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Sample records for affects litter-mixture effects

  1. Neighbour identity hardly affects litter-mixture effects on decomposition rates of New Zealand forest species.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoorens, B.; D. A. Coomes; R. Aerts

    2010-01-01

    The mass loss of litter mixtures is often different than expected based on the mass loss of the component species. We investigated if the identity of neighbour species affects these litter-mixing effects. To achieve this, we compared decomposition rates in monoculture and in all possible two-species combinations of eight tree species, widely differing in litter chemistry, set out in two contrasting New Zealand forest types. Litter from the mixed-species litter bags was separated into its comp...

  2. Fungi are involved in the effects of litter mixtures on consumption by shredders

    OpenAIRE

    Jabiol, Jérémy; Chauvet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    1. Decomposition of litter mixtures in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems often shows non- additive diversity effects on decomposition rate, generally interpreted in streams as a result of the feeding activity of macroinvertebrates. The extent to which fungal assemblages on mixed litter may influence consumption by macroinvertebrates remains unknown. 2. We assessed the effect of litter mixing on all possible three-species combinations drawn from four tree species (Alnus glutinosa, Betula...

  3. Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Leaf Decomposition of Single-Species and Litter Mixture in Pinus tabulaeformis Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The litter decomposition process is closely correlated with nutrient cycling and the maintenance of soil fertility in the forest ecosystem. In particular, the intense environmental concern about atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition requires a better understanding of its influence on the litter decomposition process. This study examines the responses of single-species litter and litter mixture decomposition processes to N addition in Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. ecosystems. Chinese pine litter, Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica Fisch. ex Ledeb. litter, and a pine–oak mixture were selected from a plantation and a natural forest of Chinese pine. Four N addition treatments, i.e., control (N0: 0 kg N ha−1·year−1, low-N (N1: 5 kg N ha−1·year−1, medium-N (N2: 10 kg N ha−1·year−1, and high-N (N3: 15 kg N ha−1·year−1, were applied starting May 2010. In the plantation, N addition significantly stimulated the decomposition of the Chinese pine litter. In the natural forest, N addition had variable effects on the decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture. A stimulatory effect of the high-N treatment on the Chinese pine litter decomposition could be attributed to a decrease in the substrate C:N ratio. However, an opposite effect was found for the Mongolian oak litter decomposition. The stimulating effect of N addition on the Chinese pine litter may offset the suppressive effect on the Mongolian oak litter, resulting in a neutral effect on the litter mixture. These results suggest that the different responses in decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture to N addition are mainly attributed to litter chemical composition. Further investigations are required to characterize the effect of long-term high-level N addition on the litter decomposition as N deposition is likely to increase rapidly in the region where this study was conducted.

  4. Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Leaf Decomposition of Single-Species and Litter Mixture in Pinus tabulaeformis Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Jinsong Wang; Wensheng Bu; Bo Zhao; Xiuhai Zhao; Chunyu Zhang; Juan Fan; Gadow, Klaus V.

    2015-01-01

    The litter decomposition process is closely correlated with nutrient cycling and the maintenance of soil fertility in the forest ecosystem. In particular, the intense environmental concern about atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition requires a better understanding of its influence on the litter decomposition process. This study examines the responses of single-species litter and litter mixture decomposition processes to N addition in Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) ecosystems. Chinese ...

  5. Assessing the Effect of Leaf Litter Diversity on the Decomposition and Associated Diversity of Fungal Assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Gao; Fengfeng Kang; Tianyu Li; Xiaoshuai Song; Weihong Zhao; Xiaowen Yu; Hairong Han

    2015-01-01

    Although the effect of litter mixture on decomposition has been well documented, few studies have examined the relationships between richness and relative abundance of leaf species in litter mixture and changes in universal fungal communities during the decomposition process in temperate forests. In this study, we used the litterbag method and included three leaf litter species, i.e., aspen (Populus davidiana Dode), birch (Betula platyphylla Sukaczev) and oak (Quercus mongolica Fischer ex Led...

  6. Factors Affecting the Cost Effectiveness of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Simoens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In an era of spiraling health care costs and limited resources, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the cost effectiveness of antibiotics. The aim of this study is to draw on published economic evaluations with a view to identify and illustrate the factors affecting the cost effectiveness of antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections. The findings indicate that the cost effectiveness of antibiotics is influenced by factors relating to the characteristics and the use of antibiotics (i.e., diagnosis, comparative costs and comparative effectiveness, resistance, patient compliance with treatment, and treatment failure and by external factors (i.e., funding source, clinical pharmacy interventions, and guideline implementation interventions. Physicians need to take into account these factors when prescribing an antibiotic and assess whether a specific antibiotic treatment adds sufficient value to justify its costs.

  7. Factors affecting radiolytic effects in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On basis of radiation chemical considerations supported by model system studies, several general predictions can be made regarding the influence of specific parameters on the chemical effects in irradiated foods. Among the parameters considered are: food composition, physical state of components, irradiation temperature, dose-rate, and total dose. Composition determines the type and extent of reactions initiated by both direct and indirect radiolytic interaction. The multiphasic character of foods influences cross reactions between components. State of hydration introduces both physical and chemical aspects into these considerations. Irradiating systems in which the water is frozen changes substantially the chemical effects because the diffusion of reactive entities is impeded. Temperature, especially in frozen systems, has a specific effect on the type and extent of reactions that could occur. Dose and dose-rate, insofar as they affect the pathways for reaction of intermediate species with the original or new components, also determine the type and amount of final radiolysis products. Illustrations of many of these features of the chemistry have been drawn from experiments on model systems of proteins, frozen aqueous solutions, and compounds derived from lipids, as well as from irradiated meats and poultry. These considerations and related experimental results explain the validity of using chemical data to obtain clearances and to extend clearances from approved food to other foods or to other irradiation conditions. (author)

  8. Effective affective communication in virtual environments

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Colin G.; Jones, Gareth J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of communication between entities in virtual environments have tended to focus on the relevant technical issues and its social impact impact. An important component of human communication is the conveying of affective information via voice, facial expression and gestures and other body language. Virtual environments may be populated by representations of human or virtual agent participants. Communications may be between person-person, agent-agent or person-agent. This paper explores t...

  9. Psychocultural Factors Affecting Intercultural Communication Effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HanYinyan

    2004-01-01

    In intercultural contexts, people do not always find it easy to put through the message they intend to convey to people of other cultures even when they speak the same language. There seems to be some non-linguistic obstacles standing in between them. Consequently, misinterpretation and misunderstanding occur and communication effectiveness can not be achieved.

  10. Plant density affects measures of biodiversity effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stachová, T.; Fibich, P.; Lepš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-11. ISSN 1752-9921 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/08/H044 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 138/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity effects * plant density * constant final yield Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.284, year: 2013 http://jpe.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/04/27/jpe.rts015.full.pdf+html

  11. Affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness for public speaking anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Craske, Michelle G; Lieberman, Matthew D; Hur, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Exposure is an effective treatment for anxiety but many patients do not respond fully. Affect labeling (labeling emotional experience) attenuates emotional responding. The current project examined whether affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness in participants with public speaking anxiety. Participants were randomized to exposure with or without affect labeling. Physiological arousal and self-reported fear were assessed before and after exposure and compared between groups. Consistent with hypotheses, participants assigned to Affect Labeling, especially those who used more labels during exposure, showed greater reduction in physiological activation than Control participants. No effect was found for self-report measures. Also, greater emotion regulation deficits at baseline predicted more benefit in physiological arousal from exposure combined with affect labeling than exposure alone. The current research provides evidence that behavioral strategies that target prefrontal-amygdala circuitry can improve treatment effectiveness for anxiety and these effects are particularly pronounced for patients with the greatest deficits in emotion regulation. PMID:25795524

  12. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  13. Factors Affecting the Effectiveness and Use of Moodle: Students' Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damnjanovic, Vesna; Jednak, Sandra; Mijatovic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to identify the factors affecting the effectiveness of Moodle from the students' perspective. The research hypotheses derived from the suggested extended Seddon model have been empirically validated using the responses to a survey on e-learning usage among 255 users. We tested the model across higher education…

  14. Online peer assessment: Effects of cognitive and affective feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, J.; Law, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the effects of online peer assessment, in the form of peer grading and peer feedback, on students' learning. One hundred and eighty one high school students engaged in peer assessment via an online system-iLap. The number of grade-giving and grade-receiving experiences was examined and the peer feedback was coded according to different cognitive and affective dimensions. The effects, on both assessors and assessees, were analyzed using multiple regression. The results indic...

  15. Factors Affecting the Disposition Effect in Tehran Stock Market

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Tehrani; Niloofar Gharehkoolchian

    2012-01-01

    Given the significance and perceived inevitability of disposition effect and its impact on investment decisions, we investigate factors affecting the disposition effect in the Tehran Stock Exchange. Four hypotheses were developed and the data used in the study were collected through availability sampling. One-sample t-test, two-sample t-test and one-way ANOVA were run to analyze the data while Pearson correlation test and multiple regressions were used to assess relationships among variables ...

  16. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W.; McGeary, John E.; Monti, Peter M.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2011-01-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marij...

  17. Recovery rate affects the effective epidemic threshold with synchronous updating

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Panpan; Tang, Ming; Zhao, Pengcheng; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of effective epidemic threshold is essential for understanding epidemic dynamics on complex networks. The existing studies on the effective epidemic threshold of the susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model generally assume that all infected nodes immediately recover after the infection process, which more or less does not conform to the realistic situation of disease. In this paper, we systematically study the effect of arbitrary recovery rate on the SIR spreading dynamics on complex networks. We derive the theoretical effective epidemic threshold and final outbreak size based on the edge-based compartmental theory. To validate the proposed theoretical predictions, extensive numerical experiments are implemented by using asynchronous and synchronous updating methods. When asynchronous updating method is used in simulations, recovery rate does not affect the final state of spreading dynamics. But with synchronous updating, we find that the effective epidemic threshold decreases with re...

  18. How positive affect modulates cognitive control: New insights into the specificity of positive affect effects

    OpenAIRE

    Fröber, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that positive affect modulates cognitive control by increasing cognitive flexibility. The present thesis is aimed to shed further light on this relationship between positive affect and cognitive control by investigating possible influences of arousal (Part I), dissociating between proactive and reactive control (Part II), and testing an increased novelty bias under positive affect (Part III). Arousal differences between positive affective states were manipulate...

  19. Effects of Water Jet on Heat-Affected Concretes

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, L. (Libor); Bodnárová, L.; Válek, J. (Jan); M. Zeleňák; Klich, J. (Jiří); Foldyna, J.; Novotný, M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper is dealing with the effects of flat high-speed water jet on concretes affected by high temperature. Research should help to correct use of water jet technology in repair works on concrete structures especially after wildfires in tunnels, underground garages, etc., which are exposed to enormous thermal stress. Four concrete mixtures were prepared for tests of interaction of water jet with concrete. The samples were exposed to 200 °C and 600 °C and for comparison one third of samples ...

  20. Affective and Cognitive Information Behavior: Interaction Effects in Internet Use

    OpenAIRE

    Nahl, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The presence and influence of affective variables in information behavior was studied. Affective load (AL), a compound variable consisting of uncertainty and technophobia measures, was found to be present in a variety of simple and complex information tasks integrated into upper-division, disciplinary coursework. Affective load was higher in those who reported low values of affective coping skills and who had either high or low cognitive assessment scores. Affective coping skills (ACS) consi...

  1. Conditions affecting the revelation effect for autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Daniel M; Godfrey, Ryan D; Davison, Arienne; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2004-04-01

    In four experiments involving 184 participants, people rated their confidence that particular events had happened in their childhood (e.g., "Broke a window playing ball"). If participants had to unscramble a key word in a phrase just before rating it (e.g., "Broke a nwidwo [window] playing ball"), confidence ratings increased-the revelation effect. However, the pattern of revelation effects depended on the particular way in which participants processed key words (e.g., visualizing vs. counting vowels in the word window) approximately 10 min prior to rating life events that contained those words. Prior exposure to key words never in itself directly affected confidence ratings. These results demonstrate that one can manipulate the revelation effect by altering the processing that participants perform on words prior to unscrambling them. These results also pose difficulties for many accounts of the revelation effect. The major puzzle posed by our present findings is that unscrambling key words increases confidence that an event has happened in childhood, whereas prior exposure to these words does not. PMID:15285128

  2. Analysis of factors affecting the effect of stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial test and industrial trial production of stope leaching were carried out at Taoshan orefield of Dabu deposit. The results of test and trial production showed obvious differences in leaching rate and leaching time. Compared with industrial trial production of stope leaching, the leaching rate of industrial test was higher, and leaching time was shorter. It was considered that the blasting method and liquid arrangement were the main factors affecting the leaching rate and leaching time according to analysis. So we put forward the following suggestions: the technique of deep hole slicing tight-face blasting was used to reduce the yield of lump ores, the effective liquid arrangement methods were adopted to make the lixiviant infiltrating throughout whole ore heap, and bacterial leaching was introduced. (authors)

  3. Group decision-making: Factors that affect group effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Osmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are operating in a dynamic and turbulent environment. In these conditions, they have to make decisions for new problems or situations. Most of decisions are therefore non-programmed and unstructured, accompanied by risk and uncertainty. Moreover, the problems and situations are complex. All organizations are oriented towards group decisionmaking processes, as useful tools to cope with uncertainty and complexity. Apart from the necessity, companies are turning towards participatory processes also to benefit from the important advantages that these processes offer. Organizations have realized the importance of group decision-making processes to contribute to the creation of sustainable competitive advantages. Main objective of this paper is to show that group decision-making processes do not offer guarantee for good decisions, because the effectiveness of group is affected by many factors. So, the first thing done in this paper is discussing about the benefits and limitations that accompany the use of groups with decision-making purpose. Afterwards, we stop on the different factors that influence the group’s ability to make good decisions. The aim is to emphasize that regardless of the many advantages of groups, some factors as group size, type of communication within the group, leadership style, the norms, the differentiation of roles and statuses, cohesion and compliance degree should be the main elements to keep into consideration because they affect the effectiveness of group. In this regard, is discussed how such factors influence the quality of decision and then we try to draw some conclusions that can improve and make better and easier group decision-making processes.

  4. Changing facial affect recognition in schizophrenia : Effects of training on brain dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Petia Popova; Popov, Tzvetan G.; Christian Wienbruch; Carolus, Almut M.; Miller, Gregory A.; Rockstroh, Brigitte S

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in social cognition including facial affect recognition and their detrimental effects on functional outcome are well established in schizophrenia. Structured training can have substantial effects on social cognitive measures including facial affect recognition. Elucidating training effects on cortical mechanisms involved in facial affect recognition may identify causes of dysfunctional facial affect recognition in schizophrenia and foster remediation strategies. In the present study,...

  5. Strategies for Developing Effective Teaching Skills in the Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other academic discipline, physical education holds the highest potential for teaching affective skills. By its very nature, the typical physical education setting offers countless teachable moments and opportunities to capitalize on the development of affective skills. The seeming lack of attention given to affective…

  6. STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF ACID ETCHING ON AFFECTED ENAMEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Stoleriu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to establish and compare the effects of ortophosphoric and hydrochloric acids on the enamel affected by incipient carious lesions with different evolution. Materials and method. 20 teeth with acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions were considered for the study. The teeth were sectioned in two halves through the middle of the non-cavitary lesions. The halves of 5 white spot-type lesions and of 5 brown spot-type ones were analyzed as to their surface roughness, on an atomic force microscope (AFM. 5 halves with white spot-type lesions and 5 halves with brown spot-type ones were subjected to acid etching with 37% ortophosphoric acid (Scotchbond etchant gel, 3M ESPE, and an equal number of samples was subjected to the action of 15% hydrochloric acid (ICON-etch, DMG Dental Products Ltd for 2 min, then washed with water and analyzed by AFM. Results. The initial surface roughness of the enamel was higher in the white spot–type carious lesions, comparatively with the brown spot-type ones. For both types of carious non-cavitary lesions, acid etching with phosphoric and hydrochloric acid significantly increased the surface roughness of the enamel, comparatively with the status of the enamel surface prior to etching. The hydrochloric acid led to a surface roughness significantly higher than in the case of ortophosphoric acid, in both acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions. The roughness values obtained through etching with ortophosphoric and hydrochloric acid were higher in the white spot-type carious lesions, comparatively with the brown spot-type ones. Conclusions. Both the 37% ortophosphoric acid and the 15% hydrochloric acid determined a significantly higher surface roughness of the enamel affected by acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions. The surface condition of the brown spot-type carious lesions was less significantly modified, comparatively with that of the white spot-type lesions, by the

  7. Motivation-One of the Affective Factors and its Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Fang-hua

    2014-01-01

    Affective factors play a positive role in English study and motivation is the most important. Higher motivation predicts better second language acquisition. The types of motivation are mainly divided into two:extrinsic motivation and intrinsic moti-vation. Teachers should study their students as well as the teaching materials and then select scientific methods and make good use of them to reinforce their students' motivation.

  8. Is accessing of words affected by affective valence only? A discrete emotion view on the emotional congruency effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuqian Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper advances the discussion on which emotion information affects word accessing. Emotion information, which is formed as a result of repeated experiences, is primary and necessary in learning and representing word meanings. Previous findings suggested that valence (i.e., positive or negative denoted by words can be automatically activated and plays a role in many significant cognitive processes. However, there has been a lack of discussion about whether discrete emotion information (i.e., happiness, anger, sadness, and fear is also involved in these processes. According to the hierarchy model, emotions are considered organized within an abstract-to-concrete hierarchy, in which emotion prototypes are organized following affective valence. By controlling different congruencies of emotion relations (i.e., matches or mismatches between valences and prototypes of emotion, the present study showed both an evaluative congruency effect (Experiment 1 and a discrete emotional congruency effect (Experiment 2. These findings indicate that not only affective valences but also discrete emotions can be activated under the present priming lexical decision task. However, the present findings also suggest that discrete emotions might be activated at the later priming stage as compared to valences. The present work provides evidence that information about discrete emotion could be involved in word processing. This might be a result of subjects’ embodied experiences.

  9. Is Accessing of Words Affected by Affective Valence Only? A Discrete Emotion View on the Emotional Congruency Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuqian; Liu, Bo; Lin, Shouwen

    2016-01-01

    This paper advances the discussion on which emotion information affects word accessing. Emotion information, which is formed as a result of repeated experiences, is primary and necessary in learning and representing word meanings. Previous findings suggested that valence (i.e., positive or negative) denoted by words can be automatically activated and plays a role in many significant cognitive processes. However, there has been a lack of discussion about whether discrete emotion information (i.e., happiness, anger, sadness, and fear) is also involved in these processes. According to the hierarchy model, emotions are considered organized within an abstract-to-concrete hierarchy, in which emotion prototypes are organized following affective valence. By controlling different congruencies of emotion relations (i.e., matches or mismatches between valences and prototypes of emotion), the present study showed both an evaluative congruency effect (Experiment 1) and a discrete emotional congruency effect (Experiment 2). These findings indicate that not only affective valences but also discrete emotions can be activated under the present priming lexical decision task. However, the present findings also suggest that discrete emotions might be activated at the later priming stage as compared to valences. The present work provides evidence that information about discrete emotion could be involved in word processing. This might be a result of subjects' embodied experiences. PMID:27379000

  10. The examination of factors affecting e-learning effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Rabeb Mbarek; Ferid Zaddem

    2013-01-01

    Technology information has increased dramatically in the last years and has contributed to the growth in technology delivered instruction as an important learning and education method. In this perspective, many academic researches considered the importance of e-learning effectiveness.Although the existing models of e-learning effectiveness has improved our understanding of how online training can support and enhance learning, most of published models do not take into account the importance of...

  11. Effects of Positive Affect on Risk Perceptions in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Claudia M.; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Affective influences may play a key role in adolescent risk taking, but have rarely been studied. Using an audiovisual method of affect induction, two experimental studies examined the effect of positive affect on risk perceptions in adolescence and young adulthood. Outcomes were risk perceptions regarding drinking alcohol, smoking a cigarette,…

  12. The examination of factors affecting e-learning effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeb Mbarek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technology information has increased dramatically in the last years and has contributed to the growth in technology delivered instruction as an important learning and education method. In this perspective, many academic researches considered the importance of e-learning effectiveness.Although the existing models of e-learning effectiveness has improved our understanding of how online training can support and enhance learning, most of published models do not take into account the importance of the relationship between social presence and interaction. Thus, this study develops preceding investigation by extending a model of e-learning effectiveness which adds social presence to other studied variables including computer self efficacy, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, interaction between trainer and trainees, and e-learning effectiveness. Moreover, the model includes the possible relationships between independent factors. In this case, the present research seek to identify the influence of computer self efficacy, ease of use, perceived usefulness, interaction, and social presence on e- learning effectiveness. Furthermore, this study considers the possible influences between individual characteristics, perceptual characteristics and environmental characteristics.Using data from 410 employees, the conceptual model was validated through a Tunisian context. Results indicate the importance of interaction, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and social presence on e-learning achievement. E-learning achievement, in turn, influences e-learning transfer.

  13. Factors Affecting University Teaching Team Effectiveness in Detached Working Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of a study of the factors that contribute to teaching team effectiveness in situations where team members rarely meet face to face. Academic faculty within a university Business School were asked to report the degrees to which they believed that the module teaching teams to which they belonged contained members who…

  14. Diffusion affected magnetic field effect in exciplex fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burshtein, Anatoly I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Ivanov, Anatoly I., E-mail: Anatoly.Ivanov@volsu.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue, 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-14

    The fluorescence of the exciplex, {sup 1}[D{sup +δ}A{sup −δ}], formed at contact of photoexcited acceptor {sup 1}A{sup *} with an electron donor {sup 1}D, is known to be very sensitive to an external magnetic field, reducing the spin conversion efficiency in the resulting geminate radical ion pair, {sup 1,3}[D{sup +}…A{sup −}]. The relative increase of the exciplex fluorescence in the highest magnetic field compared to the lowest one, known as the magnetic field effect, crucially depends on the viscosity of the solvent. This phenomenon first studied experimentally is at first reproduced here theoretically. The magnetic field effect is shown to vanish in both limits of high and low solvent diffusivity reaching a maximum in between. It is also very sensitive to the solvent dielectric constant and to the exciplex and radical-ion pair conversion rates.

  15. The redundant target effect is affected by modality switch costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Lange, K.; Rösler, F.;

    2004-01-01

    When participants have to respond to stimuli of two modalities, faster reaction times are observed for simultaneous, bimodal events than for unimodal events (the redundant target effect [RTE]). This finding has been interpreted as reflecting processing gains for bimodal relative to unimodal stimu...... for the MSE, supporting the hypothesis that coactivation occurs independently of modality switch costs......., possibly due to multisensory interactions. In random stimulus sequences, reaction times are slower when the stimulus is preceded by a stimulus of a different modality (modality switch effect [MSE]). Simple reaction time redundant target experiments with auditory-visual, visual-tactile, and auditory......-tactile stimulus combinations were run to determine whether the RTE may be partly explained by MSEs because bimodal stimuli do not require a modality switch. In all three modality pairings, significant MSEs and RTEs were observed. However, the RTE was still significant after reaction times were corrected...

  16. Effects of Orientation on Recognition of Facial Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. M.; Mealey, J. B.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The ability to discriminate facial features is often degraded when the orientation of the face and/or the observer is altered. Previous studies have shown that gross distortions of facial features can go unrecognized when the image of the face is inverted, as exemplified by the 'Margaret Thatcher' effect. This study examines how quickly erect and supine observers can distinguish between smiling and frowning faces that are presented at various orientations. The effects of orientation are of particular interest in space, where astronauts frequently view one another in orientations other than the upright. Sixteen observers viewed individual facial images of six people on a computer screen; on a given trial, the image was either smiling or frowning. Each image was viewed when it was erect and when it was rotated (rolled) by 45 degrees, 90 degrees, 135 degrees, 180 degrees, 225 degrees and 270 degrees about the line of sight. The observers were required to respond as rapidly and accurately as possible to identify if the face presented was smiling or frowning. Measures of reaction time were obtained when the observers were both upright and supine. Analyses of variance revealed that mean reaction time, which increased with stimulus rotation (F=18.54, df 7/15, p (is less than) 0.001), was 22% longer when the faces were inverted than when they were erect, but that the orientation of the observer had no significant effect on reaction time (F=1.07, df 1/15, p (is greater than) .30). These data strongly suggest that the orientation of the image of a face on the observer's retina, but not its orientation with respect to gravity, is important in identifying the expression on the face.

  17. Word Meaning Frequencies Affect Negative Compatibility Effects In Masked Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Andreas; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Negative compatibility effects (NCEs)-that is, slower responses to targets in related than unrelated prime-target pairs, have been observed in studies using stimulus-response (S-R) priming with stimuli like arrows and plus signs. Although there is no consensus on the underlying mechanism, explanations tend to locate NCEs within the motor-response system. A characteristic property of perceptuo-motor NCEs is a biphasic pattern of activation: A brief period in which very briefly presented (typically) masked primes facilitate processing of related targets is followed by a phase of target processing impairment. In this paper, we present data that suggest that NCEs are not restricted to S-R priming with low-level visual stimuli: The brief (50 ms), backward masked (250 ms) presentation of ambiguous words (bank) leads to slower responses than baseline to words related to the more frequent (rob) but not less frequent meaning (swim). Importantly, we found that slowed responses are preceded by a short phase of response facilitation, replicating the biphasic pattern reported for arrows and plus signs. The biphasic pattern of priming and the fact that the NCEs were found only for target words that are related to their prime word's more frequent meaning has strong implications for any theory of NCEs that locate these effects exclusively within the motor-response system. PMID:27152129

  18. Neurogenic effects of fingolimod in hippocampus, affecting fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschalis Efstathopoulos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod (FTY720; Gilenya™,Novartis Pharma AG is a recently developed Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P analogue, orally administered as a new therapeutic agent in Multiple Sclerosis (MS (Brinkmann V. et al. 2010. S1P receptors (S1PRs are expressed in various sites in the CNS including the subventricular zone (Waeber C. et al. 1999; Choi J.W. et al. 2013 while endogenous S1P was shown to induce proliferation and morphological changes in embryonic hippocampal neural progenitors in culture (Harada J. et al. 2004. In this study we investigated the effects of fingolimod on adult rodent hippocampal neurogenesis and their possible functional role. To this aim, thymidine analogue BrdU was injected at the end or before a 2-week i.p. administration of a therapeutic dose of Fingolimod (0,3 mg/kg in young and old mice. Stereological counts of BrdU+ cells revealed significant increase in both proliferation, and survival of neural stem cells (NSC in the area of Dentate Gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, compared to control untreated animals of young but not old ages. In the case of survival assessment, most of the BrdU + cells were also positive for NeuN, suggesting an increase of newly formed neurons. The increase in proliferation rate of NSC was also confirmed by BrdU uptake in hippocampal NSC cultures in vitro, implying that the effects of fingolimod are cell autonomous. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that S1PR was not co-localized with GFAP+ cells in the Subgranular zone (SGZ of the DG, but was strongly co-localized with transcription factor MASH1 and weakly with DcX or PSA-NCAM positive neural progenitors. These findings suggest that expression of S1PR1 in the SGZ is restricted to transit amplifying neural progenitors and maintained also in the stage of neuroblast. In addition, the effects of Fingolimod in DG neurogenesis were positively correlated to enhanced fear memory and increased context discrimination, an established DG-dependent cognitive task

  19. Affective Overload: The Effect of Emotive Visual Stimuli on Target Vocabulary Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Yakup; Griffiths, Carol; Özel, Zeynep Ebrar Yetkiner; Kinay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in cognitive load in recent years, but the effect of affective load and its relationship to mental functioning has not received as much attention. In order to investigate the effects of affective stimuli on cognitive function as manifest in the ability to remember foreign language vocabulary, two groups of…

  20. Identifying aid effectiveness challenges in fragile and conflict-affected states

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Fragile and conflict-affected states face daunting challenges for development. Aid has a greater importance on development in these states than in others, and therefore aid effectiveness management and delivery of aid bears serious consideration. Despite its significance, aid effectiveness is appreciably lower in fragile and conflict-affected states than in others. What are the key aid ...

  1. Topsoil Depth Effects on Crop Yields as Affected by Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott; Cruse, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Topsoil (A-horizon) depth is positively correlated with crop productivity; crop roots and available nutrients are concentrated in this layer; topsoil is critical for nutrient retention and water holding capacity. Its loss or reduction can be considered an irreversible impact of soil erosion. Climatic factors such as precipitation and temperature extremes that impose production stress further complicate the relationship between soil erosion and crop productivity. The primary research objective was to determine the effects of soil erosion on corn and soybean yields of loess and till-derived soils in the rain-fed farming region of Iowa. Data collection took place from 2007 to 2012 at seven farm sites located in different major soil regions. Collection consisted of 40 to 50 randomly selected georeferenced soil probe locations across varying erosion classes in well drained landscape positions. Soil probes were done to a minimum depth of 100 cm and soil organic carbon samples were obtained in the top 10 cm. Crop yields were determined utilizing georeferenced harvest maps from yield monitoring devices and cross referenced with georeferenced field data points. Data analysis targeted relationships between crop yields versus soil organic carbon contents (SOC) and crop yields versus topsoil depths (TSD). The variation of yield and growing season rainfall across multiple years were also evaluated to provide an indication of soil resiliency associated with topsoil depth and soil organic carbon levels across varying climatic conditions. Results varied between sites but generally indicated a greater yield potential at thicker TSD's and higher SOC concentrations; an annual variation in yield response as a function of precipitation amount during the growing season; largest yield responses to both TSD and SOC occurred in the driest study year (2012); and little to no significant yield responses to TSD occurred during the wettest study year (2010). These results were not

  2. Consumer Choice of Hotel Experiences: The Effects of Cognitive, Affective, and Sensory Attributes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dohee

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the choice behavior of customers is crucial for effective service management and marketing in the hospitality industry. The first purpose of this dissertation is to examine the differential effects that cognitive, affective, and sensory attributes have on consumer hotel choice. The second purpose is to examine the moderating effects of consumer choice context on the relationship between the cognitive, affective, and sensory attributes and hotel choice. To achieve these two ...

  3. Anxiety, Affect, Self-Esteem, and Stress: Mediation and Moderation Effects on Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nima, Ali Al; Rosenberg, Patricia; Archer, Trevor; Garcia, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background Mediation analysis investigates whether a variable (i.e., mediator) changes in regard to an independent variable, in turn, affecting a dependent variable. Moderation analysis, on the other hand, investigates whether the statistical interaction between independent variables predict a dependent variable. Although this difference between these two types of analysis is explicit in current literature, there is still confusion with regard to the mediating and moderating effects of different variables on depression. The purpose of this study was to assess the mediating and moderating effects of anxiety, stress, positive affect, and negative affect on depression. Methods Two hundred and two university students (males  = 93, females  = 113) completed questionnaires assessing anxiety, stress, self-esteem, positive and negative affect, and depression. Mediation and moderation analyses were conducted using techniques based on standard multiple regression and hierarchical regression analyses. Main Findings The results indicated that (i) anxiety partially mediated the effects of both stress and self-esteem upon depression, (ii) that stress partially mediated the effects of anxiety and positive affect upon depression, (iii) that stress completely mediated the effects of self-esteem on depression, and (iv) that there was a significant interaction between stress and negative affect, and between positive affect and negative affect upon depression. Conclusion The study highlights different research questions that can be investigated depending on whether researchers decide to use the same variables as mediators and/or moderators. PMID:24039896

  4. Anxiety, affect, self-esteem, and stress: mediation and moderation effects on depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Nima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mediation analysis investigates whether a variable (i.e., mediator changes in regard to an independent variable, in turn, affecting a dependent variable. Moderation analysis, on the other hand, investigates whether the statistical interaction between independent variables predict a dependent variable. Although this difference between these two types of analysis is explicit in current literature, there is still confusion with regard to the mediating and moderating effects of different variables on depression. The purpose of this study was to assess the mediating and moderating effects of anxiety, stress, positive affect, and negative affect on depression. METHODS: Two hundred and two university students (males  = 93, females  = 113 completed questionnaires assessing anxiety, stress, self-esteem, positive and negative affect, and depression. Mediation and moderation analyses were conducted using techniques based on standard multiple regression and hierarchical regression analyses. MAIN FINDINGS: The results indicated that (i anxiety partially mediated the effects of both stress and self-esteem upon depression, (ii that stress partially mediated the effects of anxiety and positive affect upon depression, (iii that stress completely mediated the effects of self-esteem on depression, and (iv that there was a significant interaction between stress and negative affect, and between positive affect and negative affect upon depression. CONCLUSION: The study highlights different research questions that can be investigated depending on whether researchers decide to use the same variables as mediators and/or moderators.

  5. Age affects the adjustment of cognitive control after a conflict: evidence from the bivalency effect

    OpenAIRE

    Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Meier, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Age affects cognitive control. When facing a conflict, older adults are less able to activate goal-relevant information and inhibit irrelevant information. However, cognitive control also affects the events after a conflict. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age affects the adjustment of cognitive control following a conflict. To this end, we investigated the bivalency effect, that is, the performance slowing occurring after the conflict induced by bivalent stimuli (i.e., sti...

  6. Changing facial affect recognition in schizophrenia: Effects of training on brain dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petia Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in social cognition including facial affect recognition and their detrimental effects on functional outcome are well established in schizophrenia. Structured training can have substantial effects on social cognitive measures including facial affect recognition. Elucidating training effects on cortical mechanisms involved in facial affect recognition may identify causes of dysfunctional facial affect recognition in schizophrenia and foster remediation strategies. In the present study, 57 schizophrenia patients were randomly assigned to (a computer-based facial affect training that focused on affect discrimination and working memory in 20 daily 1-hour sessions, (b similarly intense, targeted cognitive training on auditory-verbal discrimination and working memory, or (c treatment as usual. Neuromagnetic activity was measured before and after training during a dynamic facial affect recognition task (5 s videos showing human faces gradually changing from neutral to fear or to happy expressions. Effects on 10–13 Hz (alpha power during the transition from neutral to emotional expressions were assessed via MEG based on previous findings that alpha power increase is related to facial affect recognition and is smaller in schizophrenia than in healthy subjects. Targeted affect training improved overt performance on the training tasks. Moreover, alpha power increase during the dynamic facial affect recognition task was larger after affect training than after treatment-as-usual, though similar to that after targeted perceptual–cognitive training, indicating somewhat nonspecific benefits. Alpha power modulation was unrelated to general neuropsychological test performance, which improved in all groups. Results suggest that specific neural processes supporting facial affect recognition, evident in oscillatory phenomena, are modifiable. This should be considered when developing remediation strategies targeting social cognition in schizophrenia.

  7. Happiness and Time Preference: The Effect of Positive Affect in a Random-Assignment Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    John Ifcher; Homa Zarghamee

    2011-01-01

    We conduct a random-assignment experiment to investigate whether positive affect impacts time preference, where time preference denotes a preference for present over future utility. Our result indicates that, compared to neutral affect, mild positive affect significantly reduces time preference over money. This result is robust to various specification checks, and alternative interpretations of the result are considered. Our result has implications for the effect of happiness on time preferen...

  8. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  9. Hostility and Facial Affect Recognition: Effects of a Cold Pressor Stressor on Accuracy and Cardiovascular Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herridge, Matt L.; Harrison, David W.; Mollet, Gina A.; Shenal, Brian V.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of hostility and a cold pressor stressor on the accuracy of facial affect perception were examined in the present experiment. A mechanism whereby physiological arousal level is mediated by systems which also mediate accuracy of an individual's interpretation of affective cues is described. Right-handed participants were classified as…

  10. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice. PMID:23469474

  11. Affective Organizational Commitment and Citizenship Behavior: Linear and Non-linear Moderating Effects of Organizational Tenure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing a meta-analytical approach for testing moderating effects, the current study investigated organizational tenure as a moderator in the relation between affective organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). We observed that, across 40 studies (N = 11,416 respondents), the effect size for the relation between…

  12. Interactive effects of trait and state affect on top-down control of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Juyoen; Miller, Gregory A; McDavitt, Jenika R B; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Crocker, Laura D; Infantolino, Zachary P; Towers, David N; Warren, Stacie L; Heller, Wendy

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have investigated how attentional control is affected by transient affective states while taking individual differences in affective traits into consideration. In this study, participants completed a color-word Stroop task immediately after undergoing a positive, neutral or negative affective context manipulation (ACM). Behavioral performance was unaffected by any ACM considered in isolation. For individuals high in trait negative affect (NA), performance was impaired by the negative but not the positive or neutral ACM. Neuroimaging results indicate that activity in primarily top-down control regions of the brain (inferior frontal gyrus and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) was suppressed in the presence of emotional arousal (both negative and positive ACMs). This effect appears to have been exacerbated or offset by co-occurring activity in other top-down control regions (parietal) and emotion processing regions (orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and nucleus accumbens) as a function of the valence of state affect (positive or negative) and trait affect (trait NA or trait PA). Neuroimaging results are consistent with behavioral findings. In combination, they indicate both additive and interactive influences of trait and state affect on top-down control of attention. PMID:25556211

  13. Effects of sertraline, duloxetine, vortioxetine, and idazoxan in the rat affective bias test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Louise Konradsen; Haubro, Kia; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Affective biases seemingly play a crucial role for the onset and development of depression. Acute treatment with monoamine-based antidepressants positively influence emotional processing, and an early correction of biases likely results in repeated positive experiences that ultimately...... lead to improved mood. Objectives Using two conventional antidepressants, sertraline and duloxetine, we aimed to forward the characterization of a newly developed affective bias test (ABT) for rats. Further, we examined the effect of vortioxetine, a recently approved antidepressant, and the α2...... adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan on affective biases....

  14. Effect of Enhanced Zinc Nutrition on Mitigation of Huanglongbing (HLB)-affected Citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, S L; Li, Z. G.; He, Z. L.

    2014-01-01

    The growth decline of huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus trees is considered to be associated with nutritional disorder, as typical symptoms of HLB such as stunted tree growth, chlorosis or blotchy mottle of leaves, resembles zinc (Zn), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) deficiencies, while lower Zn concentration has been consistently reported in the HLB affected compared to healthy plants. Hydroponic culture studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of enhanced Zn nutrition on the mitigation...

  15. Effects of music and music-video on affect during exercise at the lactate threshold

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, JM; Hall, J; Arnold, R.; Karageorghis, CI; Hussein, A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of music and music-video on core affect during and immediately after stationary cycling at the lactate threshold. A randomized, fully counterbalanced, crossover design with three conditions (music, music-video, and a no-music-video control) was adopted. Twenty-four participants exercised at lactate threshold while exposed to music, music-video, and control conditions. Affective valence and perceived activation were assessed every 2...

  16. Effects of prosocial, neutral, and violent video games on college students' affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Muniba; Anderson, Craig A; Gentile, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Recent research reveals that playing prosocial video games increases prosocial cognitions and helpful behaviors [Gentile el al., 2009; Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2009; 2010; 2011]. These results are consistent with social-cognitive models of social behavior [e.g., the "General Learning Model," Buckley and Anderson, 2006]. The social-cognitive learning models suggest that in addition to influencing cognitions, media content may also influence affect. However, past studies on prosocial video games have failed to find a significant effect on affective measures [Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2010]. The present research examined the effects of prosocial, neutral, and violent video games on state hostility and positive affect. Also examined were moderating effects of trait aggressiveness, trait altruistic helping, and trait egoistic helping. Prosocial games reduced state hostility and increased positive state affect. Violent video games had the opposite effects. These effects were moderated by trait physical aggression. Altruistic participants reported relatively more positive affect and less state hostility. Egoistic participants reported relatively more aggravated and mean feelings. PMID:22549724

  17. The effect of negative mood intensity on autobiographical recall: Evidence for the underlying role of affect in mood congruence effect

    OpenAIRE

    Drače, Saša; Efendić, Emir; Marić, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we test the hypothesis that affective state underlies the effect of mood congruence in autobiographical recall. Forty-five participants were subjected to negative and neutral mood inductions, and then asked to recall one personal memory. We also introduced another negative mood condition in which participants were exposed to the same mood inducing material (i.e., pictures), but were supposed to feel a less intense affective state. We replicated the congruence effect be...

  18. The Unique Effects of Parental Alcohol and Affective Disorders, Parenting, and Parental Negative Affect on Adolescent Maladjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Moira; Chassin, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Using a high-risk community sample, multiple regression analyses were conducted separately for mothers (n = 416) and fathers (n = 346) to test the unique, prospective influence of parental negative affect on adolescent maladjustment (internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, and negative emotionality) 2 years later over and above parental…

  19. Effects of a Brief Meditation Training on Negative Affect, Trait Anxiety and Concentrated Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baptista Menezes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMeditation has been associated with positive psychological outcomes, but few studies have investigated brief interventions. This randomized controlled pilot study assessed the effects of five days of focused meditation on positive and negative affect, state and trait anxiety, as well as concentrated attention in a nonclinical sample distributed in two groups (experimental = 14, 51.8% female, Mage= 23.9; control = 19, 62% female, Mage= 24.9. The instruments used were the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Concentrated Attention Test. The meditation group reduced negative affect and trait anxiety, and also improved correct responses on the attention test, relative to controls. These preliminary findings indicate that even short focused meditation training may help improve some psychological variables. It is discussed that the early manifestation of these benefits may be especially relevant to strengthen the motivation to continue and practice regularly.

  20. Rhythm is it: Effects of Dynamic Body Feedback on Affect, Attitudes and Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SabineCKoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates effects of dynamic body feedback on affect, attitudes, and cognition, focusing on the impact of movement rhythms with smooth vs. sharp reversals as one basic category of movement qualities. It investigates how those qualities relate to already explored effects of approach vs. avoidance motor behavior as one basic category of movement shaping. Studies 1 and 2 tested the effects of one of two basic movement qualities (smooth vs. sharp rhythms on affect and cognition. The third study tested those movement qualities in combination with movement shaping (approach vs. avoidance motor behavior and the effects of those combinations on attitudes toward initially valence-free stimuli and affect. Results suggest that movement rhythms influence affect (studies 1 and 2, and attitudes (study 3, and moderate the impact of approach and avoidance motor behavior on attitudes (study 3. Extending static body feedback research with a dynamic account, findings indicate that movement rhythms can moderate and go beyond effects of approach and avoidance motor behavior.

  1. The relationship between servant leadership, affective team commitment and team effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bright Mahembe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Value-based leadership practices play a critical role in teamwork in high-performance organisations.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to empirically validate a theoretical model explicating the structural relationships between servant leadership, affective team commitment and team effectiveness.Motivation for the study: The increased eliance on teams for production calls for an analysis of the role of follower-focused leadership practices in enhancing eam effectiveness.Research design, approach and method: A non-probabilityand multicultural sample consisting of 202 primary and secondary school teachers was drawn from 32 chools in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.Main findings: High levels of reliability were found and uni-dimensionality of the subscales was demonstrated through exploratory factor analyses. Good fit with the data was found for the measurement models through confirmatory factor analyses. Structural equation modelling showed a reasonable fit for the structural model. Positive relationships were found amongst servant leadership, team effectiveness and affective team commitment. Standard multiple regression analysis showed that affective team commitment moderated the relationship between servant leadership and team effectiveness.Practical/managerial implications: The findings emphasise the central role played by servant leadership and affective team commitment in team performance. Servant leadership fosters team effectiveness if employees feel committed to their work team.Contribution/value-add: The servant leadership style alone may not be a sufficient condition for team effectiveness; other variables, such as affective team commitment, also play a role. The study suggested specific variables that may also combine with leadership to positively influence team effectiveness.

  2. The relationship between servant leadership, affective team commitment and team effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bright Mahembe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Value-based leadership practices play a critical role in teamwork in high-performance organisations. Research purpose: The aim of the study was to empirically validate a theoretical model explicating the structural relationships between servant leadership, affective team commitment and team effectiveness. Motivation for the study: The increased eliance on teams for production calls for an analysis of the role of follower-focused leadership practices in enhancing eam effectiveness.Research design, approach and method: A non-probabilityand multicultural sample consisting of 202 primary and secondary school teachers was drawn from 32 chools in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.Main findings: High levels of reliability were found and uni-dimensionality of the subscales was demonstrated through exploratory factor analyses. Good fit with the data was found for the measurement models through confirmatory factor analyses. Structural equation modelling showed a reasonable fit for the structural model. Positive relationships were found amongst servant leadership, team effectiveness and affective team commitment. Standard multiple regression analysis showed that affective team commitment moderated the relationship between servant leadership and team effectiveness.Practical/managerial implications: The findings emphasise the central role played by servant leadership and affective team commitment in team performance. Servant leadership fosters team effectiveness if employees feel committed to their work team.Contribution/value-add: The servant leadership style alone may not be a sufficient condition for team effectiveness; other variables, such as affective team commitment, also play a role. The study suggested specific variables that may also combine with leadership to positively influence team effectiveness

  3. The Effects of Worry and Rumination on Affect States and Cognitive Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Borkovec, Thomas D.; Sibrava, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of worry and rumination on affective states and mentation type were examined in an unselected undergraduate sample in Study 1 and in a sample of individuals with high trait worry and rumination, high rumination, and low worry/rumination in Study 2. Participants engaged in worry and rumination inductions, counterbalanced in order across…

  4. Investigating the Effects of Sweat Therapy on Group Dynamics and Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Eason, Evan A.; Winterowd, Carrie L.; Jacobs, Sue C.; Cashel, Chris

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of sweat therapy on group dynamics and affect. Sweat therapy is the combination of intense heat exposure with psychotherapy or counseling (Colmant & Merta, 1999; 2000). Twenty-four undergraduates were separated by sex and randomly assigned to eight sessions of either a sweat or non-sweat group counseling…

  5. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  6. The job crafting intervention: effects on job resources, self-efficacy, and affective well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van den Heuvel; E. Demerouti; M.C.W. Peeters

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental field study examines the effects of an intervention designed to boost job resources, affective well-being, and self-efficacy via job crafting behaviour. Employees (n = 39) in a Dutch police district received a 1-day training, after which they worked towards self-set crafting

  7. The job crafting intervention : Effects on job resources, self-efficacy, and affective well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Machteld; Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental field study examines the effects of an intervention designed to boost job resources, affective well-being, and self-efficacy via job crafting behaviour. Employees (n = 39) in a Dutch police district received a 1-day training, after which they worked towards self-set crafting

  8. The effect of handling and training on measures of affective state of farmed mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Pernille Maj

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine if handling and training female mink on a learning task, as preparation for a cognitive bias test, had an effect on measures of their affective state. Adult female farm mink were used based on measures of approach/avoidance behaviour, and categorised as explorat...

