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Sample records for affinity responsive target

  1. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Sun, Wei; Salas, Antonio; Antia, Avan; Carvajal, Cindy; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhaojin; Zhou, Ming; Tawa, Gregory J.; Dehdashti, Jean; Zheng, Wei; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS) screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development. PMID:27486194

  2. Kinetic controlled affinity labeling of target enzyme with thioester chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomohiro, Takenori; Nakabayashi, Masahiro; Sugita, Yuka; Morimoto, Shota

    2016-08-01

    High specificity has been an important feature in affinity labeling for target profiling. Especially, to label targets via rapidly progressing reactions with consumption of ligand (probe), high specificity of reaction with common functional groups of target protein should be achieved without reactions with similar groups of non-target proteins. Herein, we demonstrate the kinetic controlled affinity labeling of acyl CoA synthetase using a fatty acid analogue containing a phenylthioester linkage. High specificity was attained by accelerating the labeling rate in the binding pocket. This approach could be useful for profiling a series of target enzymes and transporters in signal transduction pathways. PMID:27298000

  3. Enhancement of Immune Effector Functions by Modulating IgG’s Intrinsic Affinity for Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Yang, Chunning; Borrok, M. Jack; Ayriss, Joanne; Aherne, Karen; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immune effector functions play an essential role in the anti-tumor efficacy of many therapeutic mAbs. While much of the effort to improve effector potency has focused on augmenting the interaction between the antibody-Fc and activating Fc-receptors expressed on immune cells, the role of antibody binding interactions with the target antigen remains poorly understood. We show that antibody intrinsic affinity to the target antigen clearly influences the extent and efficiency of Fc-mediated effector mechanisms, and report the pivotal role of antibody binding valence on the ability to regulate effector functions. More particularly, we used an array of affinity modulated variants of three different mAbs, anti-CD4, anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 against a panel of target cell lines expressing disparate levels of the target antigen. We found that at saturating antibody concentrations, IgG variants with moderate intrinsic affinities, similar to those generated by the natural humoral immune response, promoted superior effector functions compared to higher affinity antibodies. We hypothesize that at saturating concentrations, effector function correlates most directly with the amount of Fc bound to the cell surface. Thus, high affinity antibodies exhibiting slow off-rates are more likely to interact bivalently with the target cell, occupying two antigen sites with a single Fc. In contrast, antibodies with faster off-rates are likely to dissociate each binding arm more rapidly, resulting in a higher likelihood of monovalent binding. Monovalent binding may in turn increase target cell opsonization and lead to improved recruitment of effector cells. This unpredicted relationship between target affinity and effector function potency suggests a careful examination of antibody design and engineering for the development of next-generation immunotherapeutics. PMID:27322177

  4. A thermal responsive affinity ligand for precipitation of sialylated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the development of a thermal responsive affinity ligand specific to sialic acid, sialic acid containing oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, and other sialylated glycoconjugates. The ligand is a fusion protein of 40 repeats of pentapeptide of an elastin like polymer (ELP and the 21 kD sialic acid binding domain of a Vibrio cholera neuraminidase (VCNA. For cost-effective synthesis, the fusion protein was targeted to the periplasmic space of an E. coli lpp deletion mutant, resulting in its secretion to the growth medium. A pre-induction heat-shock step at 42 ˚C for 20 minutes was necessary to achieve high level expression of the ligand. Under optimized induction condition (18 ˚C, 0.1 mM IPTG and 48 hours of post-induction cultivation, the ligand was produced to about 100 mg/L. The ligand exhibited a transition temperature of 52 ˚C, which could be depressed to 37 ˚C with the addition of 0.5 M NaCl. Using fetuin as a model sialylated protein, the ligand was applied in an affinity precipitation process to illustrate its potential application in glycoprotein isolation. The ligand captured 100% fetuin from an aqueous solution when the molar ratio of ligand to fetuin was 10 to 1, which was lower than the expected for full titration of sialic acid on the glycoprotein by the lectin. Elution of fetuin from ligand was achieved with PBS buffer containing 2 mM sialic acid. To evaluate how protein and other contaminants influence the recovery of sialylated proteins, CHO medium was spiked into the fetuin solution. The predominant protein species in CHO medium was found to be albumin. Although its removal of over 94% was evident, purified fetuin contained some albumin due to its over-abundance. Additional experiments with albumin contaminant of varying concentrations showed that below 1 mg/L, albumin had no impact on the affinity precipitation, whereas above 10 mg/L, some albumin was co-purified with fetuin. However, even at 50 mg/ml, fetuin

  5. Identification of Thioredoxin Target Disulfides Using Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Maeda, Kenji; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    extracts is described. The procedure utilizes the isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) reagents containing a thiol reactive iodoacetamide group and a biotin affinity tag to target peptides containing reduced cysteine residues. The identification of substrates for Trx and the extent of target disulfide......Thioredoxins (Trx) are small redox proteins that reduce disulfide bonds in various target proteins and maintain cellular thiol redox control. Here, a thiol-specific labeling and affinity enrichment approach for identification and relative quantification of Trx target disulfides in complex protein...

  6. Supramolecular Affinity Chromatography for Methylation-Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Graham A E; Starke, Melissa J; Shaurya, Alok; Li, Janessa; Hof, Fraser

    2016-04-01

    Proteome-wide studies of post-translationally methylated species using mass spectrometry are complicated by high sample diversity, competition for ionization among peptides, and mass redundancies. Antibody-based enrichment has powered methylation proteomics until now, but the reliability, pan-specificity, polyclonal nature, and stability of the available pan-specific antibodies are problematic and do not provide a standard, reliable platform for investigators. We have invented an anionic supramolecular host that can form host-guest complexes selectively with methyllysine-containing peptides and used it to create a methylysine-affinity column. The column resolves peptides on the basis of methylation-a feat impossible with a comparable commercial cation-exchange column. A proteolyzed nuclear extract was separated on the methyl-affinity column prior to standard proteomics analysis. This experiment demonstrates that such chemical methyl-affinity columns are capable of enriching and improving the analysis of methyllysine residues from complex protein mixtures. We discuss the importance of this advance in the context of biomolecule-driven enrichment methods. PMID:26973166

  7. Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Qian, Weijun

    2014-12-17

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than

  8. High-affinity triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Gaddis, Sara S; MacLeod, Michael C; Walborg, Earl F; Thames, Howard D; DiGiovanni, John; Vasquez, Karen M

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific recognition of duplex DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provides a promising approach to manipulate mammalian genomes. A prerequisite for successful gene targeting using this approach is that the targeted gene must contain specific, high-affinity TFO target sequences (TTS). To date, TTS have been identified and characterized in only approximately 37 human or rodent genes, limiting the application of triplex-directed gene targeting. We searched the complete human and mouse genomes using an algorithm designed to identify high-affinity TTS. The resulting data set contains 1.9 million potential TTS for each species. We found that 97.8% of known human and 95.2% of known mouse genes have at least one potential high-affinity TTS in the promoter and/or transcribed gene regions. Importantly, 86.5% of known human and 83% of the known mouse genes have at least one TTS that is unique to that gene. Thus, it is possible to target the majority of human and mouse genes with specific TFOs. We found substantially more potential TTS in the promoter sequences than in the transcribed gene sequences or intergenic sequences in both genomes. We selected 12 mouse genes and 2 human genes critical for cell signaling, proliferation, and/or carcinogenesis, identified potential TTS in each, and determined TFO binding affinities to these sites in vitro. We identified at least one high-affinity, specific TFO binding site within each of these genes. Using this information, many genes involved in mammalian cell proliferation and carcinogenesis can now be targeted. PMID:17013831

  9. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: Focus on high-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura Friis; Klein, Anders Bue;

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects...

  10. High-affinity triplex targeting of double stranded DNA using chemically modified peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Mads E.; Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    While sequence-selective dsDNA targeting by triplex forming oligonucleotides has been studied extensively, only very little is known about the properties of PNA–dsDNA triplexes—mainly due to the competing invasion process. Here we show that when appropriately modified using pseudoisocytosine substitution, in combination with (oligo)lysine or 9-aminoacridine conjugation, homopyrimidine PNA oligomers bind complementary dsDNA targets via triplex formation with (sub)nanomolar affinities (at pH 7....

  11. High-affinity triplex targeting of double stranded DNA using chemically modified peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads E; Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    While sequence-selective dsDNA targeting by triplex forming oligonucleotides has been studied extensively, only very little is known about the properties of PNA-dsDNA triplexes-mainly due to the competing invasion process. Here we show that when appropriately modified using pseudoisocytosine...... substitution, in combination with (oligo)lysine or 9-aminoacridine conjugation, homopyrimidine PNA oligomers bind complementary dsDNA targets via triplex formation with (sub)nanomolar affinities (at pH 7.2, 150 mM Na(+)). Binding affinity can be modulated more than 1000-fold by changes in pH, PNA oligomer...... length, PNA net charge and/or by substitution of pseudoisocytosine for cytosine, and conjugation of the DNA intercalator 9-aminoacridine. Furthermore, 9-aminoacridine conjugation also strongly enhanced triplex invasion. Specificity for the fully matched target versus one containing single centrally...

  12. Influence of target concentration and background binding on in vitro selection of affinity reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based aptamers possess many useful features that make them a promising alternative to antibodies and other affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, reversible folding, thermal stability and low cost. However, the selection process typically used to generate aptamers (SELEX often requires significant resources and can fail to yield aptamers with sufficient affinity and specificity. A number of seminal theoretical models and numerical simulations have been reported in the literature offering insights into experimental factors that govern the effectiveness of the selection process. Though useful, these previous models have not considered the full spectrum of experimental factors or the potential impact of tuning these parameters at each round over the course of a multi-round selection process. We have developed an improved mathematical model to address this important question, and report that both target concentration and the degree of non-specific background binding are critical determinants of SELEX efficiency. Although smaller target concentrations should theoretically offer superior selection outcome, we show that the level of background binding dramatically affect the target concentration that will yield maximum enrichment at each round of selection. Thus, our model enables experimentalists to determine appropriate target concentrations as a means for protocol optimization. Finally, we perform a comparative analysis of two different selection methods over multiple rounds of selection, and show that methods with inherently lower background binding offer dramatic advantages in selection efficiency.

  13. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard; Wilbek, Theis S;

    2015-01-01

    related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of...... trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG...... linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic...

  14. Importance of non-affine viscoelastic response in disordered fibre networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S; Head, D A

    2016-05-11

    Disordered fibre networks are ubiquitous in nature and have a wide range of industrial applications as novel biomaterials. Predicting their viscoelastic response is straightforward for affine deformations that are uniform over all length scales, but when affinity fails, as has been observed experimentally, modelling becomes challenging. Here we present a numerical methodology, related to an existing framework for amorphous packings, to predict the steady-state viscoelastic spectra and degree of affinity for disordered fibre networks driven at arbitrary frequencies. Applying this method to a peptide gel model reveals a monotonic increase of the shear modulus as the soft, non-affine normal modes are successively suppressed as the driving frequency increases. In addition to being dominated by fibril bending, these low frequency network modes are also shown to be delocalised. The presented methodology provides insights into the importance of non-affinity in the viscoelastic response of peptide gels, and is easily extendible to all types of fibre networks. PMID:27079274

  15. Locked nucleic acid (LNA): High affinity targeting of RNA for diagnostics and therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauppinen, S.; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a nucleic acid analogue containing one or more LNA nucleotide monomers with a bicyclic furanose unit locked in an RNA mimicking sugar conformation. This conformational restriction results in unprecedented hybridization affinity towards complementary single stranded RNA...... and thus, makes LNA uniquely suited for mimicking RNA structures and sequence specific targeting of RNA in vitro or in vivo. The focus of this paper is on LNAantisense, LNA-modified siRNA (siLNA), and detection and analysis of microRNAs by LNA-modified oligonucleotide probes....

  16. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca2+ Probe D4ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Greotti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER represents the major intracellular Ca2+ store and the free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+] within its lumen ([Ca2+]ER can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca2+ sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca2+ probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd for Ca2+, low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca2+] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca2+ affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca2+] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca2+]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer’s Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2. The lower Ca2+ affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca2+ content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls.

  17. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H; Pineda, Julio M; Kacherovsky, Nataly A; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  18. Affinity ultrafiltration of DNA topoisomerases-targeted compounds determined with HPLC/ESI-MS for drug candidate screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虹; 潘远江

    2004-01-01

    A method of screening assay is demonstrated. The approach is based on the affinity ofantitumor candidates for topoisomerases. In this method, antitumor candidates are fished out using topoisomerases as targets. Traditional analysis of complex compounds typically encounters signal suppression due to the relatively low concentrations, but enzyme-affinity screening for the active compounds can effectively concentrate the desired analysts into a small volume of high concentration. Active compounds are separated from non-affinity compounds by ultrafiltration. The molecules-enzymes complexes that are retained on the filter are subsequently separated by acidification to obtain the topoisomerases-affinity compounds for analysis on High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (ESI-MS). This enzyme-affinity based screening assay provides a highly specific and efficient method that can directly screen, identify, and acquire drug candidates thus improving the accuracy and speed of high-throughput screening activities.

  19. Affinity ultrafiltration of DNA topoisomerases-targeted compounds determined with HPLC/ESI-MS for drug candidate screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虹; 潘远江

    2004-01-01

    A method of screening assay is demonstrated. The approach is based on the affinity of antitumor candidates for topoisomerases. In this method, antitumor candidates are fished out using topoisomerases as targets. Traditional analysis of complex compounds typically encounters signal suppression due to the relatively low concentrations, but enzyme-affinity screening for the active compounds can effectively concentrate the desired analysts into a small volume of high concen-tration. Active compounds are separated from non-affinity compounds by ultrafiltration. The molecules-enzymes complexes that are retained on the filter are subsequently separated by acidification to obtain the topoisomerases-affinity compounds for analysis on High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detec-tion (ESI-MS). This enzyme-affinity based screening assay provides a highly specific and efficient method that can directly screen, identify, and acquire drug candidates thus improving the accuracy and speed of high-throughput screening activities.

  20. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-28

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples. PMID:27087258

  1. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples.Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the

  2. A sol-gel-integrated protein array system for affinity analysis of aptamer-target protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Jeehye; Kim, Soyoun

    2011-06-01

    A sol-gel microarray system was developed for a protein interaction assay with high activity. Comparing to 2-dimensional microarray surfaces, sol-gel can offer a more dynamic and broad range for proteins. In the present study, this sol-gel-integrated protein array was used in binding affinity analysis for aptamers. Six RNA aptamers and their target protein, yeast TBP (TATA-binding protein), were used to evaluate this method. A TBP-containing sol-gel mixture was spotted using a dispensing workstation under high-humidity conditions and each Cy-3-labeled aptamer was incubated. The dissociation constants (K(d)) were calculated by plotting the fluorescent intensity of the bound aptamers as a function of the TBP concentrations. The K(d) value of the control aptamer was found to be 8 nM, which agrees well with the values obtained using the conventional method, electric mobility shift assay. The sol-gel-based binding affinity measurements fit well with conventional binding affinity measurements, suggesting their possible use as an alternative to the conventional method. In addition, aptamer affinity measurements by the sol-gel-integrated protein chip make it possible to develop a simple high-throughput affinity method for screening high-affinity aptamers. PMID:21749295

  3. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  4. α4βδ GABA receptors are high-affinity targets for γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Absalom, N.; Karim, N.; Eghorn, L.F.;

    2012-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) binding to brain-specific high-affinity sites is well-established and proposed to explain both physiological and pharmacological actions. However, the mechanistic links between these lines of data are unknown. To identify molecular targets for specific GHB high-affinit...... physiology. This finding will aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the proposed function of GHB as a neurotransmitter and its unique therapeutic effects in narcolepsy and alcoholism....

  5. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  6. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayla K Shorter

    Full Text Available T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL, have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4 are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  7. Ampicillin/penicillin-binding protein interactions as a model drug-target system to optimize affinity pull-down and mass spectrometric strategies for target and pathway identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rechenberg, Moritz; Blake, Brian Kelly; Ho, Yew-Seng J; Zhen, Yuejun; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Richardson, Bonnie E; Xu, Nafei; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of active compounds identified in cell-based assays is an important step in preclinical drug development. New analytical approaches that combine drug affinity pull-down assays with mass spectrometry (MS) could lead to the identification of new targets and druggable pathways. In this work, we investigate a drug-target system consisting of ampicillin- and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) to evaluate and compare different amino-reactive resins for the immobilization of the affinity compound and mass spectrometric methods to identify proteins from drug affinity pull-down assays. First, ampicillin was immobilized onto various amino-reactive resins, which were compared in the ampicillin-PBP model with respect to their nonspecific binding of proteins from an Escherichia coli membrane extract. Dynal M-270 magnetic beads were chosen to further study the system as a model for capturing and identifying the targets of ampicillin, PBPs that were specifically and covalently bound to the immobilized ampicillin. The PBPs were identified, after in situ digestion of proteins bound to ampicillin directly on the beads, by using either one-dimensional (1-D) or two-dimensional (2-D) liquid chromatography (LC) separation techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. Alternatively, an elution with N-lauroylsarcosine (sarcosyl) from the ampicillin beads followed by in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis identified proteins potentially interacting noncovalently with the PBPs or the ampicillin. The in situ approach required only little time, resources, and sample for the analysis. The combination of drug affinity pull-down assays with in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis is a useful tool in obtaining complex information about a primary drug target as well as its protein interactors. PMID:15761956

  8. T-cell receptor affinity and avidity defines antitumor response and autoimmunity in T-cell immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shi; Malecek, Karolina; Johnson, Laura A.; Yu, Zhiya; Vega-Saenz de Miera, Eleazar; Darvishian, Farbod; McGary, Katelyn; Huang, Kevin; Boyer, Josh; Corse, Emily; Shao, Yongzhao; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Osman, Iman; Krogsgaard, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    T cells expressing antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can mediate effective tumor regression, but they often also are accompanied by autoimmune responses. To determine the TCR affinity threshold defining the optimal balance between effective antitumor activity and autoimmunity in vivo, we used a unique self-antigen system comprising seven human melanoma gp100(209–217)-specific TCRs spanning physiological affinities (1–100 μM). We found that in vitro and in vivo T-cell responses are determined by TCR affinity, except in one case that was compensated by substantial CD8 involvement. Strikingly, we found that T-cell antitumor activity and autoimmunity are closely coupled but plateau at a defined TCR affinity of 10 µM, likely due to diminished contribution of TCR affinity to avidity above the threshold. Together, these results suggest that a relatively low-affinity threshold is necessary for the immune system to avoid self-damage, given the close relationship between antitumor activity and autoimmunity. The low threshold, in turn, indicates that adoptive T-cell therapy treatment strategies using in vitro-generated high-affinity TCRs do not necessarily improve efficacy. PMID:23576742

  9. Affinity precipitation of human serum albumin using a thermo-response polymer with an L-thyroxin ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Zhaoyang; Cao, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Background Affinity precipitation has been reported as a potential technology for the purification of proteins at the early stage of downstream processing. The technology could be achieved using reversible soluble-insoluble polymers coupled with an affinity ligand to purify proteins from large volumes of dilute solution material such as fermentation broths or plasma. In this study, a thermo-response polymer was synthesized using N-methylol acrylamide, N-isopropyl acrylamide and butyl acrylate...

  10. A high affinity kidney targeting by chitobionic acid-conjugated polysorbitol gene transporter alleviates unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kim, Sanghwa; Firdous, Jannatul; Lee, Ah-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Seo, Min Kyeong; Park, Tae-Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-01

    Aside from kidney transplantation - a procedure which is exceedingly dependent on donor-match and availability leading to excessive costs - there are currently no permanent treatments available which reverse kidney injury and failure. However, kidney-specific targeted gene therapy has outstanding potential to treat kidney-related dysfunction. Herein we report a novel kidney-specific targeted gene delivery system developed through the conjugation of chitobionic acid (CBA) to a polysorbitol gene transporter (PSGT) synthesized from sorbitol diacrylate and low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene to alleviate unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. CBA-PSGT performed exceptionally well for targeted delivery of HGF to kidney tissues compared to its non-targeted counterparts (P type I and II), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and the expressions of ICAM-1, TIMP-1 and α-SMA which play a critical role in obstructive kidney functions. Therefore, CBA-PSGT should be further investigated because of its potential to alleviate UUO and kidney-related diseases using high affinity kidney targeting. PMID:27318934

  11. Theoretical analysis of antibody targeting of tumor spheroids: importance of dosage for penetration, and affinity for retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christilyn P; Wittrup, K Dane

    2003-03-15

    The interplay among antibody/antigen binding kinetics, antibody diffusion, and antigen metabolic turnover together determines the depth of penetration of antitumor antibodies into prevascular tumor spheroid cell clumps. A sharp boundary between an outer shell of bound high-affinity antibody and an inner antibody-free core has been previously observed and mathematically modeled and was termed the "binding site barrier." We show here that this process is well described by a simplified shrinking core model wherein binding equilibration is much more rapid than diffusion. This analysis provides the following experimentally testable predictions: (a) the binding site barrier is a moving boundary whose velocity is proportional to the time integral of antibody concentration at the spheroid surface (i.e. plasma antibody AUC); (b) the velocity of this moving boundary is independent of binding affinity, if the affinity is sufficiently high to strongly favor antibody/antigen complex formation at prevailing antibody concentrations; and (c) maximum tumor retention is achieved when the antibody/antigen dissociation rate approaches the rate of antigen metabolic turnover. The consistency of these predictions with published experimental results is demonstrated. The shrinking core model provides a simple analytic relationship predicting the effects of altered antibody pharmacokinetics, antibody molecular weight, antigen turnover rate, antigen expression level, and micrometastasis size on antibody penetration and retention. For example, a formula is provided for predicting the bolus dose necessary to accomplish tumor saturation as a function of antibody and tumor properties. Furthermore, this analysis indicates certain attributes necessary for an optimal tumor targeting agent. PMID:12649189

  12. Affinity peptide developed by phage display selection for targeting gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Jie Zhang; Yan-Xia Sui; Arun Budha; Jian-Bao Zheng; Xue-Jun Sun; Ying-Chun Hou; Thomas D Wang; Shao-Ying Lu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To develop an affinity peptide that binds to gastric cancer used for the detection of early gastric cancer.METHODS:A peptide screen was performed by biopanning the PhD-12 phage display library,clearing non-specific binders against tumor-adjacent normal appearing gastric mucosa and obtaining selective binding against freshly harvested gastric cancer tissues.Tumortargeted binding of selected peptides was confirmed by bound phage counts,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,competitive inhibition,fluorescence microscopy and semi-quantitative analysis on immunohistochemistry using different types of cancer tissues.RESULTS:Approximately 92.8% of the non-specific phage clones were subtracted from the original phage library after two rounds of biopanning against normalappearing gastric mucosa.After the third round of positive screening,the peptide sequence AADNAKTKSFPV (AAD) appeared in 25% (12/48) of the analyzed phages.For the control peptide,these values were 6.8 ± 2.3,5.1 ± 1.7,3.5 ± 2.1,4.6 ± 1.9 and 1.1 ± 0.5,respectively.The values for AAD peptide were statistically significant (P < 0.01) for gastric cancer as compared with other histological classifications and control peptide.CONCLUSION:A novel peptide is discovered to have a specific binding activity to gastric cancer,and can be used to distinguish neoplastic from normal gastric mucosa,demonstrating the potential for early cancer detection on endoscopy.

  13. An In-tether Chiral Center Modulates the Helicity, Cell Permeability, and Target Binding Affinity of a Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kuan; Geng, Hao; Zhang, Qingzhou; Liu, Qisong; Xie, Mingsheng; Sun, Chengjie; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Huacan; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    The addition of a precisely positioned chiral center in the tether of a constrained peptide is reported, yielding two separable peptide diastereomers with significantly different helicity, as supported by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the absolute configuration of the in-tether chiral center in helical form is R, which is in agreement with theoretical simulations. The relationship between the secondary structure of the short peptides and their biochemical/biophysical properties remains elusive, largely because of the lack of proper controls. The present strategy provides the only method for investigating the influence of solely conformational differences upon the biochemical/biophysical properties of peptides. The significant differences in permeability and target binding affinity between the peptide diastereomers demonstrate the importance of helical conformation. PMID:27167181

  14. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Christopher; Mathonet, Pascale; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Diamandakis, Agata; Tomei, Licia; Demartis, Anna; Nardi, Chiara; Sambucini, Sonia; Missineo, Antonino; Alt, Karen; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Harris, Matt; Hedt, Amos; Weis, Roland; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2). Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26313909

  15. Structure-based rational design of a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 decoy receptor with high binding affinity for a target protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Han

    Full Text Available Repeat proteins are increasingly attracting much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural features. Nonetheless, engineering interaction interface and understanding molecular basis for affinity maturation of repeat proteins still remain a challenge. Here, we present a structure-based rational design of a repeat protein with high binding affinity for a target protein. As a model repeat protein, a Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4 decoy receptor composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR modules was used, and its interaction interface was rationally engineered to increase the binding affinity for myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2. Based on the complex crystal structure of the decoy receptor with MD2, we first designed single amino acid substitutions in the decoy receptor, and obtained three variants showing a binding affinity (K(D one-order of magnitude higher than the wild-type decoy receptor. The interacting modes and contributions of individual residues were elucidated by analyzing the crystal structures of the single variants. To further increase the binding affinity, single positive mutations were combined, and two double mutants were shown to have about 3000- and 565-fold higher binding affinities than the wild-type decoy receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations and energetic analysis indicate that an additive effect by two mutations occurring at nearby modules was the major contributor to the remarkable increase in the binding affinities.

  16. Targeted therapy against human lung cancer in nude mice by high-affinity recombinant antimesothelin single-chain Fv immunotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dominic; Yano, Seiji; Shinohara, Hisashi; Solorzano, Carmen; Van Arsdall, Melissa; Bucana, Corazon D; Pathak, Sen; Kruzel, Ewa; Herbst, Roy S; Onn, Amir; Roach, Jennifer S; Onda, Masanori; Wang, Qing-cheng; Pastan, Ira; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2002-06-01

    Several tumors, including mesothelioma and ovarian cancer, can overexpress mesothelin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked differentiation glycoprotein. The membrane-bound type of mesothelin is found in the blood of cancer patients at a very low level, which makes mesothelin a good candidate for targeted therapy of certain cancers. An antimesothelin disulfide-linked Fv (SS1 Fv) was fused to a truncated mutant of Pseudomonas exotoxin A to produce the recombinant immunotoxin SS1(dsFv)-PE38, which has a high binding affinity to mesothelin (Kd = 0.7 nM). Our studies in vitro showed that SS1(dsFv)-PE38 is significantly more cytotoxic to the high-mesothelin-producing NCI-H226 human non-small cell lung cancer cells than to human lung adenocarcinoma PC14PE6 cells, which do not express mesothelin. When administered at a nontoxic dose of 500 microg/kg on days 7, 9, and 11 to nude mice injected i.v. with the two human lung cancer cell lines, SS1(dsFv)-PE38 selectively inhibited experimental lung metastases produced by the mesothelin-producing NCI-H226 cells. Our data indicate that mesothelin-producing squamous cell carcinoma of the lung may be a good target for this immunotoxin. PMID:12479219

  17. Pegylated Trastuzumab Fragments Acquire an Increased in Vivo Stability but Show a Largely Reduced Affinity for the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selis, Fabio; Focà, Giuseppina; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Marra, Carla; Di Mauro, Concetta; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Politano, Annalisa; Sanna, Riccardo; Ruvo, Menotti; Tonon, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    PEGylation of biomolecules is a major approach to increase blood stream half-life, stability and solubility of biotherapeutics and to reduce their immunogenicity, aggregation potential and unspecific interactions with other proteins and tissues. Antibodies have generally long half-lives due to high molecular mass and stability toward proteases, however their size lowers to some extent their potential because of a reduced ability to penetrate tissues, especially those of tumor origin. Fab or otherwise engineered smaller fragments are an alternative but are less stable and are much less well retained in circulation. We have here investigated the effects of various PEGylations on the binding properties and in vivo half-life of Fab fragments derived from the enzymatic splitting of Trastuzumab. We find that PEGylation increases the half-life of the molecules but also strongly affects the ability to recognize the target antigen in a way that is dependent on the extent and position of the chemical modification. Data thus support the concept that polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugation on Trastuzumab Fabs increases half-life but reduces their affinity and this is a fine balance, which must be carefully considered for the design of strategies based on the use of antibody fragments. PMID:27043557

  18. Deep Sequencing-guided Design of a High Affinity Dual Specificity Antibody to Target Two Angiogenic Factors in Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Patrick; Lee, Chingwei V; Sanowar, Sarah; Wu, Ping; Stinson, Jeremy; Harris, Seth F; Fuh, Germaine

    2015-09-01

    The development of dual targeting antibodies promises therapies with improved efficacy over mono-specific antibodies. Here, we engineered a Two-in-One VEGF/angiopoietin 2 antibody with dual action Fab (DAF) as a potential therapeutic for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Crystal structures of the VEGF/angiopoietin 2 DAF in complex with its two antigens showed highly overlapping binding sites. To achieve sufficient affinity of the DAF to block both angiogenic factors, we turned to deep mutational scanning in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs). By mutating all three CDRs of each antibody chain simultaneously, we were able not only to identify affinity improving single mutations but also mutation pairs from different CDRs that synergistically improve both binding functions. Furthermore, insights into the cooperativity between mutations allowed us to identify fold-stabilizing mutations in the CDRs. The data obtained from deep mutational scanning reveal that the majority of the 52 CDR residues are utilized differently for the two antigen binding function and permit, for the first time, the engineering of several DAF variants with sub-nanomolar affinity against two structurally unrelated antigens. The improved variants show similar blocking activity of receptor binding as the high affinity mono-specific antibodies against these two proteins, demonstrating the feasibility of generating a dual specificity binding surface with comparable properties to individual high affinity mono-specific antibodies. PMID:26088137

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers with Stimuli-Responsive Affinity: Progress and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Chen; Yue Ma; Jianmin Pan; Zihui Meng; Guoqing Pan; Börje Sellergren

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers (SR-MIPs) have attracted considerable research interest in recent years due to the potential applications in drug delivery, biotechnology and separation sciences. This review comprehensively summarizes various SR-MIPs, including the design and applications of thermo-responsive MIPs, pH-responsive MIPs, photo-responsive MIPs, biomolecule-responsive MIPs and ion-responsive MIPs. Besides the development of current SR-MIPs, the advanta...

  20. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation...... occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions....... Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in...

  1. Consumer responses to ethnic targeted marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.-S.I.A. Lenoir (Anne-Sophie); S. Puntoni (Stefano)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Marketing is impacted more than ever by demographic change, to the extent that practitioners targeting ethnic groups should re-think their approach depending upon the strength with which different generations identify with their cultural heritage.

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers with Stimuli-Responsive Affinity: Progress and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers (SR-MIPs have attracted considerable research interest in recent years due to the potential applications in drug delivery, biotechnology and separation sciences. This review comprehensively summarizes various SR-MIPs, including the design and applications of thermo-responsive MIPs, pH-responsive MIPs, photo-responsive MIPs, biomolecule-responsive MIPs and ion-responsive MIPs. Besides the development of current SR-MIPs, the advantages as well as the disadvantages of current SR-MIPs were also displayed from different angles, especially preparation methods and application fields. We believe this review will be helpful to guide the design, development and application of SR-MIPs.

  3. Evidence of self-affine multiplicity fluctuation of target residues in 84Kr-AgBr interactions at 1.7 AGeV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong-Hai; LI Hui-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Self-afline multiplicity scaling is investigated in the framework of a two-dimensional factorial mo-ment methodology using the concept of the Hurst exponent (H). Analyzing the experimental data of target evaporated fragments emitted in84Kr-AgBr interactions at 1.7 AGeV revealed that the best power law behav-ior is exhibited for H = 0.3 indicating a self-affine multiplicity fluctuation pattern. A signal of multifractality is also observed from knowledge of the anomalous fractal dimension dq extracted from the intermittency exponent aq of the anisotropic phase space scenario.

  4. Aptamers and Capillary Electrophoresis: physico-chemical characterization of free aptamers in solution or grafted on nanoparticles, and study of their affinity towards a proteic target in view of their use in sensitive diagnosis methods

    OpenAIRE

    Girardot, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are short oligonucleotides selected by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and showing great affinity and specificity towards their target. This work deals with the physico-chemical characterization of aptamers and the study of their affinity towards their target, using capillary electrophoresis, through the example of an aptamer selected against a highly basic protein, lysozyme. After having evaluated several modifications of the capillary surface, the ...

  5. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  6. Integration of Affinity Selection-Mass Spectrometry and Functional Cell-Based Assays to Rapidly Triage Druggable Target Space within the NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, Victoria D; Andrews, Christine L; Richards, Matthew P; Xu, Zangwei; Sun, Tianxiao; Chen, Yiping; Hashke, Andrew; Smotrov, Nadya; Fernandez, Rafael; Nickbarg, Elliott B; Chamberlin, Chad; Sauvagnat, Berengere; Curran, Patrick J; Boinay, Ryan; Saradjian, Peter; Allen, Samantha J; Byrne, Noel; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Ford, Rachael E; Hall, Dawn L; Kornienko, Maria; Rickert, Keith W; Sharma, Sujata; Shipman, Jennifer M; Lumb, Kevin J; Coleman, Kevin; Dandliker, Peter J; Kariv, Ilona; Beutel, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The primary objective of early drug discovery is to associate druggable target space with a desired phenotype. The inability to efficiently associate these often leads to failure early in the drug discovery process. In this proof-of-concept study, the most tractable starting points for drug discovery within the NF-κB pathway model system were identified by integrating affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) with functional cellular assays. The AS-MS platform Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) was used to rapidly screen 15 NF-κB proteins in parallel against large-compound libraries. ALIS identified 382 target-selective compounds binding to 14 of the 15 proteins. Without any chemical optimization, 22 of the 382 target-selective compounds exhibited a cellular phenotype consistent with the respective target associated in ALIS. Further studies on structurally related compounds distinguished two chemical series that exhibited a preliminary structure-activity relationship and confirmed target-driven cellular activity to NF-κB1/p105 and TRAF5, respectively. These two series represent new drug discovery opportunities for chemical optimization. The results described herein demonstrate the power of combining ALIS with cell functional assays in a high-throughput, target-based approach to determine the most tractable drug discovery opportunities within a pathway. PMID:26969322

  7. Identification of Thioredoxin Disulfide Targets Using a Quantitative Proteomics Approach Based on Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Maeda, Kenji; Svensson, Birte

    2008-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous protein disulfide reductase involved in a wide range of cellular redox processes. A large number of putative target proteins have been identified using proteomics approaches, but insight into target specificity at the molecular level is lacking since the reactivi...

  8. Response to targeted therapy in urachal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Testa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a young woman diagnosed with metastatic urachal carcinoma. A multimodal approach was used for the management of this patient. Due to disease progression despite surgery and two different chemotherapy regimens (neoadjuvant capecitabine + irinotecan + oxaliplatin and docetaxel + cisplatin after surgery, treatment with sunitinib was eventually started. Treatment with sunitinib resulted in stable disease and improvement of symptoms. Sunitinib was discontinued due to the occurrence of metrorrhagia, and restarted one week later. Disease eventually progressed and the patient died 18 months after the onset of symptoms. This is the first report on the use of sunitinib for the management of urachal carcinoma and provides initial evidence supporting the use of targeted therapy in this setting.

  9. Inverse Thermal-Responsive Glyco-Polypeptide Polymer for One-Pot Glyco-Affinity Proteomic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Long Sun

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Proteins are ultimately responsible for the biological processes in cells, body fluids, and tissue specimens.This presents enormous challenges to the field of proteomics, which aims to identify, characterize and assign biological functions of all proteins. Determining individual protein in complex biological samples often requires some type of separation as a prerequisite for its measurement. The complexities of chemical structure and in the physiological function of every protein contribute to the problems encountered when trying to separate these biomolecules. A number of techniques exist for the separation of proteins, however, a separation technique that satisfies speed of analysis, selectivity, sensitivity, adequate throughput capacity, and affordable cost of analysis is unavailable yet.

  10. Cellular automaton model of cell response to targeted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that the response of cells to low doses of radiation is not linear and cannot be accurately extrapolated from the high dose response. To investigate possible mechanisms involved in the behaviour of cells under very low doses of radiation, a cellular automaton (CA) model was created. The diffusion and consumption of glucose in the culture dish were computed in parallel to the growth of cells. A new model for calculating survival probability was introduced; the communication between targeted and non-targeted cells was also included. Early results on the response of non-confluent cells to targeted irradiation showed the capability of the model to take account for the non-linear response in the low-dose domain

  11. Targeting Customers for Demand Response Based on Big Data

    OpenAIRE

    Kwac, Jungsuk; Rajagopal, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Selecting customers for demand response programs is challenging and existing methodologies are hard to scale and poor in performance. The existing methods were limited by lack of temporal consumption information at the individual customer level. We propose a scalable methodology for demand response targeting utilizing novel data available from smart meters. The approach relies on formulating the problem as a stochastic integer program involving predicted customer responses. A novel approximat...

  12. A high-affinity [18 F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. Methods: p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(−) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blocking agent. Results: The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(−) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. Conclusions: We have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa. Advances in Knowledge: The only FDA-approved imaging agent for PCa, Prostascint®, targets PSMA but suffers from inherent shortcomings. The data acquired in this manuscript confirmed that our new generation of [18F]-labeled PSMA inhibitor exhibited promising in vivo performance as a PET imaging agent for PCa and is well-positioned for subsequent clinical trials. Implications for Patient Care Our preliminary data demonstrate that this tracer

  13. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Juergen M; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the "knobs-into-holes" technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2-3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  14. Xanthate-Functional Temperature-Responsive Polymers: Effect on Lower Critical Solution Temperature Behavior and Affinity toward Sulfide Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Sung; Forbes, Elizaveta; Franks, George V; Connal, Luke A

    2016-08-01

    Xanthate-functional polymers represent an exciting opportunity to provide temperature-responsive materials with the ability to selectively attach to specific metals, while also modifying the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior. To investigate this, random copolymers of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) with xanthate incorporations ranging from 2 to 32% were prepared via free radical polymerization. Functionalization with 2% xanthate increased the LCST by 5 °C relative to the same polymer without xanthate. With increasing xanthate composition, the transition temperature increased and the transition range broadened until a critical composition of the hydrophilic xanthate groups (≥18%) where the transition disappeared completely. The adsorption of the polymers at room temperature onto chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) surfaces increased with xanthate composition, while adsorption onto quartz (SiO2) was negligible. These findings demonstrate the affinity of these functional smart polymers toward copper iron sulfide relative to quartz surfaces, presumably due to the interactions between xanthate and specific metal centers. PMID:27434760

  15. Mature high-affinity immune responses to (pro)insulin anticipate the autoimmune cascade that leads to type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Achenbach, Peter; Koczwara, Kerstin; Knopff, Annette; Naserke, Heike; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2004-01-01

    Children at risk for type 1 diabetes can develop early insulin autoantibodies (IAAs). Many, but not all, of these children subsequently develop multiple islet autoantibodies and diabetes. To determine whether disease progression is reflected by autoantibody maturity, IAA affinity was measured by competitive radiobinding assay in first and subsequent IAA-positive samples from children followed from birth in the BABYDIAB cohort. IAA affinity in first positive samples ranged from less than 106 l...

  16. Monoclonal nicotine-specific antibodies reduce nicotine distribution to brain in rats: dose- and affinity-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyler, D E; Roiko, S A; Benlhabib, E; LeSage, M G; St Peter, J V; Stewart, S; Fuller, S; Le, C T; Pentel, P R

    2005-07-01

    Vaccination against nicotine is being studied as a potential treatment for nicotine dependence. Some of the limitations of vaccination, such as variability in antibody titer and affinity, might be overcome by instead using passive immunization with nicotine-specific monoclonal antibodies. The effects of antibodies on nicotine distribution to brain were studied using nicotine-specific monoclonal antibodies (NICmAbs) with K(d) values ranging from 60 to 250 nM and a high-affinity polyclonal rabbit antiserum (K(d) = 1.6 nM). Pretreatment with NICmAbs substantially increased the binding of nicotine in serum after a single nicotine dose, reduced the unbound nicotine concentration in serum, and reduced the distribution of nicotine to brain. Efficacy was directly related to antibody affinity for nicotine. Efficacy of the highest affinity NICmAb, NICmAb311, was dose-related, with the highest dose reducing nicotine distribution to brain by 78%. NICmAb311 decreased nicotine clearance by 90% and prolonged the terminal half-life of nicotine by 120%. At equivalent doses, NICmAb311 was less effective than the higher affinity rabbit antiserum but comparable efficacy could be achieved by increasing the NICmAb311 dose. These data suggest that passive immunization with nicotine-specific monoclonal antibodies substantially alters nicotine pharmacokinetics in a manner similar to that previously reported for vaccination against nicotine. Antibody efficacy is a function of both dose and affinity for nicotine. PMID:15843487

  17. Radiation responses of stem cells: targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cells are fundamental to the development of any tissue or organism via their ability to self-renew, which is aided by their unlimited proliferative capacity and their ability to produce fully differentiated offspring, often from multiple lineages. Stems cells are long lived and have the potential to accumulate mutations, including in response to radiation exposure. It is thought that stem cells have the potential to be induced into a cancer stem cell phenotype and that these may play an important role in resistance to radiotherapy. For radiation-induced carcinogenesis, the role of targeted and non-targeted effects is unclear with tissue or origin being important. Studies of genomic instability and bystander responses have shown consistent effects in haematopoietic models. Several models of radiation have predicted that stem cells play an important role in tumour initiation and that bystander responses could play a role in proliferation and self-renewal. (authors)

  18. Bystander responses in cells models; targets, dosimetry and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of microbeam approaches has been a major advance in probing the relevance of bystander responses in cell and tissue models. Our own studies at the Gray Cancer Institute have used both a charged particle microbeam, producing protons and helium ions and a soft X-ray microprobe, delivering focused carbon-K, aluminium-K and titanium-K soft X-rays. Using these techniques we have been able to build up a comprehensive picture of the underlying differences between bystander responses and direct effects in cell and tissue-like models. What is now clear is that bystander dose-response relationships, the underlying mechanisms of action and the targets involved are not the same as those observed for direct irradiation of DNA in the nucleus. Our recent studies have shown bystander responses induced in human or hamster cells even when radiation is deposited away from the nucleus in cytoplasmic targets either after charged particle or soft X-ray exposure. Importantly, the level of bystander effect, measured as cell killing was similar to that observed when the same amount of energy was deposited but targeted to the nucleus. In other studies, we have shown that underlying determination of the level of response is the energy deposited in a single cell rather than the number of cells hit. Also the overall response at low doses may be dominated by bystander signaling. These observations have significance for our understanding of radiation risk at low doses including those of environmental exposures and the applicability of the Linear Non Threshold model. The realization that cell to cell signaling is important for radiation response may also open up new therapeutic opportunities to either improve tumor cell kill or protect normal tissues if the pathways underpinning bystander signaling can be elucidated and controlled

  19. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies. PMID:26420919

  20. Providing affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guglielmi, Michel; Johannesen, Hl

    , Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. Research found that there was a lack of identity or sense of belonging and nothing anchoring people to the region as a whole. Common affinity is somehow forced to the people of East England and thereby we came to the conclusion that a single landmark or a...... a sense of belonging to people sharing deterritorialized synchronic experiences. But at the same time, the immersion experience is highly low tech and desperately analog, mainly based on fabulation, cartoons, and mushrooms growing in local forests. It ultimately appeals to the experienced sense of...

