work life that can be reduced through proper organization and planning.

  11. A comparative study of the effect of triage training by role-playing and educational video on the knowledge and performance of emergency medical service staffs in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghababaeian, Hamidreza; Sedaghat, Soheila; Tahery, Noorallah; Moghaddam, Ali Sadeghi; Maniei, Mohammad; Bahrami, Nosrat; Ahvazi, Ladan Araghi

    2013-12-01

    Educating emergency medical staffs in triage skills is an important aspect of disaster preparedness. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of role-playing and educational video presentation on the learning and performance of the emergency medical service staffs in Khozestan, Iran A total of 144 emergency technicians were randomly classified into two groups. A researcher trained the first group using an educational video method and the second group with a role-playing method. Data were collected before, immediately, and 15 days after training using a questionnaire covering the three domains of demographic information, triage knowledge, and triage performance. The data were analyzed using defined knowledge and performance parameters. There was no significant difference between the two training methods on performance and immediate knowledge (P = .2), lasting knowledge (P=.05) and immediate performance (P = .35), but there was a statistical advantage for the role-playing method on lasting performance (P = .02). The two educational methods equally increase knowledge and performance, but the role-playing method may have a more desirable and lasting effect on performance.

  12. Perceived racial discrimination, but not mistrust of medical researchers, predicts the heat pain tolerance of African Americans with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Burel R; Pham, Quyen T; Glover, Toni L; Sotolongo, Adriana; King, Christopher D; Sibille, Kimberly T; Herbert, Matthew S; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Sanden, Shelley H; Staud, Roland; Redden, David T; Bradley, Laurence A; Fillingim, Roger B

    2013-11-01

    Studies have shown that perceived racial discrimination is a significant predictor of clinical pain severity among African Americans. It remains unknown whether perceived racial discrimination also alters the nociceptive processing of painful stimuli, which, in turn, could influence clinical pain severity. This study examined associations between perceived racial discrimination and responses to noxious thermal stimuli among African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Mistrust of medical researchers was also assessed given its potential to affect responses to the noxious stimuli. One-hundred and 30 (52% African American, 48% non-Hispanic White) community-dwelling older adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis completed two study sessions. In session one, individuals provided demographic, socioeconomic, physical and mental health information. They completed questionnaires related to perceived lifetime frequency of racial discrimination and mistrust of medical researchers. In session two, individuals underwent a series of controlled thermal stimulation procedures to assess heat pain sensitivity, particularly heat pain tolerance. African Americans were more sensitive to heat pain and reported greater perceived racial discrimination as well as greater mistrust of medical researchers compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Greater perceived racial discrimination significantly predicted lower heat pain tolerance for African Americans but not non-Hispanic Whites. Mistrust of medical researchers did not significantly predict heat pain tolerance for either racial group. These results lend support to the idea that perceived racial discrimination may influence the clinical pain severity of African Americans via the nociceptive processing of painful stimuli.

  13. Systematic reviews in context: highlighting systematic reviews relevant to Africa in the Pan African Medical Journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Tsague, Landry

    2016-01-01

    contribute in enhancing the value of research in Africa, the Pan African Medical Journal will start a new regular column that will highlight priority systematic reviews relevant to the continent.

  14. Predicting the admission into medical school of African American college students who have participated in summer academic enrichment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, A; Cregler, L L; Lewis, L

    1998-02-01

    To identify cognitive and noncognitive variables as predictors of the admission into medical school of African American college students who have participated in summer academic enrichment programs (SAEPs). The study sample comprised 309 African American college students who participated in SAEPs at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine from 1980 to 1989 and whose educational and occupational statuses were determined by follow-up tracking. A three-step logistic regression was used to analyze the data (with alpha = .05); the criterion variable was admission to medical school. The 17 predictor variables studied were one of two types, cognitive and noncognitive. The cognitive variables were (1) Scholastic Aptitude Test mathematics (SAT-M) score, (2) SAT verbal score, (3) college grade-point average (GPA), (4) college science GPA, (5) SAEP GPA, and (6) SAEP basic science GPA (BSGPA). The noncognitive variables were (1) gender, (2) highest college level at the time of the last SAEP application, (3) type of college attended (historically African American or predominately white), (4) number of SAEPs attended, (5) career aspiration (physician or another health science option) (6) parents who were professionals, (7) parents who were health care role models, (8) evidence of leadership, (9) evidence of community service, (10) evidence of special motivation, and (11) strength of letter of recommendation in the SAEP application. For each student the rating scores for the last four noncognitive variables were determined by averaging the ratings of two judges who reviewed relevant information in each student's file. In step 1, which explained 20% of the admission decision variance, SAT-M score, SAEP BSGPA, and college GPA were the three significant cognitive predictors identified. In step 2, which explained 31% of the variance, the three cognitive predictors identified in step 1 were joined by three noncognitive predictors: career aspiration, type of college, and

  15. 77 FR 16036 - Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device ISO...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0226...) audit report provides FDA a degree of assurance of compliance with basic and fundamental quality management system requirements for medical devices. \\1\\ The GHTF founding members auditing systems include...

  16. Occupational Radiation Exposure to the Extremities of Medical Staff during Hysterosalpingography and Radionuclide Bone Scan Procedures in Several Nigerian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi Norbert Jibiri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The practice of regular dose measurement helps to ascertain the level of occupational dose delivered to the staff involved in diagnostic procedures. This study was carried out to evaluate the dose exposed to the hands of radiologists and a radiologic technologist carrying out HSG and radionuclide bone scan examinations in several hospitals in Nigeria. Methods: Radiation doses exposed to the hands of radiologists and a technician carrying out hysterosalpingography (HSG and bone scan procedures were measured using calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeters. Five radiologists and a radiologic technologist were included in the study for dose measurement. Results: The study indicates that each radiologist carried out approximately 2 examinations per week with the mean dose ranging between 0.49-0.62 mSv per week, resulting in an annual dose of 191 mSv. Similarly, the occupational dose delivered to both the left and right hands of a radiologic technologist administering 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP without cannula and with cannula were 10.68 (720.2 and 13.82 (556.4 mSv per week (and per annum, respectively. It was determined that the left hand of the personnel received higher doses than their right hand. Conclusion: The estimated annual dose during HSG is far below the annual dose limit for deterministic effects, however, it is greater than 10% of the applicable annual dose limit. Hence, routine monitoring is required to ensure adequate protection of the personnel. The total annual dose received during the bone scan exceeds the annual dose limit for both hands, and the dose to either left or right hand is greater than the dose limit of 500 mSv/yr. The radiologists monitored are not expected to incur any deterministic effects during HSG examinations, however, accumulated doses arising from the scattered radiation to the eyes, legs, and neck could be substantial and might lead to certain effects. More staff are required to administer 99m

  17. AN IMPACT OF THE EFFICIENT FUNCTIONING OF THE VENTILATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM ON THERMAL COMFORT OF THE MEDICAL STAFF IN THE OPERATING ROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Jankowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ventilation and air conditioning systems are necessary for developing proper parameters of indoor envi-ronment in operating rooms. The main task of ventilation and air conditioning in those specific areas consists in creating desirable temperature, reducing the number of microorganisms and the concen-trations of hazardous gases and substances in the air, as well as ensuring the proper direction of airflow. In Poland, indoor environment in operating rooms has to comply with the requirements set out in three regulations (Journal of Laws of 2002 No. 75, item 690, as amended, Journal of Laws of 2002 No. 217, item 1833, Journal of Laws of 2011 No. 31, item 158, as amended and the document entitled "Guidelines for the design of general hospitals". Given insufficient accuracy of the abovementioned national documents, it is a common practice to use foreign standards, i.e. ASHRAE Standard 170-2013, DIN 1946-4: 2008 and FprCEN TR 16244: 2011. When considering the conditions for thermal comfort, it is important to bear in mind a close link between air flow velocity and air temperature. Air in the zone occupied by patients and medical staff must not cause the sensation of draft. Furthermore, air velocity should be sufficient to eliminate interference caused by the presence of people and other sources of heat. It should also reduce the turbulence level in the air in the operating room. Efficient functioning of ventilation and air conditioning was tested during treatments and operations carried out on three wards of a Warsaw hospital. Tests were performed with the participation of medical staff from various surgical units. They were asked to perform minor manual tasks to simulate work on the op-erating table, and to complete a questionnaire on subjective thermal sensation. The applied methodology is widely used during testing of general and local ventilation in public buildings. Air temperature, relative humidity, air flow supply and exhaust air from the

  18. Financial Hardship, Unmet Medical Need, and Health Self-Efficacy among African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D.; Mitchell, Jamie A.; Shires, Deirdre A.; Modlin, Charles S., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health self-efficacy (the confidence to take care of one's health) is a key component in ensuring that individuals are active partners in their health and health care. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy among African American men and to determine if unmet…

  19. Gender differences in medical advice and health behavior of obese African Americans with and without type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Joan A; Huffman, Fatma G

    2012-09-01

    This study examined gender differences in medical advice related to diet and physical activity for obese African American adults (N = 470) with and without diabetes. Data from the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Even after sociodemographic adjustments, men were less likely to report receiving medical advice as compared with women. Both men and women given dietary and physical activity advice were more likely to follow it. Men were less likely to report currently reducing fat or calories, yet men with diabetes were 5 times more likely to state that they were reducing fat and calories as compared with women with diabetes. Gender- and disease state-specific interventions are needed comparing standard care with enhanced patient education. Moreover, these findings necessitate studies that characterize the role of the health care professional in the diagnosis and treatment of obesity and underscore patient-provider relationships.

  20. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has also been difficult for African researchers to access the work of other African academics. In partnership with hundreds of journals from all over the continent, AJOL works to change this, so that African-origin research output is available to Africans and to the rest of the ... Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics.

  1. Staff Perceptions of Professional Development and Empowerment as Long-Term Leadership Tasks of School Principals in South African Schools: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Eldridge; Muller, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the perceptions of school staff of professional development and empowerment as part of the long-term leadership task of principals. The long-term leadership model was used as a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the perceptions of 118 teachers and education managers in approximately 100 schools throughout…

  2. Evaluation of an mHealth Medication Regimen Self-Management Program for African American and Hispanic Uncontrolled Hypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana M. Davidson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH program was developed using a patient-centered, theory-guided, iterative design process. Electronic medication trays provided reminder signals, and Short Message Service [SMS] messaging reminded subjects to monitor BP with Bluetooth-enabled monitors. Motivational and reinforcement text messages were sent to participants based upon levels of adherence. Thirty-eight African-American (18 and Hispanic (20 uncontrolled hypertensives completed clinic-based anthropometric and resting BP evaluations prior to randomization, and again at months 1, 3 and 6. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM revealed statistically significant time-by-treatment interactions (p < 0.0001 indicating significant reductions in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP for the SMASH group vs. the standard care (SC control group across all time points. 70.6% of SMASH subjects vs. 15.8% of the SC group reached BP control (< 140/90 mmH at month 1 (p < 0.001. At month 6, 94.4% of the SMASH vs. 41.2% of the SC group exhibited controlled BP (p < 0.003. Our findings provide encouraging evidence that efficacious mHealth, chronic disease, medical regimen, self-management programs can be developed following principles of patient-centered, theory-guided design.

  3. The interactive effects of social support and physical functioning on HIV medical outcomes among African Americans whom inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Denison, Julie A; Thorpe, Roland J; Knowlton, Amy R

    2017-02-15

    Research suggests a syndemic of substance use, mental illness, and familial conflict is associated with poor HIV medical outcomes among African American persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Social support may facilitate positive health outcomes. This study explores psychosocial correlates of HIV medical outcomes, defined as undetectable viral load (UVL) and acute care minimization. Data were from baseline of the BEACON study (N = 351). UVL was ≤40 copies/mL. Acute care minimization was defined as no ER visits and/or hospitalizations in 6 months. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regression were implemented (N = 351). Moderate syndemic burden was associated with viral suppression. Individuals with main partner caregivers had 35% higher likelihood of viral suppression than individuals whose main supporters were neither kin nor main partners (adjusted point-prevalence rate ratio [APR] = 1.35; 95% CI [1.05, 1.74]). Surprisingly, individuals with more health-related support were more likely to use acute care than individuals with less health-related support (pInteraction analyses showed that physical function modified the relationship between main supporter type and acute care minimization. Results suggest that social support receipt was not consistently associated with HIV medical outcomes. Conversely, higher syndemic burden may have facilitated positive outcomes through necessitating increased rates of health care engagement. Health care professionals should elicit discussion of social support to strengthen PLHIVs' and their supporters' relationships to improve their health. Results highlight the need for culturally tailored interventions to improve HIV medical outcomes among African American PLHIV substance users.