  9. The Effect of Differentiation Approach Developed on Creativity of Gifted Students: Cognitive and Affective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Esra; Özdemir, Ahmet S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a differentiation approach for the mathematics education of gifted middle school students and to determine the effect of the differentiation approach on creative thinking skills of gifted students based on both cognitive and affective factors. In this context, the answer to the following question was searched:…

  10. The relationship between servant leadership, affective team commitment and team effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bright Mahembe; Amos S. Engelbrecht

    2013-01-01

    Orientation: Value-based leadership practices play a critical role in teamwork in high-performance organisations. Research purpose: The aim of the study was to empirically validate a theoretical model explicating the structural relationships between servant leadership, affective team commitment and team effectiveness. Motivation for the study: The increased eliance on teams for production calls for an analysis of the role of follower-focused leadership practices in enhancing eam effectiveness...

  11. The effect of affect in advertising: can product preference be conditioned by background music?

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    The present experiment provides a recent replication of Gorn’ (1982) affective conditioning study, investigating the role of music-induced mood in advertising and its subsequent effect on product choice. As an extension to Gorn’s original procedure, the experiment has addressed certain procedural concerns and expanded the scope of the study to investigate the effect of ‘mere exposure’. This was achieved by incorporating an additional background colour variable into the procedur...

  12. Designing Effective Persuasive Systems Utilizing the Power of Entanglement: Communication Channel, Strategy and Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Chatterjee, Samir

    With rapid advances in information and communication technology, computer-mediated communication (CMC) technologies are utilizing multiple IT platforms such as email, websites, cell-phones/PDAs, social networking sites, and gaming environments. However, no studies have compared the effectiveness of a persuasive system using such alternative channels and various persuasive techniques. Moreover, how affective computing impacts the effectiveness of persuasive systems is not clear. This study proposes (1) persuasive technology channels in combination with persuasive strategies will have different persuasive effectiveness; (2) Adding positive emotion to a message that leads to a better overall user experience could increase persuasive effectiveness. The affective computing or emotion information was added to the experiment using emoticons. The initial results of a pilot study show that computer-mediated communication channels along with various persuasive strategies can affect the persuasive effectiveness to varying degrees. These results also shows that adding a positive emoticon to a message leads to a better user experience which increases the overall persuasive effectiveness of a system.

  13. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed. PMID:23067337

  14. Using multiple risk factors to assess the behavioral, cognitive, and affective effects of learned helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, K J

    1994-03-01

    Rather than examining the effect of the pessimistic explanatory style on an outcome variable reflecting a single domain, I studied the effects of multiple learned-helplessness risk factors on behavioral, cognitive, and affective variables. Undergraduate students completed the Learned Helplessness Scale (Quinless & McDermott-Nelson, 1988) as a measure of their expectation of uncontrollability and the Explanatory Style Questionnaire (Peterson et al., 1982) to determine their explanations for both positive and negative events. Results revealed a significant effect for risk level, with students at greater risk of helplessness reporting significantly more procrastination, lower grade point averages, and more dysphoria. These results support the use of multiple risk factors representing all learned-helplessness precursors and the assessment of learned-helplessness deficits drawn simultaneously from behavioral, cognitive, and affective domains. PMID:8189396

  15. The Interactive Effects of Affect Lability, Negative Urgency, and Sensation Seeking on Young Adult Problematic Drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Karyadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies have suggested that affect lability might reduce the risk for problematic drinking among sensation seekers by compensating for their deficiencies in emotional reactivity and among individuals high on negative urgency by disrupting stable negative emotions. Due to the high prevalence of college drinking, this study examined whether affect lability interacted with sensation seeking and negative urgency to influence college student problematic drinking. 414 college drinkers (mean age: 20, 77% female, and 74% Caucasian from a US Midwestern University completed self-administered questionnaires online. Consistent with our hypotheses, our results indicated that the effects of sensation seeking and negative urgency on problematic drinking weakened at higher levels of affect lability. These findings emphasize the importance of considering specific emotional contexts in understanding how negative urgency and sensation seeking create risk for problematic drinking among college students. These findings might also help us better understand how to reduce problematic drinking among sensation seekers and individuals high on negative urgency.

  16. The effects of mastery learning correctives on academic achievement and student affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeese, Sean Vincent

    This study was conducted to examine the differences in high school biology achievement and student affect towards teacher and content from the use of individualized correctives as part of mastery learning. An experimental pretest-posttest with control group design was used during the fall 2011 semester. Over a thirteen-week period, 99 students in five general-level biology classes received mastery learning instruction covering several state standards. Of the 99 students, 50 received individualized correctives based on the results of formative assessment. The other 49 students received a non-individualized study guide after the formative assessment. A written summative examination was used to measure achievement. The Instructional Affect Assessment Instrument (IAAI) was used to measure student affect. The written summative evaluation and the IAAI were administered as a pretest to assure the independence of the covariate and treatment effect. Data were analyzed with a multivariate repeated measures test and ANCOVAs. No differences were found between the individualized corrective group and the general study guide group in terms of achievement or student affect toward content or teacher. Results indicate that individualized correctives were not the key factor in mastery learning for this population and type of science content. Further study on the impact of individualized correctives in different subject areas and populations is recommended as well as additional research on the effect of repeated testing.

  17. Can words heal? Using affect labeling to reduce the effects of unpleasant cues on symptom reporting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OmerVan den Bergh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Processing unpleasant affective cues induces elevated momentary symptom reports, especially in persons with high levels of symptom reporting in daily life. The present study aimed to examine whether applying an emotion regulation strategy, i.e. affect labeling, can inhibit these emotion influences on symptom reporting. Student participants (N=61 with varying levels of habitual symptom reporting completed six picture viewing trials of homogeneous valence (3 pleasant, 3 unpleasant under 3 conditions: merely viewing, emotional labeling or content (non-emotional labeling. Affect ratings and symptom reports were collected after each trial. Participants completed a motor inhibition task and self-control questionnaires as indices of their inhibitory capacities. Heart rate variability was also measured. Labeling, either emotional or non-emotional, significantly reduced experienced affect, as well as the elevated symptoms reports observed after unpleasant picture viewing. These labeling effects became more pronounced with increasing levels of habitual symptom reporting, suggesting a moderating role of the latter variable, but did not correlate with any index of general inhibitory capacity. Our findings suggest that using an emotion regulation strategy, such as labeling emotional stimuli, can reverse the effects of unpleasant stimuli on symptom reporting and that such strategies can be especially beneficial for individuals suffering from medically unexplained physical symptoms.

  18. Effect of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone in submerged arc welding process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Om; Sunil Pandey

    2013-12-01

    Submerged arc welding (SAW) is a fusion joining process, known for its high deposition capabilities. This process is useful in joining thick section components used in various industries. Besides joining, SAW can also be used for surfacing applications. Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) produced within the base metal as a result of tremendous heat of arc is of big concern as it affects the performance of welded/surfaced structure in service due to metallurgical changes in the affected region. This work was carried out to investigate the effect of polarity and other SAW parameters on HAZ size and dilution and to establish their correlations. Influence of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone was then carried out. Four levels of heat input were used to study their effect on % dilution and HAZ area at both the electrode positive and electrode negative polarities. Proper management of heat input in welding is important, because power sources can be used more efficiently if one knows how the same heat input can be applied to get the better results. Empirical models have been developed using statistical technique.

  19. Effects of personal relevance and simulated darkness on the affective appraisal of a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; Houtkamp, Joske M; Vreugdenhil, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether personal relevance influences the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment (VE) in simulated darkness. In the real world, darkness often evokes thoughts of vulnerability, threat, and danger, and may automatically precipitate emotional responses consonant with those thoughts (fear of darkness). This influences the affective appraisal of a given environment after dark and the way humans behave in that environment in conditions of low lighting. Desktop VEs are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and (architectural or lighting) interventions on human behaviour and feelings of safety. Their (ecological) validity for these purposes depends critically on their ability to correctly address the user's cognitive and affective experience. Previous studies with desktop (i.e., non-immersive) VEs found that simulated darkness only slightly affects the user's behavioral and emotional responses to the represented environment, in contrast to the responses observed for immersive VEs. We hypothesize that the desktop VE scenarios used in previous studies less effectively induced emotional and behavioral responses because they lacked personal relevance. In addition, factors like signs of social presence and relatively high levels of ambient lighting may also have limited these responses. In this study, young female volunteers explored either a daytime or a night-time (low ambient light level) version of a desktop VE representing a deserted (no social presence) prototypical Dutch polder landscape. To enhance the personal relevance of the simulation, a fraction of the participants were led to believe that the virtual exploration tour would prepare them for a follow-up tour through the real world counterpart of the VE. The affective appraisal of the VE and the emotional response of the participants were measured through self-report. The results show that the VE was appraised as slightly less pleasant and more

  20. Nortriptyline mediates behavioral effects without affecting hippocampal cytogenesis in a genetic rat depression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersén, Asa; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gruber, Susanne H M;

    2009-01-01

    A prevailing hypothesis is that neurogenesis is reduced in depression and that the common mechanism for antidepressant treatments is to increase it in adult hippocampus. Reduced neurogenesis has been shown in healthy rats exposed to stress, but it has not yet been demonstrated in depressed patients....... Emerging studies now indicate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can, exert behavioral effects without affecting neurogenesis in mice. Here we extend our previous findings demonstrating that the number of BrdU positive cells in hippocampus was significantly higher in a rat model of depression......, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the control strain the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). We also show that chronic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline exerts behavioral effects in the Porsolt forced swim test without affecting hippocampal cell proliferation in the FSL...

  1. Affective and Cognitive Characteristics of Nigerian Student-Teachers : towards Developing an Effective Teacher Education Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Adeosun, Oyenike; Oladipo, Bayo; Oni, Adesoji

    2013-01-01

    The study seeks to analyze the affective and cognitive traits of teacher trainees in higher educational institutions in Nigeria. This is with the view to develop an effective teacher education framework by using inputs from the trainees, in-service teachers and teacher educators and to incorporate their ideas into the structuring and organization of not only the educational programmes but also the admission processes into such programmes. Using inputs from classroom teachers, teacher trainees...

  2. Marijuana’s Acute Effects on Cognitive Bias for Affective and Marijuana Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; McGeary, John E.; Valerie S. Knopik

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana’s ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7–3.0 % delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affec...

  3. Anxiety, Affect, Self-Esteem, and Stress: Mediation and Moderation Effects on Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Al Nima; Patricia Rosenberg; Trevor Archer; Danilo Garcia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mediation analysis investigates whether a variable (i.e., mediator) changes in regard to an independent variable, in turn, affecting a dependent variable. Moderation analysis, on the other hand, investigates whether the statistical interaction between independent variables predict a dependent variable. Although this difference between these two types of analysis is explicit in current literature, there is still confusion with regard to the mediating and moderating effects of diffe...

  4. Effects of a Brief Meditation Training on Negative Affect, Trait Anxiety and Concentrated Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Baptista Menezes; Lisiane Bizarro

    2015-01-01

    AbstractMeditation has been associated with positive psychological outcomes, but few studies have investigated brief interventions. This randomized controlled pilot study assessed the effects of five days of focused meditation on positive and negative affect, state and trait anxiety, as well as concentrated attention in a nonclinical sample distributed in two groups (experimental = 14, 51.8% female, Mage= 23.9; control = 19, 62% female, Mage= 24.9). The instruments used were the Positive Affe...

  5. Anxiety, Affect, Self-Esteem, and Stress: Mediation and Moderation Effects on Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Nima, Ali Al; Rosenberg, Patricia; Archer, Trevor; Garcia, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background Mediation analysis investigates whether a variable (i.e., mediator) changes in regard to an independent variable, in turn, affecting a dependent variable. Moderation analysis, on the other hand, investigates whether the statistical interaction between independent variables predict a dependent variable. Although this difference between these two types of analysis is explicit in current literature, there is still confusion with regard to the mediating and moderating effects of differ...

  6. Revising beliefs based in evidence versus affect: Effects on knowledge acquisition and conceptual change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Thomas D.

    Theoretical treatments on the issue of conceptual change have paid little attention to the distinction between acquiring knowledge that conflicts with prior beliefs and revising prior beliefs in light of that new knowledge. Models of conceptual change that fail to make the knowledge-belief distinction can produce faulty predictions and interpretations, and prevent us from discovering the factors that independently impact knowledge acquisition and belief revision. Beliefs vary widely in whether they are based in coherence with known evidence and conceptual representations versus their promotion of affective values and goals. Study 1 provided empirical demonstrations of the prevalence of affect-based beliefs, the high degree of both between- and within-person variability in belief basis, and the validity of self-reports in assessing that variation. Study 2 supported present arguments about why the popular educational constructs of personal epistemology are not useful for understanding the evidence-affect basis of beliefs. This variability in belief basis represents variability in the coherence and specificity of the conceptual structure underlying different beliefs. Thus, the effects of prior beliefs on knowledge acquisition and subsequent belief revision may depend upon the underlying evidence-affect basis of prior beliefs. Study 1 provided data suggesting that belief revision is a separate process and not a mere by-product of acquiring belief-conflicting knowledge, and that revision is less likely when prior beliefs are initially held for affective reasons. Study 3 supported current predictions that comprehension of belief-conflicting and belief-consistent information is better when prior beliefs are evidence- rather than affect-based. In addition, the comprehension of belief-conflicting and belief-consistent information was equivalent. The widespread, but previously untested, assumption that prior beliefs impede the learning of belief-conflicting information may

  7. An unusual side effect of isotretinoin: retinoid dermatitis affecting external urethral meatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alli, Nuran; Yorulmaz, Ahu

    2015-01-01

    Isotretinoin (Iso) is the most effective drug against severe nodulocystic acne. As a synthetic oral retinoid, Iso exerts its actions by modulating cell growth and differentiation. Targeting all the pathophysiologic processes in acne development, Iso has been considered to be an unique drug, however it has several side effects. While chelitis, xerosis, ocular sicca, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, hyperlipidemia are the most common side effects, teratogenicity and depressive symptoms are the most concerning ones. In addition, Iso has unusual side effects which have been described for the first time in the literature. Here, we report a remarkable side effect of Iso in a 23-years-old male patient with retinoid dermatitis affecting the external uretral meatus. To our knowledge, only few cases of retinoid dermatitis in the urethral mucosa due to Iso have been reported in the literature so far. PMID:24964168

  8. Imaging Imageability: Behavioral Effects and Neural Correlates of Its Interaction with Affect and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Chris F.; Cribben, Ivor; Cummine, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The construct of imageability refers to the extent to which a word evokes a tangible sensation. Previous research (Westbury et al., 2013) suggests that the behavioral effects attributed to a word's imageability can be largely or wholly explained by two objective constructs, contextual density and estimated affect. Here, we extend these previous findings in two ways. First, we show that closely matched stimuli on the three measures of contextual density, estimated affect, and human-judged imageability show a three-way interaction in explaining variance in LD RTs, but that imagebility accounts for no additional variance after contextual density and estimated affect are entered first. Secondly, we demonstrate that the loci and functional connectivity (via graphical models) of the brain regions implicated in processing the three variables during that task are largely over-lapping and similar. These two lines of evidence support the conclusion that the effect usually attributed to human-judged imageability is largely or entirely due to the effects of other correlated measures that are directly computable. PMID:27471455

  9. The intervention model for affective involvement and its effectiveness: Fostering affective involvement between persons who are congenitally deafblind and their communication partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Can one share emotions with someone who can’t hear and see well? This dissertation addresses the effectiveness of a training for professionals to foster affective involvement or the mutual sharing of emotions with people who are congenitally deafblind. People with congenital deafblindness are unable

  10. Effects of parent-child affective quality during high school years on subsequent substance use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina S. Ralston

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that the quality of affective relationships between youth and parents is associated with lower levels of a range of problem behaviors during childhood, early and late adolescence. While the protective effect of parental monitoring on substance use in the high school and post high school years has been demonstrated, there is a knowledge gap concerning effects of parent-child affective quality (PCAQ during the same periods. We tested a conceptual theoretical model to examine the effects of PCAQ on substance use following high school. The sample was from a RCT that assessed adolescents in rural Iowa from the seventh grade through two years after high school (N=456. We specified direct effects of PCAQ in 12th grade on drunkenness, smoking and illicit drug use during the two years immediately following high school graduation. We also specified the effects of early substance use initiation (alcohol, tobacco and marijuana use reported at baseline on later use. The direct effect of PCAQ in 12th grade on substance use was significant for all substances during at least one of the two years past graduation (ypg. Results were: drunkenness 1 ypg, β=-.126, p<.05; smoking 1 ypg, β=-.119, p<.05; 2 ypg, β=-.146, p<.05; illicit drug use 2 ypg, β=-.165, p<.05. Some significant indirect effects of PCAQ at baseline, via PCAQ at 12th grade, were found. Results also indicated significant direct effects of early initiation on two of the three substances, albeit with a different pattern of effects over time for each substance by years post high school. Importantly, while early initiation remains the strongest predictor of long-term tobacco and illicit drug use, results show how PCAQ might reduce its harmful effects.

  11. Estimation of stochastic effects risk in children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation risk estimation of stochastic effect was evaluated in a group of children assisted in the Cuba Republic as part of the program for medical attention with children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident . Doses, received from different sources, were estimated for risk evaluation. The study shows total detrimental effects between 0,02 - 0,01% for different groups; values lower than expected for developed country (17-20%). Fatal thyroid cancer increased up to 0,07% in one of the studied groups. (authors). 8 refs., 4 tabs

  12. The Functional Effect of Teacher Positive and Neutral Affect on Task Performance of Students with Significant Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungho; Singer, George H. S.; Gibson, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The study uses an alternating treatment design to evaluate the functional effect of teacher's affect on students' task performance. Tradition in special education holds that teachers should engage students using positive and enthusiastic affect for task presentations and praise. To test this assumption, we compared two affective conditions. Three…

  13. Affective Overload: The Effect of Emotive Visual Stimuli on Target Vocabulary Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Yakup; Griffiths, Carol; Özel, Zeynep Ebrar Yetkiner; Kinay, Hüseyin

    2016-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in cognitive load in recent years, but the effect of affective load and its relationship to mental functioning has not received as much attention. In order to investigate the effects of affective stimuli on cognitive function as manifest in the ability to remember foreign language vocabulary, two groups of student volunteers (N = 64) aged from 17 to 25 years were shown a Powerpoint presentation of 21 target language words with a picture, audio, and written form for every word. The vocabulary was presented in comfortable rooms with padded chairs and the participants were provided with snacks so that they would be comfortable and relaxed. After the Powerpoint they were exposed to two forms of visual stimuli for 27 min. The different formats contained either visually affective content (sexually suggestive, violent or frightening material) or neutral content (a nature documentary). The group which was exposed to the emotive visual stimuli remembered significantly fewer words than the group which watched the emotively neutral nature documentary. Implications of this finding are discussed and suggestions made for ongoing research. PMID:25487113

  14. Effects of Virtual Human Appearance Fidelity on Emotion Contagion in Affective Inter-Personal Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volante, Matias; Babu, Sabarish V; Chaturvedi, Himanshu; Newsome, Nathan; Ebrahimi, Elham; Roy, Tania; Daily, Shaundra B; Fasolino, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Realistic versus stylized depictions of virtual humans in simulated inter-personal situations and their ability to elicit emotional responses in users has been an open question for artists and researchers alike. We empirically evaluated the effects of near visually realistic vs. non-realistic stylized appearance of virtual humans on the emotional response of participants in a medical virtual reality system that was designed to educate users in recognizing the signs and symptoms of patient deterioration. In a between-subjects experiment protocol, participants interacted with one of three different appearances of a virtual patient, namely visually realistic, cartoon-shaded and charcoal-sketch like conditions in a mixed reality simulation. Emotional impact were measured via a combination of quantitative objective measures were gathered using skin Electrodermal Activity (EDA) sensors, and quantitative subjective measures such as the Differential Emotion Survey (DES IV), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Social Presence questionnaire. The emotional states of the participants were analyzed across four distinct time steps during which the medical condition of the virtual patient deteriorated (an emotionally stressful interaction), and were contrasted to a baseline affective state. Objective EDA results showed that in all three conditions, male participants exhibited greater levels of arousal as compared to female participants. We found that negative affect levels were significantly lower in the visually realistic condition, as compared to the stylized appearance conditions. Furthermore, in emotional dimensions of interest-excitement, surprise, anger, fear and guilt participants in all conditions responded similarly. However, in social emotional constructs of shyness, presence, perceived personality, and enjoyment-joy, we found that participants responded differently in the visually realistic condition as compared to the cartoon and sketch conditions. Our

  15. Marijuana's acute effects on cognitive bias for affective and marijuana cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R; Kahler, Christopher W; Rohsenow, Damaris J; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S

    2015-10-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana's ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On 2 separate days, regular marijuana users (N = 89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and 2 experimental tasks: pleasantness rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the pleasantness rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources toward marijuana-specific and negatively valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels. PMID:26167716

  16. Effectiveness of Organic Wastes as Fertilizers and Amendments in Salt-Affected Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Diacono

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive salt rate can adversely influence the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils, mainly in arid and semi-arid world regions. Therefore, salt-affected soils must be reclaimed to maintain satisfactory fertility levels for increasing food production. Different approaches have been suggested to solve these issues. This short review focuses on selected studies that have identified organic materials (e.g., farmyard manures, different agro-industrial by-products, and composts as effective tools to improve different soil properties (e.g., structural stability and permeability in salt-affected soils. Organic fertilization is highly sustainable when compared to other options to date when taken into consideration as a solution to the highlighted issues. However, further experimental investigations are needed to validate this approach in a wider range of both saline and sodic soils, also combining waste recycling with other sustainable agronomic practices (crop rotations, cover crops use, etc..

  17. The effects of different sources of occupational stress on affective, motivational, and psychosomatic outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovalle, N.K. II.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of role conflict, role ambiguity, and five additional potential sources of occupational stress on an affective outcome (job satisfaction), a motivational outcome (intent to quit), and two psychosomatic outcomes (mental and physical anxiety). In addition to role conflict and role ambiguity, the five additional sources of occupational stress centered on job characteristics, work pressures, rewards and opportunities, interaction of the job and home life, and lack of job challenge. Data were collected from 85 technicians and managers in a service organization. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that each of the sources of stress have significant yet different effects on the outcomes. Moreover, role conflict and ambiguity did not have as much of an effect across all outcomes as the other five sources of stress. These findings could be used to improve the measurement, understanding, and treatment of occupational stress. Other implications are discussed. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Effects of an experimental social stressor on resources loss, negative affect, and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Moshe; Ben-Zur, Hasida

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study, grounded in Hobfoll's conservation of resources (COR) theory, assessed the effects of manipulating a social stressor on loss of psychological resources, negative affect, and coping strategies. Israeli student volunteers were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: (1) social stressor (n = 66) and (2.) nonstressor (n = 59). The social stressor, aimed at reducing participant's personal resources, was experimentally induced via the Trier Social Stress Test protocol. The protocol consisted of a mock job interview administered under evaluative conditions, followed by performing a difficult arithmetic calculation task. The nonstressor condition involved a neutral interaction with an experimenter, followed by performing a relatively easy mental calculation task. Consistent with our hypotheses, the social stressor, compared to the nonstressor condition, resulted in statistically significant lower mean levels of psychological resources, higher levels of negative affect, and increased emotion-oriented and avoidance-oriented coping. Furthermore, under the social stressor condition, compared with the nonstressor condition, negative affect was more strongly related to loss of psychological resources and various coping strategies. Overall, the data provide experimental support for key tenets of COR theory. PMID:24192220

  19. The Offer Framing Effect: Choosing Single versus Bundled Offerings Affects Variety Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Mauricio Mittelman; Eduardo B. Andrade; Amitava Chattopadhyay; C. Miguel Brendl

    2014-01-01

    Choices of multiple items can be framed as a selection of single offerings (e.g., a choice of two individual candy bars) or of bundled offerings (e.g., a choice of a bundle of two candy bars). Four experiments provide strong evidence that consumers seek more variety when choosing from single than from bundled offerings. The offer framing effect shows that the mechanics of choosing--the ways consumers go about making choices of multiple items--affect variety seeking in a systematic manner. The...

  20. Effect of 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate on the Bond Strength to Normal versus Caries-Affected Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Komori, Paula C. P.; Pashley, David H.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Linda WANG; Carrilho, Marcela R.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to normal (ND) and caries-affected (CAD) dentin. Forty extracted human molars with coronal carious lesions, surrounded by normal dentin, were selected for this study. Flat surfaces of two types of dentin (i.e. ND and CAD) were prepared with a water-cooled high speed diamond disc, and then acid-etched, rinsed and air-dried. In contro...

  1. Effects of estradiol on uterine perfusion in anesthetized cyclic mares affected with uterine vascular elastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2016-01-01

    Uterine vascular elastosis in mares is characterized by degeneration of uterine vasculature through thickening of the elastin layers. Factors commonly associated with this degeneration include age, parity, and chronic uterine endometritis. Affected mares have also been shown to exhibit decreases in uterine blood flow and perfusion of the uterus. Due to the increased thickness of the elastin layers, we hypothesize that vasodilatation of the uterine vasculature is also impaired. To test the functionality of these vessels, we evaluated the vasodilatory effects of estradiol on the uterine vascular bed in mares with normal vasculature and mares with severe elastosis. Both groups were tested in estrus and diestrus. Fluorescent microspheres were used to determine basal blood perfusion, followed by the intravenous administration of 1.0 μg/kg of 17β-estradiol. After 90 min, perfusion was measured once again to determine the vascular response to estradiol. Control mares in estrus displayed a significant increase in total uterine blood flow after the administration of estradiol when compared to baseline levels. No other group had a significant increase in total blood flow and perfusion after estradiol administration. The administration of estradiol in control mares induced regional increases in perfusion in the uterine horns and uterine body during estrus and only in the uterine horns during diestrus. Mares affected by elastosis exhibited no regional differences in perfusion levels post-estradiol administration. The difference in the vasodilatory response induced by estradiol between reproductively healthy mares and mares affected with elastosis indicates that the functionality of the affected vessels is compromised. PMID:26642749

  2. Do congenital prosopagnosia and the other-race effect affect the same face recognition mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina eEsins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital prosopagnosia, an innate impairment in recognizing faces, as well as the other-race effect, a disadvantage in recognizing faces of foreign races, both affect face recognition abilities. Are the same face processing mechanisms affected in both situations? To investigate this question, we tested three groups of 21 participants: German congenital prosopagnosics, South Korean participants and German controls in three different tasks involving faces and objects. First we tested all participants on the Cambridge Face Memory Test in which they had to recognize Caucasian target faces in a 3-alternative-forced-choice task. German controls performed better than Koreans who performed better than prosopagnosics. In the second experiment, participants rated the similarity of Caucasian faces that differed parametrically in either features or second-order relations (configuration. Prosopagnosics were less sensitive to configuration changes than both other groups. In addition, while all groups were more sensitive to changes in features than in configuration, this difference was smaller in Koreans. In the third experiment, participants had to learn exemplars of artificial objects, natural objects, and faces and recognize them among distractors of the same category. Here prosopagnosics performed worse than participants in the other two groups only when they were tested on face stimuli. In sum, Koreans and prosopagnosic participants differed from German controls in different ways in all tests. This suggests that German congenital prosopagnosics perceive Caucasian faces differently than do Korean participants. Importantly, our results suggest that different processing impairments underlie the other-race effect and congenital prosopagnosia.

  3. Effects of pruning in Monterey pine plantations affected by Fusarium circinatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezos, D.; Lomba, J. M.; Martinez-Alvarez, P.; Fernandez, M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg and O'Donnell (1998) is the causal agent of Pitch Canker Disease (PCD) in Pinus species, producing damage to the main trunk and lateral branches as well as causing branch dieback. The disease has been detected recently in northern Spain in Pinus spp. seedlings at nurseries and in Pinus radiata D. Don adult trees in plantations. Fusarium circinatum seems to require a wound to enter the tree, not only that as caused by insects but also that resulting from damage by humans, i.e. mechanical wounds. However, the effects of pruning on the infection process have yet to be studied. The aim of the present study was to know how the presence of mechanical damage caused by pruning affects PCD occurrence and severity in P. radiata plantations. Fifty P. radiata plots (pruned and unpruned) distributed throughout 16 sites affected by F. circinatum in the Cantabria region (northern Spain) were studied. Symptoms of PCD presence, such as dieback, oozing cankers and trunk deformation were evaluated in 25 trees per plot and related to pruning effect. A significant relationship between pruning and the number of cankers per tree was observed, concluding that wounds caused by pruning increase the chance of pathogen infection. Other trunk symptoms, such as the presence of resin outside the cankers, were also higher in pruned plots. These results should be taken into account for future management of Monterey Pine plantations. (Author) 36 refs.

  4. Effect of subsurface drainage on salt movement and distribution in salt-affected soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to evaluate different subsurface drainage treatments (combinations of depth and spacing) on salt movement and distribution. The soil is clay and the drainage was designed according to the steady-state condition (Hooghoudt's equation). Three spacings and two depths resulted in six drainage treatments. Soil samples represented the initial state of every treatment and after 14 months they (cotton followed by wheat) were analysed. The data show that drain depth has its effective role in salt leaching, while drain spacing has its effect on salt distribution in the soil profile. The leaching rate of each specific ion is also affected by the different drainage treatments. In general, the salt movement and distribution should be taken into consideration when evaluating the design of drainage systems. (author)

  5. Factors Affecting the Effectiveness of Inorganic Silicate Sealer Material through Multi-Quality Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Mi Hsu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effectiveness of concrete protection with two inorganic silicate sealer materials (ISSMs. The Taguchi method and grey relational analysis (GRA have been used to identify the key factors influencing concrete protection provided by the surface treatment. Seven control factors with two levels were selected. By using the orthogonal array L12 (27, 12 experiments are chosen and four tests—the compressive strength test, resistivity test, absorption test and permeability test—were performed. Results have shown that the major factors affecting the protection effectiveness of ISSM are the water-binder ratio of mortar substrate, age of substrate for sealer application, addition of pozzolanic material and sealer type.

  6. The effect of anogenital warts on life quality of affected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanimirović Branko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anogenital warts represent a clinical manifestation of the infection of the lower female genital tract, human papilloma viruses types 6 and 11. They belong to the group of sexually transmitted diseases and then may be localized either on the female or male genitalia. The aim of the study was to show the effect of anogenital warts on life quality of the affected patients. Material and methods. The study was conducted on 200 female patients using the standardized questionnaire filled in by patients under the researcher's supervision immediately before laser wart removal. Each question out of 15 could be answered by one of the suggested answers: always, almost always, sometimes, rarely and never. The answer 'always' was worth one point, 'almost always' two points, 'sometimes' three points, 'rarely' four points and never 'five' points. Life quality was categorized as bad, tolerable, good, very good and excellent. The lower number of points in the questionnaire indicated the worse life quality and the higher number of points demonstrated a better life quality. Results. The study results showed that the highest number of subjects was in the third and fourth decade of life. The presence of anogenital warts had an effect on life quality in most patients. 5% of subjects assessed their life quality as bad, 16% as tolerable, 45% as good and 23% as very good. Only in 11% of patients the presence of anogenital warts did not have any effect on life quality (c2 = 121.680, p< 0.001. Conclusion. The presence of anogenital warts has a significant effect on life quality of affected patients, indicating the significance of their early detection and treatment.

  7. Effects of rock fragments on water dynamics in a fire-affected soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; García-Moreno, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.

    2014-05-01

    Rock fragments (RF) are common in the surface of Mediterranean semiarid soils, and have important effects on the soil physical (bulk density and porosity) and hydrological processes (infiltration, evaporation, splash erosion and runoff generation) (Poesen and Lavee, 1994; Rieke-Zapp et al., 2007). In some cases, RFs in Mediterranean areas have been shown to protect bare soils from erosion risk (Cerdà, 2001; Martínez-Zavala, Jordán, 2008; Zavala et al., 2010). Some of these effects are much more relevant when vegetation cover is low or has been reduced after land use change or other causes, as forest fires. Although very few studies exist, the interest on the hydrological effects of RFs in burned areas is increasing recently. After a forest fire, RFs may contribute significantly to soil recovery. In this research we have studied the effect of surface and embedded RFs on soil water control, infiltration and evaporation in calcareous fire-affected soils from a Mediterranean area (SW Spain). For this study, we selected an area with soils derived from limestone under holm oak forest, recently affected by a moderate severity forest fire. The proportion of RF cover showed a significant positive relation with soil water-holding capacity and infiltration rates, although infiltration rate reduced significantly when RF cover increased above a certain threshold. Soil evaporation rate decreased with increasing volumetric content of RFs and became stable with RF contents approximately above 30%. Evaporation also decreased with increasing RF cover. When RF cover increased above 50%, no significant differences were observed between burned and control vegetated plots. REFERENCES Poesen, J., Lavee, H. 1994. Rock fragments in top soils: significance and processes. Catena Supplement 23, 1-28. Cerdà, A. 2001. Effect of rock fragment cover on soil infiltration, interrill runoff and erosion. European Journal of Soil Science 52, 59-68. DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2389.2001.00354.x. Rieke

  8. The Effects of Science Teaching Through Team Game Tournament Technique on Success Levels and Affective Characteristics of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Mansur HARMANDAR; ÇİL, Emine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of teaching a unit “Reproduction and Growth in Living Things” from the science curriculum of 8th graders by using Team Game Tournament (TGT) technique on the achievement and affective characteristics of the students. In order to determine the effects of TOT technique on achievement, quantitative research approach was used and to determine its effects on the affective characteristics, qualitative research approach was used. In the quantit...

  9. The Social N400 effect: how the presence of other listeners affects language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Gardner, Tom; Stoner, Cat

    2015-02-01

    During conversation, it is necessary to keep track of what others can and cannot understand. Previous research has focused largely on understanding the time course along which knowledge about interlocutors influences language comprehension/production rather than the cognitive process by which interlocutors take each other's perspective. In addition, most work has looked at the effects of knowledge about a speaker on a listener's comprehension, and not on the possible effects of other listeners on a participant's comprehension process. In the current study, we introduce a novel joint comprehension paradigm that addresses the cognitive processes underlying perspective taking during language comprehension. Specifically, we show that participants who understand a language stimulus, but are simultaneously aware that someone sitting next to them does not understand the same stimulus, show an electrophysiological marker of semantic integration difficulty (i.e., an N400-effect). Crucially, in a second group of participants, we demonstrate that presenting exactly the same sentences to the participant alone (i.e. without a co-listener) results in no N400-effect. Our results suggest that (1) information about co-listeners as well as the speaker affect language comprehension, and (2) the cognitive process by which we understand what others comprehend mirrors our own language comprehension processes. PMID:24825307

  10. Local inhibition of GABA affects precedence effect in the inferior colliculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjun Wang; Ningyu Wang; Dan Wang; Jun Jia; Jinfeng Liu; Yan Xie; Xiaohui Wen; Xiaoting Li

    2014-01-01

    The precedence effect is a prerequisite for faithful sound localization in a complex auditory envi-ronment, and is a physiological phenomenon in which the auditory system selectively suppresses the directional information from echoes. Here we investigated how neurons in the inferior col-liculus respond to the paired sounds that produce precedence-effect illusions, and whether their ifring behavior can be modulated through inhibition with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We recorded extracellularly from 36 neurons in rat inferior colliculus under three conditions:no injection, injection with saline, and injection with gamma-aminobutyric acid. The paired sounds that produced precedence effects were two identical 4-ms noise bursts, which were deliv-ered contralaterally or ipsilaterally to the recording site. The normalized neural responses were measured as a function of different inter-stimulus delays and half-maximal interstimulus delays were acquired. Neuronal responses to the lagging sounds were weak when the inter-stimulus delay was short, but increased gradually as the delay was lengthened. Saline injection produced no changes in neural responses, but after local gamma-aminobutyric acid application, responses to the lagging stimulus were suppressed. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid affected the normalized response to lagging sounds, independently of whether they or the paired sounds were contralateral or ipsilateral to the recording site. These observations suggest that local inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid in the rat inferior colliculus shapes the neural responses to lagging sounds, and modulates the precedence effect.

  11. Does response mode affect amount recalled or the magnitude of the testing effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Adam L; Roediger, Henry L

    2013-01-01

    The testing effect is the finding that retrieval practice can enhance recall on future tests. One unanswered question is whether first-test response mode (writing or speaking the answer) affects final-test performance (and whether final-test response mode itself matters). An additional unsettled issue is whether written and oral recall lead to differences in the amount recalled. In three experiments, we examined these issues: whether subjects can recall more via typing or speaking; whether typing or speaking answers on a first test can lead to better final-test performance (and whether an interaction occurs with final-test response mode) and whether any form of overt response leads to better final-test performance as compared to covert retrieval (thinking of the answer but not producing it). Subjects studied paired associates; took a first test by typing, speaking, or thinking about responses; and then took a second test in which the answers were either spoken or typed. The results revealed few differences between typing and speaking during recall, and no difference in the size of the testing effect on the second test. Furthermore, an initial covert retrieval yielded roughly the same benefit to future test performance as did overt retrieval. Thus, the testing effect was quite robust across these manipulations. The practical implication for learning is that covert retrieval provides as much benefit to later retention as does overt retrieval and that both can be effective study strategies. PMID:22898928

  12. Factors affecting Diatomaceous Earth effectiveness in the control of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diatomaceous earth (DE) is a potential alternative to control the lesser mealworm of poultry farms Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer). Our study aimed to understand the role of some of the environmental and insect behavioral factors play on DE effectiveness, such as the substrate (chicken food and poultry house litter), temperature and DE repellent activity on lesser mealworm adults. Mortality was higher at the highest temperature (32 deg C), and it increased with DE concentration (53 and 84% respectively, for concentrations of 86 and 172 g/m2) (P < 0.05). The substrate also influenced DE effectiveness: 95% mortality was observed in the feed, against 4% in the poultry litter. Part of these results can be attributed to the removal of DE particles by the poultry bedding, as supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and rhodamine concentration on the surface of the insects. As to insect behavior, DE had a repellent effect, since trap capture decreased nearly 50% in traps containing DE as opposed to those containing only food. Therefore, environmental factors do affect the DE effectiveness, and they must be taken into consideration when looking into developing control strategies in the field. (author)

  13. Concurrent and Prospective Effects of Psychopathic Traits on Affective and Cognitive Empathy in a Community Sample of Late Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Bart H. J.; de Wied, Minet Annette; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A deficit in affective rather than cognitive empathy is thought to be central to psychopathic traits. However, empirical evidence for empathy deficits in adolescents with psychopathic traits is limited. We investigated the concurrent and prospective effects of psychopathic traits on affective and cognitive trait empathy in late…

  14. Affective State of School Pupils during Their First Lesson of the Day--Effect of Morningness-Eveningness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph; Rahafar, Arash; Arbabi, Talat; Bretschneider, Rebekka

    2014-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results concerning chronopsychological effects at school is the worse school performance in evening-oriented adolescents. The study intends to correlate affective state with chronotype. Therefore, we carried out a field study in adolescents in a natural setting (in school) and assessed their actual affective state during…

  15. Pathogen-specific effects of quantitative trait loci affecting clinical mastitis and somatic cell count in danish holstein cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Peter; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Thomasen, J.R.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the risk of clinical mastitis (CM) and QTL affecting somatic cell score (SCS) exhibit pathogen-specific effects on the incidence of mastitis. Bacteriological data on mastitis pathogens were used to investigate...

  16. The Effect of Intrinsic Motivation on the Affect and Evaluation of the Creative Process among Fine Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko-Kaczmarek, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the effect of intrinsic motivation on affect, subjective evaluation, and the creative process of young artists. Relations between motivation, affect, and evaluation were treated as a dynamic process and measured several times. The unique contribution of this study is that it…

  17. The effects of reward and punishment in violent video games on aggressive affect, cognition, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnagey, Nicholas L; Anderson, Craig A

    2005-11-01

    Three experiments examined the effects of rewarding and punishing violent actions in video games on later aggression-related variables. Participants played one of three versions of the same race-car video game: (a) a version in which all violence was rewarded, (b) a version in which all violence was punished, and (c) a nonviolent version. Participants were then measured for aggressive affect (Experiment 1), aggressive cognition (Experiment 2), and aggressive behavior (Experiment 3). Rewarding violent game actions increased hostile emotion, aggressive thinking, and aggressive behavior. Punishing violent actions increased hostile emotion, but did not increase aggressive thinking or aggressive behavior. Results suggest that games that reward violent actions can increase aggressive behavior by increasing aggressive thinking. PMID:16262775

  18. Therapeutic control of plasma concentrations and long-term effect of nortriptyline in recurrent affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh-Sørensen; Hansen, C E; Baastrup, P C; Hvidberg, E F

    1976-07-01

    Based on the evidence that therapeutic plasma concentration range in fact exists for the tricyclic antidepressant drug, Nortriptyline (range 50-150 ng/ml), three different investigations were under taken in order to clarify some clinical pharmacological problems during long-term treatment with this drug. The possible prophlactic effect of the drug in recurrent affective disorders was specially examined in a group of patients with a high risk of episodes in their unipolar manic-depressive disease. The results highly demonstrate the value of monitoring plasma levels in achieving therapeutic control. Depressive relapses during treatment, for months and years, were only related to therapeutic insufficient plasma levels of the drug. PMID:981330

  19. Intervention effects on negative affect of CPS-referred children: results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Teresa; Bernard, Kristin; Ross, Emily; Dozier, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to early adversity places young children at risk for behavioral, physiological, and emotional dysregulation, predisposing them to a range of long-term problematic outcomes. Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) is a 10-session intervention designed to enhance children's self-regulatory capabilities by helping parents to behave in nurturing, synchronous, and non-frightening ways. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in a randomized clinical trial, with parents who had been referred to Child Protective Services (CPS) for allegations of maltreatment. Parent-child dyads received either the ABC intervention or a control intervention. Following the intervention, children from the ABC intervention (n=56) expressed lower levels of negative affect during a challenging task compared to children from the control intervention (n=61). PMID:24814751

  20. Factors affecting the effectiveness of head-only electrical stunning in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, A; Ruiz-de-la-Torre, J L; Stub, C; Diestre, A; Manteca, X

    2000-07-01

    The effects of factors such as the position of the tongs, the presence of wool, and the wetness of the skin on the efficiency of the head-only stunning procedure, and the duration of the periods of unconsciousness and analgesia were studied in lambs. The degree of insensibility was determined from the evaluation of physiological responses and electroencephalograms. The proportion of successfully stunned animals was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the animals stunned with the tongs in a frontal position than in those stunned with them in a caudal position, in the animals stunned with wet electrodes than in those stunned with dry electrodes and also in the animals without wool than in those with wool. The interval between stunning and sensibility to pain was affected significantly (P<0.01) only by the position of the tongs, being longer in animals with them in a frontal position than in those with them in a caudal position. PMID:10955892

  1. Seemingly irrational driving behavior model: The effect of habit strength and anticipated affective reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Shih

    2015-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that aberrant driving behaviors are not entirely rational. On the basis of the dual-process theory, this study postulates that drivers may learn to perform irrational aberrant driving behaviors, and these behaviors could be derived either from a deliberate or an intuitive decision-making approach. Accordingly, a seemingly irrational driving behavior model is proposed; in this model, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was adopted to represent the deliberate decision-making mechanism, and habit strength was incorporated to reflect the intuitive decision process. A multiple trivariate mediation structure was designed to reflect the process through which driving behaviors are learned. Anticipated affective reactions (AARs) were further included to examine the effect of affect on aberrant driving behaviors. Considering the example of speeding behaviors, this study developed scales and conducted a two-wave survey of students in two departments at a university in Northern Taiwan. The analysis results show that habit strength consists of multiple aspects, and frequency of past behavior cannot be a complete repository for accumulating habit strength. Habit strength appeared to be a crucial mediator between intention antecedents (e.g., attitude) and the intention itself. Including habit strength in the TPB model enhanced the explained variance of speeding intention by 26.7%. In addition, AARs were different from attitudes; particularly, young drivers tended to perform speeding behaviors to reduce negative feelings such as regret. The proposed model provides an effective alternative approach for investigating aberrant driving behaviors; corresponding countermeasures are discussed. PMID:26056969

  2. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  3. Fucoxanthin: A Marine Carotenoid Exerting Anti-Cancer Effects by Affecting Multiple Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Ravi Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fucoxanthin is a marine carotenoid exhibiting several health benefits. The anti-cancer effect of fucoxanthin and its deacetylated metabolite, fucoxanthinol, is well documented. In view of its potent anti-carcinogenic activity, the need to understand the underlying mechanisms has gained prominence. Towards achieving this goal, several researchers have carried out studies in various cell lines and in vivo and have deciphered that fucoxanthin exerts its anti-proliferative and cancer preventing influence via different molecules and pathways including the Bcl-2 proteins, MAPK, NFκB, Caspases, GADD45, and several other molecules that are involved in either cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or metastasis. Thus, in addition to decreasing the frequency of occurrence and growth of tumours, fucoxanthin has a cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Some studies show that this effect is selective, i.e., fucoxanthin has the capability to target cancer cells only, leaving normal physiological cells unaffected/less affected. Hence, fucoxanthin and its metabolites show great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer.