  1. IBI302, a promising candidate for AMD treatment, targeting both the VEGF and complement system with high binding affinity in vitro and effective targeting of the ocular tissue in healthy rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinyi; Li, Jia; Xu, Xianxing; Wang, Chunming; Cheng, Yuanguo

    2016-04-01

    Uncontrolled activation of complement and upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play fundamental roles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, most drugs used to treat AMD focus on a single target, and the percentage of effectively treated patients in clinical practice needs to be improved. Therefore, novel AMD treatment approaches are needed. IBI302 is a novel bispecific decoy receptor fusion protein designed with both a VEGF inhibition domain and a complement cascade inhibition domain, which are connected by the Fc region of human immunoglobulin. In this study, we systematically evaluated the binding affinity between IBI302 and VEGF isoforms and complement proteins by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. Anti-VEGF blockers (aflibercept and bevacizumab) and complement receptor 1 were used as references. The SPR assay results indicated that IBI302 could bind different VEGF isoforms and complement proteins with high affinity. The biological activity of IBI302 was also studied. IBI302 showed an inhibitory effect on human primary umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and the activation of complement pathways in vitro. Finally, the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of IBI302 were evaluated in rhesus monkeys. The PK results showed that after a 0.5 mg/eye intravitreal dosage, IBI302 became rapidly distributed from the vitreous humor into targeted tissues and remained active over 504 h. Overall, the favorable anti-angiogenic and anti-complement effects of IBI302 along with the good PK profiles in rhesus monkeys support the selection and development of IBI302 as a promising candidate for AMD treatment. PMID:26919788

  2. Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses from copepod hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Amalia A; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    Copepods are abundant crustaceans that harbor diverse bacterial communities, yet the nature of their interactions with microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we report that Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses in the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis We pre-treated E. affinis with an antibiotic cocktail and exposed them to either a zooplankton specialist (Vibrio sp. F10 9ZB36) or a free-living species (Vibrio ordalii 12B09) for 24 h. We then identified via RNA-Seq a total of 78 genes that were differentially expressed following Vibrio exposure, including homologs of C-type lectins, chitin-binding proteins and saposins. The response differed between the two Vibrio treatments, with the greatest changes elicited upon inoculation with V. sp. F10 We suggest that these differentially regulated genes play important roles in cuticle integrity, the innate immune response, and general stress response, and that their expression may enable E. affinis to recognize and regulate symbiotic vibrios. We further report that V. sp. F10 culturability is specifically altered upon colonization of E. affinis These findings suggest that rather than acting as passive environmental vectors, copepods discriminately interact with vibrios, which may ultimately impact the abundance and activity of copepod-associated bacteria. PMID:27056917

  3. Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles for targeting the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinzhi; Lane, Lucas A; Nie, Shuming

    2015-12-10

    One of the most challenging and clinically important goals in nanomedicine is to deliver imaging and therapeutic agents to solid tumors. Here we discuss the recent design and development of stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles for targeting the common attributes of solid tumors such as their acidic and hypoxic microenvironments. This class of stimuli-responsive nanoparticles is inactive during blood circulation and under normal physiological conditions, but is activated by acidic pH, enzymatic up-regulation, or hypoxia once they extravasate into the tumor microenvironment. The nanoparticles are often designed to first "navigate" the body's vascular system, "dock" at the tumor sites, and then "activate" for action inside the tumor interstitial space. They combine the favorable biodistribution and pharmacokinetic properties of nanodelivery vehicles and the rapid diffusion and penetration properties of smaller drug cargos. By targeting the broad tumor habitats rather than tumor-specific receptors, this strategy has the potential to overcome the tumor heterogeneity problem and could be used to design diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles for a broad range of solid tumors. PMID:26341694

  4. Radiolabeled high affinity peptidomimetic antagonist selectively targets {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} receptor-positive tumor in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beom-Su [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lim, Esther [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Hee Park, Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shin, In Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Danthi, S. Narasimhan [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Hwang, In Sook [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Le, Nhat [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Yu, Sarah [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Xie Jianwu [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Li, King C.P. [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Paik, Chang H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)]. E-mail: cpaik@mail.nih.gov

    2007-05-15

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to synthesize radiolabeled peptidomimetic integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} antagonists that selectively target integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} receptor and clear rapidly from the whole body. Methods: Integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} antagonists, 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-2-ylamino) ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-(S)-aminoethylsulfonyl-amino-{beta}-alanine (IA) and 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-pyrimidin-2-ylamino)-ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-(S)-[N- (3-amino-neopenta-1-carbamyl)]-aminoethylsulfonylamino-{beta}-alanine hydrochloride (IAC), a hydrophobic carbamate derivative of IA, were conjugated with 2-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-DOTA at the amino terminus and labeled with {sup 111}In. The {sup 111}In labeled IA and IAC were subjected to in vitro receptor binding, biodistribution and imaging studies using nude mice bearing the receptor-positive M21 human melanoma xenografts. Results: The {sup 111}In-labeled IA (40%) and -IAC (72%) specifically bound in vitro to {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} (0.8 {mu}M) at a molar excess. This receptor binding was completely blocked by a molar excess of cold IA to {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}. The higher receptor-binding affinity of the {sup 111}In-labeled IAC was reflected in higher tumor uptake and retention: 5.6{+-}1.4 and 4.5{+-}0.7 %ID/g vs. 3.8{+-}0.9 and 2.0{+-}0.3 %ID/g for the {sup 111}In-labeled IA at 0.33 and 2 h. The tumor uptakes were inhibited by the co-injection of 200 {mu}g of IA, indicating that the uptake was receptor mediated. These antagonists were excreted primarily via the renal system. The {sup 111}In activity retained in the whole body was quite comparable between the {sup 111}In-labeled IA (24% ID) and the {sup 111}In-labeled IAC (33% ID) at 2 h. The higher peak tumor uptake and longer retention resulted in higher tumor-to-background ratios for the {sup 111}In-labeled IAC at 2 h with 9.7, 2.3, 0.8, 1.9, 7.1, 2.2, 0.9, 3.7 and 9.9 for blood, liver, kidney, lung, heart, stomach

  5. Ventilatory and metabolic responses of burrowing owls, Athene cunicularia, to moderate and extreme hypoxia: analysis of the hypoxic ventilatory threshold vs. hemoglobin oxygen affinity relationship in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Delbert L; Boggs, Dona F; Kilgore, Trevor J; Colby, Conrad; Williams, Burl R; Bavis, Ryan W

    2008-06-01

    We measured ventilation, oxygen consumption and blood gases in burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) breathing moderate and extreme hypoxic gas mixtures to determine their hypoxic ventilatory threshold (HVT) and to assess if they, like other birds and mammals, exhibit a relationship between HVT and hemoglobin O2 affinity (P(50)) of their blood. An earlier report of an attenuated ventilatory responsiveness of this species to hypoxia was enigmatic given the low O2 affinity (high P(50)) of burrowing owl hemoglobin. In the current study, burrowing owls breathing 11% and 9% O2 showed a significantly elevated total ventilation. The arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) at which ventilation is elevated above normoxic values in burrowing owls was 58 mm Hg. This threshold value conforms well to expectations based on the high P(50) of their hemoglobin and the HVT vs. P(50) relationship for birds developed in this study. Correcting for phylogenetic relatedness in the multi-species analysis had no effect on the HVT vs. P(50) relationship. Also, because burrowing owls in this study did not show a hypometabolic response at any level of hypoxia (even at 9% O2); HVT described in terms of percent change in oxygen convection requirement is identical to that based on ventilation alone. PMID:17561426

  6. A versatile fluorescent biosensor based on target-responsive graphene oxide hydrogel for antibiotic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bing; Zhao, Huimin; Du, Lei; Gan, Xiaorong; Quan, Xie

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensing platform based on graphene oxide (GO) hydrogel was developed through a fast and facile gelation, immersion and fluorescence determination process, in which the adenosine and aptamer worked as the co-crosslinkers to connect the GO sheets and then form the three-dimensional (3D) macrostructures. The as-prepared hydrogel showed high mechanical strength and thermal stability. The optimal hydrogel had a linear response for oxytetracycline (OTC) of 25-1000μg/L and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 25μg/L. Moreover, together with the high affinity of the aptamer for its target, this assay exhibited excellent sensitivity and selectivity. According to its design principle, the as-designed hydrogel was also tested to possess the generic detection function for other molecules by simply replacing its recognition element, which is expected to lay a foundation to realize the assembly of functionalized hierarchical graphene-based materials for practical applications in analytical field. PMID:27132000

  7. Stimuli-responsive PEGylated prodrugs for targeted doxorubicin delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, stimuli-sensitive prodrugs have been extensively studied for the rapid “burst” release of antitumor drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficiency. In this study, a novel stimuli-sensitive prodrug containing galactosamine as a targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol)–doxorubicin (PEG–DOX) conjugate, was developed for targeting HepG2 human liver cancer cells. To obtain the PEG–DOX conjugate, both galactosamine-decorated poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (Gal-PEG-CHO) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (mPEG-CHO) were firstly synthesized and functionalized with dithiodipropionate dihydrazide (TPH) through direct reductive amination via Schiff's base formation, and then DOX molecules were chemically conjugated to the hydrazide end groups of TPH-functionalized Gal-/m-PEG chains via pH-sensitive hydrazone linkages. The chemical structures of TPH-functionalized PEG and PEG–DOX prodrug were confirmed by 1H NMR analysis. The PEG–DOX conjugate could self-assemble into spherical nanomicelles with a mean diameter of 140 nm, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The drug loading content and loading efficiency in the prodrug nanomicelles were as high as 20 wt.% and 75 wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release studies showed that DOX was released rapidly from the prodrug nanomicelles at the intracellular levels of pH and reducing agent. Cellular uptake and MTT experiments demonstrated that the galactosamine-decorated prodrug nanomicelles were more efficiently internalized into HepG2 cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis process and exhibited a higher toxicity, compared with pristine prodrug nanomicelles. These results suggest that the novel Gal-PEG–DOX prodrug nanomicelles have tremendous potential for targeted liver cancer therapy. - Highlights: • A novel stimuli-responsive PEGylated prodrugs is synthesized. • PEGylated prodrugs can self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles (140 nm).

  8. Stimuli-responsive PEGylated prodrugs for targeted doxorubicin delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Minghui; Qian, Junmin, E-mail: jmqian@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Ting; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, stimuli-sensitive prodrugs have been extensively studied for the rapid “burst” release of antitumor drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficiency. In this study, a novel stimuli-sensitive prodrug containing galactosamine as a targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol)–doxorubicin (PEG–DOX) conjugate, was developed for targeting HepG2 human liver cancer cells. To obtain the PEG–DOX conjugate, both galactosamine-decorated poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (Gal-PEG-CHO) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (mPEG-CHO) were firstly synthesized and functionalized with dithiodipropionate dihydrazide (TPH) through direct reductive amination via Schiff's base formation, and then DOX molecules were chemically conjugated to the hydrazide end groups of TPH-functionalized Gal-/m-PEG chains via pH-sensitive hydrazone linkages. The chemical structures of TPH-functionalized PEG and PEG–DOX prodrug were confirmed by {sup 1}H NMR analysis. The PEG–DOX conjugate could self-assemble into spherical nanomicelles with a mean diameter of 140 nm, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The drug loading content and loading efficiency in the prodrug nanomicelles were as high as 20 wt.% and 75 wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release studies showed that DOX was released rapidly from the prodrug nanomicelles at the intracellular levels of pH and reducing agent. Cellular uptake and MTT experiments demonstrated that the galactosamine-decorated prodrug nanomicelles were more efficiently internalized into HepG2 cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis process and exhibited a higher toxicity, compared with pristine prodrug nanomicelles. These results suggest that the novel Gal-PEG–DOX prodrug nanomicelles have tremendous potential for targeted liver cancer therapy. - Highlights: • A novel stimuli-responsive PEGylated prodrugs is synthesized. • PEGylated prodrugs can self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles (140 nm

  9. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  10. Monocarboxylate transporters as targets and mediators in cancer therapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, F; Pinheiro, C; Morais-Santos, F; Azevedo-Silva, J; Queirós, O; Preto, A; Casal, M

    2014-12-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) belong to a family of transporters, encoded by the SLC16 gene family, which is presently composed by 14 members, but only MCT1 to 4 have been biochemically characterized. They have important functions in healthy tissues, being involved in the transmembrane transport of lactic acid and other monocarboxylic acids in human cells. One of the recently recognized hallmarks of cancer is altered metabolism, with high rates of glucose consumption and consequent lactate production. To maintain this metabolic phenotype, cancer cells upregulate a series of plasma membrane proteins, including MCTs. MCT1 and MCT4, in particular, play a dual role in the maintenance of the metabolic phenotype of tumour cells. On one hand, they facilitate the efflux of lactate and, on the other hand, they contribute to the preservation of the intracellular pH, by co-transporting a proton. Thus, MCTs are attractive targets in cancer therapy, especially in cancers with a hyper-glycolytic and acid-resistant phenotype. Recent evidence demonstrates that MCTs are involved in cancer cell uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, including 3-bromopyruvate. In this way MCTs can act as "Trojan horses", as their elevated expression in cancer cells can mediate the entry of this chemotherapeutic agent into the cells and selectively kill cancer cells. As a result, MCTs will be mediators of chemotherapeutic response, and their expression can be used as a molecular marker to predict response to chemotherapy. PMID:24921258

  11. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jun Zhou*, Yi-Ting Tsai*, Hong Weng, Ewin N Tang, Ashwin Nair, Digant P Davé, Liping Tang, Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX *Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo.Keywords: in vivo imaging, nanoprobe, neutrophils, inflammation, biocompatibility

  12. Affine functors and duality

    OpenAIRE

    J. Navarro; Sancho, C.; Sancho, P.

    2009-01-01

    A functor of sets $\\mathbb X$ over the category of $K$-commutative algebras is said to be an affine functor if its functor of functions, $\\mathbb A_{\\mathbb X}$, is reflexive and $\\mathbb X=\\Spec \\mathbb A_{\\mathbb X}$. We prove that affine functors are equal to a direct limit of affine schemes and that affine schemes, formal schemes, the completion of affine schemes along a closed subscheme, etc., are affine functors. Endowing an affine functor $\\mathbb X$ with a functor of monoids structure...

  13. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hijiri Hasegawa; Nasa Savory; Koichi Abe; Kazunori Ikebukuro

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of a...

  14. Class II-targeted antigen is superior to CD40-targeted antigen at stimulating humoral responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frleta, D; Demian, D; Wade, W F

    2001-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of using monoclonal antibodies to target antigen (avidin) to different surface molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC). In particular, we targeted CD40 to test whether the "adjuvant" properties of CD40 signaling combined with targeted antigen would result in enhanced serologic responses. We targeted avidin to class II as a positive control and to CD11c as a negative control. These surface proteins represent an ensemble of surface molecules that signal upon ligation and that are expressed on professional APC, in particular dendritic cells (DC). We observed that targeting class II molecules on APC was superior to targeting CD40, or CD11c. However, CD40 and CD11c could function as targets for antigen bound monoclonal antibodies under certain conditions. Interestingly, inclusion of anti-CD40 mAb with the targeting anti-class II-targeted antigens negatively affects humoral response, suggesting that CD40 signaling under certain conditions may suppress processing and/or presentation of targeted antigen. PMID:11360928

  15. Dynamic response of the target container under pulsed heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liping Ni [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The structural mechanics of a liquid target container for pulsed spallation sources have been simulated using both a commercial code and a PSI-developed program. Results from the transient thermal-structural analysis showed that, due to inertia effects, the dynamic stress in the target container is contributed mainly from direct heating in the initial time stage, and later from the pressure wave in the target liquid once it reaches the wall. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  16. Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins is correlated with the presence of high-affinity binding sites in the brush border membrane of target insect midguts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding studies were performed with two 125I-labeled Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins on brush border membrane vesicles prepared from the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta or the cabbage butterfly Pieris brassicae. One δ-endotoxin, Bt2-protoxin, is a 130-kDa recombinant crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. berliner. It kills larvae of both insect species. The active Bt2-toxin is a 60-kDa proteolytic fragment of the Bt2-protoxin. It binds saturably and with high affinity to brush border membrane vesicles from the midgut of both species. The other δ-endotoxin, Bt4412-protoxin, is a 136-kDa crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, which is highly toxic for P. brassicae, but not for M. sexta larvae. Bt4412-toxin, obtained after proteolytic activation of Bt4412-protoxin, shows high-affinity saturable binding to P. brassicae vesicles but not to M. sexta vesicles. The correlation between toxicity and specific binding is further strengthened by competition studies. Other B. thuringiensis δ-endotoxins active against M. sexta compete for binding of 125I-labeled Bt2-toxin to M. sexta vesicles, whereas toxins active against dipteran or coleopteran larvae do not compete. Bt2-toxin and Bt4412-toxin bind to different sites on P. brassicae vesicles

  17. Structural dynamic response of target container against proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Stress waves were analyzed for a target container of neutron science research project using a high-intensity proton accelerator that generates high energy and high current proton beam. In the mercury target, the pulsed proton beam generates intense power density in the course of spallation reaction and causes pressure wave in the mercury and stress wave in the target container due to a sudden temperature change. Structural integrity of the target container depends on the power intensity at a maximum energy deposit. A broad proton profile is favorable to the structural assessment of the container rather than narrow one. Stress wave have propagated in the target container at a speed of sound. It only takes 0.1 ms for the size of 40 cm length stainless steel container. Further assessment is necessary to optimize a geometry of the container and establish a method to evaluate a life time. (author)

  18. Structural dynamic response of target container against proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress waves were analyzed for a target container of neutron science research project using a high-intensity proton accelerator that generates high energy and high current proton beam. In the mercury target, the pulsed proton beam generates intense power density in the course of spallation reaction and causes pressure wave in the mercury and stress wave in the target container due to a sudden temperature change. Structural integrity of the target container depends on the power intensity at a maximum energy deposit. A broad proton profile is favorable to the structural assessment of the container rather than narrow one. Stress wave have propagated in the target container at a speed of sound. It only takes 0.1 ms for the size of 40 cm length stainless steel container. Further assessment is necessary to optimize a geometry of the container and establish a method to evaluate a life time. (author)

  19. Proliferative responses and binding properties of hematopoietic cells transfected with low-affinity receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin M, and ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Gearing, D P; Ziegler, S F; Comeau, M R; Friend, D; Thoma, B; Cosman, D; Park, L.; Mosley, B

    1994-01-01

    Specific low-affinity receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM; gp130), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF; receptor alpha, CNTFR alpha) may be utilized in various combinations to generate high-affinity binding sites and signal transduction. We have tested the ability of combinations of these receptors to transduce a proliferative signal in BAF-B03 cells. Coexpression of the LIF receptor and gp130 in these cells conferred high-affinity LIF and OSM binding and respo...

  20. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and [3H]PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of [3H]PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation)

  1. Identification of S-phase DNA damage-response targets in fission yeast reveals conservation of damage-response networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A; Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M; Elledge, Stephen J; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-06-28

    The cellular response to DNA damage during S-phase regulates a complicated network of processes, including cell-cycle progression, gene expression, DNA replication kinetics, and DNA repair. In fission yeast, this S-phase DNA damage response (DDR) is coordinated by two protein kinases: Rad3, the ortholog of mammalian ATR, and Cds1, the ortholog of mammalian Chk2. Although several critical downstream targets of Rad3 and Cds1 have been identified, most of their presumed targets are unknown, including the targets responsible for regulating replication kinetics and coordinating replication and repair. To characterize targets of the S-phase DDR, we identified proteins phosphorylated in response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced S-phase DNA damage in wild-type, rad3∆, and cds1∆ cells by proteome-wide mass spectrometry. We found a broad range of S-phase-specific DDR targets involved in gene expression, stress response, regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, and DNA replication and repair. These targets are highly enriched for proteins required for viability in response to MMS, indicating their biological significance. Furthermore, the regulation of these proteins is similar in fission and budding yeast, across 300 My of evolution, demonstrating a deep conservation of S-phase DDR targets and suggesting that these targets may be critical for maintaining genome stability in response to S-phase DNA damage across eukaryotes. PMID:27298342

  2. Dual Affine invariant points

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Mathieu; Schuett, Carsten; Werner, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    An affine invariant point on the class of convex bodies in R^n, endowed with the Hausdorff metric, is a continuous map p which is invariant under one-to-one affine transformations A on R^n, that is, p(A(K))=A(p(K)). We define here the new notion of dual affine point q of an affine invariant point p by the formula q(K^{p(K)})=p(K) for every convex body K, where K^{p(K)} denotes the polar of K with respect to p(K). We investigate which affine invariant points do have a dual point, whether this ...

  3. Examination of Studies Targeting Social Skills with Pivotal Response Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkus Genc, Gulden; Vuran, Sezgin

    2013-01-01

    In early education, especially in effective teaching to children with autism spectrum disorders, the teaching methods which are applicable in natural settings like pivotal response treatment (PRT) are commonly used. It is one of the naturalistic intervention models aiming to facilitate the stimulant-response generalization, decrease the dependency…

  4. Polarizing T and B cell responses by APC-targeted subunit vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig eGrødeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines mostly aim at the induction of specific neutralizing antibodies. While antibodies are important for protection against a particular virus strain, T cells can recognize epitopes that will offer broader protection against influenza. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine format by which protein antigens can be targeted specifically to receptors on antigen presenting cells (APCs. The DNA-encoded vaccine proteins are homodimers, each chain consisting of a targeting unit, a dimerization unit, and an antigen. The strategy of targeting antigen to APCs greatly enhances immune responses as compared to non-targeted controls. Furthermore, targeting of antigen to different receptors on APCs can polarize the immune response to different arms of immunity. Here, we discuss how targeting of hemagglutinin (HA to MHC class II molecules increases Th2 and IgG1 antibody responses, whereas targeting to chemokine receptors XCR1 or CCR1/3/5 increases Th1 and IgG2a responses, in addition to CD8+ T cell responses. We also discuss these results in relation to work published by others on APC-targeting. Differential targeting of APC surface molecules may allow the induction of tailor-made phenotypes of adaptive immune responses that are optimal for protection against various infectious agents, including influenza virus.

  5. Know your epidemic, know your response: targeting HIV in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Curth, Nadja; Bridge, Jamie;

    2010-01-01

    predictable funding for a sustainable response that incorporates prevention and treatment scale-up. Strong political leadership and the involvement of affected communities are key to developing a systematic and comprehensive response. The potential consequences of inaction in Asia are enormous: even small...... have been many successes in the HIV response in Asia over the past decade, great challenges clearly remain - especially when addressing most-at-risk populations, who are often criminalized, marginalized, and discriminated against. These groups face significant legal and social barriers to accessing HIV...

  6. Nonintentional behavioural responses to psi : hidden targets and hidden observers

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mary-Jane Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Psi is the phenomenon of apparently responding to or receiving information by means other than the recognised senses. Psi information may influence human behaviour, without the individual intending this or even being aware of it. This thesis seeks to investigate nonintentional behavioural responses to psi. We present five empirical studies that investigated nonintentional behavioural responses to psi information. In each study, the psi information was hidden from participants, ...

  7. Age-related decrease in the responsiveness of rat articular chondrocytes to EGF is associated with diminished number and affinity for the ligand of cell surface binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribault, D; Habib, M; Abdel-Majid, K; Barbara, A; Mitrovic, D

    1998-01-12

    The effect of age on the responsiveness of articular chondrocytes (AC) to epidermal growth factor (EGF) was examined. Cells were isolated by digesting cartilage fragments from the humeral and femoral heads of 21-day old, 8- and 14-month old rats with collagenase. The cells were cultured under standard conditions, as monolayers. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation by the DNA content of subconfluent cultures. [125I]EGF binding and the amounts of EGF and EGF-receptor mRNAs were determined using confluent cells. DNA synthesis was decreased with age of animals. EGF stimulated DNA synthesis in cultures in 1- and 8-month old rats at low serum concentrations (< 5%), and in cultures in 14-month old animals at high serum concentrations. It also increased 5-day DNA content of cultures compared to serum-treated controls but this effect was weak in cultures in 14-month old rats. The number of high affinity binding sites for [125I]EGF decreased from 37,800 in the 1-month old to 1950 in the 14-month old rat AC. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) also decreased with age: 0.18 nmol/l in the 1-month old; 0.12 nmol/l in the 8-month old; and 0.07 nmol/l in the 14-month old cells. AC in older rats contained more EGF mRNA and less EGF-receptor mRNA. Incubation of the cells with EGF resulted in down regulation of the EGF- and upregulation of EGF-receptor mRNA expressions. These findings show the age-related quantitative and qualitative alterations in EGF and EGF-receptor which may account, at least in part, for the diminished responsiveness of senescent AC to EGF. PMID:9509392

  8. Stable Extended Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Coiled Coil as an Effective Target in an Assay for High-Affinity Fusion Inhibitors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Lifeng; Balogh, Edina; Gochin, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 coiled-coil domain is an important target for fusion inhibitors, including the peptide T20, which has been approved as a drug against HIV-1. Research into nonpeptide fusion inhibitors has focused primarily on a hydrophobic pocket located within the coiled coil and has so far yielded compounds with relatively weak fusion inhibitory activity. Here, we describe metal ion-assisted stabilization of an extended 39-residue construct of gp41, which...

  9. Is It Reliable to Use Common Molecular Docking Methods for Comparing the Binding Affinities of Enantiomer Pairs for Their Protein Target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, David; Caballero, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Molecular docking is a computational chemistry method which has become essential for the rational drug design process. In this context, it has had great impact as a successful tool for the study of ligand-receptor interaction modes, and for the exploration of large chemical datasets through virtual screening experiments. Despite their unquestionable merits, docking methods are not reliable for predicting binding energies due to the simple scoring functions they use. However, comparisons between two or three complexes using the predicted binding energies as a criterion are commonly found in the literature. In the present work we tested how wise is it to trust the docking energies when two complexes between a target protein and enantiomer pairs are compared. For this purpose, a ligand library composed by 141 enantiomeric pairs was used, including compounds with biological activities reported against seven protein targets. Docking results using the software Glide (considering extra precision (XP), standard precision (SP), and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS) modes) and AutoDock Vina were compared with the reported biological activities using a classification scheme. Our test failed for all modes and targets, demonstrating that an accurate prediction when binding energies of enantiomers are compared using docking may be due to chance. We also compared pairs of compounds with different molecular weights and found the same results. PMID:27104528

  10. Affine Grassmann codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Beelen, Peter; Ghorpade, Sudhir Ramakant

    2010-01-01

    We consider a new class of linear codes, called affine Grassmann codes. These can be viewed as a variant of generalized Reed-Muller codes and are closely related to Grassmann codes.We determine the length, dimension, and the minimum distance of any affine Grassmann code. Moreover, we show that...... affine Grassmann codes have a large automorphism group and determine the number of minimum weight codewords....

  11. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram, E-mail: tejabhiram@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Ramasamy, Shivaraman [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy [Department of Pharmacy practice, SRM College of Pharmacy, Chennai 603203 (India)

    2015-04-15

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex.

  12. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex

  13. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke ou...

  14. Bisphosphonates target B cells to enhance humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tonti, Elena; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Galliverti, Gabriele; Moseman, E. Ashley; Di Lucia, Pietro; Amabile, Angelo; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Giovanni, Marco; Sironi, Laura; Chevrier, Nicolas; Sitia, Giovanni; Gennari, Luigi; Guidotti, Luca G.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that are widely used to inhibit loss of bone mass in patients. We show here that the administration of clinically relevant doses of bisphosphonates in mice increases antibody responses to live and inactive viruses, proteins, haptens and existing commercial vaccine formulations. Bisphosphonates exert this adjuvant-like activity in the absence of CD4+ and γδ T cells, neutrophils or dendritic cells and their effect does not rely on local macrophage depletion ...

  15. Decreasing affinity of CAR-T cells targeting HER2 to increase therapeutic out-come against tumors%降低亲和力提高HER2-CAR-T细胞治疗的安全性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章浩; 叶真龙; 钱其军

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether decreasing affinity of CAR-T cells can increase their therapeutic outcome or not .Methods Moderate affinity La-G3HER2-CAR and high affinity Ha-G3HER2-CAR were constructed ,and electroporated to modify T cells .Western blot assay ,FCM assay and the RTCA DP cytotoxic equipment were applied to test the CAR expres-sion and cytotoxic function of CAR-T cells .Results 43000 and 58000 exogenous CD3ζfragments were expressed by both La-G3HER2-CAR-T cells and Ha-G3HER2-CAR-T cells with 58 .1% and 69 .0% transfection rate respectively .High affinity Ha-G3HER2-CAR-T cells effectively killed all target tumor cells by which HER2 was expressed at variable expression levels , while moderate affinity La-G3HER2-CAR-T cells specifically killed HER2 high-level expressing SK-OV-3 and BT474 cells ,and showed weaker cytotoxicity on HER2 moderate-level expressing MDA-MB-231 and HCC-202 cells ,and showed no cytotoxicity on HER2 low-level expressing MCF-7 and 293 cells .The underlying mechanic investigation found that La-G3HER2-CAR-T cells and Ha-G3HER2-CAR-T cells were differentially activated by co-culture with MDA-MB-231 (CD107a:8 .2% vs 71 .6% , IFN-γ:66 .3% vs 83 .4% ,TNF-α:73 .4% vs 94 .1% ) .Conclusion Moderate affinity La-G3HER2-CAR-T cells have en-hanced specific cytotoxicity toward target tumor cells compared to high affinity Ha-G3HER2-CAR-T cells ,decreasing affinity of CAR-T cell is a promising strategy to increase the therapeutic outcome of CAR-T cell based immunotherapies .%目的 探讨降低CAR-T细胞亲和力是否能有效提高其杀伤特异性,减少"脱靶效应".方法 构建靶向HER2的中等亲和力和高亲和力的La-G3HER2-CAR和Ha-G3HER2-CAR并电穿孔转染T细胞,采用Western Blot、FCM技术和xCELLigence RTCA DP进行CAR载体表达和杀伤功能检测.结果 La-G3HER2-CAR-T细胞和Ha-G3HER2-CAR-T细胞分别表达43000和58000的外源CAR载体片段,转染效率分别为58.1%和69.0%.高亲和力的Ha-G3HER2-CAR-T

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of copper-64 radiolabeled [DUPA-6-Ahx-(NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2], a novel bivalent targeting vector having affinity for two distinct biomarkers (GRPr/PSMA) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are two identifying biomarkers expressed in very high numbers on prostate cancer cells and could serve as a useful tool for molecular targeting and diagnosis of disease via positron-emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was to produce the multipurpose, bivalent [DUPA-6-Ahx-(64Cu-NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2] radioligand for prostate cancer imaging, where DUPA = (2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid), a small-molecule, PSMA-targeting probe, 6Ahx = 6-aminohexanoic acid, 5-Ava = 5-aminovaleric acid, NODAGA = [2-(4,7-biscarboxymethyl)-1,4,7-(triazonan-1-yl)pentanedioic acid] (a derivative of NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid)), and BBN(7-14)NH2 = bombesin, a GRPr-specific peptide targeting probe. Methods: The PSMA/GRPr dual targeting ligand precursor [DUPA-6-Ahx-K-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2], was synthesized by solid-phase and manual peptide synthesis, after which NODAGA was added via manual conjugation to the ε-amine of lysine (K). The new bivalent GRPr/PSMA targeting vector was purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and metallated with 64CuCl2 and natCuCl2. The receptor binding affinity was evaluated in human, prostate, PC-3 (GRPr-positive) and LNCaP (PSMA-positive) cells and the tumor-targeting efficacy determined in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) and athymic nude mice bearing PC-3 and LNCaP tumors. Whole-body maximum intensity microPET/CT images of PC-3/LNCaP tumor-bearing mice were obtained 18 h post-injection (p.i.). Results: Competitive binding assays in PC-3 and LNCaP cells indicated high receptor binding affinity for the [DUPA-6-Ahx-(natCu-NODAGA)-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH2] conjugate. MicroPET scintigraphy in PC-3/LNCaP tumor-bearing mice indicated that xenografted tumors were visible at 18 h p.i. with collateral, background

  17. Structure-function studies of DNA binding domain of response regulator KdpE reveals equal affinity interactions at DNA half-sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Narayanan

    Full Text Available Expression of KdpFABC, a K(+ pump that restores osmotic balance, is controlled by binding of the response regulator KdpE to a specific DNA sequence (kdpFABC(BS via the winged helix-turn-helix type DNA binding domain (KdpE(DBD. Exploration of E. coli KdpE(DBD and kdpFABC(BS interaction resulted in the identification of two conserved, AT-rich 6 bp direct repeats that form half-sites. Despite binding to these half-sites, KdpE(DBD was incapable of promoting gene expression in vivo. Structure-function studies guided by our 2.5 Å X-ray structure of KdpE(DBD revealed the importance of residues R193 and R200 in the α-8 DNA recognition helix and T215 in the wing region for DNA binding. Mutation of these residues renders KdpE incapable of inducing expression of the kdpFABC operon. Detailed biophysical analysis of interactions using analytical ultracentrifugation revealed a 2∶1 stoichiometry of protein to DNA with dissociation constants of 200±100 and 350±100 nM at half-sites. Inactivation of one half-site does not influence binding at the other, indicating that KdpE(DBD binds independently to the half-sites with approximately equal affinity and no discernable cooperativity. To our knowledge, these data are the first to describe in quantitative terms the binding at half-sites under equilibrium conditions for a member of the ubiquitous OmpR/PhoB family of proteins.

  18. Artificial ground motions compatible with both specified peak displacement and target response spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposed an artificial ground motion simulating method, which may be used to generate the artificial seismic ground shaking time history that satisfies both the target absolute acceleration response spectrum and the target peak ground displacement. Firstly, the method utilizes the traditional method, which modifies the Fourier amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain, to generate the initial acceleration time history, a(t), with the given peak ground acceleration (APG), response spectrum ST(ω, ζ), and intensity envelope being prescribed as targets; and then through superimposing the narrow-band time history in the time domain, the method further modulates a(t) to make its peak displacement approach the target peak ground displacement, i.e., DPGT, as well as to improve its fitting precision to the target response spectrum. The numerical examples demonstrates that the results obtained by this proposed algorithm possess are with very high fitting precision. (authors)

  19. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  20. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Martine A.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C.; Kalay, Hakan; Van Bloois, Louis; Storm, G; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhance

  1. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C.M.; Kalay, Hakan; Bloois, van Louis; Storm, G.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Kooyk, van Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhanced with st

  2. "Siglec"ting the allergic response for therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    As a physician-scientist, I have pursued research related to translational immunology with the goal of improving our ability to diagnose and treat allergic, immunologic and other diseases involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. We have tried to delineate novel mechanisms of human disease, working whenever possible with primary human cells and tissues, attempting to identify targets that might be amenable to the development of new therapies. As a general strategy, we have compared eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils to look for pathways in inflammation that were unique to distinct subsets of these cells. In doing so, the concepts of glycobiology did not enter my mind until we began noticing some intriguing functional differences involving selectins and their ligands among these cell types. One simple observation, that neutrophils were coated with a glycan that allowed them to interact with an endothelial adhesion molecule while eosinophils lacked this structure, pried open the glyco-door for me. Fruitful collaborations with card-carrying glycobiologists soon followed that have forever positively influenced our science, and have enhanced our hypotheses, experimental design, research opportunities and discoveries. Within a few years, we helped to discover Siglec-8, an I-type lectin expressed only on human eosinophils, basophils, mast cells. This receptor, together with its closest mouse counterpart Siglec-F, has been the primary focus of our work now for over a decade. If not for those in the fields of glycobiology and glycoimmunology, my lab would not have made much progress toward the goal of leveraging Siglec-8 for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26911285

  3. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1(157-165) peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW "peg" dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2-4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165) target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  4. In Silico Characterization of the Binding Affinity of Dendrimers to Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs): Can PBPs be Potential Targets for Antibacterial Dendrimers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Kalhapure, Rahul; Suleman, Nadia; Govender, Thirumala

    2016-04-01

    We have shown that novel silver salts of poly (propyl ether) imine (PETIM) dendron and dendrimers developed in our group exhibit preferential antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus. This led us to examine whether molecular modeling methods could be used to identify the key structural design principles for a bioactive lead molecule, explore the mechanism of binding with biological targets, and explain their preferential antibacterial activity. The current article reports the conformational landscape as well as mechanism of binding of generation 1 PETIM dendron and dendrimers to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in order to understand the antibacterial activity profiles of their silver salts. Molecular dynamics at different simulation protocols and conformational analysis were performed to elaborate on the conformational features of the studied dendrimers, as well as to create the initial structure for further binding studies. The results showed that for all compounds, there were no significant conformational changes due to variation in simulation conditions. Molecular docking calculations were performed to investigate the binding theme between the studied dendrimers and PBPs. Interestingly, in significant accordance with the experimental data, dendron and dendrimer with aliphatic cores were found to show higher activity against S. aureus than the dendrimer with an aromatic core. The latter showed higher activity against MRSA. The findings from this computational and molecular modeling report together with the experimental results serve as a road map toward designing more potent antibacterial dendrimers against resistant bacterial strains. PMID:26743758

  5. Superior Colliculus Responses to Attended, Unattended, and Remembered Saccade Targets during Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Suryadeep; Nazari, Sina Alipour; Yan, Xiaogang; Wang, Hongying; Crawford, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    In realistic environments, keeping track of multiple visual targets during eye movements likely involves an interaction between vision, top-down spatial attention, memory, and self-motion information. Recently we found that the superior colliculus (SC) visual memory response is attention-sensitive and continuously updated relative to gaze direction. In that study, animals were trained to remember the location of a saccade target across an intervening smooth pursuit (SP) eye movement (Dash et al., 2015). Here, we modified this paradigm to directly compare the properties of visual and memory updating responses to attended and unattended targets. Our analysis shows that during SP, active SC visual vs. memory updating responses share similar gaze-centered spatio-temporal profiles (suggesting a common mechanism), but updating was weaker by ~25%, delayed by ~55 ms, and far more dependent on attention. Further, during SP the sum of passive visual responses (to distracter stimuli) and memory updating responses (to saccade targets) closely resembled the responses for active attentional tracking of visible saccade targets. These results suggest that SP updating signals provide a damped, delayed estimate of attended location that contributes to the gaze-centered tracking of both remembered and visible saccade targets. PMID:27147987

  6. Affinity-Based Screening of Tetravalent Peptides Identifies Subtype-Selective Neutralizers of Shiga Toxin 2d, a Highly Virulent Subtype, by Targeting a Unique Amino Acid Involved in Its Receptor Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Takaaki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Miho; Shimizu, Eiko; Zhang, Baihao; Funamoto, Satoru; Yamasaki, Shinji; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), a major virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), can be classified into two subgroups, Stx1 and Stx2, each consisting of various closely related subtypes. Stx2 subtypes Stx2a and Stx2d are highly virulent and linked with serious human disorders, such as acute encephalopathy and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Through affinity-based screening of a tetravalent peptide library, we previously developed peptide neutralizers of Stx2a in which the structure was optimized to bind to the B-subunit pentamer. In this study, we identified Stx2d-selective neutralizers by targeting Asn16 of the B subunit, an amino acid unique to Stx2d that plays an essential role in receptor binding. We synthesized a series of tetravalent peptides on a cellulose membrane in which the core structure was exactly the same as that of peptides in the tetravalent library. A total of nine candidate motifs were selected to synthesize tetravalent forms of the peptides by screening two series of the tetravalent peptides. Five of the tetravalent peptides effectively inhibited the cytotoxicity of Stx2a and Stx2d, and notably, two of the peptides selectively inhibited Stx2d. These two tetravalent peptides bound to the Stx2d B subunit with high affinity dependent on Asn16. The mechanism of binding to the Stx2d B subunit differed from that of binding to Stx2a in that the peptides covered a relatively wide region of the receptor-binding surface. Thus, this highly optimized screening technique enables the development of subtype-selective neutralizers, which may lead to more sophisticated treatments of infections by Stx-producing EHEC. PMID:27382021

  7. The specificity of targeted vaccines for APC surface molecules influences the immune response phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig Grødeland

    Full Text Available Different diseases require different immune responses for efficient protection. Thus, prophylactic vaccines should prime the immune system for the particular type of response needed for protection against a given infectious agent. We have here tested fusion DNA vaccines which encode proteins that bivalently target influenza hemagglutinins (HA to different surface molecules on antigen presenting cells (APC. We demonstrate that targeting to MHC class II molecules predominantly induced an antibody/Th2 response, whereas targeting to CCR1/3/5 predominantly induced a CD8(+/Th1 T cell response. With respect to antibodies, the polarizing effect was even more pronounced upon intramuscular (i.m delivery as compared to intradermal (i.d. vaccination. Despite these differences in induced immune responses, both vaccines protected against a viral challenge with influenza H1N1. Substitution of HA with ovalbumin (OVA demonstrated that polarization of immune responses, as a consequence of APC targeting specificity, could be extended to other antigens. Taken together, the results demonstrate that vaccination can be tailor-made to induce a particular phenotype of adaptive immune responses by specifically targeting different surface molecules on APCs.

  8. Bidimensional microdosimetry as a tool for evaluating biological response and target structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper addresses the issue of the relevance of microdosimetric spectra for quantifying the effects of low-level exposures to radiation. Biological response functions derived to date from numerical analyses of radiobiological and microdosimetric observations refer to uniform targets of a preassumed size. The characteristic two-modal shape of functions obtained for several endpoints reflects the importance of two different pathways of damage formation, each of them related in fact to different target sizes. The correlated energy deposition distributions in such a bidimensional system are suggested as a more appropriate physical input for analysing biological response and target structure. (author)

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a (18F-labeled high affinity NOTA conjugated bombesin antagonist as a PET ligand for GRPR-targeted tumor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Varasteh

    Full Text Available Expression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in prostate cancer suggests that this receptor can be used as a potential molecular target to visualize and treat these tumors. We have previously investigated an antagonist analog of bombesin (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2, RM26 conjugated to 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid (NOTA via a diethylene glycol (PEG2 spacer (NOTA-P2-RM26 labeled with (68Ga and (111In. We found that this conjugate has favorable properties for in vivo imaging of GRPR-expression. The focus of this study was to develop a (18F-labelled PET agent to visualize GRPR. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F using aluminum-fluoride chelation. Stability, in vitro binding specificity and cellular processing tests were performed. The inhibition efficiency (IC50 of the [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 was compared to that of the (natGa-loaded peptide using (125I-Tyr(4-BBN as the displacement radioligand. The pharmacokinetics and in vivo binding specificity of the compound were studied. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F within 1 h (60-65% decay corrected radiochemical yield, 55 GBq/µmol. The radiopeptide was stable in murine serum and showed high specific binding to PC-3 cells. [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 showed a low nanomolar inhibition efficiency (IC50=4.4±0.8 nM. The internalization rate of the tracer was low. Less than 14% of the cell-bound radioactivity was internalized after 4 h. The biodistribution of [(18F]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 demonstrated rapid blood clearance, low liver uptake and low kidney retention. The tumor uptake at 3 h p.i. was 5.5±0.7 %ID/g, and the tumor-to-blood, -muscle and -bone ratios were 87±42, 159±47, 38±16, respectively. The uptake in tumors, pancreas and other GRPR-expressing organs was significantly reduced when excess amount of non-labeled peptide was co-injected. The low uptake in bone suggests a high in vivo stability of the Al-F bond. High contrast PET image was obtained 3 h p

  10. Electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar responses to complex targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis

    2014-05-01

    defined through a constant real value, or else its frequency-dispersion properties can be taken into account by incorporating into the model Debye approximations. The electromagnetic source can be represented as a simple line of current (in the case of two-dimensional models), a Hertzian dipole, a bow tie antenna, or else, the realistic description of a commercial antenna can be included in the model [2]. Preliminary results for some of the proposed cells are presented, obtained by using GprMax [3], a freeware tool which solves Maxwell's equations by using a second order in space and time Finite-Difference Time-Domain algorithm. B-Scans and A-Scans are calculated at 1.5 GHz, for the total electric field and for the field back-scattered by targets embedded in the cells. A detailed description of the structures, together with the relevant numerical results obtained to date, are available for the scientific community on the website of COST Action TU1208, www.GPRadar.eu. Research groups working on the development of electromagnetic forward- and inverse-scattering techniques, as well as on imaging methods, might test and compare the accuracy and applicability of their approaches on the proposed set of scenarios. The aim of this initiative is not that of identifying the best methods, but more properly to indicate the range of reliability of each approach, highlighting its advantages and drawbacks. In the future, the realisation of the proposed concrete cells and the acquisition of GPR experimental data would allow a very effective benchmark for forward and inverse scattering methods. References [1] R. Yelf, A. Ward, "Nine steps to concrete wisdom." Proc. 13th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, Lecce, Italy, 21-25 June 2010, pp. 1-8. [2] C. Warren, A. Giannopoulos, "Creating FDTD models of commercial GPR antennas using Taguchi's optimisation method." Geophysics (2011), 76, article ID G37. [3] A. Giannopoulos, "Modelling ground penetrating radar by GPRMAX

  11. Affine and Projective Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, M K

    1995-01-01

    An important new perspective on AFFINE AND PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. This innovative book treats math majors and math education students to a fresh look at affine and projective geometry from algebraic, synthetic, and lattice theoretic points of view. Affine and Projective Geometry comes complete with ninety illustrations, and numerous examples and exercises, covering material for two semesters of upper-level undergraduate mathematics. The first part of the book deals with the correlation between synthetic geometry and linear algebra. In the second part, geometry is used to introduce lattice theory

  12. High-affinity human leucocyte antigen class I binding variola-derived peptides induce CD4(+) T cell responses more than 30 years post-vaccinia virus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M.; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Lund, Ole; Dziegiel, M. H.; Buus, S.; Claesson, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-gamma secreting T lymphocytes against pox virus-derived synthetic 9-mer peptides were tested by enzyme-linked immunospot in peripheral blood of individuals vaccinated with vaccinia virus more than 30 years ago. The peptides were characterized biochemically as high-affinity human leucoc...

  13. Artificial ground motion compatible with specified ground shaking peaks and target response spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Fengxin; Zhang Yushan; Lü Hongshan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a hybrid simulation method to generate artificial ground motion time histories that are compatible with specified peak seismic acceleration, velocity and displacement as well as the target response spectrum of absolute acceleration. First, based on traditional methods that match the target spectrum in the frequency domain, an initial acceleration time history was synthesized to satisfy the specified peak acceleration, target spectral acceleration and intensity envelope. Second, by using the inversion formula of the seismic input to a linear single-degree-of-freedom system and by superimposing a series of narrow-band time histories in the time domain, the initial time history is further modified to allow its peak velocity and displacement to approach the targets and improve its matching precision with the target spectrum.Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate that the proposed method achieves good agreement with the target values.

  14. Affine dynamics with torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueltekin, Kemal [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schroedinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor. (orig.)

  15. Characterization of wheat miRNAs and their target genes responsive to cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, ZongBo; Hai, BenZhai; Guo, JunLi; Li, YongFang; Zhang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    A increasing number of microRNAs have been shown to play important regulatory roles in plant responses to various metal stresses. However, little information about miRNAs especially miRNAs responsive to cadmium (Cd) stress is available in wheat. To investigate the role of miRNAs in responses to Cd stress, wheat seedlings were subjected to 250 μM Cd solution for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h, and analyses of morphological and physiological changes as well as the expression of five miRNAs and their corresponding targets were carried out. Our results demonstrated that miRNAs and their targets were differentially expressed in leaves and roots of wheat seedlings exposed to Cd stress. Furthermore, miR398 may involve in oxidative stress tolerance by regulating its target CSD to participate in Cd stress. Among ten miRNA-target pairs studied, nine pairs showed complex regulation relationship in leaves and roots of wheat seedlings exposed to Cd stress. These findings suggested that miRNAs are involved in the mediation of Cd stress signaling responses in wheat. The characterization of the miRNAs and the associated targets in responses to Cd exposure provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanism of heavy metal tolerance in plants. PMID:26854408

  16. Affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras: Actions on tensor space

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, Zajj; Virk, Rahbar

    2012-01-01

    The affine and degenerate affine Birman-Murakami-Wenzl (BMW) algebras arise naturally in the context of Schur-Weyl duality for orthogonal and symplectic quantum groups and Lie algebras, respectively. Cyclotomic BMW algebras, affine and cyclotomic Hecke algebras, and their degenerate versions are quotients. In this paper we explain how the affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras are tantalizers (tensor power centralizer algebras) by defining actions of the affine braid group and the degenerate affine braid algebra on tensor space and showing that, in important cases, these actions induce actions of the affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras. We then exploit the connection to quantum groups and Lie algebras to determine universal parameters for the affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras. Finally, we show that the universal parameters are central elements--the higher Casimir elements for orthogonal and symplectic enveloping algebras and quantum groups.