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and performance of medical staff of teaching healthcare settings about hepatitis B and C in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Ataei

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Due to excessive contact with patients, a paramedic-educated society is expected to have an optimal level of knowledge, attitude, and performance related to viral hepatitis. Our results from the checklists showed that medical personnel are not appropriately aware of viral hepatitis and their performance, too, is not satisfactory. Further continuous training is required and there needs to be more emphasis on actions regarding behaviors with high risk of infection transmission.

  5. The Secret Drama at the Patient's Bedside-Refusal of Treatment Because of the Practitioner's Ethnic Identity: The Medical Staff 's Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Keshet, Yael

    2018-04-01

    Patients' refusal of treatment based on the practitioner's ethnic identity reveals a clash of values: neutrality in medicine versus patient-centered care. Taking the Israeli-Palestinian conflict into account, this article aims at examining Israeli health care professionals' points of view concerning patients' refusal of treatment because of a practitioner's ethnic identity. Fifty in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 managers and 40 health care professionals, Jewish and Arab, employed at 11 public hospitals. Most refusal incidents recorded are unidirectional: Jewish patients refusing to be treated by Arab practitioners. Refusals are usually directed toward nurses and junior medical staff members, especially if recognizable as religious Muslims. Refusals are often initiated by the patients' relatives and occur more frequently during periods of escalation in the conflict. The structural competency approach can be applied to increase awareness of the role of social determinants in shaping patients' ethnic-based treatment refusals and to improve the handling of such incidents.

  6. 影响医务人员医学伦理审查认知的因素分析%Analysis of the Influential Factors of Medical Staff's Cognition on Medical Ethics Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娟; 孙昌林; 张静; 程雨蒙; 左玉玲

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the influential factors of medical staff's cognition on medical ethics review in Wuhan municipal medical institutions,and thus to provide suggestions for strengthening the ethical construction.Methods:Aquestionnaire survey was conducted among medical staff.Chi-square test and Logistic regression method were performed to analyze the influential factors of medical staff's cognition on medical ethics review.Results:The results showed that medical staff's cognition on medical ethics review was affected by the technical tide,education background,whether had received ethical education,the cognition on ethics committees and whether the medical institution had established ethics committee.With higher technical titles,they thought more necessity to establish ethics committees and conduct ethical review of the clinical applications of new technology and new business.Those with higher technical titles and had read the ethical propaganda materials thought it more necessary to conduct ethical review of the clinical application of new technology and new business and the ethical review of biomedical research involved human beings.Conclusions:The medical institution should embody the establishment and standardization of ethical committees into the hospital assessment management system,as a necessary condition for the application of research projects and achievement awards.Also,it should conduct medical ethics training for all medical staff.Only those passed the examination can enter into the research and clinical operation with certificates,which can protect the medical ethics education into practice.It should strengthen the medical staff's cognition on ethical review,constantly innovate the operation rules and management system based on following the basic ethical review principles,and constantly improve the medical ethical review mechanism.%目的 分析影响武汉市级医疗机构医务人员医学伦理审查认知的因素,为加强

  7. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  8. African Journals Online: Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 167 ... African Journal of AIDS Research (AJAR) is a peer-reviewed ... The African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies is an international ... The Journal has been produced through the efforts of Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and the African .... in basic and clinical medical sciences as well as dentistry.

  9. Integrating team resource management program into staff training improves staff's perception and patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation: the experience in a university-affiliated medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Chi; Jerng, Jih-Shuin; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Huang, Szu-Fen; Liu, Yueh-Ping; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2014-08-11

    The process involved in organ procurement and transplantation is very complex that requires multidisciplinary coordination and teamwork. To prevent error during the processes, teamwork education and training might play an important role. We wished to evaluate the efficacy of implementing a Team Resource Management (TRM) program on patient safety and the behaviors of the team members involving in the process. We implemented a TRM training program for the organ procurement and transplantation team members of the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), a teaching medical center in Taiwan. This 15-month intervention included TRM education and training courses for the healthcare workers, focused group skill training for the procurement and transplantation team members, video demonstration and training, and case reviews with feedbacks. Teamwork culture was evaluated and all procurement and transplantation cases were reviewed to evaluate the application of TRM skills during the actual processes. During the intervention period, a total of 34 staff members participated the program, and 67 cases of transplantations were performed. Teamwork framework concept was the most prominent dimension that showed improvement from the participants for training. The team members showed a variety of teamwork behaviors during the process of procurement and transplantation during the intervention period. Of note, there were two potential donors with a positive HIV result, for which the procurement processed was timely and successfully terminated by the team. None of the recipients was transplanted with an infected organ. No error in communication or patient identification was noted during review of the case records. Implementation of a Team Resource Management program improves the teamwork culture as well as patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation.

  10. The Performance of New Accrual Accounting Plan in Tehran University of Medical Sciences from Financial Staff Perspective: A Cross-sectional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mahboub Ahari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and objectives : Accrual Accounting System was developed to determine the actual cost of organizational performance. This type of accounting approach is adopted as a main control lever for development and implementation of operational budget within public organizations. Since medical universities play a significant role in society's health and the major part of the country’s budget is devoted to it, the study was accomplished to study the main findings of Iranian New Financial Plan in a governmental medical university. Study will provide better insight on how the plan could meet supposed objectives. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 46 accounting staffs of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS were selected by accidental sampling and studied by using a 22-item questionnaire. Respondents were asked to answer the questions about how the plan was performed in their departments and whether it was a success or a failure. We used T-Test and Analysis of Variance for mean comparison. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. Results: Most of the respondents were male (52.2% and graduated with bachelor degree in accounting and 65% of the respondents had at least a little knowledge of accrual accounting fundamentals. The study results showed that most of the respondents implied that the outcomes of the implemented plan were satisfying. Respondents who were graduated in financial majors had higher satisfaction rate than others. Conclusion: The role of a comprehensive information system as an underlying and challenging necessity should be emphasized in accrual accounting system. Performance based budgeting system as a frequently focused program in Iranian socio-economic public organizations and Iran’s Ministry of Health and Medical Education should be fitted with the settlement of new financial plan.

  11. Competency-based Education and Training of medical staff. A Programm of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach: Concept – Implementation – Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasske, Eva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the Medical Academy Waldbreitbach is to connect individual and organisational requirements in order to promote an appropriate and multi-locational development of medical competency in the face of the continuously evolving challenges of clinical practice. Integral processes in this are the reduction of organisational learning barriers and the successive integration of competency-oriented learning events in the structures of personnel and organisational development. The modular system for the further development of doctors’ skills serves here as a supplementary and recommendation system for both existing curricula and those defined by regulatory organisations and professional associations.Methods: The Medical Academy’s modular system has a two-dimensional structure. In addition to the axis of biography orientation, the model orients itself around issues relating to the needs of a doctor in any individual professional position, as well as with whom he comes into contact and where his primary challenges lie. In order to achieve better integration in day-to-day routine and a needs-specific orientation of content, the modular system provides a combination of “one, two or three day and two- three- or four-hour training units” depending upon the topic. The transfer of experiential knowledge with the aid of practical exercises is a central element of the didactic model.Results: Through the combined use of summative and formative assessment, the significance of a dialogue-orientated approach in both planning and in the organisational process was highlighted. In feedback discussions and quantitative evaluation sheets, participants identified in particular cross-generational knowledge sharing as a central element for the development of personal values alongside the interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge. The combination of specialist and interdisciplinary topics, for example on team processes or communication, is frequently

  12. Understanding the types of fraud in claims to South African medical schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legotlo, T G; Mutezo, A

    2018-03-28

    Medical schemes play a significant role in funding private healthcare in South Africa (SA). However, the sector is negatively affected by the high rate of fraudulent claims. To identify the types of fraudulent activities committed in SA medical scheme claims. A cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted, adopting a case study strategy. A sample of 15 employees was purposively selected from a single medical scheme administration company in SA. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from study participants. A thematic analysis of the data was done using ATLAS.ti software (ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development, Germany). The study population comprised the 17 companies that administer medical schemes in SA. Data were collected from 15 study participants, who were selected from the medical scheme administrator chosen as a case study. The study found that medical schemes were defrauded in numerous ways. The perpetrators of this type of fraud include healthcare service providers, medical scheme members, employees, brokers and syndicates. Medical schemes are mostly defrauded by the submission of false claims by service providers and syndicates. Fraud committed by medical scheme members encompasses the sharing of medical scheme benefits with non-members (card farming) and non-disclosure of pre-existing conditions at the application stage. The study concluded that perpetrators of fraud have found several ways of defrauding SA medical schemes regarding claims. Understanding and identifying the types of fraud events facing medical schemes is the initial step towards establishing methods to mitigate this risk. Future studies should examine strategies to manage fraudulent medical scheme claims.

  13. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  14. Medical care employment in the United States, 1968 to 1993: The importance of health sector jobs for African Americans and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, D U; Lewontin, J P; Woolhandler, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the social and economic impact of health sector employment. US medical care employment was analyzed for each year between 1968 and 1993, with data from the March Current Population Survey. Between 1968 and 1993, medical care employment grew from 4.32 million to 11.40 million persons, accounting for 5.7% of all jobs in 1968 and 8.4% in 1993. Today, one seventh of employed women work in medical care; they hold 78% of medical care jobs. One fifth of all employed African-American women work in medical care. African-Americans hold 15.5% of jobs in the health sector: they hold 24.1% of the jobs in nursing homes, 15.9% of the jobs in hospitals, but only 5.6% of the jobs in practitioners' offices. Hispanics constitute 6.4% of medical care employees. Real wages rose 25% to 50% between 1968 and 1993 for most health occupations. Wages of registered nurses rose 86%; physicians' incomes rose 22%. Wages of nursing home workers were far lower than those of comparable hospital workers, and the gap has widened. In 1993, 11.7% of all medical care workers lacked health insurance and 597 000 lived in poverty. Hospital cuts and the continuing neglect of long-term care exacerbate unemployment and poverty among women and African Americans.

  15. The effect of quality circles on job satisfaction and quality of work-life of staff in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Karampourian, Arezou; Beiranvand, Shoorangiz; Pournia, Yadollah

    2013-10-01

    Quality circles, as a participatory management technique, offer one alternative for dealing with frustration and discontent of today's workers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of implementation of quality circles on nurses' quality of work-life and job satisfaction. In this study, two emergency medical services (EMS) of Hamedan province were selected and randomly assigned as the experimental and control groups. After the experimental group was trained and quality circles were established in this group, the levels of quality of work-life and job satisfaction were measured in the two groups. Then, the statistical analyses were performed using t-test. After the intervention, the results showed significant differences between the scores of motivational factors (p=0.001), the total scores of job satisfaction (p=0.003), and the scores of some quality of work life (QWL) conceptual categories including the use and development of capacities (p=0.008), the total space of life (p=0.003), and the total scores of QWL (p=0.031) in the experimental group compared to those in the control group. This study confirms the effectiveness of quality circles in improving quality of work-life and job satisfaction of nurses working in EMS, and offers their application as a management method that can be used by EMS managers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Medical students' experiences of professional lapses and patient rights abuses in a South African health sciences faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivian, Lauraine M H; Naidu, Claudia S; Keikelame, Mpoe J; Irlam, James

    2011-10-01

    To elicit South African medical students' experiences of witnessing patient rights abuses and professional lapses during their clinical training in order to inform an appropriate and effective response. During June and July 2009 at the University of Cape Town Faculty of Health Sciences, the authors surveyed 223 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-year medical students in selected clinical rotations concerning abuses they had observed. Volunteers were later interviewed individually. The authors coded interview transcripts for key themes using a constant-comparative grounded theory approach. Of 223 students surveyed, 183 (82%) responded, 130 (71%) of whom reported witnessing patient rights abuses and professional lapses, including physical abuse (38%), verbal abuse (37%), disrespect for patients' dignity (25%), and inadequately informing patients about their treatment (25%). Students attributed abuse to stressed health workers, overburdened facilities, and disempowered patients. Most students who witnessed abuse (59%) did not actively respond, and 64% of survey respondents felt unprepared or uncertain about challenging abuses in the future. Interviews with 28 students yielded detailed accounts of the abuses witnessed and of students' emotional reactions, coping strategies, and responses. Most students did not report abuses; they feared reprisal or doubted it would make a difference. This study demonstrates the disjunction between what these students were taught about human rights and ethics and what they witnessed in clinical settings. The high prevalence of patient rights abuses experienced by these students highlights the need to align medical ethics and human rights with medico-legal protocols in theory and clinical practice.