  4. [Factors affecting Diatomaceous earth effectiveness in the control of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luis F A; Oliveira, Daian G P; Neves, Pedro M O J

    2008-01-01

    Diatomaceous earth (DE) is a potential alternative to control the lesser mealworm of poultry farms Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer). Our study aimed to understand the role of some of the environmental and insect behavioral factors play on DE effectiveness, such as the substrate (chicken food and poultry house litter), temperature and DE repellent activity on lesser mealworm adults. Mortality was higher at the highest temperature (32 masculineC), and it increased with DE concentration (53 and 84% respectively, for concentrations of 86 and 172 g/m(2)) (P litter. Part of these results can be attributed to the removal of DE particles by the poultry bedding, as supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and rhodamine concentration on the surface of the insects. As to insect behavior, DE had a repellent effect, since trap capture decreased nearly 50% in traps containing DE as opposed to those containing only food. Therefore, environmental factors do affect the DE effectiveness, and they must be taken into consideration when looking into developing control strategies in the field. PMID:19169561

  5. Tentative longterm effects of a noradrenergic antidepressant; affecting the number of glucose transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Fonnes, Vera Linn Synnevåg

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is an affective disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Only in Europe at least 21 million are thought to be affected. Several theories have been developed during the years trying to explain the cause of depression. This study is based on the theory where major depressive disorder is believed to be caused by impaired cerebral glucose metabolism, proposed by Hundal in 2006.The astroglia are thought to be the primary affected cells. The glucose transporter...

  6. Effects of the therapist's nonverbal behavior on participation and affect of individuals with Alzheimer's disease during group music therapy sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevasco, Andrea M

    2010-01-01

    In healthcare settings, medical professionals' nonverbal behavior impacts patients' satisfaction and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of a music therapist's nonverbal behavior, affect and proximity, on participation and affect of 38 individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other related dementia (ADRD) during movement-to-music, singing, and instrument playing. Data indicated 62% of the individuals evinced positive affect when the therapist utilized affect and proximity combined, followed by the affect only condition (53%), proximity only condition (30%), and no affect or proximity condition (28%). A Friedman analysis indicated a significant difference in individuals' affect according to treatment conditions, chi(r)2 (3, 4) = 34.05, p = .001. Nonverbal behavior also impacted individuals' accuracy of participation, with participation at 79% for both affect and proximity combined, 75% for affect only, 71% for no affect or proximity, and 70% for proximity only. A significant difference occurred for participation by treatment conditions, F (3, 111) = 4.05, p = .009, eta2 = .10. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:21275336

  7. No effect of ambient odor on the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment with signs of disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Desktop virtual environments (VEs are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and interventions on human behavior and safety related concerns in built environments. For these applications it is essential that users appraise the affective qualities of the VE similar to those of its real world counterpart. Previous studies have shown that factors like simulated lighting, sound and dynamic elements all contribute to the affective appraisal of a desktop VE. Since ambient odor is known to affect the affective appraisal of real environments, and has been shown to increase the sense of presence in immersive VEs, it may also be an effective tool to tune the affective appraisal of desktop VEs. This study investigated if exposure to ambient odor can modulate the affective appraisal of a desktop VE with signs of public disorder. METHOD: Participants explored a desktop VE representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism and crime, while being exposed to either room air or subliminal levels of unpleasant (tar or pleasant (cut grass ambient odor. Whenever they encountered signs of disorder they reported their safety related concerns and associated affective feelings. RESULTS: Signs of crime in the desktop VE were associated with negative affective feelings and concerns for personal safety and personal property. However, there was no significant difference between reported safety related concerns and affective connotations in the control (no-odor and in each of the two ambient odor conditions. CONCLUSION: Ambient odor did not affect safety related concerns and affective connotations associated with signs of disorder in the desktop VE. Thus, semantic congruency between ambient odor and a desktop VE may not be sufficient to influence its affective appraisal, and a more realistic simulation in which simulated objects appear to emit scents may be required to achieve this goal.

  8. Parent-of-origin effect in schizophrenia and non-affective psychoses: Evidence from dermatoglyphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjith Divakaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims at examining "parent-of-origin effect" (POE in dermatoglyphic patterns among patients with schizophrenia and non-affective psychoses. Materials and Methods: Dermatoglyphic comparison was carried out for schizophrenia patients (n=200 and healthy controls (HC (n=100. In addition, the effect of family history and POE was examined in the dermatoglyphic pattern. Results: Schizophrenia patients compared to HC had significantly lower left total finger ridge count (LTFRC (t=3.63, P<0.001, right total finger ridge count (RTFRC (t=4.86, P<0.001, and absolute finger ridge count (ATFRC (t=4.80, P<0.001 compared to HC. It was also noted that patient group had significantly higher average number of arches (t=2.20, P=0.03. The comparison between the same sex POE group and the opposite sex POE group revealed that significant differences exist in LTFRC (t=2.91, P<0.01 and ATFRC (t=2.30, P=0.02. The same sex group also had lesser number of whorls compared to opposite sex group (t=2.04, P=0.04. Conclusions: The same sex parental inheritance group seem to be more developmentally compromised than the opposite sex parental inheritance group indicating a significant POE. Complex epigenetic mechanisms along with hormonal modulation could explain the sex specific disease phenotype expression, which is a plausible explanation as in the present study.

  9. Urban effects and summer thunderstorms in a tropical cyclone affected situation over Guangzhou city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With data mainly from Guangzhou mesonet Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), Guangzhou Doppler Radar and satellite TBB data, characteristics and evolution of the urban heat island (UHI) over Guangzhou City were analyzed in a tropical cyclone affected situation for early August 2005. In particular, two thunderstorms occurring during this period respectively at the night of 4 August and in the afternoon of 7 August were investigated to study the relationships between the development of thunderstorms and the UHI. Results showed that two thunderstorms were associated with the UHI effects. UHI induced local air convergence and initiated the thunderstorm convections. Both cases showed a general agreement in time and space for the locations of maximum UHI, convergence, convection, and precipitation. Convection was found to be more favorable to developing in time periods and locations with stronger intensity of UHI. Analysis also showed that, due to the urban effects, both thunderstorms got strengthened when moving over Guangzhou City, with maximum radar echoes observed right over the urban area and precipitation located within the city. All these features reveal that two thunderstorms were urban-induced storms.

  10. Antiovulatory effect of ICI 33,828 (methallibure) without affecting prolactin release in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deis, R P; Vermouth, N T

    1974-01-01

    The acute effect of 1-alpha-methylallylthiocarbamoyl-2-methylthiocarbamoylhydrazine (methall ibure) on the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin on the day of proestrus was studied in normal rats. 21 rats received 5 mg methallibure/100 gm body weight the day before proestrus when blood samples were obtained for LH and prolactin determinations. The rats were sacrificed the examined for ova. 8 methallibure-treated rats were injected with 10 following morning (first day of estrus) and the oviducts were mcg LH/100 gm body weight on the day of estrus following blood extraction. Oviducts were examined for ova the next day. The single dose of methallibure blocked LH release in 19 out of 21 rats. The 19 rats had mean LH values of 130.2 ng/ml, highly significant (p less than .0001) when compared with 392.7 ng/ml in the controls. Prolactin release was not affected by methallibure, since the mean prolactin level for treated rats was 166.8 ng/ml and 198.7 ng/ml for the controls. The serum prolactin peak on the afternoon of proestrus was confirmed in 7 normal (31 ng/ml) and in 17 estrous rats (28.3 ng/ml). In 4 treated rats, prolactin levels determined on the day of estrus were markedly higher (61 ng/ml; p less than .0001) than in normal estrous rats. None of the rats which had subnormal LH levels showed spontaneous ovulation. However, the 10 mcg LH/100 gm body weight in previously methallibure-treated rats induced ovulation. The number of ova per rat was similar in the LH treated (9.6) and in the controls (10.6). It is concluded that methallibure prevents ovulation by centrally blocking LH release either without affecting or by stimulating prolactin release. PMID:4858373

  11. A study of the parameters affecting the effectiveness of Moringa oleifera in drinking water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M.; Craven, T.; Mkandawire, T.; Edmondson, A. S.; O'Neill, J. G.

    The powder obtained from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been shown to be an effective primary coagulant for water treatment. When the seeds are dried, dehusked, crushed and added to water, the powder acts as a coagulant binding colloidal particles and bacteria to form agglomerated particles (flocs), which settle allowing the clarified supernatant to be poured off. Very little research has been undertaken on the parameters affecting the effectiveness of M. oleifera, especially in Malawi, for purification of drinking water and there is a great need for further testing in this area. Conclusive data needs to be compiled to demonstrate the effects of various water parameters have on the efficiency of the seeds. A parametric study was undertaken at Leeds Metropolitan University, UK, with the aim to establish the most appropriate dosing method; the optimum dosage for removal of turbidity; the influence of pH and temperature; together with the shelf life of the M. oleifera seeds. The study revealed that the most suitable dosing method was to mix the powder into a concentrated paste, hence forming a stock suspension. The optimum M. oleifera dose, for turbidity values between 40 and 200 NTU, ranged between 30 and 55 mg/l. With turbidity set at 130 NTU and a M. oleifera dose within the optimum range at 50 mg/l, pH levels were varied between 4 and 9. It was discovered that the coagulant performance was not too sensitive to pH fluctuations when conditions were within the optimum range. The most efficient coagulation, determined by the greatest reduction in turbidity, occurred at pH 6.5. Alkaline conditions were overall more favourable than acidic conditions; pH 9 had an efficiency of 65% of optimum, whilst at pH 5 the efficiency dropped to around 55%. The efficiency further dropped at pH 4, where the powder only produced results of around 10% of optimum conditions. A temperature range of 4-60 °C was studied in this research. Colder waters (<15 °C) were found to

  12. Effects of alcoholic extract of Curcuma longa on Ascaridia infestation affecting chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrubaie, Abdulrazak Labi

    2015-07-01

    Ascaridia galli, the common intestinal nematode, remains a major cause of economic loss in the poultry industry in developing countries. Treatments using chemicals are not only expensive but also affect host health. Plant extracts as better alternative is gaining significance. Here, we have studied the effects of alcoholic extract of turmeric, Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae) roots, against A. galli infection in chicken. Different concentrations of C. longa root extract were tested in vitro on 5 groups of adults A. galli worms and in vivo on 6 groups of chicks. The results showed that the turmeric root extract @ 60 mg mL(-1) in vitro significantly (P galli. The G2 was not given any treatment while G3 was treated with piperazine (@ 200 mg kg(-1) body wt.); and Groups 4, 5 and 6 were given turmeric @ 200, 400 and 600 mg kg(-1) body wt., respectively. The mean number of worms extracted at the end of the trial in G2 (untreated) was 18.10 ± 2.42, while the G3 treated with piperazine had no worms. Groups 4 and 5 did not show any significant difference compared to G2. However, G6 that had 3.20 ± 1.33 worms was statistically significant. Higher concentrations of turmeric given to infected chickens significantly reduced the length and weight of worms. The study showed that the worm infestation damaged the intestinal villi, and.treatment with high concentration of C. longa had healing effects and restored the integrity of intestinal mucosa. The results have demonstrated the ameliorating effect of C. longa turmeric on A. galli infested chickens. PMID:26245030

  13. Orthographic familiarity, phonological legality and number of orthographic neighbours affect the onset of ERP lexical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adorni Roberta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that the variability among studies in the onset of lexical effects may be due to a series of methodological differences. In this study we investigated the role of orthographic familiarity, phonological legality and number of orthographic neighbours of words in determining the onset of word/non-word discriminative responses. Methods ERPs were recorded from 128 sites in 16 Italian University students engaged in a lexical decision task. Stimuli were 100 words, 100 quasi-words (obtained by the replacement of a single letter, 100 pseudo-words (non-derived and 100 illegal letter strings. All stimuli were balanced for length; words and quasi-words were also balanced for frequency of use, domain of semantic category and imageability. SwLORETA source reconstruction was performed on ERP difference waves of interest. Results Overall, the data provided evidence that the latency of lexical effects (word/non-word discrimination varied as a function of the number of a word's orthographic neighbours, being shorter to non-derived than to derived pseudo-words. This suggests some caveats about the use in lexical decision paradigms of quasi-words obtained by transposing or replacing only 1 or 2 letters. Our findings also showed that the left-occipito/temporal area, reflecting the activity of the left fusiform gyrus (BA37 of the temporal lobe, was affected by the visual familiarity of words, thus explaining its lexical sensitivity (word vs. non-word discrimination. The temporo-parietal area was markedly sensitive to phonological legality exhibiting a clear-cut discriminative response between illegal and legal strings as early as 250 ms of latency. Conclusion The onset of lexical effects in a lexical decision paradigm depends on a series of factors, including orthographic familiarity, degree of global lexical activity, and phonologic legality of non-words.

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces: a tentative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In our daily lives, we form some impressions of other people. Although those impressions are affected by many factors, face-based affective signals such as facial expression, facial attractiveness, or trustworthiness are important. Previous psychological studies have demonstrated the impact of facial impressions on remembering other people, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this psychological process. The purpose of this article is to review recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies to investigate the effects of face-based affective signals including facial expression, facial attractiveness, and trustworthiness on memory for faces, and to propose a tentative concept for understanding this affective-cognitive interaction. On the basis of the aforementioned research, three brain regions are potentially involved in the processing of face-based affective signals. The first candidate is the amygdala, where activity is generally modulated by both affectively positive and negative signals from faces. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), as the second candidate, increases as a function of perceived positive signals from faces; whereas activity in the insular cortex, as the third candidate, reflects a function of face-based negative signals. In addition, neuroscientific studies have reported that the three regions are functionally connected to the memory-related hippocampal regions. These findings suggest that the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces could be modulated by interactions between the regions associated with the processing of face-based affective signals and the hippocampus as a memory-related region. PMID:22837740

  15. Effects of autonomous motivational priming on motivation and affective responses towards high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denver M Y; Teseo, Amanda J; Bray, Steven R

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the effect of autonomous motivational priming on motivation, attitudes and intentions towards high-intensity interval training (HIT). Participants (N = 42) performed a graded exercise test to determine their peak aerobic power (WPEAK). At a subsequent testing session, participants were randomised to complete either an autonomous or neutral motivational priming task followed by a 10 × 1 HIT exercise protocol, alternating 1-min bouts of hard (70% WPEAK) and light (12.5% WPEAK) exercises for 20 min. Participants primed with autonomous motivation reported greater enjoyment, P = .009, ηp(2) = .16, and perceived competence, P = .005, ηp(2) = .18, post-exercise compared to those in the neutral priming condition. Participants in the autonomous motivational priming condition also reported more positive attitudes, P = .014, ηp(2) = .14, towards HIT; however, there was no difference between the conditions for task motivation during HIT or intentions, P = .53, ηp(2) = .01, to engage in HIT. These findings highlight autonomous motivational priming as a method of enhancing affective and motivational experiences regarding HIT. PMID:26634389

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of temperature field for various parameters affect the film cooling effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a lot of parameters that affect the film cooling performance have been investigated numerically in three-dimensional model. For this purpose, five different inclination angles (α = 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o), four blowing ratios (M = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) two different nozzle geometries, namely, circular and square shaped have been considered for multiple nozzles. Renormalized (RNG) k-ε turbulence model is used as turbulence closure. The performance of RNG k-ε turbulence model is tested by comparing with available experimental data found in the literature and it is observed that both results are in good agreement. Based on series of simulations it can be concluded that maximum cooling efficiency is obtained at inclination angle of 30o and the blowing ratio of 2.0. It should be noted that circular shaped nozzle provides more effective cooled surface than square shaped nozzles. Present paper shows also the dependence of the cooling efficiency to the one of the most important vortex structure of counter-rotating vortex pair.

  17. Effects of an overfeeding regimen--the affective component of the sweet sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantino, M; Baigts, F; Cabanac, M; Apfelbaum, M

    1983-09-01

    In some isolated parts of North Africa, there persists an ancient Berber custom of imposing an overfeeding regimen on young girls before marriage, to achieve an obesity which is regarded as aesthetically pleasing. We have studied the effect of such a regimen, lasting 12--16 weeks, on blood lipids and on the affective reactions to sweet tastes in nine subjects. It is known that the pleasantness of alimentary cues i.e., the feeding behaviour, depends on the subject's nutritional state. Only three subjects gained weight (by 3,5 and 8 kg), in spite of the strong pressure to overeat. No change in plasma lipid concentrations were observed. Nevertheless, at the end of the regimen every subject showed a highly significant decrease in the rated pleasantness of sweet stimuli when they were tested fasting. However, the reduction in sweet pleasantness induced by ingestion of a 200 ml load of 1.4 M glucose solution was not changed by the overfeeding. Thus, pressure to overfeed can reduce hunger, as seen in the attractiveness of sweet foods in fasted subjects, without modifying glucose-induced satiety. PMID:6582799

  18. Analysis of optical neural stimulation effects on neural networks affected by neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The number of people in risk of developing a neurodegenerative disease increases as the life expectancy grows due to medical advances. Multiple techniques have been developed to improve patient's condition, from pharmacological to invasive electrodes approaches, but no definite cure has yet been discovered. In this work Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS) has been studied. ONS stimulates noninvasively the outer regions of the brain, mainly the neocortex. The relationship between the stimulation parameters and the therapeutic response is not totally clear. In order to find optimal ONS parameters to treat a particular neurodegenerative disease, mathematical modeling is necessary. Neural networks models have been employed to study the neural spiking activity change induced by ONS. Healthy and pathological neocortical networks have been considered to study the required stimulation to restore the normal activity. The network consisted of a group of interconnected neurons, which were assigned 2D spatial coordinates. The optical stimulation spatial profile was assumed to be Gaussian. The stimulation effects were modeled as synaptic current increases in the affected neurons, proportional to the stimulation fluence. Pathological networks were defined as the healthy ones with some neurons being inactivated, which presented no synaptic conductance. Neurons' electrical activity was also studied in the frequency domain, focusing specially on the changes of the spectral bands corresponding to brain waves. The complete model could be used to determine the optimal ONS parameters in order to achieve the specific neural spiking patterns or the required local neural activity increase to treat particular neurodegenerative pathologies.

  19. The Effects of Rumination on the Timing of Maternal and Child Negative Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flancbaum, Meir; Oppenheimer, Caroline W.; Abela, John R. Z.; Young, Jamie F.; Stolow, Darren; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined whether rumination serves as a moderator of the temporal association between maternal and child negative affect. Participants included 88 mothers with a history of major depressive episodes and their 123 children. During an initial assessment, mothers and their children completed measures assessing negative affect and…

  20. The Effects of Personality, Affectivity, and Work Commitment on Motivation to Improve Work through Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naquin, Sharon S.; Holton, Elwood F., III

    2002-01-01

    Naquin and Holton report how the NEO Five-Factor Inventory and Positive and Negative Affectivity Schedule were used to measure motivation to improve work through learning of 239 trainees. Positive affect, work commitment, and extraversion were significant antecedents of motivation. Invited reaction by Rodney A. McCloy and Lauress L. Wise raises…

  1. The Formation of Group Affect and Team Effectiveness : The Moderating Role of Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanghe, Jacqueline; Wisse, Barbara; van der Flier, Henk

    2010-01-01

    In the current research we use the social identity perspective to enhance our understanding of group affect (i.e. a collectively shared pattern of affective states among group members). Because higher identification (i.e. the extent to which group members define themselves in terms of their group me

  2. Effect of biosolid waste compost on soil respiration in salt-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Silvia; Gómez, Ignacio; García, Fuensanta; Navarro, José; Jordán, Manuel Miguel; Belén Almendro, María; Martín Soriano, José

    2013-04-01

    respiration, compost, electrical conductivity, salinization, Bac-Trac References: Abdelbasset Lakhdar, Mokded Rabhi, Tahar Ghnaya, Francesco Montemurro, Naceur Jedidi , Chedly Abdelly. Effectiveness of compost use in salt-affected soil. Journal of Hazardous Materials 171 (2009) pp 29-37. M. Tejada, C. Garcia, J.L. Gonzalez , M.T. Hernandez . Use of organic amendment as a strategy for saline soil remediation:Influence on the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) pp 1413-1421. I. Gomez; J.M. Disla Soriano; J. Navarro-Pedreño; F. García-Orenes; M.B. Almendro-Candel; M.M. Jordan. Quantification of soil respiration in different saline soil of Alicante (Spain). EGU General Assembly (2012). Viena. Ed. Geophysycal Research Abstracts. Vol 14 EGU2012-2399,(2012). (Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MICINN. Project Ref.: CGL2009-11194)

  3. The Effects of Music, Relaxation and Suggestion on Tertiary Students' Affect and Achievement in Learning Japanese as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Kuninori

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the three major factors of Suggestopedia--music, relaxation and suggestion--on the students' affect and development of communicative competence in tertiary Japanese language classes. A review of literature on Suggestopedia, the original form of Accelerated Learning (AL), shows that its effects are…

  4. Parent education project. III: Increasing affection and responsivity in developmentally handicapped mothers: component analysis, generalization, and effects on child language.

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, M. A.; Case, L; Rincover, A; Towns, F; Betel, J

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a parent training program consisting of verbal instruction, modeling, and feedback on the affection and responsivity of 3 developmentally handicapped mothers towards their children. The results indicated the following: First, the training package increased maternal physical affection, praise, and imitation of child vocalizations. These parenting skills increased to levels found in comparison groups of nonhandicapped mothers. Second, the training package was more ef...

  5. Job Satisfaction and Performance: The Moderating Effects of Value Attainment and Affective Disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochwarter, Wayne A.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Brymer, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 270 hotel managers found that the strongest positive relationship between job satisfaction and performance occurred when high attainment of values associated with work was coupled with high-positive or low-negative affective disposition. (SK)

  6. The Interactive Effects of Affect Lability, Negative Urgency, and Sensation Seeking on Young Adult Problematic Drinking

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny Karyadi; Ayca Coskunpinar; Dir, Allyson L.; Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that affect lability might reduce the risk for problematic drinking among sensation seekers by compensating for their deficiencies in emotional reactivity and among individuals high on negative urgency by disrupting stable negative emotions. Due to the high prevalence of college drinking, this study examined whether affect lability interacted with sensation seeking and negative urgency to influence college student problematic drinking. 414 college drinkers (mean a...

  7. Negative Affect Mediates Effects of Psychological Stress on Disordered Eating in Young Chinese Women

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jue; Zhen WANG; Guo, Boliang; Arcelus, Jon; Zhang, Haiyin; Jia, Xiuzhen; Xu, Yong; Qiu, Jianyin; Xiao, Zeping; Yang, Min

    2012-01-01

    Background The bi-relationships between psychological stress, negative affect and disordered eating has been well studied in western culture, while tri-relationship among them, i.e. how some of those factors influence these bi-relationships, has rarely been studied. However, there has been little related study in the different Chinese culture. This study was conducted to investigate the bi-relationships and tri-relationship between psychological stress, negative affect, and disordered eating ...

  8. The Effects of Self-Focus On Affect and Vertical Jump Performance of NCAA Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas G. Hammond; Henry (Hap) Davis IV; Leonard Ziachowsky

    2015-01-01

    Self-focused attention is often associated with a process of evaluation that has implications for affect, motivation and performance. However, this topic has received little attention in elite sport. Thus, the aim of this study was to understand the relationship between self-focused attention, affective responses and physical performance of successfully (n=12) and unsuccessful (n=12) NCAA athletes. Each athlete was presented with a self-focused and other-focused condition. They provided ratin...

  9. Dispositional Happiness and Affective Forecasting about Academic Performance: General or Specific Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that dispositional traits can influence personal affective forecasting. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between dispositional happiness and affective prediction about academic performance among undergraduate students. Participants were asked to predict their emotional reactions on a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (very bad) to 7 (very good), two months before they will obtain their results for one examination. All the participants were cont...

  10. Screening effects on thyroid cancer risk estimates for populations affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation calculations are performed in order to explore the ecological bias in studies as they are performed with settlement specific data in the aftemath of the Chernobyl accident. Based on methods, that were developed by Lubin for exploring the ecologic bias due to smoking in indoor radon studies of lung cancer, the influence of the introduction of ultrasound devices and enhanced medical surveillance on the detection and reporting of thyroid cancer cases was investigated. Calculations were performed by simulating thyroid doses of one million children in a total of 744 settlements and assuming a linear dependence of the risk on dose and various scenarios of the screening. The dose distributions simulate the distributions similar to those used in previous ecologic studies of the thyroid cancer risk in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident. The ecologic bias was defined as the ratio of risk coefficients derived from an ecological study to the corresponding risk factor in the underlying risl model. the ecologic bias was estimated for each of the screening scenarios. Analytical equations were derived that allow the exact numerical compuation of the bias which is determined by covariance terms between the increased detection and reporting on one side and thyroid dose values (individual and averaged for the settlements) on the other side. Nested in th epopulation data, a cohort study was simulated with 10 000 individuals and an average thyroid dose of 0.3 Gy. the present study underlines the different scopes of the ecologic and cohort study designs perfomed in the aftermed of the Chernobyl accident. Whereas the ecologic studies give an estimate of the excess thyroid cancer risks per unit dose under the conditions of a health care system as it is typical for the affected countries after the Chernobyl accident, the cohort study gives risk estimates within a well screened cohort. Due to the strong screening effects, excess absoulte risks in the ecological study cohort are

  11. Risk of emotional disorder in offspring of depressed parents: gender differences in the effect of a second emotionally affected parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman-Peeters, Karlien M C; Ormel, Johan; Van Sonderen, Eric L P; Den Boer, Johan A; Minderaa, Ruud B; Hartman, Catharina A

    2008-01-01

    In offspring of depressed parents a second parent with emotional problems is likely to increase risk of emotional disorder. This effect may however differ between sons and daughters and between offspring of depressed fathers and offspring of depressed mothers. In adolescent and young-adult offspring of parents with major depressive disorder, this study examined the effects of a second affected parent, offspring gender, gender of the depressed parent and their interactions on risk of depression and anxiety disorder. We found that daughters had a higher risk of depression and anxiety than sons and that offspring of depressed mothers had a higher risk of anxiety than offspring of depressed fathers. In addition to these main effects, we found an interaction between parent and offspring gender inasmuch that sons of depressed fathers had the lowest risk of depression and anxiety relative to the other groups. A second affected parent tended to increase risk of depression and significantly increased risk of anxiety. However, this effect of a second affected parent on offspring anxiety was most prominent in daughters when the second affected parent was the father, whereas risk in sons did not increase if the father was affected as well. Our results indicate that paternal and maternal depression similarly and additively increase daughters' risk of emotional disorder, but that sons' risk only increases with maternal depression. Intergenerational transmission of emotional disorder seems strongest when the female gender is involved, either in the form of a daughter or a depressed mother. PMID:17941098

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces: a tentative model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTsukiura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When we encounter someone in our daily lives, we form impressions of that person. Although those impressions are affected by many factors, face-based affective signals such as facial expression, facial attractiveness, or trustworthiness are important. Previous psychological studies have demonstrated the impact of facial impressions on remembering other people, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this psychological process. The purpose of this article is to review recent functional MRI (fMRI studies to investigate the effects of face-based affective signals including facial expression, facial attractiveness, and trustworthiness on memory for faces, and to propose a concept for understanding this affective-cognitive interaction. On the basis of the aforementioned research, three brain regions are potentially involved in the processing of face-based affective signals. The first candidate is the amygdala, where activity is generally modulated by both affectively positive and negative signals from faces. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, as the second candidate, increases as a function of perceived positive signals from faces; whereas activity in the insular cortex, as the third candidate, reflects a function of face-based negative signals. In addition, neuroscientific studies have reported that the three regions are functionally connected to the memory-related hippocampal regions. These findings suggest that the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces could be modulated by interactions between the regions associated with the processing of face-based affective signals and the hippocampus as a memory-related region.

  13. The Effects of Self-Focus On Affect and Vertical Jump Performance of NCAA Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Hammond

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-focused attention is often associated with a process of evaluation that has implications for affect, motivation and performance. However, this topic has received little attention in elite sport. Thus, the aim of this study was to understand the relationship between self-focused attention, affective responses and physical performance of successfully (n=12 and unsuccessful (n=12 NCAA athletes. Each athlete was presented with a self-focused and other-focused condition. They provided ratings of positive affect and then completed vertical squat jumps after each stimulus condition. Significant interactions were observed between stimulus condition and athlete performance group for all dependent variables. Successful athletes demonstrated significantly more positive affect, and greater jump height and energy output following the self-focused condition. The opposite trend was observed for unsuccessful athletes. These findings highlight the potential for self-focused attention to enhance or detract from sport performance based on the direction of self-discrepancies.Keywords: self-focused attention, self-evaluation, elite athletes, positive affect, athletic performance

  14. Effects of Agricultural Input Assistance on Households Affected by HIV/AIDS: A Case of Chirumanzu Communal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutambara Jackqeline

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to ascertain the effect of humanitarian and developmental aid programmes on vulnerable households affected by HIV/AIDS. The study looked at the effect of NGOs-donated maize seed and fertilizer packs to the HIV/AIDS affected households using wards in Chirumhanzu district of Midlands province in Zimbabwe as a case study. This was done by comparing the land-use and output of maize, household income, farming assets and number of the main livestock types for the affected households before and after they received agricultural input assistance. The results from this study showed that agricultural inputs were a limiting factor to the households that are affected by HIV/AIDS. Provision of input packs enabled the households to increase cropping land by incorporating land that was not longer being utilize. In the process they managed to increase their agricultural maize production which resulted in increase in their welfare. Following the findings of this study, it is recommended that government and donors should support the vulnerable households through the provision of agricultural inputs which is a better way of achieving poverty alleviation in the medium to long term for the vulnerable households. However, for this to be achieved effectively, the support to the households affected by HIV/AIDS should be holistic including other forms of support like medical, palliative and other socio-economic support.

  15. An effective strategy for intervention with children and adolescents affected by HIV and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossart-Walker, S; Moss, N E

    2000-04-01

    angry outbursts and provocative behavior have been integrated into the story of the group. As children need to express rage they at times speak of John, using his ability to express this feeling as an example to the safety of the group. Again this type of work is not only powerful and intense, but needs to be unhurried. Children such as John and his comembers need time to experience their grief and heal their pain. Thus, groups are an effective strategy for work with HIV-affected children in helping them deal with the losses within their families and continue to grow into healthy adults. PMID:10768070

  16. LIGHT THERAPY FOR SEASONAL AFFECTIVE-DISORDER - THE EFFECTS OF TIMING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEESTERS, Y; JANSEN, JHC; BEERSMA, DGM; BOUHUYS, AL; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    1995-01-01

    Background. Sixty-eight patients with seasonal affective disorder participated in a 10 000-lux light treatment study in which two questions were addressed: do response rates differ when the light is applied at different times of the day and does short-term rank ordering of morning and evening light

  17. The Mediating Effects of Parenting Behaviors on Maternal Affect and Reports of Children's Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Wildman, Beth G.

    2009-01-01

    Parenting behaviors have received ample support as a mediator of the relationship between maternal affect and child behavior problems. The majority of these research efforts were based on a uni-dimensional conceptualization of maternal mood, even though decades of theory and research suggest that mood is multidimensional. We examined the mediating…

  18. Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

  19. QTL with dominance effect affecting residual feed intake on BTA6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Residual feed intake (RFI) is a measure of feed efficiency and therefore an economically relevant trait. A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting RFI in beef cattle was conducted. Approximately equally spaced microsatellite markers (n = 229) spanned the 29 bovine autosomes. Tw...

  20. Effects of Workplace Intervention on Affective Well-Being in Employees' Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; McHale, Susan M.; Almeida, David M.; Kelly, Erin L.; King, Rosalind B.

    2016-01-01

    Using a group-randomized field experimental design, this study tested whether a workplace intervention--designed to reduce work-family conflict--buffered against potential age-related decreases in the affective well-being of employees' children. Daily diary data were collected from 9- to 17-year-old children of parents working in an information…

  1. From Attribution to Helping: An Analysis of the Mediating Effects of Affect and Expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Mulherin, Anne

    1980-01-01

    Investigates the hypothesis that willingness to help another person depends on the cause of the person's need and that the relationship between attribution and helping is mediated by affect and expectancy of future need. Subjects were 40 male and 40 female undergraduate students. (Author/SS)

  2. School and Classroom Goal Structures: Effects on Affective Responses in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Koidou, Eirini; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Grouios, George

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the relative impact of school and classroom goal structures on students' affective responses and the mediating role of motivation. The sample of the study consisted of 368 high school students, who completed measures of school and classroom goal structures, motivational regulations in physical education, boredom, and…

  3. The Effects of Online Discussion Forum Aggressive Messages and Cognitive Distortion on Users' Negative Affect and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng

    2012-01-01

    This research is comprised of two studies designed to explore the effects of online discussion forum aggressive messages and Internet cognitive distortion on users' negative affect and aggression. The results of study 1 revealed 69 users could perceive both disgust and hostility feelings toward aggressive messages conducted by the authors, and…

  4. No effect of ambient odor on the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment with signs of disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Schaik, M.G. van; Theunissen, N.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background : Desktop virtual environments (VEs) are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and interventions on human behavior and safety related concerns in built environments. For these applications it is essential that users appraise the affective qualities of the V

  5. The Effect of Teaching Vocabulary through Semantic Mapping on EFL Learners' Awareness of the Affective Dimensions of Deep Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilforoushan, Somayeh

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of teaching vocabulary through semantic mapping on the awareness of two affective dimensions, evaluation and potency dimensions of deep vocabulary knowledge as well as the general vocabulary knowledge of EFL students. Sixty intermediate EFL female adult learners participated in this study; they were chosen among 90…

  6. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, D.; Seco, J.; Tijero, B.; Abecia, L. C.; Gómez-Esteban, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain) [men 59 (56.2%), women 46 (43.85%)]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire for quality of life) was statistically associated with affective dimension of pain (PRIA, affective pain rating index). However, the influence of this dimension on PDQ-39 was different in the specific case of PD patients that experimented a high score (>12) in SCOPA-AUT (Scale for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic scale). Conclusions. These results confirm the effect of affective perception of pain in life quality of PD patients, indicating the critical role of autonomic symptoms in the modulation of the influence of pain on quality of life and showing the possible utility of dysautonomia as clinical prognostic indicator of quality of life in PD patients affected by pain.

  7. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson’s disease (PD patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain [men 59 (56.2%, women 46 (43.85%]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire for quality of life was statistically associated with affective dimension of pain (PRIA, affective pain rating index. However, the influence of this dimension on PDQ-39 was different in the specific case of PD patients that experimented a high score (>12 in SCOPA-AUT (Scale for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic scale. Conclusions. These results confirm the effect of affective perception of pain in life quality of PD patients, indicating the critical role of autonomic symptoms in the modulation of the influence of pain on quality of life and showing the possible utility of dysautonomia as clinical prognostic indicator of quality of life in PD patients affected by pain.

  8. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, D; Seco, J; Echevarría, E; Tijero, B; Abecia, L C; Gómez-Esteban, J C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain) [men 59 (56.2%), women 46 (43.85%)]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire for quality of life) was statistically associated with affective dimension of pain (PRIA, affective pain rating index). However, the influence of this dimension on PDQ-39 was different in the specific case of PD patients that experimented a high score (>12) in SCOPA-AUT (Scale for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic scale). Conclusions. These results confirm the effect of affective perception of pain in life quality of PD patients, indicating the critical role of autonomic symptoms in the modulation of the influence of pain on quality of life and showing the possible utility of dysautonomia as clinical prognostic indicator of quality of life in PD patients affected by pain. PMID:27239367

  9. Risk of emotional disorder in offspring of depressed parents: Gender differences in the effect of a second emotionally affected parent

    OpenAIRE

    Landman-Peeters, K.M.; Ormel, J.; van Sonderen, E.L.; Den Boer, J A; Minderaa, R. B.; Hartman, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    In offspring of depressed parents a second parent with emotional problems is likely to increase risk of emotional disorder. This effect may however differ between sons and daughters and between offspring of depressed fathers and offspring of depressed mothers. In adolescent and young-adult offspring of parents with major depressive disorder, this study examined the effects of a second affected parent, offspring gender, gender of the depressed parent and their interactions on risk of depressio...

  10. Effects of age and task difficulty on recognition of facial affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgeta, Vasiliki

    2010-05-01

    Current evidence suggests that older adults are less accurate than young adults in their ability to identify facial expressions of emotion. In the present study, young and older adults' ability to correctly recognize facial affect representative of 6 different emotions (happiness, surprise, disgust, fear, anger, and sadness) was examined in 3 conditions varying in difficulty. Task difficulty was measured by varying the number of labels available in a forced choice recognition task to 2, 4, and 6. Results showed that age differences were present in the 2 more difficult conditions for fear and sadness. Older adults were impaired in recognizing facial expressions of surprise only in the 4-label condition. Current findings suggest that task difficulty moderates age differences in emotion labeling. The present study has contributed to previous research by illuminating the conditions under which age differences in the accuracy of labeling of facial affect are more likely to be observed. PMID:20176659

  11. The effects of tempo and familiarity on children's affective interpretation of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Jasmine

    2011-06-01

    When and how does one learn to associate emotion with music? This study attempted to address this issue by examining whether preschool children use tempo as a cue in determining whether a song is happy or sad. Instrumental versions of children's songs were played at different tempos to adults and children ages 3 to 5 years. Familiar and unfamiliar songs were used to examine whether familiarity affected children's identification of emotion in music. The results indicated that adults, 4 year olds and 5 year olds rated fast songs as significantly happier than slow songs. However, 3 year olds failed to rate fast songs differently than slow songs at above-chance levels. Familiarity did not significantly affect children's identification of happiness and sadness in music. PMID:21668112

  12. Analysis Effect Development Of The Money Market And Fundamental’s Factors Affect The Stock Price Of Banking In Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Pelsa, Ibnu

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the effect of fundamental’s factors and systematic rates to the stock price of bank on the list of LQ 45 in Indonesia. Fundamental analysis is a picture of the bank company’s performance based on fundamental factors. Systematic Rates (BIRATE and JIBOR) is a rates that affects the market price of the existing shares on the stock exchange. Fundamental analysis is the form of financial ratios, BIRate and JIBOR are identified variables could affect the stock pric...

  13. Factors affecting the intention of providers to deliver more effective continuing medical education to general practitioners: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higginbotham Nick

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the importance of continuing medical education (CME for GPs, there has been little research into how providers decide what types of CME to deliver to GPs. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the intention of providers to provide more effective types of CME; and to design a survey instrument which can be used to test the applicability of Triandis' model of social behaviour to the provision of CME to general practitioners. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 11 Australian providers of CME for interviews and a random sample of 25 providers for the pilot test. Open-ended interviews structured on Triandis' theory were performed with key informants who provide CME to GPs. These were used to develop a pilot survey instrument to measure the factors affecting intention, resulting in a revised instrument for use in further research. Results There was a broad range of factors affecting providers' intention to deliver more effective forms of CME identified, and these were classifiable in a manner which was consistent with Triandis' model. Key factors affecting providers' intention were the attitude toward CME within organisations and the time and extra work involved. Conclusions We identified a range of potential factors influencing the intention of providers to provide more effective forms of CME, in all categories of Triandis model. Those interested in increasing the choice of more effective CME activities available to GPs may need to broaden the methods used in working with providers to influence them to use more effective CME techniques. The interview material and questionnaire analysis of the pilot survey support the use of Triandis model. Further research is needed to validate Triandis'model for the intention to deliver more effective forms of CME. Such research will inform future strategies aimed at increasing the amount and choice of effective CME activities available for GPs.

  14. Biological Effect of Muller's Ratchet: Distant Capsid Site Can Affect Picornavirus Protein Processing▿

    OpenAIRE

    Escarmís, Cristina; Perales, Celia; Domingo, Esteban

    2009-01-01

    Repeated bottleneck passages of RNA viruses result in accumulation of mutations and fitness decrease. Here, we show that clones of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) subjected to bottleneck passages, in the form of plaque-to-plaque transfers in BHK-21 cells, increased the thermosensitivity of the viral clones. By constructing infectious FMDV clones, we have identified the amino acid substitution M54I in capsid protein VP1 as one of the lesions associated with thermosensitivity. M54I affects ...

  15. Effectiveness of Organic Wastes as Fertilizers and Amendments in Salt-Affected Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Mariangela Diacono; Francesco Montemurro

    2015-01-01

    Excessive salt rate can adversely influence the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils, mainly in arid and semi-arid world regions. Therefore, salt-affected soils must be reclaimed to maintain satisfactory fertility levels for increasing food production. Different approaches have been suggested to solve these issues. This short review focuses on selected studies that have identified organic materials (e.g., farmyard manures, different agro-industrial by-products, and composts)...

  16. Brand equity – how is it affected by critical incidents and what moderates the effect

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrandt, Lutz; Tischer, Sven

    2012-01-01

    To explore how occurring critical incidents affect customer-brand relations, this study measures the impact on the basis of an online experiment. For this purpose, 1,122 usable responses are gathered considering the smartphone brands of Apple and Nokia as well as different scenarios. The respective reactions to these negative incidents are evaluated using the concept of customer-based brand equity. More precisely, a structure equation model is specified and differences in latent factor means ...

  17. Effect of citizenship factors behavioral affecting on dimensions of managers' personality in organizational entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Ali VAZIRI, Seyed; SAFARI, Narjes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Entrepreneur manager respond to chaos, unrest and environmental uncertainty and try to create a strong strategy even it has natural short period. Furthermore, they provide lack of environmental uncertainty by their innovation in other organizations and they create new opportunity by destruction available opportunities. They are trying to achieve new opportunities sooner than competitors do. This research, studied citizenship factors behavioral affecting on dimensions of managers' pe...

  18. Effects of songs with prosocial lyrics on prosocial thoughts, affect, and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Greitemeyer, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    "Previous research has shown that exposure to violent media increased aggression-related affect and thoughts, physiological arousal, and aggressive behavior as well as decreased prosocial tendencies. The present research examined the hypothesis that exposure to prosocial media promotes prosocial outcomes. Three studies revealed that listening to songs with prosocial (relative to neutral) lyrics increased the accessibility of prosocial thoughts, led to more interpersonal empathy, and fostered ...

  19. The effect of choice on the physiology of emotion: An affective startle modulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Genevsky, Alexander; Gard, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The affective startle modulation task has been an important measure in understanding physiological aspects of emotion and motivational responses. Research utilizing this method has relied primarily on a ‘passive’ viewing paradigm, which stands in contrast to everyday life where much of emotion and motivation involves some active choice or agency. The present study investigated the role of choice on the physiology of emotion. Eighty-four participants were randomized into ‘choice’ (n=44) or ‘no...

  20. Effects of Perceived Procedural Justice and Exchange Ideology on Employees' Affective Commitment: Evidence from Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Mona Naguib Moussa

    2013-01-01

    This paper examined how perceived procedural justice and exchange ideology affect employees’ commitment inSaudi private sector companies. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 104Saudi employees. Descriptive statistics, reliability analysis and regression analysis, were used to analyze thedata. The results revealed that perception of organizational procedural justice influenced employees’commitment towards their organizations. Employees with high exchange ide...

  1. The Effect of Body Image Threat on Smoking Motivation Among College Women: Mediation by Negative Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez Khoury, Elena N.; Litvin, Erika B.; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous descriptive, correlational, and quasi-experimental research has established that weight concerns and negative body image are associated with tobacco smoking, cessation, and relapse among young women. A recent experimental study found that activation of negative body image cognitions produced urges to smoke (Lopez, Drobes, Thompson, & Brandon, 2008). The current study intended to replicate and extend these experimental findings by examining the role of negative affect as a mediator of...

  2. Khat Use and Trait Anger: Effects on Affect Regulation during an Acute Stressful Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Bongard, Stephan; al'Absi, Mustafa; Khalil, Najat Sayem; Al Habori, Molham

    2011-01-01

    Khat (Catha edulis) is a widely used stimulating drug often consumed in daily routine in Yemen and East African countries. Chewing khat acutely elicits states of euphoria and feelings of well-being which later shift into emotional instability and low mood. Little is known about emotional regulation in habitual khat chewers. In this study, we compared self-reports on trait anger as well as positive and negative affect responses to a mental arithmetic challenge. Participants included 135 men an...