  17. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  18. Doing worse, but feeling happy: Social comparison and identification in response to upward and downward targets

    OpenAIRE

    Groothof, H.A.K.; Siero, F.W.; Buunk, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated people’s responses to exposure to downward and upward targets. In Study 1, among 197 participants, it was predicted and found that such exposure led to a contrast effect on self-evaluation, and to an assimilation effect on affect. In Study 2, among 148 participants, it was predicted and found that the contrast effect on self-evaluation occurred in particular when participants were induced to compare themselves with the target, and that the assimilation effect on affect occurre...

  19. Application of Adenosine Triphosphate Affinity Probe and Scheduled Multiple-Reaction Monitoring Analysis for Profiling Global Kinome in Human Cells in Response to Arsenite Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation of cellular components catalyzed by kinases plays important roles in cell signaling and proliferation. Quantitative assessment of perturbation in global kinome may provide crucial knowledge for elucidating the mechanisms underlying the cytotoxic effects of environmental toxicants. Here, we utilized an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) affinity probe coupled with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to assess quantitatively the arsenite-induced alteration o...

  20. Competitive Selection from Single Domain Antibody Libraries Allows Isolation of High-Affinity Antihapten Antibodies That Are Not Favored in the llama Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Sofia Tabares-da; Rossotti, Martin; Carleiza, Carmen; Carrión, Federico; Pritsch, Otto; Ahn, Ki Chang; Last, Jerold A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2011-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) found in camelids, lack a light chain and their antigen-binding site sits completely in the heavy-chain variable domain (VHH). Their simplicity, thermostability, and ease in expression have made VHHs highly attractive. While this has been successfully exploited for macromolecular antigens, their application to the detection of small molecules is still limited to a very few reports, mostly describing low affinity VHHs. Using triclocarban (TCC) as a model hapten...

  1. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions. PMID:27507473

  2. Ablative response of microdisc targets irradiated by 1.064 μm light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ablative response of microdisc targets irradiated with an 8 ns FWHM Nd:Glass laser is compared to that of infinite foils. The front surface exhaust velocity, plasma electron temperature, and size of the x-ray emitting region of Al and Fe targets irradiated with a laser intensity of 1013 to 1014 W/cm2 are relatively independent of the target diameter and thickness, but the x-ray conversion efficiency (E/sub photon/ greater than or equal to 700 eV) decreases as these target dimensions decrease. These observations suggest that in this experiment: (1) lateral heat flow is not a significant factor: (2) a steady-state ablative flow at the front surface is established; and (3) two-dimensional effects lead to an increase in the density gradient or to a decrease in the average density in the vicinity of the x-ray emitting region as the target dimensions decrease

  3. Individualized therapies in colorectal cancer: KRAS as a marker for response to EGFR-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kuiyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individualized therapies that are tailored to a patient's genetic composition will be of tremendous value for treatment of cancer. Recently, Kirsten ras (KRAS status has emerged as a predictor of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeted therapies. In this article, we will discuss targeted therapies for colorectal cancers (CRC based on EGFR signaling pathway and review published data about the potential usefulness of KRAS as a biological marker for response to these therapies. Results from relevant studies published since 2005 and unpublished results presented at national meetings were retrieved and summarized. These studies reflected response (or lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic CRC as a function of KRAS status. It has become clear that patients with colorectal cancer whose tumor has an activating mutation in KRAS do not respond to monoclonal antibody therapies targeting EGFR. It should now become a standard practice that any patients being considered for EGFR targeted therapies have their tumors tested for KRAS status and only those with wild-type KRAS being offered such therapies.

  4. Impact velocity vs. target hardness relationships for equivalent response of cask structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, impact velocity vs. target hardness relationships for cask structures are reviewed. The relationships are based on equivalent cask responses in terms of equal deceleration or similar cask damages. By examining several past cask or container tests as well as some analytical results, some conclusions can be drawn about the relationship between target hardness and equivalent impact velocities. This relationship clearly shows that the cask response to impact is cask-dependent and that the rigid sphere impact model results in an unconservative estimate of equivalent velocity

  5. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhua Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the “affinity maturation” step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3 monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34, COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5, Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1 and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11. The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold.

  6. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T; Vinci, Chris R; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the "affinity maturation" step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  7. Response of Solid and Liquid Targets to High Power Proton Beams for Neutrino Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, P

    2000-01-01

    The response of solid and liquid targets to rapid heating by the incident proton beam is assessed in a classical way, among other things by solving the wave equation under linear conditions and in cylindrical symmetry. This study provides bench mark values and allows to identify critical issues and limiting factors which can help to guide further investigations with more sophisticated means.

  8. Differential inflammatory response to inhaled lipopolysaccharide targeted either to the airways or the alveoli in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Möller

    Full Text Available Endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS is a potent inducer of inflammation and there is various LPS contamination in the environment, being a trigger of lung diseases and exacerbation. The objective of this study was to assess the time course of inflammation and the sensitivities of the airways and alveoli to targeted LPS inhalation in order to understand the role of LPS challenge in airway disease.In healthy volunteers without any bronchial hyperresponsiveness we targeted sequentially 1, 5 and 20 µg LPS to the airways and 5 µg LPS to the alveoli using controlled aerosol bolus inhalation. Inflammatory parameters were assessed during a 72 h time period. LPS deposited in the airways induced dose dependent systemic responses with increases of blood neutrophils (peaking at 6 h, Interleukin-6 (peaking at 6 h, body temperature (peaking at 12 h, and CRP (peaking at 24 h. 5 µg LPS targeted to the alveoli caused significantly stronger effects compared to 5 µg airway LPS deposition. Local responses were studied by measuring lung function (FEV(1 and reactive oxygen production, assessed by hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in fractionated exhaled breath condensate (EBC. FEV(1 showed a dose dependent decline, with lowest values at 12 h post LPS challenge. There was a significant 2-fold H(2O(2 induction in airway-EBC at 2 h post LPS inhalation. Alveolar LPS targeting resulted in the induction of very low levels of EBC-H(2O(2.Targeting LPS to the alveoli leads to stronger systemic responses compared to airway LPS targeting. Targeted LPS inhalation may provide a novel model of airway inflammation for studying the role of LPS contamination of air pollution in lung diseases, exacerbation and anti-inflammatory drugs.

  9. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...

  10. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  11. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1) H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  12. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  13. Rapid antibody responses by low-dose, single-step, dendritic cell-targeted immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Griffiths, Michelle N.; Burton, Dennis R; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the kinetics of antibody responses in conventional and dendritic cell-targeted immunization by using a model antigen in mice. Targeting was achieved by linking the reporter antigen (polyclonal goat anti-hamster antibody) to N418, a hamster mAb that binds to the CD11c molecule on the surface of murine dendritic cells. Intradermal injection of submicrogram quantities of goat anti-hamster antibody complexed to mAb N418 elicited goat antibody-specific serum IgG in mice. Antigen-s...

  14. Affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras: The center

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, Zajj; Virk, Rahbar

    2011-01-01

    The degenerate affine and affine BMW algebras arise naturally in the context of Schur-Weyl duality for orthogonal and symplectic Lie algebras and quantum groups, respectively. Cyclotomic BMW algebras, affine Hecke algebras, cyclotomic Hecke algebras, and their degenerate versions are quotients. In this paper the theory is unified by treating the orthogonal and symplectic cases simultaneously; we make an exact parallel between the degenerate affine and affine cases via a new algebra which takes the role of the affine braid group for the degenerate setting. A main result of this paper is an identification of the centers of the affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras in terms of rings of symmetric functions which satisfy a "cancellation property" or "wheel condition" (in the degenerate case, a reformulation of a result of Nazarov). Miraculously, these same rings also arise in Schubert calculus, as the cohomology and K-theory of isotropic Grassmanians and symplectic loop Grassmanians. We also establish new inte...

  15. Hierarchical Affinity Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Inmar; Frey, Brendan J

    2012-01-01

    Affinity propagation is an exemplar-based clustering algorithm that finds a set of data-points that best exemplify the data, and associates each datapoint with one exemplar. We extend affinity propagation in a principled way to solve the hierarchical clustering problem, which arises in a variety of domains including biology, sensor networks and decision making in operational research. We derive an inference algorithm that operates by propagating information up and down the hierarchy, and is efficient despite the high-order potentials required for the graphical model formulation. We demonstrate that our method outperforms greedy techniques that cluster one layer at a time. We show that on an artificial dataset designed to mimic the HIV-strain mutation dynamics, our method outperforms related methods. For real HIV sequences, where the ground truth is not available, we show our method achieves better results, in terms of the underlying objective function, and show the results correspond meaningfully to geographi...

  16. Affinity driven social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  17. Affine General Equilibrium Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørn Eraker

    2008-01-01

    No-arbitrage models are extremely flexible modelling tools but often lack economic motivation. This paper describes an equilibrium consumption-based CAPM framework based on Epstein-Zin preferences, which produces analytic pricing formulas for stocks and bonds under the assumption that macro growth rates follow affine processes. This allows the construction of equilibrium pricing formulas while maintaining the same flexibility of state dynamics as in no-arbitrage models. In demonstrating the a...

  18. Gaussian Affine Feature Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Xiaochun

    2011-01-01

    A new method is proposed to get image features' geometric information. Using Gaussian as an input signal, a theoretical optimal solution to calculate feature's affine shape is proposed. Based on analytic result of a feature model, the method is different from conventional iterative approaches. From the model, feature's parameters such as position, orientation, background luminance, contrast, area and aspect ratio can be extracted. Tested with synthesized and benchmark data, the method achieve...

  19. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  20. Identification of treatment response predictors and potential molecular targets for chemo preventive and antiangiogenic therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the project were: To evaluate the cellular responses to anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic natural or synthetic compounds (chemo preventives, inhibitors of cell survival and inflammation related signal transduction). To identify bio markers for treatment response through the selection of targets that are common to or specific for anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activities. To analyze the regulation of the key tumor-promotion pathways Akt, HIF1α, NFκB. We focused our studies on the antiapoptotic role of the AKT survival pathway, which is involved in prostate tumor progression to an androgen-independent phenotype

  1. Modifying chemotherapy response by targeted inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor 4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translation is regulated predominantly at the initiation phase by several signal transduction pathways that are often usurped in human cancers, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis. mTOR exerts unique administration over translation by regulating assembly of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F, a heterotrimeric complex responsible for recruiting 40S ribosomes (and associated factors) to mRNA 5′ cap structures. Hence, there is much interest in targeted therapies that block eIF4F activity to assess the consequences on tumor cell growth and chemotherapy response. We report here that hippuristanol (Hipp), a translation initiation inhibitor that selectively inhibits the eIF4F RNA helicase subunit, eIF4A, resensitizes Eμ-Myc lymphomas to DNA damaging agents, including those that overexpress eIF4E—a modifier of rapamycin responsiveness. As Mcl-1 levels are significantly affected by Hipp, combining its use with the Bcl-2 family inhibitor, ABT-737, leads to a potent synergistic response in triggering cell death in mouse and human lymphoma and leukemia cells. Suppression of eIF4AI using RNA interference also synergized with ABT-737 in murine lymphomas, highlighting eIF4AI as a therapeutic target for modulating tumor cell response to chemotherapy

  2. On the Affine Isoperimetric Inequalities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wuyang Yu; Gangsong Leng

    2011-11-01

    We obtain an isoperimetric inequality which estimate the affine invariant -surface area measure on convex bodies. We also establish the reverse version of -Petty projection inequality and an affine isoperimetric inequality of $_{-p}K$.

  3. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Melchers M; Bontjer I; Tong T; Chung NP; Klasse PJ; Eggink D; Montefiori DC; Gentile M; Cerutti A; Olson WC; Berkhout B; Binley JM; Moore JP; Sanders RW

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these cells, would improve Env-specific antibody responses. Therefore, we fused trimeric Env gp140 to A PRoliferation-Inducing Ligand (APRIL), B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF), and CD40 Ligand (CD40L). The...

  4. Candidate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Arsenic Responsiveness of Protein Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Graham-Evans, Barbara E.; Udensi, Udensi K.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Rajendram V. Rajnarayanan; Anyanwu, Matthew N; Cohly, Hari H.P.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that causes skin cancer and binds to cysteine residues—a property that could be used to infer arsenic responsiveness of a target protein. Non-synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (nsSNPs) result in amino acid substitutions and may alter arsenic binding with cysteine residues. Thus, the objective of this investigation was to identify and analyze nsSNPs that lead to substitutions to or from cysteine residues as an indication of increased or decreased arsenic r...

  5. Generation of T Cell Responses Targeting the Reactive Metabolite of Halothane in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    YOU, QIANG; Cheng, Linling; Ju, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (IADRs) represent a significant problem in clinical practice and drug development. Studies of the underlying mechanisms of IADRs have been hampered by the lack of animal models. Halothane causes severe allergic hepatitis with clinical features consistent with an IADR. Our ultimate goal is to develop a mouse model of halothane hepatitis. Evidence suggests that adaptive immune responses targeting liver protein adducts of the reactive metabolite (TFA) play ...

  6. Dopamine responsiveness is regulated by targeted sorting of D2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, Selena E.; Enquist, Johan; Hopf, Frederic W.; Lee, Josephine H.; Gladher, Fredrik; Kharazia, Viktor; Waldhoer, Maria; Mailliard, William S.; Armstrong, Randall; Bonci, Antonello; Whistler, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant dopaminergic signaling is a critical determinant in multiple psychiatric disorders, and in many disease states, dopamine receptor number is altered. Here we identify a molecular mechanism that selectively targets D2 receptors for degradation after their activation by dopamine. The degradative fate of D2 receptors is determined by an interaction with G protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP). As a consequence of this GASP interaction, D2 responses in rat brain fail ...

  7. Identification of wild soybean miRNAs and their target genes responsive to aluminum stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Qiao-Ying

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important regulatory roles in development and stress response in plants. Wild soybean (Glycine soja has undergone long-term natural selection and may have evolved special mechanisms to survive stress conditions as a result. However, little information about miRNAs especially miRNAs responsive to aluminum (Al stress is available in wild soybean. Results Two small RNA libraries and two degradome libraries were constructed from the roots of Al-treated and Al-free G. soja seedlings. For miRNA identification, a total of 7,287,655 and 7,035,914 clean reads in Al-treated and Al-free small RNAs libraries, respectively, were generated, and 97 known miRNAs and 31 novel miRNAs were identified. In addition, 49 p3 or p5 strands of known miRNAs were found. Among all the identified miRNAs, the expressions of 30 miRNAs were responsive to Al stress. Through degradome sequencing, 86 genes were identified as targets of the known miRNAs and five genes were found to be the targets of the novel miRNAs obtained in this study. Gene ontology (GO annotations of target transcripts indicated that 52 target genes cleaved by conserved miRNA families might play roles in the regulation of transcription. Additionally, some genes, such as those for the auxin response factor (ARF, domain-containing disease resistance protein (NB-ARC, leucine-rich repeat and toll/interleukin-1 receptor-like protein (LRR-TIR domain protein, cation transporting ATPase, Myb transcription factors, and the no apical meristem (NAM protein, that are known to be responsive to stress, were found to be cleaved under Al stress conditions. Conclusions A number of miRNAs and their targets were detected in wild soybean. Some of them that were responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses were regulated by Al stress. These findings provide valuable information to understand the function of miRNAs in Al tolerance.

  8. Non-affine displacements in flexible polymer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Anindita; Wen, Qi; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, T. C.; Janmey, Paul A.; Yodh, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    The validity of the affine assumption in model flexible polymer networks is explored. To this end, the displacements of fluorescent tracer beads embedded in polyacrylamide gels are quantified by confocal microscopy under shear deformation, and the deviations of these displacements from affine responses are recorded. Non-affinity within the gels is quantified as a function of polymer chain density and cross-link concentration. Observations are in qualitative agreement with current theories of ...

  9. A target based approach identifies genomic predictors of breast cancer patient response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallett Robin M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of chemotherapy regimens in breast cancer patients is variable and unpredictable. Whether individual patients either achieve long-term remission or suffer recurrence after therapy may be dictated by intrinsic properties of their breast tumors including genetic lesions and consequent aberrant transcriptional programs. Global gene expression profiling provides a powerful tool to identify such tumor-intrinsic transcriptional programs, whose analyses provide insight into the underlying biology of individual patient tumors. For example, multi-gene expression signatures have been identified that can predict the likelihood of disease reccurrence, and thus guide patient prognosis. Whereas such prognostic signatures are being introduced in the clinical setting, similar signatures that predict sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy are not currently clinically available. Methods We used gene expression profiling to identify genes that were co-expressed with genes whose transcripts encode the protein targets of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. Results Here, we present target based expression indices that predict breast tumor response to anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy. Indeed, these signatures were independently predictive of chemotherapy response after adjusting for standard clinic-pathological variables such as age, grade, and estrogen receptor status in a cohort of 488 breast cancer patients treated with adriamycin and taxotere/taxol. Conclusions Importantly, our findings suggest the practicality of developing target based indices that predict response to therapeutics, as well as highlight the possibility of using gene signatures to guide the use of chemotherapy during treatment of breast cancer patients.

  10. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    OpenAIRE

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-pol...

  11. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah, E-mail: sitinurfadzilah077@ppinang.uitm.edu.my [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Faculty of Pharmacy, University Teknologi Mara (Malaysia); Lang, Matti A., E-mail: m.lang@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Abu-Bakar, A' edah, E-mail: a.abubakar@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  12. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  13. The effects of incidentally learned temporal and spatial predictability on response times and visual fixations during target detection and discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa R Beck

    Full Text Available Responses are quicker to predictable stimuli than if the time and place of appearance is uncertain. Studies that manipulate target predictability often involve overt cues to speed up response times. However, less is known about whether individuals will exhibit faster response times when target predictability is embedded within the inter-trial relationships. The current research examined the combined effects of spatial and temporal target predictability on reaction time (RT and allocation of overt attention in a sustained attention task. Participants responded as quickly as possible to stimuli while their RT and eye movements were measured. Target temporal and spatial predictability were manipulated by altering the number of: 1 different time intervals between a response and the next target; and 2 possible spatial locations of the target. The effects of target predictability on target detection (Experiment 1 and target discrimination (Experiment 2 were tested. For both experiments, shorter RTs as target predictability increased across both space and time were found. In addition, the influences of spatial and temporal target predictability on RT and the overt allocation of attention were task dependent; suggesting that effective orienting of attention relies on both spatial and temporal predictability. These results indicate that stimulus predictability can be increased without overt cues and detected purely through inter-trial relationships over the course of repeated stimulus presentations.

  14. Inhibition of MNK pathways enhances cancer cell response to chemotherapy with temozolomide and targeted radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzmil, Michal; Seebacher, Jan; Hess, Daniel; Behe, Martin; Schibli, Roger; Moncayo, Gerald; Frank, Stephan; Hemmings, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    Current standard-of-care treatment for malignant cancers includes radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Here, we report increased MAP kinase-interacting kinase (MNK)-regulated phosphorylation of translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in glioma cells upon temozolomide (TMZ) treatment and in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cells in response to targeted radionuclide therapy. Depletion of MNK activity by using two MNK inhibitors, CGP57380 or cercosporamide, as well as by MNK1-specific knockdown sensitized glioblastoma (GBM) cells and GBM-derived spheres to TMZ. Furthermore, CGP57380 treatment enhanced response of MTC cells to (177)Lu-labeled gastrin analogue. In order to understand how MNK signaling pathways support glioma survival we analyzed putative MNK substrates by quantitative phosphoproteomics in normal condition and in the presence of TMZ. We identified MNK inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation sites on eIF4G1, mutations of which either influenced eIF4E phosphorylation or glioma cell response to TMZ, pointing to altered regulation of translation initiation as a resistance mechanism. Pharmacological inhibition of overexpressed MNK1 by CGP57380 reduced eIF4E phosphorylation and induced association of inactive MNK1 with eIF4G1. Taken together, our data show an activation of MNK-mediated survival mechanisms in response to either glioma chemotherapy or MTC targeted radiation and suggest that inhibition of MNK activity represents an attractive sensitizing strategy for cancer treatments. PMID:27289018

  15. Gaussian Affine Feature Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiaopeng

    2011-01-01

    A new method is proposed to get image features' geometric information. Using Gaussian as an input signal, a theoretical optimal solution to calculate feature's affine shape is proposed. Based on analytic result of a feature model, the method is different from conventional iterative approaches. From the model, feature's parameters such as position, orientation, background luminance, contrast, area and aspect ratio can be extracted. Tested with synthesized and benchmark data, the method achieves or outperforms existing approaches in term of accuracy, speed and stability. The method can detect small, long or thin objects precisely, and works well under general conditions, such as for low contrast, blurred or noisy images.

  16. In vitro affinity maturation of a natural human antibody overcomes a barrier to in vivo affinity maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Fouts, Ashley E; Stengel, Katharina; Luan, Peng; Dillon, Michael; Liang, Wei-Ching; Feierbach, Becket; Kelley, Robert F; Hötzel, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies isolated from human donors are increasingly being developed for anti-infective therapeutics. These antibodies undergo affinity maturation in vivo, minimizing the need for engineering of therapeutic leads for affinity. However, the affinities required for some therapeutic applications may be higher than the affinities of the leads obtained, requiring further affinity maturation in vitro. To improve the neutralization potency of natural human antibody MSL-109 targeting human cytomegalovirus (CMV), we affinity matured the antibody against the gH/gL glycoprotein complex. A phage display library where most of the six complementary-determining regions (CDRs) were allowed to vary in only one amino acid residue at a time was used to scan for mutations that improve binding affinity. A T55R mutation and multiple mutations in position 53 of the heavy chain were identified that, when present individually or in combination, resulted in higher apparent affinities to gH/gL and improved CMV neutralization potency of Fab fragments expressed in bacterial cells. Three of these mutations in position 53 introduced glycosylation sites in heavy chain CDR 2 (CDR H2) that impaired binding of antibodies expressed in mammalian cells. One high affinity (KD < 10 pM) variant was identified that combined the D53N and T55R mutations while avoiding glycosylation of CDR H2. However, all the amino acid substitutions identified by phage display that improved binding affinity without introducing glycosylation sites required between two and four simultaneous nucleotide mutations to avoid glycosylation. These results indicate that the natural human antibody MSL-109 is close to a local affinity optimum. We show that affinity maturation by phage display can be used to identify and bypass barriers to in vivo affinity maturation of antibodies imposed by glycosylation and codon usage. These constraints may be relatively prevalent in human antibodies due to the codon usage and the amino acid

  17. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Martine A; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-10-28

    Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhanced with strong adjuvants such as TLR ligands. However, often these adjuvants have off-target effects, and would benefit from a DC-specific targeting strategy, similar to the tumour antigen. The goal of this study was to develop a strategy for specifically targeting DC with tumour antigen and adjuvant by using glycoliposomes. We have generated liposomes containing the glycan Lewis(Le)(X) which is highly specific for the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN expressed by DC. Le(X)-modified liposomes were taken up by human monocyte-derived DC in a DC-SIGN-specific manner. As adjuvants we incorporated the TLR ligands Pam3CySK4, Poly I:C, MPLA and R848 into liposomes and compared their adjuvant capacity on DC. Incorporation of the TLR4 ligand MPLA into glycoliposomes induced DC maturation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a DC-SIGN-specific manner, and DC activation was comparable to administration of soluble MPLA. Incorporation of MPLA into glycoliposomes significantly enhanced antigen cross-presentation of the melanoma tumour antigen gp100280-288 peptide to CD8(+) T cells compared to non-glycosylated MPLA liposomes. Importantly, antigen cross-presentation of the gp100280-288 peptide was significantly higher using MPLA glycoliposomes compared to the co-administration of soluble MPLA with glycoliposomes. Taken together, our data demonstrates that specific targeting of a gp100 tumour antigen and the adjuvant MPLA to DC-SIGN-expressing DC enhances the uptake of peptide-containing liposomes, the activation of DC, and induces tumour antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. These data demonstrate that adjuvant-containing glycoliposome-based vaccines targeting DC-SIGN(+) DC

  18. Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Reproducible Quantification of Phospho-signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jacob J; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G; Voytovich, Uliana J; Moore, Heather D; Lin, Chenwei; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L; Stirewalt, Derek L; Reding, Kerryn W; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-02-01

    A major goal in cell signaling research is the quantification of phosphorylation pharmacodynamics following perturbations. Traditional methods of studying cellular phospho-signaling measure one analyte at a time with poor standardization, rendering them inadequate for interrogating network biology and contributing to the irreproducibility of preclinical research. In this study, we test the feasibility of circumventing these issues by coupling immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based enrichment of phosphopeptides with targeted, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to achieve precise, specific, standardized, multiplex quantification of phospho-signaling responses. A multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay targeting phospho-analytes responsive to DNA damage was configured, analytically characterized, and deployed to generate phospho-pharmacodynamic curves from primary and immortalized human cells experiencing genotoxic stress. The multiplexed assays demonstrated linear ranges of ≥3 orders of magnitude, median lower limit of quantification of 0.64 fmol on column, median intra-assay variability of 9.3%, median inter-assay variability of 12.7%, and median total CV of 16.0%. The multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay enabled robust quantification of 107 DNA damage-responsive phosphosites from human cells following DNA damage. The assays have been made publicly available as a resource to the community. The approach is generally applicable, enabling wide interrogation of signaling networks. PMID:26621847

  19. Synthesis of tetracycline analogs and their bone affinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Cai Huang; Hu Zheng; Ling Ling Weng

    2008-01-01

    Tetracycline analogs were designed and synthesized and their bone affinities were tested on hydroxyapatite. The results showedthat the carbonyl-amide-enol structure in A ring and phenol-ketone structure in BCD ring may be responsible for tetracycline's highbone affinity and either A ring or BCD ring has a planar conformation is essential.

  20. Assessment of Targeted and Non-Targeted Responses in Cells Deficient in ATM Function following Exposure to Low and High Dose X-Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Kiuru, Anne; Kämäräinen, Meerit; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of ...

  1. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  2. Affinity Purification of Insulin by Peptide-Ligand Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The affinity heptapeptide (HWWWPAS) for insulin, selected from phage display library,was coupled to EAH Sepharose 4B gel and packed to a 1-mL column. The column was used for the affinity purification of insulin from protein mixture and commercial insulin preparation. It was observed that the minor impurity in the commercial insulin was removed by the affinity chromatography. Nearly 40 mg of insulin could be purified with the 1-mL affinity column. The results revealed the high specificity and capacity of the affinity column for insulin purification. Moreover, based on the analysis of the amino acids in the peptide sequence, shorter peptides were designed and synthesized for insulin chromatography. As a result, HWWPS was found to be a good alternative to HWWWPAS, while the other two peptides with three or four amino acids showed weak affinity for insulin. The results indicated that the peptide sequence of HWWWPAS was quite conservative for specific binding of insulin.

  3. In situ crosslinked smart polypeptide nanoparticles for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Huqiang; Liu, Peng; Sheng, Nan; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-03-01

    Smart tumor-targeted drug delivery is crucial for improving the effect of chemotherapy and reducing the adverse effects. Here, we synthesized a smart polypeptide copolymer based on n-butylamine-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-cysteine) (PLL-PLC) with functionalization of folic acid (FA) and 1,2-dicarboxylic-cyclohexene anhydride (DCA) for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery. The copolymers (FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC) spontaneously crosslinked in situ to form redox and pH dual responsive FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC nanoparticles (FD-NPs), which had a reversible zeta potential around -30 mV at pH 7.4, but switched to +15 mV at pH 5.0. Moreover, FD-NPs effectively loaded DOX with a loading capacity at 15.7 wt%. At pH 7.4, only 24.5% DOX was released within 60 h. However, at pH 5.0, the presence of 10 mM DTT dramatically accelerated DOX release with over 90% of DOX released within 10 h. Although the FD-NPs only enhanced DOX uptake in FA receptor positive (FR+) cancer cells at pH 7.4, a weak acidic condition promoted FD-NP-facilitated DOX uptake in both FR+ HeLa and FR- A549 cells, as well as significantly improving cellular binding and end/lysosomal escape. In vivo studies in a HeLa cancer model demonstrated that the charge-reversible FD-NPs delivered DOX into tumors more effectively than charge-irreversible nanoparticles. Hence, these multistage responsive FD-NPs would serve as highly efficient drug vectors for targeted cancer chemotherapy.Smart tumor-targeted drug delivery is crucial for improving the effect of chemotherapy and reducing the adverse effects. Here, we synthesized a smart polypeptide copolymer based on n-butylamine-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-cysteine) (PLL-PLC) with functionalization of folic acid (FA) and 1,2-dicarboxylic-cyclohexene anhydride (DCA) for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery. The copolymers (FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC) spontaneously crosslinked in situ to form redox and pH dual responsive FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC nanoparticles (FD-NPs), which had a reversible

  4. An affine framework for analytical mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    An affine Cartan calculus is developed. The concepts of special affine bundles and special affine duality are introduced. The canonical isomorphisms, fundamental for Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of the dynamics in the affine setting are proved.

  5. Design of Student Information Management Database Application System for Office and Departmental Target Responsibility System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui

    It is the inevitable outcome of higher education reform to carry out office and departmental target responsibility system, in which statistical processing of student's information is an important part of student's performance review. On the basis of the analysis of the student's evaluation, the student information management database application system is designed by using relational database management system software in this paper. In order to implement the function of student information management, the functional requirement, overall structure, data sheets and fields, data sheet Association and software codes are designed in details.

  6. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A;

    2013-01-01

    )-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response....... nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV...

  7. Watch the Target! Effects in the Affective Misattribution Procedure Become Weaker (But Not Eliminated When Participants Are Motivated to Provide Accurate Responses to the Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas B Eder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that priming effects in the affective misattribution procedure (AMP are unaffected by direct warnings to avoid an influence of the primes. The present research examined whether a priming influence is diminished by task procedures that encourage accurate judgments of the targets. Participants were motivated to categorize the affective meaning of nonsense targets accurately by being made to believe that a true word was presented in each trial and by providing feedback on (allegedly incorrect responses. This condition produced robust priming effects. Priming was however reduced and less reliable relative to more typical AMP conditions in which participants guessed the meaning of openly presented nonsense targets. Affective judgments of nonsense targets were not affected by advance knowledge of the response mapping during the priming phase, which argues against a response-priming explanation of AMP effects. These findings show that affective primes influence evaluative judgments even in conditions in which the motivation to provide accurate responses is high and a priming of motor responses is not possible. Priming effects were however weaker with high accuracy motivation, suggesting that a focus on accurate judgments is an effective strategy to control for an unwanted priming influence in the AMP.

  8. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  9. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    CERN Document Server

    Urichuk, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows, and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  10. Recognizing subsurface target responses in ground penetrating radar data using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Rayn T.; Morton, Kenneth D.; Collins, Leslie M.; Torrione, Peter A.

    2015-05-01

    Improved performance in the discrimination of buried threats using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data has recently been achieved using features developed for applications in computer vision. These features, designed to characterize local shape information in images, have been utilized to recognize patches that contain a target signature in two-dimensional slices of GPR data. While these adapted features perform very well in this GPR application, they were not designed to specifically differentiate between target responses and background GPR data. One option for developing a feature specifically designed for target differentiation is to manually design a feature extractor based on the physics of GPR image formation. However, as seen in the historical progression of computer vision features, this is not a trivial task. Instead, this research evaluates the use of convolutional neural networks (CNNs) applied to two-dimensional GPR data. The benefit of using a CNN is that features extracted from the data are a learned parameter of the system. This has allowed CNN implementations to achieve state of the art performance across a variety of data types, including visual images, without the need for expert designed features. However, the implementation of a CNN must be done carefully for each application as network parameters can cause performance to vary widely. This paper presents results from using CNNs for object detection in GPR data and discusses proper parameter settings and other considerations.

  11. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A; van Cuijk, Loes; van Belle, Gijsbert J; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Choudhary, Chunaram; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Marteijn, Jurgen A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2013-06-10

    Protein modifications by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) play key roles in cellular signaling pathways. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) directly couple these modifications by selectively recognizing SUMOylated target proteins through SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), promoting their K48-linked ubiquitylation and degradation. Only a single mammalian STUbL, RNF4, has been identified. We show that human RNF111/Arkadia is a new STUbL, which used three adjacent SIMs for specific recognition of poly-SUMO2/3 chains, and used Ubc13-Mms2 as a cognate E2 enzyme to promote nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV)-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response. PMID:23751493

  12. Specific nongluten proteins of wheat are novel target antigens in celiac disease humoral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebener, Sina; Tanaka, Charlene K; Uhde, Melanie; Zone, John J; Vensel, William H; Kasarda, Donald D; Beams, Leilani; Briani, Chiara; Green, Peter H R; Altenbach, Susan B; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-01-01

    While the antigenic specificity and pathogenic relevance of immunologic reactivity to gluten in celiac disease have been extensively researched, the immune response to nongluten proteins of wheat has not been characterized. We aimed to investigate the level and molecular specificity of antibody response to wheat nongluten proteins in celiac disease. Serum samples from patients and controls were screened for IgG and IgA antibody reactivity to a nongluten protein extract from the wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Butte 86. Antibodies were further analyzed for reactivity to specific nongluten proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Immunoreactive molecules were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Compared with healthy controls, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of antibody reactivity to nongluten proteins. The main immunoreactive nongluten antibody target proteins were identified as serpins, purinins, α-amylase/protease inhibitors, globulins, and farinins. Assessment of reactivity toward purified recombinant proteins further confirmed the presence of antibody response to specific antigens. The results demonstrate that, in addition to the well-recognized immune reaction to gluten, celiac disease is associated with a robust humoral response directed at a specific subset of the nongluten proteins of wheat. PMID:25329597

  13. FILAMENTOUS FLOWER Is a Direct Target of JAZ3 and Modulates Responses to Jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boter, Marta; Golz, John F; Giménez-Ibañez, Selena; Fernandez-Barbero, Gemma; Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in regulating growth, development, and immunity. Activation of the JA-signaling pathway is based on the hormone-triggered ubiquitination and removal of transcriptional repressors (JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN [JAZ] proteins) by an SCF receptor complex (SCF(COI1)/JAZ). This removal allows the rapid activation of transcription factors (TFs) triggering a multitude of downstream responses. Identification of TFs bound by the JAZ proteins is essential to better understand how the JA-signaling pathway modulates and integrates different responses. In this study, we found that the JAZ3 repressor physically interacts with the YABBY (YAB) family transcription factor FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL)/YAB1. In Arabidopsis thaliana, FIL regulates developmental processes such as axial patterning and growth of lateral organs, shoot apical meristem activity, and inflorescence phyllotaxy. Phenotypic analysis of JA-regulated responses in loss- and gain-of-function FIL lines suggested that YABs function as transcriptional activators of JA-triggered responses. Moreover, we show that MYB75, a component of the WD-repeat/bHLH/MYB complex regulating anthocyanin production, is a direct transcriptional target of FIL. We propose that JAZ3 interacts with YABs to attenuate their transcriptional function. Upon perception of JA signal, degradation of JAZ3 by the SCF(COI1) complex releases YABs to activate a subset of JA-regulated genes in leaves leading to anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll loss, and reduced bacterial defense. PMID:26530088

  14. PAS-1, a protein affinity purified from Ascaris suum worms, maintains the ability to modulate the immune response to a bystander antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Telma M; Enobe, Cristina S; Araújo, Cláudia A; Macedo, Mahasti S; Macedo-Soares, Maria Fernanda

    2006-04-01

    Helminth infections and parasite components have potent immunomodulatory effects on a host's immune system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of PAS-1, a protein component of Ascaris suum adult worms recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAIP-1), on humoral and cell-mediated responses to a bystander antigen (ovalbumin [OVA]). MAIP-1 recognized only one of the three polypeptide chains of PAS-1, but neutralized the suppressive effect of the whole worm extract on OVA-specific antibody production. PAS-1 inhibited antibody production against a T-cell-dependent, but not a T-cell-independent, antigen in a dose-dependent way. IgM, IgG1, IgG2b, and also IgE and anaphylactic IgG1 levels were downregulated. In addition, PAS-1 inhibited OVA-specific delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in the footpad of mice, showing a potent immunosuppressive activity on both Th1 and Th2 responses that seems to be mediated by the induction of large amounts of IL-10 and IL-4. Indeed, PAS-1-specific spleen cells secreted sevenfold more IL-10 and threefold more IL-4 than OVA-specific cells in response to in vitro restimulation with the respective antigens. In conclusion, we showed that PAS-1, a single protein component from A. suum, maintains all its immunosuppressive properties. PMID:16519731

  15. Correction: Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Correction for 'Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy' by Kyoung Sub Kim, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02273a. PMID:27300478

  16. Correction: Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-06-01

    Correction for `Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy' by Kyoung Sub Kim, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02273a.

  17. The Leishmania infantum PUF proteins are targets of the humoral response during visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Requena Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins of the PUF family share a conserved domain consisting of tandemly repeated 36-40 amino acid motifs (typically eight known as Puf repeats. Proteins containing tandem repeats are often dominant targets of humoral responses during infectious diseases. Thus, we considered of interest to analyze whether Leishmania PUF proteins result antigenic during visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Findings Here, employing whole-genome databases, we report the composition, and structural features, of the PUF family in Leishmania infantum. Additionally, the 10 genes of the L. infantum PUF family were cloned and used to express the Leishmania PUFs in bacteria as recombinant proteins. Finally, the antigenicity of these PUF proteins was evaluated by determining levels of specific antibodies in sera from experimentally infected hamsters. The Leishmania PUFs were all recognized by the sera, even though with different degree of reactivity and/or frequency of recognition. The reactivity of hamster sera against recombinant LiPUF1 and LiPUF2 was particularly prominent, and these proteins were subsequently assayed against sera from human patients. High antibody responses against rLiPUF1 and rLiPUF2 were found in sera from VL patients, but these proteins resulted also recognized by sera from Chagas' disease patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that Leishmania PUFs are targets of the humoral response during L. infantum infection and may represent candidates for serodiagnosis and/or vaccine reagents; however, it should be kept in mind the cross-reactivity of LiPUFs with antibodies induced against other trypanosomatids such as Trypanosoma cruzi.

  18. Regulation of microRNA-155 in atherosclerotic inflammatory responses by targeting MAP3K10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhu

    Full Text Available AIMS: Accumulating evidence suggest that numerous microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as various diseases that accompany inflammatory responses. Inflammation is known to be a major contributor to atherogenesis. Previous studies provide promising evidence in support of the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease. However, mechanistic data on these small molecules in atherosclerosis (AS are still missing. The present study aims to investigate the potential role of miRNAs in AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: The miRNA transcriptase was verified by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Thoracic aorta samples were obtained from Apolipoprotein E knockout mice, and plasma samples were from coronary artery disease (CAD patients. The results showed that the miR-155 level was the most significantly elevated both in AS mice and CAD patients relative to the normal control. The functional role of miR-155 in the atherosclerotic path physiological process was also observed in vivo and in vitro. The observations suggested that miR-155 is a part of a negative feedback loop, which down-modulates inflammatory cytokine production and decreases AS progression. miR-155 was also found to mediate the inflammatory response and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 10. CONCLUSIONS: miR-155 contributes to the prevention of AS development and progression. It may also be involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of the inflammatory response and MAPK pathway by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 10.

  19. First-In-Human Study Demonstrating Tumor-Angiogenesis by PET/CT Imaging with 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST, a High-Affinity Peptidomimetic for αvβ3 Integrin Receptor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Richard P.; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Müller, Dirk; Danthi, Narasimhan; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST™ is an αvβ3 integrin antagonist and the first radiolabeled peptidomimetic to reach clinical development for targeting integrin receptors. In this first-in-human study, the feasibility of integrin receptor peptidomimetic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was confirmed in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and breast cancer. Methods: Patients underwent PET/CT imaging with 68Ga NODAGA-THERANOST. PET images were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively and compared to 2-deoxy-2-(18F) fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) findings. Images were obtained 60 minutes postinjection of 300–500 MBq of 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST. Results: 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST revealed high tumor-to-background ratios (SUVmax=4.8) and uptake at neoangiogenesis sites. Reconstructed fused images distinguished cancers with high malignancy potential and enabled enhanced bone metastasis detection. 18F-FDG-positive lung and lymph node metastases did not show uptake, indicating the absence of neovascularization. Conclusions: 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST was found to be safe and effective, exhibiting in this study rapid blood clearance, stability, rapid renal excretion, favorable biodistribution and PK/PD, low irradiation burden (μSv/MBq/μg), and convenient radiolabeling. This radioligand might enable theranostics, that is, a combination of diagnostics followed by the appropriate therapeutics, namely antiangiogenic therapy, image-guided presurgical assessment, treatment response evaluation, prediction of pathologic response, neoadjuvant-peptidomimetic-radiochemotherapy, and personalized medicine strategies. Further clinical trials evaluating 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST are warranted. PMID:25945808

  20. Magnetically-responsive silica-gold nanobowls for targeted delivery and SERS-based sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Alexander H.; Landon, Preston B.; Gomez, Karla Santacruz; Kang, Heemin; Lee, Joon; Zhang, Chen; Janetanakit, Woraphong; Sant, Vrinda; Lu, Tianyu; Colburn, David A.; Akkiraju, Siddhartha; Dossou, Samuel; Cao, Yue; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Varghese, Shyni; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-01

    Composite colloidal structures with multi-functional properties have wide applications in targeted delivery of therapeutics and imaging contrast molecules and high-throughput molecular bio-sensing. We have constructed a multifunctional composite magnetic nanobowl using the bottom-up approach on an asymmetric silica/polystyrene Janus template consisting of a silica shell around a partially exposed polystyrene core. The nanobowl consists of a silica bowl and a gold exterior shell with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles sandwiched between the silica and gold shells. The nanobowls were characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetometry, vis-NIR and FTIR spectroscopy. Magnetically vectored transport of these nanobowls was ascertained by time-lapsed imaging of their flow in fluid through a porous hydrogel under a defined magnetic field. These magnetically-responsive nanobowls show distinct surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging capability. The PEGylated magnetically-responsive nanobowls show size-dependent cellular uptake in vitro.Composite colloidal structures with multi-functional properties have wide applications in targeted delivery of therapeutics and imaging contrast molecules and high-throughput molecular bio-sensing. We have constructed a multifunctional composite magnetic nanobowl using the bottom-up approach on an asymmetric silica/polystyrene Janus template consisting of a silica shell around a partially exposed polystyrene core. The nanobowl consists of a silica bowl and a gold exterior shell with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles sandwiched between the silica and gold shells. The nanobowls were characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetometry, vis-NIR and FTIR spectroscopy. Magnetically vectored transport of these nanobowls was ascertained by time-lapsed imaging of their flow in fluid through a porous hydrogel under a defined magnetic field. These magnetically-responsive nanobowls show distinct

  1. A Data Mining-Based Response Model for Target Selection in Direct Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniafe Festus Ayetiran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying customers who are more likely to respond to new product offers is an important issue in direct marketing. In direct marketing, data mining has been used extensively to identify potential customers for a new product (target selection. Using historical purchase data, a predictive response model with data mining techniques was developed to predict a probability that a customer in Ebedi Microfinance bank will respond to a promotion or an offer. To achieve this purpose, a predictive response model using customers’ historical purchase data was built with data mining techniques. The data were stored in a data warehouse to serve as management decision support system. The response model was built from customers’ historic purchases and demographic dataset.Bayesian algorithm precisely Naïve Bayes algorithm was employed in constructing the classifier system. Both filter and wrapper feature selection techniques were employed in determining inputs to the model.The results obtained shows that Ebedi Microfinance bank can plan effective marketing of their products and services by obtaining a guiding report on the status of their customers which will go a long way in assisting management in saving significant amount of money that could have been spent on wasteful promotional campaigns.

  2. Targeting the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer: overcoming treatment barriers and improving local immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J; Alewine, C; Figg, W D; Duffy, A

    2016-07-01

    Historically, patients diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic cancer have faced a grim prognosis. The survival benefit seen with systemic chemotherapies and even combinations thereof have been disappointing. However, growing data suggest that the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer may be contributing to this poor prognosis. This microenvironment has a dense fibrotic stroma, and is hypoxic and highly immunosuppressive, all of which pose barriers to treatment. Newer strategies looking to disrupt the fibrotic stroma, target hypoxic areas, and improve local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are currently undergoing clinical evaluation and seem to offer great promise. In addition to these therapies, preclinical work evaluating novel cytotoxic agents including nanoparticles has also been encouraging. While much research still needs to be done, these strategies offer new hope for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26661112

  3. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Heidegger, S; Schmidt, A; Gößl, D; Argyo, C; Endres, S; Bein, T; Bourquin, C

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-funct...