  17. Examination of cross contamination risks between hospitals by external medical staff via cross-sectional intercept survey of hand hygiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffers, Hank

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Work in hospitals is supported by contributions of life sciences industry representatives (IR in various ways of fields. Close contact between them, caretakers and patients is unavoidable, even in situations where hygiene is critical.The present study investigates whether IR display comparable levels of and methicillin-resistant (MRSA contamination after being exposed to a shared environment for a minimum of 4 hours.Material and methods: An anonymous survey to sample a group of healthcare professionals for traces of fingertip contamination was performed. We used dip slides ( and MRSA to evaluate professionals at the medical exhibition MEDICA. After applying exclusion criteria 298 participants remained valid, they consisted of 208 industry representatives, 49 nurses and 41 physicians.Results: IR where engaged in hospitals, operating rooms and outpatient clinics (82%, 41.8%, 51.9% respectively. 65.9% of IR (vs. 48.8% physicians and 40.8% nurses carried a microbiological burden ≥10 CFU (colony forming units. Neither (≥10 CFU in IR (40.9% did show statistical differences in contamination patterns in comparison to physicians (43.9%, p=0.346 and nurses (36.7%, p=0.878 nor did MRSA (physicians p=0.579, nurses p=0.908. We were unable to differentiate transient from pre-existing permanent colonization.Conclusion: Exposure to the same environment may result in similar hand contamination patterns of IR when compared caregivers. This supports the concern that industry representatives can cause cross infection between hospitals and hygiene sensitive areas like operation room, intensive care unit and central sterilization units particularly. Further study is required to clarify whether pre-existing bacterial colonization is an influencing factor and how industry is taking care of this to create a safe working environment for their employees, the customers and ultimately the patients.

  18. Effect of Shift Work on the Frequency of Depression in Nursing Staff of Yazd University of Medical Sciences

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    Gholam Hossein Halvani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression as a disorder is relatively common in all societies; several factors are involved in depression development, that shift work is one of these factors. This study compared the frequency of depression in different shifts of nurses in hospitals of Yazd University of medical sciences. Materials & Methods: This study is a descriptive analytical study. Based on statistical methods, 150 nurses participated in this study. The research tool was a questionnaire that included 15 personal questions and 21 questions related to Beck test. The results were analysed by SPSS software. Results: 13.3% of all subjects were males and 86.7% were females. Results showed that, there is no significant relationship between gender, education, type of job, employment status and satisfaction levels of income with depression. Marital status (P-Value = 0.009 and F = 6.93, shift work (day working and shift work (P-Value = 0.032 and F = 1.11, job satisfaction (P-Value = 0.000 and F = 7.641 and the satisfaction of the employer (P-Value = 0.001 and F = 5.414 were significantly associated with depression. 3.49% of the nurses were in normal status, 7.26% had mild depression, 3.9% required consultation with the psychiatrist,% 7.8% suffered from moderate depression, 75.4% from severe depression and 3.1% from very severe depression. Conclusion: It seems that shift work can not cause depression alone, but depression is the result of the interaction of several factors.

  19. Engaging staff to improve quality and safety in an austere medical environment: a case-control study in two Sierra Leonean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael A; Chima, Adaora M; Sampson, John B; Jackson, Eric V; Koka, Rahul; Marx, Megan K; Kamara, Thaim B; Ogbuagu, Onyebuchi U; Lee, Benjamin H

    2015-08-01

    Inadequate observance of basic processes in patient care such as patient monitoring and documentation practices are potential impediments to the timely diagnoses and management of patients. These gaps exist in low resource settings such as Sierra Leone and can be attributed to a myriad of factors such as workforce and technology deficiencies. In the study site, only 12.4% of four critical vital signs were documented in the pre-intervention period. Implement a failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to improve documentation of four patient vital signs: temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate and respiratory rate. FMEA was implemented among a subpopulation of health workers who are involved in monitoring and documenting patient vital signs. Pre- and post-FMEA monitoring and documentation practice were compared with a control site. Participants identified a four-step process to monitoring and documenting vital signs, three categories of failure modes and four potential solutions. Based on 2100 patient days of documentation compliance data from 147 patients between July and November 2012, staff members at the study site were 1.79 times more likely to document all four patient vital signs in the post-implementation period (95% CI [1.35, 2.38]). FMEA is a feasible and effective strategy for improving quality and safety in an austere medical environment. Documentation compliance improved at the intervention facility. To evaluate the scalability and sustainability of this approach, programs targeting the development of these types of process improvement skills in local staff should be evaluated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  20. Implementation of the patient-centered medical home in the Veterans Health Administration: associations with patient satisfaction, quality of care, staff burnout, and hospital and emergency department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karin M; Helfrich, Christian; Sun, Haili; Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Dolan, Emily; Taylor, Leslie; Wong, Edwin; Maynard, Charles; Hernandez, Susan E; Sanders, William; Randall, Ian; Curtis, Idamay; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementing the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) initiative aims to improve health outcomes through team-based care, improved access, and care management. To track progress and evaluate outcomes at all VHA primary care clinics, we developed and validated a method to assess PCMH implementation. To create an index that measures the extent of PCMH implementation, describe variation in implementation, and examine the association between the implementation index and key outcomes. We conducted an observational study using data on more than 5.6 million veterans who received care at 913 VHA hospital-based and community-based primary care clinics and 5404 primary care staff from (1) VHA clinical and administrative databases, (2) a national patient survey administered to a weighted random sample of veterans who received outpatient care from June 1 to December 31, 2012, and (3) a survey of all VHA primary care staff in June 2012. Composite scores were constructed for 8 core domains of PACT: access, continuity, care coordination, comprehensiveness, self-management support, patient-centered care and communication, shared decision making, and team-based care. Patient satisfaction, rates of hospitalization and emergency department use, quality of care, and staff burnout. Fifty-three items were included in the PACT Implementation Progress Index (Pi2). Compared with the 87 clinics in the lowest decile of the Pi2, the 77 sites in the top decile exhibited significantly higher patient satisfaction (9.33 vs 7.53; P hospitalization rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (4.42 vs 3.68 quarterly admissions for veterans 65 years or older per 1000 patients; P < .001), and lower emergency department use (188 vs 245 visits per 1000 patients; P < .001). The extent of PCMH implementation, as measured by the Pi2, was highly associated with important outcomes for both

  1. A national house-staff audit of medical prophylaxis in medical patients for the PREVENTion of Venous ThromboEmbolism (PREVENT-VTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamali, H; Suliman, A M; Zaid, H; O'Donoghue, E; Burke, A; Suliman, A W; Salem, M; O'Toole, A; Yearoo, A Ibrahim; Javid, S; Ullah, I; Bolger, K; Dunican, E; McCullagh, B; Curtin, D; Lonergan, M T; Dillon, L; Murphy, A W; Gaine, S

    2013-01-01

    We established a national audit to assess the thromboprophylaxis rate for venous thromoembolism (VTE) in at risk medical patients in acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland and to determine whether the use of stickers to alert physicians regarding thromboprophylaxis would double the rate prophylaxis in a follow-up audit. 651 acute medical admission patients in the first audit and 524 in the second re-audit were recruited. The mean age was 66.5 yrs with similar numbers of male and female patients and 265 (22.6%) patients were active smokers. The first and second audits identified 549 (84%) and 487 (93%) of patients at-risk for VTE respectively. Of the at-risk patients, 163 (29.7%) and 132 (27.1%) received LMWH in the first and second audit respectively. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was instigated in 75 (13.6%) patients in the first and 86 (17.7%) patients in the second audit. The placement of stickers in patient charts didn't produce a significant increase in the number of at risk patients treated in the second audit. There is unacceptably low adherence to the ACCP guidelines in Ireland and more complex intervention than chart reminders are required to improve compliance.

  2. African-American and Latina Women Seeking Public Health Services: Cultural Beliefs regarding Pregnancy, including Medication-taking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Dalia Sanchez, MD, MCP, MHA, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe cultural beliefs and medication-taking-behavior about pregnancy in African-American and Latina women. Design: qualitative study using phenomenological methodology; face-to-face, semi structured interviews and focus group. Thematic analysis was done to obtain themes consistent with the research objective. Setting: Maricopa County, Arizona, Department of Public-health Programs, November 2008 through April 2009.Participants: women seeking public-health services in the greater Phoenix, Arizona.Results: fifteen adult women representing two ethnic groups (seven African-Americans and eight Latinas participated. Themes derived from the interview data included: “The Dilemma: To Become or Not to Become Pregnant;” “The Ideal Stress-free World: Support System;” “Changing Worlds: Wanting Dependency;” and “The Health care System: Disconnection from Pregnancy to Postpartum.”Conclusions: based on the cultural themes: 1. pregnancies were not planned; 2. healthy life-style changes were not likely to occur during pregnancy; 3. basic facts about the biology of sexual intercourse and pregnancy were not understood, and there was no usage of any preconceptional or prenatal medications; and 4. professional health care was not desired or considered necessary (except during delivery. These cultural beliefs can contribute to negative birth outcomes, and need to be considered by pharmacists and other health-care providers. The information gained from this study can guide the implementation of educational programs developed by pharmacists that are more sensitive to the cultural beliefs and points of view of these particular women. Such programs would thus be more likely to be favorably received and utilized.

  3. Conocimientos sobre shigellosis y su manejo epidemiológico en personal médico Knowledges on shigellosis and its epidemiological management in medical staff

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    Alvin Mena Cantero

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la Shigella como agente causal de episodios diarreicos con sangre ha sido el germen aislado con mayor frecuencia en los laboratorios clínicos, no obstante, el número de casos reportados por el Sistema de Enfermedades de Declaración Obligatoria es inferior, lo que demuestra un subregistro en su notificación. Objetivos: elevar el nivel de conocimientos de médicos y alumnos internos sobre la shigellosis. Métodos: se realizó un estudio cuasi experimental antes-después, de una intervención educativa sobre la shigellosis y su manejo epidemiológico. La investigación se hizo en los policlínicos comunitarios docentes "Marcio Manduley" y "Nguyen Van Troi" en el período de enero a junio de 2008. La muestra quedó conformada por 64 médicos, de ellos 21 eran alumnos internos. Todos expresaron su consentimiento para participar en la investigación. Se aplicó la prueba no paramétrica ji cuadrada con un nivel de significación de p Introduction: Shigella as causal agent of diarrheic episodes with presence of blood has been the more frequent isolated agent in clinical laboratories; however, the number of cases reported by System of Diseases of Mandatory Statement is lower demonstrating a sub-registry of its notification. Objectives: to confirm the knowledge level of medical staff on the Shigellosis. Methods: a quasi-experimental study was conducted before and after a educational intervention on the Shigellosis and its epidemiological management. Research was made in the "Marcio Manduley" and "Nguyen Van Troi" Teaching and Community polyclinics from January to June, 2008. Sample included 43 physicians and 21 internal students in which the intervention was applied. Information was obtained by application of anonymous questionnaire. Results: before intervention it was possible to verify that taxonomic knowledges were satisfactory in only 9 polled persons for a 14,06%, after it, the figure of persons with a good level of knowledges

  4. Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour intentions for three bowel management practices in intensive care: effects of a targeted protocol implementation for nursing and medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Serena; Lam, Lawrence T; McInnes, Elizabeth; Elliott, Doug; Hardy, Jennifer; Middleton, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Bowel management protocols have the potential to minimize complications for critically ill patients. Targeted implementation can increase the uptake of protocols by clinicians into practice. The theory of planned behaviour offers a framework in which to investigate clinicians' intention to perform the behaviour of interest. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of implementing a bowel management protocol on intensive care nursing and medical staffs' knowledge, attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, behaviour intentions, role perceptions and past behaviours in relation to three bowel management practices. A descriptive before and after survey using a self-administered questionnaire sent to nursing and medical staff working within three intensive care units before and after implementation of our bowel management protocol (pre: May - June 2008; post: Feb - May 2009). Participants had significantly higher knowledge scores post-implementation of our protocol (pre mean score 17.6; post mean score 19.3; p = 0.004). Post-implementation there was a significant increase in: self-reported past behaviour (pre mean score 5.38; post mean score 7.11; p = 0.002) and subjective norms scores (pre mean score 3.62; post mean score 4.18; p = 0.016) for bowel assessment; and behaviour intention (pre mean score 5.22; post mean score 5.65; p = 0.048) for administration of enema. This evaluation, informed by the theory of planned behaviour, has provided useful insights into factors that influence clinician intentions to perform evidence-based bowel management practices in intensive care. Addressing factors such as knowledge, attitudes and beliefs can assist in targeting implementation strategies to positively affect clinician behaviour change. Despite an increase in clinicians' knowledge scores, our implementation strategy did not, however, significantly change clinician behaviour intentions for all three bowel management practices. Further research is

  5. Understanding the types of fraud in claims to South African medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional qualitative methodology was adopted in the study, as the phenomenon ... To identify the types of fraudulent activities committed in SA medical scheme claims. ... and Banking Research Ethics Review Committee (ref. no. 2016/.