  3. Customer brand engagement : affection to brand usage intent and moderating effect of brand experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hintikka, Anni

    2015-01-01

    Customer engagement is a relatively new area in the marketing literature and academic research has only shortly studied the nature of customer engagement. Despite the slight research numerous work have recognized the growing attention of customer brand engagement and consequently Marketing Science Institute has listed it as one of its key research priorities. Another important research interest which highly affects to customers satisfaction and loyalty, is brand experience. The...

  4. Influenza epidemics and incidence of schizophrenia, affective disorders and mental retardation in Western Australia: no evidence of a major effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, V; Castle, D; Page, A; Fazio, S; Gurrin, L; Burton, P; Montgomery, P; Jablensky, A

    1997-07-25

    In-utero exposure to influenza has been implicated as a risk factor for developmental CNS damage. This study tests the hypothesis that in-utero exposure to influenza: (1) in the second gestational trimester is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia and affective psychoses; and (2) in the first gestational trimester is associated with an increased risk of mental retardation. Analysis was confined to 1852 cases on the Western Australian psychiatric case register with ICD-9 diagnoses of schizophrenia, affective psychoses, or neurotic depression (comparison group), and 804 cases on the Intellectual Handicap Register with mental retardation that were related to 82,963 'exposed' and 32,462 'non-exposed' births between 1950 and 1960 in the total population of Western Australia. The data were examined for effects associated with six influenza epidemics in the period 1950-1960. Using relative risk ratios for individual epidemics as well as Poisson regression and a proportional hazards model to examine systematic effects for the whole period, no major effect could be identified for maternal influenza on the incidence of schizophrenia, affective psychoses and neurotic depression, despite sufficient statistical power to detect an effect. However, a possible effect was found for mental retardation in males exposed in the first and second gestational trimester. PMID:9376335

  5. The strategic Samaritan : How effectiveness and proximity affect corporate responses to external crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, Jennifer; Diermeier, Daniel A.; Galinsky, Adam D.

    2012-01-01

    This research examines how two dimensions of moral intensity involved in a corporation's external crisis response-magnitude of effectiveness and interpersonal proximity-influence observer perceptions of and behavioral intentions toward the corporation. Across three studies, effectiveness decreased n

  6. ON THE CURRENT RMB EXCHANGE RATE REGIME AFFECTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MONETARY POLICY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄燕君

    2001-01-01

    The current exchange rate regime of China is just like the US dollar-pegged exchange rate regime, which weakens the effectiveness of monetary policy but increases the effectiveness of fiscal policy. Since the scope of implementing the fiscal policy is quite narrow, it is necessary to promote the effectiveness of monetary policy by enlarging the elasticity of the RMB exchange rate regime so as to stimulate the rapid development of the Chinese economy effectively.

  7. The Effect of Explicit Affective Strategy Training on Iranian EFL learners’ Oral Language Proficiency and Anxiety Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mostafavi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed at investigating the possible effects of explicit teaching of affective strategies on Iranian EFL learners’ oral language proficiency and the extent of their anxiety in EFL classroom.  First, PET test was administered to a total number of 120 female third grade high school EFL students.  Then, 60 participants whose score fell within the range of + 1 SD from the mean score were selected for the main study.  Next, they were randomly assigned into two groups (one control and one experimental.  The design of the study was Experimental comparison-group plan.  Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale adopted from Horwitz (1986 was used to examine the EFL learners’ anxiety level in English class.  Moreover, two equivalent oral tests adopted from Heaton (1975 were administered to the participants of the two groups both at the beginning and at the end of the study served as pre and post-tests.  The treatment for the experimental group included Oxford's (1990 taxonomy of affective strategies, which included explicit affective strategy instruction (in relaxation, music, visualization, humor, positive self-talk, risk-taking, and monitoring emotions.  The control group did not receive any special instruction in terms of affective strategies.  To investigate the possible effects of explicit affective strategy use instruction on the participants’ oral language proficiency and their anxiety level, the pre and posttests of oral tests and the participants’ self-reports of anxiety control in both groups were analyzed and compared.  The results of independent samples T- test indicated that while the two groups were homogeneous in terms of oral proficiency and level of anxiety control before introducing the treatment, the experimental group performed better than the control group in the oral post-test.  Moreover, the level of anxiety control for the experimental group was significantly different and higher than that of the

  8. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  9. Modern Virtual Reality. And the effects of affecting human senses to increase immersion

    OpenAIRE

    Ekros, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Modern virtual reality is an ever growing subject in today’s society. I delved deeper into some key moments in the development of modern virtual reality. Oculus Rift has shown incredible potential. Some developments even seek to envelope the human senses in virtual reality as well.   With several different approaches to the same solution there are many ways that the experience can affect the overall immersion of a consumer into the product.  The tests I performed were primarily focused around...

  10. Effects of depressive symptoms and experimentally adopted schemas on sexual arousal and affect in sexually healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffel, Stephanie W; Heiman, Julia R

    2006-04-01

    The present study examined the effects of depressive mood symptoms and experimentally adopted sexual schemas on women's sexual arousal and affect. Women's vaginal response, subjective sexual arousal, and affect were measured in response to sexually explicit visual material in a laboratory setting. At baseline on a self-report measure, women with depressive mood symptoms (n = 28) reported significantly lower sexual desire than women with normal mood (n=28), but no significant differences in arousal, orgasm, satisfaction, or pain. Participants were asked to adopt both a positive and negative sexual self-schema prior to viewing erotic stimuli. Women in both mood groups demonstrated significantly greater subjective sexual arousal, vaginal response, and positive affect in the positive schema condition than in the negative schema condition when controlling for anxiety. There were no main effects for mood symptoms. These findings support an information processing conceptualization of sexual arousal and suggest that an acute dose of cognitive sexual schemas can significantly impact subsequent sexual and affective responses. Implications of findings for the assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunction are noted. PMID:16752119

  11. Affect Recognition through Facebook for Effective Group Profiling Towards Personalized Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos TROUSSAS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Social networks are progressively being considered as an intense thought for learning. Particularly in the research area of Intelligent Tutoring Systems, they can create intuitive, versatile and customized e-learning systems which can advance the learning process by revealing the capacities and shortcomings of every learner and by customizing the correspondence by group profiling. In this paper, the primary idea is the affect recognition as an estimation of the group profiling process, given that the fact of knowing how individuals feel about specific points can be viewed as imperative for the improvement of the tutoring process. As a testbed for our research, we have built up a prototype system for recognizing the emotions of Facebook users. Users' emotions can be neutral, positive or negative. A feeling is frequently presented in unpretentious or complex ways in a status. On top of that, data assembled from Facebook regularly contain a considerable measure of noise. Indeed, the task of automatic affect recognition in online texts turns out to be more troublesome. Thus, a probabilistic approach of Rocchio classifier is utilized so that the learning process is assisted. Conclusively, the conducted experiments confirmed the usefulness of the described approach.

  12. Context Effects on Facial Affect Recognition in Schizophrenia and Autism: Behavioral and Eye-Tracking Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Noah J; Pinkham, Amy E; Weittenhiller, Lauren P; Faso, Daniel J; Simpson, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Although Schizophrenia (SCZ) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) share impairments in emotion recognition, the mechanisms underlying these impairments may differ. The current study used the novel "Emotions in Context" task to examine how the interpretation and visual inspection of facial affect is modulated by congruent and incongruent emotional contexts in SCZ and ASD. Both adults with SCZ (n= 44) and those with ASD (n= 21) exhibited reduced affect recognition relative to typically-developing (TD) controls (n= 39) when faces were integrated within broader emotional scenes but not when they were presented in isolation, underscoring the importance of using stimuli that better approximate real-world contexts. Additionally, viewing faces within congruent emotional scenes improved accuracy and visual attention to the face for controls more so than the clinical groups, suggesting that individuals with SCZ and ASD may not benefit from the presence of complementary emotional information as readily as controls. Despite these similarities, important distinctions between SCZ and ASD were found. In every condition, IQ was related to emotion-recognition accuracy for the SCZ group but not for the ASD or TD groups. Further, only the ASD group failed to increase their visual attention to faces in incongruent emotional scenes, suggesting a lower reliance on facial information within ambiguous emotional contexts relative to congruent ones. Collectively, these findings highlight both shared and distinct social cognitive processes in SCZ and ASD that may contribute to their characteristic social disabilities. PMID:26645375

  13. How Adaptive Learning Affects Evolution: Reviewing Theory on the Baldwin Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Sznajder, B.; Sabelis, M.W.; M. Egas

    2011-01-01

    We review models of the Baldwin effect, i.e., the hypothesis that adaptive learning (i.e., learning to improve fitness) accelerates genetic evolution of the phenotype. Numerous theoretical studies scrutinized the hypothesis that a non-evolving ability of adaptive learning accelerates evolution of genetically determined behavior. However, their results are conflicting in that some studies predict an accelerating effect of learning on evolution, whereas others show a decelerating effect. We beg...

  14. How adaptive learning affects evolution: reviewing theory on the Baldwin effect

    OpenAIRE

    Sznajder, B.; Sabelis, M.W.; M. Egas

    2012-01-01

    We review models of the Baldwin effect, i.e., the hypothesis that adaptive learning (i.e., learning to improve fitness) accelerates genetic evolution of the phenotype. Numerous theoretical studies scrutinized the hypothesis that a non-evolving ability of adaptive learning accelerates evolution of genetically determined behavior. However, their results are conflicting in that some studies predict an accelerating effect of learning on evolution, whereas others show a decelerating effect. We beg...

  15. Does noise affect learning? A short review on noise effects on cognitive performance in children

    OpenAIRE

    Klatte, Maria; Bergström, Kirstin; Lachmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview of research concerning both acute and chronic effects of exposure to noise on children's cognitive performance. Experimental studies addressing the impact of acute exposure showed negative effects on speech perception and listening comprehension. These effects are more pronounced in children as compared to adults. Children with language or attention disorders and second-language learners are still more impaired than age-matched controls. Noise-induced di...

  16. Does noise affect learning? A short review on noise effects on cognitive performance in children

    OpenAIRE

    Maria eKlatte; Kirstin eBergstroem; Thomas eLachmann

    2013-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview of research concerning both acute and chronic effects of exposure to noise on children´s cognitive performance. Experimental studies addressing the impact of acute exposure showed negative effects on speech perception and listening comprehension. These effects are more pronounced in children as compared to adults. Children with language or attention disorders and second-language learners are still more impaired than age-matched controls. Noise-induc...

  17. The interaction between dispersal, the Allee effect and scramble competition affects population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R.; Wertheim, B.; Hemerik, L.; Schneider, P.; Powell, J.

    2002-01-01

    Many organisms experience an Allee effect: their populations do not grow optimally at low densities. In addition, individuals compete with one another at high densities. The Allee effect and competition thus create a lower and an upper bound to local population size. Local populations can, however,

  18. The interaction between dispersal, the Allee effect and scramble competition affects population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R; Wertheim, B; Hemerik, L; Schneider, P; Powell, J

    2002-01-01

    Many organisms experience an Allee effect: their populations do not grow optimally at low densities. In addition, individuals compete with one another at high densities. The Allee effect and competition thus create a lower and an upper bound to local population size. Local populations can, however.

  19. The effects of an action video game on visual and affective information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Playing action video games can have beneficial effects on visuospatial cognition and negative effects on social information processing. However, these two effects have not been demonstrated in the same individuals in a single study. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of playing an action or non-action video game on the processing of emotion in facial expression. The data revealed that 10h of playing an action or non-action video game had differential effects on the ERPs relative to a no-contact control group. Playing an action game resulted in two effects: one that reflected an increase in the amplitude of the ERPs following training over the right frontal and posterior regions that was similar for angry, happy, and neutral faces; and one that reflected a reduction in the allocation of attention to happy faces. In contrast, playing a non-action game resulted in changes in slow wave activity over the central-parietal and frontal regions that were greater for targets (i.e., angry and happy faces) than for non-targets (i.e., neutral faces). These data demonstrate that the contrasting effects of action video games on visuospatial and emotion processing occur in the same individuals following the same level of gaming experience. This observation leads to the suggestion that caution should be exercised when using action video games to modify visual processing, as this experience could also have unintended effects on emotion processing. PMID:23419898

  20. Arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus by affecting transmembrane flow of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenying; Yin, Yongqiang; Wang, Zengyong; Fang, Runping; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Min; Bai, Gang; Luo, Guo'an

    2013-12-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan extract from Arctium lappa (L.), exhibits anti-inflammation, antioxidation, vasodilator effects, etc. However, the effects of arctigenin on bronchus relaxation are not well investigated. This study aimed to investigate how arctigenin regulates bronchus tone and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) flow. Trachea strips of guinea pigs were prepared for testing the relaxation effect of arctigenin to acetylcholine, histamine, KCl, and CaCl2, respectively. Furthermore, L-type calcium channel currents were detected by patch-clamp, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was detected by confocal microscopy. The results showed that arctigenin exhibited relaxation effect on tracheae to different constrictors, and this was related to decreasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration by inhibiting Ca(2+) influx partly through L-type calcium channel as well as promoting Ca(2+) efflux. In summary, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms by which arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus and suggests its potential use for airway disease therapy. PMID:24114345

  1. A Review on the Effects of Emulsions on Flow Behaviours and Common Factors Affecting the Stability of Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, J.S.; WONG, S.F.; M. C. Law; Y. Samyudia; S.S. Dol

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this review study is to present the current state of available research results and understanding on the effects of emulsions on flow behaviours and flow properties, as well as common factors affecting the stability of emulsions. Emulsions occur in many areas of daily life and industry settings but this review study only intends to discuss emulsions associated with upstreams crude oil production, particularly the oil pipelines transporting system. In the transporting pip...

  2. The Liposuction-Induced Effects on Adiponectin and Selected Cytokines Are Not Affected by Exercise Training in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Yazigi Solis; Guilherme Giannini Artioli; Eduardo Montag; Vitor de Salles Painelli; Fábio Lopes Saito; Fernanda Rodrigues Lima; Hamilton Roschel; Bruno Gualano; Antonio Herbert Lancha Junior; Fabiana Braga Benatti

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the abrupt liposuction-induced decrease in adipose tissue could affect adipokine secretion pattern. We hypothesized that exercise training could positively impact adipokine metabolism following liposuction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of liposuction on inflammation-related adipokines in women who were either exercise-trained or remained sedentary after surgery. Thirty-six healthy normal-weight women underwent an abdominal liposuction and two...

  3. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the heat affected zone microstructure and toughness of multi-pass welded pipeline steels

    OpenAIRE

    Nuruddin, Ibrahim K.

    2012-01-01

    This research is aimed at understanding the effect of thermal cycles on the metallurgical and microstructural characteristics of the heat affected zone of a multi-pass pipeline weld. Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagrams of the pipeline steel grades studied (X65, X70 and X100) were generated using a thermo mechanical simulator (Gleeble 3500) and 10 mm diameter by 100 mm length samples. The volume change during phase transformation was studied by a dilatometer, this is to underst...

  4. Effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the heat affected zone of stainless steel welds

    OpenAIRE

    Stoenescu, Raluca

    2005-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on austenitic stainless steels, usually used for the manufacturing of internal elements of nuclear reactors (e.g. the core shrouds), are the alteration of the microchemistry and the microstructure, and, as a consequence, of the mechanical properties. The present study is aimed at extending knowledge upon the impact of neutron-irradiation on the heat affected zone (HAZ) of welded materials, which was influenced by the thermal cycles upon fusion welding. Two t...

  5. Effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the heat affected zone of stainless steel welds

    OpenAIRE

    Stoenescu, Raluca; Baluc, Nadine Laurence

    2007-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on austenitic stainless steels, usually used for the manufacturing of internal elements of nuclear reactors (e.g. the core shrouds), are the alteration of the microchemistry and the microstructure, and, as a consequence, of the mechanical properties. The present study is aimed at extending knowledge upon the impact of neutron-irradiation on the heat affected zone (HAZ) of welded materials, which was influenced by the thermal cycles upon fusion welding. Two t...

  6. Effective the ultrasonography in the diagnosis of the affections of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective work was made to highlight the value of the ultrasonido in the diagnosis of the affections of the digestive tract. In total 282 patients were explored constituted in 2 groups integrated by 82 and 200 sick persons, respectively. In the first group they were included patient to those that were detected a lesion of the digestive tract during an exploration ultrasonografica in a casual way. In the second group there are 100 patients that have previous diagnosis of lesion of the digestive tract and that they were studied later on with ultrasonido and 100 healthy to those that equally were carried out a study ultrasonografico. The results were: sensibility of 100%, specificity of 97%, value positive predictivos of 98,7%

  7. Factors affecting effectiveness of vaccination against hepatitis B virus in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-09-14

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major global health problem. Despite the success of the general measures against blood transmitted infections in hemodialysis (HD) units, the prevalence of HBV infection among the HD patients is still high. Thus vaccination against HBV is indicating in this population. However, compared with the general population the seroprotection achieved in HD patients remains relatively low, at about 70%. In this review patient, HD procedure and vaccine-associated factors that affect the efficacy of HBV vaccination are analyzed. Also alternative routes of HBV vaccine administration as well as new and more immunogenic vaccine formulations are discussed. However, besides scientific progress, vigilance of HD physicians and staff regarding the general measures against the transmission of blood borne infections and the vaccination against HBV is also required for reducing the prevalence of this viral infection. PMID:25232238

  8. Khat use and trait anger: effects on affect regulation during an acute stressful challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Stephan; al'Absi, Mustafa; Khalil, Najat Sayem; Al Habori, Molham

    2011-01-01

    Khat (Catha edulis) is a widely used stimulating drug often consumed in daily routine in Yemen and East African countries. Chewing khat acutely elicits states of euphoria and feelings of well-being which later shift into emotional instability and low mood. Little is known about emotional regulation in habitual khat chewers. In this study, we compared self-reports on trait anger as well as positive and negative affect responses to a mental arithmetic challenge. Participants included 135 men and women from Yemen who chew khat regularly, occasionally or not at all. Participants attended a laboratory session that involved resting periods and performing a math challenge. Analyses of variance and regression show that regular khat chewing is associated with higher trait anger, more pronounced negative responses during stress and less pronounced positive emotional states. These results suggest that regular khat chewing is associated with disturbances in emotion regulation processes. PMID:21860244

  9. Effect of DSP4 and desipramine in the sensorial and affective component of neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Lidia; Mico, Juan A; Rey-Brea, Raquel; Camarena-Delgado, Carmen; Berrocoso, Esther

    2016-10-01

    Previous findings suggest that neuropathic pain induces characteristic changes in the noradrenergic system that may modify the sensorial and affective dimensions of pain. We raise the hypothesis that different drugs that manipulate the noradrenergic system can modify specific domains of pain. In the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain, the sensorial (von Frey and acetone tests) and the affective (place escape/avoidance paradigm) domains of pain were evaluated in rats 1 and 2weeks after administering the noradrenergic neurotoxin [N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride] (DSP4, 50mg/kg). In other animals, we evaluated the effect of enhancing noradrenergic tone in the 2weeks after injury by administering the antidepressant desipramine (10mg/kg/day, delivered by osmotic minipumps) during this period, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal regulated kinases (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was also assessed. The ACC receives direct inputs from the main noradrenergic nucleus, the locus coeruleus, and ERK activation has been related with the expression of pain-related negative affect. These studies revealed that DSP4 almost depleted noradrenergic axons in the ACC and halved noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus along with a decrease in the affective dimension and an increased of p-ERK in the ACC. However, it did not modify sensorial pain perception. By contrast, desipramine reduced pain hypersensitivity, while completely impeding the reduction of the affective pain dimension and without modifying the amount of p-ERK. Together results suggest that the noradrenergic system may regulate the sensorial and affective sphere of neuropathic pain independently. PMID:27181607

  10. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariko Fukushima

    Full Text Available The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG, which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC. When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect, while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect. These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  11. Radiation effects on the stability of benzimidazole, which directly affects the stability of human DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As all of us know that DNA is the genetic material and that is therefore stood at the very center of the study of life. Among the four important nitrogenous bases found in DNA one is purine which is nothing but a benzimidazole structure substituted by two nitrogens at 1 and 3 positions. Denaturation and renaturation duo to radiation are the two important incidents in DNA life which are the reason of many diseases and also the remedy of many diseases. These two incidents occur due to environmental effect on the parent part of DNA such as purine or we may say that benzimidazole structure. Since benzimidazole is an important part of human DNA structure so its response on different environment causes e huge effect on human gen. To study such response different types of benzimidazole molecules have been studied and two of such benzimidazole molecules are 2-Acetyl Benzomidazole (2ABI) and 2-Benzoyl Benzimidazole (2BBI). Usually these molecules show excited state proton transfer characteristics in polar and nonpolar environment. Proton transfer effect is very important behavior in DNA bases which is the fundamental phenomenon of different drug designing. To control such effect or to produce the effect as much as we want we have tried to restrict the molecule in different nano cavities. Michroheterogeneous media such as micelles as usual has enormous environmental effect on charge transfer phenomenon. The specialty of this media is that they have an ability to concentrate guest molecules into relatively small effective volumes and then to promote the re-encounter of such molecules. This property also makes micelles a good device for inducing efficient electrostatic interactions between the micelle head groups and the guest molecules. This electrostatic interaction has a direct effect on the stability of 2ABI and 2BBI molecule in ground state as well as in excited state due to micellization and this stability has enormous effect on human gene stability. (authors)

  12. STUDY OF PARAMETERS AFFECTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MORINGA OLEIFERA IN HARDNESS & TURBIDITY REMOVAL

    OpenAIRE

    Usaid ur Rehman Farooqui; Augustine Ifelebuegu

    2014-01-01

    This research involves the study of effects due to changes in various parameters such as pH (range; pH 4-9) and temperature (0ºC-50ºC) on effectiveness of Moringa Oleifera. Turbidity measurement has been considered during research for observing the effectiveness of Moringa Oleifera with the help of 40 NTU, 80 NTU and 160 NTU solutions. Synthetic hard water varied from 300ppm to 900ppm as calcium hardness. Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP-OES OPTIMA 5300 DV...

  13. Caesium cell coherent population trapping clock: main effects affecting the frequency stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic clocks using coherent population trapping (CPT) allow to improve performances of vapour cell conventional microwave clocks, or else to miniaturize them thanks to of a full optical interrogation. In this paper, we describe a prototype developed at LNE-SYRTE. It combines two original techniques: an excitation scheme with two linearly and orthogonally polarized beams, and a Ramsey interrogation. This enables the observation of narrow resonances with a good signal-to-noise ratio. A few major effects influencing the frequency stability are addressed; they are the effect of the buffer gas, of the magnetic field, of the laser power, and finally the effect of the local oscillator noise or Dick effect. The measured frequency stability is 7x10-13 at 1 s and 2x10-14 at 2000 s. (authors)

  14. Does the compatibility effect in the race Implicit Association Test reflect familiarity or affect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Sachiko; Peek-O'Leary, Marie

    2005-06-01

    In the Implicit Association Test (IAT; Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) involving race classification (white vs. black), an apparent compatibility effect is found between the "pleasant" attribute and the "white" category. This race IAT effect has been interpreted in terms of "implicit prejudice"--that is, more positive evaluation of whites than of blacks that is not open to consciousness. We suggested instead that the race IAT effect is better interpreted in terms of the salience asymmetry account proposed by Rothermund and Wentura (2004), whereby greater familiarity with the white category makes it more salient. Evidence that has been presented against the familiarity interpretation is considered, and alternative interpretations of findings related to the race IAT effect are discussed. PMID:16235627

  15. Mood Induction in Children: Effect of the Affective Valence of a Text on Phonological Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Fartoukh, Michaël; Chanquoy, Lucile; Piolat, Annie

    2014-01-01

    The influence of mood on working memory capacity has been investigated in adults, albeit with conflicting results, but remains relatively unexplored in children. The present study examined the effect of a mood induction procedure on phonological working memory capacity in fourth and fifth graders. An initial working memory span test was followed first by a collective mood induction procedure, then by a second working memory span test. Results showed an effect of mood induction procedure on ph...

  16. Phosphocreatine interacts with phospholipids, affects membrane properties and exerts membrane-protective effects

    OpenAIRE

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F.; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R.; Meier, Beat H.; Epand, Richard M.; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are sti...

  17. Phosphocreatine Interacts with Phospholipids, Affects Membrane Properties and Exerts Membrane-Protective Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F.; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R.; Meier, Beat H.; Epand, Richard M.; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are sti...

  18. The Effect of Evaluation of Factors Affecting Organizational Silence (Case Study: Parsian Insurance in Esfahan)

    OpenAIRE

    Mashallah Valikhani; Hamid Karpardaz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effective factors on the organizational salience. Indeed, the effect of managerial, organizational, group, and individual factors on the organizational salience was investigated in the musicality of ParsianInsurance In Esfahan. This research, in terms of its purpose, is an applied one; and in terms of implementation method, is a survey with a correlation approach. The population includes 140 experienced managers, vicepresidents and employees of...

  19. Effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual variables and performance of self-selected walking pace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Flávia Angélica Martins; Nunes, Renan Felipe Hartmann; Ferreira, Sandro Dos Santos; Krinski, Kleverton; Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklin; Alves, Ragami Chaves; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual responses as well as the performance of self-selected walking pace. [Subjects] The study included 28 adult women between 29 and 51 years old. [Methods] The subjects were divided into three groups: no musical stimulation group (control), and 90 and 140 beats per minute musical tempo groups. Each subject underwent three experimental sessions: involved familiarization with the equipment, an incremental test to exhaustion, and a 30-min walk on a treadmill at a self-selected pace, respectively. During the self-selected walking session, physiological, perceptual, and affective variables were evaluated, and walking performance was evaluated at the end. [Results] There were no significant differences in physiological variables or affective response among groups. However, there were significant differences in perceptual response and walking performance among groups. [Conclusion] Fast music (140 beats per minute) promotes a higher rating of perceived exertion and greater performance in self-selected walking pace without significantly altering physiological variables or affective response. PMID:26180303

  20. Effect of DISC1 polymorphisms on the long-term course of neurocognitive deficits in non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Bourgon, J; Ayesa-Arriola, R; Fatjó-Vilas, M; Roiz-Santiañez, R; Fañanás, L; Crespo-Facorro, B

    2015-10-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are core symptoms of schizophrenia that determine a poorer outcome. High variability in the progression of neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia has been described. It is still unknown whether genetic variations can affect the course of cognitive deficits. Variations in the Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene have previously been associated with neurocognitive deficits. This study investigated the association between 3 DISC1 polymorphisms (rs6675281 (Leu607Phe), rs1000731, and rs821616 (Ser704Cys)) and long-term (3 years) cognitive performance. One-hundred-thirty-three Caucasian drug-naive patients experiencing a first episode of non-affective psychosis were genotyped. Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and after 3 years of initiating treatment. Other clinical and socio-demographic variables were recorded to eliminate potential confounding effects. Patients carrying the A allele of rs1000731 exhibited a significant improvement in Working Memory and Attention domains, and the homozygosity of the A allele of rs821616 showed a significant improvement in Motor Dexterity performance over 3 years of follow-up. In conclusion, DISC1 gene variations may affect the course of cognitive deficits found in patients suffering from the first episode of non-affective psychosis. PMID:26443054

  1. Effects of salience-network-node neurofeedback training on affective biases in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, J Paul; Glover, Gary H; Bagarinao, Epifanio; Chang, Catie; Mackey, Sean; Sacchet, Matthew D; Gotlib, Ian H

    2016-03-30

    Neural models of major depressive disorder (MDD) posit that over-response of components of the brain's salience network (SN) to negative stimuli plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of MDD. In the present proof-of-concept study, we tested this formulation directly by examining the affective consequences of training depressed persons to down-regulate response of SN nodes to negative material. Ten participants in the real neurofeedback group saw, and attempted to learn to down-regulate, activity from an empirically identified node of the SN. Ten other participants engaged in an equivalent procedure with the exception that they saw SN-node neurofeedback indices from participants in the real neurofeedback group. Before and after scanning, all participants completed tasks assessing emotional responses to negative scenes and to negative and positive self-descriptive adjectives. Compared to participants in the sham-neurofeedback group, from pre- to post-training, participants in the real-neurofeedback group showed a greater decrease in SN-node response to negative stimuli, a greater decrease in self-reported emotional response to negative scenes, and a greater decrease in self-reported emotional response to negative self-descriptive adjectives. Our findings provide support for a neural formulation in which the SN plays a primary role in contributing to negative cognitive biases in MDD. PMID:26862057

  2. Socio-emotional support in French hospitals: Effects on French nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiller, Caroline; Van Der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the differences in human resource management (HRM) practices between the non-profit health care sector and business life, the majority of health care sector research appears to be based on the HRM (for human resources management) blueprint for business life staff policy and practice. This study is aimed to better understand the impact of workplace social support in the context of French hospitals. Concrete, the first objective of this article comprises a thorough conceptualization and operationalization of workplace social support (i.e. both professional and personal social support). Data were collected in a French hospital among a sample of 62 respondents (for the qualitative part of our study), and among a sample of 171 health care professionals (nurses and nurse aids) (for the quantitative part of our study). Our outcomes indicate that, especially, personal support given by one's supervisor is strongly and positively related to nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment. After a discussion about the outcomes, followed by some recommendations for future research, the article concludes with some practical implications for management in hospitals. PMID:26856519

  3. Land Management Effects on Biogeochemical Functioning of Salt-Affected Paddy Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.QUANTIN; O.GRUNBERGER; N.SUVANNANG; E.BOURDON

    2008-01-01

    Most lowlands in Northeast Thailand (Isaan region) are cultivated with rice and large areas are affected by salinity,which drastically limits rice production.A field experiment was conducted during the 2003 rainy season to explore the interactions between salinity and land management in two fields representative of two farming practices:an intensively managed plot with organic inputs and efficient water management,and one without organic matter addition.Field measurements,including pH,Eh,electrical conductivity (EC),and soil solution chemistry,were performed at three depths,with a particular focus on Fe dynamics,inside and outside saline patches.High reducing conditions appeared after flooding particularly in plots receiving organic matter and reduction processes leading to oxide reduction and to the release of Fe and,to a lesser extend,Mn to the soil solution.Oxide reduction led to the consumption of H+ and the more the Fe reduction was,the higher the pH was,up to 6.5.Formation of hydroxy-green rust were likely to be at the origin of the pH stabilization.In the absence of organic amendments,high salinity prevented the establishment of the reduction processes and pH value remained around 4.Even under high reduction conditions,the Fe concentrations in the soil solution were below commonly observed toxic values and the amended plot had better rice production yield.

  4. Does food insecurity affect parental characteristics and child behavior? Testing mediation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Oshima, Karen M Matta; Kim, Youngmi

    2010-01-01

    Using two waves of data from the Child Development Supplement in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, this study investigates whether parental characteristics (parenting stress, parental warmth, psychological distress, and parent's self-esteem) mediate household food insecurity's relations with child behavior problems. Fixed-effects analyses examine data from a low-income sample of 416 children from 249 households. This study finds that parenting stress mediates the effects of food insecurity on child behavior problems. However, two robustness tests produce different results from those of the fixed-effects models. This inconsistency suggests that household food insecurity's relations to the two types of child behavior problems need to be investigated further with a different methodology and other measures. PMID:20873019

  5. Technical issues of electric nanopulse contact lithotripsy as factors affecting lithotripsy effectiveness and probe resourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Ivanova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess the relationship of main technical issues of electric nanopulse contact lithotripsy (CLT with lithotripsy effectiveness and lithotripsy resources of probe.Electric nanopulses were transmitted by the flexible probes and the lithotripter «Urolit». The relationship between lithotripsy effectiveness and tip diameter of probes, pulse energy, pulse frequency was assessed, and resources of lithotripsy probes with different diameters of the tip were analyzed.Sufficient number of electric nanopulse to destroy stone models was less when tip diameter, nanopulse energy and frequency were greater.Effectiveness of electric nanopulse CLT can be enhanced with the increase of nanopulse energy, frequency and probe diameter. Complex correction of technical issues of electric nanopulse CLT can be a way of probe resources saving.

  6. How Does Sub-National Autonomy Affect the Effectiveness of Structural Funds?

    OpenAIRE

    Baehr, Cornelius

    2006-01-01

    Economic and social cohesion between the EU Member States is one of the explicitly stated goals in the Treaty on European Union. The EU’s Structural Funds as a part of the Union’s regional policies are a mechanism of conditional grants that provides co-financing for growth enhancing investments. Evidence on the effectiveness of the Structural Funds is mixed. While Boldrin and Canova (2001) find no sign of a catch-up effect of regions receiving aid for the period of 1980-1996, Beugelsdijk ...

  7. The effect of chewing gum flavor on the negative affect associated with tobacco abstinence among dependent cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee M; Collins, Frank L; Vanderveen, Joseph W; Weaver, Cameron C

    2010-11-01

    Many smokers relapse during cessation attempts due to increases in negative affect. Previous research has shown that chewing confectionary chewing gum appears to lessen the severity of acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms and help individuals who are trying to reduce smoking in part due to the flavor of the gum chewed. The current study compared the effects of three flavored gums to a No Gum Control during 48-hour cessation periods for young dependent smokers. Forty-nine smokers participated in three experimental conditions (peppermint, vanilla, and baked apple cardamom flavored gum) as well as a No Gum Control across four weeks while abstaining from smoking for 48-hours each week. Compared to the No Gum Control, participants in the Gum conditions reported lower levels of anxiety, dysphoria, and tension. Vanilla and baked apple cardamom flavored gum resulted in lower levels of negative affect while peppermint flavored gum was not different from the No Gum Control. These findings indicate that some flavors of gum are effective in reducing the negative affect associated with nicotine withdrawal and may serve as a valuable tool in helping smokers quit. PMID:20598808

  8. Sublethal effects of aged oil sands-affected water on white sucker (Catostomus commersonii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Collin J; Hogan, Natacha S; Kavanagh, Richard J; Mercer, Angella G; Kraak, Glen J Van Der; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    To investigate impacts of proposed oil sands aquatic reclamation techniques on benthic fish, white sucker (Catostomus commersonii Lacépède, 1803) were stocked in 2 experimental ponds-Demonstration Pond, containing aged fine tailings capped with fresh water, consistent with proposed end-pit lake designs, and South Bison Pond, containing aged unextracted oil sands material-to examine the effects of unmodified hydrocarbons. White sucker were stocked from a nearby reservoir at both sites in May 2010 and sampled 4 mo later to measure indicators of energy storage and utilization. Comparisons were then made with the source population and 2 reference lakes in the region. After exposure to aged tailings, white sucker had smaller testes and ovaries and reduced growth compared with the source population. Fish introduced to aged unextracted oil sands material showed an increase in growth over the same period. Limited available energy, endocrine disruption, and chronic stress likely contributed to the effects observed, corresponding to elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids, aromatic compounds in bile, and increased CYP1A activity. Because of the chemical and biological complexity of these systems, direct cause-effect relationships could not be identified; however, effects were associated with naphthenic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ammonia, and high pH. Impacts on growth have not been previously observed in pelagic fishes examined in these systems, and may be related to differences in sediment interaction. PMID:25545538

  9. Explaining the effects of targeted online advertising on children's cognitive, affective, and behavioral brand responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Reijmersdal; E. Rozendaal; N. Smink; G. van Noort; M. Buijzen

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, information from children's profile pages on social network sites is used to target online advertising. This practice has raised concerns in society and academia, however, effects of profile targeting on children remained unstudied. Therefore, this study focused on children's cognitive

  10. Gender Affects Semantic Competition: The Effect of Gender in a Non-Gender-Marking Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Kumiko; Hyönä, Jukka; Scholfield, Merete

    2013-01-01

    English speakers tend to produce fewer pronouns when a referential competitor has the same gender as the referent than otherwise. Traditionally, this gender congruence effect has been explained in terms of ambiguity avoidance (e.g., Arnold, Eisenband, Brown-Schmidt, & Trueswell, 2000; Fukumura, Van Gompel, & Pickering, 2010). However, an…

  11. The "Animal House" Effect: How University-Themed Comedy Films Affect Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylkiw, Louise; Currie, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from learning and attitude theories, the current investigation explores the effect of media on students' attitudes. Study 1 was a content analysis of 34 films classified as university-themed comedies and showed that such films highlighted risk-taking (e.g., alcohol consumption) and minimized the importance of academics (e.g., studying).…

  12. Mycorrhizal effectiveness and manganese toxicity in soybean as affected by soil type and endophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira Marco Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal plants may present Mn toxicity alleviation and this depends on the plant-endophyte-environment interaction. The effectiveness of three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF (Glomus macrocarpum, G. etunicatum, G. intraradices and a control without AMF in two soils: Typic Rhodudalf with high Mn availability and a Typic Quartzipsamment, with low Mn availability, was evaluated in a time-course experiment at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks after soybean (Glycine max L. seedling emergence. The objective was to select the most effective AMF species to enhance plant growth and to assess its effects upon Mn uptake by plants and Mn availability in the soil. For the sandy soil, AMF inoculation resulted in increased plant biomass, especially with G. intraradices and G. etunicatum. Lower Mn concentrations were observed in shoot and root of mycorrhizal plants. For the clayey soil, there was also an increase in plant biomass, but only for plants inoculated with G. intraradices and G. etunicatum. Mycorrhizal plants presented higher Mn concentrations in shoot and root and there was an increase of available Mn in the soil, in relation to the control, especially in the treatment with G. macrocarpum. When inoculated with G. macrocarpum, plants presented Mn toxicity symptoms and reduced biomass in comparison to control plants. The effects of mycorrhizal inoculation, either positive or negative, were most intense at 9 and 12 weeks.

  13. Corn Leaf Water Retention as Affected by Organic Fer—tilizations and Effective Microbes Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUHUILIAN; N.AJIKI; 等

    1998-01-01

    Effects of organic fertilizers and effective microbes on lef water retention of sweet corn (Zea mays L.cv. Honey-Bantam) were studied.Sweet corns were grown with organic or chemical fertilzers with or without effective microbes (EM).A water retention urve was obtained by drying the excised leaves under a light of 500μmol(m2.s)-1,The cure shows two distinct phases.The initial steep slope indicates the water loss speed by stomatal transpiration (Est) and the gentle slope of the second phase indicates water loss speed by cuticular transpiration(Ecu).Both Est and Ecu were lower for leaves of plants grown with organic materials than fro thoe with chemical fertilizers.Addition of EM to both organic and chemical fertilizers decreased Est but showed no effect on Ecu.The water retention ability of the excised leaves was proportional to pho-tosynthetic maintenance ability under soil water deficit conditions as well as the solte concentration in leaves ,The results suggested that organic fertilization and EM appication increased water stress resistance both under in situ conditions and in excised leaves of sweet corn plants.

  14. How Disasters Affect Local Labor Markets: The Effects of Hurricanes in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasen, Ariel R.; Polachek, Solomon W.

    2009-01-01

    This study improves upon the Difference in Difference approach by examining exogenous shocks using a Generalized Difference in Difference (GDD) technique that identifies economic effects of hurricanes. Based on the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages data, worker earnings in Florida counties hit by a hurricane increase up to 4 percent,…

  15. The Interactive Effects of Facial Expressions of Emotion and Verbal Messages on Perceptions of Affective Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Howard S.

    1979-01-01

    Students' perceptions of sincerity, dominance, and positivity were measured by pairing happy, angry, surprised and sad faces of teachers with teachers' comments characterized as positive or negative and dominant or submissive. Clear effects of facial-verbal combinations emerged; there were no sex differences other than in perceptions of sincerity.…

  16. Gender Peer Effects in School: Does the Gender of School Peers Affect Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses gender peer effects in education and their impact on student achievement in Chile. We address the topic from three different level of analysis: (a) whether the proportion of girls in a cohort influences students' educational outcomes (b) whether assignment to a classroom with a higher proportion of girls influences…

  17. Eating Disorder Public Service Announcements: Analyzing Effects from an Intergroup Affect and Stereotype Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, Irina A.; Seate, Anita Atwell; Waks, Leah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have documented that exposure to stereotypical information about certain social groups leads to unfavorable perceptions and feelings toward that group. Integrating insights from the mental illness stigma and the social identity perspective literatures, the purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of eating disorder…

  18. Does noise affect learning? A short review on noise effects on cognitive performance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, Maria; Bergström, Kirstin; Lachmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview of research concerning both acute and chronic effects of exposure to noise on children's cognitive performance. Experimental studies addressing the impact of acute exposure showed negative effects on speech perception and listening comprehension. These effects are more pronounced in children as compared to adults. Children with language or attention disorders and second-language learners are still more impaired than age-matched controls. Noise-induced disruption was also found for non-auditory tasks, i.e., serial recall of visually presented lists and reading. The impact of chronic exposure to noise was examined in quasi-experimental studies. Indoor noise and reverberation in classroom settings were found to be associated with poorer performance of the children in verbal tasks. Regarding chronic exposure to aircraft noise, studies consistently found that high exposure is associated with lower reading performance. Even though the reported effects are usually small in magnitude, and confounding variables were not always sufficiently controlled, policy makers responsible for noise abatement should be aware of the potential impact of environmental noise on children's development. PMID:24009598

  19. Does noise affect learning? A short review on noise effects on cognitive performance in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eKlatte

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides an overview of research concerning both acute and chronic effects of exposure to noise on children´s cognitive performance. Experimental studies addressing the impact of acute exposure showed negative effects on speech perception and listening comprehension. These effects are more pronounced in children as compared to adults. Children with language or attention disorders and second-language learners are still more impaired than age-matched controls. Noise-induced disruption was also found for non-auditory tasks, i.e., serial recall of visually presented lists and reading. The impact of chronic exposure to noise was examined in quasi-experimental studies. Indoor noise and reverberation in classroom settings were found to be associated with poorer performance of the children in verbal tasks. Regarding chronic exposure to aircraft noise, studies consistently found that high exposure is associated with lower reading performance. Even though the reported effects are usually small in magnitude, and confounding variables were not always sufficiently controlled, policy makers responsible for noise abatement should be aware of the potential impact of environmental noise on children´s development.

  20. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures - lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pan, X.; Berg, M. P.; Butenschoen, O.; Murray, P. J.; Bartish, Igor V.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Dong, M.; Prinzing, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 1806 (2015), s. 1-9; no. UNSP 20150103. ISSN 1471-2954 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : decomposition * litter degradation * phylogenetic signal of functional traits Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  1. Phosphocreatine interacts with phospholipids, affects membrane properties and exerts membrane-protective effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Tokarska-Schlattner

    Full Text Available A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr, phosphocreatine (PCr and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr. Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i chemical binding assay, (ii surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR, (iii solid-state (31P-NMR, and (iv differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults

  2. The effect of playing a science center-based mobile game: Affective outcomes and gender differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana

    Situated in a hands-on science center, The Great STEM Caper was a collaborative mobile game built on the ARIS platform that was designed to engage 5th-9th grade players in NGSS science and engineering practices while they interacted with various exhibits. Same gender partners sharing one iPad would search for QR codes placed at specific exhibits; scanning a code within the game would launch a challenge for that exhibit. The primary hypothesis was that in- game victories would be equivalent to "mastery experiences" as described by Bandura (1997) and would result in increased science self-efficacy. Gender differences in gameplay behaviors and perceptions were also studied. The study included two groups, one that played the game during their visit and one that explored the science center in the traditional way. The Motivation to Learn Science Questionnaire was administered to participants in both groups both before and after their visit to the science center. Participants wore head-mounted GoPro cameras to record their interactions within the physical and social environment. No differences in affective outcomes were found between the game and comparison groups or between boys and girls in the game group. The MLSQ was unable to measure any significant change in science self-efficacy, interest and enjoyment of science, or overall motivation to learn science in either group. However, girls outperformed boys on every measure of game achievement. Lazzaro's (2004) four types of fun were found to be a good fit for describing the gender differences in game perceptions and behaviors. Girls tended to enjoy hard fun and collaborative people fun while boys enjoyed easy fun and competitive people fun. While boys associated game achievement with enjoyment and victory, girls perceived their game achievement as difficult, rather than enjoyable or victorious.