  4. Enhanced radiation response in radioresistant MCF-7 cells by targeting peroxiredoxin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz AJG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Daniel Tamae,2 Yun Yen,3 JianJian Li,4 Tieli Wang1 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University at Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 2Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: In our previous study, we identified that a protein target, peroxiredoxin II (PrxII, is overexpressed in radioresistant MCF+FIR3 breast-cancer cells and found that its expression and function is associated with breast-cancer radiation sensitivity or resistance. Small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PrxII gene expression was able to sensitize MCF+FIR3 radioresistant breast-cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The major focus of this work was to investigate how the radiation response of MCF+FIR3 radioresistant cells was affected by the siRNA that inhibits PrxII gene expression. Our results, presented here, show that silencing PrxII gene expression increased cellular toxicity by altering cellular thiol status, inhibiting Ca2+ efflux from the cells, and perturbing the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. By combining radiotherapy and siRNA technology, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies that may have potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents due to this technology's property of targeting to specific cancer-related genes. Keywords: siRNA, PrxII, radiation resistance, Ca2+, MCF+FIR3

  5. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  6. Lineup identification accuracy: The effects of alcohol, target presence, confidence ratings, and response time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Kneller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the intoxication of many eyewitnesses at crime scenes, only four published studies to date have investigated the effects of alcohol intoxication on eyewitness identification performance. While one found intoxication significantly increased false identification rates from target absent showups, three found no such effect using the more traditional lineup procedure. The present study sought to further explore the effects of alcohol intoxication on identification performance and examine whether accurate decisions from intoxicated witnesses could be postdicted by confidence and response times. One hundred and twenty participants engaged in a study examining the effects of intoxication (control, placebo, and mild intoxication and target presence on identification performance. Participants viewed a simultaneous lineup one week after watching a mock crime video of a man attempting to steal cars. Ethanol intoxication (0.6 ml/kg was found to make no significant difference to identification accuracy and such identifications from intoxicated individuals were made no less confidently or slowly than those from sober witnesses. These results are discussed with respect to the previous research examining intoxicated witness identification accuracy and the misconceptions the criminal justice system holds about the accuracy of such witnesses.

  7. Sickle erythrocytes target cytotoxics to hypoxic tumor microvessels and potentiate a tumoricidal response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Terman

    Full Text Available Resistance of hypoxic solid tumor niches to chemotherapy and radiotherapy remains a major scientific challenge that calls for conceptually new approaches. Here we exploit a hitherto unrecognized ability of sickled erythrocytes (SSRBCs but not normal RBCs (NLRBCs to selectively target hypoxic tumor vascular microenviroment and induce diffuse vaso-occlusion. Within minutes after injection SSRBCs, but not NLRBCs, home and adhere to hypoxic 4T1 tumor vasculature with hemoglobin saturation levels at or below 10% that are distributed over 70% of the tumor space. The bound SSRBCs thereupon form microaggregates that obstruct/occlude up to 88% of tumor microvessels. Importantly, SSRBCs, but not normal RBCs, combined with exogenous prooxidant zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP induce a potent tumoricidal response via a mutual potentiating mechanism. In a clonogenic tumor cell survival assay, SSRBC surrogate hemin, along with H(2O(2 and ZnPP demonstrate a similar mutual potentiation and tumoricidal effect. In contrast to existing treatments directed only to the hypoxic tumor cell, the present approach targets the hypoxic tumor vascular environment and induces injury to both tumor microvessels and tumor cells using intrinsic SSRBC-derived oxidants and locally generated ROS. Thus, the SSRBC appears to be a potent new tool for treatment of hypoxic solid tumors, which are notable for their resistance to existing cancer treatments.

  8. Quantotypic Properties of QconCAT Peptides Targeting Bovine Host Response to Streptococcus uberis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin;

    2012-01-01

    with host response to pathogens remains a challenging task. In this paper we present a targeted proteome analysis of a panel of 20 proteins that are widely believed to be key players and indicators of bovine host response to mastitis pathogens. Stable isotope labeled variants of two concordant...

  9. Tumor responsive targeted multifunctional nanosystems for cancer imaging, chemo- and siRNA therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Ronak

    Cancer is one of the most insidious diseases. Compromising of over 100 different types and sharing the unifying factors of uncontrolled growth and metastasis, unmet clinical needs in terms of cancer diagnosis and treatment continue to exist. It is widely accepted that most forms of cancer are treatable or even curable if detected before widespread metastasis occurs. Nearly a quarter of deaths in the United States is the result of cancer and it only trails heart disease in terms of annual mortality. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are the primary treatment modalities for cancer. Research in these procedures has resulted in substantial benefits for cancer patients, but there is still room for an improvement. However, a time has been reached at which it appears that the benefits from these modalities have been reached the maximum. Therefore, it is vital to develop new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The field of nanotechnology is concerned with structures in the nanometer size range and holds the potential to drastically impact and improve the lives of patients suffering from cancer. Not only can nanotechnology improve current methods of diagnosis and treatment, it has a possibility of introducing newer and better modalities. The overall purpose of this work is to develop novel nanotechnology-based methodologies for the diagnosis and treatment of various forms of cancers. The first aim of the project is the development of a multifunctional targeted nanosystem for the delivery of siRNA to overcome drug resistance. The second aspect is the synthesis of a quantum dot-based delivery system that releases drug in response to pH changes. The third aim is the development of a targeted, tumor environment responsive magnetic resonance nanoparticle contrast agent coupled with a nanoparticle-based treatment.

  10. The application of magnetic force differentiation for the measurement of the affinity of peptide libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been developed for measuring the binding affinity of phage displayed peptides and a target protein using magnetic particles. The specific interaction between the phage displayed peptides and the target protein was subject to a force generated by the magnetic particle. The binding affinity was obtained by analyzing the force-bond lifetime

  11. H2O2-responsive molecularly engineered polymer nanoparticles as ischemia/reperfusion-targeted nanotherapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwon; Bae, Soochan; Hong, Donghyun; Lim, Hyungsuk; Yoon, Joo Heung; Hwang, On; Park, Seunggyu; Ke, Qingen; Khang, Gilson; Kang, Peter M.

    2013-07-01

    The main culprit in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the most abundant form of ROS produced during I/R, causes inflammation, apoptosis and subsequent tissue damages. Here, we report H2O2-responsive antioxidant nanoparticles formulated from copolyoxalate containing vanillyl alcohol (VA) (PVAX) as a novel I/R-targeted nanotherapeutic agent. PVAX was designed to incorporate VA and H2O2-responsive peroxalate ester linkages covalently in its backbone. PVAX nanoparticles therefore degrade and release VA, which is able to reduce the generation of ROS, and exert anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activity. In hind-limb I/R and liver I/R models in mice, PVAX nanoparticles specifically reacted with overproduced H2O2 and exerted highly potent anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities that reduced cellular damages. Therefore, PVAX nanoparticles have tremendous potential as nanotherapeutic agents for I/R injury and H2O2-associated diseases.

  12. Apolipoprotein E-specific innate immune response in astrocytes from targeted replacement mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montine Thomas J

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inheritance of the three different alleles of the human apolipoprotein (apo E gene (APOE are associated with varying risk or clinical outcome from a variety of neurologic diseases. ApoE isoform-specific modulation of several pathogenic processes, in addition to amyloid β metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, have been proposed: one of these is innate immune response by glia. Previously we have shown that primary microglia cultures from targeted replacement (TR APOE mice have apoE isoform-dependent innate immune activation and paracrine damage to neurons that is greatest with TR by the ε4 allele (TR APOE4 and that derives from p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK activity. Methods Primary cultures of TR APOE2, TR APOE3 and TR APOE4 astrocytes were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. ApoE secretion, cytokine production, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB subunit activity were measured and compared. Results Here we showed that activation of primary astrocytes from TR APOE mice with LPS led to TR APOE-dependent differences in cytokine secretion that were greatest in TR APOE2 and that were associated with differences in NF-κB subunit activity. Conclusion Our results suggest that LPS activation of innate immune response in TR APOE glia results in opposing outcomes from microglia and astrocytes as a result of TR APOE-dependent activation of p38MAPK or NF-κB signaling in these two cell types.

  13. miR-204 targets Bcl-2 expression and enhances responsiveness of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacconi, A; Biagioni, F; Canu, V; Mori, F; Di Benedetto, A; Lorenzon, L; Ercolani, C; Di Agostino, S; Cambria, A M; Germoni, S; Grasso, G; Blandino, R; Panebianco, V; Ziparo, V; Federici, O; Muti, P; Strano, S; Carboni, F; Mottolese, M; Diodoro, M; Pescarmona, E; Garofalo, A; Blandino, G

    2012-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs aberrantly expressed in human tumors. Here, we aim to identify miRs whose deregulated expression leads to the activation of oncogenic pathways in human gastric cancers (GCs). Thirty nine out of 123 tumoral and matched uninvolved peritumoral gastric specimens from three independent European subsets of patients were analyzed for the expression of 851 human miRs using Agilent Platform. The remaining 84 samples were used to validate miRs differentially expressed between tumoral and matched peritumoral specimens by qPCR. miR-204 falls into a group of eight miRs differentially expressed between tumoral and peritumoral samples. Downregulation of miR-204 has prognostic value and correlates with increased staining of Bcl-2 protein in tumoral specimens. Ectopic expression of miR-204 inhibited colony forming ability, migration and tumor engraftment of GC cells. miR-204 targeted Bcl-2 messenger RNA and increased responsiveness of GC cells to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin treatment. Ectopic expression of Bcl-2 protein counteracted miR-204 pro-apoptotic activity in response to 5-fluorouracil. Altogether, these findings suggest that modulation of aberrant expression of miR-204, which in turn releases oncogenic Bcl-2 protein activity might hold promise for preventive and therapeutic strategies of GC. PMID:23152059

  14. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:696-716. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1389 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26762467

  15. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Acheva

    Full Text Available DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays, low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2.

  16. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Simon; Gößl, Dorothée; Schmidt, Alexandra; Niedermayer, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Endres, Stefan; Bein, Thomas; Bourquin, Carole

    2015-12-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1β. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications.Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized

  17. The intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult celiac disease is focused on a single deamidated glutamine targeted by tissue transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, H; Körner, R; Molberg, O;

    2000-01-01

    to demonstrate that the intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult CD is focused on two immunodominant, DQ2-restricted peptides that overlap by a seven-residue fragment of gliadin. We show that tTG converts a glutamine residue within this fragment into glutamic acid and that this process is...... affinity for DQ2, a molecule known to preferentially bind peptides containing negatively charged residues. Interestingly, the modified glutamine is accommodated in different pockets of DQ2 for the different epitopes. These results suggest modifications of anchor residues that lead to an improved affinity...

  18. Food and Natural Materials Target Mechanisms to Effectively Regulate Allergic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    An immune hypersensitivity disorder called allergy is caused by diverse allergens entering the body via skin contact, injection, ingestion, and/or inhalation. These allergic responses may develop into allergic disorders, including inflammations such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, anaphylaxis, food allergies, and allergic rhinitis. Several drugs have been developed to treat these allergic disorders; however, long-term intake of these drugs could have adverse effects. As an alternative to these medicines, food and natural materials that ameliorate allergic disorder symptoms without producing any side effects can be consumed. Food and natural materials can effectively regulate successive allergic responses in an allergic chain-reaction mechanism in the following ways: [1] Inhibition of allergen permeation via paracellular diffusion into epithelial cells, [2] suppression of type 2 T-helper (Th) cell-related cytokine production by regulating Th1/Th2 balance, [3] inhibition of pathogenic effector CD4(+) T cell differentiation by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and [4] inhibition of degranulation in mast cells. The immunomodulatory effects of food and natural materials on each target mechanism were scientifically verified and shown to alleviate allergic disorder symptoms. Furthermore, consumption of certain food and natural materials such as fenugreek, skullcap, chitin/chitosan, and cheonggukjang as anti-allergics have merits such as safety (no adverse side effects), multiple suppressive effects (as a mixture would contain various components that are active against allergic responses), and ease of consumption when required. These merits and anti-allergic properties of food and natural materials help control various allergic disorders. PMID:26598817

  19. Development of an in vivo assay for non-targeted radiation effects based on response rather than dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adaptive response may be defined as the effect of a small priming dose of radiation modifying the anticipated cellular response of the same tissues so as to alter the predicted response to a larger dose of radiation. We and others have demonstrated that at low radiation doses (less than 0.5 Gy) the lethal and mutational effect of the radiation is mainly, possibly entirely, due to the non-targeted effects. This is the dose range for priming doses in adaptive response protocols. In an associated presentation from our group, we demonstrate that the adaptive response may be explicable as a non targeted (bystander) response. In this paper we present data from exposed people, showing that a simple assay using blood can demonstrate variation in the extent and type of non-targeted effects and that exposure to radiation can modulate the subsequent non-targeted response to a later dose. The serum from blood samples of exposed individuals was harvested, diluted in tissue culture medium and added to reporter cells. The toxicity or growth promoting activity of the serum was measured using a clonogenic assay coupled with immunocytochemical measurement of various proteins involved in apoptosis or growth. While the assay has only been applied to human blood so far, it is expected that it would be useful for monitoring response to low doses in fish or mammals. There is already evidence that bystander effects are controlled by both genetic and epigenetic (lifestyle) factors. These data could support the development of a simple blood based assay to predict overall response of critical species to low doses of radiation taking all the low dose factors into account. A key element of the assay is that it allows response to be measured and correlates response rather than dose with harm. (author)

  20. Overview of affinity biosensors in food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pradip D

    2006-01-01

    The 4 major driving forces that are expected to lead to increased use of affinity biosensors that meet crucial industrial test specifications, e.g., fast, reliable, cost-effective, and use of low-skilled personnel, are (1) strict legislative framework, e.g., recent changes proposed to the European food safety and hygiene legislation, EC No. 178/2002; (2) industrial shift from quality control to quality assurance procedures, e.g., Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, ensuring effective positioning in the global competitive trade; (3) just-in-time production resulting in 'right' product every time; and (4) consumer demand for safe and wholesome products. The affinity biosensors field has expanded significantly over the past decade, with a projected global biosensors market growth from $6.1 billion in 2004 to $8.2 billion in 2009, representing major industrial sectors (e.g., Pharma, Medicare, and Food). This brief review is targeted to affinity biosensors developed for the food industry and includes research and development leading to biosensors for microbiological and chemical analytes of industrial concern, commercial biosensors products on the market, and examples of future prospects in this diagnostic field. PMID:16792079

  1. ErbB polymorphisms: insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Morand, Grégoire B; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary) and to acquired (secondary) resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed. PMID:25699077

  2. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A Alaoui-Jamali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary and to acquired (secondary resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed.

  3. Infinite transitivity on affine varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Arzhantsev, Ivan; Flenner, Hubert; Kaliman, Shulim; Kutzschebauch, Frank; ZAIDENBERG, MIKHAIL

    2012-01-01

    In this note we survey recent results on automorphisms of affine algebraic varieties, infinitely transitive group actions and flexibility. We present related constructions and examples, and discuss geometric applications and open problems.

  4. Representations of affine Hecke algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Nanhua

    1994-01-01

    Kazhdan and Lusztig classified the simple modules of an affine Hecke algebra Hq (q E C*) provided that q is not a root of 1 (Invent. Math. 1987). Ginzburg had some very interesting work on affine Hecke algebras. Combining these results simple Hq-modules can be classified provided that the order of q is not too small. These Lecture Notes of N. Xi show that the classification of simple Hq-modules is essentially different from general cases when q is a root of 1 of certain orders. In addition the based rings of affine Weyl groups are shown to be of interest in understanding irreducible representations of affine Hecke algebras. Basic knowledge of abstract algebra is enough to read one third of the book. Some knowledge of K-theory, algebraic group, and Kazhdan-Lusztig cell of Cexeter group is useful for the rest

  5. The Response Regulator BfmR Is a Potential Drug Target for Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Thomas A; Manohar, Akshay; Beanan, Janet M; Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Graham, Jessica; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A. baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A. baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and health

  6. Affine toric SL(2)-embeddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the theory of affine SL(2)-embeddings, which was constructed in 1973 by Popov, a locally transitive action of the group SL(2) on a normal affine three-dimensional variety X is determined by a pair (p/q,r), where 0GV//T-hat. In the substantiation of this result a key role is played by Cox's construction in toric geometry. Bibliography: 12 titles

  7. Simultaneous purification and refolding of proteins by affinity precipitation and macro (affinity ligand)-facilitated three phase partitioning (MLFTPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ipsita; Mondal, Kalyani; Gupta, Munishwar N

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes two simple interrelated non-chromatographic methods of protein purification. In the first method, called affinity precipitation, inherent affinity of reversibly soluble-insoluble polymers (also called stimuli-sensitive or smart polymers) is exploited to form an affinity complex in free solution with target protein. The affinity complex is precipitated by a suitable change in the medium. The desired protein is dissociated from the smart polymer. In the second method called macro (affinity ligand)-facilitated three phase partitioning (MLFTPP), the affinity complex is precipitated at an interface between upper t-butanol-rich phase and lower aqueous phase. These three phases are achieved by adding appropriate amounts of ammonium sulfate and t-butanol to the initial crude extract. In the first protocol, sequential MLFTPP is used with two different smart polymers to purify pectinase and cellulase from a single crude preparation. The second protocol illustrates the application of the affinity precipitation in simultaneous purification and refolding of a urea-denatured xylanase. PMID:24648072

  8. pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots for targeting hypoxic tumor siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, HongYan; Zhang, ShengYu; Ling, Yong; Meng, GuoLiang; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-28

    Hypoxia is a characteristic of cancer and plays a key role in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and resistance to cancer therapies. SiRNA treatment is effective against hypoxic tumors by gene silencing. However, siRNA delivery to the hypoxic regions of solid tumors still presents a challenge due to the distance from blood vessels and the increased presence of efflux transporters. Therefore, tumor therapies would be improved through the immediate development of an effective siRNA delivery system to hypoxic regions. To this end, we synthesized a system to deliver HIF-1α siRNA into hypoxic tumor cells. The system consists of a functional shell composed of 2-deoxyglucose (DG)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) connected with the compound of lipoic acid, lysine and 9-poly-d-arginine (LA-Lys-9R) by a hydrazone bond and a core of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The molecular structure of DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The multifunctional CdTe QDs measured approximately 200 nm and showed excellent biocompatibility, perfect siRNA binding capability and enhanced hypoxic tumor targeting. Importantly, the system described here is pH-responsive with a hydrazone bond; therefore, it avoids GLUT1 receptor-mediated endocytic recycling, resulting in irreversible delivery of the siRNA. We used Western blots to confirm the superior gene silencing efficiency induced by the DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R with hydrazone modified CdTe QDs. Here, we demonstrate high efficacy of the siRNA tumor delivery system using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In addition, these studies demonstrate that pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots show improved antitumor efficacy with decreased organ toxicity, indicating a promising siRNA delivery system for hypoxic cancer therapy. PMID:26590349

  9. Targeting brains, producing responsibilities: the use of neuroscience within British social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, Tineke; Pickersgill, Martyn

    2015-05-01

    Concepts and findings 'translated' from neuroscientific research are finding their way into UK health and social policy discourse. Critical scholars have begun to analyse how policies tend to 'misuse' the neurosciences and, further, how these discourses produce unwarranted and individualizing effects, rooted in middle-class values and inducing guilt and anxiety. In this article, we extend such work while simultaneously departing from the normative assumptions implied in the concept of 'misuse'. Through a documentary analysis of UK policy reports focused on the early years, adolescence and older adults, we examine how these employ neuroscientific concepts and consequently (re)define responsibility. In the documents analysed, responsibility was produced in three different but intersecting ways: through a focus on optimisation, self-governance, and vulnerability. Our work thereby adds to social scientific examinations of neuroscience in society that show how neurobiological terms and concepts can be used to construct and support a particular imaginary of citizenship and the role of the state. Neuroscience may be leveraged by policy makers in ways that (potentially) reduce the target of their intervention to the soma, but do so in order to expand the outcome of the intervention to include the enhancement of society writ large. By attending as well to more critical engagements with neuroscience in policy documents, our analysis demonstrates the importance of being mindful of the limits to the deployment of a neurobiological idiom within policy settings. Accordingly, we contribute to increased empirical specificity concerning the impacts and translation of neuroscientific knowledge in contemporary society whilst refusing to take for granted the idea that the neurosciences necessarily have a dominant role (to play). PMID:25792340

  10. Targeting existing power plants: EPA emission reduction with wind and demand response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricity generation accounts for 40% of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion in the United States. Section 111 of the Clean Air Act (CAA) allows for greenhouse gas emission regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In June 2014, EPA issued the Clean Power Plan that proposes regulation of existing power plants via a “best system of emission reduction” or BSER. Reducing carbon dioxide emissions caused by electricity generation is one of the main motivations for increasing wind power and other renewable energy use, and this option is included in the BSER. This paper applies Monte Carlo simulation with a two-stage power flow optimization framework to analyze the potential CO2 emission reduction with 10% and 20% wind penetration using the proposed BSER. The results show that EPA's BSER does achieve significant emission reduction, but an increase in cost of electricity and load curtailment can result if significant wind is installed without other measures. These concerns are eliminated by including recourse to real-time demand response along with EPA's BSER, suggesting that the proposed BSER, implemented alone, could be insufficient for reaching EPA's target CO2 reductions while also safeguarding power system reliability and cost. - Highlights: • EPA's proposed BSER is demonstrated to be effective in reducing CO2 emissions. • Increasing penetration of wind power leads to increasing reductions in CO2 emissions. • EPA's BSER works best when implemented as a unified system. • EPA's BSER implemented alone could lead to reliability and cost concerns. • Real-time demand response mitigates reliability and cost concerns from the BSER

  11. Biological drugs targeting the immune response in the therapy of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveria Pastore

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Saveria Pastore1, Emanuela Gubinelli2, Luca Leoni2, Desanka Raskovic2, Liudmila Korkina11Laboratory of Tissue Engineering and Cutaneous Physiopathology; 2Second Dermatology Unit, Istituto Dermopatico dell’Immacolata, IRCCS, Roma, ItalyAbstract: Chronic plaque psoriasis affects more than 2% of world population, has a chronic recurrent behavior, gives a heavy burden to the patients’ quality of life, and hence remains a huge medical and social problem. The clinical results of conventional therapies of psoriasis are not satisfactory. According to the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular basis of psoriasis, it is defined as an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. A new generation of biological drugs, targeting molecules and cells involved into perturbed pro-inflammatory immune response in the psoriatic skin and joints, has been recently designed and applied clinically. These biological agents are bioengineered proteins such as chimeric and humanized antibodies and fusion proteins. In particular, they comprise the antitumor necrosis factor-α agents etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, with clinical efficacy in both moderate-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and the anti-CD11a efalizumab with selective therapeutic action exclusively in the skin. Here, we overview recent findings on the molecular pathways relevant to the inflammatory response in psoriasis and present our clinical experience with the drugs currently employed in the dermatologic manifestations, namely etanercept, infliximab, and efalizumab. The growing body of clinical data on the efficacy and safety of antipsoriasis biological drugs is reviewed as well. Particular focus is given to long-term safety concerns and feasibility of combined therapeutic protocols to ameliorate clinical results.Keywords: psoriasis, immune-mediated inflammation, etanercept, infliximab, efalizumab

  12. pH- and Thiol-Responsive BODIPY-Based Photosensitizers for Targeted Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiong-Jie; Lau, Janet T F; Wang, Qiong; Ng, Dennis K P; Lo, Pui-Chi

    2016-06-01

    A diiodo distyryl boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) core was conjugated to two ferrocenyl quenchers through acid-labile ketal and/or thiol-cleavable disulfide linkers, of which the fluorescence and photosensitizing properties were significantly quenched through a photoinduced electron-transfer process. The two symmetrical analogues that contained either the ketal or disulfide linkers could only be activated by a single stimulus, whereas the unsymmetrical analogue was responsive to dual stimuli. Upon interaction with acid and/or dithiothreitol (DTT), these linkers were cleaved selectively. The separation of the BODIPY core and the ferrocenyl moieties restored the photoactivities of the former in phosphate buffered saline and inside the MCF-7 breast cancer cells, rendering these compounds as potential activable photosensitizers for targeted photodynamic therapy. The dual activable analogue exhibited the greatest enhancement in intracellular fluorescence intensity in both an acidic environment (pH 5) and the presence of DTT (4 mm). Its photocytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells also increased by about twofold upon preincubation with 4 mm of DTT. The activation of this compound was also demonstrated in nude mice bearing a HT29 human colorectal carcinoma. A significant increase in fluorescence intensity in the tumor was observed over 9 h after intratumoral injection. PMID:27139139

  13. Inflammatory and immune responses in the cochlea: potential therapeutic targets for sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eFujioka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The inner ear was previously assumed to be an immune-privileged organ due to the existence of its tight junction-based blood-labyrinth barrier. However, studies performed during the past decade revealed that the mesenchymal region of the cochlea, including its lateral wall, is a common site of inflammation. Neutrophils do not enter this region, which is consistent with the old dogma; however, bone marrow-derived resident macrophages are always present in the spiral ligament of the lateral wall and are activated in response to various types of insults, including noise exposure, ischemia, mitochondrial damage and surgical stress. Recent studies have also revealed another type of immune cell, called perivascular melanocyte-like macrophages (PVM/Ms, in the stria vascularis. These dedicated antigen-presenting cells also control vascular contraction and permeability. This review discusses a series of reports regarding inflammatory/immune cells in the cochlear lateral wall, the pathways involved in cochlear damage and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  14. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  15. First-In-Human Study Demonstrating Tumor-Angiogenesis by PET/CT Imaging with 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST, a High-Affinity Peptidomimetic for αvβ3 Integrin Receptor Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Richard P.; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Müller, Dirk; Satz, Stanley; Danthi, Narasimhan; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST™ is an αvβ3 integrin antagonist and the first radiolabeled peptidomimetic to reach clinical development for targeting integrin receptors. In this first-in-human study, the feasibility of integrin receptor peptidomimetic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was confirmed in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and breast cancer.

  16. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Dynamic Response to Aphidicolin-Mediated Replication Stress Uncovers Targets for ATM and ATMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelghani Mazouzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The cellular response to replication stress requires the DNA-damage-responsive kinase ATM and its cofactor ATMIN; however, the roles of this signaling pathway following replication stress are unclear. To identify the functions of ATM and ATMIN in response to replication stress, we utilized both transcriptomics and quantitative mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics. We found that replication stress induced by aphidicolin triggered widespread changes in both gene expression and protein phosphorylation patterns. These changes gave rise to distinct early and late replication stress responses. Furthermore, our analysis revealed previously unknown targets of ATM and ATMIN downstream of replication stress. We demonstrate ATMIN-dependent phosphorylation of H2AX and of CRMP2, a protein previously implicated in Alzheimer’s disease but not in the DNA damage response. Overall, our dataset provides a comprehensive resource for discovering the cellular responses to replication stress and, potentially, associated pathologies.

  17. Measurement Tools and Target Symptoms/Skills Used to Assess Treatment Response for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Erin Elizabeth; Diehl, Joshua John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the measurement tools and target symptoms/skills used to assess treatment response during Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) intervention trials from 2001 through 2010. Data from 195 prospective trials were analyzed. There were 289 unique measurement tools, of which 61.6% were used only once, and 20.8 % were investigator-designed.…

  18. The classical origin of quantum affine algebra in squashed sigma models

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Io; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2012-01-01

    We consider a quantum affine algebra realized in two-dimensional non-linear sigma models with target space three-dimensional squashed sphere. Its affine generators are explicitly constructed and the Poisson brackets are computed. The defining relations of quantum affine algebra in the sense of the Drinfeld first realization are satisfied at classical level. The relation to the Drinfeld second realization is also discussed including higher conserved charges. Finally we comment on a semiclassic...

  19. Explaining the effects of targeted online advertising on children's cognitive, affective, and behavioral brand responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Reijmersdal; E. Rozendaal; N. Smink; G. van Noort; M. Buijzen

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, information from children's profile pages on social network sites is used to target online advertising. This practice has raised concerns in society and academia, however, effects of profile targeting on children remained unstudied. Therefore, this study focused on children's cognitive

  20. Quiet Eye Duration Is Responsive to Variability of Practice and to the Axis of Target Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Robert R.; Okumura, Michelle S.; Alexander, Melissa G. F.; Gardin, Fredrick A.; Sylvester, Curtis T.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that quiet eye, the final fixation before the initiation of a movement in aiming tasks, is used to scale the movement's parameters. Two groups of 12 participants (N = 24) threw darts to targets in the horizontal and vertical axes under conditions of higher (random) or lower (blocked) target variability. Supporting our…

  1. Fiber optic affinity ligand sensor for quantification of petroleum and bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavering, Thomas A.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Luo, Shufang; Evans, Mishell K.; Pennington, Charles; Van Tassell, Roger; Jones, Mark E.

    2001-02-01

    A novel system incorporating optical fiber long-period grating (LPG)-based sensors for rapid detection of biological targets is presented to address the current need for highly responsive, inexpensive, instrumentation for in-situ subsurface bioremediation technologies. With the appropriate configuration, the LPG sensor is able to measure key environmental parameters. The sensor allows for highly sensitive, real-time, refractive index measurements and by applying affinity coatings to the fiber surface, specific binding of molecules can be accomplished using swellable polymers or ligand-based affinity coatings. Advantages of the sensors have are that they are highly responsive, low profile, and can be serially multiplexed within a single-ended probe-like arrangement. This arrangement can be utilized either locally for site characterization or as a distributed sensor to map contaminant levels at multiple depths over a large area. The performance advantages make optical fiber sensors ideal for detection of environmental targets in drinking water, groundwater, soil, and other complex samples. This paper presents recent long-period grating-based sensor results that demonstrate the potential for bioremediation as well as a variety of other chemical and biological sensing applications.

  2. The Salmonella Effector Protein SopA Modulates Innate Immune Responses by Targeting TRIM E3 Ligase Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kamanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium stimulates inflammatory responses in the intestinal epithelium, which are essential for its ability to replicate within the intestinal tract. Stimulation of these responses is strictly dependent on the activity of a type III secretion system encoded within its pathogenicity island 1, which through the delivery of effector proteins, triggers signaling pathways leading to inflammation. One of these effectors is SopA, a HECT-type E3 ligase, which is required for the efficient stimulation of inflammation in an animal model of Salmonella Typhimurium infection. We show here that SopA contributes to the stimulation of innate immune responses by targeting two host E3 ubiquitin ligases, TRIM56 and TRIM65. We also found that TRIM65 interacts with the innate immune receptor MDA5 enhancing its ability to stimulate interferon-β signaling. Therefore, by targeting TRIM56 and TRIM65, SopA can stimulate signaling through two innate immune receptors, RIG-I and MDA5. These findings describe a Salmonella mechanism to modulate inflammatory responses by directly targeting innate immune signaling mechanisms.

  3. Time-Frequency Analysis of Electromagnetic Pulse Response from a Spherical Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈东; 金亚秋

    2003-01-01

    Transient backscattering from a spherical target under incidence of an electromagnetic short pulse is studied. The target can be a perfectly conducting sphere, a dielectric sphere or a dielectric spherical shell. To understand the scattering mechanism from transient impulse echoes for target detection, both the short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and the wavelet transform (WT) are applied to retrieval of scattering information from the backscattering data. Analysis in both the time and frequency domains demonstrates that the WT is more feasible than the STFT to clarifying scattering process of the scatterer because of its excellent multi-resolution characteristic. This technique shall be helpful for scattering analysis and detection of more complex single or multi-targets.

  4. Involvement of miR160/miR393 and their targets in cassava responses to anthracnose disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinweha, Nattaya; Asvarak, Thipa; Viboonjun, Unchera; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2015-02-01

    Cassava is a starchy root crop for food and industrial applications in many countries around the world. Among the factors that affect cassava production, diseases remain the major cause of yield loss. Cassava anthracnose disease is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Severe anthracnose attacks can cause tip die-backs and stem cankers, which can affect the availability of planting materials especially in large-scale production systems. Recent studies indicate that plants over- or under-express certain microRNAs (miRNAs) to cope with various stresses. Understanding how a disease-resistant plant protects itself from pathogens should help to uncover the role of miRNAs in the plant immune system. In this study, the disease severity assay revealed different response to C. gloeosporioides infection in two cassava cultivars. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis uncovered the differential expression of the two miRNAs and their target genes in the two cassava cultivars that were subjected to fungal infection. The more resistant cultivar revealed the up-regulation of miR160 and miR393, and consequently led to low transcript levels in their targets, ARF10 and TIR1, respectively. The more susceptible cultivar exhibited the opposite pattern. The cis-regulatory elements relevant to defense and stress responsiveness, fungal elicitor responsiveness and hormonal responses were the most prevalent present in the miRNAs gene promoter regions. The possible dual role of these specific miRNAs and their target genes associated with cassava responses to C. gloeosporioides is discussed. This is the first study to address the molecular events by which miRNAs which might play a role in fungal-infected cassava. A better understanding of the functions of miRNAs target genes should greatly increase our knowledge of the mechanism underlying susceptibility and lead to new strategies to enhance disease tolerance in this economically important crop. PMID:25462963

  5. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Sara L.; Hansen, Rebecca K.; Wagner, Sebastian A.; van Cuijk, Loes; van Belle, Gijsbert J.; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Choudhary, Chunaram; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Protein modifications by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) play key roles in cellular signaling pathways. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) directly couple these modifications by selectively recognizing SUMOylated target proteins through SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), promoting their K48-linked ubiquitylation and degradation. Only a single mammalian STUbL, RNF4, has been identified. We show that human RNF111/Arkadia is a new STUbL, which used three adjacent SIMs for s...

  6. Differential Inflammatory Response to Inhaled Lipopolysaccharide Targeted Either to the Airways or the Alveoli in Man

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, Winfried; Heimbeck, Irene; Hofer, Thomas P J; Khadem Saba, Gülnaz; Neiswirth, Margot; Frankenberger, Marion; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Löms

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS) is a potent inducer of inflammation and there is various LPS contamination in the environment, being a trigger of lung diseases and exacerbation. The objective of this study was to assess the time course of inflammation and the sensitivities of the airways and alveoli to targeted LPS inhalation in order to understand the role of LPS challenge in airway disease. In healthy volunteers without any bronchial hyperresponsiveness we targeted sequentially 1, 5 and...

  7. Multiple poes and other features of affine Toda field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some perturbative features of affine Toda field theory are explored, in particular the mechanisms responsible for the first-, second- and third-order poles in the conjectured exact factorisable S-matrices in the ADE series of models. It is found that generic collections of Feynman diagrams are responsible for the leading order poles in any of the theories. However, the complexity is such that it has not yet proved possible to analyse all the singularities that occur up to order twelve. Some comments are made on an associated tiling problem and on an interesting connection between the affine Toda couplings and the Clebsch-Gordan decomposition of tensor products. (orig.)

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M;

    2015-01-01

    subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic...... analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular...... response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational...

  9. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  10. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  11. The Response of the German Agricultural Sector to the Envisaged Biofuel Targets in Germany and Abroad: A CGE Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sorda, Giovanni; Banse, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the impact of national, European and global biofuel targets on German food production and land allocation until 2020. The LEITAP General Equilibrium Model simulates the interaction of agricultural and energy markets in response to the envisaged expansion of the biofuel industry. First generation biofuels are integrated in the production structure of the petroleum sector. Second generation biofuels are modelled indirectly via estimated bottom-up reductions in land availab...

  12. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Triboulet, Sarah,; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc...

  13. TARGET COSTING – THE RESPONSE OF THE MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING TO CHANGES IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OFILEANU DIMI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to highlight the Target Costing concept and the way in which the concept is used by the Romanian entities. The article analyzes the concept starting from the time of its appearance and up to the present moment, presenting the concept’s characteristics and its mode of action. A careful review of the specialized literature will be presented and the fact that this concept represents in fact a method of management. In order to study an eventual correlation between using Target Costing concept and the financial results obtained, an analysis of a sample of Romanian entities which produce shoes will be made. Also, it was analyzed the level of use and how much the Target Costing concept is known.

  14. Assessment of targeted and non-targeted responses in cells deficient in ATM function following exposure to low and high dose X-rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kiuru

    Full Text Available Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure.

  15. Molecular targets of omega 3 and conjugated linoleic fatty acids – micromanaging cellular response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eVisioli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized de novo by mammals and need to be ingested either with the diet or through the use of supplements/functional foods to ameliorate cardiovascular prognosis. This review focus on the molecular targets of omega 3 fatty acids and CLA, as paradigmatic molecules that can be explored both as nutrients and as pharmacological agents, especially as related to cardioprotection. In addition, we indicate novel molecular targets, namely microRNAs that might contribute to the observed biological activities of such essential fatty acids.

  16. Properties of the Affine Invariant Ensemble Sampler in high dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Huijser, David; Brewer, Brendon J

    2015-01-01

    We present theoretical and practical properties of the affine-invariant ensemble sampler Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In high dimensions the affine-invariant ensemble sampler shows unusual and undesirable properties. We demonstrate this with an $n$-dimensional correlated Gaussian toy problem with a known mean and covariance structure, and analyse the burn-in period. The burn-in period seems to be short, however upon closer inspection we discover the mean and the variance of the target distribution do not match the expected, known values. This problem becomes greater as $n$ increases. We therefore conclude that the affine-invariant ensemble sampler should be used with caution in high dimensional problems. We also present some theoretical results explaining this behaviour.

  17. Affine density in wavelet analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kutyniok, Gitta

    2007-01-01

    In wavelet analysis, irregular wavelet frames have recently come to the forefront of current research due to questions concerning the robustness and stability of wavelet algorithms. A major difficulty in the study of these systems is the highly sensitive interplay between geometric properties of a sequence of time-scale indices and frame properties of the associated wavelet systems. This volume provides the first thorough and comprehensive treatment of irregular wavelet frames by introducing and employing a new notion of affine density as a highly effective tool for examining the geometry of sequences of time-scale indices. Many of the results are new and published for the first time. Topics include: qualitative and quantitative density conditions for existence of irregular wavelet frames, non-existence of irregular co-affine frames, the Nyquist phenomenon for wavelet systems, and approximation properties of irregular wavelet frames.

  18. Efficient mRNA-Based Genetic Engineering of Human NK Cells with High-Affinity CD16 and CCR7 Augments Rituximab-Induced ADCC against Lymphoma and Targets NK Cell Migration toward the Lymph Node-Associated Chemokine CCL19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Levy, Emily; Karambelkar, Amrita; Li, Linhong; Reger, Robert; Berg, Maria; Peshwa, Madhusudan V.; Childs, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, investigators have pursued methods to genetically engineer natural killer (NK) cells for use in clinical therapy against cancer. Despite considerable advances in viral transduction of hematopoietic stem cells and T cells, transduction efficiencies for NK cells have remained disappointingly low. Here, we show that NK cells can be genetically reprogramed efficiently using a cGMP-compliant mRNA electroporation method that induces rapid and reproducible transgene expression in nearly all transfected cells, without negatively influencing their viability, phenotype, and cytotoxic function. To study its potential therapeutic application, we used this approach to improve key aspects involved in efficient lymphoma targeting by adoptively infused ex vivo-expanded NK cells. Electroporation of NK cells with mRNA coding for the chemokine receptor CCR7 significantly promoted migration toward the lymph node-associated chemokine CCL19. Further, introduction of mRNA coding for the high-affinity antibody-binding receptor CD16 (CD16-158V) substantially augmented NK cell cytotoxicity against rituximab-coated lymphoma cells. Based on these data, we conclude that this approach can be utilized to genetically modify multiple modalities of NK cells in a highly efficient manner with the potential to improve multiple facets of their in vivo tumor targeting, thus, opening a new arena for the development of more efficacious adoptive NK cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27047492

  19. In vitro evolution and affinity-maturation with Coliphage qβ display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Skamel

    Full Text Available The Escherichia coli bacteriophage, Qβ (Coliphage Qβ, offers a favorable alternative to M13 for in vitro evolution of displayed peptides and proteins due to high mutagenesis rates in Qβ RNA replication that better simulate the affinity maturation processes of the immune response. We describe a benchtop in vitro evolution system using Qβ display of the VP1 G-H loop peptide of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. DNA encoding the G-H loop was fused to the A1 minor coat protein of Qβ resulting in a replication-competent hybrid phage that efficiently displayed the FMDV peptide. The surface-localized FMDV VP1 G-H loop cross-reacted with the anti-FMDV monoclonal antibody (mAb SD6 and was found to decorate the corners of the Qβ icosahedral shell by electron microscopy. Evolution of Qβ-displayed peptides, starting from fully degenerate coding sequences corresponding to the immunodominant region of VP1, allowed rapid in vitro affinity maturation to SD6 mAb. Qβ selected under evolutionary pressure revealed a non-canonical, but essential epitope for mAb SD6 recognition consisting of an Arg-Gly tandem pair. Finally, the selected hybrid phages induced polyclonal antibodies in guinea pigs with good affinity to both FMDV and hybrid Qβ-G-H loop, validating the requirement of the tandem pair epitope. Qβ-display emerges as a novel framework for rapid in vitro evolution with affinity-maturation to molecular targets.

  20. Protein isolation using affinity chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Besselink, T.

    2012-01-01

    Many product or even waste streams in the food industry contain components that may have potential for e.g. functional foods. These streams are typically large in volume and the components of interest are only present at low concentrations. A robust and highly selective separation process should be developed for efficient isolation of the components. Affinity chromatography is such a selective method. Ligands immobilized to a stationary phase (e.g., a resin or membrane) are used to bind the c...

  1. Inhomogeneous self-affine carpets

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dimension theory of inhomogeneous self-affine carpets. Through the work of Olsen, Snigireva and Fraser, the dimension theory of inhomogeneous self-similar sets is now relatively well-understood, however, almost no progress has been made concerning more general non-conformal inhomogeneous attractors. If a dimension is countably stable, then the results are immediate and so we focus on the upper and lower box dimensions and compute these explicitly for large classes of inhomo...

  2. Responsive + Server Side, a multi-device targeting web application optimization strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lindell, Jóhann

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate RESS, Responive + Server Side, a startegy for serving optimized web content to different types of end user devices. RESS is also compared to other mutli-device targeting solutions, Responisve Web Design and Server Side Adaptation, from different points of view, such as performance and workload.

  3. Alternative affinity tools: more attractive than antibodies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, V.J.B.; Levisson, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Smidt, H.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies are the most successful affinity tools used today, in both fundamental and applied research (diagnostics, purification and therapeutics). Nonetheless, antibodies do have their limitations, including high production costs and low stability. Alternative affinity tools based on nucleic acids

  4. Spectral affinity in protein networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Shang-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI networks enable us to better understand the functional organization of the proteome. We can learn a lot about a particular protein by querying its neighborhood in a PPI network to find proteins with similar function. A spectral approach that considers random walks between nodes of interest is particularly useful in evaluating closeness in PPI networks. Spectral measures of closeness are more robust to noise in the data and are more precise than simpler methods based on edge density and shortest path length. Results We develop a novel affinity measure for pairs of proteins in PPI networks, which uses personalized PageRank, a random walk based method used in context-sensitive search on the Web. Our measure of closeness, which we call PageRank Affinity, is proportional to the number of times the smaller-degree protein is visited in a random walk that restarts at the larger-degree protein. PageRank considers paths of all lengths in a network, therefore PageRank Affinity is a precise measure that is robust to noise in the data. PageRank Affinity is also provably related to cluster co-membership, making it a meaningful measure. In our experiments on protein networks we find that our measure is better at predicting co-complex membership and finding functionally related proteins than other commonly used measures of closeness. Moreover, our experiments indicate that PageRank Affinity is very resilient to noise in the network. In addition, based on our method we build a tool that quickly finds nodes closest to a queried protein in any protein network, and easily scales to much larger biological networks. Conclusion We define a meaningful way to assess the closeness of two proteins in a PPI network, and show that our closeness measure is more biologically significant than other commonly used methods. We also develop a tool, accessible at http://xialab.bu.edu/resources/pnns, that allows the user to

  5. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations. PMID:24788578

  6. Large-scale integration of small molecule-induced genome-wide transcriptional responses, Kinome-wide binding affinities and cell-growth inhibition profiles reveal global trends characterizing systems-level drug action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eVidovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS project is a large-scale coordinated effort to build a comprehensive systems biology reference resource. The goals of the program include the generation of a very large multidimensional data matrix and informatics and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and make the data readily accessible. LINCS data include genome-wide transcriptional signatures, biochemical protein binding profiles, cellular phenotypic response profiles and various other datasets for a wide range of cell model systems and molecular and genetic perturbations. Here we present a partial survey of this data facilitated by data standards and in particular a robust compound standardization workflow; we integrated several types of LINCS signatures and analyzed the results with a focus on mechanism of action and chemical compounds. We illustrate how kinase targets can be related to disease models and relevant drugs. We identified some fundamental trends that appear to link Kinome binding profiles and transcriptional signatures to chemical information and biochemical binding profiles to transcriptional responses independent of chemical similarity. To fill gaps in the datasets we developed and applied predictive models. The results can be interpreted at the systems level as demonstrated based on a large number of signaling pathways. We can identify clear global relationships, suggesting robustness of cellular responses to chemical perturbation. Overall, the results suggest that chemical similarity is a useful measure at the systems level, which would support phenotypic drug optimization efforts. With this study we demonstrate the potential of such integrated analysis approaches and suggest prioritizing further experiments to fill the gaps in the current data.

  7. Manifolds with integrable affine shape operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Joaquín

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This work establishes the conditions for the existence of vector fields with the property that theirs covariant derivative, with respect to the affine normal connection, be the affine shape operatorS in hypersurfaces. Some results are obtained from this property and, in particular, for some kind of affine decomposable hypersurfaces we explicitely get the actual vector fields.

  8. Specific Nongluten Proteins of Wheat Are Novel Target Antigens in Celiac Disease Humoral Response

    OpenAIRE

    Huebener, Sina; Tanaka, Charlene K.; Uhde, Melanie; Zone, John J.; Vensel, William H.; Kasarda, Donald D.; Beams, Leilani; Briani, Chiara; Green, Peter H.R.; Altenbach, Susan B; Alaedini, Armin

    2014-01-01

    While the antigenic specificity and pathogenic relevance of immunologic reactivity to gluten in celiac disease have been extensively researched, the immune response to nongluten proteins of wheat has not been characterized. We aimed to investigate the level and molecular specificity of antibody response to wheat nongluten proteins in celiac disease. Serum samples from patients and controls were screened for IgG and IgA antibody reactivity to a nongluten protein extract from the wheat cultivar...