  6. Academic Guidance for Undergraduate Students in a South African Medical School: Can we guide them all?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho P Jama

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institutions, including medical schools, still grapple with the challenge of poor academic performance of students. Some studies report the positive results of providing academic guidance for common challenges such as poor and/or ineffective time management, study methods, test- and exam-taking techniques and management, and the high academic workload of undergraduate medical students. However, limited detailed insights and understanding of medical students who experience more complex challenges are available.  This study was conducted at a medical school in South Africa to determine undergraduate medical students’ perceptions of factors affecting their academic performance. A total of 89 semi-structured interviews were held with undergraduate medical students who were identified as having academic problems between 2012 and 2015. According to the results, more blacks, males and first- and second year students experienced poor academic performance. Prominent findings included the harsh realities and implications of lack of accommodation for black students; how poor academic performance can lead to an array of other social and psychological problems, such as withdrawal of bursaries and negative achievement emotions that some students experience. Compared to the usual objective measures of individual ability, the rich qualitative data of cases presented in this study reveal critical, real insights and understanding of students’ challenges from their own perspective.

  7. Methadone maintenance treatment program in prisons from the perspective of medical and non-medical prison staff: a qualitative study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Ghobad; Farnia, Marzieh; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Moazen, Babak; Rahmani, Khaled

    2015-03-12

    As one of the most important components of harm reduction strategy for high-risk groups, following the HIV epidemics, Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) has been initiated in prisoners since 2003. In this paper, we aimed to assess the advantages and shortcomings of the MMT program from the perspective of people who were involved with the delivery of prison healthcare in Iran. On the basis of grounded theory and through conducting 14 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), 7 FGDs among physicians, consultants, experts, and 7 FGDs among directors and managers of prisons (n= 140) have been performed. The respondents were asked about positive and negative elements of the MMT program in Iranian prisons. This study included a total of 48 themes, of which 22 themes were related to advantages and the other 26 were about shortcomings of MMT programs in the prisons. According to participants' views "reduction of illegal drug use and high-risk injection", "reduction of potentially high-risk behaviors" and "making positive attitudes" were the main advantages of MMT in prisons, while issues such as "inaccurate implementation", "lack of skilled manpower" and "poor care after release from prison" were among the main shortcomings of MMT program. MMT program in Iran's prisons has achieved remarkable success in the field of harm reduction, but to obtain much more significant results, its shortcomings and weaknesses must be also taken into account by policy-makers. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  8. Measurements and evaluation of the risks due to external radiation exposures and to intake of activated elements for operational staff engaged in the maintenance of medical cyclotrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Parisi, R; Todde, S; De Felice, P; Savi, A; Pepe, A; Mrskova, A

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the activation phenomena and to evaluate the risk of external exposure and intake doses for the maintenance staff of two medical cyclotrons. Two self-shielded cyclotrons are currently operating in the facility for the routine production of (11)C and (18)F. Four radiochemistry laboratories are linked to the cyclotrons by means of shielded radioisotope delivery lines. Radiopharmaceuticals are prepared both for the PET Diagnostic Department, where four CT-PET scanners are operating with a mean patient workload of 40 d(-1) and for [(18)F]FDG external distribution, to provide radiopharmaceuticals for other institutions. In spite of the fact that air contamination inside the radiochemistry laboratories during the synthesis represents the largest 'slice of the pie' in the evaluation of annual intake dose, potential contamination due to the activated particulate, generated during cyclotron irradiation by micro-corrosion of targets and other components potentially struck by the proton beam and generated neutrons, should be considered. In this regard, the most plausible long-lived (T(1/2) > 30 d) radioisotopes formed are: (97)Tc, (56)Co, (57)Co, (58)Co, (60)Co, (49)V, (55)Fe, (109)Cd, (65)Zn and (22)Na. The results for the operating personnel survey has revealed only low-level contamination for (65)Zn in one test, together with minor (18)F intake, probably due to the environmental dispersion of the radioisotope during the [(18)F]FDG synthesis.

  9. Data on motivational factors of the medical and nursing staff of a Greek Public Regional General Hospital during the economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Marianna; Konstantinos, Mitosis; Talias, Michael A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, we present the data related to motivational factors given by the medical (n=118) and nursing (n=217) staff, of a Greek Public General Hospital during a period of financial austerity. The data collection has been based on a structured self-administrable questionnaire which was used in a previous survey in Cyprus (Chatzicharalambous, 2015) [1]. The incentives-rewards included amount in a total to 11 (both financial and non-financial). The data contains 4 parts: (1) demographics, (2) assessment of the degree to which this hospital provided such incentives-rewards, (3) personal assessment of the participants about the significance of these incentive-rewards and (4) to what extent these incentives-rewards have increased or decreased over the last five years due to the economic crisis. The sample was analyzed as a whole on demographics and by a professional subgroup (doctors and nurses) for the other three parts. The data include quantitative tables for all parts. Finally include three tables contain multilevel models.

  10. Data on motivational factors of the medical and nursing staff of a Greek Public Regional General Hospital during the economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Charalambous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the data related to motivational factors given by the medical (n=118 and nursing (n=217 staff, of a Greek Public General Hospital during a period of financial austerity. The data collection has been based on a structured self-administrable questionnaire which was used in a previous survey in Cyprus (Chatzicharalambous, 2015 [1]. The incentives-rewards included amount in a total to 11 (both financial and non-financial. The data contains 4 parts: (1 demographics, (2 assessment of the degree to which this hospital provided such incentives-rewards, (3 personal assessment of the participants about the significance of these incentive-rewards and (4 to what extent these incentives-rewards have increased or decreased over the last five years due to the economic crisis. The sample was analyzed as a whole on demographics and by a professional subgroup (doctors and nurses for the other three parts. The data include quantitative tables for all parts. Finally include three tables contain multilevel models.

  11. [Work-to-family influence and social supports: job satisfaction in a north-Italy public health organization --differences between medical and administrative staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lara; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in the well-being at work has grown considerably, also considering the latest law directives. Several scholars have devoted particular attention to the topic of the work-to-family influence and of social supports, as elements able to affect the perceived well-being. The well-being in health care has to consider the particular nature of work and the relevant relational dimensions that require special attention for the emotional side. The research was promoted by the Committee for Equal Opportunities of a public health organization in the North-West Italy. Referring to the job demands-resources theoretical model, this study investigated the role of organizational and family supports, work-to-family spillover (positive and negative) and family workload as possible determinants of job satisfaction, intended as an indicator of psychological well-being at work. Respondents to the questionnaire are 541 (55% of the total employees), their average age is 43 and they are mostly women (80%). Data analysis showed the central role of supervisors supports, of the co-workers supports and, to a lesser extent, the role of the work-to-family spillover in influencing job satisfaction. Moreover, significant differences between medical and administrative staff were detected. The centrality of supports, especially those of supervisors in determining job satisfaction, is in line with studies indicating that a supportive leadership and a family-friendly culture can facilitate the arise of positive outcomes for both workers and organizations.

  12. Virtual medical plant modeling based on L-system | Ding | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... aid of graphics and PlantVR, we implemented the plant shape and 3-D structure's reconstruction. Conclusion: Three-dimensional structure virtual plant growth model based on time- controlled L-system has been successfully established. Keywords: Drug R&D, toxicity, medical plants, fractals; L-system; quasi binary-trees.

  13. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education; Establishing financial markets in Ethiopia: the environmental foundation, challenges and opportunities ... Ethiopian Journal of Education and Sciences; Gender Relations in ... South African Actuarial Journal.

  14. Alienation and engagement in postgraduate training at a South African medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Juanita; Cilliers, Francois; Van Heusden, Martie; Wasserman, Elizabeth; Burch, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of contextual factors, such as the learning environment and sociocultural characteristics of the student, are becoming increasingly evident. Mann [2001. Alternative perspectives on the student experience: Alienation and engagement. Stud High Educ 26(1):7-19.] proposed that all learning experiences can be viewed as either alienating or engaging and Case expanded on this work. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of alienation or engagement as experienced by residents in anatomical pathology at one South African university. A cross-sectional case study, with 16 semi-structured interviews was conducted. Residents were categorised as either alienated or engaged, based mainly on workplace experiences. Four relevant dimensions were identified; individual, home, workplace and institution. The personal attributes, strategies for coping and reasons for choosing pathology of alienated residents differed from those with engaged experiences. Poor socioeconomic background and schooling did not lead to predominantly alienating experiences, but this group still lacked some generic skills. In the workplace, two main factors resulting in alienated experiences were the interaction between residents and consultants and residents' comprehension of workplace-based learning. We present a simple model which may be used to identify factors that engage and alienate students in the learning experience in the workplace-based setting. Addressing these factors can contribute towards a more engaging experience for all residents.

  15. Exigencias laborales psicológicas percibidas por médicos especialistas hospitalarios Job stress perceived by hospital medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Escribà-Agüir

    2002-12-01

    muerte, sentirse responsable de vidas humanas, incertidumbre ante el diagnóstico y el tratamiento y otros con la organización del trabajo (sobrecarga de trabajo y falta de personal.Objective: To identify the psychosocial risk factors related to psychological demands perceived by specialist physicians from six public hospitals in the province of Valencia in Spain. Methods: A qualitative study was carried out. The population studied comprised the hospitals' specialist medical staff (Oncology, Internal Medicine, Traumatology, Radiology and Intensive Care. A trained interviewer performed 47 individual, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. To select the participants, the following structural variables were taken into account: gender, age, family responsibilities, medical specialty, professional standing, length of service, and type of contract. Interviews were tape recorded and subsequently transcribed. Finally, the content of the interviews was analyzed. Results: The main psychosocial risk factors mentioned by the participants were workload and lack of staff, mainly due to the characteristics of work organization in the hospital. Another job stressor was daily contact with suffering and death, and feeling responsible for human life. Other significant job stressors were interpersonal relations in the work environment, in the case of patients' relatives, uncertainty about diagnosis and treatment, the possibility of being sued for malpractice, and communicating bad news. Conclusions: Hospital physicians report a large number of psychosocial risk factors. Some involve the characteristics of the medical profession (contact with suffering and death, responsibility for human life, uncertainty about diagnosis and treatment and others concern work organization (workload and staffing shortages.