  3. Affective dysfunction in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: Therapeutic effects of environmental stimulation and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Mari A; Gray, Laura J; Pelka, Gregory J; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Christodoulou, John; Tam, Patrick P L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and consequent dysregulation of brain maturation. Patients suffer from a range of debilitating physical symptoms, however, behavioral and emotional symptoms also severely affect their quality of life. Here, we present previously unreported and clinically relevant affective dysfunction in the female heterozygous Mecp2(tm1Tam) mouse model of RTT (129sv and C57BL6 mixed background). The affective dysfunction and aberrant anxiety-related behavior of the Mecp2(+/-) mice were found to be reversible with environmental enrichment (EE) from 4 weeks of age. The effect of exercise alone (via wheel running) was also explored, providing the first evidence that increased voluntary physical activity in an animal model of RTT is beneficial for some phenotypes. Mecp2(+/-) mutants displayed elevated corticosterone despite decreased Crh expression, demonstrating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. EE of Mecp2(+/-) mice normalized basal serum corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF protein levels. The enrichment-induced rescue appears independent of the transcriptional regulation of the MeCP2 targets Bdnf exon 4 and Crh. These findings provide new insight into the neurodevelopmental role of MeCP2 and pathogenesis of RTT, in particular the affective dysfunction. The positive outcomes of environmental stimulation and physical exercise have implications for the development of therapies targeting the affective symptoms, as well as behavioral and cognitive dimensions, of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26019053

  4. Frame-of-Reference Training Effectiveness: Effects of Goal Orientation and Self-Efficacy on Affective, Cognitive, Skill-Based, and Transfer Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierdorff, Erich C.; Surface, Eric A.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    Empirical evidence supporting frame-of-reference (FOR) training as an effective intervention for calibrating raters is convincing. Yet very little is known about who does better or worse in FOR training. We conducted a field study of how motivational factors influence affective, cognitive, and behavioral learning outcomes, as well as near transfer…

  5. A Methanol Extract of Brugmansia arborea Affects the Reinforcing and Motor Effects of Morphine and Cocaine in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bracci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have shown that several of the effects of morphine, including the development of tolerance and physical withdrawal symptoms, are reduced by extracts of Brugmansia arborea (L. Lagerheim (Solanaceae (B. arborea. In the present study we evaluate the action of the methanol extract of B. arborea (7.5–60 mg/kg on the motor and reinforcing effects of morphine (20 and 40 mg/kg and cocaine (25 mg/kg using the conditioned place preference (CPP procedure. At the doses employed, B. arborea did not affect motor activity or induce any effect on CPP. The extract partially counteracted morphine-induced motor activity and completely blocked the CPP induced by 20 mg/kg morphine. On the other hand, B. arborea blocked cocaine-induced hyperactivity but did not block cocaine-induced CPP. Reinstatement of extinguished preference with a priming dose of morphine or cocaine was also inhibited by B. arborea. The complex mechanism of action of B. arborea, which affects the dopaminergic and the cholinergic systems, seems to provide a neurobiological substrate for the effects observed. Considered as a whole, these results point to B. arborea as a useful tool for the treatment of morphine or cocaine abuse.

  6. New insights into parental effects and toxicity: Mate availability and diet in the parental environment affect offspring responses to contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parental effects manifest as alterations in offspring phenotype resulting from the parental phenotype and/or parental environment. We evaluated the effects of parental diet quality and mating strategy on the toxicant tolerance of offspring in Biomphalaria glabrata snails. We raised snails either individually (self-fertilizing) or in groups of three (outcrossing) on a diet of uncooked lettuce, fish food, cooked lettuce, or cooked lettuce plus fish food. We then exposed their offspring to cadmium and malathion challenges. Cadmium tolerance varied with parental diet and was greater in the offspring of outcrossing snails than self-fertilizing snails. Malathion tolerance was not affected by parental diet but was greater in the offspring of outcrossing snails. These results indicate that offspring responses to stressors are heavily influenced by parental experience, but may depend on the specific stressor and the mechanism of action and/or detoxification. -- Highlights: •We reared parental snails either alone or in groups and fed them one of four diets. •We exposed their juvenile offspring to cadmium and malathion survival challenges. •Outcrossing increased toxicant tolerance of juveniles compared to self-fertilizing. •Parental diet affected juvenile offspring tolerance to cadmium but not malathion. •Toxicant characteristics likely influenced parental effects on toxicant tolerance. -- Both parental diet composition and mating strategy can significantly alter the toxicant tolerance of offspring, and toxicant characteristics likely influence the probability of parental effects

  7. The effect of emotions on risk perception: Experimental evaluation of the affective tendencies framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drače Saša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the role of specific emotions on risk perception providing a more stringent experimental test of the Appraisal Tendencies Framework (ATF. Consistent with expectations, angry and happy participants made more optimistic risk estimates than participants who were made sad. As hypothesized by ATF, happiness and anger also led people to somewhat higher certainty appraisals than sadness. However, this change in perception did not mediate the impact of emotions on risk estimates. Taken together, our results provide the evidence for causal role of specific emotions in risk perception and contribute to literature showing that the effects of emotion on judgment are not solely due to the valence of the experienced emotion. However, they also suggest that the processes underlying emotion effects remain in need for further specifications.

  8. Fucoxanthin: A Marine Carotenoid Exerting Anti-Cancer Effects by Affecting Multiple Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeetha Ravi Kumar; Masashi Hosokawa; Kazuo Miyashita

    2013-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a marine carotenoid exhibiting several health benefits. The anti-cancer effect of fucoxanthin and its deacetylated metabolite, fucoxanthinol, is well documented. In view of its potent anti-carcinogenic activity, the need to understand the underlying mechanisms has gained prominence. Towards achieving this goal, several researchers have carried out studies in various cell lines and in vivo and have deciphered that fucoxanthin exerts its anti-proliferative and cancer preventing ...

  9. Differential Effects of Acute and Regular Physical Exercise on Cognition and Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Michael E; Davis, F. Caroline; VanTieghem, Michelle R.; Whalen, Paul J.; Bucci, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of regular exercise versus a single bout of exercise on cognition, anxiety, and mood were systematically examined in healthy, sedentary young adults who were genotyped to determine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) allelic status (i.e., Val-Val or Val66Met polymorphism). Participants were evaluated on novel object recognition (NOR) memory and a battery of mental health surveys before and after engaging in either a) a four-week exercise program, with exercise on the final te...

  10. How task errors affect subsequent behavior : evidence from distributional analyses of task-switching effects

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhauser, Marco; Hübner, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Switch costs in task switching are often assumed to reflect the strengthening of task-related associations. Recently, we provided evidence that committing an error leads to the strengthening of the wrong task (Steinhauser and Hübner, 2006). In the present study, we report how error-induced control compensates for the effects of error strengthening. We hypothesized that, although error detection cannot prevent an error from being strengthened, it initiates processes that suppress the negative ...

  11. Differential effects of parental separation on child outcomes : are children from higher social backgrounds affected more?

    OpenAIRE

    BERNARDI, Fabrizio; Boertien, Diederik; Popova, Daria

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of high divorce rates for intergenerational mobility depend on two factors. The first has been widely studied and regards the differing incidence of divorce according to socio-economic background. The second has been studied less and is the heterogeneity in the effects of divorce according to parental background. This paper investigates whether signs from earlier research that children from higher social backgrounds suffer more from divorce can indeed be interpreted as such. ...

  12. Does the degree of image likeness affect the caricature and prototype effects in facial recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Background: Psychological research has largely overlooked that there is variability between photographs of the same person and as a result facial recognition studies have used randomly selected images to represent individuals. Thesis aim: This study therefore aimed to investigate if the variations between images are significant and if these differences influence the caricature and prototype effects. Method: Experiment 1 was designed to investigate image likeness and it found that variations b...

  13. Factors Affecting the Effectiveness of Inorganic Silicate Sealer Material through Multi-Quality Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Si-Yu; Huang, Ran; Chi, Mao-Chieh; Hsu, Hui-Mi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of concrete protection with two inorganic silicate sealer materials (ISSMs). The Taguchi method and grey relational analysis (GRA) have been used to identify the key factors influencing concrete protection provided by the surface treatment. Seven control factors with two levels were selected. By using the orthogonal array L12 (27), 12 experiments are chosen and four tests—the compressive strength test, resistivity test, absorption test and permeabilit...

  14. How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Woody biomass is particularly resistant to breakdown and must be size reduced to make pretreatment with steam, acid, or other chemicals effective. However, because mechanical size reduction of woody biomass can consume significant amounts of energy, it is important to understand how to minimize size reduction, while still realizing high sugar yields from the combined operations of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Thus, this study focused on determining how sugar yields change with parti...

  15. Comparison of CFD simulations and measurements of flow affected by coanda effect

    OpenAIRE

    Jícha Miroslav; Forman Matěj; Vach Tomáš; Jedelský Jan; Fišer Jan

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with experimental research and numerical simulations of specific phenomena in fluid flows called Coanda effect (CE), which has numerous important engineering applications. Although many researchers have concerned with wall jets, the physics of this flow still remains not well understood. This study is focused on analysis of behaviour of jet flow close to the wall and influence of its inclination. The flow has been visualized using smoke and velocity was measured by means of ...

  16. HOW EXTERNAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AFFECTS SEOS PERFORMANCE: MEDIATING EFFECT OF AGENCY COSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Nan-Yu; Wang, Fu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    In an analysis of moment structure (AMOS) setting, this study investigates the effectiveness of external corporate governance in mitigating agency costs and enhancing long-term operating performance for seasoned equity offerings (SEOs). Additionally, this study hypothesizes the crucial and mediating role of agency costs in the relationship between governance structure and post-SEO operating performance. The results reveal that the mediating role of reducing agency costs is crucial to the caus...

  17. Effective rectus sheath canal: does it affect total extraperitoneal approach for inguinal mesh hernioplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulana Mohammad Ansari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the effects of the 1st port placement at two different levels below umbilicus during the total extraperitoneal (TEP laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia and to check the hypothesis that shorter effective rectus sheath canal would facilitate the TEP procedure. Methods: Eighteen adult males underwent TEP repair for uncomplicated primary inguinal hernia in one year. First (optical port was placed 1 cm and 2.5 cm below the umblicus in the two groups (I and II, respectively. Effective rectus sheath canal (ERSC was measured. Primary outcome measures (endoscopic vision, ease of the procedure and operating time were compared between the two groups. Results: ERSC (mean ± SD was found 3.24 ± 0.41 and 2.08 ± 0.27 cm in group I (n = 7 and group II (n = 11, respectively (P < 0.05. Endoscopic vision was found significantly better in group II compared to group I; visual analogue score (VAS 8.82 ± 0.41 vs 4.57 ± 0.45, respectively (P < 0.05. Procedure was found significantly easier in group II compared to group I (VAS 8.91 ± 0.44 vs 5.5 ± 0.65; P < 0.05. Operating time was found significantly lower in group II compared to group I (1.83 ± 0.3 vs 2.71 ± 0.42 h; P < 0.05. Conclusions: Shorter effective rectus sheath canal of ≤ 2 cm greatly facilitates the TEP hernioplasty in terms of endoscopic vision, ease of the procedure and operating time, and is highly recommended, especially for the beginners. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(1: 73-76

  18. Affecting factors to effectiveness of starting therapy in children with hiv infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Denisenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research – to characterize of the factors that influence the effectiveness of the starting highly activе antiretroviral therapy in children with HIV infection.Materials and methods. A total of 67 children with HIV infectionat the age from 24 to 36 months who have not received antiretroviral treatment. Patients received highly activе antiretroviral therapy on clinical, immunological and laboratory indications. Regimen consisted of two HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (zidovudine and lamivudine in combination with a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or viral protease inhibitor. Аs the third component of the scheme in 22 patients (32,8% used nevirapine, in 24 (35,8% – lopinavir/ritonavir, in 21 children (31,3% – nelfinavir. In the future, the effectiveness of treatment was assessed by clinical parameters, the number of CD4 lymphocytes in the blood and HIV blood viral load. Data on the duration of the effectiveness of conservation regimens examined using Cox proportional hazard model.Results. Duration of highly activу antiretroviral therapy was 12–79 months (median 28 months, interquartile range 13–60 months. In 55,2% patients, achieved sustained viral suppression (viral load levels below the level of test system sensitivity, improving the immune status (increase number of CD4 lymphocytes, the positive dynamics of clinical symptoms. In 37,3% patients, initial regimen was modified because of its inefficiency, which is often due to the inability to completely suppress viral replication (37,5% and improve immune status (8,9%. Side effects occurred in 28,4% children, but only in 7,5% patients they were the cause of change therapies. When testing the clinical and laboratory parameters prior to treatment in the Cox model revealed that an independent factor increasing the duration of the effectivenessof homepage conservation regimen was the appointment of

  19. Effects of release factors affecting the recovery rates of tagged tunas : application to bigeye tuna

    OpenAIRE

    Gaertner, Daniel; Kebe, P.; C. Palma

    2008-01-01

    The tagging data base compiled since the 1960s by the secretariat of ICCAT was used to assess the effects of several release factors on the recovery rate of bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus). The release factors considered were the length of the fish, the latitude, the longitude, the gear used during the tagging operation, the kind of tag used, the year and the month as well as the interactions between the length and the tag type and the length and the year. It was showed that all of these explana...

  20. Investigating the Effects of Project-Oriented Chemistry Experiments on Some Affective and Cognitive Field Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci MORGİL

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The general aim of this study is to prepare project-based chemistry experiments related to various chemistry topics via group study by pre-service chemistry teachers. Also it is tried to find answers to the following questions:1. Did pre-service teachers’ performance change after mentioned applications? 2. Had conducted applications effect on pre-service teachers’ attitude towards chemistry, attitudes towards chemistry laboratory, anxieties and scientific process skills? 3. How was the physical condition of laboratory where project-based chemistry experiment applications were conducted and what were the difficulties encountered by pre-service teachers in laboratory studies?

  1. Comparison of CFD simulations and measurements of flow affected by coanda effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental research and numerical simulations of specific phenomena in fluid flows called Coanda effect (CE, which has numerous important engineering applications. Although many researchers have concerned with wall jets, the physics of this flow still remains not well understood. This study is focused on analysis of behaviour of jet flow close to the wall and influence of its inclination. The flow has been visualized using smoke and velocity was measured by means of Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA. CFD simulations have been performed on the same geometry and compared with experiments in order to find a tool for correct prediction of the CE.

  2. Comparison of CFD simulations and measurements of flow affected by coanda effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišer, Jan; Jedelský, Jan; Vach, Tomáš; Forman, Matěj; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with experimental research and numerical simulations of specific phenomena in fluid flows called Coanda effect (CE), which has numerous important engineering applications. Although many researchers have concerned with wall jets, the physics of this flow still remains not well understood. This study is focused on analysis of behaviour of jet flow close to the wall and influence of its inclination. The flow has been visualized using smoke and velocity was measured by means of Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA). CFD simulations have been performed on the same geometry and compared with experiments in order to find a tool for correct prediction of the CE.

  3. The Effects of Trauma History and Prenatal Affective Symptoms on Obstetric Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Emma Robertson; Putnam, Frank W; Pressman, Eva K; Rubinow, David R; Putnam, Karen T; Matthieu, Monica M; Gilchrist, Michelle A; Jones, Ian; O'Connor, Thomas G

    2016-06-01

    Prenatal maternal mood may inform the adverse obstetric outcomes seen in disadvantaged populations. The contribution of having a trauma history is not well studied. We examined the impact of trauma exposure and mood symptoms on obstetric outcomes in 358 women. Women with antecedent trauma were more likely to have a history of depression, odds ratio = 2.83, 95% confidence interval [1.81, 4.42], were younger at their first pregnancy, 18.86 years versus 20.10 years, and had a higher number of previous pregnancies, 2.01 versus 1.54, compared to those with no trauma exposure. Women with prenatal anxiety had significantly smaller babies than nonanxious women, 3,313.17 g, (SD = 441.58) versus 3,429.27 g, (SD = 437.82) Trauma history magnified the effects of maternal prenatal mood on birthweight; the moderating effect was limited to those who first experienced a trauma under 18 years of age. Childhood trauma exposure increased vulnerability for low birthweight delivery associated with prenatal mood disturbance. Screening pregnant women for trauma history and current mood symptoms is indicated. PMID:27276162

  4. Radiative and Physiological Effects of Increased CO2: How Does This Interaction Affect Climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoua, Lahouari

    2011-01-01

    Several climate models indicate that in a 2xCO2 environment, temperature and precipitation would increase and runoff would increase faster than precipitation. These models, however, did not allow the vegetation to increase its leaf density as a response to the physiological effects of increased CO2 and consequent changes in climate. Other assessments included these interactions but did not account for the vegetation downregulation to reduce plant's photosynthetic activity and as such resulted in a weak vegetation negative response. When we combine these interactions in climate simulations with 2xCO2, the associated increase in precipitation contributes primarily to increase evapotranspiration rather than surface runoff, consistent with observations, and results in an additional cooling effect not fully accounted for in previous 2xCO2 simulations. By accelerating the water cycle, this feedback slows but does not alleviate the projected warming, reducing the land surface warming by 0.6 C. Compared to previous studies, these results imply that long term negative feedback from CO2-induced increases in vegetation density could reduce temperature following a stabilization of CO2 concentration.

  5. The factors affecting effectiveness of treatment in phages therapy, mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eCHATAIN-LY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of lytic bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents controlling pathogenic bacteria has appeared as a promising new alternative strategy in the face of growing antibiotic resistance which has caused problems in many fields including medicine, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. The use of bacteriophages has numerous advantages over traditional antimicrobials. The effectiveness of phage applications in fighting against pathogenic bacteria depends on several factors such as the bacteriophages/target bacteria ratio, the mode and moment of treatment, environmental conditions (pH, temperature ..., the neutralization of phage and accessibility to target bacteria, amongst others. This report presents these factors and the challenges involved in developing phage therapy applications

  6. Slicing, sampling, and distance-dependent effects affect network measures in simulated cortical circuit structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Carl Miner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The neuroanatomical connectivity of cortical circuits is believed to follow certain rules, the exact origins of which are still poorly understood. In particular, numerous nonrandom features, such as common neighbor clustering, overrepresentation of reciprocal connectivity, and overrepresentation of certain triadic graph motifs have been experimentally observed in cortical slice data. Some of these data, particularly regarding bidirectional connectivity are seemingly contradictory, and the reasons for this are unclear. Here we present a simple static geometric network model with distance-dependent connectivity on a realistic scale that naturally gives rise to certain elements of these observed behaviors, and may provide plausible explanations for some of the conflicting findings. Specifically, investigation of the model shows that experimentally measured nonrandom effects, especially bidirectional connectivity, may depend sensitively on experimental parameters such as slice thickness and sampling area, suggesting potential explanations for the seemingly conflicting experimental results.

  7. Which has more effects on risk perception and judgments, affect or reason?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When managing risks, people are often assumed to behave irrationally and emotionally. On risk researches Slovic (1987, 1999) pointed but the 'emotion heuristics' which stress the emotional process of risk judgments. However, some researchers (e.g. Behavioral Economy: c.f. Kahneman and Tversky, 1979) argues that people's behaviors are basically very rational even though they have some irrational biases. On this research we focused on the judgment processes of risk communication, and examined which would have stronger effects on risk acceptance and trust formation, rational-oriented-communication or emotional-oriented-communication. Total of 506 students at 4 universities (199 males, 265 females, and 42 genders unknown) participated in the experiments. (author)

  8. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of...... control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p<0.01). The risk of psychosis increased two and a half times for each additional adversity. All......-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. RESULTS: Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the...

  9. Effects of Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on external adaptation of restorations in caries-affected cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the external adaptation of composite resin restorations in caries-affected cavities. Mixed class V cavity preparations were performed in 36 intact human third molars, in half of which caries was artificially induced. Both healthy and carious dentin were etched with 35% phosphoric acid (Ultradent Products Inc., South Jordan, Utah, USA), and the teeth were divided into three groups, i.e., (a) untreated etched dentin, (b) application of the Er, Cr:YSGG laser and (c) use of chlorhexidine as an adjunct in the bonding process. Restorations were fabricated with Z350 XT FiltekTM composite resin (3M ESPE) and subsequently the specimens were subjected to thermocycling to simulate artificial ageing. Quantitative analysis of external adaptation was performed by scanning electron microscopy in both healthy and affected dentin using epoxy resin replicas. It was concluded that the application of laser and chlorhexidine did not affect the percentages of marginal adaptation of class V restorations. Furthermore, thermocycling may influence adaptation values. (letter)

  10. The Effect of Explicit Affective Strategy Training on Iranian EFL learners’ Oral Language Proficiency and Anxiety Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Mostafavi; Fereidoon Vahdany

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the possible effects of explicit teaching of affective strategies on Iranian EFL learners’ oral language proficiency and the extent of their anxiety in EFL classroom.  First, PET test was administered to a total number of 120 female third grade high school EFL students.  Then, 60 participants whose score fell within the range of + 1 SD from the mean score were selected for the main study.  Next, they were randomly assigned into two groups (one control ...

  11. Effect of the heat-affected zones on hydrogen permeation and embrittlement of low-carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steels with yield strengths below about 900 MPa are essentially immune to hydrogen embrittlement, and almost all pipeline steels have a yield strength below that value. However, same catastrophic failures of pipelines have been reported. Under mechanical stress these failures are due to the local formation of high-hardness martensite (hard spot) during cooling and from the presence of absorbed hydrogen developed under cathodic over-protection. This paper describes a photoelectrochemical, micrographic and fractographic study of the effect of an heat-affected zone (hard spot) on hydrogen permeation and the embrittlement of an API 5L STD X60 steel. (orig.)

  12. The Effect of Perceived Justice on Satisfaction, Value, Trust and Affect: Evidence from a Business-to-Business Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Heidarzadeh Hanzaee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the effect of distributive justice, procedural justice and interactional justice on satisfaction, value, trust and affect. Furthermore, this study argues whether this variables influences behavioral intentions in a B2B setting. To test these relationships, the present study uses data from 198 members of purchasing committee in medical laboratory. Structural equations modeling using PLS was performed to empirically test the relationship between the constructions this study. The results of the structural equation analysis reveal that all of these hypotheses are supported. Following a discussion of the results, research limitations and directions for future research are offered.

  13. The effect of recombinant erythropoietin on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Hoejman, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The study aims to investigate the effect of repeated infusions of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with affective disorders. In total, 83 patients were recruited: 40 currently depressed patients with treatment-resistant...... depression (TRD) (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HDRS-17) score >17) (study 1) and 43 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) in partial remission (HDRS-17 and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) ≤ 14) (study 2). In both studies, patients were randomised to receive eight weekly EPO (Eprex; 40,000 IU) or...

  14. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rada, D.; Seco, J.; Echevarría, E.; B. Tijero; Abecia, L. C.; J. C. Gómez-Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain) [men 59 (56.2%), women 46 (43.85%)]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life...

  15. The interactive effects of affect and shopping goal on information search and product evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangyuan; Wyer, Robert S; Shen, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Although shoppers often want to evaluate products to make a purchase decision, they can also shop for enjoyment. In each case, the amount of time they spend on shopping and the number of options they consider can depend on the mood they happen to be in. We predicted that mood can signal whether the goal has been attained and when people should stop processing information. When people are primarily motivated to purchase a particular type of product, positive mood signals that they have done enough. Thus, they consider less information if they are happy than if they are unhappy. When people shop for enjoyment, however, positive mood signals that they are still having fun. Thus, they consider more information when they are happy than when they are not. Four experiments among university students (N = 827) examined these possibilities. Experiment 1 provided initial evidence for the interactive effects of mood and goals on search behavior and product evaluation. Other studies examined the implications of this conceptualization for different domains: (a) the relative impact of brand and attribute information on judgments (Experiment 2), (b) gender differences in shopping behavior (Experiment 3), and (c) the number of options that people review in an actual online shopping website (Experiment 4). PMID:26460676

  16. Antioxidant Effect of Natural Honeys Affected by Their Source and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellen Martin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In purpose to examine the antioxidant activity of 15 natural honeys of different origin ABTS method was used, total phenol content and dry matter content of honey samples were determined. Honeys were collected from different locations of Slovakia, Poland and Serbia and were represented as monofloral and multifloral samples (10 which originated from Poland and Slovakia, forest samples (4 originated from Serbia and honeydew honey. Average values of antioxidant activity observed in samples of honeys ranged from 0.62 to 4.63 mmol/kg. The highest antioxidant activity was detected in buckwheat honey and the lowest was shown in acacia honey. By observing the impact of individual honey samples on antioxidant activity it was found that the sample had a highly statistically significant effect. 10 homogeneous groups which varied in the antioxidant activity among each other were established by all 15 samples. Antioxidant activity of honeys could be a positive influence factor in terms of honey differentiation, especially in the case of the forest honeys collected from different places. Monofloral and multifloral honeys (10 established 5 homogenous groups, but in the case of several multifloral honeys which originated from different places of Poland and Slovakia no statistically significant differences were found.

  17. Visual Contextual Effects of Orientation, Contrast, Flicker, and Luminance: All Are Affected by Normal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bao N.; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of a visual stimulus can be markedly altered by spatial interactions between the stimulus and its surround. For example, a grating stimulus appears lower in contrast when surrounded by a similar pattern of higher contrast: a phenomenon known as surround suppression of perceived contrast. Such center–surround interactions in visual perception are numerous and arise from both cortical and pre-cortical neural circuitry. For example, perceptual surround suppression of luminance and flicker are predominantly mediated pre-cortically, whereas contrast and orientation suppression have strong cortical contributions. Here, we compare the perception of older and younger observers on a battery of tasks designed to assess such visual contextual effects. For all visual dimensions tested (luminance, flicker, contrast, and orientation), on average the older adults showed greater suppression of central targets than the younger adult group. The increase in suppression was consistent in magnitude across all tasks, suggesting that normal aging produces a generalized, non-specific alteration to contextual processing in vision. PMID:27148047

  18. [How do transport and metabolism affect the biological effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kanae; Toriba, Akira; Tang, Ning; Kameda, Takayuki; Takigami, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Go; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are carcinogenic/mutagenic, are generated by combustion of fossil fuels and also released through tanker or oilfield accident to cause a large scale environmental pollution. PAHs concentration in China is especially high in East Asia because of many kinds of generation sources such as coal heating systems, vehicles and factories without exhaust gas/particulate treatment systems. So, the atmospheric pollution caused by PAHs in China has been seriously concerned from the view point of health effects. Like yellow sand and sulfur oxide, PAHs exhausted in China are also transported to Japan. Additionally, strongly mutagenic nitrated PAHs (NPAHs), estrogenic/antiestrogenic PAH hydroxides (PAHOHs) and reactive oxygen species-producing PAH quinones (PAHQs) are formed from PAHs by the chemical reaction during the transport. Furthermore these PAHOHs and PAHQs are produced by the metabolism in animal body. In the biological activities caused by the above PAH derivatives, the structure-activity relationship was observed. In this review, our recent results on the generation of PAH derivatives by atmospheric transport and metabolism are reported. Also, the existing condition of PAHs as atmospheric pollutants is considered. PMID:22382837

  19. Effect anticipation affects perceptual, cognitive, and motor phases of response preparation: evidence from an event-related potential (ERP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Richard Harrison

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticipation of action effects is a basic process that can be observed even for key-pressing responses in a stimulus-response paradigm. In Ziessler, Nattkemper and Vogt’s (2012 experiments participants first learned arbitrary effects of key-pressing responses. In the test phase an imperative stimulus determined the response, but participants withheld the response until a Go-stimulus appeared. Reaction times were shorter if the Go-stimulus was compatible with the learned response effect. This is strong evidence that effect representations were activated during response planning. Here we repeated the experiment using event-related potentials (ERPs, and we found that Go-stimulus locked ERPs depended on the compatibility relationship between the Go-stimulus and the response effect. In general, this supports the interpretation of the behavioural data. More specifically, differences in the ERPs between compatible and incompatible Go-stimuli were found for the early perceptual P1 component and the later frontal P2 component. P1 differences were found only in the second half of the experiment and for long SOAs between imperative stimulus and Go-stimulus, i.e. when the effect was fully anticipated and the perceptual system was prepared for the effect-compatible Go-stimulus. P2 amplitudes, likely associated with evaluation and conflict detection, were larger when Go-stimulus and effect were incompatible; presumably, incompatibility increased the difficulty of effect anticipation. Onset of response-locked LRPs occurred earlier under incompatible conditions indicating extended motor processing. Together, these results strongly suggest that effect anticipation affects all (i.e. perceptual, cognitive, and motor phases of response preparation.

  20. Effect Anticipation Affects Perceptual, Cognitive, and Motor Phases of Response Preparation: Evidence from an Event-Related Potential (ERP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil R; Ziessler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The anticipation of action effects is a basic process that can be observed even for key-pressing responses in a stimulus-response paradigm. In Ziessler et al.'s (2012) experiments participants first learned arbitrary effects of key-pressing responses. In the test phase an imperative stimulus determined the response, but participants withheld the response until a Go-stimulus appeared. Reaction times (RTs) were shorter if the Go-stimulus was compatible with the learned response effect. This is strong evidence that effect representations were activated during response planning. Here, we repeated the experiment using event-related potentials (ERPs), and we found that Go-stimulus locked ERPs depended on the compatibility relationship between the Go-stimulus and the response effect. In general, this supports the interpretation of the behavioral data. More specifically, differences in the ERPs between compatible and incompatible Go-stimuli were found for the early perceptual P1 component and the later frontal P2 component. P1 differences were found only in the second half of the experiment and for long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) between imperative stimulus and Go-stimulus, i.e., when the effect was fully anticipated and the perceptual system was prepared for the effect-compatible Go-stimulus. P2 amplitudes, likely associated with evaluation and conflict detection, were larger when Go-stimulus and effect were incompatible; presumably, incompatibility increased the difficulty of effect anticipation. Onset of response-locked lateralized readiness potentials (R-LRPs) occurred earlier under incompatible conditions indicating extended motor processing. Together, these results strongly suggest that effect anticipation affects all (i.e., perceptual, cognitive, and motor) phases of response preparation. PMID:26858621

  1. Factors affecting the laser processing of wood, 2: Effects of material parameters on machinability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material parameters of wood were investigated. Factors relating to the workpiece include cutting direction, specific gravity, and components of the wood such as resin-like materials. Also studies of the effects of irregular tissue on machinability were made. The interactions between laser beam and materials are often greatly complex. They depend on the characteristics of the laser beam, the thermal constants of the woods, and the optical surface properties of the woods. Therefore, high quality beam mode and carefully selected materials were used. The following laser cutting properties became clear after studying the experimental results. Slow speed cutting and softwoods make slight differences, regarding cutting section and fiber direction. However, it can beconsidered that there is not very much change except in cross-section. Because of the high power density of laser, cutting speed makes no big difference. The irregular tissue of wood cannot maintain normal cutting speed and accuracy. The factor of genuine density eta, which is thought to be entirely independent of each specific gravity, is definedas the concept of density in general. It can be obtained by applying a simple rule, that is, the eta is the ratio of r(u)/rho(s) where rho(s) is the wood substance as the characteristic value of wood, and r(u)is specific gravity. An experimental formula shows that the depth of cut decreases in proportion to the value of eta. However, in the strict sense of the word, data of wood material as a natural resources mustbe treated qualitatively, because there are deviations from regularity due to various reasons. (author)

  2. The low-income single-family house and the effectiveness of architects in affecting affordability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Dulaney Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Architects are increasingly engaged in efforts to provide affordable, owner-occupied housing in the United States. Yet architects’ roles in broadly addressing affordable housing remain marginal as was anecdotally evident by the absence of architects at a recent university-sponsored affordable housing workshop. Apparently, the potential contributions of architects in “the development of innovative approaches and best practices” related to affordable, owner-occupied housing is not always valued to housing policymakers and planners such as those who organized this workshop. This paper speculatively explores the gap between the potential value of architects and their actual effectiveness at realizing widespread relevancy, innovation, and change in improving the quality and attainability of affordable, owner occupied housing and how this gap may contribute to the undervaluation and marginalization of architects’ efforts to address affordable housing needs in the United States. Case studies of several recent U.S. house design competitions exemplify these gaps. Potential strategies for closing these gaps and thus appreciating the value of architects’ efforts in this endeavor are identified.To become central in providing much-needed affordable, owner-occupied housing, architects must make the value of their potential contributions evident. This requires a clear definition of design goals, a rigorous assessment of built projects, and the thorough dissemination of findings and methodologies. Architects must engage those fields to which they have, in the U.S., long relinquished affordable, single-family housing. Architects must demonstrate that qualitative design improvements are not just possible within the frameworks and agendas of those other fields but that good design will better enable the achievement of those extra-disciplinary goals.

  3. The effect of erythropoietin on cognition in affective disorders - Associations with baseline deficits and change in subjective cognitive complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Caroline Vintergaard; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars V; Miskowiak, Kamilla W

    2016-08-01

    This is a secondary data analysis from our erythropoietin (EPO) trials. We examine (I) whether EPO improves speed of complex cognitive processing across bipolar and unipolar disorder, (II) if objective and subjective baseline cognitive impairment increases patients׳ chances of treatment-efficacy and (III) if cognitive improvement correlates with better subjective cognitive function, quality of life and socio-occupational capacity. Patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder were randomized to eight weekly EPO (N=40) or saline (N=39) infusions. Cognition, mood, quality of life and socio-occupational capacity were assessed at baseline (week 1), after treatment completion (week 9) and at follow-up (week 14). We used repeated measures analysis of covariance to investigate the effect of EPO on speed of complex cognitive processing. With logistic regression, we examined whether baseline cognitive impairment predicted treatment-efficacy. Pearson correlations were used to assess associations between objective and subjective cognition, quality of life and socio-occupational capacity. EPO improved speed of complex cognitive processing across affective disorders at weeks 9 and 14 (p≤0.05). In EPO-treated patients, baseline cognitive impairment increased the odds of treatment-efficacy on cognition at weeks 9 and 14 by a factor 9.7 (95% CI:1.2-81.1) and 9.9 (95% CI:1.1-88.4), respectively (p≤0.04). Subjective cognitive complaints did not affect chances of treatment-efficacy (p≥0.45). EPO-associated cognitive improvement correlated with reduced cognitive complaints but not with quality of life or socio-occupational function. As the analyses were performed post-hoc, findings are only hypothesis-generating. In conclusion, pro-cognitive effects of EPO occurred across affective disorders. Neuropsychological screening for cognitive dysfunction may be warranted in future cognition trials. PMID:27349944

  4. The mTOR System Can Affect Basic Ovarian Cell Functions and Mediate the Effect of Ovarian Hormonal Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Sirotkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Both reproductive hormones and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR intracellular signalling system, including mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2 and its key enzyme sirtuin 1 (SIRT 1 are involved in the control of ovarian processes but the interrelationship between hormones and mTOR has been studied insufficiently. The aim of our in vitro experiments was to elucidate the involvement of mTOR in the control of basic ovarian cell functions and in mediating the action of upstream hormonal stimulators. In the first series of experiments, we examined the effect of the known hormonal regulators of ovarian functions, Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH, oxytocin (OT and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I (all at 0, 1, 10 and 100 ng mL-1 doses, on the accumulation of SIRT1 in porcine ovarian granulosa cells. In the second series of experiments, we examined the effects of mTOR blockers, PF 046 (an inhibitor of mTORC1 and WYE 687 (inhibitor of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 (both at a dose of 1 μg mL-1 on both basal and FSH-induced (0, 1, 10 and 100 ng FSH mL-1 doses basic ovarian functions (proliferation, apoptosis and steroidogenesis of cultured porcine granulosa cells. The accumulation of SIRT1, PCNA (a proliferation-related peptide and Bax (an apoptosis-related peptide was detected by immunocytochemistry. The release of progesterone (P4 and testosterone (T was analysed by EIA. It was observed that either FSH or OT additions increased the SIRT1 accumulation in ovarian cells, whilst IGF-I addition decreased it. The PF 046, when given alone, inhibited ovarian cell proliferation but did not affect apoptosis or the release of P4 and T. The WYE 687, when added alone did not affect proliferation and apoptosis but inhibited the P4 and T release by ovarian cells. The FSH, when given alone, stimulated proliferation did not affect apoptosis and increased the release of both P4 and T. In the presence of PF 046, FSH did not significantly alter proliferation

  5. Emotional communication in the context of joint attention for food stimuli: effects on attentional and affective processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussignan, Robert; Schaal, Benoist; Boulanger, Véronique; Garcia, Samuel; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Guided by distinct theoretical frameworks (the embodiment theories, shared-signal hypothesis, and appraisal theories), we examined the effects of gaze direction and emotional expressions (joy, disgust, and neutral) of virtual characters on attention orienting and affective reactivity of participants while they were engaged in joint attention for food stimuli contrasted by preference (disliked, moderately liked, and liked). The participants were exposed to videos of avatars looking at food and displaying facial expressions with their gaze directed either toward the food only or toward the food and participants consecutively. We recorded eye-tracking responses, heart rate, facial electromyography (zygomatic, corrugator, and levator labii regions), and food wanting/liking. The avatars' joy faces increased the participants' zygomatic reactions and food liking, with mutual eye contact boosting attentional responses. Eye contact also fostered disgust reactions to disliked food, regardless of the avatars' expressions. The findings show that joint attention for food accompanied by face-to-face emotional communication elicits differential attentional and affective responses. The findings appear consistent with the appraisal theories of emotion. PMID:25541512

  6. Moderate drought did not affect the effectiveness of ethylenediurea (EDU) in protecting Populus cathayana from ambient ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yue; Yuan, Xiangyang; Shang, Bo; Manning, William J; Yang, Aizhen; Wang, Younian; Feng, Zhaozhong

    2016-11-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of ambient ozone (O3) on an O3-sensitive poplar (Populus cathayana) by using ethylenediurea (EDU) as a chemical protectant under two soil water treatments (well-watered (WW) and moderate drought (MD, 50-60% of WW in volumetric soil water content). EDU was applied as foliar spray at 0, 300, 450, and 600ppm. Photosynthetic parameters, pigment contents, leaf nitrogen, antioxidant capacity, growth, and biomass were measured. The 8h (9:00-17:00) average ambient O3 concentration was 71.7ppb, and AOT40 was 29.2ppmh during the experimental period (9 June to 21 September), which was high enough to cause plant injury. MD had significantly negative effects on P. cathayana, as indicated by reduced photosynthesis, growth, and biomass, and higher MDA contents. On the other hand, EDU significantly increased photosynthesis rate, chlorophyll a fluorescence, Vcmax and Jmax, photosynthetic pigments, total antioxidant capacity, tree growth and biomass accumulation, and reduced lipid peroxidation, but there was no significant interaction between EDU and drought for most parameters, indicating that EDU can efficiently protect Populus cathayana against ambient O3 and the protection was not affected by soil water contents when soil water reached moderate drought level. Among all doses, EDU at 450ppm provided maximum protection. Comparison of EDU-treated and non-treated P. cathayana could be used as a biomarker system in risk assessment of the effects of ambient O3 on forest health. PMID:27424114

  7. Do biopesticides affect the demographic traits of a parasitoid wasp and its biocontrol services through sublethal effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Antonio; Zappalà, Lucia; Stark, John D; Desneux, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®), emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment) and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life-history variables

  8. Distinguishing disease effects from environmental effects in a mountain ungulate: seasonal variation in body weight, hematology, and serum chemistry among Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) affected by sarcoptic mange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Jesús M; Serrano, Emmanuel; Soriguer, Ramón C; González, Francisco J; Sarasa, Mathieu; Granados, José E; Cano-Manuel, Francisco J; Cuenca, Rafaela; Fandos, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    Our study focuses on the Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) from the Sierra Nevada Natural Space (southern Spain), where sarcoptic mange is an endemic disease and animals are affected by a highly seasonal environment. Our aim was to distinguish between disease and environmental influences on seasonal variation in body weight, hematology, and serum biochemistry in Iberian ibex. We sampled 136 chemically immobilized male ibexes. The single effect of mange influenced hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, leukocytes, band neutrophils, monocytes, cholesterol, urea, creatine, and aspartate aminotransferase. Both mange and the period of the year also affected values of mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, neutrophils, glucose, and serum proteins. Scabietic animals showed a marked reduction in body weight (21.4 kg on average), which was more pronounced in winter. These results reveal that 1) infested animals are anemic, 2) secondary infections likely occur, and 3) sarcoptic mange is catabolic. PMID:25380360

  9. The Effects of Intimate Partner Violence on Relationship Satisfaction Over Time for Young At-Risk Couples: The Moderating Role of Observed Negative and Positive Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Shortt, Joann Wu; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, the moderating effects of observed negative and positive affects on the association between intimate partner violence (IPV, physical aggression) and relationship satisfaction were examined over a 5-year period. Multiwave data were obtained from a sample of young-adult men at risk for delinquency and their women partners (n = 121 couples; ages 21-26 years). The trajectory of each partner’s relationship satisfaction and the effects of dyadic IPV and affect were tested usin...

  10. Aging negatively affects estrogens-mediated effects on nitric oxide bioavailability by shifting ERα/ERβ balance in female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Novensà

    Full Text Available AIMS: Aging is among the major causes for the lack of cardiovascular protection by estrogen (E2 during postmenopause. Our study aims to determine the mechanisms whereby aging changes E2 effects on nitric oxide (NO production in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAM. METHODS AND RESULTS: Although we found no differences on NO production in females SAM prone (SAMP, aged compared to SAM resistant (SAMR, young, by either DAF-2 fluorescence or plasmatic nitrite/nitrate (NO2/NO3, in both cases, E2 treatment increased NO production in SAMR but had no effect in SAMP. Those results are in agreement with changes of eNOS protein and gene expression. E2 up-regulated eNOS expression in SAMR but not in SAMP. E2 is also known to increase NO by decreasing its catabolism by superoxide anion (O(2(-. Interestingly, E2 treatment decreased O(2(- production in young females, while increased O(2(- in aged ones. Furthermore, we observed that aging changed expression ratio of estrogen receptors (ERβ/ERα and levels of DNA methylation. Increased ratio ERβ/ERα in aged females is associated to a lack of estrogen modulation of NO production and with a reversal in its antioxidant effect to a pro-oxidant profile. CONCLUSIONS: Together, our data suggest that aging has detrimental effects on E2-mediated benefits on NO bioavailability, partially by affecting the ability of E2 to induce up regulation of eNOS and decrease of O(2(-. These modifications may be associated to aging-mediated modifications on global DNA methylation status, but not to a specific methylation at 5'flanking region of ERα gene.