  9. Identification of hookworm DAF-16/FOXO response elements and direct gene targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The infective stage of the parasitic nematode hookworm is developmentally arrested in the environment and needs to infect a specific host to complete its life cycle. The canine hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum is an excellent model for investigating human hookworm infections. The transcription factor of A. caninum, Ac-DAF-16, which has a characteristic fork head or "winged helix" DNA binding domain (DBD, has been implicated in the resumption of hookworm development in the host. However, the precise roles of Ac-DAF-16 in hookworm parasitism and its downstream targets are unknown. In the present study, we combined molecular techniques and bioinformatics to identify a group of Ac-DAF-16 binding sites and target genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The DNA binding domain of Ac-DAF-16 was used to select genomic fragments by in vitro genomic selection. Twenty four bound genomic fragments were analyzed for the presence of the DAF-16 family binding element (DBE and possible alternative Ac-DAF-16 bind motifs. The 22 genes linked to these genomic fragments were identified using bioinformatics tools and defined as candidate direct gene targets of Ac-DAF-16. Their developmental stage-specific expression patterns were examined. Also, a new putative DAF-16 binding element was identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that Ac-DAF-16 is involved in diverse biological processes throughout hookworm development. Further investigation of these target genes will provide insights into the molecular basis by which Ac-DAF-16 regulates its downstream gene network in hookworm infection.

  10. Lineup identification accuracy: The effects of alcohol, target presence, confidence ratings, and response time

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy Kneller; Alistair J. Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Despite the intoxication of many eyewitnesses at crime scenes, only four published studies to date have investigated the effects of alcohol intoxication on eyewitness identification performance. While one found intoxication significantly increased false identification rates from target absent showups, three found no such effect using the more traditional lineup procedure. The present study sought to further explore the effects of alcohol intoxication on identification performance ...

  11. A shear-stress responsive nano-container to target critically constricted arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Holme, Margaret Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular diseases are the world's biggest cause of mortality. During the acute case of heart attack, vasodilators are administered to open up the constricted artery and allow blood perfusion to the surrounding tissue. However, there are currently no treatments on the market that allow such drugs to be delivered locally to the site of a critically constricted artery. Such a targeted delivery method could significantly improve patient prognosis. The presente...

  12. Species-scanning mutagenesis of the serotonin transporter reveals residues essential in selective, high-affinity recognition of antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Kristensen, A S; Wiborg, O

    2001-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a high-affinity sodium/chloride-dependent neurotransmitter transporter responsible for reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. SERT is a selective target of several clinically important antidepressants. In a cross-species analysis comparing human and...... antidepressants citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine and imipramine were several-fold higher at hSERT compared with bSERT. No species selectivity was observed for the antidepressants fluvoxamine, and sertraline or for the psychostimulants cocaine, the cocaine analogue beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl...

  13. Definition of the viral targets of protective HIV-1-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothe Beatriz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of the CTL component of a future HIV-1 vaccine will depend on the induction of responses with the most potent antiviral activity and broad HLA class I restriction. However, current HIV vaccine designs are largely based on viral sequence alignments only, not incorporating experimental data on T cell function and specificity. Methods Here, 950 untreated HIV-1 clade B or -C infected individuals were tested for responses to sets of 410 overlapping peptides (OLP spanning the entire HIV-1 proteome. For each OLP, a "protective ratio" (PR was calculated as the ratio of median viral loads (VL between OLP non-responders and responders. Results For both clades, there was a negative relationship between the PR and the entropy of the OLP sequence. There was also a significant additive effect of multiple responses to beneficial OLP. Responses to beneficial OLP were of significantly higher functional avidity than responses to non-beneficial OLP. They also had superior in-vitro antiviral activities and, importantly, were at least as predictive of individuals' viral loads than their HLA class I genotypes. Conclusions The data thus identify immunogen sequence candidates for HIV and provide an approach for T cell immunogen design applicable to other viral infections.

  14. A Borrelia burgdorferi Surface-Exposed Transmembrane Protein Lacking Detectable Immune Responses Supports Pathogen Persistence and Constitutes a Vaccine Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Faith; Kaur, Simarjot; Smith, Alexis A; Yang, Xiuli; Wilder, Cara N; Sharma, Kavita; Buyuktanir, Ozlem; Pal, Utpal

    2016-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi harbors a limited set of transmembrane surface proteins, most of which constitute key targets of humoral immune responses. Here we show that BB0405, a conserved membrane-spanning protein of unknown function, fails to evoke detectable antibody responses despite its extracellular exposure. bb0405 is a member of an operon and ubiquitously expressed throughout the rodent-tick infection cycle. The gene product serves an essential function in vivo, as bb0405-deletion mutants are unable to transmit from ticks and establish infection in mammalian hosts. Despite the lack of BB0405-specific immunoglobulin M or immunoglobulin G antibodies during natural infection, mice immunized with a recombinant version of the protein elicited high-titer and remarkably long-lasting antibody responses, conferring significant host protection against tick-borne infection. Taken together, these studies highlight the essential role of an apparently immune-invisible borrelial transmembrane protein in facilitating infection and its usefulness as a target of protective host immunity blocking the transmission of B. burgdorferi. PMID:26747708

  15. Catechol Polymers for pH-Responsive, Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jing; Chen, Feng; Cryns, Vincent L.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    A novel cell-targeting, pH-sensitive polymeric carrier was employed in this study for delivery of the anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) to cancer cells. Our strategy is based on facile conjugation of BTZ to catechol-containing polymeric carriers that are designed to be taken up selectively by cancer cells through cell surface receptor-mediated mechanisms. The polymer used as a building block in this study was poly(ethylene glycol), which was chosen for its ability to reduce nonspecific interac...

  16. Gravitational Goldstone fields from affine gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Tresguerres, R

    2000-01-01

    In order to facilitate the application of standard renormalization techniques, gravitation should be decribed, if possible, in pure connection formalism, as a Yang-Mills theory of a certain spacetime group, say the Poincare or the affine group. This embodies the translational as well as the linear connection. However, the coframe is not the standard Yang-Mills type gauge field of the translations, since it lacks the inhomogeneous gradient term in the gauge transformations. By explicitly restoring the "hidden" piece responsible for this behavior within the framework of nonlinear realizations, the usual geometrical interpretation of the dynamical theory becomes possible, and in addition one can avoid the metric or coframe degeneracy which would otherwise interfere with the integrations within the path integral. We claim that nonlinear realizations provide a general mathematical scheme clarifying the foundations of gauge theories of spacetime symmetries. When applied to construct the Yang-Mills theory of the aff...

  17. Specific nongluten proteins of wheat are novel target antigens in celiac disease humoral response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is generally understood to be triggered by the ingestion of gluten proteins of wheat and related cereals. The skin manifestation of the condition is known as dermatitis herpetiformis. Antibody response to native and deamidated seque...

  18. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  19. The Nrf2-antioxidant response element pathway: a target for regulating energy metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that responds to oxidative stress by binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter of genes coding for antioxidant enzymes like NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and proteins for glutathione synthesis. ...

  20. Early Detection Rapid Response Program Targets New Noxious Weed Species in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Jennifer E.; Halpern, Alison D.; DesCamp, Wendy C.; Miller, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection, rapid response is a critical component of invasive plant management. It can be challenging, however, to detect new invaders before they become established if landowners cannot identify species of concern. In order to increase awareness, eye-catching postcards were developed in Washington State as part of a noxious weed educational…

  1. Targeting the oxidative stress response system of fungi with safe, redox-potent chemosensitizing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    One mode of action of the antimycotics amphotericin B (AMB) or itraconazole (ITZ) against filamentous fungi involves cellular oxidative stress response. Aspergillus fumigatus sakA', a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) gene deletion mutant in the antioxidation system, was more sensitive to AMB ...

  2. The distribution of BRAF gene fusions in solid tumors and response to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Chmielecki, Juliann; Gay, Laurie; Johnson, Adrienne; Chudnovsky, Jacob; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Roels, Steven; Miller, Vincent A; Nakamura, Brooke N; Gray, Adam; Wong, Michael K; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-02-15

    Although the BRAF V600E base substitution is an approved target for the BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, BRAF gene fusions have not been investigated as anticancer drug targets. In our study, a wide variety of tumors underwent comprehensive genomic profiling for hundreds of known cancer genes using the FoundationOne™ or FoundationOne Heme™ comprehensive genomic profiling assays. BRAF fusions involving the intact in-frame BRAF kinase domain were observed in 55 (0.3%) of 20,573 tumors, across 12 distinct tumor types, including 20 novel BRAF fusions. These comprised 29 unique 5' fusion partners, of which 31% (9) were known and 69% (20) were novel. BRAF fusions included 3% (14/531) of melanomas; 2% (15/701) of gliomas; 1.0% (3/294) of thyroid cancers; 0.3% (3/1,062) pancreatic carcinomas; 0.2% (8/4,013) nonsmall-cell lung cancers and 0.2% (4/2,154) of colorectal cancers, and were enriched in pilocytic (30%) vs. nonpilocytic gliomas (1%; p pilocytic astrocytomas, pancreatic acinar and papillary thyroid cancers. PMID:26314551

  3. Development of an aptamer-based affinity purification method for vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Lönne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since aptamers bind their targets with high affinity and specificity, they are promising alternative ligands in protein affinity purification. As aptamers are chemically synthesized oligonucleotides, they can be easily produced in large quantities regarding GMP conditions allowing their application in protein production for therapeutic purposes. Several advantages of aptamers compared to antibodies are described in general within this paper. Here, an aptamer directed against the human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF was used as affinity ligand for establishing a purification platform for VEGF in small scale. The aptamer was covalently immobilized on magnetic beads in a controlled orientation resulting in a functional active affinity matrix. Target binding was optimized by introduction of spacer molecules and variation of aptamer density. Further, salt-induced target elution was demonstrated as well as VEGF purification from a complex protein mixture proving the specificity of protein-aptamer binding.

  4. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity ...

  5. Rational self-affine tiles

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    An integral self-affine tile is the solution of a set equation $\\mathbf{A} \\mathcal{T} = \\bigcup_{d \\in \\mathcal{D}} (\\mathcal{T} + d)$, where $\\mathbf{A}$ is an $n \\times n$ integer matrix and $\\mathcal{D}$ is a finite subset of $\\mathbb{Z}^n$. In the recent decades, these objects and the induced tilings have been studied systematically. We extend this theory to matrices $\\mathbf{A} \\in \\mathbb{Q}^{n \\times n}$. We define rational self-affine tiles as compact subsets of the open subring $\\mathbb{R}^n\\times \\prod_\\mathfrak{p} K_\\mathfrak{p}$ of the ad\\'ele ring $\\mathbb{A}_K$, where the factors of the (finite) product are certain $\\mathfrak{p}$-adic completions of a number field $K$ that is defined in terms of the characteristic polynomial of $\\mathbf{A}$. Employing methods from classical algebraic number theory, Fourier analysis in number fields, and results on zero sets of transfer operators, we establish a general tiling theorem for these tiles. We also associate a second kind of tiles with a rational matr...

  6. The affine quantum gravity programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central principle of affine quantum gravity is securing and maintaining the strict positivity of the matrix { g-hat ab(x)} composed of the spatial components of the local metric operator. On spectral grounds, canonical commutation relations are incompatible with this principle, and they must be replaced by noncanonical, affine commutation relations. Due to the partial second-class nature of the quantum gravitational constraints, it is advantageous to use the recently developed projection operator method, which treats all quantum constraints on an equal footing. Using this method, enforcement of regularized versions of the gravitational operator constraints is formulated quite naturally by means of a novel and relatively well-defined functional integral involving only the same set of variables that appears in the usual classical formulation. It is anticipated that skills and insight to study this formulation can be developed by studying special, reduced-variable models that still retain some basic characteristics of gravity, specifically a partial second-class constraint operator structure. Although perturbatively nonrenormalizable, gravity may possibly be understood nonperturbatively from a hard-core perspective that has proved valuable for specialized models. Finally, developing a procedure to pass to the genuine physical Hilbert space involves several interconnected steps that require careful coordination

  7. An affinity pull-down approach to identify the plant cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotides (CNs) are intracellular second messengers that play an important role in mediating physiological responses to environmental and developmental signals, in species ranging from bacteria to humans. In response to these signals, CNs are synthesized by nucleotidyl cyclases and then act by binding to and altering the activity of downstream target proteins known as cyclic nucleotide-binding proteins (CNBPs). A number of CNBPs have been identified across kingdoms including transcription factors, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and channels, all of which harbor conserved CN-binding domains. In plants however, few CNBPs have been identified as homology searches fail to return plant sequences with significant matches to known CNBPs. Recently, affinity pull-down techniques have been successfully used to identify CNBPs in animals and have provided new insights into CN signaling. The application of these techniques to plants has not yet been extensively explored and offers an alternative approach toward the unbiased discovery of novel CNBP candidates in plants. Here, an affinity pull-down technique for the identification of the plant CN interactome is presented. In summary, the method involves an extraction of plant proteins which is incubated with a CN-bait, followed by a series of increasingly stringent elutions that eliminates proteins in a sequential manner according to their affinity to the bait. The eluted and bait-bound proteins are separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, excised, and digested with trypsin after which the resultant peptides are identified by mass spectrometry - techniques that are commonplace in proteomics experiments. The discovery of plant CNBPs promises to provide valuable insight into the mechanism of CN signal transduction in plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  8. Clinical Response of Metastatic Breast Cancer to Multi-targeted Therapeutic Approach: A Single Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Meiners

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes the ongoing (partial remission of a female patient (41 years old from estrogen receptor (ER-positive/progesterone receptor (PR-negative metastatic breast cancer in response to a combination treatment directed towards the revitalization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (oxidative phosphorylation, the suppression of NF-kappaB as a factor triggering the inflammatory response, and chemotherapy with capecitabine. The reduction of tumor mass was evidenced by a continuing decline of CA15-3 and CEA tumor marker serum levels and 18FDG-PET-CT plus magnetic resonance (MR imaging. It is concluded that such combination treatment might be a useful option for treating already formed metastases and for providing protection against the formation of metastases in ER positive breast cancer. The findings need to be corroborated by clinical trials. Whether similar results can be expected for other malignant tumor phenotypes relying on glycolysis as the main energy source remains to be elucidated.

  9. Clinical Response of Metastatic Breast Cancer to Multi-targeted Therapeutic Approach: A Single Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiners, Christian [Gautinger Straße 3b, D-82234 Wessling (Germany)

    2011-03-17

    The present article describes the ongoing (partial) remission of a female patient (41 years old) from estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor (PR)-negative metastatic breast cancer in response to a combination treatment directed towards the revitalization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (oxidative phosphorylation), the suppression of NF-kappaB as a factor triggering the inflammatory response, and chemotherapy with capecitabine. The reduction of tumor mass was evidenced by a continuing decline of CA15-3 and CEA tumor marker serum levels and {sup 18}FDG-PET-CT plus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It is concluded that such combination treatment might be a useful option for treating already formed metastases and for providing protection against the formation of metastases in ER positive breast cancer. The findings need to be corroborated by clinical trials. Whether similar results can be expected for other malignant tumor phenotypes relying on glycolysis as the main energy source remains to be elucidated.

  10. Clinical Response of Metastatic Breast Cancer to Multi-targeted Therapeutic Approach: A Single Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article describes the ongoing (partial) remission of a female patient (41 years old) from estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor (PR)-negative metastatic breast cancer in response to a combination treatment directed towards the revitalization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (oxidative phosphorylation), the suppression of NF-kappaB as a factor triggering the inflammatory response, and chemotherapy with capecitabine. The reduction of tumor mass was evidenced by a continuing decline of CA15-3 and CEA tumor marker serum levels and 18FDG-PET-CT plus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It is concluded that such combination treatment might be a useful option for treating already formed metastases and for providing protection against the formation of metastases in ER positive breast cancer. The findings need to be corroborated by clinical trials. Whether similar results can be expected for other malignant tumor phenotypes relying on glycolysis as the main energy source remains to be elucidated

  11. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a pref...

  12. Institutions for Macro Stability in Brazil: Inflation Targets and Fiscal Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    José Roberto Afonso; Eliane Cristina de Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Monetary and fiscal institutions have played a decisive role in the stabilisation of the Brazilian economy since the mid-1990s. Brazil’s experience of designing and managing institutions to this end is likely to be of interest to other emerging and low- or middle-income economies. In Brazil institutional reforms were predominantly made in response to a succession of internal and, particularly, external crises. Indeed, perhaps nowhere in the world has inflation received as much attention from ...

  13. Regulation of MicroRNA-155 in Atherosclerotic Inflammatory Responses by Targeting MAP3K10

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Ting; Yang, Lin; Li, Zhoubin; Wong, Mei Mei; Zheng, Xiaoye; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Li; Yan, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Aims Accumulating evidence suggest that numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as various diseases that accompany inflammatory responses. Inflammation is known to be a major contributor to atherogenesis. Previous studies provide promising evidence in support of the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease. However, mechanistic data on these small molecules in atherosclerosis (AS) are still missing. The present study aims...

  14. Ligand-responsive RNA switches: viral translation regulators, therapeutic targets, and tunable building blocks for nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Boerneke, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches represent a new class of simple and small switching modules which regulate viral translation initiation by adopting well-defined ligand-free and bound conformational states without undergoing large secondary structure rearrangements, distinguishing them from metabolite-sensing riboswitches. Initially discovered in the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV), RNA switch motifs have now been discovered in the genomes of diverse o...

  15. DFT study on the effect of exocyclic substituents on the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haining; Bara, Jason E.; Turner, C. Heath, E-mail: hturner@eng.ua.edu

    2013-04-18

    Highlights: • DFT calculations are used to predict the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazoles. • The electron-withdrawing groups dominate the predicted proton affinity. • The effects of multiple substituents on the proton affinity can be accurately predicted. • Large compound libraries can be screened for imidazoles with tailored reactivity. - Abstract: A deeper understanding of the acid/base properties of imidazole derivatives will aid the development of solvents, polymer membranes and other materials that can be used for CO{sub 2} capture and acid gas removal. In this study, we employ density functional theory calculations to investigate the effect of various electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups on the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazole. We find that electron-donating groups are able to increase the proton affinity relative to 1-methylimidazole, i.e., making the molecule more basic. In contrast, electron-withdrawing groups cause a decrease of the proton affinity. When multiple substituents are present, their effects on the proton affinity were found to be additive. This finding offers a quick approach for predicting and targeting the proton affinities of this series of molecules, and we show the strong correlation between the calculated proton affinities and experimental pK{sub a} values.

  16. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives. (topical review)

  17. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  18. The Dietary Flavonoid Kaempferol Mediates Anti-Inflammatory Responses via the Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4 Molecular Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Hyoung Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though a lot of reports have suggested the anti-inflammatory activity of kaempferol (KF in macrophages, little is known about its exact anti-inflammatory mode of action and its immunopharmacological target molecules. In this study, we explored anti-inflammatory activity of KF in LPS-treated macrophages. In particular, molecular targets for KF action were identified by using biochemical and molecular biological analyses. KF suppressed the release of nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, downregulated the cellular adhesion of U937 cells to fibronectin (FN, neutralized the generation of radicals, and diminished mRNA expression levels of inflammatory genes encoding inducible NO synthase (iNOS, TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- and sodium nitroprusside- (SNP- treated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. KF reduced NF-κB (p65 and p50 and AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos levels in the nucleus and their transcriptional activity. Interestingly, it was found that Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4 responsible for NF-κB and AP-1 activation were identified as the direct molecular targets of KF by kinase enzyme assays and by measuring their phosphorylation patterns. KF was revealed to have in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by the direct suppression of Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4, involved in the activation of NF-κB and AP-1.

  19. microRNAs targeting DEAD-box helicases are involved in salinity stress response in rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macovei Anca

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice (Oryza sativa L., one of the most important food crop in the world, is considered to be a salt-sensitive crop. Excess levels of salt adversely affect all the major metabolic activities, including cell wall damage, cytoplasmic lysis and genomic stability. In order to cope with salt stress, plants have evolved high degrees of developmental plasticity, including adaptation via cascades of molecular networks and changes in gene expression profiles. Posttranscriptional regulation, through the activity of microRNAs, also plays an important role in the plant response to salinity conditions. MicroRNAs are small endogenous RNAs that modulate gene expression and are involved in the most essential physiological processes, including plant development and adaptation to environmental changes. Results In the present study, we investigated the expression profiles of osa-MIR414, osa-MIR408 and osa-MIR164e along with their targeted genes, under salinity stress conditions in wild type and transgenic rice plants ectopically expressing the PDH45 (Pea DNA Helicase gene. The present miRNAs were predicted to target the OsABP (ATP-Binding Protein, OsDSHCT (DOB1/SK12/helY-like DEAD-box Helicase and OsDBH (DEAD-Box Helicase genes, included in the DEAD-box helicase family. An in silico characterization of the proteins was performed and the miRNAs predicted targets were validated by RLM-5′RACE. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the OsABP, OsDBH and OsDSHCT genes were up-regulated in response to 100 and 200 mM NaCl treatments. The present study also highlighted an increased accumulation of the gene transcripts in wild type plants, with the exception of the OsABP mRNA which showed the highest level (15.1-fold change compared to control in the transgenic plants treated with 200 mM NaCl. Salinity treatments also affected the expression of osa-MIR414, osa-MIR164e and osa-MIR408, found to be significantly down-regulated, although the changes in mi

  20. Platelet collagen receptors and coagulation. A characteristic platelet response as possible target for antithrombotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Munnix, Imke C A; Siljander, Pia R M

    2005-04-01

    Collagen is a unique agonist of platelets, because it acts as an immobilized ligand that only causes platelet activation after stable adhesion. This review addresses the present understanding of how platelet interaction with collagen supports the process of thrombin generation and coagulation. Only some of the collagen-adhered platelets, that is, those showing profound changes in shape and shedding microparticles (resembling apoptotic cells), appear to contribute to the procoagulant activity of platelets. The main signaling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, plays a key role in the platelet procoagulant response during thrombus formation; this is a reason why new anti-glycoprotein-VI antibodies are promising antithrombotic tools. PMID:16039967

  1. Relevance of vitamin D receptor target genes for monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Vukić

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 has transcriptome- and genome-wide effects and activates, via the binding of its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR, several hundred target genes. Using samples from a 5-month vitamin D3 intervention study (VitDmet, we recently reported that the expression of 12 VDR target genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs as well as 12 biochemical and clinical parameters of the study participants are significantly triggered by vitamin D3. In this study, we performed a more focused selection of further 12 VDR target genes and demonstrated that changes of their mRNA expression in PBMCs of VitDmet subjects significantly correlate with alterations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels. Network and self-organizing map analysis of these datasets together with that of the other 24 parameters was followed by relevance calculations and identified changes in parathyroid hormone serum levels and the expression of the newly selected genes STS, BCL6, ITGAM, LRRC25, LPGAT1 and TREM1 as well as of the previously reported genes DUSP10 and CD14 as the most relevant parameters for describing vitamin D responsiveness in vivo. Moreover, parameter relevance ranking allowed the segregation of study subjects into high and low responders. Due to the long intervention period the vitamin D response was not too prominent on the level of transcriptional activation. Therefore, we performed in the separate VitDbol trial a short-term but high dose stimulation with a vitamin D3 bolus. In PBMCs of VitDbol subjects we observed direct transcriptional effects on the selected VDR target genes, such as an up to 2.1-fold increase already one day after supplementation onset. In conclusion, both long-term and short-term vitamin D3 supplementation studies allow monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of human individuals and represent new types of human in vivo vitamin D3 investigations.

  2. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4 is required for the response of human cells to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yili; Seifert, Anne; Chua, Joy Shijia; Maure, Jean-François; Golebiowski, Filip; Hay, Ronald T

    2012-06-01

    Here we demonstrate that RNF4, a highly conserved small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, plays a critical role in the response of mammalian cells to DNA damage. Human cells in which RNF4 expression was ablated by siRNA or chicken DT40 cells with a homozygous deletion of the RNF4 gene displayed increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recruitment of RNF4 to double-strand breaks required its RING and SUMO interaction motif (SIM) domains and DNA damage factors such as NBS1, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), RNF8, 53BP1, and BRCA1. In the absence of RNF4, these factors were still recruited to sites of DNA damage, but 53BP1, RNF8, and RNF168 displayed delayed clearance from such foci. SILAC-based proteomics of SUMO substrates revealed that MDC1 was SUMO-modified in response to ionizing radiation. As a consequence of SUMO modification, MDC1 recruited RNF4, which mediated ubiquitylation at the DNA damage site. Failure to recruit RNF4 resulted in defective loading of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 onto ssDNA. This appeared to be a consequence of reduced recruitment of the CtIP nuclease, resulting in inefficient end resection. Thus, RNF4 is a novel DNA damage-responsive protein that plays a role in homologous recombination and integrates SUMO modification and ubiquitin signaling in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:22661230

  3. BCL-2 family proteins as 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets and determinants of response in myeloid malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenberger, J M; Kornblau, S M; Pierceall, W E; Lena, R; Chow, D; Shi, C-X; Mantei, J; Ahmann, G; Gonzales, I M; Choudhary, A; Valdez, R; Camoriano, J; Fauble, V; Tiedemann, R E; Qiu, Y H; Coombes, K R; Cardone, M; Braggio, E; Yin, H; Azorsa, D O; Mesa, R A; Stewart, A K; Tibes, R

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic molecular vulnerabilities enhancing hypomethylating agents in myeloid malignancies have remained elusive. RNA-interference drug modifier screens identified antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members as potent 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets. In further dissecting BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 contribution to 5-Azacytidine activity, siRNA silencing of BCL-XL and MCL-1, but not BCL-2, exhibited variable synergy with 5-Azacytidine in vitro. The BCL-XL, BCL-2 and BCL-w inhibitor ABT-737 sensitized most cell lines more potently compared with the selective BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199, which synergized with 5-Azacytidine mostly at higher doses. Ex vivo, ABT-737 enhanced 5-Azacytidine activity across primary AML, MDS and MPN specimens. Protein levels of BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 in 577 AML patient samples showed overlapping expression across AML FAB subtypes and heterogeneous expression within subtypes, further supporting a concept of dual/multiple BCL-2 family member targeting consistent with RNAi and pharmacologic results. Consequently, silencing of MCL-1 and BCL-XL increased the activity of ABT-199. Functional interrogation of BCL-2 family proteins by BH3 profiling performed on patient samples significantly discriminated clinical response versus resistance to 5-Azacytidine-based therapies. On the basis of these results, we propose a clinical trial of navitoclax (clinical-grade ABT-737) combined with 5-Azacytidine in myeloid malignancies, as well as to prospectively validate BH3 profiling in predicting 5-Azacytidine response. PMID:24451410

  4. BCL-2 family proteins as 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets and determinants of response in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenberger, J M; Kornblau, S M; Pierceall, W E; Lena, R; Chow, D; Shi, C-X; Mantei, J; Ahmann, G; Gonzales, I M; Choudhary, A; Valdez, R; Camoriano, J; Fauble, V; Tiedemann, R E; Qiu, Y H; Coombes, K R; Cardone, M; Braggio, E; Yin, H; Azorsa, D O; Mesa, R A; Stewart, A K; Tibes, R

    2014-08-01

    Synergistic molecular vulnerabilities enhancing hypomethylating agents in myeloid malignancies have remained elusive. RNA-interference drug modifier screens identified antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members as potent 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets. In further dissecting BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 contribution to 5-Azacytidine activity, siRNA silencing of BCL-XL and MCL-1, but not BCL-2, exhibited variable synergy with 5-Azacytidine in vitro. The BCL-XL, BCL-2 and BCL-w inhibitor ABT-737 sensitized most cell lines more potently compared with the selective BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199, which synergized with 5-Azacytidine mostly at higher doses. Ex vivo, ABT-737 enhanced 5-Azacytidine activity across primary AML, MDS and MPN specimens. Protein levels of BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 in 577 AML patient samples showed overlapping expression across AML FAB subtypes and heterogeneous expression within subtypes, further supporting a concept of dual/multiple BCL-2 family member targeting consistent with RNAi and pharmacologic results. Consequently, silencing of MCL-1 and BCL-XL increased the activity of ABT-199. Functional interrogation of BCL-2 family proteins by BH3 profiling performed on patient samples significantly discriminated clinical response versus resistance to 5-Azacytidine-based therapies. On the basis of these results, we propose a clinical trial of navitoclax (clinical-grade ABT-737) combined with 5-Azacytidine in myeloid malignancies, as well as to prospectively validate BH3 profiling in predicting 5-Azacytidine response. PMID:24451410

  5. Dual-stimuli responsive hyaluronic acid-conjugated mesoporous silica for targeted delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinfu; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Wenquan; Sun, Changshan; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Pu; Wang, Zhanyou; Wang, Siling

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a redox and enzyme dual-stimuli responsive delivery system (MSN-SS-HA) based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for targeted drug delivery has been developed, in which hyaluronic acid (HA) was conjugated on the surface of silica by cleavable disulfide (SS) bonds. HA possesses many attractive features, including acting as a targeting ligand and simultaneously a capping agent to achieve targeted and controlled drug release, prolonging the blood circulation time, and increasing the physiological stability and biocompatibility of MSN. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was chosen as a model drug. In vitro drug release profiles showed that the release of DOX was markedly restricted in pH 7.4 and pH 5.0 phosphate buffer solution (PBS), while it was significantly accelerated upon the addition of glutathione (GSH)/hyaluronidases (HAase). In addition, the release was further accelerated in the presence of both GSH and HAase. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed that MSN-SS-HA exhibited a higher cellular uptake via cluster of differentiation antigen-44 (CD44) receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with thiol (SH)-functionalized MSN (MSN-SH) in CD44 receptor over-expressed in human HCT-116 cells. The DOX-loaded MSN-SS-HA was more cytotoxic against HCT-116 cells than NIH-3T3 (CD44 receptor-negative) cells due to the enhanced cellular uptake of MSN-SS-HA. This paper describes the development of an effective method for using a single substance as multi-functional material for MSN to simultaneously regulate drug release and achieve targeted delivery. PMID:25985912

  6. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Missailidis, Sotiris

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  7. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs

  8. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clubok, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  9. Maximin affinity learning of image segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Turaga, Srinivas C; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Images can be segmented by first using a classifier to predict an affinity graph that reflects the degree to which image pixels must be grouped together and then partitioning the graph to yield a segmentation. Machine learning has been applied to the affinity classifier to produce affinity graphs that are good in the sense of minimizing edge misclassification rates. However, this error measure is only indirectly related to the quality of segmentations produced by ultimately partitioning the affinity graph. We present the first machine learning algorithm for training a classifier to produce affinity graphs that are good in the sense of producing segmentations that directly minimize the Rand index, a well known segmentation performance measure. The Rand index measures segmentation performance by quantifying the classification of the connectivity of image pixel pairs after segmentation. By using the simple graph partitioning algorithm of finding the connected components of the thresholded affinity graph, we are ...

  10. Bananas, pesticides and health in southwestern Ecuador: A scalar narrative approach to targeting public health responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Public health responses to agricultural pesticide exposure are often informed by ethnographic or other qualitative studies of pesticide risk perception. In addition to highlighting the importance of structural determinants of exposure, such studies can identify the specific scales at which pesticide-exposed individuals locate responsibility for their health issues, with implications for study and intervention design. In this study, an ethnographic approach was employed to map scalar features within explanatory narratives of pesticides and health in Ecuador's banana-producing El Oro province. Unstructured observation, 14 key informant interviews and 15 in-depth semi-structured interviews were carried out during 8 months of fieldwork in 2011-2013. Analysis of interview data was informed by human geographic literature on the social construction of scale. Individual-focused narratives of some participants highlighted characteristics such as carelessness and ignorance, leading to suggestions for educational interventions. More structural explanations invoked farm-scale processes, such as uncontrolled aerial fumigations on plantations owned by elites. Organization into cooperatives helped to protect small-scale farmers from 'deadly' banana markets, which in turn were linked to the Ecuadorian nation-state and actors in the banana-consuming world. These scalar elements interacted in complex ways that appear linked to social class, as more well-off individuals frequently attributed the health problems of other (poorer) people to individual behaviours, while providing more structural explanations of their own difficulties. Such individualizing narratives may help to stabilize inequitable social structures. Research implications of this study include the possibility of using scale-focused qualitative research to generate theory and candidate levels for multi-level models. Equity implications include a need for public health researchers planning interventions to engage with

  11. Enzyme responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Zhang, Beilu; Luo, Zhong; Ding, Xingwei; Li, Jinghua; Dai, Liangliang; Zhou, Jun; Zhao, Xiaojing; Ye, Jingya; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-02-01

    This study reports a biocompatible controlled drug release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for tumor microenvironment responsive drug delivery. It was fabricated by grafting phenylboronic acid conjugated human serum albumin (PBA-HSA) onto the surfaces of MSNs as a sealing agent, via an intermediate linker of a functional polypeptide, which was composed of two functional units: the polycation cell penetrating peptide (CPP) polyarginine, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) substrate peptide. A series of characterizations confirmed that the system had been successfully constructed. In vitro tests proved that the anticancer drug loading system could efficiently induce cell apoptosis in vitro. More importantly, the in vivo tumor experiments confirmed that the anticancer loading system could efficiently inhibit tumor growth with minimal side effects.This study reports a biocompatible controlled drug release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for tumor microenvironment responsive drug delivery. It was fabricated by grafting phenylboronic acid conjugated human serum albumin (PBA-HSA) onto the surfaces of MSNs as a sealing agent, via an intermediate linker of a functional polypeptide, which was composed of two functional units: the polycation cell penetrating peptide (CPP) polyarginine, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) substrate peptide. A series of characterizations confirmed that the system had been successfully constructed. In vitro tests proved that the anticancer drug loading system could efficiently induce cell apoptosis in vitro. More importantly, the in vivo tumor experiments confirmed that the anticancer loading system could efficiently inhibit tumor growth with minimal side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FTIR spectra, TGA curves, BET and BJH parameters, zeta potentials of nanoparticles; cleavage assay of the peptide detected by HPLC and MS; dose-dependent cytotoxicity of MSNs

  12. Curcumin Differs from Tetrahydrocurcumin for Molecular Targets, Signaling Pathways and Cellular Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B. Aggarwal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin (diferuloylmethane, a golden pigment from turmeric, has been linked with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, and antidiabetic properties. Most of the these activities have been assigned to methoxy, hydroxyl, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety or to diketone groups present in curcumin. One of the major metabolites of curcumin is tetrahydrocurcumin (THC, which lacks α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety and is white in color. Whether THC is superior to curcumin on a molecular level is unclear and thus is the focus of this review. Various studies suggest that curcumin is a more potent antioxidant than THC; curcumin (but not THC can bind and inhibit numerous targets including DNA (cytosine-5-methyltransferase-1, heme oxygenase-1, Nrf2, β-catenin, cyclooxygenase-2, NF-kappaB, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, amyloid plaques, reactive oxygen species, vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclin D1, glutathione, P300/CBP, 5-lipoxygenase, cytosolic phospholipase A2, prostaglandin E2, inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase-1, -2, P38MAPK, p-Tau, tumor necrosis factor-α, forkhead box O3a, CRAC; curcumin can inhibit tumor cell growth and suppress cellular entry of viruses such as influenza A virus and hepatitis C virus much more effectively than THC; curcumin affects membrane mobility; and curcumin is also more effective than THC in suppressing phorbol-ester-induced tumor promotion. Other studies, however, suggest that THC is superior to curcumin for induction of GSH peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, NADPH: quinone reductase, and quenching of free radicals. Most studies have indicated that THC exhibits higher antioxidant activity, but curcumin exhibits both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties.

  13. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  14. MicroRNA-155 targets SMAD2 and modulates the response of macrophages to transforming growth factor-{beta}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louafi, Fethi; Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2010-12-31

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine with important effects on processes such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and immunosupression. Using bioinformatics, we identified SMAD2, one of the mediators of TGF-β signaling, as a predicted target for a microRNA, microRNA-155 (miR-155). MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have emerged as an important class of gene expression regulators. miR-155 has been found to be involved in the regulation of the immune response in myeloid cells. Here, we provide direct evidence of binding of miR-155 to a predicted binding site and the ability of miR-155 to repress SMAD2 protein expression. We employed a lentivirally transduced monocyte cell line (THP1-155) containing an inducible miR-155 transgene to show that endogenous levels of SMAD2 protein were decreased after sustained overexpression of miR-155. This decrease in SMAD2 led to a reduction in both TGF-β-induced SMAD-2 phosphorylation and SMAD-2-dependent activation of the expression of the CAGA(12)LUC reporter plasmid. Overexpression of miR-155 altered the cellular responses to TGF-β by changing the expression of a set of genes that is involved in inflammation, fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Our study provides firm evidence of a role for miR-155 in directly repressing SMAD2 expression, and our results demonstrate the relevance of one of the two predicted target sites in SMAD2 3'-UTR. Altogether, our data uncover an important role for miR-155 in modulating the cellular response to TGF-β with possible implications in several human diseases where homeostasis of TGF-β might be altered. PMID:21036908

  15. Covariant Functional Calculi from the Affine Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yafang

    2009-01-01

    Invoking the Clifford-Hermite Wavelets from Clifford analysis, we use the covariances of affine groups to construct a kind of functional calculi for several non-commuting bounded operators. Functional calculi are the intertwining transforms between the representations of affine groups in the space $L^2(\\mathbb R^m)$ and in the space of bounded operators. It turns out that the Weyl calculus is the value of this new functional calculus at the identity of affine groups. Our app...

  16. Multipole solutions in metric-affine gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Socorro, J; Macías, A; Mielke, E W; Socorro, José; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Macías, Alfredo; Mielke, Eckehard W.

    1998-01-01

    Above Planck energies, the spacetime might become non--Riemannian, as it is known fron string theory and inflation. Then geometries arise in which nonmetricity and torsion appear as field strengths, side by side with curvature. By gauging the affine group, a metric affine gauge theory emerges as dynamical framework. Here, by using the harmonic map ansatz, a new class of multipole like solutions in the metric affine gravity theory (MAG) is obtained.

  17. Maximin affinity learning of image segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivas C Turaga; Briggman, Kevin L; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Images can be segmented by first using a classifier to predict an affinity graph that reflects the degree to which image pixels must be grouped together and then partitioning the graph to yield a segmentation. Machine learning has been applied to the affinity classifier to produce affinity graphs that are good in the sense of minimizing edge misclassification rates. However, this error measure is only indirectly related to the quality of segmentations produced by ultimately partitioning the a...

  18. Discrete Affine Minimal Surfaces with Indefinite Metric

    OpenAIRE

    Craizer, Marcos; Anciaux, Henri; Lewiner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by the Weierstrass representation of smooth affine minimal surfaces with indefinite metric, we propose a constructive process producing a large class of discrete surfaces that we call discrete affine minimal surfaces. We show that they are critical points of an affine area functional defined on the space of quadrangular discrete surfaces. The construction makes use of asymptotic coordinates and allows defining the discrete analogs of some differential geometric objects, such as the n...

  19. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  20. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Andy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanders, Geoffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Henson, Van [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  1. Compact noncontraction semigroups of affine operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voynov, A. S.; Protasov, V. Yu

    2015-07-01

    We analyze compact multiplicative semigroups of affine operators acting in a finite-dimensional space. The main result states that every such semigroup is either contracting, that is, contains elements of arbitrarily small operator norm, or all its operators share a common invariant affine subspace on which this semigroup is contracting. The proof uses functional difference equations with contraction of the argument. We look at applications to self-affine partitions of convex sets, the investigation of finite affine semigroups and the proof of a criterion of primitivity for nonnegative matrix families. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  2. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-[3H]3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent

  3. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  4. Scavenger receptor-targeted photodynamic therapy of J774 tumors in mice: tumor response and concomitant immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Huzaira, Misbah; Zahra, Touqir

    2002-06-01

    J774 is a cell line derived from Balb/c mice that in vitro behaves as macrophages (including scavenger-receptor expression) and has been widely used to study macrophage cell biology. In vivo it produces histiocytic lymphoma tumors that are invasive and metastatic. We report here on the response of subcutaneous J774 tumors to photodynamic therapy with scavenger-receptor targeted chlorin(e6). Bovine serum albumin was covalently conjugated with chlorin(e6), maleylated and purified by acetone precipitation and both this and free chlorin(e6) were injected IV into mice at 2 mg/kg. When tumors were illuminated with 665 nm laser-light after 24 hours there was a highly significant response (tumor volume and growth rate) for the conjugate, but this led to a relatively small survival increase due to the highly metastatic nature of the tumor. The free chlorin(e6) gave very little tumor response. When light was delivered 3 hours after injection the response from the conjugate disappeared due to insufficient time for the tumor cells to take up the photosensitizer by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Free chlorin(e6) at 3 hours, however, produced a total regression of the tumors due to a primarily vascular effect, but the mice died sooner than control animals. When J774 tumors were surgically removed at different times after implantation the mouse survival was proportional to the length of time they had had the tumor. We interpret this data to show that mice with J774 tumors slowly develop concomitant immunity and a PDT regimen that swiftly ablates the tumor will give worse survival results than a regimen with a slower tumor response.

  5. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis eliminates the adaptive response of ascitic hepatoma 22 cells to nedaplatin that targets thioredoxin reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yijun [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China); Lu, Hongjuan [Productivity Center of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210042, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Dongxu; Li, Shengrong; Sun, Kang; Wan, Xiaochun [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China); Taylor, Ethan Will [Department of Nanoscience, Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402 (United States); Zhang, Jinsong, E-mail: zjs@ahau.edu.cn [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China)

    2012-12-15

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is a target for cancer therapy and the anticancer mechanism of cisplatin involves TrxR inhibition. We hypothesize that the anticancer drug nedaplatin (NDP), an analogue of cisplatin and a second-generation platinum complex, also targets TrxR. Furthermore, we investigate whether the therapeutic efficacy of NDP can be enhanced by simultaneous modulation of 1) TrxR, via NDP, and 2) glutathione (GSH), via the GSH synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Mice bearing ascitic hepatoma 22 (H22) cells were treated with NDP alone or NDP plus BSO. TrxR activity of H22 cells was inhibited by NDP in a dose-dependent manner. A high correlation between the inhibition of TrxR activity at 6 h and the inhibition of ascitic fluid volume at 72 h was established (r = 0.978, p < 0.01). As an adaptive response, the viable ascitic cancer cells after NDP treatment displayed an enlarged cell phenotype, assembled with several-fold more antioxidant enzymes and GSH-predominant non-protein free thiols. This adaptive response was largely eliminated when BSO was co-administered with NDP, leading to the decimation of the H22 cell population without enhancing renal toxicity, since at this dose, NDP did not inhibit renal TrxR activity. In conclusion, the pharmacological effect of NDP involves TrxR inhibition, and the adaptive response of NDP-treated ascitic H22 cells can be efficiently counteracted by BSO. Simultaneous modulation of TrxR and GSH on ascitic H22 cells using NDP plus BSO greatly enhances therapeutic efficacy as compared with the single modulation of TrxR using NDP alone. -- Highlights: ► Nedaplatin at a pharmacological dose inhibits TrxR in cancer cells but not in kidney. ► The nedaplatin-treated cancer cells exhibit adaptive response. ► Buthionine sulfoximine inhibits glutathione in both cancer cells and kidney. ► Buthionine sulfoximine counteracts the adaptive response to the nedaplatin treatment. ► Buthionine sulfoximine does not

  6. Serum hormone and target organ responses after irradiation of hypothalamus with various doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect radiation response of neuroendocrine function after single dose irradiation to hypothalamus and to provide a fundamental study for SRS and SRT. Methods: Porcine hypothalamus regions were irradiated by 5, 10, 15 and 20 Gy with 10 MV X-rays. The serum levels of testosterone, T3, T4 and cortisol were measured. At the 40th week, hypothalamus, testes, thyroids and adrenals were obtained for histopathological examination. Results: 1) Significant gliosis in hypothalamus region irradiated with 15 and 20 Gy was observed by electro microscopy. 2) The serum testosterone levels declined in all irradiated groups but it was recovered to normal afterward in 5 Gy group. Remarkable atrophy in testis interstitial was noticed in 15 Gy and 20 Gy groups at the 40 the week after irradiation. 3) No significant changes in T3 and T4 levels were found, but the degeneration of the thyroids was observed in 15 Gy and 20 Gy groups. Conclusions: 1) Hypothalamus is vulnerable to radiation, 5 Gy single dose irradiation is well tolerated and single dose above 10 Gy may cause significant deficiency in the GnRH secretion. 2) TRH cells of hypothalamus may maintain normal function after 5-20 Gy single dose irradiation

  7. Measurements and simulations of the BLM response to a radiation field inside the CERF target area

    CERN Document Server

    Lebbos, E; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Ferrari, A; Kramer, D; Nordt, A; Roeed, K; Roesler, S; Sapinski, M; Vlachoudis, V

    2010-01-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility is installed in one of the secondary beam lines (H6) of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), in the North Experimental Area at CERN. This facility is used as a reference for testing, inter-comparing and calibrating passive and active instruments. In May 2009, the SPS provided a mixed hadron beam (protons, pions and kaons) during a few days, in order to perform several measurements with different devices such as the Radiation Protection Monitor used for residual dose rates due to Induced Radioactivity in the LHC (PMI), the Secondary Emission Monitor used for high beam losses (SEM), the Radiation Monitor for electronics (RadMon), and the Beam Loss Monitor for the LHC (BLM). This report focuses on the measurements of the BLM response during this year’s operation at CERF. The measurements evaluate the sensitivity of the BLM signal to the particle energy spectrum, with special attention to the contribution coming from thermal neutrons. For this purpose, meas...