  16. A Pilot Trial Examining African American and White Responses to Algorithm-Guided Smoking Cessation Medication Selection in Persons Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Pamela; McClernon, F Joseph; Burkholder, Greer; Mugavero, Michael J; Willig, James; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Cropsey, Karen L

    2017-07-01

    Algorithm-based treatments (AT) may be an effective clinical tool to aid HIV clinicians in prescribing pharmacotherapy to increase smoking cessation among people living with HIV (PLWH). Initial results from AT indicated significant increases in abstinence self-efficacy and medication utilization and declines in cigarettes smoked per day across time. Given historical racial disparities, it is unclear if both African Americans and White smokers would benefit equally from this type of intervention. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine racial differences in response to AT guided smoking cessation for African American and White smokers living with HIV. One hundred PLWH smokers (n = 100) were randomized to receive either AT guided smoking cessation or Treatment as Usual (TAU) which consisted of instructing participants to talk to a provider about smoking cessation assistance when ready to make a quit attempt. Participants were African American (75%) and White (25%) and majority men (71%) who had never been married (56%). African Americans smoked fewer cigarettes and were more likely to smoke mentholated cigarettes compared to White smokers at baseline. African Americans increased their use of other tobacco products (cigars/cigarillos) over time relative to White smokers. A significant interaction between race and quit goal was observed, with White smokers who reported complete abstinence as their goal having higher quit rates, while African Americans who reported a goal other than complete abstinence demonstrating higher quit rates. The increased use of cigars/cigarillos during quit attempts as well as having a goal other than complete abstinence should be considered when applying algorithm based interventions for PLWH African American smokers.

  17. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Fen; Jin, Jing-Fen; Feng, Xiu-Qin; Huang, Xin; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    .001). A 3-and-a-half-year intervention program on MAEs was confirmed to be effective. MAEs made by nursing staff can be reduced, but cannot be eliminated. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of multidiscipline collaboration among physicians, pharmacists, nurses, information engineers, and hospital administrators are pivotal to safety in medication administration. JCI accreditation may help health systems enhance the awareness and ability to prevent MAEs and achieve successful quality improvements.

  18. Improving medication safety and cardiovascular risk factor control to mitigate disparities in African-American kidney transplant recipients: Design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Cole

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of data analyzing the influence of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factor control on graft survival disparities in African-American kidney transplant recipients. Studies in the general population indicate that CVD risk factor control is poor in African-Americans, leading to higher rates of renal failure and major acute cardiovascular events. However, with the exception of hypertension, there is no data demonstrating similar results within transplant recipients. Recent analyses conducted by our investigator group indicate that CVD risk factors, especially diabetes, are poorly controlled in African-American recipients, which likely impacts graft loss. This study protocol describes a prospective interventional clinical trial with the goal of demonstrating improved medication safety and CVD risk factor control in adult solitary kidney transplant recipients at least one-year post-transplant with a functioning graft. This is a prospective, interventional, 6-month, pharmacist-led and technology enabled study in adult kidney transplant recipients with the goal of improving CVD risk factor outcomes by improving medication safety and patient self-efficacy. This papers describes the issues related to racial disparities in transplant, the details of this intervention and how we expect this intervention to improve CVD risk factor control in kidney transplant recipients, particularly within African-Americans.

  19. Time management in radiation oncology: evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during radiotherapy for prostate cancer: the DEGRO-QUIRO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilholz, L; Willner, J; Thiel, H-J; Zamboglou, N; Sack, H; Popp, W

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate resource requirements, the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) recorded the times needed for core procedures in the radio-oncological treatment of various cancer types within the scope of its QUIRO trial. The present study investigated the personnel and infrastructural resources required in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The investigation was carried out in the setting of definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer patients between July and October 2008 at two radiotherapy centers, both with well-trained staff and modern technical facilities at their disposal. Personnel attendance times and room occupancy times required for core procedures (modules) were each measured prospectively by two independently trained observers using time measurements differentiated on the basis of professional group (physician, physicist, and technician), 3D conformal (3D-cRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Total time requirements of 983 min for 3D-cRT and 1485 min for step-and-shoot IMRT were measured for the technician (in terms of professional group) in all modules recorded and over the entire course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer (72-76 Gy). Times needed for the medical specialist/physician were 255 min (3D-cRT) and 271 min (IMRT), times of the physicist were 181 min (3D-cRT) and 213 min (IMRT). The difference in time was significant, although variations in time spans occurred primarily as a result of various problems during patient treatment. This investigation has permitted, for the first time, a realistic estimation of average personnel and infrastructural requirements for core procedures in quality-assured definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The increased time needed for IMRT applies to the step-and-shoot procedure with verification measurements for each irradiation planning.

  20. 'The words will pass with the blowing wind': staff and parent views of the deferred consent process, with prior assent, used in an emergency fluids trial in two African hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassy Molyneux

    Full Text Available To document and explore the views and experiences of key stakeholders regarding the consent procedures of an emergency research clinical trial examining immediate fluid resuscitation strategies, and to discuss the implications for similar trials in future.A social science sub-study of the FEAST (Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy trial. Interviews were held with trial team members (n = 30, health workers (n = 15 and parents (n = 51 from two purposively selected hospitals in Soroti, Uganda, and Kilifi, Kenya.Overall, deferred consent with prior assent was seen by staff and parents as having the potential to protect the interests of both patients and researchers, and to avoid delays in starting treatment. An important challenge is that the validity of verbal assent is undermined when inadequate initial information is poorly understood. This concern needs to be balanced against the possibility that full prior consent on admission potentially causes harm through introducing delays. Full prior consent also potentially imposes worries on parents that clinicians are uncertain about how to proceed and that clinicians want to absolve themselves of any responsibility for the child's outcome (some parents' interpretation of the need for signed consent. Voluntariness is clearly compromised for both verbal assent and full prior consent in a context of such vulnerability and stress. Further challenges in obtaining verbal assent were: what to do in the absence of the household decision-maker (often the father; and how medical staff handle parents not giving a clear agreement or refusal.While the challenges identified are faced in all research in low-income settings, they are magnified for emergency trials by the urgency of decision making and treatment needs. Consent options will need to be tailored to particular studies and settings, and might best be informed by consultation with staff members and community representatives using a deliberative

  1. Attitudes and beliefs of South African medical students toward organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobnach, Sanju; Borkum, Megan; Millar, Alastair J W; Hoffman, Ross; Muller, Elmi; McCurdie, Fiona; Kahn, Delawir

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and analyse the attitudes and beliefs of medical students regarding organ donation, procurement, and transplantation. Medical students at the University of Cape Town were prospectively surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 346 study participants; the mean age was 21 (range 18-33) yr, 38% were male and 62% was female. Only 8% of respondents were registered donors; clinical and white students constituted the majority of this group. Of the 315 "non-donors," the main reason for not donating was "I have not really thought about organ donation" (59%). Most students (91%) would accept an artificial organ; and 87% and 52% of students would accept human and animal organs respectively. Muslim students (11%, preincarnation (18%, p=0.00) were less willing to accept human or animal organs. About 95% of respondents stated that they would like to learn more about transplantation and would keep information about it in their practice but only 18% of respondents knew where to find information for potential donors and recipients. Most students have a favorable attitude toward organ transplantation; religion and belief systems impact on willingness to receive organs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Chronic disease risk factors, healthy days and medical claims in South African employees presenting for health risk screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolbe-Alexander Tracy L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD accounts for more than a third (37% of all deaths in South Africa. However, this burden of disease can be reduced by addressing risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine the health and risk profile of South African employees presenting for health risk assessments and to measure their readiness to change and improve lifestyle behaviour. Methods Employees (n = 1954 from 18 companies were invited to take part in a wellness day, which included a health-risk assessment. Self-reported health behaviour and health status was recorded. Clinical measures included cholesterol finger-prick test, blood pressure and Body Mass Index (BMI. Health-related age was calculated using an algorithm incorporating the relative risk for all case mortality associated with smoking, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, BMI and cholesterol. Medical claims data were obtained from the health insurer. Results The mean percentage of participation was 26% (n = 1954 and ranged from 4% in transport to 81% in the consulting sector. Health-related age (38.5 ± 12.9 years was significantly higher than chronological age (34.9 ± 10.3 yrs (p Conclusion SA employees' health and lifestyle habits are placing them at increased risk for NCD's, suggesting that they may develop NCD's earlier than expected. Inter-sectoral differences for health-related age might provide insight into those companies which have the greatest need for interventions, and may also assist in predicting future medical expenditure. This study underscores the importance of determining the health and risk status of employees which could assist in identifying the appropriate interventions to reduce the risk of NCD's among employees.

  3. Reduction of levels of radiation exposure over patients and medical staff by using additional filters of copper and aluminum on the outputs of X-ray tubes in hemodynamic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, Guilherme L.; Müller, Felipe M.; Schuch, Luiz A.

    2013-01-01

    Radioprotection in hemodynamic services is extremely important. Decrease of total exposition time, better positioning of medical staff in the room, use of individual and collective protection equipment and shorter distance between the patient and the image intensifier tube are, among others, some ways to reduce the levels of radiation. It is noted that these possible forms of reducing the radiation exposition varies depending on the medical staff. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to reduce such levels of radiation exposition in a way apart from medical staffs. It is proposed, therefore, the use of additional filters on the output of the X-ray tube in three hemodynamic equipment from different generations: detector with a flat panel of amorphous selenium, image intensifier tube with charge coupled device, and image intensifier tube with video camera. In order to quantify the quality of the images generated, a simulator made of aluminum plates and other devices was set up, so it was possible to measure and compare the acquired images. Methods of images analysis (threshold, histogram, 3D surface) were used to measure the signal/noise ratio, the spatial resolution, the contrast and the definition of the signal area, thus doubts regarding the analysis of the images among observers (inter-observers) and even for a single observer (intra-observer) can be avoided. Ionization chambers were also used in order to quantify the doses of radiation that penetrated the skin of the patients with and without the use of the filters. In all cases was found an arrangement of filters that combines quality of the images with a significant reduction of the levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, concerning both the patient and the medical staff. (author)

  4. 'The nice thing about doctors is that you can sometimes get a day off school': an action research study to bring lived experiences from children, parents and hospice staff into medical students' preparation for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Jessica; Yardley, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    Patient and public involvement in healthcare is important to ensure services meet their needs and priorities. Increasingly, patient experiences are being used to educate healthcare professionals. The potential contribution to medical education of children and parents using hospice services has not yet been fully explored. (1) To explore perceptions of what medical students must learn to become 'good doctors' among children, parents and staff in a hospice. (2) To collaborate with children/parents and staff to develop educational materials based on their lived experiences for medical students. (3) To assess feasibility of student-led action research in a children's hospice to develop research skills. Prospective ethical approval received. Volunteer children (n=7), parents (n=5) and staff (n=6) were recruited from a children's hospice. Data were generated in audio-recorded semistructured focus groups, individual interviews and/or activity workshops. Participants discussed what newly qualified doctors' needed to care for children with life-limiting conditions. Audio data were transcribed and combined with visual data for thematic analysis. Findings were refined by participant feedback. This paper presents thematic findings and educational material created from the project. Thematic analysis identified six learning themes: (1) treat children as individuals; (2) act as a person before being a doctor; (3) interpersonal communication; (4) appreciate the clinical environment; (5) learn from children, parents and other staff; (6) how to be a doctor as part of a team. The student researcher successfully developed qualitative research skills, coproducing materials with participants for sharing learning derived from lived experiences. All participants were willing and able to make valuable contributions, and believed that this was a worthwhile use of time and effort. Further work is required to understand how best to integrate the experiences of children in hospices into

  5. South African Dental Students' Perceptions of Most Important Nonclinical Skills According to Medical Leadership Competency Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Berg-Cloete, Sophy E; Snyman, Lorraine; Postma, Thomas C; White, John G

    2016-11-01

    Recent developmental frameworks suggest that dental curricula should focus on developing nonclinical skills in dental students. The aim of this study was to qualitatively map students' perceptions of the most important nonclinical skills against the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF). A representative sample of second- to fifth-year students (n=594; overall response rate 69%) from all four dental schools in South Africa participated in a cross-sectional survey in 2014-15 enquiring about nonclinical skills and dental practice management. One of the questions required students to list the four most important nonclinical skills required for a dentist. Students (n=541) most frequently noted competencies related to working with others (97.9%), personal qualities (72.3%), and managing services (42.9%) as the most important nonclinical skills. Very few students mentioned competencies related to the improvement of services (14.1%) and the provision of strategic direction (10.9%). The students' attention appeared to be on nonclinical skills generally required for clinical care with some realization of the importance of managing services, indicating a need for a stronger focus on leadership and management training in dental schools in South Africa. The results also helped to unravel some of the conceptual ambiguity of the MLCF and highlight opportunities for leadership research using the MLCF as a conceptual framework.