  11. Salvage logging effect on soil properties in a fire-affected Mediterranean forest: a two years monitoring research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Moltó, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Chrenkovà, Katerina; Torres, Pilar; Jara-Navarro, Ana B.; Díaz, Gisela; Izquierdo, Ezequiel

    2015-04-01

    In the Mediterranean countries, forest fires are common and must be considered as an ecological factor, but changes in land use, especially in the last five decades have provoked a modification in their natural regime. Moreover, post-fire management can have an additional impact on the ecosystem; in some cases, even more severe than the fire. Salvage logging is a traditional management in most fire-affected areas. In some cases, the way of doing it, using heavy machinery, and the vulnerability of soils to erosion and degradation make this management potentially very agresive to soil, and therefore to the ecosystem. Very little research has been done to study how this treatment could affect soil health. In this research we show 2 years of monitoring of some soil properties in an area affected by a forest fire, where some months later this treatment was applied. The study area is located in 'Sierra de Mariola Natural Park' in Alcoi, Alicante (E Spain). A big forest fire (>500 has) occurred in July 2012. The forest is composed mainly of Pinus halepensis trees with an understory of typical Mediterranean shrubs species such as Quercus coccifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Brachypodium retusum, etc. Soil is classified as a Typic Xerorthent (Soil Survey Staff, 2014) developed over marls. In February 2013, salvage logging (SL) treatment consisting in a complete extraction of the burned wood using heavy machinery was applied in a part of the affected forest. Plots for monitoring this effect were installed in this area and in a similar nearby area where no treatment was done, and then used as control (C) for comparison. Soil samplings were done immediately after treatment and every 6 months. Some soil properties were analysed, including soil organic matter (SOM) content, basal soil respiration (BSR), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), bulk density (BD), soil water repellency (SWR), aggregate stability (AS), field capacity, nitrogen, etc. After two years of

  12. Dissipation and effects of tricyclazole on soil microbial communities and rice growth as affected by amendment with alperujo compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jaramillo, M; Redondo-Gómez, S; Barcia-Piedras, J M; Aguilar, M; Jurado, V; Hermosín, M C; Cox, L

    2016-04-15

    The presence of pesticides in surface and groundwater has grown considerably in the last decades as a consequence of the intensive farming activity. Several studies have shown the benefits of using organic amendments to prevent losses of pesticides from runoff or leaching. A particular soil from the Guadalquivir valley was placed in open air ponds and amended at 1 or 2% (w/w) with alperujo compost (AC), a byproduct from the olive oil industry. Tricyclazole dissipation, rice growth and microbial diversity were monitored along an entire rice growing season. An increase in the net photosynthetic rate of Oryza sativa plants grown in the ponds with AC was observed. These plants produced between 1100 and 1300kgha(-1) more rice than plants from the unamended ponds. No significant differences were observed in tricyclazole dissipation, monitored for a month in soil, surface and drainage water, between the amended and unamended ponds. The structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities were also studied by the use of the polymerase chain reaction denaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) from DNA extracted directly from soil samples. The banding pattern was similar for all treatments, although the density of bands varied throughout the time. Apparently, tricyclazole did not affect the structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities, and this was attributed to its low bioavailability. Rice cultivation under paddy field conditions may be more efficient under the effects of this compost, due to its positive effects on soil properties, rice yield, and soil microbial diversity. PMID:26849328

  13. Acute toxicity of the cationic surfactant C12-benzalkonium in different bioassays: how test design affects bioavailability and effect concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Geurts, Marc; Sjollema, Sascha B; Kramer, Nynke I; Hermens, Joop L M; Droge, Steven T J

    2014-03-01

    Using an ion-exchange-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method, the freely dissolved concentrations of C12-benzalkonium were measured in different toxicity assays, including 1) immobilization of Daphnia magna in the presence or absence of dissolved humic acid; 2) mortality of Lumbriculus variegatus in the presence or absence of a suspension of Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) sediment; 3) photosystem II inhibition of green algae Chlorella vulgaris; and 4) viability of in vitro rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) in the presence or absence of serum proteins. Furthermore, the loss from chemical adsorption to the different test vessels used in these tests was also determined. The C12-benzalkonium sorption isotherms to the different sorbent phases were established as well. Our results show that the freely dissolved concentration is a better indicator of the actual exposure concentration than the nominal or total concentration in most test assays. Daphnia was the most sensitive species to C12-benzalkonium. The acute Daphnia and Lumbriculus tests both showed no enhanced toxicity from possible ingestion of sorbed C12-benzalkonium in comparison with water-only exposure, which is in accordance with the equilibrium partitioning theory. Moreover, the present study demonstrates that commonly used sorbent phases can strongly affect bioavailability and observed effect concentrations for C12-benzalkonium. Even stronger effects of decreased actual exposure concentrations resulting from sorption to test vessels, cells, and sorbent phases can be expected for more hydrophobic cationic surfactants. PMID:24273010

  14. Does lipophilicity affect the effectiveness of a transmembrane anion transporter? Insight from squaramido-functionalized bis(choloyl) conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Deng, Li-Qun; Chen, Jin-Xiang; Zhou, Chun-Qiong; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2015-12-28

    Six squaramido-functionalized bis(choloyl) conjugates were synthesized and fully characterized on the basis of NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and ESI MS (LR and HR) data. Their transmembrane anionophoric activity was investigated in detail by means of chloride ion selective electrode technique and pyranine assay. The data indicate that this set of compounds is capable of promoting the transmembrane transport of anions presumably via proton/anion symport and anion exchange processes, and that lipophilicity in terms of clog P from 3.90 to 8.32 affects the apparent ion transport rate in a concentration-dependent fashion. Detailed kinetic analysis on the data obtained from both the chloride efflux and pH discharge experiments reveals that there may exist an optimum clog P range for the intrinsic ion transport rate. However, lipophilicity exhibits little effect on the effectiveness of this set of compounds in terms of either k2/Kdiss or EC50 values. PMID:26488550

  15. A 'cost-effective' probabilistic model to select the dominant factors affecting the variation of the component failure rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), the component failure rate λ is a key parameter in the sense that the study of its behavior gives the essential information for estimating the current values as well as the trends in the failure probabilities of interest. Since there is an infinite variety of possible underlying factors which might cause changes in λ (e.g. operating time, maintenance practices, component environment, etc.), an 'importance ranking' process of these factors is considered most desirable to prioritize research efforts. To be 'cost-effective', the modeling effort must be small, i.e. essentially involving no estimation of additional parameters other than λ. In this paper, using a multivariate data analysis technique and various statistical measures, such a 'cost-effective' screening process has been developed. Dominant factors affecting the failure rate of any components of interest can easily be identified and the appropriateness of current research plans (e.g. on the necessity of performing aging studies) can be validated. (author)

  16. Video games do affect social outcomes: a meta-analytic review of the effects of violent and prosocial video game play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemeyer, Tobias; Mügge, Dirk O

    2014-05-01

    Whether video game play affects social behavior is a topic of debate. Many argue that aggression and helping are affected by video game play, whereas this stance is disputed by others. The present research provides a meta-analytical test of the idea that depending on their content, video games do affect social outcomes. Data from 98 independent studies with 36,965 participants revealed that for both violent video games and prosocial video games, there was a significant association with social outcomes. Whereas violent video games increase aggression and aggression-related variables and decrease prosocial outcomes, prosocial video games have the opposite effects. These effects were reliable across experimental, correlational, and longitudinal studies, indicating that video game exposure causally affects social outcomes and that there are both short- and long-term effects. PMID:24458215

  17. Correlation between target volume and electron transport effects affecting heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer is conducted with heterogeneity-corrected treatment plans, as the correction greatly affects the dose delivery to the lung tumor. In this study, the correlation between the planning target volume (PTV) and the dose delivery is investigated by separation of the heterogeneity correction effects into photon attenuation and electron transport. Under Institutional Review Board exemption status, 74 patients with lung cancer who were treated with SBRT were retrospectively evaluated. All treatment plans were generated using an anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of an Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system. Two additional plans were created using the same treatment parameters (monitor units, beam angles and energy): a plan with no heterogeneity correction (NC), and a plan calculated with a pencil beam convolution algorithm (PBC). Compared with NC, AAA and PBC isocenter doses were on average 13.4% and 21.8% higher, respectively. The differences in the isocenter dose and the dose coverage for 95% of the PTV (D95%) between PBC and AAA were correlated logarithmically (ρ = 0.78 and ρ = 0.46, respectively) with PTV. Although D95% calculated with AAA was in general 2.9% larger than that for NC, patients with a small PTV showed a negative ΔD95% for AAA due to the significant effect of electron transport. The PTV volume shows logarithmic correlation with the effects of the lateral electron transport. These findings indicate that the dosimetric metrics and prescription, especially in clinical trials, should be clearly evaluated in the context of target volume characteristics and with proper heterogeneity correction. (author)

  18. Factors affecting fuel break effectiveness in the control of large fires on the Los Padres National Forest, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Brennan, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    As wildfires have increased in frequency and extent, so have the number of homes developed in the wildland-urban interface. In California, the predominant approach to mitigating fire risk is construction of fuel breaks, but there has been little empirical study of their role in controlling large fires.We constructed a spatial database of fuel breaks on the Los Padres National Forest in southern California to better understand characteristics of fuel breaks that affect the behaviour of large fires and to map where fires and fuel breaks most commonly intersect. We evaluated whether fires stopped or crossed over fuel breaks over a 28-year period and compared the outcomes with physical characteristics of the sites, weather and firefighting activities during the fire event. Many fuel breaks never intersected fires, but others intersected several, primarily in historically fire-prone areas. Fires stopped at fuel breaks 46% of the time, almost invariably owing to fire suppression activities. Firefighter access to treatments, smaller fires and longer fuel breaks were significant direct influences, and younger vegetation and fuel break maintenance indirectly improved the outcome by facilitating firefighter access. This study illustrates the importance of strategic location of fuel breaks because they have been most effective where they provided access for firefighting activities.

  19. Effects of neonatal fluoxetine exposure on behavior across development in rats selectively bred for an infantile affective trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerberg, Betty; Germeyan, Sierra C

    2015-03-01

    Infants born to women with depressive symptoms are at higher risk for insecure attachment and behavioral problems. Thus current medical practice is to continue psychotropic medication of pregnant women with depression despite concerns about its behavioral teratology. There are few animal studies focused on long-term behavioral effects of prenatal antidepressant exposure; in addition, studies have not looked at individual differences in baseline affective state as a source of response variability. In this study, fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), was administered to male and female rat pups from postnatal days 2-7 to model exposure to antidepressants in the human third trimester. Four behavioral measures were conducted from the neonatal to adult age periods in Low and High lines selectively bred for their rate of ultrasonic vocalizations after brief maternal separation. Neonatal fluoxetine administration decreased distress calls in both lines, but to a greater extent in High line rats than Low line. Neonatal fluoxetine also impaired motor coordination in neonates. Neonatal fluoxetine administration decreased social behavior in both juvenile and adult subjects. Fluoxetine-related reductions in anxiety behavior were not observed at the two older ages. As expected, High line subjects displayed more anxiety behavior than Low line subjects at all three test ages. These results suggest that there are may be significant behavioral consequences of antidepressant use during late pregnancy on offspring maternal attachment and social behavior, with implications for increased risk of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25503615

  20. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure and Toughness of Coarse Grain Heat Affected Zone in Nb Microalloyed HSLA Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-qiao; ZHANG Han-qian; LI Jin-fu; LIU Wei-ming

    2009-01-01

    The influence of Nb on microstructure, mechanical property and the transformation kinetics of the coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ) in HSLA steels for different heat inputs, has been investigated. When welded at higher heat inputs (100-60 kJ/cm), impact toughness values of the steel without Nb are much higher than those of the steel with Nb, and the lowest span is 153 J at 60 kJ/cm. But only a little higher values are observed at lower heat inputs (40-30 kJ/cm), and the highest span is 68 J at 30 kJ/cm. Dilatation studies indicate that continuous cooling transformation starting temperatures (Ts) of CGHAZ for the steel with Nb are approximately 15-30 ℃ which are lower than those of the steel without Nb at all heat inputs. For higher heat inputs, Nb in solid solution suppresses ferrite transformation and promotes the formation of granular bainite which has detrimental effect on impact tough-ness. For lower heat inputs higher Charpy impact energy values in the steel with Nb are associated with the formation of low carbon self-tempered martensite.

  1. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin–focal adhesion kinase signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang YT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yu-ting Huang,1,* Lan Zhao,1,* Zheng Fu,1 Meng Zhao,1 Xiao-meng Song,1 Jing Jia,1 Song Wang,1 Jin-ping Li,1 Zhi-feng Zhu,1 Gang Lin,1,2 Rong Lu,1,2 Zhi Yao1,3 1Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 2Shenzhen Kangzhe Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Shenzhen, 3Key Laboratory of Immuno Microenvironment and Disease of the Educational Ministry of China, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this paper Abstract: Tyroservatide (YSV can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin–focal adhesion kinase (FAK signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin ß1 and integrin ß3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer. Keywords: tyroservatide, integrin, focal adhesion kinase, FAK, MMP-2, MMP-9

  2. Evaluating the indirect effect of self-compassion on binge eating severity through cognitive-affective self-regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer B; Forman, Mallory J

    2013-04-01

    Current theory and evidence point to disruptions in self-concept and difficulties with emotion regulation as contributing to the severity of binge eating. Alternatively, contemporary perspectives on self-compassion suggest that individual differences in this adaptive approach to self-regulation may serve to counteract these cognitive-affective triggers presumably resulting in reductions in binge eating severity. Accordingly, the present cross-sectional analysis examined an indirect effect model of positive dimensions of self-compassion on binge eating severity through both emotional tolerance and unconditional self-acceptance pathways. Two hundred fifteen undergraduate students (78% female) completed self-report measures of the variables of interest; BMI was calculated from self-reported heights and weights. Pearson's correlations revealed a positive linear association between self-compassion and unconditional self-acceptance; negative links were observed between self-compassion and emotional intolerance along with the severity of binge eating symptoms. A subsequent multiple mediator analysis utilizing both normal test theory and robust non-parametric bootstrap resampling procedures confirmed the presence of a significant total indirect effect of self-compassion on binge eating severity (-.15, pself-acceptance (-.11, p<0.01) which were preserved in a model adjusted for BMI. Preliminary results underscore the need to further evaluate the tenability of this model in both prospective cohort and intervention-based research. Findings additionally invite considering the value of integrating self-compassion training into college health promotion efforts towards mitigating the appreciable levels of binge eating behavior prevalent in this at-risk population. PMID:23557826

  3. The Liposuction-Induced Effects on Adiponectin and Selected Cytokines Are Not Affected by Exercise Training in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Yazigi Solis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the abrupt liposuction-induced decrease in adipose tissue could affect adipokine secretion pattern. We hypothesized that exercise training could positively impact adipokine metabolism following liposuction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of liposuction on inflammation-related adipokines in women who were either exercise-trained or remained sedentary after surgery. Thirty-six healthy normal-weight women underwent an abdominal liposuction and two months after surgery were randomly allocated into two groups: trained (TR, n=18, four-month exercise program and nontrained (NT, n=18. Inflammation-related adipokine serum levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and adiponectin and abdominal and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT mRNA levels were assessed before (PRE and six months after surgery (POST6. TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 serum levels were unchanged in both groups. In contrast, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels in scAT were increased, whereas adiponectin scAT mRNA and serum levels were decreased at POST6 (P<0.05, main effect for time. No changes were observed in mRNA levels of MCP-1, CD14, and CD68 in any of the groups. In conclusion, liposuction downregulates adiponectin scAT gene expression and serum levels and upregulates scAT gene expression of inflammation-related genes six months after surgery in normal-weight women, irrespective of exercise training.

  4. Hyperglycaemia attenuates the gastrokinetic effect of erythromycin and affects the perception of postprandial hunger in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent studies have demonstrated that acute changes in the blood glucose concentration may affect gastrointestinal motor function and the perception of sensations arising from the gastrointestinal tract. Erythromycin has been shown to accelerate gastric emptying in both normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus. The major aims of this study were to determine in normal subjects whether the effects of erythromycin on gastric emptying, and perceptions of hunger and fullness are modified by the blood glucose concentration. 10 normal subjects (aged 20-39 yr) underwent concurrent measurement of gastric emptying, blood glucose, hunger and fullness on four separate occasions: twice during euglycaemia (∼4 mmol/L) and twice during hyperglycaemia (∼15 mmol/L). Either erythromycin (3 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) was administered intravenously immediately before ingestion of a radioisotopically labelled solid meal. Gastric emptying was slower (P<0.0001) during hyperglycaemia when compared to euglycaemia after both erythromycin and saline administration. Erythromycin accelerated the post-lag emptying rate during euglycaemia (P<0.05), but not hyperglycaemia. Hunger decreased (P<0.001) and fullness increased (P<0.001) after the meal Postprandial hunger was less (P<0.05) and fullness greater (P<0.05 during hyperglycaemia after saline infusion, but not after erythromycin. Hunger was greater after erythromycin when compared to saline during both hyperglycaemia and euglycaemia (P<0.05). In conclusion, at a blood glucose concentration of ∼15 mmol/L when compared to euglycaemia: (i) after administration of erythromycin (3 mg/kg IV) gastric emptying of a solid meal is much slower, (ii) the effect of erythromycin on gastric emptying of a solid meal is attenuated and (iii) the perception of postprandial hunger is reduced and that of fullness increased

  5. Lipid emulsions differentially affect LPS-induced acute monocytes inflammation: in vitro effects on membrane remodeling and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Delabranche, Xavier; Klymchenko, Andrey; Drai, Jocelyne; Blond, Emilie; Zobairi, Fatiha; Mely, Yves; Hasselmann, Michel; Toti, Florence; Meziani, Ferhat

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how lipid emulsions for parenteral nutrition affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute monocyte inflammation in vitro. An 18 h long LPS induced human monocyte leukemia cell stimulation was performed and the cell-growth medium was supplemented with three different industrial lipid emulsions: Intralipid(®), containing long-chain triglycerides (LCT--soybean oil); Medialipid(®), containing LCT (soybean oil) and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT--coconut oil); and SMOFlipid(®), containing LCT, MCT, omega-9 and -3 (soybean, coconut, olive and fish oils). Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by Trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry respectively. Monocyte composition and membrane remodeling were studied using gas chromatography and NR12S staining. Microparticles released in supernatant were measured by prothrombinase assay. After LPS challenge, both cellular necrosis and apoptosis were increased (threefold and twofold respectively) and microparticle release was enhanced (sevenfold) after supplementation with Medialipid(®) compared to Intralipid(®), SMOFlipid(®) and monocytes in the standard medium. The monocytes differentially incorporated fatty acids after lipid emulsion challenge. Finally, lipid-treated cells displayed microparticles characterized by disrupted membrane lipid order, reflecting lipid remodeling of the parental cell plasma membrane. Our data suggest that lipid emulsions differentially alter cell viability, monocyte composition and thereby microparticle release. While MCT have deleterious effects, we have shown that parenteral nutrition emulsion containing LCT or LCT and MCT associated to n-3 and n-9 fatty acids have no effect on endotoxin-induced cell death and inflammation. PMID:25038627

  6. Hyperglycaemia attenuates the gastrokinetic effect of erythromycin and affects the perception of postprandial hunger in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.L.; Berry, M.; Kong, M.F.; Kwiatek, M.; Samsom, M.; Horowitz, M. [University of South Australia, SA (Australia). School of Medicine Radiation]|[Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia). Department of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Recent studies have demonstrated that acute changes in the blood glucose concentration may affect gastrointestinal motor function and the perception of sensations arising from the gastrointestinal tract. Erythromycin has been shown to accelerate gastric emptying in both normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus. The major aims of this study were to determine in normal subjects whether the effects of erythromycin on gastric emptying, and perceptions of hunger and fullness are modified by the blood glucose concentration. 10 normal subjects (aged 20-39 yr) underwent concurrent measurement of gastric emptying, blood glucose, hunger and fullness on four separate occasions: twice during euglycaemia ({approx}4 mmol/L) and twice during hyperglycaemia ({approx}15 mmol/L). Either erythromycin (3 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) was administered intravenously immediately before ingestion of a radioisotopically labelled solid meal. Gastric emptying was slower (P<0.0001) during hyperglycaemia when compared to euglycaemia after both erythromycin and saline administration. Erythromycin accelerated the post-lag emptying rate during euglycaemia (P<0.05), but not hyperglycaemia. Hunger decreased (P<0.001) and fullness increased (P<0.001) after the meal Postprandial hunger was less (P<0.05) and fullness greater (P<0.05) during hyperglycaemia after saline infusion, but not after erythromycin. Hunger was greater after erythromycin when compared to saline during both hyperglycaemia and euglycaemia (P<0.05). In conclusion, at a blood glucose concentration of {approx}15 mmol/L when compared to euglycaemia: (i) after administration of erythromycin (3 mg/kg IV) gastric emptying of a solid meal is much slower, (ii) the effect of erythromycin on gastric emptying of a solid meal is attenuated and (iii) the perception of postprandial hunger is reduced and that of fullness increased

  7. Reciprocal effects of stable and temporary components of neuroticism and affective disorders : Results of a longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P.; Penelo, E.; de Rooij, M.; Penninx, B. W.; Ormel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional studies show that neuroticism is strongly associated with affective disorders. We investigated whether neuroticism and affective disorders mutually reinforce each other over time, setting off a potential downward spiral. Method A total of 2981 adults aged 18-65 years, cons

  8. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  9. Engaging Élitism: The Mediating Effect of Work Engagement on Affective Commitment and Quit Intentions in Two Australian University Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Justine L.; Morris, Leanne

    2013-01-01

    Some universities rely on their élitism as one mechanism to attract and retain talented faculty. This paper examines two groups of élite and non-élite universities and the mediating effect that work engagement has on affective commitment and intention to quit. Findings indicate partial support for the mediating effect of work engagement in the…

  10. What's in a face? The role of skin tone, facial physiognomy, and color presentation mode of facial primes in affective priming effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Elena V; Strube, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Participants (N = 106) performed an affective priming task with facial primes that varied in their skin tone and facial physiognomy, and, which were presented either in color or in gray-scale. Participants' racial evaluations were more positive for Eurocentric than for Afrocentric physiognomy faces. Light skin tone faces were evaluated more positively than dark skin tone faces, but the magnitude of this effect depended on the mode of color presentation. The results suggest that in affective priming tasks, faces might not be processed holistically, and instead, visual features of facial priming stimuli independently affect implicit evaluations. PMID:22468422

  11. Autonomous regulation mode moderates the effect of actual physical activity on affective states : an ambulant assessment approach to the role of self-determination

    OpenAIRE

    Kanning, Martina; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Brand, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that physical activity influences affective states. However, studies have seldom depicted these associations in ongoing real-life situations, and there is no investigation showing that motivational states (i.e., more or less autonomously regulated) would moderate these effects in situ. To investigate the interaction of autonomous regulation and actual physical activity (aPA) with affective states, we use an ambulatory assessment approach. The participants were 44 university...

  12. Watch the Target! Effects in the Affective Misattribution Procedure Become Weaker (But Not Eliminated When Participants Are Motivated to Provide Accurate Responses to the Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas B Eder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that priming effects in the affective misattribution procedure (AMP are unaffected by direct warnings to avoid an influence of the primes. The present research examined whether a priming influence is diminished by task procedures that encourage accurate judgments of the targets. Participants were motivated to categorize the affective meaning of nonsense targets accurately by being made to believe that a true word was presented in each trial and by providing feedback on (allegedly incorrect responses. This condition produced robust priming effects. Priming was however reduced and less reliable relative to more typical AMP conditions in which participants guessed the meaning of openly presented nonsense targets. Affective judgments of nonsense targets were not affected by advance knowledge of the response mapping during the priming phase, which argues against a response-priming explanation of AMP effects. These findings show that affective primes influence evaluative judgments even in conditions in which the motivation to provide accurate responses is high and a priming of motor responses is not possible. Priming effects were however weaker with high accuracy motivation, suggesting that a focus on accurate judgments is an effective strategy to control for an unwanted priming influence in the AMP.

  13. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    , experience and consumption are all strategic design tools applied by planners and architects. Whereas urban design in former modernist planning served merely functional or political means, urban design has increasingly become an aesthetical mediator of ideologies embedded in the urban field of life forces...... capitalism not only changes urban life and its means of production, it specifically influences the way the city is designed and how it unfolds as events (Anderson & Harrison 2010) and affective, emotional production (Pile 2009). Through examples of urban design and events in the Carlsberg City in Copenhagen...... and The High Line in Chelsea, New York, the paper sets out to define and question these affective modes of production. Whether these productions are socio-material practices consisting of ludic designs (Stevens 2007), temporary architecture or art installations or evental practices consisting of...

  14. The effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on affective memory recall dynamics in depression: a mechanistic model of rumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Karlijn Van Vugt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Converging research suggests that mindfulness training exerts its therapeutic effectson depression by reducing rumination. Theoretically, rumination is a multifaceted construct thataggregates multiple neurocognitive aspects of depression, including poor executive control,negative and overgeneral memory bias, and persistence or stickiness of negative mind states.Current measures of rumination, most often self-reports, do not capture these different aspects ofruminative tendencies, and therefore are limited in providing detailed information about themechanisms of mindfulness.Methods: We developed new insights into the potential mechanisms of rumination, based onthree model-based metrics of free recall dynamics. These three measures reflect the patterns ofmemory retrieval of valenced information: The probability of first recall (Pstart whichrepresents initial affective bias, the probability of staying with the same valence category ratherthan switching, which indicates strength of positive or negative association networks (Pstay;and probability of stopping (Pstop or ending recall within a given valence, which indicatesdrift persistence or stickiness of a mind state. We then investigated the effects of MBCT(N=29 vs wait-list control (N=23 on these recall dynamics in a Randomized Controlled Trial(RCT in individuals with recurrent depression. Participants completed a standard laboratorystressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST, to induce negative mood and activate ruminativetendencies. Then, participants completed a free recall task consisting of three word lists. Thisassessment was conducted both before and after treatment or wait-list.Results: While MBCT participant’s Pstart remained relatively stable, controls showed multipleindications of depression-related deterioration towards more negative and less positive bias.Following the intervention, MBCT participants decreased in their tendency to sustain trains ofnegative words

  15. Callous-unemotional traits and empathy deficits: Mediating effects of affective perspective-taking and facial emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Joyce H L; Barry, Christopher T; Sacco, Donald F

    2016-09-01

    Although empathy deficits are thought to be associated with callous-unemotional (CU) traits, findings remain equivocal and little is known about what specific abilities may underlie these purported deficits. Affective perspective-taking (APT) and facial emotion recognition may be implicated, given their independent associations with both empathy and CU traits. The current study examined how CU traits relate to cognitive and affective empathy and whether APT and facial emotion recognition mediate these relations. Participants were 103 adolescents (70 males) aged 16-18 attending a residential programme. CU traits were negatively associated with cognitive and affective empathy to a similar degree. The association between CU traits and affective empathy was partially mediated by APT. Results suggest that assessing mechanisms that may underlie empathic deficits, such as perspective-taking, may be important for youth with CU traits and may inform targets of intervention. PMID:26192073

  16. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richard; J. van der Pligt; N.K. de Vries

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in t

  17. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    Recently, in human geography there has been a considerable attention paid to retheorising maps; less as a product and more as practice. This refers to the notion that rather than reading maps as fixed representations, digital mapping is by nature a dynamic, performative, and participatory practice....... In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology...

  18. Integrated Effects of Wheat Residue and Phosphorus Application on Rice Productivity and Soil Health Under Salt Affected Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of crop residue incorporation along with P application on rice production under salt affected soil having pH 8.57, ECe 5.65 (dS/m), SAR 17.38 (mmol/L)percentage and available P (3.9 mg/kg). The study was carried out at MK Farm, Farooqabad, Sheikhupura, Pakistan during Kharif season in 2009. Treatments were arranged using randomised complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The treatments were control (T/sub 1/), straw incorporation @ 5 tonnes/ha (T/sub 2/), T/sub 2/+20 kg/ P2O5/ha (T/sub 3/), T/sub 2/+40 kg/P2O5/ha (T/sub 4/) and T/sbu 2/+60 kg/P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha (T/sub 5/). The highest grain yield (4.407 t/ha) was recorded in treatment receiving 5 tonnes wheat straw along with 40 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha which is 14.6percentage more than control and the lowest grain yield (3.847 t/ha) was recorded in control. Maximum P (0.37percentage) and K(0.13percentage) contents of grain were recorded where wheat straw was applied @ 5 t/ha along with 40 and 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha whereby P content of control was (0.3percentage). The residual P was 5.7 mg/kg where wheat straw was applied @ 5 t/ha along with 40 and 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha. The residual P in control was 4.3 mg/kg. It can be concluded that incorporation of residue enhanced the availability of P, K and Ca to plant roots. Under saline-sodic/sodic conditions, plant can better cope with salinity in the presence of calcium and K availability. (author)

  19. The effect of parental loss on cognitive and affective interference in adolescent boys from a post-conflict region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S C; Baudoncq, R; De Schryver, M

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the impact of early-life stressors such as parental loss on cognitive-affective processing during adolescence, especially in regions chronically affected by war and armed conflict. Here, we tested 72 male adolescents living in Northern Uganda (ages 14-19), 52 of whom still had both of their parents and 20 participants who had experienced parental loss. Participants completed a classic color-naming Stroop task as well as an affective interference task, the opposite emotions test (OET). Adolescents with parental loss showed a decrease in performance over time, especially on the Stroop task. Critically, this decrement in performance was positively associated with reported symptoms of trauma, but only in the parental loss group. The current data suggest a difficulty in maintaining cognitive control performance in youths with experience of parental loss. The findings are discussed in relation to traumatic stress and mental health in post-conflict regions. PMID:25899130

  20. Effect of hydrogen on the embrittlement of heat affected zones of the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inner walls of WWER pressure vessels are lined with an austenitic overlay providing corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone thus produced shows higher susceptibility to hydrogen absorption and to hydrogen-induced embrittlement than the base steel. It was shown by experiments that the structure of the heat affected zone in the Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel features a microstructure with a number of defects and phase interfaces that serve as trap points for hydrogen absorption. Heat treatment provides regeneration of the heat affected zone and also increased resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in a range comparable to that of the base metal. The increased number of defects due to neutron radiation resulted in reduced uniform ductility. Increased hydrogen level was decisive for reducing nonuniform steel ductility. (Z.M.). 6 figs., 3 refs

  1. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  2. Comparison of the Effects of Reflection and Contemplation Activities on Service-Learners' Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Trae; Alrutz, Megan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the extent to which service-learners' mindfulness is affected by engagement in reflection (e.g., dialogue) and contemplation activities (e.g., labyrinth tracing). The results are compared within and between treatment groups, while covarying for participants' initial levels of mindfulness. While both dialogue and…

  3. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Examination of Reverse Coding Effects in Meyer and Allen's Affective and Continuance Commitment Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magazine, Sherry L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examination of the Affective and Continuance Commitment Scales of J. P. Meyer and N. J. Allen using confirmatory factor analysis for 333 subjects with the LISREL 7 computer program provided strong support across multiple diagnostics for existence of a reverse coding factor defined by the 6 negatively worded scale items. (Author/SLD)

  4. Applying the Intervention Model for Fostering Affective Involvement with Persons Who Are Congenitally Deafblind: An Effect Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.A.W.; Janssen, M.J.; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.; Huisman, M.J.M.E.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we applied the Intervention Model for Affective Involvement (IMAI) to four participants who are congenitally deafblind and their 16 communication partners in 3 different settings (school, a daytime activities center, and a group home). We examined whether the interventio

  5. Effect of blending Huanglongbing (HLB) disease affected orange juice with juice from healthy oranges on flavor quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, has been a concern for the citrus industry as it progressively damages and ultimately kills citrus trees. While this disease does not affect human health, it is associated with bitter off-flavor for orange juice. The objective of this study was to determine...

  6. Public, Catholic Single-Sex, and Catholic Coeducational High Schools: Their Effects on Achievement, Affect and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.

    Growth during the last 2 years of high school was examined in public and Catholic high schools using data from the High School and Beyond database--a large, nationally representative study. Earlier research was extended by considering: (1) affective variables (e.g., self-concept, locus of control), academic choices (e.g., course selection), and…

  7. Effects of Experimentally Manipulated Peer Rejection on Children's Negative Affect, Self-Esteem, and Maladaptive Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesdale, Drew; Lambert, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Children (n = 88) aged 8 and 10 years participated in a minimal group study in which their rejection versus acceptance, by one other person versus a group of three people, was experimentally manipulated. Analysis of their self-reported negative affect, self-esteem, and maladaptive social behavior, revealed that, regardless of the source of the…

  8. The effects of experimentally induced rumination, positive reappraisal, acceptance, and distancing when thinking about a stressful event on affect states in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rood; J. Roelofs; S.M. Bögels; A. Arntz

    2012-01-01

    The current study compares the effects of experimentally induced rumination, positive reappraisal, distancing, and acceptance on affect states in adolescents aged 13-18. Participants (N = 160) were instructed to think about a recent stressful event. Next, they received specific instructions on how t

  9. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Rumination, Positive Reappraisal, Acceptance, and Distancing when Thinking about a Stressful Event on Affect States in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Lea; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Bogels, Susan M.; Arntz, Arnoud

    2012-01-01

    The current study compares the effects of experimentally induced rumination, positive reappraisal, distancing, and acceptance on affect states in adolescents aged 13-18. Participants (N = 160) were instructed to think about a recent stressful event. Next, they received specific instructions on how to think about that event in each condition.…

  10. The effects of hostility and arousal on facial affect perception : a test of a neuropsychological model of hostility

    OpenAIRE

    Herridge, Matthew L.

    1996-01-01

    Within the field of psychology, hostility has historically been a heavily researched affective construct. The purpose of this experiment was to test hypotheses derived from a neuropsychological model of hostility utilizing two common research paradigms from the extant literatures on hostility's cognitive and physiological correlates. This was accomplished by testing an integral component of a previously proposed neuropsychological model of hostility (Herridge & Harrison, 1994). The purpose of...

  11. Linkage strategies for genetically complex traits. III. The effect of marker polymorphism on analysis of affected relative pairs.

    OpenAIRE

    Risch, N

    1990-01-01

    The results from the second paper of this series are reexamined for markers that are not completely polymorphic. A maximum lod score (MLS) criterion is defined for affected relative pairs. The expected MLS (EMLS) is calculated as a function of the marker polymorphic information content (PIC) for various values of lambda R (relative risk ratio) and different relative types by using simulations. An m-allele model with equal allele frequencies is employed. The EMLS is calculated for two sampling...

  12. Effects of Violent-Video-Game Exposure on Aggressive Behavior, Aggressive-Thought Accessibility, and Aggressive Affect Among Adults With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Christopher R; Mazurek, Micah O; Hilgard, Joseph; Rouder, Jeffrey N; Bartholow, Bruce D

    2015-08-01

    Recent mass shootings have prompted the idea among some members of the public that exposure to violent video games can have a pronounced effect on individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Empirical evidence for or against this claim has been missing, however. To address this issue, we assigned adults with and without ASD to play a violent or nonviolent version of a customized first-person shooter video game. After they played the game, we assessed three aggression-related outcome variables (aggressive behavior, aggressive-thought accessibility, and aggressive affect). Results showed strong evidence that adults with ASD, compared with typically developing adults, are not differentially affected by acute exposure to violent video games. Moreover, model comparisons provided modest evidence against any effect of violent game content whatsoever. Findings from this experiment suggest that societal concerns that exposure to violent games may have a unique effect on adults with autism are not supported by evidence. PMID:26113064

  13. Low-dose irradiation effects on creep properties of type 304 stainless steel weld metal, heat-affected zones, and welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrity of large non-replaceable primary reactor components of liquid metal fast breeders largely depends on the properties of weld metal and heataffected zones. Safety authorities, involved in the licensing of the SNR-300, have required the measurement and interpretation of post-irradiation creep and creep rupture properties of DIN 1.4948 (Type 304) stainless steel weld metal and heat-affected zones. For the present investigation, weld metal in as-deposited and stress-relieved condition has been subjected to tension and creep tests. The heat-affected zone structure was studied with specimens subjected to temperature cycles representative for different locations in the parent metal near the fusion zone. The specimens were irradiated in the HFR Petten at 823 K submerged in sodium to a total neutron fluence of 5 X 103 n/m2. Irradiation has no significant effect on creep and tensile properties of weld metal. The heat-affected zone is strongly affected by low-dose neutron irradiation: its 10000-h creep strength is about 25 MPa lower than that of parent metal under similar conditions. The creep strength of welded joints is controlled by a strain limit criterion. In unirradiated condition, the weld metal has the lowest ductility and rupture occurs in the weld metal. In irradiated condition the heat-affected zone has the lowest ductility for the higher creep stresses (>175 MPa) and lower rupture times (<3000 h). For lower creep stresses, the weld metal, though not affected by irradiation, determines the creep strength. Application of a stress relief treatment reduces the dislocation density and changes the carbide population in weld metal to such a degree that the ductility increases considerably with little loss of strength. The grain coarsening in the heat-affected zones, amplifying the irradiation embrittlement, can be suppressed by using low heat input welding techniques

  14. How does real affect affect affect recognition in speech?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, Khiet Phuong

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to develop speech-based affect recognition systems that can deal with spontaneous (‘real’) affect instead of acted affect. Several affect recognition experiments with spontaneous affective speech data were carried out to investigate what combinati

  15. Affect and self-efficacy responses during moderate-intensity exercise among low-active women: the effect of cognitive appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Amy S; Hulley, Angie; Beauchamp, Mark

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between cognitive and affective responses during acute exercise, 24 low-active females completed two 30-min bouts of cycle ergometer exercise at 90% of the ventilatory threshold. In one condition participants had full knowledge of the exercise duration (KD); in the other, exercise duration was unknown (UD). Affect and self-efficacy were measured before and every 3 min during exercise, and affect was also measured postexercise. Affect declined throughout the first half of both conditions, and continued its decline until the end of the UD condition, when a rebound effect was observed. Self-efficacy during exercise displayed a similar pattern. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that during-exercise self-efficacy was a stronger predictor of during-exercise affect than preexercise self-efficacy, and that this relationship was strongest at the end of exercise when duration was unknown. These results indicate that repetitive cognitive appraisal of self and the task could impact the exercise experiences of low-active women during the adoption phase of an exercise program. PMID:20479476

  16. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  17. Hormonal status and age differentially affect tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC on learning in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Winsauer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hormone status and age on the development of tolerance to D9-THC were assessed in sham-operated (intact or ovariectomized (OVX female rats that received either intraperitoneal saline or 5.6 mg/kg of D9-THC daily from postnatal day (PD 75 to 180 (early adulthood onward or PD 35 to 140 (adolescence onward. During this time, the 4 groups for each age (i.e., intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline, and OVX/THC were trained in a learning and performance procedure and dose-effect curves were established for D9-THC (0.56-56 mg/kg and the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R antagonist rimonabant (0.32-10 mg/kg. Despite the persistence of small rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in intact and OVX females from both ages during chronic D9-THC, all of the D9-THC groups developed tolerance. However, the magnitude of tolerance, as well as the effect of hormone status, varied with the age at which chronic D9-THC was initiated. There was no evidence of dependence in any of the groups. Hippocampal protein expression of CB1R, AHA1 (a co-chaperone of CB1R and HSP90β (a molecular chaperone modulated by AHA-1 was affected more by OVX than chronic D9-THC; striatal protein expression was not consistently affected by either manipulation. Hippocampal BDNF expression varied with age, hormone status, and chronic treatment. Thus, hormonal status differentially affects the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (D9-THC on learning and performance behavior in adolescent, but not adult, female rats. These factors and their interactions also differentially affect cannabinoid signaling proteins in the hippocampus and striatum, and ultimately, neural plasticity.

  18. Detection of Parent-of-Origin Effects Based on Complete and Incomplete Nuclear Families with Multiple Affected Children

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ji-Yuan; Hu, Yue-Qing; Lin, Shili; Fung, Wing K.

    2008-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects are important in studying genetic traits. More than 1% of all mammalian genes are believed to show parent-of-origin effects. Some statistical methods may be ineffective or fail to detect linkage or association for a gene with parent-of-origin effects. Based on case-parents trios, the parental-asymmetry test (PAT) is simple and powerful in detecting parent-of-origin effects. However, it is common in practice to collect nuclear families with both parents as well as nucl...

  19. Effect of Welding Thermal Cycles on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat Affected Zone for a Weldox 1300 Ultra-High Strength Alloy Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Węglowski M. St.; Zeman M.; Grocholewski A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the investigation of weldability of ultra-high strength steel has been presented. The thermal simulated samples were used to investigate the effect of welding cooling time t8/5 on microstructure and mechanical properties of heat affected zone (HAZ) for a Weldox 1300 ultra-high strength steel. In the frame of these investigation the microstructure was studied by light and transmission electron microscopies. Mechanical properties of parent material were analysed by tensile...

  20. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Rumination, Positive Reappraisal, Acceptance, and Distancing When Thinking About a Stressful Event on Affect States in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rood, Lea; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Bögels, Susan M.; Arntz, Arnoud

    2011-01-01

    The current study compares the effects of experimentally induced rumination, positive reappraisal, distancing, and acceptance on affect states in adolescents aged 13–18. Participants (N = 160) were instructed to think about a recent stressful event. Next, they received specific instructions on how to think about that event in each condition. Manipulation checks revealed that the manipulations were successful, except for acceptance. The two most reported events were “a fight” and “death of lov...

  1. Effect of Infusions of Non-Antibiotic Antibacterials Alone and in Combination with Cephradine on Milk Yield of Buffaloes Affected with Clinical Mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yousaf*, G. Muhammad1, M. Z. Khan2 and S. U. Rahman3

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four non-antibiotic antibacterials alone or in combination with cephradine in buffaloes on milk yield of mastitis affected quarters. For this purpose, 270 clinically mastitic quarters were grouped in randomized pattern. Non-antibiotic antibacterials viz., 2.5% chlorpromazine (2 ml), 4% lidocaine (10 ml), 10% povidone-iodine (10 ml) and 99.5% dimethylsulphoxide (20 ml) alone and in combination with first generation cephalosporin ...

  2. Are Age-Related Differences Between Young and Older Adults in an Affective Working Memory Test Sensitive to the Music Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eBorella

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There are evidences showing that music can affect cognitive performance by improving our emotional state. The aim of the current study was to analyze whether age-related differences between young and older adults in a Working Memory (WM Span test in which the stimuli to be recalled have a different valence (i.e., neutral, positive, or negative words, are sensitive to exposure to music. Because some previous studies showed that emotional words can sustain older adults’ performance in WM, we examined whether listening to music could enhance the benefit of emotional material, with respect to neutral words, on WM performance decreasing the age-related difference between younger and older adults. In particular, the effect of two types of music (Mozart vs. Albinoni, which differ in tempo, arousal and mood induction, on age-related differences in an affective version of the Operation WM Span task were analyzed.Results showed no effect of music on the WM test regardless of the emotional content of the music (Mozart vs. Albinoni. However, as in previous studies, a valence effect for the words in the WM task was found with a higher number of negative words recalled with respect to positive and neutral ones in both younger and older adults. When individual differences, in terms of accuracy in the processing phase of the Operation Span task, were considered, only younger low-performing participants were affected by the type music, with the Albinoni condition that lowered their performance with respect to the Mozart condition. Such a result suggests that individual differences in WM performance, at least when young adults are considered, could be affected by the type of music.Altogether, these findings suggest that complex span tasks, such as WM tasks, along with age-related differences are less sensitive to music effects.

  3. The Effects of Catastrophic Thinking about Pain on Attentional Interference by Pain: No Mediation of Negative Affectivity in Healthy Volunteers and in Patients with Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Crombez, G.; C Eccleston; Van den Broeck, A.; Van Houdenhove, B.; Goubert, L.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that catastrophic thinking about pain enhances attentional interference in healthy volunteers.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the attentional effects of pain catastrophizing can be accounted for by the more general predisposition of negative affectivity.METHODS: Sixty-seven pain-free students participated in the first experiment, and 33 patients with chronic low back pain participated in the second experiment. In both experiments, participants perform...

  4. Are age-related differences between young and older adults in an affective working memory test sensitive to the music effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Erika; Carretti, Barbara; Grassi, Massimo; Nucci, Massimo; Sciore, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    There are evidences showing that music can affect cognitive performance by improving our emotional state. The aim of the current study was to analyze whether age-related differences between young and older adults in a Working Memory (WM) Span test in which the stimuli to be recalled have a different valence (i.e., neutral, positive, or negative words), are sensitive to exposure to music. Because some previous studies showed that emotional words can sustain older adults' performance in WM, we examined whether listening to music could enhance the benefit of emotional material, with respect to neutral words, on WM performance decreasing the age-related difference between younger and older adults. In particular, the effect of two types of music (Mozart vs. Albinoni), which differ in tempo, arousal and mood induction, on age-related differences in an affective version of the Operation WM Span task was analyzed. Results showed no effect of music on the WM test regardless of the emotional content of the music (Mozart vs. Albinoni). However, a valence effect for the words in the WM task was found with a higher number of negative words recalled with respect to positive and neutral ones in both younger and older adults. When individual differences in terms of accuracy in the processing phase of the Operation Span task were considered, only younger low-performing participants were affected by the type music, with the Albinoni condition that lowered their performance with respect to the Mozart condition. Such a result suggests that individual differences in WM performance, at least when young adults are considered, could be affected by the type of music. Altogether, these findings suggest that complex span tasks, such as WM tasks, along with age-related differences are not sensitive to music effects. PMID:25426064

  5. The Effect of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Plasma Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Patients with Affective Disorders: A Randomised Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maj Vinberg; Kamilla Miskowiak; Pernille Hoejman; Maria Pedersen; Lars Vedel Kessing

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of repeated infusions of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with affective disorders. In total, 83 patients were recruited: 40 currently depressed patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HDRS-17) score >17) (study 1) and 43 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) in partial remission (HDRS-17 and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) ≤ 14) (...

  6. Psychological Mechanisms Mediating Effects Between Trauma and Psychotic Symptoms: The Role of Affect Regulation, Intrusive Trauma Memory, Beliefs, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Amy; Emsley, Richard; Freeman, Daniel; Bebbington, Paul; Garety, Philippa A.; Kuipers, Elizabeth E.; Dunn, Graham; Fowler, David

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests a causal role for trauma in psychosis, particularly for childhood victimization. However, the establishment of underlying trauma-related mechanisms would strengthen the causal argument. In a sample of people with relapsing psychosis (n = 228), we tested hypothesized mechanisms specifically related to impaired affect regulation, intrusive trauma memory, beliefs, and depression. The majority of participants (74.1%) reported victimization trauma, and a fifth (21.5%) met symptomatic criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. We found a specific link between childhood sexual abuse and auditory hallucinations (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.74, P = .018). This relationship was mediated by posttraumatic avoidance and numbing (OR = 1.48, SE = 0.19, P = .038) and hyperarousal (OR = 1.44, SE = 0.18, P = .045), but not intrusive trauma memory, negative beliefs or depression. In contrast, childhood emotional abuse was specifically associated with delusions, both persecutory (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.68, P = .009) and referential (adjusted OR = 2.43, SE = 0.74, P = .004). The link with persecutory delusions was mediated by negative-other beliefs (OR = 1.36, SE = 0.14, P = .024), but not posttraumatic stress symptoms, negative-self beliefs, or depression. There was no evidence of mediation for referential delusions. No relationships were identified between childhood physical abuse and psychosis. The findings underline the role of cognitive-affective processes in the relationship between trauma and symptoms, and the importance of assessing and treating victimization and its psychological consequences in people with psychosis. PMID:27460616

  7. Psychological Mechanisms Mediating Effects Between Trauma and Psychotic Symptoms: The Role of Affect Regulation, Intrusive Trauma Memory, Beliefs, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Amy; Emsley, Richard; Freeman, Daniel; Bebbington, Paul; Garety, Philippa A; Kuipers, Elizabeth E; Dunn, Graham; Fowler, David

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests a causal role for trauma in psychosis, particularly for childhood victimization. However, the establishment of underlying trauma-related mechanisms would strengthen the causal argument. In a sample of people with relapsing psychosis (n = 228), we tested hypothesized mechanisms specifically related to impaired affect regulation, intrusive trauma memory, beliefs, and depression. The majority of participants (74.1%) reported victimization trauma, and a fifth (21.5%) met symptomatic criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. We found a specific link between childhood sexual abuse and auditory hallucinations (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.74, P = .018). This relationship was mediated by posttraumatic avoidance and numbing (OR = 1.48, SE = 0.19, P = .038) and hyperarousal (OR = 1.44, SE = 0.18, P = .045), but not intrusive trauma memory, negative beliefs or depression. In contrast, childhood emotional abuse was specifically associated with delusions, both persecutory (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.68, P = .009) and referential (adjusted OR = 2.43, SE = 0.74, P = .004). The link with persecutory delusions was mediated by negative-other beliefs (OR = 1.36, SE = 0.14, P = .024), but not posttraumatic stress symptoms, negative-self beliefs, or depression. There was no evidence of mediation for referential delusions. No relationships were identified between childhood physical abuse and psychosis. The findings underline the role of cognitive-affective processes in the relationship between trauma and symptoms, and the importance of assessing and treating victimization and its psychological consequences in people with psychosis. PMID:27460616

  8. The effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on affective memory recall dynamics in depression : A mechanistic model of rumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Hitchcock, Peter; Shahar, Ben; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Converging research suggests that mindfulness training exerts its therapeutic effects on depression by reducing rumination. Theoretically, rumination is a multifaceted construct that aggregates multiple neurocognitive aspects of depression, including poor executive control, negative and

  9. The Effect of Factors Affecting Social Behavior and Prosocial Behavior (Case Study: City of Steel of Mobarakeh)

    OpenAIRE

    Mashallah Valikhani; Abbasali Behzadipur

    2015-01-01

    The present paper, titled ‘A Study of the Effects of Internal Marketing on Customer-oriented Prosocial Behaviors’ investigates the important role of internal marketing on job satisfaction, organizational commitment and, finally, role-prescribed customer service and extra-role customer service (prosocial behavior) among Standard of Isfahan Steel of Mobarakeh. A main hypothesis (speculating the significant effect of internal marketing on customer-oriented prosocial behavior) and eleven sub-hypo...