  8. Lack of anabolic response to skeletal loading in mice with targeted disruption of the pleiotrophin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Subburaman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study we showed, using the whole genome microarray approach, that pleiotrophin (PTN expression was increased by 4-fold in response to mechanical loading (ML in a good responder C57BL/6J (B6 mice. To address PTN role in mediating ML effects on bone formation, we first evaluated time course effects of ML on expression levels of PTN gene using real time RT-PCR in 10 week female B6 mice. A 9 N load was applied using a four-point bending device at 2 Hz frequency for 36 cycles, once per day for 2, 4 and 12 days on the right tibia and the left tibia was used as internal control. Findings Four-point bending caused an acute increase in PTN expression (2-fold within 2 days of loading and further increased (3–6 fold with continued loading. This increase was also seen in 16 and 36-week old mice. Based on these findings, we next used PTN knockout (KO mice to evaluate the cause and effect relationship. Quantitative analysis showed that two weeks of ML induced changes in vBMD and bone size in the PTN KO mice (8% and 6% vs. non-loaded bones were not significantly different from control mice (11% and 8% in vBMD and bone size vs. non-loaded bones. Conclusion Our results imply that PTN is not a key upstream mediator of the anabolic effects of ML on the skeleton.

  9. Using Complementary and Alternative Medicines to Target the Host Response during Severe Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Alleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now accepted that an overwhelming inflammatory response is the cause of human deaths from avian H5N1 influenza infection. With this in mind we sought to examine the literature for examples of complementary and alternative medicines that reduce inflammation, and to place the results of this search in the context of our own work in a mouse model of influenza disease, using a pharmaceutical agent with anti-inflammatory properties. Two Chinese herbs, Angelica sinensis (Dang Gui and Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen, have been recently shown to protect mice during lethal experimental sepsis via inhibition of the novel inflammatory cytokine High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1. Biochanin A, a ligand of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR alpha and gamma and the active isoflavone in Trifolium pratense (red clover, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus could be used as an influenza treatment. This is of great interest since we have recently shown that gemfibrozil, a drug used to treat hyperlipidemia in humans and a synthetic ligand of PPAR alpha, significantly reduces the mortality associated with influenza infections in mice. The inflammation-modulating abilities of these natural agents should be considered in light of what is now known about the mechanisms of fatal influenza, and tested as potential candidates for influenza treatments in their own right, or as adjunct treatments to antivirals.

  10. Target or barrier? The cell wall of early- and later- diverging plants vs cadmium toxicity: differences in the response mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eParrotta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing industrialization and urbanization result in emission of pollutants in the environment including toxic heavy metals, as cadmium and lead. Among the different heavy metals contaminating the environment, cadmium raises great concern, as it is ecotoxic and as such can heavily impact ecosystems. The cell wall is the first structure of plant cells to come in contact with heavy metals. Its composition, characterized by proteins, polysaccharides and in some instances lignin and other phenolic compounds, confers the ability to bind non-covalently and/or covalently heavy metals via functional groups. A strong body of evidence in the literature has shown the role of the cell wall in heavy metal response: it sequesters heavy metals, but at the same time its synthesis and composition can be severely affected. The present review analyzes the dual property of plant cell walls, i.e. barrier and target of heavy metals, by taking Cd toxicity as example. Following a summary of the known physiological and biochemical responses of plants to Cd, the review compares the wall-related mechanisms in early- and later-diverging land plants, by considering the diversity in cell wall composition. By doing so, common as well as unique response mechanisms to metal/cadmium toxicity are identified among plant phyla and discussed. After discussing the role of hyperaccumulators’ cell walls as a particular case, the review concludes by considering important aspects for plant engineering.

  11. Superparamagnetic Reduction/pH/Temperature Multistimuli-Responsive Nanoparticles for Targeted and Controlled Antitumor Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jin; Du, Pengcheng; Liu, Lei; Li, Jiagen; Tian, Kun; Jia, Xu; Zhao, Xubo; Liu, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Multistimuli-responsive polymeric nanoparticles with core-shell architecture were prepared by coating superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle cores with reduction/pH dual-responsive poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) as shells and thermal-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) as a "gatekeeper" on the surface via two-stage distillation precipitation polymerization. The Fe3O4@PMAA nanoparticles were synthesized using N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BACy) as cross-linker which would be easily biodegradable in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH). The cumulative release profile was investigated under different conditions, such as media pH, reductive agents, and temperature, with doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) as a model anticancer drug. They showed a low leakage of DOX at pH 7.4 (less than 11% in 24 h), while the release significantly accelerated at pH 5.0 and 10 mM GSH (over 60% in 5 h), realizing the "triggered release" of drug in the targeted tissues. The nanoparticles exhibited excellent biocompatibility while the DOX-loaded nanoparticles showed great promise of antitumor efficacy as free DOX by the MTT assay and CLSM analysis. The results suggest that the novel biodegradable nanoparticles with high drug loading capacity and multiresponsive controlled release capability could serve as an excellent gene/drug delivery system candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26554495

  12. Metabolomics reveals metabolic targets and biphasic responses in breast cancer cells treated by curcumin alone and in association with docetaxel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Bayet-Robert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin (CUR has deserved extensive research due to its anti-inflammatory properties, of interest in human diseases including cancer. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical responses of tumor cells have been reported, and the mechanisms of action of CUR remain uncompletely elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics was applied to get novel insight into responses of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to CUR alone, and MCF7 cells to CUR in cotreatment with docetaxel (DTX. In both cell types, a major target of CUR was glutathione metabolism. Total glutathione (GSx increased at low dose CUR (≤ 10 mg.l(-1-28 µM- (up to +121% in MCF7 cells, P<0.01, and +138% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.01, but decreased at high dose (≥ 25 mg.l(-1 -70 µM- (-49%, in MCF7 cells, P<0.02, and -56% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.025. At high dose, in both cell types, GSx-related metabolites decreased, including homocystein, creatine and taurine (-60 to -80%, all, P<0.05. Together with glutathione-S-transferase actvity, data established that GSx biosynthesis was upregulated at low dose, and GSx consumption activated at high dose. Another major target, in both cell types, was lipid metabolism involving, at high doses, accumulation of polyunsaturated and total free fatty acids (between ×4.5 and ×11, P<0.025, and decrease of glycerophospho-ethanolamine and -choline (about -60%, P<0.025. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a metabolic transition, even a biphasic behavior of some metabolites including GSx, between low and high doses. In addition, CUR at 10 mg.l(-1 in cotreatment with DTX induced modifications in glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, and glucose utilization. Some of these changes were biphasic depending on the duration of exposure to CUR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Metabolomics reveals major metabolic targets of CUR in breast cancer cells, and biphasic responses that challenge the widely accepted

  13. Optimized training of responsible shift personnel in nuclear power plants. Supplement volume 5 for chapter 7: Learning targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supplement volume describes the process to establish learning targets in the administrative and organizational sectors, the method adopted in revising learning targets, as well as learning targets to be attained by studying publications of other institutions. (DG)

  14. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction

  15. Targeted demersal fish species exhibit variable responses to long-term protection from fishing at the Houtman Abrolhos Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornt, Katrina R.; McLean, Dianne L.; Langlois, Tim J.; Harvey, Euan S.; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Evans, Scott N.; Newman, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    Natural fluctuations in the abundance and length of targeted fish are often disrupted by acute environmental changes and anthropogenic impacts, particularly fishing pressure. Long-term assessments of targeted fish populations inside and outside areas closed to fishing are often necessary to elucidate these effects, yet few of these studies extend over long time periods. We assessed trends in the abundance and length of six targeted fish species in areas open and closed to fishing on seven occasions spanning a 9-year period (2005-2010 and 2013) at the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia. Shallow (8-12 m) and deep (22-26 m) coral-dominated reef sites were sampled across four geographically separated island groups using baited remote underwater stereo-video (stereo-BRUV). Between 2005 and 2010, populations of Lethrinus miniatus, Lethrinus nebulosus, Plectropomus leopardus, and Chrysophrys auratus became increasingly dominated by larger individuals, potentially indicative of an ageing population. Between 2010 and 2013, however, there was a significant increase in the proportion of smaller L. miniatus, L. nebulosus, and P. leopardus in both open and closed areas, reflecting increased recruitment perhaps due to changing environmental conditions associated with a marine heat wave anomaly. This recruitment pulse was not observed for the other species in this study ( Chr. auratus, Choerodon rubescens, and Glaucosoma hebraicum). Lethrinus miniatus, L. nebulosus, Chr. auratus, and P. leopardus were larger in closed areas relative to open areas; however, they were not more abundant. These complex responses to protection also varied across sampling years for certain species (e.g., P. leopardus). Monitoring changes over the long-term in areas open and closed to fishing provides a sound basis for separating environmental variability from that associated with fishing mortality, which is crucial for optimising fisheries management.

  16. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Song; Jing Huang; Ling Shan; Hong-Tu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC),but biomarkers of activity are lacking.The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene status,vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) or stem cell factor receptor (KIT) expression,and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC.Methods:A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012.Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry.Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS) and ovcrall survival (OS) were calculated and then compared based on expression status.The Chi-square test,the KaplanMeier method,and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses.Results:Of 59 patients,objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%).The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months.There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features:Male gender,number of metastatic sites 2 or less,VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive.Eleven patients (18.6%) had evidence of VHL mutation,with an objective response rate of 45.5%,which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%).VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P =0.938) or PFS (P =0.277).The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients,respectively,which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P =0.026 and P =0.043).Conclusion:VHL mutation status could not predict

  17. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but biomarkers of activity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene status, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR or stem cell factor receptor (KIT expression, and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC. Methods: A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry. Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were calculated and then compared based on expression status. The Chi-square test, the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses. Results: Of 59 patients, objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%. The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months. There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features: Male gender, number of metastatic sites 2 or less, VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive. Eleven patients (18.6% had evidence of VHL mutation, with an objective response rate of 45.5%, which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%. VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P = 0.938 or PFS (P = 0.277. The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients, respectively, which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P = 0.026 and P = 0.043. Conclusion

  18. pH-Responsive Hyaluronic Acid-Based Mixed Micelles for the Hepatoma-Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Liang Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor targetability and stimulus responsivity of drug delivery systems are crucial in cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, hepatoma-targeting mixed micelles composed of a hyaluronic acid–glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and a hyaluronic acid-l-histidine conjugate (HA–GA/HA–His were prepared through ultrasonic dispersion. The formation and characterization of the mixed micelles were confirmed via 1H-NMR, particle size, and ζ potential measurements. The in vitro cellular uptake of the micelles was evaluated using human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. The antitumor effect of doxorubicin (DOX-loaded micelles was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a pH-dependent controlled release and were remarkably absorbed by HepG2 cells. Compared with free DOX, the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. Moreover, the micelles effectively inhibited tumor growth in H22 cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that the HA–GA/HA–His mixed micelles are a good candidate for drug delivery in the prevention and treatment of hepatocarcinoma.

  19. pH-Responsive Hyaluronic Acid-Based Mixed Micelles for the Hepatoma-Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Liang; Tian, Gui-Xiang; Yu, Wen-Jing; Jia, Guang-Tao; Sun, Tong-Yi; Gao, Zhi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    The tumor targetability and stimulus responsivity of drug delivery systems are crucial in cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, hepatoma-targeting mixed micelles composed of a hyaluronic acid–glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and a hyaluronic acid-l-histidine conjugate (HA–GA/HA–His) were prepared through ultrasonic dispersion. The formation and characterization of the mixed micelles were confirmed via 1H-NMR, particle size, and ζ potential measurements. The in vitro cellular uptake of the micelles was evaluated using human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The antitumor effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a pH-dependent controlled release and were remarkably absorbed by HepG2 cells. Compared with free DOX, the DOX-loaded HA–GA/HA–His micelles showed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. Moreover, the micelles effectively inhibited tumor growth in H22 cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that the HA–GA/HA–His mixed micelles are a good candidate for drug delivery in the prevention and treatment of hepatocarcinoma. PMID:27043540

  20. Global connectivity of hub residues in Oncoprotein structures encodes genetic factors dictating personalized drug response to targeted Cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Venky; Aravamudan, Murali

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy and mechanisms of therapeutic action are largely described by atomic bonds and interactions local to drug binding sites. Here we introduce global connectivity analysis as a high-throughput computational assay of therapeutic action - inspired by the Google page rank algorithm that unearths most ``globally connected'' websites from the information-dense world wide web (WWW). We execute short timescale (30 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with high sampling frequency (0.01 ps), to identify amino acid residue hubs whose global connectivity dynamics are characteristic of the ligand or mutation associated with the target protein. We find that unexpected allosteric hubs - up to 20Å from the ATP binding site, but within 5Å of the phosphorylation site - encode the Gibbs free energy of inhibition (ΔGinhibition) for select protein kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics. We further find that clinically relevant somatic cancer mutations implicated in both drug resistance and personalized drug sensitivity can be predicted in a high-throughput fashion. Our results establish global connectivity analysis as a potent assay of protein functional modulation. This sets the stage for unearthing disease-causal exome mutations and motivates forecast of clinical drug response on a patient-by-patient basis. We suggest incorporation of structure-guided genetic inference assays into pharmaceutical and healthcare Oncology workflows.

  1. Influence of the APOE genotype on hepatic stress response: Studies in APOE targeted replacement mice and human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, Janina; Nebel, Almut; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rimbach, Gerald; Huebbe, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is a multifunctional plasma protein mainly acting in lipid metabolism. Human APOE is polymorphic with three major isoforms (APOE2, APOE3 and APOE4). Up to 75% of the body's APOE is produced by the liver. There is increasing evidence from studies in brain-derived cells that APOE4 affects mitochondrial function and biogenesis as well as stress and inflammatory responses - processes, whose disturbances are considered hallmarks of the ageing process. However, although the liver is the main production site of APOE, knowledge about the impact of the APOE genotype on hepatic stress response-related processes is rather limited. Therefore, we studied biomarkers of oxidative status (glutathione levels, 3-nitrotyrosine adducts, protein carbonyl concentration), ER stress (XBP1(S), BiP, DDIT3), proteasome activity, mitochondrial function (respiratory complexes, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential as well as biomarkers of mitochondrial biogenesis, fission and fusion), autophagy (LC3, LAMP2A), apoptosis (BCL2, BAX, CYCS) and DNA damage in the liver of APOE targeted replacement (TR) mice and in Huh7 hepatocytes overexpressing the APOE3 and the APOE4 isoform, respectively. APOE4 mice exhibited a lower chymotrypsin-like and a higher trypsin-like proteasome activity. Levels of protein carbonyls were moderately higher in liver tissue of APOE4 vs. APOE3 mice. Other biomarkers of oxidative stress were similar between the two genotypes. Under basal conditions, the stress-response pathways investigated appeared largely unaffected by the APOE genotype. However, upon stress induction, APOE4 expressing cells showed lower levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and lower mRNA levels of the ATP-generating complex V of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a rather low influence of the APOE genotype on the hepatic stress response processes investigated in this study. PMID:27130033

  2. Synthetic Polymer Nanoparticles with Antibody-Like Affinity for a Hydrophilic Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Zhiyang; Hoshino, Yu; Rodriguez, Andy; Yoo, Hoseong; Shea, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for a hydrophilic peptide have been prepared by inverse microemulsion polymerization. Peptide affinity was achieved in part by incorporating the target (imprint) peptide in the polymerization reaction mixture. Incorporation of the imprint peptide assists in the creation of complementary binding sites in the resulting polymer nanoparticle (NP). To orient the imprint peptide at the interface of the water and oil domains during polymeri...

  3. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set. PMID:20866473

  4. Protein kinase FgSch9 serves as a mediator of the target of rapamycin and high osmolarity glycerol pathways and regulates multiple stress responses and secondary metabolism in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qin; Zhang, Chengqi; Yu, Fangwei; Yin, Yanni; Shim, Won-Bo; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein kinase Sch9 is one of the downstream effectors of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 1 and plays multiple roles in stress resistance, longevity and nutrient sensing. However, the functions of Sch9 orthologs in filamentous fungi, particularly in pathogenic species, have not been characterized to date. Here, we investigated biological and genetic functions of FgSch9 in Fusarium graminearum. The FgSCH9 deletion mutant (ΔFgSch9) was defective in aerial hyphal growth, hyphal branching and conidial germination. The mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, cell wall-damaging agents, and to rapamycin, while showing increased thermal tolerance. We identified FgMaf1 as one of the FgSch9-interacting proteins that plays an important role in regulating mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence of F. graminearum. Co-immunoprecipitation and affinity capture-mass spectrometry assays showed that FgSch9 also interacts with FgTor and FgHog1. More importantly, both ΔFgSch9 and FgHog1 null mutant (ΔFgHog1) exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses. This defect was more severe in the FgSch9/FgHog1 double mutant. Taken together, we propose that FgSch9 serves as a mediator of the TOR and high osmolarity glycerol pathways, and regulates vegetative differentiation, multiple stress responses and secondary metabolism in F. graminearum. PMID:24903410

  5. Free C+ actions on affine threefolds

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, H.

    2005-01-01

    We study algebraic actions of the additive group C+ on an affine threefold X and prove a smoothness property for the quotient morphism X -< X//C+. Then, following Shulim Kaliman, we give a proof of the conjecture that every free C+ action on affine 3-space C^3 is a translation.

  6. Lectures on extended affine Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Neher, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    We give an introduction to the structure theory of extended affine Lie algebras, which provide a common framework for finite-dimensional semisimple, affine and toroidal Lie algebras. The notes are based on a lecture series given during the Fields Institute summer school at the University of Ottawa in June 2009.

  7. Affine Constellations Without Mutually Unbiased Counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Weigert, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations, mostly in dimension six. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely.

  8. Affine constellations without mutually unbiased counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigert, Stefan [Department of Mathematics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Durt, Thomas, E-mail: slow500@york.ac.u, E-mail: thomdurt@vub.ac.b [IR-TONA, VUB, BE-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-08

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely. (fast track communication)

  9. Dyes with high affinity for polylactide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang He; Shu Fen Zhang; Bing Tao Tang; Li Li Wang; Jin Zong Yang

    2007-01-01

    Attempts were made to develop dyes with high affinity for polylactide as an alternative to the existent commercial disperse dyes.The dyes synthesized according to the affinity concept of dye to polylactide exhibited excellent dyeing properties on polylactide compared with the commercial disperse dyes.

  10. Porosity of Self-affine Sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifeng XI

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,it is proved that any self-affine set satisfying the strong separation condition is uniformly porous.The author constructs a self-affine set which is not porous,although the open set condition holds.Besides,the author also gives a C1 iterated function system such that its invariant set is not porous.

  11. Affine constellations without mutually unbiased counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely. (fast track communication)

  12. Magnetic actuated pH-responsive hydrogel-based soft micro-robot for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Go, Gwangjun; Ko, Seong Yong; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-02-01

    For drug delivery in cancer therapy, various stimuli-responsive hydrogel-based micro-devices have been studied with great interest. Here, we present a new concept for a hybrid actuated soft microrobot targeted drug delivery. The proposed soft microrobot consists of a hydrogel bilayer structure of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (PHEMA) and poly (ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEGDA) with iron (II, III) oxide particles (Fe3O4). The PHEMA layer as a pH-responsive gel is used for a trapping and unfolding motion of the soft microrobot in pH-varying solution, and the PEGDA-with-Fe3O4 layer is employed for the locomotion of the soft microrobot in the magnetic field. The bilayer soft microrobot was fabricated by a conventional photolithography procedure and its characteristics were analyzed and presented. To evaluate the trapping performance and the motility of the soft microrobot, test solutions with different pH values and an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system were used. First, the soft microrobot showed its full trapping motion at about pH 9.58 and its unfolding motion at about pH 2.6. Second, the soft microrobot showed a moving velocity of about 600 μm s-1 through the generated magnetic field of the EMA system. Finally, we fabricated the real anti-cancer drug microbeads (PCL-DTX) and executed the cytotoxicity test using the mammary carcinoma cells (4T1). The viability of the 4T1 cells treated with the proposed microrobot and the PCL-DTX microbeads decreased to 70.25 ± 1.52%. The result demonstrated that the soft microrobot can be moved to a target position by the EMA system and can release a small amount of beads by the pH variation and the robot exhibited no toxicity to the cells. In the future, we expect that the proposed soft microrobot can be applied to a new tumor-therapeutic tool that can move to a target tumor and release anti-tumor drugs.

  13. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xingwei [TEMPLE UNIV.; Latecki, Longin J [TEMPLE UNIV.

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  14. The relation of morphology and affinity maturation in germinal centers

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer-Hermann, M

    2002-01-01

    The specific morphology of germinal centers is analyzed in the context of the optimization of the humoral immune response. The relevance of dark and light zones for the affinity maturation process is investigated in the framework of a theoretical model for the germinal center reaction. Especially, it is shown that an intermediate appearance of dark zones in germinal center reactions is advantageous for the process of antibody optimization.

  15. Alterations in growth and cell death by genetic deletion of the antioxidan response factor Nrf2 ist target, the quinone reductase NQ01

    OpenAIRE

    Ariza Gómez, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To neutralize oxidative stress insults, cells have acquire complex defense mechanisms which are induced in a highly coordinated way. This coordinated response is regulated through a cis-regulatory element, called the antioxidant responsive element (ARE) or electrophile-responsive element (EpRE), located within the regulatory region of target genes (Friling, Bensimon et al. 1990, Rushmore, Morton et al. 1991). Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor, NF-E2-related factor...

  16. Photosensitizer enhanced disassembly of amphiphilic micelle for ROS-response targeted tumor therapy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liangliang; Yu, Yonglin; Luo, Zhong; Li, Menghuan; Chen, Weizhen; Shen, Xinkun; Chen, Feng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Qingfeng; Gu, Hao; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-10-01

    This study reports a reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitive drug delivery system based on amphiphilic polymer of poly(propylene sulfide)-polyethylene glycol-serine-folic acid (PPS-mPEG-Ser-FA). The polymer could form homogeneous micelles with an average diameter of around 80 nm through self-assembly, which would then be loaded with the singlet oxygen-generating photosensitizer of zinc phthalocyanine (ZNPC) and anti-cancer drug of DOX. The disassembly of micelles could be triggered by the hydrophobic to hydrophilic transition of the PPS core in response to ROS-induced oxidation in vitro. ZNPC molecules are capable of producing ROS under laser irradiation, which results in the rapid disassembly of micelles and releasing of the anti-tumor drug for tumor therapy under physiological condition otherwise. Moreover, the excessive ROS production deriving from ZNPC synergically induces cells apoptosis. Furthermore, the DOX loaded amphiphilic micelles could be internalized by tumor cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis to effectively inhibit the tumor growth in vivo, while with only minimal toxic side effects. The results in vitro and in vivo consistently demonstrate that the light-responsive micelle is a promising biodegradable nanocarrier for on-command drug release and targeted tumor therapy. PMID:27423095

  17. Galactose targeted pH-responsive copolymer conjugated with near infrared fluorescence probe for imaging of intelligent drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liyi; Sun, Chunyang; Yan, Lifeng

    2015-01-28

    Theranostic polymeric nanomaterials are of special important in cancer treatment. Here, novel galactose targeted pH-responsive amphiphilic multiblock copolymer conjugated with both drug and near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) probe has been designed and prepared by a four-steps process: (1) ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) monomers using propargylamine as initiator; (2) reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (OEGMA) and gal monomer by an azido modified RAFT agent; (3) combing the obtained two polymeric segments by click reaction; (4) NIR copolymer prodrug was synthesized by chemical linkage of both cyanine dye and anticancer drug doxorubicin to the block copolymer via amide bond and hydrazone, respectively. The obtained NIRF copolymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and its was measured by means of micelles dynamic light scattering (DLS), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), and UV-vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The prodrug has strong fluorescence in the near-infrared region, and a pH sensitive drug release was confirmed at pH of 5.4 via an in vitro drug release experiment. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry experiments of the prodrug on both HepG2 and NIH3T3 cells reveal that the galactose targeted polymeric prodrug shows a fast and enhanced endocytosis due to the specific interaction for HepG2 cells, indicating the as-prepared polymer is a candidate for theranosis of liver cancer. PMID:25569169

  18. The membrane targeted apoptosis modulators erucylphosphocholine and erucylphosphohomocholine increase the radiation response of human glioblastoma cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkylphosphocholines constitute a novel class of antineoplastic synthetic phospholipid derivatives that induce apoptosis of human tumor cell lines by targeting cellular membranes. We could recently show that the first intravenously applicable alkylphosphocholine erucylphosphocholine (ErPC) is a potent inducer of apoptosis in highly resistant human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. ErPC was shown to cross the blood brain barrier upon repeated intravenous injections in rats and thus constitutes a promising candidate for glioblastoma therapy. Aim of the present study was to analyze putative beneficial effects of ErPC and its clinically more advanced derivative erucylphosphohomocholine (erucyl-N, N, N-trimethylpropanolaminphosphate, ErPC3, Erufosine™ on radiation-induced apoptosis and eradication of clonogenic tumor cells in human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. While all cell lines showed high intrinsic resistance against radiation-induced apoptosis as determined by fluorescence microscopy, treatment with ErPC and ErPC3 strongly increased sensitivity of the cells to radiation-induced cell death (apoptosis and necrosis). T98G cells were most responsive to the combined treatment revealing highly synergistic effects while A172 showed mostly additive to synergistic effects, and U87MG cells sub-additive, additive or synergistic effects, depending on the respective radiation-dose, drug-concentration and treatment time. Combined treatment enhanced therapy-induced damage of the mitochondria and caspase-activation. Importantly, combined treatment also increased radiation-induced eradication of clonogenic T98G cells as determined by standard colony formation assays. Our observations make the combined treatment with ionizing radiation and the membrane targeted apoptosis modulators ErPC and ErPC3 a promising approach for the treatment of patients suffering from malignant glioma. The use of this innovative treatment concept in an in vivo xenograft

  19. Proton hole response function on 196Pt and 197Au transitional target nuclei up to high excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proton hole response functions have been studied on the transitional target nuclei 196Pt and 197Au via the (d, 3He) reaction at Ed = 108.4 MeV, up to 6 MeV and 18.5 MeV excitation energy respectively. 196Pt low lying levels have been studied in addition at Ed = 50 MeV. Spectroscopic information gained on the low lying levels in the 195Ir and 196Pt residual nuclei allows the discussion of the 3s1/2 and 2d3/2 orbital filling. For both 195Ir and 196Pt, new 2d5/2 and 1h11/2 levels or groups are observed. The 196Pt spectra exhibit a broad bump between 6 and 15 MeV excitation energy riding over a continuous background. The study of the excitation energy spectra up to 27 MeV leads to a consistent subtraction of the background. The contributions of the 1g9/2, 2p and 1f inner hole strengths are deduced by least square fits of DWBA angular distributions. About the whole 1g9/2 and 2p inner hole strengths and 50% of the 1f strengths are found below Ex = 18.5 MeV. The background correction is also used to reanalyse previous data obtained via the same reaction on the spherical 208Pb target for comparison. Experimental results on centroid separation energies are compared with Hartree Fock predictions. The spreading widths and specific features of the strength distribution shapes in 195Ir and 196Pt and 207Tl are discussed in connection with the dominant quadrupole collective degrees of freedom of the two first nuclei contrasting with the strong vibrational modes in 207Tl. The valence hole fragmentation in 195Ir is described in the framework of the Core-Quasi-Particle-Coupling-Model

  20. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  1. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  2. Corner Transfer Matrices and Quantum Affine Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O E; Foda, Omar; Miwa, Tetsuji

    1992-01-01

    Let H be the corner-transfer-matrix Hamiltonian for the six-vertex model in the anti-ferroelectric regime. It acts on the infinite tensor product W = V . V . V ....., where is the 2-dimensional irreducible representation of the quantum affine sl(2). We observe that H is the derivation of quantum affine sl(2), and conjecture that the eigenvectors of H form the level-1 vacuum representation of quantum affine sl(2). We report on checks in support of our conjecture.

  3. Cellular stress response: a novel target for chemoprevention and nutritional neuroprotection in aging, neurodegenerative disorders and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Mancuso, Cesare; Pennisi, Giovanni; Calafato, Stella; Bellia, Francesco; Bates, Timothy E; Giuffrida Stella, Anna Maria; Schapira, Tony; Dinkova Kostova, Albena T; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2008-12-01

    The predominant molecular symptom of aging is the accumulation of altered gene products. Moreover, several conditions including protein, lipid or glucose oxidation disrupt redox homeostasis and lead to accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the aging brain. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases or Friedreich ataxia are neurological diseases sharing, as a common denominator, production of abnormal proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, which contribute to the pathogenesis of these so called "protein conformational diseases". The central nervous system has evolved the conserved mechanism of unfolded protein response to cope with the accumulation of misfolded proteins. As one of the main intracellular redox systems involved in neuroprotection, the vitagene system is emerging as a neurohormetic potential target for novel cytoprotective interventions. Vitagenes encode for cytoprotective heat shock proteins (Hsp) Hsp70 and heme oxygenase-1, as well as thioredoxin reductase and sirtuins. Nutritional studies show that ageing in animals can be significantly influenced by dietary restriction. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on health and longevity is an increasingly appreciated area of research. Reducing energy intake by controlled caloric restriction or intermittent fasting increases lifespan and protects various tissues against disease. Genetics has revealed that ageing may be controlled by changes in intracellular NAD/NADH ratio regulating sirtuin, a group of proteins linked to aging, metabolism and stress tolerance in several organisms. Recent findings suggest that several phytochemicals exhibit biphasic dose responses on cells with low doses activating signaling pathways that result in increased expression of vitagenes encoding survival proteins, as in the case of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway activated by curcumin and NAD/NADH-sirtuin-1 activated by resveratrol. Consistently, the neuroprotective roles of dietary antioxidants including

  4. Target/error overlap in jargonaphasia: The case for a one-source model, lexical and non-lexical summation, and the special status of correct responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew; Halloran, Elizabeth; Romani, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    We present three jargonaphasic patients who made phonological errors in naming, repetition and reading. We analyse target/response overlap using statistical models to answer three questions: 1) Is there a single phonological source for errors or two sources, one for target-related errors and a separate source for abstruse errors? 2) Can correct responses be predicted by the same distribution used to predict errors or do they show a completion boost (CB)? 3) Is non-lexical and lexical information summed during reading and repetition? The answers were clear. 1) Abstruse errors did not require a separate distribution created by failure to access word forms. Abstruse and target-related errors were the endpoints of a single overlap distribution. 2) Correct responses required a special factor, e.g., a CB or lexical/phonological feedback, to preserve their integrity. 3) Reading and repetition required separate lexical and non-lexical contributions that were combined at output. PMID:26410740

  5. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mce3E suppresses host innate immune responses by targeting ERK1/2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chai, Qi-Yao; Zhang, Yong; Li, Bing-Xi; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Cui Hua

    2015-04-15

    Crucial to the pathogenesis of the tuberculosis (TB)-causing pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis is its ability to subvert host immune defenses to promote its intracellular survival. The mammalian cell entry protein 3E (Mce3E), located in the region of difference 15 of the M. tuberculosis genome and absent in Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, has an essential role in facilitating the internalization of mammalian cells by mycobacteria. However, relatively little is known about the role of Mce3E in modulation of host innate immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that Mce3E inhibits the activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of Tnf and Il6 expression, and the promotion of mycobacterial survival within macrophages. Mce3E interacts and colocalizes with ERK1/2 at the endoplasmic reticulum in a DEF motif (an ERK-docking motif)-dependent manner, relocates ERK1/2 from cytoplasm to the endoplasmic reticulum, and finally reduces the association of ERK1/2 with MEK1 and blocks the nuclear translocation of phospho-ERK1/2. A DEF motif mutant form of Mce3E (F294A) loses its ability to suppress Tnf and Il6 expression and to promote intracellular survival of mycobacteria. Inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway in macrophages using U0126, a specific inhibitor of the ERK pathway, also leads to the suppressed Tnf and Il6 expression and the enhanced intracellular survival of mycobacteria. Taken together, these results suggest that M. tuberculosis Mce3E exploits the ERK1/2 signaling pathway to suppress host innate immune responses, providing a potential Mce3E-ERK1/2 interface-based drug target against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25780035

  7. Affitins for protein purification by affinity magnetic fishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Dos Santos, Raquel; Ottengy, Stella; Viecinski, Aline Canani; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-07-29

    Currently most economical and technological bottlenecks in protein production are placed in the downstream processes. With the aim of increasing the efficiency and reducing the associated costs, various affinity ligands have been developed. Affitins are small, yet robust and easy to produce, proteins derived from the archaeal extremophilic "7kDa DNA-binding" protein family. By means of combinatorial protein engineering and ribosome display selection techniques, Affitins have shown to bind a diversity of targets. In this work, two previously developed Affitins (anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG) were immobilized onto magnetic particles to assess their potential for protein purification by magnetic fishing. The optimal lysozyme and human IgG binding conditions yielded 58mg lysozyme/g support and 165mgIgG/g support, respectively. The recovery of proteins was possible in high yield (≥95%) and with high purity, namely ≥95% and 81%, when recovering lysozyme from Escherichia coli supernatant and IgG from human plasma, respectively. Static binding studies indicated affinity constants of 5.0×10(4)M(-1) and 9.3×10(5)M(-1) for the anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG magnetic supports. This work demonstrated that Affitins, which can be virtually evolved for any protein of interest, can be coupled onto magnetic particles creating novel affinity adsorbents for purification by magnetic fishing. PMID:27342136

  8. Automorphisms in Birational and Affine Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciliberto, Ciro; Flenner, Hubert; McKernan, James; Prokhorov, Yuri; Zaidenberg, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this volume is on the problem of describing the automorphism groups of affine and projective varieties, a classical subject in algebraic geometry where, in both cases, the automorphism group is often infinite dimensional. The collection covers a wide range of topics and is intended for researchers in the fields of classical algebraic geometry and birational geometry (Cremona groups) as well as affine geometry with an emphasis on algebraic group actions and automorphism groups. It presents original research and surveys and provides a valuable overview of the current state of the art in these topics. Bringing together specialists from projective, birational algebraic geometry and affine and complex algebraic geometry, including Mori theory and algebraic group actions, this book is the result of ensuing talks and discussions from the conference “Groups of Automorphisms in Birational and Affine Geometry” held in October 2012, at the CIRM, Levico Terme, Italy. The talks at the conference high...

  9. Polymer Nanoparticles Modified with Photo- and pH-Dual-Responsive Polypeptides for Enhanced and Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Xie, Xiangyang; Yang, Yanfang; Li, Zhiping; Yu, Fanglin; Gong, Wei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-05-01

    The cationic nature of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their absence of cell selectivity restrains their applications in vivo. In this work, polymer nanoparticles (NPs) modified with photo- and pH-responsive polypeptides (PPPs) were successfully developed and respond to near-infrared (NIR) light illumination at the tumor site and a lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe). In PPPs, the internalization function of CPPs (positively charged) is quenched by a pH-sensitive inhibitory peptide (negatively charged), which is linked via a photocleavable group. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was loaded into NPs by a double-emulsion technique. In vivo experiments included siRNA loading, cellular uptake, cell apoptosis, siRNA transfection, tumor targeting delivery, and the in vivo antitumor efficacy. Results showed that the prepared PPP-NPs could selectively accumulate at the tumor sites and internalized into the tumor cells by the NIR light illumination and the lowered pHe at the tumor site. These studies demonstrated that PPP-NPs are a promising carrier for future tumor gene delivery. PMID:27043442

  10. Breast Tumor Targetable Fe3O4 Embedded Thermo-Responsive Nanoparticles for Radiofrequency Assisted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Thomas, Reju George; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Lee, Hwa Jeongong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, In-kyu; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) frequency may be utilized as an energy source to activate thermo-responsive nanoparticles for the controlled local delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrate that 180 ± 20 nm sized curcumin encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) nanoparticles containing iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs) were selectively internalized in cancer cells in vivo. Using an RF treatment at 80 watts for 2 min, Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs, dissipated heat energy of 42 degrees C, which is the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam), causing controlled curcumin release and apoptosis to cultured 4T1 breast cancer cells. Further, the tumor localization studies on orthotopic breast cancer model revealed that Fe3O4-CRC-TRC-NPs selectively accumulated at the primary tumor as confirmed by in vivo live imaging followed by ex vivo tissue imaging and HPLC studies. These initial results strongly support the development of RF assisted drug delivery from nanoparticles for improved tumor targeting for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27301171

  11. PARP inhibitor ABT-888 affects response of MDA-MB-231 cells to doxorubicin treatment, targeting Snail expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Germano; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Zampieri, Michele; Ciccarone, Fabio; Guastafierro, Tiziana; Calabrese, Roberta; Valentini, Elisabetta; Tafuri, Agostino; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Caiafa, Paola; Reale, Anna

    2015-06-20

    To overcome cancer cells resistance to pharmacological therapy, the development of new therapeutic approaches becomes urgent. For this purpose, the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in combination with other cytotoxic agents could represent an efficacious strategy. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a post-translational modification that plays a well characterized role in the cellular decisions of life and death. Recent findings indicate that PARP-1 may control the expression of Snail, the master gene of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snail is highly represented in different resistant tumors, functioning as a factor regulating anti-apoptotic programmes. MDA-MB-231 is a Snail-expressing metastatic breast cancer cell line, which exhibits chemoresistance properties when treated with damaging agents. In this study, we show that the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 was capable to modulate the MDA-MB-231 cell response to doxorubicin, leading to an increase in the rate of apoptosis. Our further results indicate that PARP-1 controlled Snail expression at transcriptional level in cells exposed to doxorubicin. Given the increasing interest in the employment of PARP inhibitors as chemotherapeutic adjuvants, our in vitro results suggest that one of the mechanisms through which PARP inhibition can chemosensitize cancer cells in vivo, is targeting Snail expression thus promoting apoptosis. PMID:25938539

  12. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation (HTx is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  13. Synthesis of a New Series of Bone Affinity Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new series of bone affinity compounds were synthesized by linking chrysophanol with 5-fluorouracil derivatives. Their bone affinity was established by hydroxyapafive (HA)affinity experiment in vitro, and their cytostatic effects were shown by the MTT assay.

  14. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichiro Matsunaga; Michiko Kimoto; Charlotte Hanson; Michael Sanford; Young, Howard A.; Ichiro Hirao

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (K D of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 ...

  15. Affine Moment Invariants Generated by Graph Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 9 (2011), 2047 – 2056. ISSN 0031-3203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/1593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Image moments * Object recognition * Affine transformation * Affine moment invariants * Pseudoinvariants * Graph representation * Irreducibility * Independence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/ZOI/suk-0359752.pdf

  16. On Affine Fusion and the Phase Model

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the $su(n)$ Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The Yang-Baxter equation leads to the construction of commuting operators as Schur polynomials, with noncommuting hopping operators as arguments. The algebraic Bethe ansatz diagonalizes them, revealing a connec...

  17. Purely affine elementary su(N) fusions

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Jorgen; Walton, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    We consider three-point couplings in simple Lie algebras -- singlets in triple tensor products of their integrable highest weight representations. A coupling can be expressed as a linear combination of products of finitely many elementary couplings. This carries over to affine fusion, the fusion of Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theories, where the expressions are in terms of elementary fusions. In the case of su(4) it has been observed that there is a purely affine elementary fusion, i.e...

  18. Complete algebraic vector fields on affine surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliman, Shulim; Kutzschebauch, Frank; Leuenberger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Let $\\AAutH (X)$ be the subgroup of the group $\\AutH (X)$ of holomorphic automorphisms of a normal affine algebraic surface $X$ generated by elements of flows associated with complete algebraic vector fields. Our main result is a classification of all normal affine algebraic surfaces $X$ quasi-homogeneous under $\\AAutH (X)$ in terms of the dual graphs of the boundaries $\\bX \\setminus X$ of their SNC-completions $\\bX$.

  19. Fan affinity laws from a collision model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour of air is incorporated. Our calculations prove the affinity laws and provide numerical estimates of the air delivery, thrust and drag on a rotating fan. (paper)

  20. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor

    OpenAIRE

    Xian HUANG; Li, SiQi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concent...

  1. Advances in identification and validation of protein targets of natural products without chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J; Kim, Y; Kwon, H J

    2016-05-01

    Covering: up to February 2016Identification of the target proteins of natural products is pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of action to develop natural products for use as molecular probes and potential therapeutic drugs. Affinity chromatography of immobilized natural products has been conventionally used to identify target proteins, and has yielded good results. However, this method has limitations, in that labeling or tagging for immobilization and affinity purification often result in reduced or altered activity of the natural product. New strategies have recently been developed and applied to identify the target proteins of natural products and synthetic small molecules without chemical modification of the natural product. These direct and indirect methods for target identification of label-free natural products include drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS), stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX), cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), thermal proteome profiling (TPP), and bioinformatics-based analysis of connectivity. This review focuses on and reports case studies of the latest advances in target protein identification methods for label-free natural products. The integration of newly developed technologies will provide new insights and highlight the value of natural products for use as biological probes and new drug candidates. PMID:26964663

  2. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Cid Fernández

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with target processing (N2b and P3b) and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-). An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided into three...

  3. Affine modifications and affine hypersurfaces with a very transitive automorphism group

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliman, Shulim; ZAIDENBERG, MIKHAIL

    1998-01-01

    We study a kind of modification of an affine domain which produces another affine domain. First appeared in passing in the basic paper of O. Zariski (1942), it was further considered by E.D. Davis (1967). The first named author applied its geometric counterpart to construct contractible smooth affine varieties non-isomorphic to Euclidean spaces. Here we provide certain conditions which guarantee preservation of the topology under a modification. As an application, we show that the group of bi...

  4. The Protein-Protein Interface Evolution Acts in a Similar Way to Antibody Affinity Maturation*

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bohua; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Chong; Guo, Huaizu; Wu, Lan; Zhang, Xunming; Qian, Weizhu; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary mechanism that acts at the interfaces of protein-protein complexes is a fundamental issue with high interest for delineating the macromolecular complexes and networks responsible for regulation and complexity in biological systems. To investigate whether the evolution of protein-protein interface acts in a similar way as antibody affinity maturation, we incorporated evolutionary information derived from antibody affinity maturation with common simulation techniq...

  5. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  6. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper. PMID:27313593

  7. Role of T cell receptor affinity in the efficacy and specificity of adoptive T cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Stone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional alpha-beta T cell receptor (TCR against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment (scFv linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the alpha-beta TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly.

  8. The landscape of host transcriptional response programs commonly perturbed by bacterial pathogens: towards host-oriented broad-spectrum drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yared H Kidane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogen strains and new infectious agents pose major challenges to public health. A promising approach to combat these problems is to target the host's genes or proteins, especially to discover targets that are effective against multiple pathogens, i.e., host-oriented broad-spectrum (HOBS drug targets. An important first step in the discovery of such drug targets is the identification of host responses that are commonly perturbed by multiple pathogens. RESULTS: In this paper, we present a methodology to identify common host responses elicited by multiple pathogens. First, we identified host responses perturbed by each pathogen using a gene set enrichment analysis of publicly available genome-wide transcriptional datasets. Then, we used biclustering to identify groups of host pathways and biological processes that were perturbed only by a subset of the analyzed pathogens. Finally, we tested the enrichment of each bicluster in human genes that are known drug targets, on the basis of which we elicited putative HOBS targets for specific groups of bacterial pathogens. We identified 84 up-regulated and three down-regulated statistically significant biclusters. Each bicluster contained a group of pathogens that commonly dysregulated a group of biological processes. We validated our approach by checking whether these biclusters correspond to known hallmarks of bacterial infection. Indeed, these biclusters contained biological process such as inflammation, activation of dendritic cells, pro- and anti- apoptotic responses and other innate immune responses. Next, we identified biclusters containing pathogens that infected the same tissue. After a literature-based analysis of the drug targets contained in these biclusters, we suggested new uses of the drugs Anakinra, Etanercept, and Infliximab for gastrointestinal pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori kx2 strain, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia

  9. Early secretory antigenic target protein-6/culture filtrate protein-10 fusion protein-specific Th1 and Th2 response and its diagnostic value in tuberculous pleural effusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈启萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the Th1 and Th2 cell percentage in pleural effusion mononuclear cells (PEMCs) stimulated by early secretory antigenic target protein-6 (ESAT-6) /culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) fusion protein (E/C) with flow cytometry (FCM) ,and to explore the local antigen specific Th1 and Th2 response and

  10. Glycan-modified liposomes boost CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses by targeting DC-SIGN on dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W.J. Unger; A.J. van Beelen; S.C. Bruijns; M. Joshi; C.M. Fehres; L. van Bloois; M.I. Verstege; M. Ambrosini; H. Kalay; K. Nazmi; J.G. Bolscher; E. Hooiberg; T.D. de Gruijl; G. Storm; Y. van Kooyk

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy requires potent tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses, initiated by dendritic cells (DCs). Tumor antigens can be specifically targeted to DCs in vivo by exploiting their expression of C-type lectin receptors (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures on antigens, resultin

  11. Downregulation of chloroplast RPS1 negatively modulates nuclear heat-responsive expression of HsfA2 and its target genes in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Dong Yu

    Full Text Available Heat stress commonly leads to inhibition of photosynthesis in higher plants. The transcriptional induction of heat stress-responsive genes represents the first line of inducible defense against imbalances in cellular homeostasis. Although heat stress transcription factor HsfA2 and its downstream target genes are well studied, the regulatory mechanisms by which HsfA2 is activated in response to heat stress remain elusive. Here, we show that chloroplast ribosomal protein S1 (RPS1 is a heat-responsive protein and functions in protein biosynthesis in chloroplast. Knockdown of RPS1 expression in the rps1 mutant nearly eliminates the heat stress-activated expression of HsfA2 and its target genes, leading to a considerable loss of heat tolerance. We further confirm the relationship existed between the downregulation of RPS1 expression and the loss of heat tolerance by generating RNA interference-transgenic lines of RPS1. Consistent with the notion that the inhibited activation of HsfA2 in response to heat stress in the rps1 mutant causes heat-susceptibility, we further demonstrate that overexpression of HsfA2 with a viral promoter leads to constitutive expressions of its target genes in the rps1 mutant, which is sufficient to reestablish lost heat tolerance and recovers heat-susceptible thylakoid stability to wild-type levels. Our findings reveal a heat-responsive retrograde pathway in which chloroplast translation capacity is a critical factor in heat-responsive activation of HsfA2 and its target genes required for cellular homeostasis under heat stress. Thus, RPS1 is an essential yet previously unknown determinant involved in retrograde activation of heat stress responses in higher plants.