  6. Demographic, medical and visual aspects of Dia- betic Retinopathy (DR and Diabetic Macular Edema (DME in South African diabetic patients*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Y. Sukha

    2009-12-01

    interactions (p = 0.01 and emotional re-action to vision loss (p = 0.018 was reported in subjects with DME. Conclusion: This study has identified possible demographic, medical and visual risk factors of DR and DME in South African diabetic patients.

  7. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 3, March 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    involved in the efforts to combat the West African Ebola epidemic in Liberia . Pachuta expressed his gratitude to the NMRC staff for continuing to be...Sailors for their involvement in the West African Ebola epidemic in Liberia , as part of two NMRC mobile laboratory teams. (Photo taken by Mikelle D...Rear Adm. Pachuta Recognizes NMRC Ebola Team SILVER SPRING, Md., -- Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) Commanding Officer, Capt. John W. Sanders

  8. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang HF

    2015-03-01

    top type of error regarding administration route, but it continuously decreased from 64 (first half-year of 2012 to 27 (first half-year of 2014. More experienced registered nurses made fewer medication errors. The number of MAEs in surgical wards was twice that in medicinal wards. Compared with non-intensive care units, the intensive care units exhibited higher occurrence rates of MAEs (1.81% versus 0.24%, P<0.001. Conclusion: A 3-and-a-half-year intervention program on MAEs was confirmed to be effective. MAEs made by nursing staff can be reduced, but cannot be eliminated. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of multidiscipline collaboration among physicians, pharmacists, nurses, information engineers, and hospital administrators are pivotal to safety in medication administration. JCI accreditation may help health systems enhance the awareness and ability to prevent MAEs and achieve successful quality improvements. Keywords: medication administration, medication errors, nurse, quality improvements

  9. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  10. The Detroit Young Adult Asthma Project: Pilot of a Technology-Based Medication Adherence Intervention for African-American Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmodin MacDonell, Karen; Naar, Sylvie; Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Lam, Phebe; Secord, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    To conduct a randomized controlled pilot of a multicomponent, technology-based intervention promoting adherence to controller medication in African-American emerging adults with asthma. The intervention consisted of two computer-delivered sessions based on motivational interviewing combined with text messaged reminders between sessions. Participants (N = 49) were 18-29 years old, African-American, with persistent asthma requiring controller medication. Participants had to report poor medication adherence and asthma control. Youth were randomized to receive the intervention or an attention control. Data were collected through computer-delivered self-report questionnaires at baseline, 1, and 3 months. Ecological Momentary Assessment via two-way text messaging was also used to collect "real-time" data on medication use and asthma control. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to the target population, as evidenced by high retention rates and satisfaction scores. Changes in study outcomes from pre- to postintervention favored the intervention, particularly for decrease in asthma symptoms, t (42) = 2.22, p < .05 (Cohen's d = .071). Results suggest that the intervention is feasible and effective. However, findings are preliminary and should be replicated with a larger sample and more sophisticated data analyses. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. West African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... To furnish a means whereby appropriate international medical and health organisations may transmit information to medical scientists in medical institutions of West Africa and elsewhere.

  12. Computer-Based Training at a Military Medical Center: Understanding Decreased Participation in Training among Staff and Ways to Improve Completion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Military health care facilities make extensive use of computer-based training (CBT) for both clinical and non-clinical staff. Despite evidence identifying various factors that may impact CBT, the problem is unclear as to what factors specifically influence employee participation in computer-based training. The purpose of this mixed method case…

  13. Seroprevalence of Antibodies to Pandemic (H1N1 2009 Influenza Virus Among Hospital Staff in a Medical Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jiun Chan

    2010-02-01

    Conclusion: The SPR of antibodies against the pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus in the hospital staff was higher than that in the general population, reflecting a higher contact risk. Prevaccination surveillance of the immune status of different risk groups may help to prioritize which groups should be vaccinated first.

  14. Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intérêt de la TEP-TDM dans le cancer broncho-pulmonaire primitif non à petite ..... framework governing herbal medicine use and practice in Kenya: a review ... of Nigerian children: effects of socio-economic, nutritional and housing factors ...

  15. South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assisted suicide and assisted voluntary euthanasia: Stransham-Ford High Court case overruled by the Appeal Court – but the door is left open · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. D.J. McQuoid-Mason, 381-382 ...

  16. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REpORTINg ON MENTAl HEAlTH IllNESS (MHI) IN KENyA: HOw wEll ARE. wE dOINg? ... fundamental for evidence-based decision-making and improved service ... Owiti, MBChB, MSc, Academic Model for Prevention and Treatment of HIV ...

  17. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-09

    Sep 9, 2009 ... PREGNANCY RATES AMONG FEMALE PARTICIPANTS IN PHASE I AND PHASE IIA AIDS VACCINE CLINICAL. TRIALS ..... for mothers, domestic workers and sex workers .... consultants of IAVI, the funding organisation and.

  18. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (CHWs) to promote WASH practices and to collect household based data using a structured reporting tool. ... are encouraged to purchase from local shops. Hand washing ... Ethics Review Board of Médecins Sans Frontières,. Luxembourg.

  19. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-07-01

    Jul 1, 2002 ... PREVALENCE OF VITAMIN A DEFICIENCY AMONG PRE-SCHOOL AND SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN IN ARSSI ZONE. ETHIOPIA. YT Asrat, BSc. MSc ... in the “low” range (<20ttl/dl) in 51% of the children. Conclusion: The results ... of Arssi zone Dodotana Sire district was selected at random for this study.

  20. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-11

    Nov 11, 2007 ... Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi Women's. Hospital, Coast ... standard Karl Storz tower consisting of two 15 inch flat ... The carbon dioxide insufflation pressure was ..... complications, took longer to perform and were offset.

  1. Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-05-07

    /10/2014 ... The risk of sustaining a bodily injury was 1.3 times higher in drivers who had not received ... similar picture is reflected across the country, where in 2013 the .... The short recall period of 3 months was made in order ...

  2. Towards Promoting An African Medical System: A critique of government responses to claims of a cure for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria, 1986-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Amusa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS epidemic has been described as the greatest health challenge of our era. Aside from Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART, the virus has defied any other form of permanent cure or disease control. The continents of Africa and Asia are the worst-hit areas by the scourge of the pandemic. Yet in Africa, there have been claims of HIV/AIDS being cured by African indigenous medical practitioners. Our paper examines the official responses of the Federal Government of Nigeria to such claims. We will examine the emergence and national responses to the epidemic in Nigeria and assess the government’s contempt for the efforts of indigenous medical practitioners in the quest for a viable cure. We conclude by asserting that until African governments realize, recognize and appropriate indigenous medical achievements into mainstream health strategy and policy, Africa will not only remain at the periphery of global health systems but will also continue to be ravaged by HIV/AIDS.

  3. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  4. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Haider

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months. It was a descriptive, hospital based, cross-sectional study. A total of 240 nurses participated in the present study, randomly chosen from various departments A pre-designed, pre-tested, structured proforma was used for data collection after getting their informed consent. Self-made scoring system was used to categorize the participants as having good, average and poor scores. Data was tabulated and analyzed using percentages and chi-square test. Results: The knowledge regarding general information about BMW management was assessed(with scores 0-8,it was found  that level of knowledge was better in student nurses than staff nurses as student nurses scored good(6-8correct answers in more than half of the questions (65%.Whereas staff nurses scored good in only 33.33% questions. When the practical information regarding the BMW management is assessed (with scores 0-8, it was found that staff nurses had relatively better practice regarding BMW management than students as they scored good(6-8correct answers in 40% and 30% respectively. Conclusion: Though overall knowledge of study participants was good but still they need good quality training to improve their current knowledge about BMW. 

  5. “I did not want to take that medicine”: African-Americans’ reasons for diabetes medication nonadherence and perceived solutions for enhancing adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyanbola OO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Olayinka O Shiyanbola,1 Carolyn M Brown,2 Earlise C Ward3 1Division of Social and Administrative Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; 2Division of Health Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 3School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Background: Diabetes is disproportionally burdensome among African-Americans (AAs and medication adherence is important for optimal outcomes. Limited studies have qualitatively examined reasons for nonadherence among AAs with type 2 diabetes, though AAs are less adherent to prescribed medications compared to whites. This study explored the reasons for medication nonadherence and adherence among AAs with type 2 diabetes and examined AAs’ perceived solutions for enhancing adherence. Methods: Forty AAs, age 45–60 years with type 2 diabetes for at least 1 year prior, taking at least one prescribed diabetes medication, participated in six semistructured 90-minute focus groups. Using a phenomenology qualitative approach, reasons for nonadherence and adherence, as well as participants’ perceived solutions for increasing adherence were explored. Qualitative content analysis was conducted. Results: AAs’ reasons for intentional nonadherence were associated with 1 their perception of medicines including concerns about medication side effects, as well as fear and frustration associated with taking medicines; 2 their perception of illness (disbelief of diabetes diagnosis; and 3 access to medicines and information resources. Participants reported taking their medicines because they valued being alive to perform their social and family roles, and their belief in the doctor’s recommendation and medication helpfulness. Participants provided solutions for enhancing adherence by focusing on the roles of health care providers, patients, and the church. AAs wanted provider counseling on the

  6. Autonomy of the child in the South African context: is a 12 year old of sufficient maturity to consent to medical treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganya, Wandile; Kling, Sharon; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-11-02

    A child is a developing person with evolving capacities that include autonomy, mental (decisional) capacity and capacity to assume responsibility. Hence, children are entitled to participatory (autonomy) rights in South Africa as observed in the Children's Act 38 of 2005. According to section 129 of the Act a child may consent to his or her own medical treatment provided that he or she is over the age of 12 years and is of sufficient maturity and decisional capacity to understand the various implications of the treatment including the risks and benefits thereof. However, the Act does not provide a definition for what qualifies as 'sufficient maturity' nor does it stipulate how health professionals ought to assess the decisional capacity of a child. In addition, South Africa is a culturally diverse country. The Western liberal notion of autonomy may not necessarily find equal prominence in the mores of people with a different worldview. Hence we demonstrate a few salient comparisons between legal liberal moral theory and African communitarianism as pertinent to the autonomy of the child. Children are rights-holders by virtue of their humanity. Their dignity as individual human persons affords them the entitlement to human rights as contemplated under the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. However, contrary to the traditional Western notion of individual autonomous persons African societies hold a communalistic notion of person hence there is less regard for individual autonomy and rights with more emphasis on the communal good and maintaining the continuity of relationships and interdependencies shared within a community. A child considered in this view is not regarded as a full person. This implies that decisions concerning the child, including consent to medical treatment are discussed and determined by the community to which the child belongs. Lastly, in this article, we draw on the notion of capacity for responsibility to produce a pragmatic

  7. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education; The competitive advantage of nations: is Porter's Diamond Framework a new theory that explains the international competitiveness of ... African Journal of Biotechnology; The application of just administrative action in the South African environmental governance sphere: An analysis of some ...

  8. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest and pre-eminent collection of peer-reviewed, African-published scholarly journals. ... Continuing Medical Education; The competitive advantage of nations: is Porter's Diamond Framework a new theory that explains the international competitiveness of countries?