  10. Mediating Effects of Intention On The Factors Affecting Organic Food Products Consumption Among Chinese Generation Y In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Poh Leong; Laily Paim

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the effect of intention as a mediator in the relationship between internal factors and external factors on consumption. The factors were a) internal factors: knowledge, awareness, health consciousness, product attributes, environmental concern, and b) external factors: subjective norms, perceived behaviour control, and media and advertisement. From the review of literature, there were limited studies done on the mediating effect of intention on the relationship bet...

  11. Assessment of the pharmacological effects of alprazolam on electroencephalography using connectivity indexes not affected by volume conduction

    OpenAIRE

    Joan Francesc Alonso; Jordi Riba

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Electroencephalographic analysis techniques have become a very useful tool to assess brain activity and interactions between cerebral regions, that is, the so-called cerebral connectivity analysis. The effects of some drugs have, so far, been studied using spectral analysis and, to a lesser extent, some linear and nonlinear connectivity techniques. New indexes have recently been designed based on assumptions that make them more robust against volume conduction effects that co...

  12. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the UK programme to protect new buildings in radon affected areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of areas in the UK with significant indoor radon levels prompted the Building Research Establishment in 1992 to publish guidance (1) specifying protection measures, enforced by law, when building new houses in radon Affected Areas. In high risk areas, with over 10% of existing houses above the 200 Bq m-3 Action Level, primary protection in the form of a radon-proof membrane is required, as well as secondary protection in the form of a sump capable of being fitted with a low cost pump. In lower risk areas with 3 to 10% of houses above the Action Level only secondary protection is specified. This latter requirement reduces the cost of providing radon remediation to around pound 150 for the fan, rather than an average of pound 750 for providing a sump and fitting a fan, but requires measurement of the radon level to judge whether remediation is required. Northamptonshire, with 6.3% of houses above the Action Level, has areas of both high and lower risk. There has been considerable influx of population in recent years, with 12,200 new houses built since 1993. In high risk areas in Northamptonshire, the collective dose reduction of primary protection has been calculated and has now reached 23 man-sieverts per year has been avoided in the total of 7,900 houses built since 1993. Using current NRPB risk estimates this is equivalent to 0.8 lung cancers avoided each year. This is similar to that achieved by the remediation programme in existing housing, although the potential saving in existing housing is much greater if more householders can be encouraged to carry out remediation (2). In addition, two new housing estates in the lower risk area have been assessed by issuing 6-day etched track detectors to householders, and using a questionnaire to assess their knowledge of radon. Two detectors were used, one in the living area and bedroom, and results were combined using the NRPB protocol to give a weighted seasonally corrected average radon level. In one

  13. The trauma of peer abuse: Effects of relational peer victimization and social anxiety disorder on physiological and affective reactions to social exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eIffland

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social exclusion elicits emotional distress, negative mood and physiological stress. Recent studies showed that these effects were more intense and persisting in socially anxious subjects. The present study examined whether the abnormal reactions of socially anxious subjects can be traced back to previous experiences of relational peer victimization during childhood and adolescence. Methods: Participants (N = 74 were patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder as well as healthy controls. The patient and control groups were subdivided into two subgroups according to the subject’s reports about previous relational peer victimization. Immediate and delayed physiological (skin conductance level and heart rate and affective reactions to a simulated social exclusion in a ball-toss game (Cyberball were recorded.Results: Overall, subjects’ immediate reactions to social exclusion were an increase in skin conductance and a reduction of positive affect. Regardless of the diagnostic status, subjects with a history of relational peer victimization showed a more intense self-reported affective change that was accompanied by a blunted skin conductance response. However, the mood of the subjects with a history of peer victimization recovered during a 15 min waiting period. A diagnosis of social anxiety disorder did not affect the reactions to social exclusion on any measure.Conclusions: Findings indicate that stress reactions to social exclusion depend more on previous experiences of peer victimization than on a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. The findings indicate that memories of negative social experiences can determine the initial stress reaction to social threats.

  14. Effective antibiotics against 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in HLB-affected citrus plants identified via the graft-based evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Citrus huanglongbing (HLB, caused by three species of fastidious, phloem-limited 'Candidatus Liberibacter', is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. To date, there is no established cure for this century-old and yet, newly emerging disease. As a potential control strategy for citrus HLB, 31 antibiotics were screened for effectiveness and phytotoxicity using the optimized graft-based screening system with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las-infected citrus scions. Actidione and Oxytetracycline were the most phytotoxic to citrus with less than 10% of scions surviving and growing; therefore, this data was not used in additional analyses. Results of principal component (PCA and hierarchical clustering analyses (HCA demonstrated that 29 antibiotics were clustered into 3 groups: highly effective, partly effective, and not effective. In spite of different modes of actions, a number of antibiotics such as, Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, Penicillin, Cefalexin, Rifampicin and Sulfadimethoxine were all highly effective in eliminating or suppressing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus indicated by both the lowest Las infection rate and titers of the treated scions and inoculated rootstock. The non-effective group, including 11 antibiotics alone with three controls, such as Amikacin, Cinoxacin, Gentamicin, Kasugamycin, Lincomycin, Neomycin, Polymixin B and Tobramycin, did not eliminate or suppress Las in the tested concentrations, resulting in plants with increased titers of Las. The other 12 antibiotics partly eliminated or suppressed Las in the treated and graft-inoculated plants. The effective and non-phytotoxic antibiotics could be potential candidates for control of citrus HLB, either for the rescue of infected citrus germplasm or for restricted field application.

  15. Cognitive and affective components of mental workload: Understanding the effects of each on human decision making behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics researchers have recognized for some time the increasing importance of understanding the role of the construct of mental workload in flight research. Current models of mental workload suggest that it is a multidimensional and complex construct, but one that has proved difficult to measure. Because of this difficulty, emphasis has usually been placed on using direct reports through subjective measures such as rating scales to assess levels of mental workload. The NASA Task Load Index (NASA/TLX, Hart and Staveland) has been shown to be a highly reliable and sensitive measure of perceived mental workload. But a problem with measures like TLX is that there is still considerable disagreement as to what it is about mental workload that these subjective measures are actually measuring. The empirical use of subjective workload measures has largely been to provide estimates of the cognitive components of the actual mental workload required for a task. However, my research suggests that these measures may, in fact have greater potential in accurately assessing the affective components of workload. That is, for example, TLX may be more likely to assess the positive and negative feelings associated with varying workload levels, which in turn may potentially influence the decision making behavior that directly bears on performance and safety issues. Pilots, for example, are often called upon to complete many complex tasks that are high in mental workload, stress, and frustration, and that have significant dynamic decision making components -- often ones that involve risk as well.

  16. How will the greening of the Arctic affect an important prey species and disturbance agent? Vegetation effects on arctic ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, H C; Chipperfield, J D; Roland, C; Svenning, J-C

    2015-07-01

    Increases in terrestrial primary productivity across the Arctic and northern alpine ecosystems are leading to altered vegetation composition and stature. Changes in vegetation stature may affect predator-prey interactions via changes in the prey's ability to detect predators, changes in predation pressure, predator identity and predator foraging strategy. Changes in productivity and vegetation composition may also affect herbivores via effects on forage availability and quality. We investigated if height-dependent effects of forage and non-forage vegetation determine burrowing extent and activity of arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii). We collected data on burrow networks and activity of arctic ground squirrels across long-term vegetation monitoring sites in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. The implications of height-specific cover of potential forage and non-forage vegetation on burrowing behaviour and habitat suitability for arctic ground squirrels were investigated using hierarchical Bayesian modelling. Increased cover of forbs was associated with more burrows and burrow systems, and higher activity of systems, for all forb heights. No other potential forage functional group was related to burrow distribution and activity. In contrast, height-dependent negative effects of non-forage vegetation were observed, with cover over 50-cm height negatively affecting the number of burrows, systems and system activity. Our results demonstrate that increases in vegetation productivity have dual, potentially counteracting effects on arctic ground squirrels via changes in forage and vegetation stature. Importantly, increases in tall-growing woody vegetation (shrubs and trees) have clear negative effects, whereas increases in forb should benefit arctic ground squirrels. PMID:25666700

  17. Assessment of the pharmacological effects of alprazolam on electroencephalography using connectivity indexes not affected by volume conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Francesc Alonso

    2015-04-01

    The fact that the considered indexes were not able to find significant differences in the beta band might indicate that phase-coupling changes induced by the drug are weak or too subtle to be detected, given that all measures are corrected by a baseline recording. This might discourage their use in psychopharmacological studies when assessing low doses, mild effects, or when working with a reduced number of participants. However, correlations with plasma concentrations remained high, indicating that PLI, WPLI and IC should not be totally discarded as means of evaluating pharmacological effects on the brain via EEG recordings.

  18. Cognitive and affective empathy in children with conduct problems: additive and interactive effects of callous-unemotional traits and autism spectrum disorders symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalich, Dave S; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

    2014-11-30

    Callous-unemotional (CU) traits and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) symptoms are characterized by problems in empathy; however, these behavioral features are rarely examined together in children with conduct problems. This study investigated additive and interactive effects of CU traits and ASD symptoms in relation to cognitive and affective empathy in a non-ASD clinic-referred sample. Participants were 134 children aged 3 to 9 years (M=5.60; 79% boys) with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder, and their parents. Clinicians, teachers, and parents reported on dimensions of child behavior, and parental reports of family dysfunction and direct observations of parental warmth/responsiveness assessed quality of family relationships. Results from multiple regression analysis showed that, over and above the effects of child conduct problem severity and quality of family relationships, both ASD symptoms and CU traits were uniquely associated with deficits in cognitive empathy. Moreover, CU traits demonstrated an independent association with affective empathy, and this relationship was moderated by ASD symptoms. That is, there was a stronger negative association between CU traits and affective empathy at higher versus lower levels of ASD symptoms. These findings suggest including both CU traits and ASD-related social impairments in models delineating the atypical development of empathy in children with conduct problems. PMID:25015711

  19. Heat or gamma irradiation sterilization affects the hypocholesterolemic effect of guar gum in axenic and heteroxenic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-two axenic (germ free) or thirty heteroxenic (axenic colonized with human flora) 2.5-3.5 months old female Fisher rats were fed for four weeks either a hypercholesterolemic (hyper) diet or a hyper diet containing 5% guar gum (GG) sterilized by heat or gamma radiation. Axenic s rat fed the irradiated GG diet had had high cholesterolemia than their counterparts fed in autoclave diet (4.50 vs 2.29 mmol/l), whereas the method of sterilization had no effect on plasma cholesterol on axenic hyper or heteroxenic animals fed (7.35 vs 6.51 mg/dl). The levels of hepatic esterified cholesterol were higher in heteroxenic animals fed the irradiated GG diet than in their counterparts fed the autoclave GG diet (5.65 vs 3.57 mmol/g tissue). The composition of volatile fatty acids in the cecal contents of heteroxenic rats was dependent on the method of sterilization regardless of the presence of fiber: the levels of butyrate were 2.88 and 0,85 μmol/g for rats fed the autoclave and irradiated diets, respectively. Gamma radiation abolished the cholesterol-lowering effect of guar gum, whereas sterilization by heat preserved this effect. The hypocholesterolemic effect of guar was reduced by gamma irradiation sterilization and was probably mediated by qualitative changes in the intestinal microflora which interfered with bile acid absorption. (author)

  20. Green tea extract only affects markers of oxidative status postprandially: lasting antioxidant effect of flavonoid-free diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, J.F.; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Haraldsdottir, J.;

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that foods rich in flavonoids might reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of green tea extract (GTE) used as a food antioxidant on markers of oxidative status after dietary depletion of...

  1. Risk of emotional disorder in offspring of depressed parents : Gender differences in the effect of a second emotionally affected parent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman-Peeters, K.M.; Ormel, J.; van Sonderen, E.L.; den Boer, J.A.; Minderaa, R.B.; Hartman, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    In offspring of depressed parents a second parent with emotional problems is likely to increase risk of emotional disorder. This effect may however differ between sons and daughters and between offspring of depressed fathers and offspring of depressed mothers. In adolescent and young-adult offspring

  2. The Effects of Foster Care Intervention on Socially Deprived Institutionalized Children's Attention and Positive Affect: Results from the BEIP Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghera, Melissa M.; Marshall, Peter J.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.; Smyke, Anna T.; Guthrie, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Background: We examined the effects of a foster care intervention on attention and emotion expression in socially deprived children in Romanian institutions. Methods: Institutionalized children were randomized to enter foster care or to remain under institutional care. Subsequently, the institutionalized and foster care groups, along with a…

  3. Slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation affects reaction times, but not priming effects, in a masked prime task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlaghecken, F.; Munchau, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Rothwell, J.C.; Eimer, M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) reduces motor cortex excitability, but it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences in healthy subjects. METHODS: We examined the effects of 1 Hz rTMS (train of 20 min; stimulus intensity 80% of active motor thr

  4. Action spectra affect variability of the climatology of biologically effective ultraviolet radiation on cloud-free days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Action spectrum (AS) describes the relative effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in producing biological effects and allows spectral UV irradiance to be weighted in order to compute biologically effective UV radiation (UVBE). The aim of this research was to study the seasonal and latitudinal distribution over Europe of daily UVBE doses responsible for various biological effects on humans and plants. Clear sky UV radiation spectra were computed at 30-min time intervals for the first day of each month of the year for Rome, Potsdam and Trondheim using a radiative transfer model fed with climatological data. Spectral data were weighted using AS for erythema, vitamin D synthesis, cataract and photo-keratitis for humans, while the generalised plant damage and the plant damage AS were used for plants. The daily UVBE doses for the above-mentioned biological processes were computed and are analysed in this study. The patterns of variation due to season (for each location) and latitude (for each date) resulted as being specific for each adopted AS. The biological implications of these results are briefly discussed highlighting the importance of a specific UVBE climatology for each biological process. (authors)

  5. Dietary antioxidants and flight exercise in female birds affect allocation of nutrients to eggs: how carry-over effects work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrip, Megan M; Seeram, Navindra P; Yuan, Tao; Ma, Hang; McWilliams, Scott R

    2016-09-01

    Physiological challenges during one part of the annual cycle can carry over and affect performance at a subsequent phase, and antioxidants could be one mediator of trade-offs between phases. We performed a controlled experiment with zebra finches to examine how songbirds use nutrition to manage trade-offs in antioxidant allocation between endurance flight and subsequent reproduction. Our treatment groups included (1) a non-supplemented, non-exercised group (control group) fed a standard diet with no exercise beyond that experienced during normal activity in an aviary; (2) a supplemented non-exercised group fed a water- and lipid-soluble antioxidant-supplemented diet with no exercise; (3) a non-supplemented exercised group fed a standard diet and trained to perform daily endurance flight for 6 weeks; and (4) a supplemented exercised group fed an antioxidant-supplemented diet and trained to perform daily flight for 6 weeks. After flight training, birds were paired within treatment groups for breeding. We analyzed eggs for lutein and vitamin E concentrations and the plasma of parents throughout the experiment for non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage. Exercised birds had higher oxidative damage levels than non-exercised birds after flight training, despite supplementation with dietary antioxidants. Supplementation with water-soluble antioxidants decreased the deposition of lipid-soluble antioxidants into eggs and decreased yolk size. Flight exercise also lowered deposition of lutein, but not vitamin E, to eggs. These findings have important implications for future studies of wild birds during migration and other oxidative challenges. PMID:27582563

  6. Learning and memory during aggression in Drosophila: handling affects aggression and the formation of a “loser” effect

    OpenAIRE

    Trannoy, Severine; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster serves to acquire or defense vital resources such as food, territory or access to mates. Flies learn from previous fighting experience and modify and adapt their behavior to new situations, suggesting that learning and memory play a major role in agonistic encounters. Prior fighting experience influences the outcome of later contests: losing a fight increases the probability of losing second contests, revealing the formation of a “loser” effect. ...

  7. The central melanocortin system affects the hypothalamo-pituitary thyroid axis and may mediate the effect of leptin

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, M. S.; Small, C J; Stanley, S. A.; Morgan, D. G. A.; Seal, L.J.; Kong, W.M.; Edwards, C M B; Abusnana, S.; Sunter, D.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S R

    2000-01-01

    Prolonged fasting is associated with a downregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary thyroid (H-P-T) axis, which is reversed by administration of leptin. The hypothalamic melanocortin system regulates energy balance and mediates a number of central effects of leptin. In this study, we show that hypothalamic melanocortins can stimulate the thyroid axis and that their antagonist, agouti-related peptide (Agrp), can inhibit it. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of Agrp (83-132) decreased...

  8. Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: effect of pH and redox conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, CL; Mortimer, RJG; Stewart, DI; Mayes, WM; Peacock, CL; Polya, DA; Lythgoe, PR; Lehoux, AP; Gruiz, K; Burke, IT

    2014-01-01

    The tailings dam breach at the Ajka alumina plant, western Hungary in 2010 introduced ∼1 million m3 of red mud suspension into the surrounding area. Red mud (fine fraction bauxite residue) has a characteristically alkaline pH and contains several potentially toxic elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaerobic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near Ajka in order to investigate the effects of red mud addition on soil biogeochemistry and arsenic mobility in soil–water experim...

  9. Empirical analyses of the factors affecting confirmation bias and the effects of confirmation bias on software developer/tester performance

    OpenAIRE

    Calikli, Gul; Bener, Ayse

    2010-01-01

    Background: During all levels of software testing, the goal should be to fail the code. However, software developers and testers are more likely to choose positive tests rather than negative ones due to the phenomenon called confirmation bias. Confirmation bias is defined as the tendency of people to verify their hypotheses rather than refuting them. In the literature, there are theories about the possible effects of confirmation bias on software development and testing. Due to the tendency t...

  10. Effects of Planning Aids and Presentation Media on Performance and Affective Responses in Strategic Decision-Making

    OpenAIRE

    Charles R. Schwenk

    1984-01-01

    The Dialectical Inquiry System (DIS) and the Devil's Advocate (DA) have been recommended as strategic decision-making aids and as improvements on the traditional expert (E) approach in which strategic decisions are based on preliminary analyses and proposals by staff experts. Previous research on the effects of the DIS and DA has produced conflicting results. In the present study, subjects produced alternative strategies and recommendations for a company described in a case. They were given t...

  11. Bioanalytical effect-balance model to determine the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments affected by black and natural carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräunig, Jennifer; Tang, Janet Y M; Warne, Michael St J; Escher, Beate I

    2016-08-01

    In sediments several binding phases dictate the fate and bioavailability of organic contaminants. Black carbon (BC) has a high sorptive capacity for organic contaminants and can limit their bioavailability, while the fraction bound to organic carbon (OC) is considered to be readily desorbable and bioavailable. We investigated the bioavailability and mixture toxicity of sediment-associated contaminants by combining different extraction techniques with in vitro bioanalytical tools. Sediments from a harbour with high fraction of BC, and sediments from remote, agricultural and urban areas with lower BC were treated with exhaustive solvent extraction, Tenax extraction and passive sampling to estimate total, bioaccessible and bioavailable fractions, respectively. The extracts were characterized with cell-based bioassays that measure dioxin-like activity (AhR-CAFLUX) and the adaptive stress response to oxidative stress (AREc32). Resulting bioanalytical equivalents, which are effect-scaled concentrations, were applied in an effect-balance model, consistent with a mass balance-partitioning model for single chemicals. Sediments containing BC had most of the bioactivity associated to the BC fraction, while the OC fraction played a role for sediments with lower BC. As effect-based sediment-water distribution ratios demonstrated, most of the bioactivity in the AhR-CAFLUX was attributable to hydrophobic chemicals while more hydrophilic chemicals activated AREc32, even though bioanalytical equivalents in the aqueous phase remained negligible. This approach can be used to understand the fate and effects of mixtures of diverse organic contaminants in sediments that would not be possible if single chemicals were targeted by chemical analysis; and make informed risk-based decisions concerning the management of contaminated sediments. PMID:27176940

  12. Effects of Neurokinin-1 Receptor Inhibition on Anxiety Behavior in Neonatal Rats Selectively Bred for an Infantile Affective Trait

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda L. Schott; Betty Zimmerberg

    2014-01-01

    Interest in understanding the etiology and developing new treatments for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents has led to recent studies of neurotransmitters not traditionally associated with neural pathways for fear and anxiety. The binding of the neurotransmitter substance P (SP) to its neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor may be a crucial component in mediating the anxiety response. While previous studies using rodent models have documented the anxiolytic effects of S...

  13. How Attributes of the Feedback Message affect Subsequent Feedback Seeking: The interactive effects of feedback sign and type

    OpenAIRE

    Megan Medvedeff; Jane Brodie Gregory; Paul E Levy

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the interactive effects of feedback type and sign on feedback-seeking behaviour, as well as the moderating role of regulatory focus. Using a behavioural measure of feedback seeking, we demonstrated a strong interaction between feedback type and sign, such that individuals subsequently sought the most feedback after they were provided with negative process feedback. Additionally, results suggested that an individual's chronic regulatory focus has implications ...

  14. Acute effects of brisk walking on urges to eat chocolate, affect, and responses to a stressor and chocolate cue. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Adrian H; Oliver, Anita J

    2009-02-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of an acute exercise bout on urges to eat chocolate, affect, and psychological and physiological responses to stress and a chocolate cue. Following 3 days of chocolate abstinence, 25 regular chocolate eaters, took part, on separate days, in two randomly ordered conditions, in a within-subject design: a 15-min brisk semi-self-paced brisk walk or a passive control. Following each, participants completed two tasks: the Stroop colour-word interference task, and unwrapping and handling a chocolate bar. Chocolate urges [State Food Cravings Questionnaire (FCQ-S); Rodríguez, S., Fernández, M. C., Cepeda-Benito, A., & Vila, J. (2005). Subjective and physiological reactivity to chocolate images in high and low chocolate cravers. Biological Psychology, 70, 9-18], affective activation [Felt Arousal Scale; Svebak, S., & Murgatroyd, S. (1985). Metamotivational dominance: a multimethod validation of reversal theory constructs. Journal of Perception and Social Psychology, 48, 107-116], affective pleasure/valence [Feelings Scale; Hardy, C. J., & Rejeski, W. J. (1989). Not what, but how one feels: the measurement of affect during exercise. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 11, 304-317], and systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) were assessed throughout. Exercise reduced chocolate urges and there was a trend towards attenuated urges in response to the chocolate cue. Exercise also attenuated SBP/DBP increases in response to the stressor and chocolate cue. The effects on urges varied across the dimensions of the FCQ-S. PMID:18835411

  15. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm2 exposures to 224Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  16. Do es Internet Advertising Affect t he I nternet Banking Effectiveness? A Three Dimensional Model f or Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAYTOLLAH AKBARI MOG HADAM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available W ith the rapid growth of the Internet banking and financial sectors in Iran, customers are encouraged to utilize Internet banking as first priority. At the same time, the question of retaining customers or market - share has become one of the top areas of research for researchers and practitioners who aim at optimal marketing strategies. Accordingly, This study builds a three - dimensional model (factors to adopt Internet banki ng, Internet advertising effects, and Customer pleasure to examine the impact of Internet advertising on the Internet banking in order to find possible solutions in this area of banking. The theoretical three - dimensional model incorporates two new variabl es namely, “arousal” and “attitude toward brand” to test the changes in electronic transactions. Totally, 161 expert questionnaires (academics and practitioners were collected and analyzed. We found that these variables explain successfully the impact of Internet advertising on the effectiveness of Internet banking. The findings show that increasing the customer’s arousal by Internet advertisements to use Internet banking as well as creating a positive attitude toward bank’s brand are the key factors in In ternet banking effectiveness

  17. Carryover effects associated with winter location affect fitness, social status, and population dynamics in a long-distance migrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedinger, James S; Schamber, Jason L; Ward, David H; Nicolai, Christopher A; Conant, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    We used observations of individually marked female black brant geese (Branta bernicla nigricans; brant) at three wintering lagoons on the Pacific coast of Baja California-Laguna San Ignacio (LSI), Laguna Ojo de Liebre (LOL), and Bahía San Quintín (BSQ)-and the Tutakoke River breeding colony in Alaska to assess hypotheses about carryover effects on breeding and distribution of individuals among wintering areas. We estimated transition probabilities from wintering locations to breeding and nonbreeding by using multistratum robust-design capture-mark-recapture models. We also examined the effect of breeding on migration to wintering areas to assess the hypothesis that individuals in family groups occupied higher-quality wintering locations. We used 4,538 unique female brant in our analysis of the relationship between winter location and breeding probability. All competitive models of breeding probability contained additive effects of wintering location and the 1997-1998 El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event on probability of breeding. Probability of breeding in non-ENSO years was 0.98 ± 0.02, 0.68 ± 0.04, and 0.91 ± 0.11 for females wintering at BSQ, LOL, and LSI, respectively. After the 1997-1998 ENSO event, breeding probability was between 2% (BSQ) and 38% (LOL) lower than in other years. Individuals that bred had the highest probability of migrating the next fall to the wintering area producing the highest probability of breeding. PMID:22030737

  18. The insulinotropic effect of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 is not affected by acute vagotomy in anaesthetized pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedfald, Simon; Hansen, Marie; Christensen, Louise Wulff; Larsen, Sara Agnete Hjort; Hjøllund, Karina Rahr; Plamboeck, Astrid; Hartmann, Bolette; Deacon, Carolyn Fiona; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? We investigated whether intestinal vagal afferents are necessary for the insulinotropic effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infused into a mesenteric artery or a peripheral vein before and after acute truncal vagotomy. What is the main finding and its importance? We found no effect of truncal vagotomy on the insulinotropic effect of exogenous GLP-1 and speculate that high circulating concentrations of GLP-1 after i.v. and i.a. infusion might have overshadowed any neural signalling component. We propose that further investigations into the possible vagal afferent signalling of GLP-1 would best be pursued using enteral stimuli to provide high subepithelial levels of endogenous GLP-1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the gut in response to luminal stimuli and stimulates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. As a result of rapid enzymatic degradation of GLP-1 by dipeptidyl peptidase-4, a signalling pathway involving activation of intestinal vagal afferents has been proposed. We conducted two series of experiments in α-chloralose-anaesthetized pigs. In protocol I, pigs (n = 14) were allocated for either i.v. or i.a. (mesenteric) GLP-1 infusions (1 and 2 pmol kg(-1)  min(-1) , 30 min) while maintaining permissive glucose concentrations at 6 mmol l(-1) by i.v. glucose infusion. The GLP-1 infusions were repeated after acute truncal vagotomy. In protocol II, pigs (n = 27) were allocated into six groups. Glucagon-like peptide 1 was infused i.v. or i.a. (mesenteric) for 1 h at 3 or 30 pmol kg(-1)  min(-1) . During the steady state (21 min into the GLP-1 infusion), glucose (0.2 g kg(-1) , i.v.) was administered over 9 min to stimulate β-cell secretion. Thirty minutes after the glucose infusion, GLP-1 infusions were discontinued. Following a washout period, the vagal trunks were severed in four of six groups (vagal trunks were left intact in two of six groups), whereupon all

  19. Biologically effective dose and definitive radiation treatment for localized prostate cancer. Treatment gaps do affect the risk of biochemical failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not clear if prolongation of definitive external radiation therapy for prostate cancer has an effect on biochemical failure. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the biologically effective dose (BED), and in particular the duration of radiotherapy, intended as overall treatment time, has an effect on biochemical failure rates and to develop a nomogram useful to predict the 6-year probability of biochemical failure. A total of 670 patients with T1-3 N0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam definitive radiotherapy, to a total dose of 72-79.2 Gy in 40-44 fractions. The computed BED values were treated with restricted cubic splines. Variables were checked for colinearity using Spearman's test. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate freedom from biochemical relapse (FFBR) rates. The Cox regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in the final most performing model and to create a nomogram. Concordance probability estimate and calibration methods were used to validate the nomogram. Neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen deprivation was administered to 475 patients (70 %). The median follow-up was 80 months (range 20-129 months). Overall, the 6-year FFBR rate was 88.3 %. BED values were associated with higher biochemical failure risk. Age, iPSA, risk category, and days of radiotherapy treatment were independent variables of biochemical failure. A prolongation of RT (lower BED values) is associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. The nomogram may be helpful in decision making for the individual patient. (orig.)

  20. A review of the factors affecting the cost effectiveness and health benefits of domestic radon remediation programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon levels in domestic properties can be sufficiently high to pose a health hazard, significantly increasing the risk of lung cancer. The distribution of high levels varies geographically. As a result, radon remediation programmes in the United Kingdom (UK) have been developed, firstly to find the houses with high levels, and then remediate these. Our group has extensively studied domestic remediation programmes in the U.K., principally in Northamptonshire, where 6.3% of existing houses exhibit radon levels greater than the UK Action Level of 200 Bq.m-3, but also in other parts of the country. This analysis has addressed the influences of a number of different factors. Firstly, programmes in areas where more houses are over the Action level are necessarily more cost-effective. Secondly, cost-effectiveness is reduced if people do not take action to test, and then remediate, their houses, which is the case in practice. Therefore, radon awareness programmes in areas with a modest number of houses over the Action level can be more expensive, and therefore inappropriate, compared with other health interventions. Our studies have also demonstrated that the occupancy of the home, together with the ratio of radon levels upstairs and downstairs, has only a modest effect on the value of remediation. More significantly, remediation with an active pump eliminates diurnal variation, and night-time exposure is thus reduced while day-time exposure is not. The most significant impact on the value of remediation programmes, however, is whether the occupants smoke, as radon and smoking combine to produce a greater health risk. Unfortunately, surveys have shown that fewer smokers take action to test and remediate their homes, and many of those most at risk are consequently not reached by the current programmes. This paper presents a review of these issues, and considers the impact of the results on the design of future remediation programmes. (author)

  1. Green tea extract only affects markers of oxidative status postprandially: lasting antioxidant effect of flavonoid-free diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, J.F.; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Haraldsdottir, J.; Daneshvar, B.; Kall, M.A.; Loft, S.; Nilsson, L.; Nielsen, S.E.; Mayer, B.; Skibsted, L.H.; Huynh-Ba, T.; Hermetter, A.; Sandstrom, B.

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that foods rich in flavonoids might reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of green tea extract (GTE) used as a food antioxidant on markers of oxidative status after dietary depletion of...... flavonoids and catechins. The study was designed as a 2x3 weeks blinded human cross-over intervention study (eight smokers, eight non-smokers) with GTE corresponding to a daily intake of 18.6 mg catechins/d. The GTE was incorporated into meat patties and consumed with a strictly controlled diet otherwise low...

  2. Affective responses to dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  3. Moisture content of seeds affects relative biological effectiveness of alpha particles but not protons in thermal neutron exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influences of moisture content of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds which were presoaked for 13 h and re-dried before irradiation on boron addition effect (BAE) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles and protons were evaluated. Seeds of normal (10.21% in embryo), low (2.55%) and high (28.0%) moisture content showed different regression of BAE values on the absorbed amount of sup(10)B. The regression coefficient was highest for normal moisture content, followed by low moisture content, and the lowest for high moisture content. RBE of alpha particles also significantly differed between the moisture contents. Seeds of normal, low and high moisture contents showed 46.4, 37.4 and 17.0 of RBE value, respectively. Contrarily, RBE values of protons did not significantly vary with moisture content. It was found that the ratio of RBE of alpha particles between different moisture contents could be expressed by the product of the three ratios, i.e. ratio of sensitivity to gamma-rays, ratio of BAE, and ratio of moisture content. It was concluded that adjustment of moisture of the seeds to normal content (about 10%) is important to get a high value of both BAE and RBE of alpha particles

  4. Mediating Effects of Intention On The Factors Affecting Organic Food Products Consumption Among Chinese Generation Y In Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Poh Leong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to measure the effect of intention as a mediator in the relationship between internal factors and external factors on consumption. The factors were a internal factors: knowledge, awareness, health consciousness, product attributes, environmental concern, and b external factors: subjective norms, perceived behaviour control, and media and advertisement. From the review of literature, there were limited studies done on the mediating effect of intention on the relationship between (internal factor and external factors and organic food product consumption among CGY in Malaysia. A total of 410 respondents completed the online questionnaires that evaluated the factors. Structural Equation Modelling was used as the main practical approach for data analysis. The results showed that intention was a full or a complete mediator between the six exogenous constructs; knowledge, health consciousness, product attributes, environmental concern, perceived behaviour, and media and advertisement, while it only acted as a partial mediator between subjective norm and consumption. However, the intention was not a full or a complete mediator between awareness and consumption. Eventually, the implications for theory improvement and practices were discussed.

  5. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  6. Subliminal Affective Priming Effects of Schematic symbols%示意性符号的阈下情绪启动效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 任亚军; 盛柳柳; 徐钟庚

    2015-01-01

    本研究旨在研究示意性符号的阈下情绪启动效应。采用三明治掩蔽技术记录了不同时间间隔(83ms 和583ms)下示意性符号启动的情绪反应及反应时,结果表明:(1)正、负性示意性符号都产生了阈下情绪启动效应;(2)时间间隔(SOA)会影响示意性符号的情绪启动效果,较短的 SOA 水平下,示意性符号的正性情绪启动效果较差;(3)启靶刺激效价一致相比于不一致时,更容易启动相对应的情绪。%This study adopted the sandwich masking techniques to record the affective responses and reaction time under different time intervals (83ms and 583ms) to investigate the subliminal affective priming effect of schematic symbols. The results showed that: (1) both the positive and negative schematic symbols produced subliminal priming effects; (2) SOA had an influence on the affective priming, with shorter SOA to have worse priming effects of the positive schematic symbols; and (3)related emotions were easier to prime when the valence of the priming stimulation was consistent, rather than non-consistent, with that of the target stimulation.

  7. ADAR2 affects mRNA coding sequence edits with only modest effects on gene expression or splicing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Allissa A; Cookson, Mark R; Galter, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases bind double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine. Editing creates multiple isoforms of neurotransmitter receptors, such as with Gria2. Adar2 KO mice die of seizures shortly after birth, but if the Gria2 Q/R editing site is mutated to mimic the edited version then the animals are viable. We performed RNA-Seq on frontal cortices of Adar2(-/-) Gria2(R/R) mice and littermates. We found 56 editing sites with significantly diminished editing levels in Adar2 deficient animals with the majority in coding regions. Only two genes and 3 exons showed statistically significant differences in expression levels. This work illustrates that ADAR2 is important in site-specific changes of protein coding sequences but has relatively modest effects on gene expression and splicing in the adult mouse frontal cortex. PMID:26669816

  8. The Zebrafish, a Novel Model Organism for Screening Compounds Affecting Acute and Chronic Ethanol-Induced Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, S; Facciol, A; Gerlai, R

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a major unmet medical and economic issue for which very few efficacious pharmacological treatment options are currently available. The development and identification of new compounds and drugs to treat alcohol addiction is hampered by the high costs and low amenability of traditional laboratory rodents to high-throughput behavioral screens. The zebrafish represents an excellent compromise between systems complexity and practical simplicity by overcoming many limitations inherent in these rodent models. In this chapter, we review current advances in the behavioral and neurochemical characterization of ethanol-induced changes in zebrafish. We also discuss the basic principles and methods of and the most recent advances in using paradigms with which one can screen for compounds altering acute and chronic ethanol-induced effects in zebrafish. PMID:27055623

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL FACTORS AND THE FACTORS AFFECTING EFFECTIVENESS OF ADVERTISEMENTS IN PRINT AND ELECTRONIC MEDIA – AN ANALYTICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PONGIANNAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advertisement is a communication whose purpose is to inform potential customers about products and services and how to use and obtain them. Every major medium is used to deliver these messages including: television, radio, movies, magazines, newspapers and internet. It is often placed by an advertising agency on behalf of a company. Advertisements influence our lives in many unsuspecting ways because of rapid changes in the macro environment. These days advertising is regarded as a paid form of non-personal presentation of ideas, goods and services by an identified sponsor testing or evaluation of advertising effectiveness refers to the managerial exercise aimed at relating the advertising results to the established standards of performance and objectives so as to assess the real value of the advertising performance.

  10. The Effect of Chemical Composition on Microstructure and Properties of Intercritically Reheated Coarse-Grained Heat-Affected Zone in X70 Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhixiong; Kuzmikova, Lenka; Li, Huijun; Barbaro, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The current study investigates the effect of different levels of Ti, N, and Ti/N ratios on microstructure and properties in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained heat-affected zone (ICCGHAZ) of two-pass submerged arc welds in API 5L grade X70 pipe. Gleeble simulation was employed to reproduce the ICCGHAZ of actual welds. Hardness and Charpy V-notch (CVN) tests were performed on the simulated samples. The microstructure of simulated ICCGHAZ was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). LePera color etching technique was employed to identify and quantify the martensitic-austenitic (M-A) constituent. Results show that the simulated ICCGHAZ exhibited extremely low toughness, but in the studied range of Ti and N, there was no correlation with Ti/N ratio. The beneficial effect of near-stoichiometric Ti/N ratio observed in coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) did not translate to ICCGHAZ. This was because of the negative effect of the blocky M-A constituent formed on prior austenite grain boundaries.

  11. Characterisation of the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect affecting an austenitic TWIP steel based on digital image correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When strained in tension, high-manganese austenitic TWIP steels achieve very high strength and elongation before necking. They also present serrated flow within a certain range of temperatures and strain rates. A consequence of this jerky flow is the appearance of strain localisation in the form of narrow deformation bands apparent on the surface of the sample. This phenomenon arises from the dynamic interaction between solute atoms and mobile dislocations, otherwise known as dynamic strain ageing (DSA). In this study, the heterogeneous deformation of a Fe-20wt.%Mn-1.2wt.%C grade has been investigated at room temperature and at different strain rates by means of digital image correlation (DIC) for spatially resolved strain measurements made in situ during tensile tests. Simple tensile tests have also been conducted at different temperatures in order to investigate the evolution of the type of serrations and their influence on the bulk mechanical properties. The results of tests performed at room temperature and at two different strain rates, indicate that the plasticity is entirely governed by the appearance of localised deformation bands, similar to those observed in materials that exhibit the Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect. However, no critical strain for the onset of the phenomenon could be determined. The origin of these observations is discussed in this paper. It is proposed that the mode of propagation of the bands is dependent on the strain rate and the strain level. Moreover, it is shown that the band propagation is well correlated with the different types of serrations appearing on the stress-strain curve. These results match the characteristics of a classical DSA effect and help to shed light on the remarkable properties achieved by this material.

  12. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate Treatment on Microtensile Bond Strength to Carious Affected Dentin Using Two Adhesive Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Bahari; Siavash Savadi Oskoee; Soodabeh Kimyai; Firoz Pouralibaba; Farrokh Farhadi; Marouf Norouzi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to carious affected dentin (CAD) using etch-and-rinse and self-etch ad-hesive systems. Materials and methods. The occlusal surface of 32 human molars with moderate occlusal caries was removed. Infected dentin was removed until reaching CAD and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups based on the Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE ...

  13. The effect of vaccination against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on the Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV-2) load in porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) affected pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Genzow, Marika; Schwartz, Kent; Gonzalez, Glenda; Anderson, Gail; Chittick, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A diagnostic project was initiated across the United States in 2006 to improve the understanding of porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD) as well as to identify co-factors in PCVAD-affected farms. A Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV-2) DNA real-time polymerase chain reaction quantitation (qPCR) was established according to a published method and sera from a total of 23pig farms across the United States were examined for viral loads for PCV-2 and analyzed for any possible effects of Porcine r...

  14. Biologically effective dose and definitive radiation treatment for localized prostate cancer. Treatment gaps do affect the risk of biochemical failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanpaolo, P.; Barbieri, V. [CROB, Rionero in Vulture (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.; Genovesi, D. [' ' G. D' Annunzio Univ., Chieti (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.

    2014-08-15

    It is not clear if prolongation of definitive external radiation therapy for prostate cancer has an effect on biochemical failure. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the biologically effective dose (BED), and in particular the duration of radiotherapy, intended as overall treatment time, has an effect on biochemical failure rates and to develop a nomogram useful to predict the 6-year probability of biochemical failure. A total of 670 patients with T1-3 N0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam definitive radiotherapy, to a total dose of 72-79.2 Gy in 40-44 fractions. The computed BED values were treated with restricted cubic splines. Variables were checked for colinearity using Spearman's test. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate freedom from biochemical relapse (FFBR) rates. The Cox regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in the final most performing model and to create a nomogram. Concordance probability estimate and calibration methods were used to validate the nomogram. Neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen deprivation was administered to 475 patients (70 %). The median follow-up was 80 months (range 20-129 months). Overall, the 6-year FFBR rate was 88.3 %. BED values were associated with higher biochemical failure risk. Age, iPSA, risk category, and days of radiotherapy treatment were independent variables of biochemical failure. A prolongation of RT (lower BED values) is associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. The nomogram may be helpful in decision making for the individual patient. (orig.) [German] Es ist nicht geklaert, ob die Verlaengerung einer definitiven Strahlentherapie bei der Behandlung von Prostatakarzinompatienten einen Effekt auf das biochemische Versagen hat. Die vorliegende Studie hat das Ziel zu evaluieren, ob biologisch die effektive Dosis und insbesondere die Gesamtdauer der Behandlung eine Wirkung auf das biochemisches Rezidiv haben koennte. Ferner

  15. Effect of Cage-Induced Stereotypies on Measures of Affective State and Recurrent Perseveration in CD-1 and C57BL/6 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Janja; Bailoo, Jeremy D.; Melotti, Luca; Würbel, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Stereotypies are abnormal repetitive behaviour patterns that are highly prevalent in laboratory mice and are thought to reflect impaired welfare. Thus, they are associated with impaired behavioural inhibition and may also reflect negative affective states. However, in mice the relationship between stereotypies and behavioural inhibition is inconclusive, and reliable measures of affective valence are lacking. Here we used an exploration based task to assess cognitive bias as a measure of affective valence and a two-choice guessing task to assess recurrent perseveration as a measure of impaired behavioural inhibition to test mice with different forms and expression levels of stereotypic behaviour. We trained 44 CD-1 and 40 C57BL/6 female mice to discriminate between positively and negatively cued arms in a radial maze and tested their responses to previously inaccessible ambiguous arms. In CD-1 mice (i) mice with higher stereotypy levels displayed a negative cognitive bias and this was influenced by the form of stereotypy performed, (ii) negative cognitive bias was evident in back-flipping mice, and (iii) no such effect was found in mice displaying bar-mouthing or cage-top twirling. In C57BL/6 mice neither route-tracing nor bar-mouthing was associated with cognitive bias, indicating that in this strain these stereotypies may not reflect negative affective states. Conversely, while we found no relation of stereotypy to recurrent perseveration in CD-1 mice, C57BL/6 mice with higher levels of route-tracing, but not bar-mouthing, made more repetitive responses in the guessing task. Our findings confirm previous research indicating that the implications of stereotypies for animal welfare may strongly depend on the species and strain of animal as well as on the form and expression level of the stereotypy. Furthermore, they indicate that variation in stereotypic behaviour may represent an important source of variation in many animal experiments. PMID:27145080

  16. Investigation into the phenomena affecting the retention behavior of basic analytes in chaotropic chromatography: Joint effects of the most relevant chromatographic factors and analytes' molecular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čolović, Jelena; Kalinić, Marko; Vemić, Ana; Erić, Slavica; Malenović, Anđelija

    2015-12-18

    The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the phenomena affecting the retention behavior of structurally diverse basic drugs in ion-interaction chromatographic systems with chaotropic additives. To this end, the influence of three factors was studied: pH value of the aqueous phase, concentration of sodium hexafluorophosphate, and content of acetonitrile in the mobile phase. Mobile phase pH was found to affect the thermodynamic equilibria in the studied system beyond its effects on the analytes' ionization state. Specifically, increasing pH from 2 to 4 led to longer retention times, even with analytes which remain completely protonated. An explanation for this phenomenon was sought by studying the adsorption behavior of acetonitrile and chaotropic additive onto stationary phase. It was shown that the magnitude of the developed surface potential, which significantly affects retention - increases with pH, and that this can be attributed to the larger surface excess of acetonitrile. To study how analytes' structural properties influence their retention, quantitative structure-retention modeling was performed next. A support vector machine regression model was developed, relating mobile phase constituents and structural descriptors with retention data. While the ETA_EtaP_B_RC and XlogP can be considered as molecular descriptors which describe factors affecting retention in any RP-HPLC system, TDB9p and RDF45p are molecular descriptors which account for spatial arrangement of polarizable atoms and they can clearly relate to analytes' behavior on the stationary phase surface, where the electrostatic potential develops. Complementarity of analytes' structure with that of the electric double layer can be seen as a key factor influencing their retention behavior. Structural diversity of analytes and good predictive capabilities over a range of experimental conditions make the established model a useful tool in predicting retention behavior in the studied

  17. Effect of Cage-Induced Stereotypies on Measures of Affective State and Recurrent Perseveration in CD-1 and C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Janja; Bailoo, Jeremy D; Melotti, Luca; Würbel, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Stereotypies are abnormal repetitive behaviour patterns that are highly prevalent in laboratory mice and are thought to reflect impaired welfare. Thus, they are associated with impaired behavioural inhibition and may also reflect negative affective states. However, in mice the relationship between stereotypies and behavioural inhibition is inconclusive, and reliable measures of affective valence are lacking. Here we used an exploration based task to assess cognitive bias as a measure of affective valence and a two-choice guessing task to assess recurrent perseveration as a measure of impaired behavioural inhibition to test mice with different forms and expression levels of stereotypic behaviour. We trained 44 CD-1 and 40 C57BL/6 female mice to discriminate between positively and negatively cued arms in a radial maze and tested their responses to previously inaccessible ambiguous arms. In CD-1 mice (i) mice with higher stereotypy levels displayed a negative cognitive bias and this was influenced by the form of stereotypy performed, (ii) negative cognitive bias was evident in back-flipping mice, and (iii) no such effect was found in mice displaying bar-mouthing or cage-top twirling. In C57BL/6 mice neither route-tracing nor bar-mouthing was associated with cognitive bias, indicating that in this strain these stereotypies may not reflect negative affective states. Conversely, while we found no relation of stereotypy to recurrent perseveration in CD-1 mice, C57BL/6 mice with higher levels of route-tracing, but not bar-mouthing, made more repetitive responses in the guessing task. Our findings confirm previous research indicating that the implications of stereotypies for animal welfare may strongly depend on the species and strain of animal as well as on the form and expression level of the stereotypy. Furthermore, they indicate that variation in stereotypic behaviour may represent an important source of variation in many animal experiments. PMID:27145080

  18. Side-effects of a bad attitude: How GNSS spacecraft orientation errors affect solar radiation pressure modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilssner, Florian; Springer, Tim; Schönemann, Erik; Zandbergen, Rene; Enderle, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure (SRP) is the largest non-gravitational perturbation for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites, and can therefore have substantial impact on their orbital dynamics. Various SRP force models have been developed over the past 30 years for the purpose of precise orbit determination. They all rely upon the assumption that the satellites continuously maintain a Sun-Nadir pointing attitude with the navigation antenna boresight (body-fixed z-axis) pointing towards Earth center, and the solar panel rotation axis (body-fixed y-axis) being normal to the Sun direction. However, in reality, this is not perfectly the case. Reasons for a non-nominal spacecraft attitude may be eclipse maneuvers, commanded attitude biases and Sun/horizon sensor measurement errors, for example due to mounting misalignment or incorrectly calibrated sensor electronics. In this work the effect of GNSS spacecraft orientation errors on SRP modelling is investigated. Simplified mathematical functions describing the SRP force acting on the solar arrays in the presence of yaw-, pitch- and roll-biases are derived. Special attention is paid to the yaw-bias and its relationship to the SRP dynamics, particular in direction of the spacecraft y-axis ("y-bias force"). Analytical and experimental results gathered from orbit and attitude analyses of GPS Block II/IIA/IIF satellites demonstrate how sensitive the SRP coefficients are to changes in yaw.