  12. ACREAGE RESPONSE TO THE TARGET PRICE AND SET-ASIDE PROVISIONS OF THE FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ACT OF 1977

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Sam

    1980-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Act of 1977 increased the influence of target prices on acreage allocation decisions Differences between target and market prices were highly correlated with rates of participation in recent grain set-aside programs But, target prices also encourage set-aside participants to increase acreage of the set-aside crop The net effect of a set-aside on acreage of a specific crop may, thus, be positive or negative. Deficiencies in the target price formula magnify the potentia...

  13. On moving targets and magic bullets: Can the UK lead the way with responsible data linkage for health research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, G.; Ainsworth, J.; Cunningham, J.; Dobbs, C.; Jones, K.H.; Kalra, D.; Lea, N.C.; Sethi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide an overview of essential elements of good governance of data linkage for health-related research, to consider lessons learned so far and to examine key factors currently impeding the delivery of good governance in this area. Given the considerable hurdles which must be overcome and the changing landscape of health research and data linkage, a principled, proportionate, risk-based approach to governance is advocated. Discussion In light of the considerable value of data linkage to health and well-being, the United Kingdom aspires to design and deliver good governance in health-related research. A string of projects have been asking: what does good governance look like in data linkage for health research? It is argued here that considerable progress can and must be made in order to develop the UK’s contribution to future health and wealth economies, particularly in light of mis-start initiatives such as care.data in NHS England. Discussion centres around lessons learned from previous successful health research initiatives, identifying those governance mechanisms which are essential to achieving good governance. Conclusion This article suggests that a crucial element in any step-increase of research capability will be the adoption of adaptive governance models. These must recognise a range of approaches to delivering safe and effective data linkage, while remaining responsive to public and research user expectations and needs as these shift and change with time and experience. The targets are multiple and constantly moving. There is not – nor should we seek – a single magic bullet in delivering good governance in health research. PMID:26342668

  14. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cieslewicz, Maryelise [Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bhushan, Kumar R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Frangioni, John V. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wittrup, K. Dane, E-mail: wittrup@mit.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods: We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to DOTA, reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results: Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten-binding affinity of 100 pM is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nM to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2{+-}1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a {sup 111}In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions: We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity, DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals.

  15. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods: We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to DOTA, reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results: Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten-binding affinity of 100 pM is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nM to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2±1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a 111In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions: We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity, DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals.

  16. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  17. The general control nonderepressible-2 kinase mediates stress response and longevity induced by target of rapamycin inactivation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rousakis, Aris; Vlassis, Arsenios; Vlanti, Anna;

    2013-01-01

    nutrient-sensing pathway, the target of rapamycin (TOR). We also demonstrated that the GCN-2 and TOR signaling pathways converge on the PHA-4/FoxA transcription factor and its downstream target genes to ensure survival of the whole organism under a multitude of stress conditions, such as nutrient scarcity...

  18. "The face of ostracism": The impact of the social categorization on the thermal facial responses of the target and the observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Daniele; Alparone, Francesca R; Cardone, Daniela; van Beest, Ilja; Merla, Arcangelo

    2016-01-01

    Ostracism has been shown to elicit pain in both the target and the observers. Two experiments investigated the autonomic thermal signature associated with an ostracism experience and assessed whether and how social categorization impacts the autonomic arousal of both the target and the observer. Autonomic response was assessed using thermal infrared imaging, recording facial temperature variation during an online game of ball toss (i.e., Cyberball). Social categorization was manipulated using a minimal group paradigm. The results show a more intense autonomic response during ostracism (vs. inclusion), marked by an increase in facial temperature in the nose and the perioral area. This autonomic response is stronger when individuals are ostracized by ingroup (vs. outgroup) members. Similar pattern of temperature variations emerge when individuals observe an ostracism episode involving ingroup members. Our findings advance the understanding of psycho-physiological mechanisms underlying the ostracism experience and emphasize the impact of social categorization in such mechanisms. PMID:26613387

  19. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    chromatin suggest that differential affinity could be functionally relevant and thus contribute to the functional differentiation of the subtypes. The conservation of the relative affinities for SAR and non-SAR DNA, in spite of a strong preference for SAR sequences, indicates that differential affinity alone cannot be responsible for the heterogeneous distribution of some subtypes in cell nuclei.

  20. Congophilicity (Congo red affinity) of different beta2-microglobulin conformations characterized by dye affinity capillary electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Sen, J W; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2000-01-01

    The amyloidogenic protein beta-microglobulin was characterized by affinity capillary electrophoresis (CE). CE could separate conformational variants of beta2-microglobulin and with the amyloid-specific dye Congo red as a buffer additive it was possible to measure different Congo red-affinities of...

  1. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  2. On Affine Fusion and the Phase Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Walton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the su(n Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The Yang-Baxter equation leads to the construction of commuting operators as Schur polynomials, with noncommuting hopping operators as arguments. The algebraic Bethe ansatz diagonalizes them, revealing a connection to the modular S matrix and fusion of the su(n WZNW model. The noncommutative Schur polynomials play roles similar to those of the primary field operators in the corresponding WZNW model. In particular, their 3-point functions are the su(n fusion multiplicities. We show here how the new phase model realization of affine fusion makes obvious the existence of threshold levels, and how it accommodates higher-genus fusion.

  3. On affine fusion and the phase model

    CERN Document Server

    Walton, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the su(n) Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The algebraic Bethe ansatz constructs the commuting operators of the phase model as Schur polynomials, with non-commuting hopping operators as arguments. These non-commutative Schur polynomials play roles similar to those of the primary field operators in the corresponding WZNW model. In particular, their 3-point functions are the su(n) fusion multiplicities. We show here how the new phase model realization of affine fusion makes obvious the existence of threshold levels, and how it accommodates higher-genus fusion.

  4. Affine Projection Algorithm Using Regressive Estimated Error

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shu; Zhi, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    An affine projection algorithm using regressive estimated error (APA-REE) is presented in this paper. By redefining the iterated error of the affine projection algorithm (APA), a new algorithm is obtained, and it improves the adaptive filtering convergence rate. We analyze the iterated error signal and the stability for the APA-REE algorithm. The steady-state weights of the APA-REE algorithm are proved to be unbiased and consist. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a f...

  5. Control and estimation of piecewise affine systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    As a powerful tool to study nonlinear systems and hybrid systems, piecewise affine (PWA) systems have been widely applied to mechanical systems. Control and Estimation of Piecewise Affine Systems presents several research findings relating to the control and estimation of PWA systems in one unified view. Chapters in this title discuss stability results of PWA systems, using piecewise quadratic Lyapunov functions and piecewise homogeneous polynomial Lyapunov functions. Explicit necessary and sufficient conditions for the controllability and reachability of a class of PWA systems are

  6. Periodic cyclic homology of affine Hecke algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Solleveld, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    This is the author's PhD-thesis, which was written in 2006. The version posted here is identical to the printed one. Instead of an abstract, the short list of contents: Preface 5 1 Introduction 9 2 K-theory and cyclic type homology theories 13 3 Affine Hecke algebras 61 4 Reductive p-adic groups 103 5 Parameter deformations in affine Hecke algebras 129 6 Examples and calculations 169 A Crossed products 223 Bibliography 227 Index 237 Samenvatting 245 Curriculum vitae 253

  7. The Affine q-Schur algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Green, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    We introduce an analogue of the $q$-Schur algebra associated to Coxeter systems of type $\\hat A_{n-1}$. We give two constructions of this algebra. The first construction realizes the algebra as a certain endomorphism algebra arising from an affine Hecke algebra of type $\\hat A_{r-1}$, where $n \\geq r$. This generalizes the original $q$-Schur algebra as defined by Dipper and James, and the new algebra contains the ordinary $q$-Schur algebra and the affine Hecke algebra as subalgebras. Using th...

  8. Parity-dependent recognition of DBL1X-3X suggests an important role of the VAR2CSA high-affinity CSA-binding region in the development of the humoral response against placental malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechavanne, Sébastien; Srivastava, Anand; Gangnard, Stéphane; Nunes-Silva, Sofia; Dechavanne, Célia; Fievet, Nadine; Deloron, Philippe; Chêne, Arnaud; Gamain, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum multidomain protein VAR2CSA stands today as the leading vaccine candidate against pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). Most of the studies aiming to decrypt how naturally acquired immunity develops have assessed the immune recognition of individual VAR2CSA Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domains, thus overlooking the presence of conformational epitopes resulting from the overall folding of the full-length protein. In order to characterize the development of humoral immunity toward VAR2CSA, we made use of a large cohort of 293 Senegalese pregnant women to assess the level of recognition by plasma IgG of the full-length VAR2CSA protein of the 3D7 parasite strain (3D7-VAR2CSA), the CSA-binding multidomains 3D7-DBL1X to -DBL3X (3D7-DBL1X-3X), and the CSA nonbinding multidomains 3D7-DBL4ε to -DBL6ε (3D7-DBL4ε-6ε), as well as individual 3D7-DBL domains. Our results revealed a parity-dependent recognition of the full-length 3D7-VAR2CSA and of the CSA-binding region, 3D7-DBL1X-3X. Indeed, multigravid women possess significantly higher levels of antibodies directed against these constructs than primigravidae. Our results suggest an important role of antibodies targeting the CSA-binding region in the development of immunity against PAM, therefore providing new insights on how natural protection might be acquired and further information for the design of VAR2CSA-based vaccines. PMID:25824842

  9. Hypothesis: Targeted Ikkβ deletion upregulates MIF signaling responsiveness and MHC class II expression in mouse hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Koch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Katherine S Koch, Hyam L LeffertHepatocyte Growth Control and Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is causally related to the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease but its hepatocellular mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Scattered reports in the literature hint at functional connections between the expression of MIF and major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II molecules. Not surprisingly, these relationships have not yet been explored in hepatocytes because MIF and MHC Class II cell surface receptors are commonly expressed by other cell types including various antigen presenting cells of the immune system. On the other hand, mounting evidence suggests that heteromeric MIF receptors share a common molecule with intracellular MHC Class II complexes, viz., CD74, which also serves as the MHC Class II chaperone; and, while it is unclear what cancer-related role(s MHC Class II receptors might play, increasing evidence suggests that MIF and CD74 are also implicated in the biology of hepatocellular carcinoma. These reports are provocative for two reasons: firstly, Ikkβ Δhep mice carrying hepatocyte-targeted deletions of Ikkβ, an IκB kinase complex subunit required for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB, have been shown to display heightened susceptibilities to hepatotoxins and chemical hepatocarcinogens; secondly, microarray profiling observations indicate that Ikkβ Δhep hepatocytes constitutively and “ectopically” overexpress genes, particularly CD74, CD44 (a MIF-receptor subunit and MHC Class II I-A/E β and I-A α chains, and gene families that regulate host immune process and immune defense responses. These findings together suggest that Ikkβ Δhep mice might express functional MIF and MHC Class II receptors, leading to increased hepatocellular sensitivity to

  10. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses. PMID:22752448

  11. Crossing Chris: Some Markerian Affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Martin

    2010-01-01

    -pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

    Abstract (E: This essay creatively explores a group of artists, writers, and other special individuals whose work or life story can be described as having an intriguing affinity with the protean career of Chris Marker. Avoiding the ‘usual suspects’ (such as Godard or Sebald, it discusses gossip columnist Milt Machlin, record collector Harry Smith, painter Gianfranco Baruchello, writer-filmmaker Edgardo Cozarinsky, and several others. From this constellation, a particular view of Markerian poetics emerges, touching upon the meanings of anonymity, storytelling, history and archiving.

     

    Abstract (F: Cet essai brosse de manière créative le portrait d’un groupe d'artistes, d'écrivains et d'autres personnes particulières dont le travail ou la biographie peuvent être décrits comme montrant une étrange mais certaine connivence avec la carrière protéiforme de Chris Marker. Evitant les lieux communs (comme Godard ou Sebald, cet article trace des références moins attendues :

  12. Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Huamin (4817 Sheboygan Ave., Madison, WI 53705); Smith, Lloyd M. (1115 Amherst Dr., Madison, WI 53705)

    1997-01-01

    A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support.

  13. Rapid purification of circular DNA by triplex-mediated affinity capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, H.; Smith, L.M.

    1997-01-07

    A single-step capture of a target supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule is accomplished by forming a local triple-helix among two strands of the supercoiled circular DNA and an oligonucleotide probe. The oligonucleotide is bound to an immobilizing support which facilitates the immobilization and purification of target DNA molecules. Non-target DNA molecules and other contaminating cellular material are easily removed by washing. The triple-helical structure is destabilized by raising the pH, leaving purified target DNA in the supernatant and reusable affinity capture oligonucleotide secured to the immobilizing support. 3 figs.

  14. Magneto-nanosensor platform for probing low-affinity protein-protein interactions and identification of a low-affinity PD-L1/PD-L2 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Bechstein, Daniel J B; Ooi, Chin Chun; Patel, Ashka; Gaster, Richard S; Ng, Elaine; Gonzalez, Lino C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to understand the interactions between immune checkpoint receptors and their ligands targeted in immunotherapies against cancer. To carefully characterize the complete network of interactions involved and the binding affinities between their extracellular domains, an improved kinetic assay is needed to overcome limitations with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Here, we present a magneto-nanosensor platform integrated with a microfluidic chip that allows measurement of dissociation constants in the micromolar-range. High-density conjugation of magnetic nanoparticles with prey proteins allows multivalent receptor interactions with sensor-immobilized bait proteins, more closely mimicking natural-receptor clustering on cells. The platform has advantages over traditional SPR in terms of insensitivity of signal responses to pH and salinity, less consumption of proteins and better sensitivities. Using this platform, we characterized the binding affinities of the PD-1-PD-L1/PD-L2 co-inhibitory receptor system, and discovered an unexpected interaction between the two known PD-1 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PMID:27447090

  15. General super Virasoro construction on affine G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a bosonic current algebra and a theory of free fermions and construct a general N = 1 super Virasoro current algebra. We obtain a master-set of equations which comprises the bosonic master equation for general Virasoro construction on affine G. As an illustration we study the case of the group SU(2). (author). 13 refs

  16. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eSantana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. Neuronal classification has been a difficult problem because it is unclear what a neuronal cell class actually is and what are the best characteristics are to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological or molecular characteristics, when applied to selected datasets, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. We explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. In fact, using a combined anatomical/physiological dataset, our algorithm differentiated parvalbumin from somatostatin interneurons in 49 out of 50 cases. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  17. Affinely Recursive Functions and Neural Networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůrková, Věra; Kainen, P.C.

    Atlanta : Georgia Institute of Technology, 1994 - ( Ames , W.), s. 776-779 [IMACS World Congress /14./. Atlanta (US), 11.07.1994-15.07.1994] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IA23057; GA ČR GA201/93/0427 Keywords : neural networks * affinely recursive functions

  18. Colliding waves in metric-affine gravity

    CERN Document Server

    García, A; Macías, A; Mielke, E W; Socorro, J; García, Alberto; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Macías, Alfredo; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Socorro, José

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the formulation of the colliding gravitational waves to metric-affine theories and present an example of such kind of exact solutions. The plane waves are equipped with five symmetries and the resulting geometry after the collision possesses two spacelike Killing vectors.

  19. Transcriptome and Degradome of microRNAs and Their Targets in Response to Drought Stress in the Plants of a Diploid and Its Autotetraploid Paulownia australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Wang, Yuanlong; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Cao, Lin; Yang, Lu; Fan, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in plant growth, development, and stress response. Increasing numbers of studies aimed at discovering miRNAs and analyzing their functions in plants are being reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on the expression of miRNAs and their targets in plants of a diploid and derived autotetraploid Paulownia australis. Four small RNA (sRNA) libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from diploid and autotetraploid P. australis plants treated with either 75% or 25% relative soil water content. A total of 33 conserved and 104 novel miRNAs (processing precision value > 0.1) were identified, and 125 target genes were identified for 36 of the miRNAs by using the degradome sequencing. Among the identified miRNAs, 54 and 68 were differentially expressed in diploid and autotetraploid plants under drought stress (25% relative soil water content), respectively. The expressions of miRNAs and target genes were also validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the relative expression trends of the randomly selected miRNAs were similar to the trends predicted by Illumina sequencing. And the correlations between miRNAs and their target genes were also analyzed. Furthermore, the functional analysis showed that most of these miRNAs and target genes were associated with plant development and environmental stress response. This study provided molecular evidence for the possible involvement of certain miRNAs in the drought response and/or tolerance in P. australis, and certain level of differential expression between diploid and autotetraploid plants. PMID:27388154

  20. Transcriptome and Degradome of microRNAs and Their Targets in Response to Drought Stress in the Plants of a Diploid and Its Autotetraploid Paulownia australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Niu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in plant growth, development, and stress response. Increasing numbers of studies aimed at discovering miRNAs and analyzing their functions in plants are being reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on the expression of miRNAs and their targets in plants of a diploid and derived autotetraploid Paulownia australis. Four small RNA (sRNA libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from diploid and autotetraploid P. australis plants treated with either 75% or 25% relative soil water content. A total of 33 conserved and 104 novel miRNAs (processing precision value > 0.1 were identified, and 125 target genes were identified for 36 of the miRNAs by using the degradome sequencing. Among the identified miRNAs, 54 and 68 were differentially expressed in diploid and autotetraploid plants under drought stress (25% relative soil water content, respectively. The expressions of miRNAs and target genes were also validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the relative expression trends of the randomly selected miRNAs were similar to the trends predicted by Illumina sequencing. And the correlations between miRNAs and their target genes were also analyzed. Furthermore, the functional analysis showed that most of these miRNAs and target genes were associated with plant development and environmental stress response. This study provided molecular evidence for the possible involvement of certain miRNAs in the drought response and/or tolerance in P. australis, and certain level of differential expression between diploid and autotetraploid plants.

  1. Targeted delivery and pH-responsive release of stereoisomeric anti-cancer drugs using β-cyclodextrin assemblied Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congli; Huang, Lizhen; Song, Shengmei; Saif, Bassam; Zhou, Yehong; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2015-12-01

    The β-cyclodextrin assemblied magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (β-CD-MNPs) were successfully fabricated via a layer-by-layer method. Possessing an average size 14 nm, good stability and super-paramagnetic response (Ms 64 emu/g), the resultant nanocomposites could be served as a versatile biocompatible platform for selective loading, targeted delivery and pH-responsive release of stereoisomeric doxorubicin (DOX) and epirubicin (EPI). 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and the computer simulation further give the evidence that partial anthracene ring of drug molecule is included by β-CD. In addition, non-toxic β-CD-MNPs have excellent biocompatibility on MCF-7 cells, and cellular uptake indicate that different amounts of DOX or EPI can be transported to targeting site and released from the internalized carriers. The results demonstrate that as-prepared β-CD-MNPs could be a very promising vehicle for DOX and EPI.

  2. Identification of microRNAs and their corresponding targets involved in the susceptibility interaction of wheat response to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Wang, Ting; Feng, Chuanxin; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Xinmei; Huang, Lili; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play very important roles in plant defense responses. However, little is known about their roles in the susceptibility interaction between wheat and Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). In this study, two miRNA libraries were constructed from the leaves of the cultivar Xingzi 9104 inoculated with the virulent Pst race CYR32 and sterile water, respectively. A total of 1316 miRNA candidates, including 173 known miRNAs that were generated from 98 pre-miRNAs, were obtained. The remaining 1143 miRNA candidates included 145 conserved and 998 wheat-specific miRNAs that were generated from 87 and 1088 pre-miRNAs, respectively. The 173 known and 145 conserved miRNAs were sub-classified into 63 miRNA families. The target genes of wheat miRNAs were also confirmed using degradome sequencing technology. Most of the annotated target genes were related to signal transduction or energy metabolism. Additionally, we found that miRNAs and their target genes form complicated regulation networks. The expression profiles of miRNAs and their corresponding target genes were further analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and the results indicate that some miRNAs are involved in the compatible wheat-Pst susceptibility interaction. Importantly, tae-miR1432 was highly expressed when wheat was challenged with CYR32, and the corresponding target gene, predicted to be a calcium ion-binding protein, also exhibited upregulated expression but a divergent expression trend. PC-3P-7484, a specific wheat miRNA, was highly expressed in the wheat response to Pst infection, while the expression of the corresponding target gene ubiquillin was dramatically downregulated. These data provide the foundation for evaluating the important regulatory roles of miRNAs in wheat-Pst susceptibility interaction. PMID:26563616

  3. Identification of pancreatic tumors in vivo with ligand-targeted, pH responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles by multispectral optoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Marie K; Pender, Dillon; Chuong, Phillip; Fouts, Benjamin L; Sobelov, Alexander; McNally, Molly W; Mezera, Megan; Woo, Shiao Y; McNally, Lacey R

    2016-06-10

    Despite significant efforts to translate nanotechnology for cancer application, lack of identification of biodistribution/accumulation of these nanovehicles in vivo remains a substantial barrier for successful implementation of theranostic nanoparticles in the clinic. The purpose of the study was to develop a tumor-targeted theranostic nanovehicle for pancreatic cancer detectable by multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). To improve the tumor specificity of our mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN), we utilized a dual targeting strategy: 1) an elevated tumor receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (UPAR), and 2) the acidic tumor microenvironment. The tumor specificity of the MSN particle was improved with the addition of both chitosan, targeting acidic pH, and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA), targeting UPAR. Drug release assays confirmed pH responsive release of gemcitabine in vitro. The UPAR specific binding of MSN-UPA nanoparticles was confirmed by reduction in fluorescence signal following MSN-UPA nanoparticle treatment in UPAR positive cells blocked with a UPAR-blocking antibody. Based upon Indocyanine Green encapsulation within the nanoparticles, UPA ligand targeted MSNs demonstrated increased intensity compared to untargeted MSNs at both pH7.4 (7×) and 6.5 (20×); however the signal was much more pronounced at a pH of 6.5 using tissue phantoms (pmultispectral optoacoustic tomography (p<0.05) and confirmed by ex vivo analysis. By tracking in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution with MSOT, it was shown that pH responsive, ligand targeted MSNs preferentially bind to pancreatic tumors for payload delivery. PMID:26763377

  4. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients

  5. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, Mark [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Murphy, John R. [Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Fred, E-mail: fwang@research.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients.

  6. Lacto-N-fucopentaose III (Lewis x), a target of the antibody response in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, D.; Incani, R N; Harn, D A

    1996-01-01

    Carbohydrates on soluble egg antigens are major epitopes for the antibody responses of patients and mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Recently, protective sera of mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae were shown to recognize carbohydrate epitopes on schistosomal glutathione S-transferase. The present study demonstrates that carbohydrate epitopes are major targets of sera from C57BL/6J and CBA/J mice vaccinated with 15- or 50-kilorad-irradiated cercariae of S. mansoni. Antibody titer...

  7. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer fo...

  8. Calculation of the response of cylindrical targets to collimated beams of particles using one-dimensional adjoint transport techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of adjoint techniques to determine the interaction of externally incident collimated beams of particles with cylindrical targets is a convenient means of examining a class of problems important in radiation transport studies. The theory relevant to such applications is derived, and a simple example involving a fissioning target is discussed. Results from both discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo transport-code calculations are presented, and comparisons are made with results obtained from forward calculations. The accuracy of the discrete ordinates adjoint results depends on the order of angular quadrature used in the calculation. Reasonable accuracy by using EQN quadratures can be expected from order S16 or higher

  9. Improved response by co-targeting EGFR/EGFRvIII and Src family kinases in human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Villingshøj, Mette; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that co-targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Src with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib and the Src inhibitor AZD0530 would increase growth inhibition and impede migration. Cells overexpressing EGFR were more sensitive to gefitinib than cells expressing mutated EGFR...... or normal levels of wild-type EGFR. Furthermore, cells with mutated EGFR responded to low doses of gefitinib with increased proliferation. AZD0530 was an effective inhibitor of proliferation and migration, irrespective of EGFR status. These results suggest that co-targeting EGFR and Src might be a...

  10. Detection-Guided Fast Affine Projection Channel Estimator for Speech Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wu Jennifer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In various adaptive estimation applications, such as acoustic echo cancellation within teleconferencing systems, the input signal is a highly correlated speech. This, in general, leads to extremely slow convergence of the NLMS adaptive FIR estimator. As a result, for such applications, the affine projection algorithm (APA or the low-complexity version, the fast affine projection (FAP algorithm, is commonly employed instead of the NLMS algorithm. In such applications, the signal propagation channel may have a relatively low-dimensional impulse response structure, that is, the number m of active or significant taps within the (discrete-time modelled channel impulse response is much less than the overall tap length n of the channel impulse response. For such cases, we investigate the inclusion of an active-parameter detection-guided concept within the fast affine projection FIR channel estimator. Simulation results indicate that the proposed detection-guided fast affine projection channel estimator has improved convergence speed and has lead to better steady-state performance than the standard fast affine projection channel estimator, especially in the important case of highly correlated speech input signals.

  11. Detection-Guided Fast Affine Projection Channel Estimator for Speech Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homer John

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In various adaptive estimation applications, such as acoustic echo cancellation within teleconferencing systems, the input signal is a highly correlated speech. This, in general, leads to extremely slow convergence of the NLMS adaptive FIR estimator. As a result, for such applications, the affine projection algorithm (APA or the low-complexity version, the fast affine projection (FAP algorithm, is commonly employed instead of the NLMS algorithm. In such applications, the signal propagation channel may have a relatively low-dimensional impulse response structure, that is, the number m of active or significant taps within the (discrete-time modelled channel impulse response is much less than the overall tap length n of the channel impulse response. For such cases, we investigate the inclusion of an active-parameter detection-guided concept within the fast affine projection FIR channel estimator. Simulation results indicate that the proposed detection-guided fast affine projection channel estimator has improved convergence speed and has lead to better steady-state performance than the standard fast affine projection channel estimator, especially in the important case of highly correlated speech input signals.

  12. Targeting the tumor-draining area : local immunotherapy and its effect on the systemic T cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbert-Fransen, Marieke Fernande

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the role of local immune stimulation in the lymph node and tumor microenvironment and its effect on systemic CD8+ T cell responses, in particular the anti-tumor CD8+ T cell responses. In chapter 2 the use of a slow-release system is described to deliver the immune-acti

  13. A chirality change in XPC- and Sfi1-derived peptides affects their affinity for centrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Dora; Irudayaraj, Victor Paul Raj; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Assairi, Liliane

    2016-04-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein centrin binds to a hydrophobic motif (W(1)xxL(4)xxxL(8)) included in the sequence of several cellular targets: XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein), Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein1), and Sac3 [the central component of the transcription and mRNA export (TREX-2) complex]. However, centrin binding occurs in a reversed orientation (L(8)xxxL(4)xxW(1)) for Sfi1 and Sac3 compared with XPC. Because D-peptides have been investigated for future therapeutic use, we analyzed their centrin-binding properties. Their affinity for centrin was measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The chirality change in the target-derived peptides affected their ability to bind centrin in a specific manner depending on the sequence orientation of the centrin-binding motif. In contrast to L-XPC-P10, D-XPC-P10 bound C-HsCen1 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and to a lesser extent. D-XPC-P10 exhibited a reduced affinity for C-HsCen1 (Ka=0.064 × 10(6) M(-1)) by a factor of 2000 compared with L-XPC-P10 (Ka=132 × 10(6) M(-1)). D-peptides have a lower affinity than L-peptides for centrin, and the strength of this affinity depends on the sequence orientation of the target-derived peptides. The residual affinity observed for D-XPC suggests that the use of d-peptides represents a promising strategy for inhibiting centrin binding to its targets. PMID:26923803

  14. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8(+) T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8(+) T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8(+) T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-E(d) single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  15. Target antigen expression on a professional antigen-presenting cell induces superior proliferative antitumor T-cell responses via chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossig, Claudia; Bär, Annette; Pscherer, Sibylle; Altvater, Bianca; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Jürgens, Heribert; Vormoor, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Human T cells expressing tumor antigen-specific chimeric receptors fail to sustain their growth and activation in vivo, which greatly reduces their therapeutic value. The defective proliferative response to tumor cells in vitro can partly be overcome by concomitant CD28 costimulatory signaling. We investigated whether T-cell activation via chimeric receptors (chRec) can be further improved by ligand expression on antigen-presenting cells of B-cell origin. We generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expressing a CD19-specific chRec. These CTLs are provided with native receptor stimulation by autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) but exclusively with chRec (CD19-specific) stimulation by allogeneic, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched CD19+ LCLs. CD19zeta-transduced EBV-specific CTLs specifically lysed both allogeneic EBV targets and CD19+ tumor cells through the chRec in a major histocompatibility complex-independent manner, while maintaining their ability to recognize autologous EBV targets through the native T-cell receptor. The transduced CTLs failed to proliferate in response to CD19+ tumor targets even in the presence of CD28 costimulatory signaling. By contrast, CD19 expressed on HLA-mismatched LCL-induced T-cell activation and long-term proliferation that essentially duplicated the result from native receptor stimulation with autologous LCLs, suggesting that a deficit of costimulatory molecules on target cells in addition to CD28 is indeed responsible for inadequate chRec-mediated T-cell function. Hence, effective tumor immunotherapy may be favored if engagement of the chRec on modified T cells is complemented by interaction with multiple costimulator molecules. The use of T cells with native specificity for EBV may be one means of attaining this objective. PMID:16365597

  16. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  17. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mouratou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized.

  18. Improved native affinity purification of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batey, Robert T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2007-08-01

    RNA biochemical or structural studies often require an RNA sample that is chemically pure, and most protocols for its in vitro production use denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to achieve this. Unfortunately, many RNAs do not quantitatively refold into an active conformation after denaturation, creating significant problems for downstream characterization or use. In addition, this traditional purification method is not amenable to studies demanding high-throughput RNA production. Recently, we presented the first general method for producing almost any RNA sequence that employs an affinity tag that is removed during the purification process. Because technical difficulties prevented application of this method to many RNAs, we have developed an improved version that utilizes a different activatable ribozyme and affinity tag that are considerably more robust, rapid, and broadly applicable. PMID:17548432

  19. AFFINITY OF LIGNIN PREPARATIONS TOWARDS GENOTOXIC COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božena Košíková

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals may be modulated by other chemicals, including those prepared by organic synthesis. Consid-ering the several drawbacks of synthetic compounds vis-a-vis the human organism, the lignin biomass component was examined for this purpose. The binding affinity of lignin samples prepared by chemical and biological modification of lignin products derived from chemical wood treatment towards for N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDA was examined. The protective role of the lignin samples against carcinogenesis was tested on a well-known model carcinogen, N-methyl-N´-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG. The observed ability of a series of lignin preparations to reduce alkylation damage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA on hamster cells in vitro could be explained by their affinity to bind N-nitrosoamines. The results indicate that lignin has potential to protect living organisms against damaging effects of different genotoxicants.

  20. Phosphopeptide enrichment by immobilized metal affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10–11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe 3+ for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide......Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively...... charged metal ions such as Fe3+, Ga3+, Al3+, Zr4+, and Ti4+ has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from...

  1. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J. E.; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O. H.; Tadepalli, A.; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe he...

  2. Staircase models from affine Toda field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors propose a class of purely elastic scattering theories generalizing the staircase model of Al. B. Zamolodchikov, based on the affine Toda field theories for simply-laced Lie algebras g = A,D,E at suitable complex values of their coupling constants. Considering their Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations, they give analytic arguments in support of a conjectured renormalization group flow visiting the neighborhood of each Wg minimal model in turn

  3. AFFINE TRANSFORMATION IN RANDOM ITERATED FUNCTION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊勇; 史定华

    2001-01-01

    Random iterated function systems (IFSs) is discussed, which is one of the methods for fractal drawing. A certain figure can be reconstructed by a random IFS. One approach is presented to determine a new random IFS, that the figure reconstructed by the new random IFS is the image of the origin figure reconstructed by old IFS under a given affine transformation. Two particular examples are used to show this approach.

  4. Homogeneous grading affine Toda quantum solitons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zuevsky, Alexander

    Vol. 563. Bristol : IOP Science, 2014 - (Burdik, C.; Navratil, O.; Posta, S.), 012036 ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Integrable Systems and Quantum Symmetries (ISQS-22) /22./. Prague (CZ), 26.06.2014-29.06.-2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : exactly solvable models * conformal and affine Toda systems * quantum groups Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/563/1/012036

  5. Denominators in cluster algebras of affine type

    OpenAIRE

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Marsh, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The Fomin-Zelevinsky Laurent phenomenon states that every cluster variable in a cluster algebra can be expressed as a Laurent polynomial in the variables lying in an arbitrary initial cluster. We give representation-theoretic formulas for the denominators of cluster variables in cluster algebras of affine type. The formulas are in terms of the dimensions of spaces of homomorphisms in the corresponding cluster category, and hold for any choice of initial cluster.

  6. Thermodynamics. Using Affinities to define reversible processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ritacco, Hernán A

    2016-01-01

    In this article a definition of reversible processes in terms of differences in intensive Thermodynamics properties (Affinities) is proposed. This definition makes it possible to both define reversible processes before introducing the concept of entropy and avoid the circularity problem that follows from the Clausius definition of entropy changes. The convenience of this new definition compared to those commonly found in textbooks is demonstrated with examples.

  7. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Targets and Biphasic Responses in Breast Cancer Cells Treated by Curcumin Alone and in Association with Docetaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Morvan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background Curcumin (CUR) has deserved extensive research due to its anti-inflammatory properties, of interest in human diseases including cancer. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical responses of tumor cells have been reported, and the mechanisms of action of CUR remain uncompletely elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics was applied to get novel insight into responses of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to CUR alone, and MCF7 cells to CUR in...

  8. Divine targets: youth at the centre of Catholic and Pentecostal responses to HIV and AIDS in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Murray, Laura; Wittlin, Natalie; Parker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the focus on youth in Catholic and Evangelical Pentecostal discussions about and responses to HIV and AIDS in Brazil. Key informant, oral history, and in-depth interviews revealed a disconnect between young people’s views of themselves as leaders in their religious institutions’ responses to HIV and other social problems and adult religious leaders’ views of youth as vulnerable and in need of being saved. Religious leaders presented young people as institutional commoditie...

  9. In vivo transcription of a progesterone-responsive gene is specifically inhibited by a triplex-forming oligonucleotide.

    OpenAIRE

    Ing, N H; Beekman, J M; Kessler, D J; Murphy, M.; Jayaraman, K; Zendegui, J G; Hogan, M E; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1993-01-01

    Oligonucleotides provide novel reagents for inhibition of gene expression because of their high affinity binding to specific nucleotide sequences. We describe a 38 base, single-stranded DNA that forms a triple helix or 'triplex' on progesterone response elements of a target gene. This triplex-forming oligonucleotide binds with a Kd = 100 nM at 37 degrees C and physiological pH, and blocks binding of progesterone receptors to the target. Furthermore, it completely inhibited progesterone recept...

  10. Down-regulation of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in response to myostatin overexpression in skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Amirouche, Adel; Durieux, Anne-Cécile; Banzet, Sébastien; Koulmann, Nathalie; Bonnefoy, Régis; Mouret, Catherine; Bigard, Xavier; Peinnequin, André; Freyssenet, Damien

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-beta family, has been identified as a master regulator of embryonic myogenesis and early postnatal skeletal muscle growth. However, cumulative evidence also suggests that alterations in skeletal muscle mass are associated with dysregulation in myostatin expression and that myostatin may contribute to muscle mass loss in adulthood. Two major branches of the Akt pathway are relevant for the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin ...

  11. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  12. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A.; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Crispe, I. Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nano-scale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The con...

  13. Identification of putative TAL effector targets of the citrus canker pathogens shows functional convergence underlying disease development and defense response

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Andre LA; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Abe, Valeria Y; de Oliveira, Maria LP; Domingues, Mariane N; Silva, Jaqueline C; Cernadas, Raul A; Benedetti, Celso E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA protein family, are DNA-binding effectors broadly found in Xanthomonas spp. that transactivate host genes upon injection via the bacterial type three-secretion system. Biologically relevant targets of TAL effectors, i.e. host genes whose induction is vital to establish a compatible interaction, have been reported for xanthomonads that colonize rice and pepper; however, citrus genes modulated by the TA...

  14. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea

    OpenAIRE

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K.; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement ...

  15. Iron-Responsive miR-485-3p Regulates Cellular Iron Homeostasis by Targeting Ferroportin

    OpenAIRE

    Sangokoya, Carolyn; Doss, Jennifer F; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by a sophisticated system that responds to iron levels and coordinates the expression of targets important for balancing iron export and uptake with intracellular storage and utilization. Ferroportin is the only known cellular iron exporter in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in both cellular and systemic iron balance. Thus the ability to regulate cellular iron export is of great interest in the search for therapeutic strategies ...

  16. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  17. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L

    2016-01-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schroedinger's purely affine theory [21], where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  18. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-06-20

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  19. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  20. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Crispe, I Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nanoscale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The conjugation of fluoresceinated ovalbumin (FLUO-OVA) and lactobionic acid with LDL resulted in a substantially increased uptake of FLUO-OVA by murine macrophage-like ANA1 cells in preference to NIH3T3 cells, and by primary peritoneal macrophages in preference to primary hepatic stellate cells. Such preferential uptake led to enhanced proliferation of OVA specific T cells, showing that the galactosylated LDL nanoscale platform is a successful antigen carrier, targeting antigen to macrophages but not to all categories of antigen presenting cells. This system will allow targeted delivery of antigen to macrophages in the liver and elsewhere, addressing the question of the role of Kupffer cells in liver immunology. It may also be an effective way of delivering drugs or vaccines directly at macrophages. PMID:19637876

  1. Genomic response to Wnt signalling is highly context-dependent - Evidence from DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens of Wnt/TCF targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wnt proteins are important regulators of embryonic development, and dysregulated Wnt signalling is involved in the oncogenesis of several human cancers. Our knowledge of the downstream target genes is limited, however. We used a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based assay to isolate and characterize the actual gene segments through which Wnt-activatable transcription factors, TCFs, regulate transcription and an Affymetrix microarray analysis to study the global transcriptional response to the Wnt3a ligand. The anti-β-catenin immunoprecipitation of DNA-protein complexes from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing a fusion protein of β-catenin and TCF7 resulted in the identification of 92 genes as putative TCF targets. GeneChip assays of gene expression performed on NIH3T3 cells and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 revealed 355 genes in NIH3T3 and 129 genes in the PC12 cells with marked changes in expression after Wnt3a stimulus. Only 2 Wnt-regulated genes were shared by both cell lines. Surprisingly, Disabled-2 was the only gene identified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation approach that displayed a marked change in expression in the GeneChip assay. Taken together, our approaches give an insight into the complex context-dependent nature of Wnt pathway transcriptional responses and identify Disabled-2 as a potential new direct target for Wnt signalling.

  2. Genomic response to Wnt signalling is highly context-dependent - Evidence from DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens of Wnt/TCF targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Railo, Antti [Oulu Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000 (Finland); Pajunen, Antti [Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu (Finland); Itaeranta, Petri; Naillat, Florence; Vuoristo, Jussi; Kilpelaeinen, Pekka [Oulu Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000 (Finland); Vainio, Seppo, E-mail: Seppo.Vainio@oulu.fi [Oulu Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000 (Finland)

    2009-10-01

    Wnt proteins are important regulators of embryonic development, and dysregulated Wnt signalling is involved in the oncogenesis of several human cancers. Our knowledge of the downstream target genes is limited, however. We used a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based assay to isolate and characterize the actual gene segments through which Wnt-activatable transcription factors, TCFs, regulate transcription and an Affymetrix microarray analysis to study the global transcriptional response to the Wnt3a ligand. The anti-{beta}-catenin immunoprecipitation of DNA-protein complexes from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing a fusion protein of {beta}-catenin and TCF7 resulted in the identification of 92 genes as putative TCF targets. GeneChip assays of gene expression performed on NIH3T3 cells and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 revealed 355 genes in NIH3T3 and 129 genes in the PC12 cells with marked changes in expression after Wnt3a stimulus. Only 2 Wnt-regulated genes were shared by both cell lines. Surprisingly, Disabled-2 was the only gene identified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation approach that displayed a marked change in expression in the GeneChip assay. Taken together, our approaches give an insight into the complex context-dependent nature of Wnt pathway transcriptional responses and identify Disabled-2 as a potential new direct target for Wnt signalling.

  3. Immune response to recombinant adenovirus in humans: capsid components from viral input are targets for vector-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier-Frenkel, V; Gahery-Segard, H; Mehtali, M; Le Boulaire, C; Ribault, S; Boulanger, P; Tursz, T; Guillet, J G; Farace, F

    2000-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 10(9) PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218-2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8(+) CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  4. Immune Response to Recombinant Adenovirus in Humans: Capsid Components from Viral Input Are Targets for Vector-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Gahery-Segard, Hanne; Mehtali, Majid; Le Boulaire, Christophe; Ribault, Sébastien; Boulanger, Pierre; Tursz, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Farace, Françoise

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 109 PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218–2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8+ CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  5. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  6. Quelques remarques sur la notion de modification affine

    OpenAIRE

    Dubouloz, Adrien

    2005-01-01

    in french We construct a global counterpart to the notion of affine modification due to Kaliman and Zaidenberg. This leads to a simple explicit description of the structure of birational affine morphisms between arbitrary quasi-projective varieties.

  7. Parameterization of an effective potential for protein-ligand binding from host-guest affinity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Lauren; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Nguyen, Crystal; Gilson, Michael K; Kurtzman, Tom; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    Force field accuracy is still one of the "stalemates" in biomolecular modeling. Model systems with high quality experimental data are valuable instruments for the validation and improvement of effective potentials. With respect to protein-ligand binding, organic host-guest complexes have long served as models for both experimental and computational studies because of the abundance of binding affinity data available for such systems. Binding affinity data collected for cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes, a popular model for molecular recognition, is potentially a more reliable resource for tuning energy parameters than hydration free energy measurements. Convergence of binding free energy calculations on CD host-guest systems can also be obtained rapidly, thus offering the opportunity to assess the robustness of these parameters. In this work, we demonstrate how implicit solvent parameters can be developed using binding affinity experimental data and the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) and validated using the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory analysis. These new solvation parameters were used to study protein-ligand binding in two drug targets against the HIV-1 virus and improved the agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding affinities. This work illustrates how benchmark sets of high quality experimental binding affinity data and physics-based binding free energy models can be used to evaluate and optimize force fields for protein-ligand systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26256816

  8. Microarray analysis of tomato's early and late wound response reveals new regulatory targets for Leucine aminopeptidase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Scranton

    Full Text Available Wounding due to mechanical injury or insect feeding causes a wide array of damage to plant cells including cell disruption, desiccation, metabolite oxidation, and disruption of primary metabolism. In response, plants regulate a variety of genes and metabolic pathways to cope with injury. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is a model for wound signaling but few studies have examined the comprehensive gene expression profiles in response to injury. A cross-species microarray approach using the TIGR potato 10-K cDNA array was analyzed for large-scale temporal (early and late and spatial (locally and systemically responses to mechanical wounding in tomato leaves. These analyses demonstrated that tomato regulates many primary and secondary metabolic pathways and this regulation is dependent on both timing and location. To determine if LAP-A, a known modulator of wound signaling, influences gene expression beyond the core of late wound-response genes, changes in RNAs from healthy and wounded Leucine aminopeptidase A-silenced (LapA-SI and wild-type (WT leaves were examined. While most of the changes in gene expression after wounding in LapA-SI leaves were similar to WT, overall responses were delayed in the LapA-SI leaves. Moreover, two pathogenesis-related 1 (PR-1c and PR-1a2 and two dehydrin (TAS14 and Dhn3 genes were negatively regulated by LAP-A. Collectively, this study has shown that tomato wound responses are complex and that LAP-A's role in modulation of wound responses extends beyond the well described late-wound gene core.

  9. A multiscale framework for affine invariant pattern recognition and registration

    OpenAIRE

    Rahtu, E. (Esa)

    2007-01-01

    Abstract This thesis presents a multiscale framework for the construction of affine invariant pattern recognition and registration methods. The idea in the introduced approach is to extend the given pattern to a set of affine covariant versions, each carrying slightly different information, and then to apply known affine invariants to each of them separately. The key part of the framework is the construction of the affine covariant set, and this is done by combining several scaled represen...

  10. The purification of affinity-labelled active-site peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isolation of the labelled peptide from the protein digest, following the affinity labelling of the active sites of enzymes or antibodies, is described. Single-step affinity chromatography utilises the affinity of the native enzymes or antibody for the ligand used to label the same protein. The labelled peptide is the only one in the digest that displays affinity for the immobilised protein and can be released with eluants that dissociate the protein-ligand complex. (Auth.)

  11. Applications of Aptamers in Targeted Imaging: State of the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, Casey A.; Cai, Weibo; Hong, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides with high affinity and specificity to the target molecules or cells, thus they can serve as an important category of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discove1y, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. The strong target affinity/selectivity, cost-effectivity, chemical versatility and safety of aptamers are superior to traditional peptides- or proteins-based ligands which make them unique choices for molecular imaging. T...