  9. "I did not want to take that medicine": African-Americans' reasons for diabetes medication nonadherence and perceived solutions for enhancing adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyanbola, Olayinka O; Brown, Carolyn M; Ward, Earlise C

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes is disproportionally burdensome among African-Americans (AAs) and medication adherence is important for optimal outcomes. Limited studies have qualitatively examined reasons for nonadherence among AAs with type 2 diabetes, though AAs are less adherent to prescribed medications compared to whites. This study explored the reasons for medication nonadherence and adherence among AAs with type 2 diabetes and examined AAs' perceived solutions for enhancing adherence. Forty AAs, age 45-60 years with type 2 diabetes for at least 1 year prior, taking at least one prescribed diabetes medication, participated in six semistructured 90-minute focus groups. Using a phenomenology qualitative approach, reasons for nonadherence and adherence, as well as participants' perceived solutions for increasing adherence were explored. Qualitative content analysis was conducted. AAs' reasons for intentional nonadherence were associated with 1) their perception of medicines including concerns about medication side effects, as well as fear and frustration associated with taking medicines; 2) their perception of illness (disbelief of diabetes diagnosis); and 3) access to medicines and information resources. Participants reported taking their medicines because they valued being alive to perform their social and family roles, and their belief in the doctor's recommendation and medication helpfulness. Participants provided solutions for enhancing adherence by focusing on the roles of health care providers, patients, and the church. AAs wanted provider counseling on the necessity of taking medicines and the consequences of not taking them, indicating the need for the AA community to support and teach self-advocacy in diabetes self-management, and the church to act as an advocate in ensuring medication use. Intentional reasons of AAs with type 2 diabetes for not taking their medicines were related to their perception of medicines and illness. Solutions for enhancing diabetes medication

  10. Excessive daytime sleepiness and adherence to antihypertensive medications among Blacks: analysis of the counseling African Americans to control hypertension (CAATCH trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams NJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natasha J Williams,1 Girardin Jean-Louis,1 Abhishek Pandey,2 Joseph Ravenell,1 Carla Boutin-Foster,3 Gbenga Ogedegbe1 1Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Internal Medicine, NYU Medical Center, New York, 2Department of Family Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, 3Center of Excellence in Disparities Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS often occurs as a result of insufficient sleep, sleep apnea, illicit substance use, and other medical and psychiatric conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that blacks exhibiting EDS would have poorer self-reported adherence to hypertensive medication using cross-sectional data from the Counseling African-Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH trial. Methods: A total of 1,058 hypertensive blacks (average age 57±12 years participated in CAATCH, a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention for participants who receive care from community health centers in New York City. Data analyzed in this study included baseline sociodemographics, medical history, EDS, and medication adherence. We used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, with a cutoff score of ≥10, to define EDS. Medication adherence was measured using an abbreviated Morisky Medication Adherence scale, with a score >0 indicating nonadherence. Results: Of the sample, 71% were female, 72% received at least a high school education, 51% reported a history of smoking, and 33% had a history of alcohol consumption. Overall, 27% of the participants exhibited EDS, and 44% of those who exhibited EDS were classified as adherent to prescribed antihypertensive medications. Multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusting for effects of age, body mass index, sex, education, and smoking and drinking history indicated that participants who exhibited EDS were more than twice as likely to be nonadherent (odds ratio 2.28, 95

  11. The design and quality control of radioactive medical diagnostic products with reference to the radiological doses to patients and to hospital staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The role of the manufacturer in reducing radiological dose to patient and to hospital staff, arising from the use of radiopharmaceuticals and radioactive clinical laboratory reagents (radioimmunoassay and related techniques), is indicated. The source of unnecessary radiation dose to the patient are as follows: the choice of an inappropriate radionuclide; radionuclidic impurities in the preparation; the choice of an inappropriate chemical form; radio-chemical impurities in the preparation. An example of a radiopharmaceutical, Indium-11 DTPA for cisternography, is given. The radiological hazards of radioimmunoassay (excluding preparation of the labelled antigen) are found to be negli

  12. Outbreak of Mysterious Illness Among Hospital Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospitals are rarely reported as settings for mass psychogenic illness (MPI). The present report scrutinizes an outbreak of probable MPI among hospital staff, with medical intervention reinforcing the course of the illness. CASE REPORT: Four of seven staff members in an emergency...

  13. Potential radiation doses likely to be received by the radiologists and para medical staff in an hospital in Pakistan. (G. M. counter, survey meter measurements )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Zeb, J.; Iqbal, S.; Orfi, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Potential radiation doses likely to received by the radiologists and paramedical staff in a typical hospital in Pakistan have been measured using a very sensitive radiation survey meter (FAG FH40F2) employing in Geiger Muller counter (FHZ 120] as a role which is extendable up to 4 meters in length. The measurements have been compared with internationally accepted Maximum Permissible Radiation Dos Level (MPDL). Radiation dose rates measured on the hands of two radiologist during fluoroscopy examination of the patient were of the order of 1 m Sv.h/sup -1/ and 540 u Sv. h/sup -1/ which were 400% to 21% higher than the MPDL (250 u Sv. h/sup -1/). Radiation dose rates measured on the chest of the nurses were 300 and 50 u Sv. h/sup -1/, which were 3000% to 500% higher than those of MPDL(10 u Sv. h/sup -1/). Such high dose rates present a serious situation from radiation damage point of view and deserve attention of the hospital management and of national regulatory authority so as to minimize the potential radiation doses to the radiologists and paramedical staff. As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept should be implemented in the health sector. (author)

  14. African Journals Online: Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 27 of 27 ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences .... The Ghana Medical Journal is a peer-reviewed, open access journal ... The Journal of Business Research (JBR) is an International journal published by ...

  15. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest and pre-eminent ... Continuing Medical Education; The competitive advantage of nations: is Porter's ... Ethiopian Journal of Education and Sciences; Advertising practice in Nigeria: ...

  16. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest and pre-eminent collection ... Continuing Medical Education; The competitive advantage of nations: is Porter's ... AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities; Advertising ...

  17. Problems and Countermeasures of Hospital Infection Management of Medi-cal Staff in the Department of Stomatology%口腔科医护人员医院感染管理存在的问题及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春梅; 王馨

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the problems and countermeasures of hospital infection management of medical staff in the department of stomatology. Methods 218 cases of medical staff in the department of stomatology from January 2014 to March 2016 were selected as the research objects, and the self-made nursing survey table was adopted and the survey con-tent was the hospital infection management problems in the medical staff in the department of stomatology, and the nursing countermeasures were put forward pointedly. Results Apparatus cleaning and soaking, disinfectant replacement time, disin-fectant concentration, disinfectant soaking after washing hands, drying hands with antisepsis paper after washing, washing hands with sanitizer, nursing operation with latex gloves, nursing operation wearing protective clothing, wearing mask and hat, disinfection by the autoclaving method, treatment table with one-time preservative film protection, cleaning the desk with disinfectant solution containing chlorine and mopping the floor had problems of varying degrees. Conclusion Intensify-ing prevention awareness of hospital infection management of medical staff in the department of stomatology and enhancing major knowledge and quality monitoring train contribute to improving the hospital infection management quality of medical staff in the department of stomatology.%目的:探讨口腔科医护人员医院感染管理存在的问题及对策。方法选取2014年1月—2016年3月期间口腔科医护人员218名作为研究对象,采用自制护理调查内容为口腔科医护人员医院感染管理问题,并针对性提出护理对策。结果器械清洗与浸泡,消毒液更换时间正常,消毒液浓度达标,洗手后消毒液浸泡,洗手后消毒纸巾擦干,洗手用洗手液,护理操作戴乳胶手套,护理操作穿防护衣,戴口罩、帽子,消毒用高压灭菌法,治疗台有用一次性保鲜膜保护,采用含氯消毒液擦桌子、拖

  18. Effects of Staff Training on Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.; Harrington, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Four learning modules on elderly sexuality were pilot tested with 109 long-term care staff. On pretests men and whites scored higher than women and African-Americans. Knowledge and attitude improvements resulted from use of modules on the need for sexuality/intimacy, sex and dementia, and sex and aging, but not the family/personal issues module.…

  19. Study of the relationship between the leadership style of managers and Job Burnout among the staff of Lorestan university of medical sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    anahita Almasian

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: There is also a significant relationship between the leadership style of managers and job burnout among the employees of the Lorestan university of medical sciences. The presence of a relationship between the leadership style of managers and job burnout among the employees demonstrates that there is an urgent need that managers use scientific methods of management in dealing with the personnel.

  20. Factores relacionados con la satisfacción laboral de enfermería en un hospital médico-quirúrgico Factors related to nursing staff job satisfaction in a medical and surgery hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Máximo Molina Linde

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: analizar el grado de satisfacción laboral de los profesionales de enfermería que trabajan en un hospital médico-quirúrgico y establecer los factores sociodemográficos y profesionales relacionados con la misma. Metodología: estudio transversal y descriptivo. Se seleccionaron aleatoriamente 75 profesionales de enfermería (total: 510 del Hospital Médico Quirúrgico de la Ciudad Sanitaria "Virgen de las Nieves", de Granada, España, se autoadministra un cuestionario anónimo, compuesto por el Font-Roja (mide la satisfacción laboral y variables socio-demográficas y laborales. Resultados: la edad media de los encuestados es de 42,9 años; 72% mujeres, 64,9% casados, 73,3% vinculados en propiedad, 58,7% son del bloque de hospitalización y 67,6% tiene turno rotatorio. El grado de satisfacción global del Font Roja resulta medio (69,92 ± 10,48, recorrido entre 24 y 120. La dimensión mejor valorada es la «relación interpersonal con los compañeros» (3,82 ± 0,86 y la peor valorada la «promoción profesional» (2,28 ± 0,75. El bloque o lugar de trabajo es un elemento predictor de la satisfacción laboral (ß=-0,297, p=0,018. Análisis y discusión: un entorno de trabajo que garantice más satisfacción laboral para los profesionales de enfermería redundaría en mejoras de calidad en los cuidados recibidos por los pacientes de parte de este tipo de personal.Objective: to analyze the degree of job satisfaction of staff nurses working in a medical and surgical hospital, and to establish the socio-demographics and professional factors related to their job satisfaction. Methodology: cross-sectional and performed on seventy five persons of the nursing staff of the medical and surgery hospital (total: 510 of Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves of Granada (Spain, by means of a self-administered and anonymous survey. The questionnaire has two parts: the first one is Font-Roja test (it measures the job satisfaction and the second one

  1. The behaviours that dementia care home staff in South Africa find challenging: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Adele; Manthorpe, Jill; Clark, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    Background Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are often the reasons for moving to a care home. Care staff, often with limited dementia training, may have to support residents with distressed behaviour on a daily basis. Evidence about the support of residents with distressed or challenging behaviour in the South African context is lacking. This exploratory study aimed to gain an understanding of what care home staff perceived to be distressed behaviour, their coping strategies and how they learned to work with residents with behavioural symptoms of dementia. Methods An exploratory study was conducted among 17 participants working in four care homes in the Western Cape province of South Africa in 2014. Semi-structured interviews were audio-recorded. Data were analysed thematically. Findings Findings reflected the literature with regard to examples of behavioural symptoms of people with dementia that staff find challenging to manage. Overall, the majority of staff reported holding positive feelings about working with people with dementia. All preferred interpersonal approaches to manage distressed behaviour above medication although a small minority noted the use of medication in some cases. Dementia training was considered by most participants as an unmet need. Conclusion This exploratory study identified care home workers' desires for training about dementia and their preferences for interpersonal as opposed to pharmacological approaches to managing residents' distressed behaviour. The legacy of race and cultural perspectives in South Africa appears to still influence care practice and provision. Staff commitment, their interest in advancing their practice and their aspirations to offer more person-centred care were evident. Dementia training was identified as potentially helpful to care home staff who manage residents' distressed behaviour. Training should be developed in South Africa to promote good practice.

  2. Multidisciplinary Training on Spiritual Care for Patients in Palliative Care Trajectories Improves the Attitudes and Competencies of Hospital Medical Staff: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, Joep; Veeger, Nic; Groot, Marieke; Zock, Hetty; Leget, Carlo; Prins, Jelle; Vissers, Kris

    2018-02-01

    Patients value health-care professionals' attention to their spiritual needs. However, this is undervalued in health-care professionals' education. Additional training is essential for implementation of a national multidisciplinary guideline on spiritual care (SC) in palliative care (PC). Aim of this study is to measure effects of a training program on SC in PC based on the guideline. A pragmatic multicenter trial using a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design as part of an action research study. Eight multidisciplinary teams in regular wards and 1 team of PC consultants, in 8 Dutch teaching hospitals, received questionnaires before training about perceived barriers for SC, spiritual attitudes and involvement, and SC competencies. The effect on the barriers on SC and SC competencies were measured both 1 and 6 months after the training. For nurses (n = 214), 7 of 8 barriers to SC were decreased after 1 month, but only 2 were still after 6 months. For physicians (n = 41), the training had no effect on the barriers to SC. Nurses improved in 4 of 6 competencies after both 1 and 6 months. Physicians improved in 3 of 6 competencies after 1 month but in only 1 competency after 6 months. Concise SC training programs for clinical teams can effect quality of care, by improving hospital staff competencies and decreasing the barriers they perceive. Differences in the effects of the SC training on nurses and physicians show the need for further research on physicians' educational needs on SC.

  3. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  4. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  5. Research Staff | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer/Editor /Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  6. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  7. Factors influencing choice of site for rural clinical placements by final year medical students in a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nontsikelelo O. Mapukata

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: This study has demonstrated the challenges faced by coordinators in balancing personal and institutional needs with country needs and the contextual factors that must be considered when implementing medical education programmes that respond to social challenges.

  8. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff ( n =55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  9. Academic Staff Perspectives Towards Adoption of E-learning at Melaka Manipal Medical College: Has E-learning Redefined our Teaching Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A; Nagandla, K; Swe, K Mm; Abas, A Bl

    2015-01-01

    E-learning is the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide online education and learning. E- Learning has now been integrated into the traditional teaching as the concept of 'blended learning' that combines digital learning with the existing traditional teaching methods to address the various challenges in the field of medical education. Structured e-learning activities were started in Melaka Manipal Medical College in 2009 via e-learning platform (MOODLE-Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment). The objective of the present study is to investigate the faculty opinions toward the existing e-learning activities, and to analyse the extent of adopting and integration of e-learning into their traditional teaching methods. A cross sectional study was conducted among faculties of Medicine and Dentistry using pre-tested questionnaires. The data was analyzed by using the statistical package for social science, SPSS, version 16.0. The result of our survey indicates that majority of our faculty (65.4%) held positive opinion towards e-learning. Among the few, who demonstrated reservations, it is attributed to their average level of skills and aptitude in the use of computers that was statistically significant (pe-learning that enables smooth transition of the faculty from their traditional teaching methods into blended approach. Our results are anticipated to strengthen the existing e-learning activities of our college and other universities and convincingly adopt e-learning as a viable teaching and learning strategy.

  10. Pharmaceutical interventions by collaboration between staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists and implementation of Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards on medication use may optimize pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Chen, Quan Zhou Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of ChinaWe read with great interest the prospective study by Cortejoso et al,1 which describes the characteristics of pharmaceutical interventions in two geriatric wards (orthogeriatric ward and geriatric day unit of a general teaching hospital. We strongly agree with their finding that shows the importance of clinical pharmacist involvement in the optimization of pharmacotherapy in elderly patients. Furthermore, we especially appreciate their new and interesting findings that the clinical pharmacist was more frequently requested by physicians and nurses for information about the pharmacotherapy of the patients on the geriatric day unit, compared with the orthogeriatric ward at admission and discharge (5.7% vs 1.2% and 1.7%, respectively, P<0.05, and that the pharmacist asked for more confirmation of the physician orders on the geriatric day unit rather than the orthogeriatric ward (19.8% vs 1.8% and 15.7% at admission and discharge, respectively, P<0.05. We are from a Joint Commission International (JCI-accredited academic medical center hospital with 3200 beds in China. Safe medication management and use are pivotal to patient safety and quality of care on which the state-of-the-art standards of the Joint Commission focus. We would like to share our perspectives in the following paragraphs.View original paper by Cortejoso and colleagues. 

  11. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  12. Patient, nursing and medical staff experiences and perceptions of the care of people with palliative esophagogastric cancer: a systematic review of the qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Alison; Evans, Catrin; Bath-Hextall, Fiona; Cooper, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    Esophagogastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing. The disease progresses quickly and five-year survival rates are poor. Treatment with palliative intent is provided for the majority of patients but there remains a lack of empirical evidence on the most effective service models to support esophagogastric cancer patients. The overall objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the best available evidence on the experiences and perceptions of patients and health professionals with regard to the care of people diagnosed with palliative esophagogastric cancer. The review considered studies that included patients diagnosed with palliative esophagogastric cancer and any health professionals involved in the delivery of palliative care to this patient group in a hospital, home or community setting. The review considered studies that investigated the experiences and perceptions of people diagnosed with palliative esophagogastric cancer and staff working with these people. Studies that were carried out in any setting, including in-patient and outpatient areas, specialist cancer and non-specialist palliative care services and those were any patient were in receipt or had experiences of palliative care services were considered. All types of health practitioners delivering palliative care to esophagogastric cancer patients were considered. Studies that focused on qualitative data, including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research, feminist research and narrative approaches were considered. Mixed methods studies were considered in the review only if qualitative findings were reported separately. A three-step search strategy was utilized. A total 11 databases were searched for studies from 2000 onward, followed by hand searching of reference lists. Methodological quality was assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument critical

  13. South African medical students’ perceptions and knowledge about antibiotic resistance and appropriate prescribing: Are we providing adequate training to future prescribers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wasserman,

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Education of medical students has been identified by the World Health Organization as an important aspect of antibiotic resistance (ABR containment. Surveys from high-income countries consistently reveal that medical students recognise the importance of antibiotic prescribing knowledge, but feel inadequately prepared and require more education on how to make antibiotic choices. The attitudes and knowledge of South African (SA medical students regarding ABR and antibiotic prescribing have never been evaluated. Objective. To evaluate SA medical students’ perceptions, attitudes and knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived quality of education relating to antibiotics and infection. Methods. This was a cross-sectional survey of final-year students at three medical schools, using a 26-item self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires recorded basic demographic information, perceptions about antibiotic use and ABR, sources, quality, and usefulness of current education about antibiotic use, and questions to evaluate knowledge. Hard-copy surveys were administered during whole-class lectures. Results. A total of 289 of 567 (51% students completed the survey. Ninety-two percent agreed that antibiotics are overused and 87% agreed that resistance is a significant problem in SA – higher proportions than those who thought that antibiotic overuse (63% and resistance (61% are problems in the hospitals where they had worked (p<0.001. Most reported that they would appreciate more education on appropriate use of antibiotics (95%. Only 33% felt confident to prescribe antibiotics, with similar proportions across institutions. Overall, prescribing confidence was associated with the use of antibiotic prescribing guidelines (p=0.003, familiarity with antibiotic stewardship (p=0.012, and more frequent contact with infectious diseases specialists (p<0.001. There was an overall mean correct score of 50% on the knowledge

  14. [Prevalence and characteristics of the "burnout syndrome" of the medical staff of cancer and TB institutions of Primorskiĭ Kraĭ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektasova, M V; Kaptsov, V A; Sheparev, A A

    2012-01-01

    As 50 doctors and 70 nurses in oncologic dispensaries as well 90 doctors and 110 nurses in tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye have been studied on the basis of voluntary testing methods supposed by C. Maslach and V.V. Boiko. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative prevalence and psychological features of the "burnout syndrome" among doctors and nurses of oncologic and tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye Territory. "Emotional burnout" in various stages of its development is much more common among nurses (75% of respondents), compared with physicians (less than 50% tested). In nursing professional burnout syndrome developed significantly more frequently in the more severe form, and with less seniority of professional activity. The dependence of burning on the age and professional experience is more common for physicians. There is an urgent need to study the epidemiology of the "burnout syndrome" and identify ways to prevent the formation of social syndrome in medical personnel.

  15. The Effective Contributing Factors in Knowledge Sharing and Knowledge Transfer among Academic Staff at Tehran University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghodsian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge transfer is known as a core process in knowledge management. Its decent and influential function in organizations would result in regeneration and innovation of knowledge.Due to this importance, the most recent research in knowledge management has been inclined toward knowledge transfer concept. We aimed to investigate the most influencing contributing factors in knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing within the faculty members at Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Method: This investigation has been conducted with a qualitative approach using grounded theory. Data were collected using semi- structured interview with 17 faculty members of ten distinct departments of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data has been transcribed and analyzed.Results: By carefully analyzing the interviews from 272 preliminary open codes after sequential analogies and induction, 54 concepts have been extracted that were categorized into one of eleven classes constituting the effective items and factors in knowledge transfer among faculty members,respectively. These categories could be placed into , non-communication factors and communication factors. The non-communication factors were knowledge actors (professors, organization (university, the knowledge, and surroundings. The communication factors are the factors that are formed in the dual relationships between the relevant factors.Conclusion: A decent knowledge flow in working groups and collaborative societies of faculty members within a department or through different university departments would lead to a better research and education management. This could also bring about some advantages: the research in each department falls in a well-defined, pre-missioned channel, avoiding scattered research works, and enhancing the training and research. The awareness of university senior managers about influencing contributing factors of knowledge transfer and their functions provide a

  16. Developing emergency medical dispatch systems in Africa – Recommendations of the African Federation for Emergency Medicine/International Academies of Emergency Dispatch Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman

    2015-09-01

    To facilitate the development of EMD systems appropriate for the African setting, the African Federation for Emergency Medicine (AFEM and the International Academies of Emergency Dispatch (IAED convened a working group in November 2014 to provide conceptual, technical, and innovative recommendations for contextually appropriate EMD systems for African settings. It is hoped that these recommendations will augment efficiency, effectiveness, and standardisation within and among African EMD systems, thereby improving health outcomes for sufferers of acute illness or injury.

  17. Attitudes towards informed consent, confidentiality, and substitute treatment decisions in southern African medical students: a case study from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipshman, L

    1999-08-01

    This study explored the attitudes of biomedical science students (medical students) in a non-Western setting towards three medical ethics concepts that are based on fundamental Western culture ethical principles. A dichotomous (agree/disagree) response questionnaire was constructed using Western ethnocentric culture (WEC) based perspectives of informed consent, confidentiality, and substitute decision-making. Hypothesized WEC-Biased responses were assigned to the questionnaire's questions or propositions. A number of useful responses (169) were obtained from a large, cross-sectional, convenience sample of the MBChB students at the University of Zimbabwe Medical School. Statistical analysis described the differences in response patterns between the student's responses compared to the hypothesized WEC-Biased response. The effect of the nine independent variables on selected dependent variables (responses to certain questionnaire questions) was analyzed by stepwise logistic regression. Students concurred with the hypothesized WEC-Biased responses for two-thirds of the questionnaire items. This agreement included support for the role of legal advocacy in the substitute decision-making process. The students disagreed with the hypothesized WEC-Biased responses in several important medical ethics aspects. Most notably, the students indicated that persons with mental dysfunctions, as a class, were properly considered incompetent to make treatment decisions. None of the studied independent variables was often associated with students' responses, but training year was more frequently implicated than either ethnicity or gender. In order to develop internationally and culturally relevant medical ethics standards, non-Western perspectives ought to be acknowledged and incorporated. Two main areas for further efforts include: curriculum development in ethics reasoning and related clinical (medico-legal) decision-making processes that would be relevant to medical students from

  18. South African Astronomical Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Work at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in recent years, by both staff and visitors, has made major contributions to the fields of astrophysics and astronomy. During 1986 the SAAO has been involved in studies of the following: galaxies; celestial x-ray sources; magellanic clouds; pulsating variables; galactic structure; binary star phenomena; nebulae and interstellar matter; stellar astrophysics; open clusters; globular clusters, and solar systems

  19. Children Ask Questions about West African Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Denice; Cochran, Mathilda; Mims, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Presents a collection of questions that fifth-grade students asked about African artwork and answers provided by staff from the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas. Observes that students' interest in important visual aspects of the art creates lead-ins to more detailed discussions of West African art and culture. (DSK)

  20. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff and resources for radiotherapy in pediatric and adolescent patients. The DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Milker-Zabel, Stefanie; Debus, Juergen; Bruns, Frank; Christiansen, Hans; Ernst, Iris; Willich, Normann; Popp, Wolfgang; Sack, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) initiated a multicenter trial to develop and evaluate adequate modules to assert core procedures in radiotherapy. The aim of this prospective evaluation was to methodical assess the required resources for radiotherapy in pediatric and adolescent patients. At three radiotherapy centers of excellence (University Hospitals of Heidelberg and Muenster, the Medical School of Hannover), the manpower and time required for radiotherapy in pediatric and adolescent patients was prospectively documented consistently over a 2-year period. The data were collected using specifically developed standard forms and were evaluated using specific process analysis tools. A total number of 1914 data sets were documented and carefully analyzed. The personnel time requirements for all occupational groups were calculated as total time needed for a specific procedure and mean time per person. Regarding radiotherapy in general anesthesia, the required manpower was higher. The personnel time requirements in these cases were also longer, mainly due to longer room occupancy. Overall, the required resources were remarkably similar between the three different departments and may, therefore, be considered as representative. For the first time, the personnel time requirements of a radiotherapy department for the maintenance, protection, and optimization of operational readiness for radiotherapy in pediatric and adolescent patients with and without general anesthesia were determined methodically. (orig.) [de