  12. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elizabeth A; Tran, Mai L; Dimos, Christos S; Budziszek, Michael J; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R; Roberts, Alison W

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants. PMID:27014284

  13. Redox-responsive nanocarrier based on heparin end-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liangliang; Li, Jinghua; Zhang, Beilu; Liu, Junjie; Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-07-01

    This study reports a smart controlled drug release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery. The system was fabricated by employing heparin as an end-capping agent to seal the mesopores of MSNs via disulfide bonds as intermediate linkers for intracellular glutathione triggered drug release. Lactobionic acid molecules were then coupled to heparin end-capped MSNs that serve as targeting motifs for facilitating the uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded MSNs by HepG2 cells and tumors, respectively. Detailed investigations demonstrated that the fabricated drug delivery systems could deliver DOX to cancer cells to induce cell apoptosis in vitro and tumor tissue for the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo with minimal side effects. The study affords a promising nanocarrier for redox-responsive cargo delivery with high curative efficiency for cancer therapy. PMID:24933090

  14. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 ± 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle

  15. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. (Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  16. Bacterial rRNA-Targeted Reverse Transcription-PCR Used To Identify Pathogens Responsible for Fever with Neutropenia▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, Sachi; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Asahara, Takashi; Takata, Oto; Fujimura, Junya; NAGATA, Satoru; Nomoto, Koji; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of bacterial rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (BrRNA RT-qPCR) assays for identifying the bacterial pathogens that cause fever with neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients, by comparing the bacterial detection rate of this technique with that of blood culture. One milliliter of blood was collected from pediatric patients who developed fever with neutropenia following cancer chemotherapy. BrRNA RT-qPCR was perfo...

  17. A graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere as a novel photochemical internalization agent for targeted and stimuli-responsive cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Chen, Zhaowei; Wang, Zhenzhen; Li, Wei; Ju, Enguo; Yan, Zhengqing; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal stability, biocompatibility and cancer cell targeting ability. After CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis, the nanosystem is embedded in endo/lysosomal vesicles and HA could be specially degraded by hyaluronidase (Hyal), inducing open pores. In the following, with visible light illumination, GHCNS could produce ROS that effectively induced lipid peroxidation and caused endo/lysosomal membrane break, accelerating the cytoplasmic release of the drug in the targeted and irradiated cells. As a result, significantly increased therapeutic potency and specificity against cancer cells could be achieved.As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal

  18. BCL-2 family proteins as 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets and determinants of response in myeloid malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Bogenberger, J M; Kornblau, S. M.; Pierceall, W E; Lena, R.; Chow, D.; Shi, C-X; Mantei, J; Ahmann, G; Gonzales, I M; A. Choudhary; R. Valdez; Camoriano, J; Fauble, V; Tiedemann, R E; Qiu, Y H

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic molecular vulnerabilities enhancing hypomethylating agents in myeloid malignancies have remained elusive. RNA-interference drug modifier screens identified antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members as potent 5-Azacytidine-sensitizing targets. In further dissecting BCL-XL, BCL-2 and MCL-1 contribution to 5-Azacytidine activity, siRNA silencing of BCL-XL and MCL-1, but not BCL-2, exhibited variable synergy with 5-Azacytidine in vitro. The BCL-XL, BCL-2 and BCL-w inhibitor ABT-737 sensitize...

  19. MicroRNA-155 Targets SMAD2 and Modulates the Response of Macrophages to Transforming Growth Factor-β*

    OpenAIRE

    Louafi, Fethi; Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T.; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine with important effects on processes such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and immunosupression. Using bioinformatics, we identified SMAD2, one of the mediators of TGF-β signaling, as a predicted target for a microRNA, microRNA-155 (miR-155). MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have emerged as an important class of gene expression regulators. miR-155 has been found to be involved in the regulation of the immune respons...

  20. Genomic Copy Number Dictates a Gene-Independent Cell Response to CRISPR/Cas9 Targeting | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables genome editing and somatic cell genetic screens in mammalian cells. We performed genome-scale loss-of-function screens in 33 cancer cell lines to identify genes essential for proliferation/survival and found a strong correlation between increased gene copy number and decreased cell viability after genome editing. Within regions of copy-number gain, CRISPR/Cas9 targeting of both expressed and unexpressed genes, as well as intergenic loci, led to significantly decreased cell proliferation through induction of a G2 cell-cycle arrest.

  1. Duals of Affine Grassmann Codes and Their Relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beelen, P.; Ghorpade, S. R.; Hoholdt, T.

    2012-01-01

    Affine Grassmann codes are a variant of generalized Reed-Muller codes and are closely related to Grassmann codes. These codes were introduced in a recent work by Beelen Here, we consider, more generally, affine Grassmann codes of a given level. We explicitly determine the dual of an affine Grassm...

  2. Simulation of Thermal Responses of 125TeO2 Solid Target to Energetic Proton Bombardment from Cyclotron When Fabricating 124I Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peir, Jinn-Jer; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Duh, Ting-Shieh

    With nuclear medicine receiving greater attention due to its unique characteristics in both diagnostics and therapeutics during recent decades, finding a highly controllable fabrication method becomes more urgent. The radioisotope 124I (T1/2=4.18d Eβ+=2.13MeV Iβ+=25%) has gained plentiful interests in the medical usages such as functioning imaging of cell proliferation in brain tumors using [124I]iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), imaging of immunoreactions in tumors using 124I-labelled monoclonal antibodies, the in-vivo imaging of 124I-labelled tyrosine derivatives, and the classical imaging of thyroid diseases with 124I, among others. Furthermore, it is because that thermal response of target during the fabrication process may affect the production of 124I to some extent and needs thorough investigations. Hence, the compact cyclotron located in the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research was employed in this study to generate 20MeV protons to irradiate TeO2 solid targets in which the radioisotopes 124I were produced through the 125Te(p, 2n)124I nuclear reaction. In addition, the widely-used ANSYS computer code was adopted to theoretically analyze thermal responses of TeO2 to irradiation cases with variations in ion beam current and its thermal conductivity. The results indicate that TeO2 temperature is strongly dependent on its thermal conductivity and ion beam current. In particular, TeO2 surface temperature is extremely sensitive to the air-gap size between TeO2 and target holder. Thus the target holder is suggested to be re-designed in order to prevent TeO2 from melting and a high efficiency production of radioisotopes 124I for nuclear medical diagnostics can be successfully achieved.

  3. Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Malaria Vaccine Target Antigen P48/45 in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum and Cross–Boosting of Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Bansal, Geetha P.; Merino, Kristen; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-01-01

    In general, malaria immunity has been suggested to be species specific with very little, if any, known cross-reactivity between Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum, both of which are responsible for >90% of human malaria, and co-endemic in many countries. It is therefore believed that species-specific immunity may be needed to target different species of Plasmodium. Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 are well established targets in the sexual stages of the malaria parasites, and are being pursued for the development of transmission blocking vaccines. Comparison of their sequences reveals 61% and 55% identity at the DNA and protein level, respectively raising the possibility that these two target antigens might share cross-reacting epitopes. Having succeeded in expressing recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins will not only exhibit immunological cross–reactivity but also cross-boost immune responses. Mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins using CFA, Montanide ISA-51 and alum as adjuvants, and the sera were analyzed by ELISA, Western blotting and indirect fixed and live IFA to address the hypothesis. Our studies revealed that Pvs48/45-immune sera showed strong cross-reactivity to full length Pfs48/45 protein, and the majority of this cross reactivity was in the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal sub-fragments of Pfs48/45. In cross-boosting experiments Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 antigens were able to cross-boost each other in mouse immunization studies. Additionally we also noticed an effect of adjuvants in the overall magnitude of observed cross-reactivity. These studies may have significant implications for immunity targeting transmission of both the species of malaria parasites. PMID:27438603

  4. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with target processing (N2b and P3b) and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-). An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided into three age groups (Young: 21-29, Middle-aged: 51-64, Old: 65-84 years old). Participants were asked to attend to visual stimuli and to ignore auditory stimuli. Aging was associated with slowed reaction times, target stimulus processing in working memory (WM, longer N2b and P3b latencies) and selection and preparation of the motor response (longer sLRP and earlier rLRP onset latencies). In the novel relative to the standard condition we observed, in the three age groups: (1) a distraction effect, reflected in a slowing of reaction times, of stimuli categorization in WM (longer P3b latency), and of motor response selection (longer sLRP onset latency); (2) a facilitation effect on response preparation (later rLRP onset latency), and (3) an increase in arousal (larger amplitudes of all ERPs evaluated, except for N2b amplitude in the Old group). A distraction effect on the stimulus evaluation processes (longer N2b latency) were also observed, but only in middle-aged and old participants, indicating that the attentional capture slows the stimulus evaluation in WM from early ages (from 50 years onwards, without differences between middle-age and older adults), but not in young adults. PMID:25294999

  5. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Cid Fernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs associated with target processing (N2b and P3b and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-. An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided in three age groups (Young: 21-29, Middle-aged: 51-64, Old: 65-84 y. o.. Participants were asked to attend to visual stimuli and to ignore auditory stimuli. Aging was associated with slowed reaction times, target stimulus processing in working memory (WM, longer N2b and P3b latencies and selection and preparation of the motor response (longer sLRP and earlier rLRP onset latencies. In the novel respect to the standard condition we observed, in the three age groups: (1 a distraction effect, reflected in a slowing of reaction times, of stimuli categorization in WM (longer P3b latency, and of motor response selection (longer sLRP onset latency; (2 a facilitation effect on response preparation (later rLRP onset latency, and (3 an increase in arousal (larger amplitudes of all ERPs evaluated, except for N2b amplitude in the Old group. A distraction effect on the stimulus evaluation processes (longer N2b component were also observed, but only in middle-aged and old participants, indicating that the attentional capture slows the stimulus evaluation in WM from early ages (from 50 years onwards, without differences between middle-age and older adults, but not in young adults.

  6. Doxorubicin loaded dual pH- and thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarrier for combined magnetic hyperthermia and targeted controlled drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervault, Aziliz; Dunn, Alexander E.; Lim, May; Boyer, Cyrille; Mott, Derrick; Maenosono, Shinya; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced features for the targeted delivery of DOX molecules via the combination of magnetic targeting, and dual pH- and thermo-responsive behaviour which offers spatial and temporal control over the release of DOX. The iron oxide cores exhibit a superparamagnetic behaviour with a saturation magnetization around 70 emu g-1. The MNCs contained 8.1 wt% of polymer and exhibit good heating properties in an alternating magnetic field. The drug release experiments confirmed that only a small amount of DOX was released at room temperature and physiological pH, while the highest drug release of 85.2% was obtained after 48 h at acidic tumour pH under hyperthermia conditions (50 °C). The drug release kinetic followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model and displayed Fickian diffusion mechanism. From the results obtained it can be concluded that this smart magnetic nanocarrier is promising for applications in multi-modal cancer therapy, to target and efficiently deliver heat and drug specifically to the tumour.Magnetic nanocarriers have attracted increasing attention for multimodal cancer therapy due to the possibility to deliver heat and drugs locally. The present study reports the development of magnetic nanocomposites (MNCs) made of an iron oxide core and a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, that can be used as both hyperthermic agent and drug carrier. The conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to the pH- and thermo-responsive MNCs via acid-cleavable imine linker provides advanced

  7. Target Practice: Reader Response Theory and Teachers' Interpretations of Students' SAT 10 Scores in Data-Based Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Becky M.

    2012-01-01

    The study reported in this article examines how teachers read and respond to their students' Stanford Achievement Test 10 (SAT 10) scores with the goal of investigating the assumption that data-based teaching practice is more "objective" and less susceptible to divergent teacher interpretation. The study uses reader response theory to frame…

  8. UBXN1 Interferes with Rig-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting MAVS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghua Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses are sensed by RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, which signal through a mitochondria-associated adaptor molecule, MAVS, resulting in systemic antiviral immune responses. Although RLR signaling is essential for limiting RNA virus replication, it must be stringently controlled to prevent damage from inflammation. We demonstrate here that among all tested UBX-domain-containing protein family members, UBXN1 exhibits the strongest inhibitory effect on RNA-virus-induced type I interferon response. UBXN1 potently inhibits RLR- and MAVS-induced, but not TLR3-, TLR4-, or DNA-virus-induced innate immune responses. Depletion of UBXN1 enhances virus-induced innate immune responses, including those resulting from RNA viruses such as vesicular stomatitis, Sendai, West Nile, and dengue virus infection, repressing viral replication. Following viral infection, UBXN1 is induced, binds to MAVS, interferes with intracellular MAVS oligomerization, and disrupts the MAVS/TRAF3/TRAF6 signalosome. These findings underscore a critical role of UBXN1 in the modulation of a major antiviral signaling pathway.

  9. Structural and Nonstructural Viral Proteins Are Targets of T-Helper Immune Response against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Mir, Carmen; Gebe, John A; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Proper antiviral humoral and cellular immune responses require previous recognition of viral antigenic peptides that are bound to HLA class II molecules, which are exposed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. The helper immune response is critical for the control and the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infection, a virus with severe health risk in infected pediatric, immunocompromised, and elderly populations. In this study, using a mass spectrometry analysis of complex HLA class II-bound peptide pools that were isolated from large amounts of HRSV-infected cells, 19 naturally processed HLA-DR ligands, most of them included in a complex nested set of peptides, were identified. Both the immunoprevalence and the immunodominance of the HLA class II response to HRSV were focused on one nonstructural (NS1) and two structural (matrix and mainly fusion) proteins of the infective virus. These findings have clear implications for analysis of the helper immune response as well as for antiviral vaccine design. PMID:27090790

  10. The oncogenic MicroRNA Hsa-miR-155-5p targets the transcription factor ELK3 and links it to the hypoxia response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Douglas Robertson

    Full Text Available The molecular response to hypoxia is a critical cellular process implicated in cancer, and a target for drug development. The activity of the major player, HIF1α, is regulated at different levels by various factors, including the transcription factor ELK3. The molecular mechanisms of this intimate connection remain largely unknown. Whilst investigating global ELK3-chromatin interactions, we uncovered an unexpected connection that involves the microRNA hsa-miR-155-5p, a hypoxia-inducible oncomir that targets HIF1α. One of the ELK3 chromatin binding sites, detected by Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq of normal Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC, is located at the transcription start site of the MIR155HG genes that expresses hsa-miR-155-5p. We confirmed that ELK3 binds to this promoter by ChIP and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR. We showed that ELK3 and hsa-miR-155-5p form a double-negative regulatory loop, in that ELK3 depletion induced hsa-miR-155-5p expression and hsa-miR-155-5p expression decreased ELK3 expression at the RNA level through a conserved target sequence in its 3'-UTR. We further showed that the activities of hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 are functionally linked. Pathway analysis indicates that both factors are implicated in related processes, including cancer and angiogenesis. Hsa-miR-155-5p expression and ELK3 depletion have similar effects on expression of known ELK3 target genes, and on in-vitro angiogenesis and wound closure. Bioinformatic analysis of cancer RNA-seq data shows that hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 expression are significantly anti-correlated, as would be expected from hsa-miR-155-5p targeting ELK3 RNA. Finally, hypoxia (0% oxygen down-regulates ELK3 mRNA in a microRNA and hsa-miR-155-5p dependent manner. These results tie ELK3 into the hypoxia response pathway through an oncogenic microRNA and into a circuit implicated in the dynamics of the hypoxic response. This crosstalk could

  11. The oncogenic MicroRNA Hsa-miR-155-5p targets the transcription factor ELK3 and links it to the hypoxia response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, E Douglas; Wasylyk, Christine; Ye, Tao; Jung, Alain C; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular response to hypoxia is a critical cellular process implicated in cancer, and a target for drug development. The activity of the major player, HIF1α, is regulated at different levels by various factors, including the transcription factor ELK3. The molecular mechanisms of this intimate connection remain largely unknown. Whilst investigating global ELK3-chromatin interactions, we uncovered an unexpected connection that involves the microRNA hsa-miR-155-5p, a hypoxia-inducible oncomir that targets HIF1α. One of the ELK3 chromatin binding sites, detected by Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq) of normal Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC), is located at the transcription start site of the MIR155HG genes that expresses hsa-miR-155-5p. We confirmed that ELK3 binds to this promoter by ChIP and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). We showed that ELK3 and hsa-miR-155-5p form a double-negative regulatory loop, in that ELK3 depletion induced hsa-miR-155-5p expression and hsa-miR-155-5p expression decreased ELK3 expression at the RNA level through a conserved target sequence in its 3'-UTR. We further showed that the activities of hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 are functionally linked. Pathway analysis indicates that both factors are implicated in related processes, including cancer and angiogenesis. Hsa-miR-155-5p expression and ELK3 depletion have similar effects on expression of known ELK3 target genes, and on in-vitro angiogenesis and wound closure. Bioinformatic analysis of cancer RNA-seq data shows that hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 expression are significantly anti-correlated, as would be expected from hsa-miR-155-5p targeting ELK3 RNA. Finally, hypoxia (0% oxygen) down-regulates ELK3 mRNA in a microRNA and hsa-miR-155-5p dependent manner. These results tie ELK3 into the hypoxia response pathway through an oncogenic microRNA and into a circuit implicated in the dynamics of the hypoxic response. This crosstalk could be important for

  12. Hydrosoluble 50% N-acetylation-thiolated chitosan complex with cobalt as a pH-responsive renal fibrosis targeting drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Tan, Lishan; Tang, Liangfeng; Li, Aiqing; Hu, Jianqiang

    2016-07-01

    About 50% N-acetylation-thiolated chitosan possessing good water solubility was modified from commercial low-molecular-weight chitosan. Chitosan performed obvious target toward renal tubular epithelial cells, and bivalent cobalt ions improved the renal fibrosis inflammation significantly. There were many complexation sites on chitosan after being modified with sulfydryl. So sulfydryl played a role of connecting bridge between chitosan and cobalt ions. Then, this N-acetylation-thiolated chitosan cobalt (NTCC) nanocomplex was designed. The nanocomplex showed excellent stability under normal physiological conditions, and cobalt would be released from the biomaterials in acidic environment. As it was affected by inflammation, the pH in renal fibrosis lesion region was acidic. So there was a specific drug release process happening in lesion region. And drug release efficiency was determined by acidity, which demonstrated that lower the acidity, the faster and more the cobalt ion release. When this nanocomplex was intraperitoneally injected into ureter-obstructed mice, obvious attenuation of fibrotic progression was shown. It was demonstrated that NTCC exhibited special renal-targeting capacity and could be chosen as drug for treating renal fibrosis. PMID:27115330

  13. Comparative Analysis and Identification of miRNAs and Their Target Genes Responsive to Salt Stress in Diploid and Tetraploid Paulownia fortunei Seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Fan

    Full Text Available Salt stress is a global environmental problem that affects plant growth and development. Paulownia fortunei is an adaptable and fast-growing deciduous tree native to China that is environmentally and economically important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important regulatory roles in growth, development, and stress responses in plants. MiRNAs that respond to biotic stresses have been identified; however, how miRNAs in P. fortunei respond to salt stress has not yet been reported. To identify salt-stress-responsive miRNAs and predict their target genes, four small RNA and four degradome libraries were constructed from NaCl-treated and NaCl-free leaves of P. fortunei seedlings. The results indicated that salt stress had different physiological effects on diploid and tetraploid P. fortunei. We detected 53 conserved miRNAs belonging to 17 miRNA families and 134 novel miRNAs in P. fortunei. Comparing their expression levels in diploid and tetraploid P. fortunei, we found 10 conserved and 10 novel miRNAs that were significantly differentially expressed under salt treatment, among them eight were identified as miRNAs probably associated with higher salt tolerance in tetraploid P. fortunei than in diploid P. fortunei. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses were performed to predict the functions of the target genes of the conserved and novel miRNAs. The expressions of 10 differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. This is the first report on P. fortunei miRNAs and their target genes under salt stress. The results provided information at the physiological and molecular levels for further research into the response mechanisms of P. fortunei to salt stress.

  14. The Yeast PH Domain Proteins Slm1 and Slm2 Are Targets of Sphingolipid Signaling during the Response to Heat Stress▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Daquinag, Alexes; Fadri, Maria; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Kunz, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    The PH domain-containing proteins Slm1 and Slm2 were previously identified as effectors of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI4,5P2) and TORC2 signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that Slm1 and Slm2 are also targets of sphingolipid signaling during the heat shock response. We show that upon depletion of cellular sphingolipid levels, Slm1 function becomes essential for survival under heat stress. We further demonstrate that Slm proteins are regulated by a phosphorylation/dephosph...

  15. Interpolation method for accurate affinity ranking of arrayed ligand-analyte interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Andree, Kiki C; van der Velde, Niels; van der Kooi, Alex; Stojanović, Ivan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-05-01

    The values of the affinity constants (kd, ka, and KD) that are determined by label-free interaction analysis methods are affected by the ligand density. This article outlines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging method that yields high-throughput globally fitted affinity ranking values using a 96-plex array. A kinetic titration experiment without a regeneration step has been applied for various coupled antibodies binding to a single antigen. Globally fitted rate (kd and ka) and dissociation equilibrium (KD) constants for various ligand densities and analyte concentrations are exponentially interpolated to the KD at Rmax = 100 RU response level (KD(R100)). PMID:26878776

  16. Targeted Overexpression of Inducible 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase in Adipose Tissue Increases Fat Deposition but Protects against Diet-induced Insulin Resistance and Inflammatory Responses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuqing; Guo, Xin; Li, Honggui; Xu, Hang; Halim, Vera; Zhang, Weiyu; Wang, Huan; Fan, Yang-Yi; Ong, Kuok Teong; Woo, Shih-Lung; Chapkin, Robert S.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Chen, Yanming; Dong, Hui; Lu, Fuer; Wei, Lai; Wu, Chaodong

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the dissociation of fat deposition, the inflammatory response, and insulin resistance in the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. As a regulatory enzyme of glycolysis, inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (iPFK2, encoded by PFKFB3) protects against diet-induced adipose tissue inflammatory response and systemic insulin resistance independently of adiposity. Using aP2-PFKFB3 transgenic (Tg) mice, we explored the ability of targeted adipocyte PFKFB3/iPFK2 overexpression to modulate diet-induced inflammatory responses and insulin resistance arising from fat deposition in both adipose and liver tissues. Compared with wild-type littermates (controls) on a high fat diet (HFD), Tg mice exhibited increased adiposity, decreased adipose inflammatory response, and improved insulin sensitivity. In a parallel pattern, HFD-fed Tg mice showed increased hepatic steatosis, decreased liver inflammatory response, and improved liver insulin sensitivity compared with controls. In both adipose and liver tissues, increased fat deposition was associated with lipid profile alterations characterized by an increase in palmitoleate. Additionally, plasma lipid profiles also displayed an increase in palmitoleate in HFD-Tg mice compared with controls. In cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, overexpression of PFKFB3/iPFK2 recapitulated metabolic and inflammatory changes observed in adipose tissue of Tg mice. Upon treatment with conditioned medium from iPFK2-overexpressing adipocytes, mouse primary hepatocytes displayed metabolic and inflammatory responses that were similar to those observed in livers of Tg mice. Together, these data demonstrate a unique role for PFKFB3/iPFK2 in adipocytes with regard to diet-induced inflammatory responses in both adipose and liver tissues. PMID:22556414

  17. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change

  18. The role of the cofilin-actin rod stress response in neurodegenerative diseases uncovers potential new drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Munsie, Lise N.; Truant, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The cofilin-actin rod stress response is an actin cytoskeletal dynamic arrest that occurs in cells under a variety of stress conditions. Upon stress, the rapidly activated cofilin saturates actin filaments causing them to bundle into rod structures in either the nucleus or cytoplasm, halting actin polymerization and thus freeing ATP. Importantly, these rods dissociate quickly following relief of the transient stress. The rods form inappropriately in neurons involved in the progression of Alzh...

  19. Tumor therapy with an antibody-targeted superantigen generates a dichotomy between local and systemic immune responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Litton, M. J.; Dohlsten, M; Hansson, J.; Rosendahl, A; Ohlsson, L.; Kalland, T; Andersson, J; Andersson, U.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated injections of a fusion protein containing the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) combined with a Fab fragment of a tumor-specific antibody is a highly efficient immunotherapy for mice expressing lung melanoma micrometastasis. In the present study, the systemic and local immune responses generated by this therapy were analyzed at a cellular level. Two distinct but coupled immune reactions occurred after repeated therapy. Tumor necrosis factor and macrophage inflammatory p...

  20. Targeting Anabolic Impairment in Response to Resistance Exercise in Older Adults with Mobility Impairments: Potential Mechanisms and Rehabilitation Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Micah J.; Robin L. Marcus; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle atrophy is associated with healthy aging (i.e., sarcopenia) and may be compounded by comorbidities, injury, surgery, illness, and physical inactivity. While a bout of resistance exercise increases protein synthesis rates in healthy young skeletal muscle, the effectiveness of resistance exercise to mount a protein synthetic response is less pronounced in older adults. Improving anabolic sensitivity to resistance exercise, thereby enhancing physical function, is most critical in needy ol...

  1. Targeting Anabolic Impairment in Response to Resistance Exercise in Older Adults with Mobility Impairments: Potential Mechanisms and Rehabilitation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micah J. Drummond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy is associated with healthy aging (i.e., sarcopenia and may be compounded by comorbidities, injury, surgery, illness, and physical inactivity. While a bout of resistance exercise increases protein synthesis rates in healthy young skeletal muscle, the effectiveness of resistance exercise to mount a protein synthetic response is less pronounced in older adults. Improving anabolic sensitivity to resistance exercise, thereby enhancing physical function, is most critical in needy older adults with clinical conditions that render them “low responders”. In this paper, we discuss potential mechanisms contributing to anabolic impairment to resistance exercise and highlight the need to improve anabolic responsiveness in low responders. This is followed with evidence suggesting that the recovery period of resistance exercise provides an opportunity to amplify the exercise-induced anabolic response using protein/essential amino acid ingestion. This anabolic strategy, if repeated chronically, may improve lean muscle gains, decrease time to recovery of function during periods of rehabilitation, and overall, maintain/improve physical independence and reduce mortality rates in older adults.

  2. On Metrizability of Invariant Affine Connections

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Erico

    2011-01-01

    The metrizability problem for a symmetric affine connection on a manifold, invariant with respect to a group of diffeomorphisms G, is considered. We say that the connection is G-metrizable, if it is expressible as the Levi-Civita connection of a G-invariant metric field. In this paper we analyze the G-metrizability equations for the rotation group G = SO(3), acting canonically on three- and four-dimensional Euclidean spaces. We show that the property of the connection to be SO(3)-invariant allows us to find complete explicit description of all solutions of the SO(3)-metrizability equations.

  3. Quantum affine symmetry in vertex models

    CERN Document Server

    Idzumi, M; Jimbo, M; Miwa, T; Nakashima, T; Tokihiro, T; Idzumi, Makoto; Iohara, Kenji; Jimbo, Michio; Miwa, Tetsuji; Nakashima, Toshiki; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    1993-01-01

    We study the higher spin anologs of the six vertex model on the basis of its symmetry under the quantum affine algebra $U_q(\\slth)$. Using the method developed recently for the XXZ spin chain, we formulate the space of states, transfer matrix, vacuum, creation/annihilation operators of particles, and local operators, purely in the language of representation theory. We find that, regardless of the level of the representation involved, the particles have spin $1/2$, and that the $n$-particle space has an RSOS-type structure rather than a simple tensor product of the $1$-particle space. This agrees with the picture proposed earlier by Reshetikhin.

  4. Tuning the Protein Corona of Hydrogel Nanoparticles: The Synthesis of Abiotic Protein and Peptide Affinity Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-06-21

    Nanomaterials, when introduced into a complex, protein-rich environment, rapidly acquire a protein corona. The type and amount of proteins that constitute the corona depend significantly on the synthetic identity of the nanomaterial. For example, hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) have little affinity for plasma proteins; in contrast, carboxylated poly(styrene) NPs acquire a dense protein corona. This range of protein adsorption suggests that the protein corona might be "tuned" by controlling the chemical composition of the NP. In this Account, we demonstrate that small libraries of synthetic polymer NPs incorporating a diverse pool of functional monomers can be screened for candidates with high affinity and selectivity to targeted biomacromolecules. Through directed synthetic evolution of NP compositions, one can tailor the protein corona to create synthetic organic hydrogel polymer NPs with high affinity and specificity to peptide toxins, enzymes, and other functional proteins, as well as to specific domains of large proteins. In addition, many NIPAm NPs undergo a change in morphology as a function of temperature. This transformation often correlates with a significant change in NP-biomacromolecule affinity, resulting in a temperature-dependent protein corona. This temperature dependence has been used to develop NP hydrogels with autonomous affinity switching for the protection of proteins from thermal stress and as a method of biomacromolecule purification through a selective thermally induced catch and release. In addition to temperature, changes in pH or buffer can also alter a NP protein corona composition, a property that has been exploited for protein purification. Finally, synthetic polymer nanoparticles with low nanomolar affinity for a peptide toxin were shown to capture and neutralize the toxin in the bloodstream of living mice. While the development of synthetic polymer alternatives to protein affinity reagents is

  5. Connection between the Affine and conformal Affine Toda models and their Hirota's solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the Affine Toda models (AT) constitute a gauge fixed version of the Conformal Affine Toda model (CAT). This result enables one to map every solution of the AT models into an infinite number of solutions of the corresponding CAT models, each one associated to a point of the orbit of the conformal group. The Hirota's τ-function are introduced and soliton solutions for the AT and CAT models associated to SL (r+1) and SP (r) are constructed. (author)

  6. Aptamer Affinity Maturation by Resampling and Microarray Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Liang, Shaolin; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Fraser, Lewis A; Shiu, Simon Chi-Chin; Tang, Marco S L; Tanner, Julian A

    2016-07-19

    Aptamers have significant potential as affinity reagents, but better approaches are critically needed to discover higher affinity nucleic acids to widen the scope for their diagnostic, therapeutic, and proteomic application. Here, we report aptamer affinity maturation, a novel aptamer enhancement technique, which combines bioinformatic resampling of aptamer sequence data and microarray selection to navigate the combinatorial chemistry binding landscape. Aptamer affinity maturation is shown to improve aptamer affinity by an order of magnitude in a single round. The novel aptamers exhibited significant adaptation, the complexity of which precludes discovery by other microarray based methods. Honing aptamer sequences using aptamer affinity maturation could help optimize a next generation of nucleic acid affinity reagents. PMID:27346322

  7. Enhanced antibody affinity in sublethally irradiated mice and bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethally irradiated mice primed with dinitrophenyl (Dnp)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin immediately after irradiation or 30 days later and subsequently boosted with a second injection of antigen displayed a secondary response to Dnp characterized by antibody affinity greater than that in unirradiated controls. Also, in radiation chimeras primed with Dnp-keyhole limpet hemocyanin 120 days after syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation the antibodies against Dnp produced after boosting were of higher affinity than the antibodies raised in normal mice. These findings are tentatively attributed to lack of suppressor thymus-derived lymphocytes (T cells) in sublethally irradiated mice and bone marrow chimeras, in which the enhanced ability to produce antibodies of high affinity may compensate for quantitative defects of the immune system

  8. A Fusion Protein between Streptavidin and the Endogenous TLR4 Ligand EDA Targets Biotinylated Antigens to Dendritic Cells and Induces T Cell Responses In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arribillaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tools for efficient targeting of antigens to antigen presenting cells is of great importance for vaccine development. We have previously shown that fusion proteins containing antigens fused to the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA, an endogenous TLR4 ligand, which targets antigens to TLR4-expressing dendritic cells (DC, are highly immunogenic. To facilitate the procedure of joining EDA to any antigen of choice, we have prepared the fusion protein EDAvidin by linking EDA to the N terminus of streptavidin, allowing its conjugation with biotinylated antigens. We found that EDAvidin, as streptavidin, forms tetramers and binds biotin or biotinylated proteins with a Kd ~ 2.6 × 10−14 mol/L. EDAvidin favours the uptake of biotinylated green fluorescent protein by DC. Moreover, EDAvidin retains the proinflammatory properties of EDA, inducing NF-κβ by TLR4-expressing cells, as well as the production of TNF-α by the human monocyte cell line THP1 and IL-12 by DC. More importantly, immunization of mice with EDAvidin conjugated with the biotinylated nonstructural NS3 protein from hepatitis C virus induces a strong anti-NS3 T cell immune response. These results open a new way to use the EDA-based delivery tool to target any antigen of choice to DC for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer.

  9. A fusion protein between streptavidin and the endogenous TLR4 ligand EDA targets biotinylated antigens to dendritic cells and induces T cell responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribillaga, Laura; Durantez, Maika; Lozano, Teresa; Rudilla, Francesc; Rehberger, Federico; Casares, Noelia; Villanueva, Lorea; Martinez, Marta; Gorraiz, Marta; Borrás-Cuesta, Francisco; Sarobe, Pablo; Prieto, Jesús; Lasarte, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    The development of tools for efficient targeting of antigens to antigen presenting cells is of great importance for vaccine development. We have previously shown that fusion proteins containing antigens fused to the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA), an endogenous TLR4 ligand, which targets antigens to TLR4-expressing dendritic cells (DC), are highly immunogenic. To facilitate the procedure of joining EDA to any antigen of choice, we have prepared the fusion protein EDAvidin by linking EDA to the N terminus of streptavidin, allowing its conjugation with biotinylated antigens. We found that EDAvidin, as streptavidin, forms tetramers and binds biotin or biotinylated proteins with a Kd ~ 2.6 × 10(-14) mol/L. EDAvidin favours the uptake of biotinylated green fluorescent protein by DC. Moreover, EDAvidin retains the proinflammatory properties of EDA, inducing NF- κβ by TLR4-expressing cells, as well as the production of TNF- α by the human monocyte cell line THP1 and IL-12 by DC. More importantly, immunization of mice with EDAvidin conjugated with the biotinylated nonstructural NS3 protein from hepatitis C virus induces a strong anti-NS3 T cell immune response. These results open a new way to use the EDA-based delivery tool to target any antigen of choice to DC for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:24093105

  10. Isolation and characterization of mutated alcohol oxidases from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha with decreased affinity toward substrates and their use as selective elements of an amperometric biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuhmann Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate, rapid, and economic on-line analysis of ethanol is very desirable. However, available biosensors achieve saturation at very low ethanol concentrations and thus demand the time and labour consuming procedure of sample dilution. Results Hansenula polymorpha (Pichia angusta mutant strains resistant to allyl alcohol in methanol medium were selected. Such strains possessed decreased affinity of alcohol oxidase (AOX towards methanol: the KM values for AOX of wild type and mutant strains CA2 and CA4 are shown to be 0.62, 2.48 and 1.10 mM, respectively, whereas Vmax values are increased or remain unaffected. The mutant AOX alleles from H. polymorpha mutants CA2 and CA4 were isolated and sequenced. Several point mutations in the AOX gene, mostly different between the two mutant alleles, have been identified. Mutant AOX forms were isolated and purified, and some of their biochemical properties were studied. An amperometric biosensor based on the mutated form of AOX from the strain CA2 was constructed and revealed an extended linear response to the target analytes, ethanol and formaldehyde, as compared to the sensor based on the native AOX. Conclusion The described selection methodology opens up the possibility of isolating modified forms of AOX with further decreased affinity toward substrates without reduction of the maximal velocity of reaction. It can help in creation of improved ethanol biosensors with a prolonged linear response towards ethanol in real samples of wines, beers or fermentation liquids.

  11. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1 complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourlay Robert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1 is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes.

  12. Development of immune-affinity 96 spots monolith array for multiple mycotoxins detection in food samples.

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    Li, Li; Xia, Li-Ru; Zhao, Yong-Fu; Wang, He-Ye

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel highly sensitive chemiluminescence immune-affinity 96 spots monolith array was developed to detect deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN), T-2 toxin (T-2), and fumonisin B1 (FB1) in corn samples. Firstly, the monolith array was prepared through on suit UV-initiated copolymerization using polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as functional monomer and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200) as the porogen. Subsequently, the four mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array was prepared by immobilization of DON, ZEN, T-2, and FB1 antibody. The mole ratio of PEGDA/GMA, UV exposure time, and the volume ratio of PEG 200/PEGDA were optimized to improve the performances of the immune-affinity monolith array. For the mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array based on chemiluminescence detection, the limit of detection was 0.0036ng/mL (DON), 0.0048ng/mL (ZEN), 0.0039ng/mL (T-2), and 0.0017ng/mL (FB1), respectively. The linear response in the range of 0.01-0.1ng/mL (R(2)=0.98). The results showed that the proposed four mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array was a stable, accurate, and highly sensitive method to determine levels of DON, ZEN, T-2, and FB1 in real samples. PMID:27423670

  13. Network-of-queues approach to B-cell-receptor affinity discrimination

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    Felizzi, Federico; Comoglio, Federico

    2012-06-01

    The immune system is one of the most complex signal processing machineries in biology. The adaptive immune system, consisting of B and T lymphocytes, is activated in response to a large spectrum of pathogen antigens. B cells recognize and bind the antigen through B-cell receptors (BCRs) and this is fundamental for B-cell activation. However, the system response is dependent on BCR-antigen affinity values that span several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the ability of the BCR to discriminate between affinities at the high end (e.g., 109M-1-1010M-1) challenges the formulation of a mathematical model able to robustly separate these affinity-dependent responses. Queuing theory enables the analysis of many related processes, such as those resulting from the stochasticity of protein binding and unbinding events. Here we define a network of queues, consisting of BCR early signaling states and transition rates related to the propensity of molecular aggregates to form or disassemble. By considering the family of marginal distributions of BCRs in a given signaling state, we report a significant separation (measured as Jensen-Shannon divergence) that arises from a broad spectrum of antigen affinities.

  14. Segmenting and targeting American university students to promote responsible alcohol use: a case for applying social marketing principles.

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    Deshpande, Sameer; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn

    2011-10-01

    The current study contributes to the social marketing literature in the American university binge-drinking context in three innovative ways. First, it profiles drinking segments by "values" and "expectancies" sought from behaviors. Second, the study compares segment values and expectancies of two competing behaviors, that is, binge drinking and participation in alternative activities. Third, the study compares the influence of a variety of factors on both behaviors in each segment. Finally, based on these findings and feedback from eight university alcohol prevention experts, appropriate strategies to promote responsible alcohol use for each segment are proposed. PMID:22054026

  15. Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-06-01

    Despite magnetic nanoparticles having shown great potential in cancer treatment, tremendous challenges related to diagnostic sensitivity and treatment efficacy for clinical application remain. Herein, we designed optimized multifunctional magnetite nanoparticles (AHP@MNPs), composed of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and photosensitizer conjugated hyaluronic acid (AHP), to achieve enhanced tumor diagnosis and therapy. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by a facile hydrolysis method. MNPs have higher biocompatibility, controllable particle sizes, and desirable magnetic properties. The fabricated AHP@MNPs have enhanced water solubility (average size: 108.13 +/- 1.08 nm), heat generation properties, and singlet oxygen generation properties upon magnetic and laser irradiation. The AHP@MNPs can target tumors via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis, which have enhanced tumor therapeutic effects through photodynamic/hyperthermia-combined treatment without any drugs. We successfully detected tumors implanted in mice via magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging. Furthermore, we demonstrated the photodynamic/hyperthermia-combined therapeutic efficacy of AHP@MNPs with synergistically enhanced efficacy against cancer.Despite magnetic nanoparticles having shown great potential in cancer treatment, tremendous challenges related to diagnostic sensitivity and treatment efficacy for clinical application remain. Herein, we designed optimized multifunctional magnetite nanoparticles (AHP@MNPs), composed of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and photosensitizer conjugated hyaluronic acid (AHP), to achieve enhanced tumor diagnosis and therapy. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by a facile hydrolysis method. MNPs have higher biocompatibility, controllable particle sizes, and desirable magnetic properties. The fabricated AHP@MNPs have enhanced water solubility (average size: 108.13 +/- 1.08 nm), heat generation properties, and singlet oxygen generation properties upon magnetic and laser

  16. Integrin-targeted pH-responsive micelles for enhanced efficiency of anticancer treatment in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjian; Deng, Hongzhang; Liu, Qiang; Chu, Liping; Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Zhao, Xuefei; Huang, Pingsheng; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-02-01

    The key to developing more nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs in clinical applications is to consider the route of the carrier from the administration site to the target tissue and to look for a simple design to complete this whole journey. We synthesized the amphiphilic copolymer cRGDfK-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl) ethane methacrylate) (cRGD-PETM) to construct multifunctional micelles. These micelles combined enhanced drug-loading efficiency with tumor-targeting properties, visual detection and controllable intracellular drug release, resulting in an improved chemotherapeutic effect in vivo. Doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated within the cRGD-PETM micelles as a model drug (termed as cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms). The size and morphology of the micelles were characterized systematically. As a result of the hydrophobic interaction and the π-π conjugation between the DOX molecules and the PTTMA copolymers, the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms showed an excellent drug-loading capacity. The results of in vitro drug-release studies indicated that the cumulative release of DOX from cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms at pH 5.0 was twice that at pH 7.4. The results of fluorescent microscopic analysis showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms could be internalized by 4T1 and HepG2 cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis with rapid intracellular drug release, which resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared with free DOX. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms improved the accumulation and retention of the drug in tumor tissues. Studies of the in vivo anticancer effects showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms had a significantly higher therapeutic efficacy with lower side-effects than free DOX and PETM/DOX Ms. These results show that the multifunctional cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms have great potential as vehicles for the delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  17. Targeting the oncogene B lymphoma deregulator IgH 3' regulatory region does not impede the in vivo inflammatory response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Faten; Saintamand, Alexis; Rouaud, Pauline; Denizot, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR), encompassing the four transcriptional enhancers hs3a-hs1,2-hs3b-hs4, is a potent lymphoma oncogene deregulator but its role in B cell-mediated inflammatory responses is unknown. We investigated the 3'RR involvement in the in vivo pristane-induced inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. The lack of the 3'RR in BALB/c mice had no wide effect on the incidence, the kinetic of development and the cellular composition of peritoneal ascites. Ascite pro-inflammatory cytokines levels (IL-6, IL-21, IL-12/23, TNF-α) were unchanged while anti-inflammatory cytokines levels (IL-10, interferon-γ) were slightly increased in 3'RR-deficient BALB/c mice as compared to wt BALB/c mice. In conclusion, the 3'RR is dispensable for the efficient recruitment of immune cells and the normal development of an inflammatory response in the in vivo pristane-induced inflammatory model. The 3'RR might be considered as a potential suitable target for anti-lymphoma pharmacological therapy without potent adverse effect on normal immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:25594069

  18. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 localizes to etoposide-exposed mitotic chromosomes: implication for a novel DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masayuki; Fujimitsu, Yuka; Sasano, Takeshi; Yoshikai, Yushi; Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Nariai, Yuko; Urano, Takeshi; Saitoh, Hisato

    2014-04-25

    RNF4, a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL), localizes to the nucleus and functions in the DNA damage response during interphase of the cell cycle. RNF4 also exists in cells undergoing mitosis, where its regulation and function remain poorly understood. Here we showed that administration of etoposide, an anticancer DNA topoisomerase II poison, to mitotic human cervical cancer HeLa cells induced SUMO-2/3-dependent localization of RNF4 to chromosomes. The FK2 antibody signals, indicative of poly/multi-ubiquitin assembly, were detected on etoposide-exposed mitotic chromosomes, whereas the signals were negligible in cells depleted for RNF4 by RNA interference. This suggests that RNF4 functions as a STUbL in the etoposide-induced damage response during mitosis. Indeed, RNF4-depletion sensitized mitotic HeLa cells to etoposide and increased cells with micronuclei. These results indicate the importance of the RNF4-mediated STUbL pathway during mitosis for the maintenance of chromosome integrity and further implicate RNF4 as a target for topo II poison-based therapy for cancer patients. PMID:24695317

  19. Induced Modules for Affine Lie Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Futorny

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We study induced modules of nonzero central charge with arbitrary multiplicities over affine Lie algebras. For a given pseudo parabolic subalgebra P of an affine Lie algebra G, our main result establishes the equivalence between a certain category of P-induced G-modules and the category of weight P-modules with injective action of the central element of G. In particular, the induction functor preserves irreducible modules. If P is a parabolic subalgebra with a finite-dimensional Levi factor then it defines a unique pseudo parabolic subalgebra P^{ps}, P subset P^{ps}. The structure of P-induced modules in this case is fully determined by the structure of P^{ps}-induced modules. These results generalize similar reductions in particular cases previously considered by V. Futorny, S. König, V. Mazorchuk [Forum Math. 13 (2001, 641-661], B. Cox [Pacific J. Math. 165 (1994, 269-294] and I. Dimitrov, V. Futorny, I. Penkov [Comm. Math. Phys. 250 (2004, 47-63].

  20. Exploring Fluorous Affinity by Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Martina; Guzzinati, Roberta; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Terms such as "fluorous affinity" and "fluorophilicity" have been used to describe the unique partition and sorption properties often exhibited by highly fluorinated organic compounds, that is molecules rich in sp(3) carbon-fluorine bonds. In this work, we made use of a highly fluorinated stationary phase and a series of benzene derivatives to study the effect of one single perfluorinated carbon on the chromatographic behavior and adsorption properties of molecules. For this purpose, the adsorption equilibria of α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, toluene, and other alkylbenzenes have been studied by means of nonlinear chromatography in a variety of acetonitrile/water eluents. Our results reveal that one single perfluorinated carbon is already enough to induce a drastic change in the adsorption properties of molecules on the perfluorinated stationary phase. In particular, it has been found that adsorption is monolayer if the perfluoroalkyl carbon is present but that, when this unit is missing, molecules arrange as multilayer stack structures. These findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of fluorous affinity. PMID:26047527