  19. Affective expressions in groups and inferences about members' relational well-being: The effects of socially engaging and disengaging emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Naomi B; Magee, Joe C

    2016-01-01

    Our findings draw attention to the interpersonal communication function of a relatively unexplored dimension of emotions-the level of social engagement versus disengagement. In four experiments, regardless of valence and target group gender, observers infer greater relational well-being (more cohesiveness and less conflict) between group members from socially engaging (sadness and appreciation) versus disengaging (anger and pride) emotion expressions. Supporting our argument that social (dis)engagement is a critical dimension communicated by these emotions, we demonstrate (1) that inferences about group members' self-interest mediate the effect of socially engaging emotions on cohesiveness and (2) that the influence of socially disengaging emotion expressions on inferences of conflict is attenuated when groups have collectivistic norms (i.e., members value a high level of social engagement). Furthermore, we show an important downstream consequence of these inferences of relational well-being: Groups that seem less cohesive because of their members' proud (versus appreciative) expressions are also expected to have worse task performance. PMID:25809798

  20. Effect of Organic Manure and Chemical Amendments on Soil Properties and Crop Yield on a Salt Affected Entisol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.U.BHATTI; Q.KHAN; A.H.GURMANI; M.J.KHAN

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted for two consecutive years in a farmer's field at Haji Mora Village, Dera Ismail Khan(D.I. Khan) in the Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP) of Pakistan to compare various management practices, such as the effect of various organic manures and gypsum in a rice-wheat cropping system on a saline-sodic Entisol (Zindani soil series). The treatments consisted of 1) a control (rice-wheat), 2) gypsum, 3) farmyard manure (FYM), 4) berseem(Trifolium alexandrinum L.) as green manure (GM), and 5) dhancha (Sesbania sp.) as GM. All treatments increased yields of both rice and wheat significantly (P < 0.01) over the control, with the green manure treatments proving more economical than the others; while they decreased pH, electrical conductivity (EC), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) of the soil. Saturation percentage and available water of the soil were raised for all treatments due to an increase in organic matter content of the soil.

  1. Heavy metals effects on forage crops yields and estimation of elements accumulation in plants as affected by soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn) effect on the productivity of forage crops (clover and perennial cereal grasses) and their accumulation in plants, depending on the concentration of these elements in a soil, has been studied in micro-field experiments on three types of soil. The principle objective was to determine regularities of heavy metals migration in a soil-plant system aiming the estimation of permissible levels of heavy metals content in soils with the following elaboration of methods, which regulate the toxicants transfer to plants. Methods of field experiments, agrochemical and atomic absorption analysis were used. Results were statistically treated by Statistica 6.0, S-Plus 6. Experimental results have shown that the intensity of heavy metals accumulation in plants depends on the type of the soil, the species of plants, the physicochemical properties of heavy metals and their content in the soil. Logarithmic interdependency of heavy metals concentration in soils and their accumulation in plants is suggested. However, the strong correlation between the different heavy metals concentrations in the various soils and the yield of crops was not observed. Toxicants accumulation in crops decreased in time

  2. A Study on Estimation on Flood Warning Trigger Rainfall in medium and small Stream Affected by Urban Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngseok, Song; Moojong, Park; JungHo, Lee; HeeSup, Lee

    2013-04-01

    As extreme floods occur frequently in recent years due to global climate changes, an in sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration is becoming the significant danger and loss of life and property in the Korean Peninsula as well as most parts of the world. The desire for living without hazardous damages grows these days, the city strategy to make the safer community has become an issue. Previously most of flood prevention efforts have been made for relatively large watersheds near to channel flow. However, as economical development and the expansion of city near medium and small stream, human casualty and property by flood occurs frequently. Therefore, to reduce the damage of human lives and property by flood, we develop an assessment method for flood warning trigger rainfall considering urban effect. Considering complex land use, HEC-HMS is used for rural area and SWMM is adopted for sewer networks runoff. And relationship between runoff and stream water level, HEC-RAS is accompanied with runoff results. Proposed flood warning trigger rainfall assessment method shows good agreement with gauged data and could be used for another case to mitigate damage. Acknowledgement: "This research was supported by a grant [NEMA-NH-2011-45] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, National Emergency Management Agency of Korea." Keyword: HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, critical precipitation, medium and small stream

  3. Background shifts affect explanatory style: how a pragmatic theory of explanation accounts for background effects in the generation of explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Parker, Seth; Bradner, Alexandra

    2010-08-01

    Cognitive scientists are interested in explanation because it provides a window into the cognition that underlies one's understanding of the world. We argue that the study of explanation has tended to focus on what makes an explanation "bona fide" as opposed to the processes involved in how the explanation is generated. In the current study, we asked participants to respond to the request for an explanation within a novel domain after we manipulated their initial exposure to the domain, and thus the background of the request. In two experiments, we found evidence that the background shaped participants' interpretations of the prompt for the explanation and that this, in turn, influenced whether they used a causal or functional style of explanation when responding to the prompt. We also asked participants to evaluate a number of explanations and found that the manipulation of the background did not have the same effect on the evaluative tasks. Our data support a pragmatic approach (e.g. The scientific image. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1980) to the study of explanation generation, a philosophical approach which argues that the background influences the interpretation of the question, the development of a relevance relation which connects the question and explanation, and the identification of some set of candidate answers. We also suggest there is an important difference between the process of generating an explanation and evaluating an explanation, a difference that has escaped the attention of cognitive scientists thus far. PMID:19859755

  4. A decision support tool for simulating the effects of alternative policies affecting water resources: an application at the European scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassio, A.; Giupponi, C.; Hiederer, R.; Simota, C.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents the methodology applied and results obtained from testing the Decision Support System 'mDSS' developed by the MULINO Project (Multi-sectoral, integrated and operational decision support system for the sustainable use of water resources at the catchment scale), for assessing alternative measures for the reduction of nitrogen pressure from agriculture on water resources at European level. The European policy background is set by the EU Nitrates Directive (91/676/EEC) and the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC). The nature of the research is exploratory. It is aimed in particular at testing the usefulness of available official statistics for ex ante evaluations of alternative policy measures at the European scale, and the feasibility of such operations within the newly released mDSS software. Alternative measures for reducing N-pressure and spatial targets were designed and simulated in a GIS environment based on raster maps of 1 km resolution. The geographic extent of the present work is defined as the agricultural land of EU15. Data deriving from official statistics were used to calculate a simplified nitrogen balance, in which the sources of nitrogen are separated into organic (livestock manure) and mineral fertilisers, to distinguish the potential contribution of livestock and crop productions to water pollution at the river basin scale. Spatial indicators and evaluation indices were defined within a conceptual framework. For the study the DPSIR approach (Driving force, Pressure, State, Impact, Response), proposed by the European Environmental Agency, was adopted. The approach was subsequently elaborated by means of the multi-criteria functionality provided by mDSS. The results of this application test at the regional scale highlight the potential of the tool for evaluating the effects of policy measures targeted at different spatial implementation strategies through the application of simple screening models and using available data

  5. Effect of ZnO morphology on affecting bactericidal property of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene biocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Agarwal, Meenakshi; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infection of implants can be controlled by selective trapping of bacteria, followed with consequent killing by targeted antibacterial agents. Herein, the role of various ZnO morphologies, viz. micro-rods (R), nanoparticles (NP), and micro-disks (D) on antibacterial efficacy of ZnO via release of Zn(2+) and H2O2 is assessed, both as isolated powders and via incorporating them in cytocompatible ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Though ZnO is antibacterial, interestingly, all ZnO morphologies elicited a supportive growth of gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) in culture medium (until 28-35μg/ml). But, all ZnO morphologies did elicit bactericidal effect on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis) both in culture medium (for 0-2.5μg/ml) or when incorporated (5-20wt.%) into UHMWPE. The bactericidal mechanisms were quantified for various ZnO morphologies via: (i) H2O2 production, (ii) Zn(2+) release, and (iii) the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. On one hand, where only ZnO(NP) elicited release of H2O2 in the absence of light, maximum Zn(2+) release was elicited by ZnO(D). Interestingly, when ZnO is incorporated as reinforcement (5-20wt.%), its antibacterial action against E. coli was vividly observed due to selective proliferation of bacteria only on friendly UHMWPE matrix. Hence, luring bacteria on affable UHMWPE surface can be complemented with their targeted killing by ZnO present in composite. PMID:26952491

  6. Factors Affecting Farmers’ Adaptation Strategies to Environmental Degradation and Climate Change Effects: A Farm Level Study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nasir Uddin

    2014-09-01

    degradation and change effects. These results provide policy makers and development service providers with important insight, which can be used to better target interventions which build promote or facilitate the adoption of coping mechanisms with potential to build resiliency to changing climate and resulting environmental impacts.

  7. A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in terrorist-affected people in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Richard A; Ekasawin, Suparat; Chakrabhand, Somchai; Suwanmitri, Soawaluk; Duangchun, Orawan; Chantaluckwong, Thananet

    2011-10-01

    Although cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there is no evidence of its success with PTSD patients still under direct threat of terrorist attacks. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of CBT for PTSD terrorist-affected people. Twenty-eight survivors of terrorist attacks in southern Thailand were randomized to 8 sessions of either CBT or treatment as usual (TAU). CBT was modified to accommodate the realistic threats facing patients. There were independent assessments conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months following treatment. Main outcome measures included symptoms of PTSD (PTSD Symptom Scale Interview), depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and complicated grief (Inventory of Complicated Grief). CBT resulted in significantly greater reduction in symptoms, including PTSD, depression, and complicated grief, at follow-up than TAU. Relative to TAU, CBT had stronger effect sizes at follow-up for PTSD, depression, and complicated grief. More patients in the CBT condition (75%) achieved high end-state functioning than participants in the TAU (33%). This preliminary evidence suggests that PTSD, depression, and complicated grief can be effectively treated despite ongoing threats of terrorism. Further, it demonstrates that non-specialist mental health workers in a non-western setting can be efficiently trained in using CBT, and this training can translate into successful treatment gains in trauma-affected individuals. PMID:21991280

  8. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauner, Gat, E-mail: gat.rauner@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Animal Science, ARO, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250 (Israel); The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Barash, Itamar, E-mail: itamar.barash@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Animal Science, ARO, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250 (Israel)

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  9. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth

  10. The Effects of Farmyard Manure and Mulch on Soil Physical Properties in a Reclaimed Coastal Tidal Flat Salt-Affected Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-bing; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; YU Shi-peng; LI Fu-rong; HOU Xiao-jing

    2014-01-01

    Careful soil management is important for the soil quality and productivity improvement of the reclaimed coastal tidal lfat saline land in northern Jiangsu Province, China. Farmyard manure (FYM) and mulch applications, which affect soil characteristics and plant signiifcantly, are regard as an effective pattern of saline land improvement. As a conventional management in the study region, FYM and mulch are used for the amendment of the new reclaimed tidal lfat regularly, but little is known about their effects on soil physical properties functioning. A study was conducted on a typical coastal tidal lfat saline land, which was reclaimed in 2005, to evaluate the effects of FYM, polyethylene iflm mulch (PM), straw mulch (SM), FYM combined with PM (FYM+PM), FYM combined with SM (FYM+SM), on soil hydraulic properties and soil mechanical impedance. CK represented conventional cultivation in study area without FYM and mulch application and served as a control. The experiment, laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications, was studied in Huanghaiyuan Farm, which specialized in the agricultural utilization for coastal tidal lfat. Result showed that capillary water holding capacity (CHC), saturated water content (SWC), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and bulk density (BD), cone index (CI) were affected signiifcantly by the FYM and mulch application, especially in the 0-10 cm soil layer. FYM and mulch management increased CHC, SWC and Ks over all soil depth in the order of FYM+SM>FYM+PM>FYM>SM>PM>CK. With the contrary sequence, BD and CI decreased signiifcantly;however, FYM and mulch application affected BD and CI only in the upper soil layers. CHC, SWC and Ks decreased signiifcantly with the increasing of soil depth, BD and CI, and a signiifcant liner equation was found between CHC, SWC, Ks and BD, CI. With the highest CHC (38.15%), SWC (39.55%), Ks (6.00 mm h-1) and the lowest BD (1.26 g cm-3) and CI (2.71 MPa), the combined management of FYM

  11. Affective modulation of recognition bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H. Phaf; M. Rotteveel

    2005-01-01

    A correspondence of processing on the familiarity-novelty and positive-negative dimensions, particularly in the earliest processing stages, is proposed. Familiarity manipulations should, therefore, not only influence affective evaluations (e.g., the mere exposure effect), but affective manipulations

  12. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  13. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size-distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central- and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp=50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  14. Neurotransmitters affecting time perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been demonstrated that dopamine and acetylcholine are the main neurotransmitters that affect time perception,which is also affected by other neurotransmitters.OBJECTIVE:To summarize how the neurotransmitter affect the time perception,and put forward the perspectives for further study on time perception.RETRIEVE STRATEGY:An online search for related literatures published in English was conducted in Elsevier SDOL(ScienceDirect Online)database from May 1990 to March 2007 using key words of "timing neurotransmitter".Totally 69 literatures were collected,and they were primarily checked.Inclusive criteria:Reviews and experimental studies;correlative studies of timing neurotransmitter.Exclusive criteria:Repeated studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION:The literatures were mainly sourced from Cognitive Brain Research and Neuroscience,and they were analyzed according to the inclusive criteria.Nineteen of them were involved,and all were experimental studies and reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS:The studies on time perception are developed mainly concentrating on dopamine and acetylcholine.Dopamine D2 receptors mainly affect the speed of internal clock.Dopamine receptors play an important role in both timing excitation and inhibition,which suggests the bi-directional regulation of dopamine.Injection of dopamine agonist can affect the attention to timing information.Injection of BW813U(antagonist of acetylcholine) can induce memory disorder,which indicates the effect of acetylcholine on timing memory,and further study shows that it is the effect of acetylcholine in precentral medial area.In a word,the study on the neurotransmitters affecting time perception is still at the primary stage.CONCLUSION:Dopamine and acetylcholine are the neurotransmitters known to be related to time perception.Dopamine in the basal ganglia is related to internal-clock in the range of seconds and minutes;Acetylcholine in prefrontal cortex is related to the mechanisms of temporal memory and attention

  15. Affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events: the moderating effect of religiosity on avoidance behavior among students studying under a high level of terror event exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Liat; Zukerman, Gil

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the development of affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events among Israeli students studying under a high level of terror event exposure and to assess the effects of religiosity on those changes development. A questionnaire was administered to 770 students in the Ariel University Center in Judea and Samaria. Higher levels of terror exposure were associated with higher levels of avoidance behavior, subjective feelings of insecurity, and emotional distress. Higher religiosity moderated avoidance behavior, even when controlling for the level of objective exposure to terror events exposure, but had no influence on subjective sense of insecurity, or the level of emotional distress. These findings suggest that religiosity moderates behavioral changes development after traumatic event exposure mainly by reducing avoidance behavior. PMID:21660614

  16. Effect of Mg Content on the Microstructure and Toughness of Heat-Affected Zone of Steel Plate after High Heat Input Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long-Yun; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Wang, Yu-Nan; Wang, Wan-Lin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of Mg content on the microstructure and toughness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of steel plates after high heat input welding was investigated by means of welding thermal simulation test and in situ observation through high-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy. It was found that with the increase of Mg content in the steel, the former austenite grain sizes were greatly decreased and the mainly microstructural constituents in HAZ were changed from the brittle constituents of Widmanstätten ferrite, ferrite side plate and upper bainite to the ductile constituents of intragranular acicular ferrite and polygonal ferrite. The proportion of grain boundary ferrite was decreased greatly with the further addition of Mg from 27 to 99 ppm. As a result, the HAZ toughness after welding with heat input of 400 kJ cm-1 is increased with increasing Mg content in the steel plate.

  17. 影响牛仔裤水洗效果的因素分析%The Analysis of Affect Factors on the Washing Effect of Denim Trousers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊莹

    2011-01-01

    The washing processes make denim trousers have various appearance,there are many affect factors on the washing effect of denim trousers.Additive,pH value,liquor ratio and so on factors were analysed.%水洗后整理可使牛仔裤获得丰富多彩的外观效果,从助剂、pH值和浴比等因素对影响牛仔裤的水洗效果进行了分析。结果表明助剂、浴比、温度、pH值和时间等对牛仔裤水洗效果均有影响,不同的设备和工艺操作也会产生不同的水洗效果。

  18. Depression Affects the Scores of All Facets of the WHOQOL-BREF and May Mediate the Effects of Physical Disability among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Chang

    Full Text Available Geriatric depression is associated with the overall quality of life (QOL. However, how depressive symptoms affect the different domains and facets of QOL in older adults, and whether depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between physical disability and QOL in older adults are unclear.A total of 490 ambulatory community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years or above were interviewed using the brief version of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life instrument (WHOQOL-BREF, the Modified Barthel Index (MBI, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Sequential models for multiple linear regressions were analysed to determine if the MBI, GDS-15 and MMSE scores predict the WHOQOL-BREF scores. The potential mediation effects of depression (as determined by the GDS-15 on the relationship between MBI and WHOQOL-BREF were also analysed.The GDS-15 score was predictive of the scores of the four domains and all 26 facets of the WHOQOL-BREF. The significant predictive effects of the MBI score on 15 of the 26 facets of the WHOQOL-BREF were reduced to three after the adjustment for the GDS-15 score. Depression (as assessed by the GDS-15 is a mediator of the relationship between MBI and the physical, psychological and environmental domains of the WHOQOL-BREF.Depression (assessed by the GDS-15 may affect the scores of every domain and all facets of the WHOQOL-BREF in the elderly. Furthermore, it may mediate the relationship between the MBI and on QOL scores. We recommend taking depressive symptoms into consideration when measuring community-dwelling older adults' QOL and providing active ageing programs.

  19. Environmentally Relevant Dose of Bisphenol A Does Not Affect Lipid Metabolism and Has No Synergetic or Antagonistic Effects on Genistein’s Beneficial Roles on Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Li, Hongyu; Zhao, Nana; Yang, Huiqin; Ye, Xiaolei; He, Dongliang; Yang, Hui; Jin, Xin; Tian, Chong; Ying, Chenjiang

    2016-01-01

    Both bisphenol A (BPA, an endocrine disrupting chemicals) and genistein (a phytoestrogen mainly derived from leguminosae) are able to bind to estrogen receptors, but they are considered to have different effects on metabolic syndrome, surprisingly. We here investigate the effects of an environmentally relevant dose of BPA alone and the combined effects with genistein on lipid metabolism in rats. Eight groups of adult male Wistar rats, fed with either standard chow diet or high-fat diet, were treated with BPA (50μg/kg/day), genistein (10mg/kg/day), and BPA plus genistein for 35 weeks, respectively. Metabolic parameters in serum and liver were determined; the hematoxylin/eosin and oil Red O staining were used to observe liver histologically; gene expressions related to hepatic lipid metabolism were analyzed by Real-time PCR; protein expressions of PPARγ, PPARα and LC3 in liver were analyzed by western blotting. No difference of body weight gain, total energy intake, liver weight/body weight or body fat percentage in both STD- and HFD-fed sub-groups was observed after treatment with BPA, genistein, or BPA plus genistein (P>0.05). Genistein alleviated lipid metabolism disorder and decreased the mRNA and protein expression of PPARγ (P0.05) or combined with genistein. Our findings suggest that long-term environmentally relevant dose of BPA did not affect lipid metabolism, and had no synergetic or antagonistic roles on genistein’s beneficial function on hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27171397

  20. Experiencing affective interactive art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2010-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective move

  1. The effect of recombinant erythropoietin on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with affective disorders: a randomised controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Vinberg

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate the effect of repeated infusions of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in patients with affective disorders. In total, 83 patients were recruited: 40 currently depressed patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HDRS-17 score >17 (study 1 and 43 patients with bipolar disorder (BD in partial remission (HDRS-17 and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS ≤ 14 (study 2. In both studies, patients were randomised to receive eight weekly EPO (Eprex; 40,000 IU or saline (0.9% NaCl infusions in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel--group design. Plasma BDNF levels were measured at baseline and at weeks 5, 9 and at follow up, week 14. In contrast with our hypothesis, EPO down regulated plasma BDNF levels in patients with TRD (mean reduction at week 9 (95% CI: EPO 10.94 ng/l (4.51-21.41 ng/l; mean increase at week 9: Saline 0.52 ng/l, p=0.04 (-5.88-4.48 ng/l p=0.04, partial ŋ2=0.12. No significant effects were found on BDNF levels in partially remitted patients with BD (p=0.35. The present effects of EPO on BDNF levels in patients with TRD point to a role of neurotrophic factors in the potential effects of EPO seen in TRD and BD. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these effects and the interaction between EPO and peripheral levels on BDNF need to be further elucidated in human studies including a broad range of biomarkers.ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00916552.

  2. Affective Image Colorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui Wang; Jia Jia; Han-Yu Liao; Lian-Hong Cai

    2012-01-01

    Colorization of gray-scale images has attracted many attentions for a long time.An important role of image color is the conveyer of emotions (through color themes).The colorization with an undesired color theme is less useful,even it is semantically correct.However this has been rarely considered.Automatic colorization respecting both the semantics and the emotions is undoubtedly a challenge.In this paper,we propose a complete system for affective image colorization.We only need the user to assist object segmentation along with text labels and an affective word.First,the text labels along with other object characters are jointly used to filter the internet images to give each object a set of semantically correct reference images.Second,we select a set of color themes according to the affective word based on art theories.With these themes,a generic algorithm is used to select the best reference for each object,balancing various requirements.Finally,we propose a hybrid texture synthesis approach for colorization.To the best of our knowledge,it is the first system which is able to efficiently colorize a gray-scale image semantically by an emotionally controllable fashion.Our experiments show the effectiveness of our system,especially the benefit compared with the previous Markov random field (MRF) based method.

  3. Dual effect of nitric oxide on SARS-CoV replication: Viral RNA production and palmitoylation of the S protein are affected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric oxide is an important molecule playing a key role in a broad range of biological process such as neurotransmission, vasodilatation and immune responses. While the anti-microbiological properties of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) such as peroxynitrite, are known, the mechanism of these effects are as yet poorly studied. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) belongs to the family Coronaviridae, was first identified during 2002-2003. Mortality in SARS patients ranges from between 6 to 55%. We have previously shown that nitric oxide inhibits the replication cycle of SARS-CoV in vitro by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we have further investigated the mechanism of the inhibition process of nitric oxide against SARS-CoV. We found that peroxynitrite, an intermediate product of nitric oxide in solution formed by the reaction of NO with superoxide, has no effect on the replication cycle of SARS-CoV, suggesting that the inhibition is either directly effected by NO or a derivative other than peroxynitrite. Most interestingly, we found that NO inhibits the replication of SARS-CoV by two distinct mechanisms. Firstly, NO or its derivatives cause a reduction in the palmitoylation of nascently expressed spike (S) protein which affects the fusion between the S protein and its cognate receptor, angiotensin converting enzyme 2. Secondly, NO or its derivatives cause a reduction in viral RNA production in the early steps of viral replication, and this could possibly be due to an effect on one or both of the cysteine proteases encoded in Orf1a of SARS-CoV.

  4. The effect of different cardiovascular risk presentation formats on intentions, understanding and emotional affect: a randomised controlled trial using a web-based risk formatter (protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newcombe Robert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The future risk of heart disease can be predicted with increasing precision. However, more research is needed into how this risk is conveyed and presented. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of presenting cardiovascular risk in different formats on individuals' intention to change behaviour to reduce risk, understanding of risk information and emotional affect. Methods/design A randomised controlled trial comprising four arms, with a between subjects design will be performed. There will be two intervention groups and two control groups. The first control comprises a pre-intervention questionnaire and presents risk in a bar graph format. The second control presents risk in a bar graph format without pre-intervention questionnaire. These two control groups are to account for the potential Hawthorne effect of thinking about cardiovascular risk before viewing actual risk. The two intervention groups comprise presenting risk in either a pictogram or metonym format (image depicting seriousness of having a myocardial infarction. 800 individuals' aged between 45 and 64 years, who have not been previously diagnosed with heart disease and have access to a computer with internet, will be given a link to a website comprising a risk calculator and electronic questionnaires. 10-year risk of having a coronary heart disease event will be assessed and presented in one of the three formats. A post-intervention questionnaire will be completed after viewing the risk format. Main outcome measures are (i intention to change behaviour, (ii understanding of risk information, (iii emotional affect and (iv worry about future heart disease. Secondary outcomes are the sub-components of the theory of planned behaviour: attitudes, perceived behavioural control and subjective norms. Discussion Having reviewed the literature, we are not aware of any other studies which have used the assessment of actual risk, in a trial to compare different

  5. Assessment of committed effective dose due to the ingestion of 210Po and 210Pb in consumed Lebanese fish affected by a phosphate fertilizer plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingestion of radionuclides through seafood intake is a one of the sources contributing to the internal effective dose in the human organism. In order to evaluate the internal exposure and potential risks due to 210Po and 210Pb associated with fish consumption, these radionuclides were measured in commonly consumed fish species from a clean area and an area subjected to the impact of a Lebanese phosphate fertilizer plant. The highest concentration of 210Pb was 98.7 Bq/kg fresh weight while 210Po activity concentrations varied from 3.6 Bq/kg to 140 Bq/kg. A supplementary radiation exposure was detected; the highest committed effective dose due to 210Po and 210Pb was found to be 1110 μSv/y and 450 μSv/y, respectively. Moreover, the average mortality and morbidity risks due to the fish consuming were estimated. - Highlights: • Enrichment in 210Po and 210Pb in fish affected by a phosphate fertilizer plant. • Significant human exposure associated with the ingestion of fish. • Estimation of potential risks due to 210Po and 210Pb via fish consumption

  6. Simulation of the geomagnetic field experienced by the International Space Station in its revolution around the Earth: Effects on psychophysiological responses to affective picture viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Seppia, C.; Mezzasalma, L.; Messerotti, M.; Cordelli, A.; Ghione, S.

    2006-02-01

    There is evidence suggesting that exposure to an abnormal magnetic environment may produce psychophysiological effects related to abnormalities in responses to stress. This may be of relevance for space medicine where astronauts are exposed to a magnetic field different from that exerted by the Earth. Aim of this study was to assess how the exposure of the head to a magnetic field simulating the one encountered by the International Space Station (ISS) during a single orbit (90 min) around the Earth affects the cardiovascular and psychophysiological parameters. Twenty-four human volunteers were studied double blindly in random order under sham and magnetic exposure. During exposure, the persons were shown a set of pictures of different emotional content while subjective self-rating, skin conductance (SC), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured. In addition, BP, HR, and tooth pain threshold were assessed before and after exposure. While subjects were under magnetic exposure, skin conductance was strongly differentiated (F|2,36 = 22.927; p = 0.0001), being high during emotionally involving (positive and negative) pictures and low during neutral pictures. Conversely, when subjects were under sham exposure, no significant differences were observed. There was, however, a trend for higher heart rate during picture viewing under magnetic exposure as compared to sham exposure. No effects were found for the other variables. These results suggest that an abnormal magnetic field that simulates the one encountered by ISS orbiting around the Earth may enhance autonomic response to emotional stimuli.

  7. Simulation of the geomagnetic field experienced by the International Space Station in its revolution around the Earth: effects on psychophysiological responses to affective picture viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Seppia, Cristina; Mezzasalma, Lorena; Messerotti, Mauro; Cordelli, Alessandro; Ghione, Sergio

    2006-06-12

    There is evidence suggesting that exposure to an abnormal magnetic environment may produce psychophysiological effects related to abnormalities in responses to stress. This may be of relevance for space medicine where astronauts are exposed to a magnetic field different from that exerted by the Earth. Aim of this study was to assess how the exposure of the head to a magnetic field simulating the one encountered by the International Space Station (ISS) during a single orbit (90 min) around the Earth affects the cardiovascular and psychophysiological parameters. Twenty-four human volunteers were studied double blindly in random order under sham and magnetic exposure. During exposure, the persons were shown a set of pictures of different emotional content while subjective self-rating, skin conductance (SC), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured. In addition, BP, HR, and tooth pain threshold were assessed before and after exposure. While subjects were under magnetic exposure, skin conductance was strongly differentiated (F(2,36)=22.927; p=0.0001), being high during emotionally involving (positive and negative) pictures and low during neutral pictures. Conversely, when subjects were under sham exposure, no significant differences were observed. There was, however, a trend for higher heart rate during picture viewing under magnetic exposure as compared to sham exposure. No effects were found for the other variables. These results suggest that an abnormal magnetic field that simulates the one encountered by ISS orbiting around the Earth may enhance autonomic response to emotional stimuli. PMID:16529860

  8. Overexpression of the kiwifruit SVP3 gene affects reproductive development and suppresses anthocyanin biosynthesis in petals, but has no effect on vegetative growth, dormancy, or flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rongmei; Wang, Tianchi; McGie, Tony; Voogd, Charlotte; Allan, Andrew C; Hellens, Roger P; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2014-09-01

    SVP-like MADS domain transcription factors have been shown to regulate flowering time and both inflorescence and flower development in annual plants, while having effects on growth cessation and terminal bud formation in perennial species. Previously, four SVP genes were described in woody perennial vine kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.), with possible distinct roles in bud dormancy and flowering. Kiwifruit SVP3 transcript was confined to vegetative tissues and acted as a repressor of flowering as it was able to rescue the Arabidopsis svp41 mutant. To characterize kiwifruit SVP3 further, ectopic expression in kiwifruit species was performed. Ectopic expression of SVP3 in A. deliciosa did not affect general plant growth or the duration of endodormancy. Ectopic expression of SVP3 in A. eriantha also resulted in plants with normal vegetative growth, bud break, and flowering time. However, significantly prolonged and abnormal flower, fruit, and seed development were observed, arising from SVP3 interactions with kiwifruit floral homeotic MADS-domain proteins. Petal pigmentation was reduced as a result of SVP3-mediated interference with transcription of the kiwifruit flower tissue-specific R2R3 MYB regulator, MYB110a, and the gene encoding the key anthocyanin biosynthetic step, F3GT1. Constitutive expression of SVP3 had a similar impact on reproductive development in transgenic tobacco. The flowering time was not affected in day-neutral and photoperiod-responsive Nicotiana tabacum cultivars, but anthesis and seed germination were significantly delayed. The accumulation of anthocyanin in petals was reduced and the same underlying mechanism of R2R3 MYB NtAN2 transcript reduction was demonstrated. PMID:24948678

  9. Carbon stocks in organic matter fractions as affected by land use and soil management, with emphasis on no-tillage effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayer Cimélio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Land use and soil management may affect both labile and humified soil organic matter (SOM fractions, but the magnitude of these changes is poorly known in subtropical environments. This study investigated effects of four land use and soil management systems (forest, native pasture, and conventional tillage and no-tillage in a wheat/soybean succession on (i total soil organic carbon (SOC stocks (0 to 250mm depth and on (ii carbon (C stocks in labile (coarse, light and humified (mineral-associated, humic substances SOM fractions (0 to 25mm depth, in a Hapludox soil from southern Brazil. In comparison to the adjacent forest site, conventionally tilled soil presented 36% (46.2Mg ha-1 less SOC in the 0 to 250mm depth and a widespread decrease in C stocks in all SOM fractions in the 0 to 25mm depth. The coarse (>53 mum and light (<1kg dm-3 SOM fractions were the most affected under no-tillage, showing 393% (1.22Mg C ha-1 and 289% (0.55Mg C ha-1 increases, respectively, in relation to conventional tillage. Similar results were observed for mineral-associated SOM and humic substance C pools (34% and 38% increases, respectively under no-tillage. Compared with labile SOM fraction results, the percentual increments on C stocks in humified fractions were smaller; but in absolute terms this C pool yielded the highest increases (3.06 and 2.95Mg C ha-1, respectively. These results showed that both labile and humified organic matter are better protected under the no-tillage system, and consequently less vulnerable to mineralization. Humified SOM stabilization process involving interactions with variable charge minerals is probably important in maintaining and restoring soil and environmental quality in tropical and subtropical regions.

  10. Potential factors affecting survival differ by run-timing and location: linear mixed-effects models of Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp. in the Klamath River, California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Quiñones

    Full Text Available Understanding factors influencing survival of Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp. is essential to species conservation, because drivers of mortality can vary over multiple spatial and temporal scales. Although recent studies have evaluated the effects of climate, habitat quality, or resource management (e.g., hatchery operations on salmonid recruitment and survival, a failure to look at multiple factors simultaneously leaves open questions about the relative importance of different factors. We analyzed the relationship between ten factors and survival (1980-2007 of four populations of salmonids with distinct life histories from two adjacent watersheds (Salmon and Scott rivers in the Klamath River basin, California. The factors were ocean abundance, ocean harvest, hatchery releases, hatchery returns, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, North Pacific Gyre Oscillation, El Niño Southern Oscillation, snow depth, flow, and watershed disturbance. Permutation tests and linear mixed-effects models tested effects of factors on survival of each taxon. Potential factors affecting survival differed among taxa and between locations. Fall Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha survival trends appeared to be driven partially or entirely by hatchery practices. Trends in three taxa (Salmon River spring Chinook salmon, Scott River fall Chinook salmon; Salmon River summer steelhead trout O. mykiss were also likely driven by factors subject to climatic forcing (ocean abundance, summer flow. Our findings underscore the importance of multiple factors in simultaneously driving population trends in widespread species such as anadromous salmonids. They also show that the suite of factors may differ among different taxa in the same location as well as among populations of the same taxa in different watersheds. In the Klamath basin, hatchery practices need to be reevaluated to protect wild salmonids.

  11. Determining the effect of oil sands process-affected water on grazing behaviour of Daphnia magna, long-term consequences, and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Ebrahim; Wiseman, Steve; Mohaddes, Effat; Morandi, Garrett; Alharbi, Hattan; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-03-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is a byproduct of the extraction of bitumen in the surface-mining oil sands industry and is currently stored in on-site tailings ponds. OSPW from three oil sands companies were studied to capture some of the variability associated with OSPW characteristics. To investigate the effect and mechanism(s) of effect of OSPW on feeding behaviour, Daphnia magna were exposed to low OSPW concentrations for 24 h and monitored for their feeding rate, olfactory response and swimming activity. The Al and Si content, which are indicators of suspended particulate matter in D. magna exposed to OSPW were investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In long-term experiments, effects of exposure to OSPW for 21 days on feeding behaviour, growth, and reproduction of D. magna were evaluated. Feeding rates were similar among the three exposure populations, yielding a 24 h IC50 of 5.3% OSPW. Results of behavioural assays suggest that OSPW impairs the chemosensory function and reduces the total activity of D. magna. In EDX spectroscopy, Al and Si were detected in the body of the exposed D. magna, suggesting that D. magna filter clay particles from the OSPW solution. Results of the long-term exposure showed that OSPW significantly inhibits feeding behaviour, suppresses growth, and reduces reproductive output of D. magna. There were no differences in the toxicity of the three samples of OSPW, which was in agreement with the fact that there were no differences in the species of dissolved organic compounds in the OSPW samples. PMID:26735738

  12. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andras David; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Matsuo, Haruka; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that C57BL/6J mice exhibit depression-like behavior under short photoperiod and suggested them as an animal model for investigating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this study, we tested if manipulations of the circadian clock with melatonin treatment could effectively modify depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and brain serotonergic system in C57BL/6J mice. Under short photoperiods (8-h light/16-h dark), daily melatonin treatments 2 h before light offset have significantly altered the 24-h patterns of mRNA expression of circadian clock genes (per1, per2, bmal1 and clock) within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) mostly by increasing amplitude in their expressional rhythms without inducing robust phase shifts in them. Melatonin treatments altered the expression of genes of serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal raphe (tph2, sert, vmat2 and 5ht1a) and serotonin contents in the amygdala. Importantly, melatonin treatment reduced the immobility in forced swim test, a depression-like behavior. As a key mechanism of melatonin-induced antidepressant-like effect, the previously proposed phase-advance hypothesis of the circadian clock could not be confirmed under conditions of our experiment. However, our findings of modest adjustments in both the amplitude and phase of the transcriptional oscillators in the SCN as a result of melatonin treatments may be sufficient to associate with the effects seen in the brain serotonergic system and with the improvement in depression-like behavior. Our study confirmed a predictive validity of C57BL/6J mice as a useful model for the molecular analysis of links between the clock and brain serotonergic system, which could greatly accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of SAD, as well as the search for new treatments. PMID:25515595

  13. Effect of Welding Thermal Cycles on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat Affected Zone for a Weldox 1300 Ultra-High Strength Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węglowski M. St.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the investigation of weldability of ultra-high strength steel has been presented. The thermal simulated samples were used to investigate the effect of welding cooling time t8/5 on microstructure and mechanical properties of heat affected zone (HAZ for a Weldox 1300 ultra-high strength steel. In the frame of these investigation the microstructure was studied by light and transmission electron microscopies. Mechanical properties of parent material were analysed by tensile, impact and hardness tests. In details the influence of cooling time in the range of 2,5 ÷ 300 sec. on hardness, impact toughness and microstructure of simulated HAZ was studied by using welding thermal simulation test. The microstructure of ultra-high strength steel is mainly composed of tempered martensite. The results show that the impact toughness and hardness decrease with increase of t8/5 under condition of a single thermal cycle in simulated HAZ. The increase of cooling time to 300 s causes that the microstructure consists of ferrite and bainite mixture. Lower hardness, for t8/5 ≥ 60 s indicated that low risk of cold cracking in HAZ for longer cooling time, exists.

  14. Transgenic insect-resistant corn affects the fourth trophic level: effects of Bacillus thuringiensis-corn on the facultative hyperparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prütz, Gernot; Brink, Andreas; Dettner, Konrad

    2004-09-01

    As hyperparasitoids may have a considerable influence on the control of herbivorous arthropods, analyzing the host-mediated impact of Bacillus thuringiensis-plants (“Bt-plants”) on hyperparasitoids is of interest. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in order to assess the potential effect of Bt-corn leaf material on the facultative hyperparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), mediated through the herbivore Chilo partellus Swinhoe (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and its primary parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). In the Bt-group, significantly less C. flavipes larvae per host spun cocoons and pupated than in the control, and the mean fresh weight of a single C. flavipes cocoon was significantly reduced compared to the control. All C. flavipes cocoons of one host formed cocoon clusters. T. howardi females of the Bt-group parasitized significantly less cocoon clusters than in the control. Moreover, significantly fewer C. flavipes cocoons per cocoon cluster were successfully parasitized as compared to the control. As a consequence, T. howardi females of the control had more offspring than in the Bt-group. Adult female T. howardi offspring of the Bt-group weighed significantly less than in the control, but there was no significant weight difference between males of both groups. Our results suggest that transgenic insect-resistant plants could affect hyperparasitoids indirectly. However, it remains to be determined whether facultative hyperparasitoids prefer to develop as primary or secondary parasitoids under field conditions.

  15. Factors affecting athletes’ motor behavior after the observation of scenes of cooperation and competition in competitive sport: the effect of sport attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eDe Stefani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAim: This study delineated how observing sports scenes of cooperation or competition modulated an action of interaction, in expert athletes, depending on their specific sport attitude. Method: In a kinematic study, athletes were divided into two groups depending on their attitude towards teammates (cooperative or competitive. Participants observed sport scenes of cooperation and competition (basketball, soccer, water polo, volleyball, and rugby and then they reached for, picked up, and placed an object on the hand of a conspecific (giving action. Mixed-design ANOVAs were carried out on the mean values of grasping-reaching parameters. Results: Data showed that the type of scene observed as well as the athletes’ attitude affected reach-to-grasp actions to give. In particular, the cooperative athletes were speeded during reach-to-grasp movements when they observed scenes of cooperation compared to when they observed scenes of competition. Discussion: Participants were speeded when executing a giving action after observing actions of cooperation. This occurred only when they had a cooperative attitude. A match between attitude and intended action seems to be a necessary prerequisite for observing an effect of the observed type of scene on the performed action. It is possible that the observation of scenes of competition activated motor strategies which interfered with the strategies adopted by the cooperative participants to execute a cooperative (giving sequence.

  16. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby's Growth Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Can the Weather Affect My ... empeorar el asma de mi hijo? Weather and Asthma The effect of weather on asthma symptoms isn' ...

  17. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate Treatment on Microtensile Bond Strength to Carious Affected Dentin Using Two Adhesive Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bahari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP on microtensile bond strength (μTBS to carious affected dentin (CAD using etch-and-rinse and self-etch ad-hesive systems. Materials and methods. The occlusal surface of 32 human molars with moderate occlusal caries was removed. Infected dentin was removed until reaching CAD and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups based on the Single Bond (SB and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE adhesive systems. Before composite resin bonding, each group was subdivided into three subgroups of ND, CAD and CPP-ACP-treated CAD (CAD-CPP based on the dentin substrate. After dissecting samples to l-mm-thick cross-sections (each subgroup: n = 13, μTBS was measured at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and post-hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results. Bond strength of both adhesive systems to ND was significantly higher than that to CAD (P 0.05. μTBS of CSE to CAD-CPP was higher than that to CAD; however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Significant differences were found between SB and CSE systems only with CAD substrate (P < 0.001. Conclusion. Regardless of the adhesive system used, surface treatment of CAD with CPP-ACP did not have a significant effect on bond strength. However, bond strength to CAD was higher with SB rather than with CSE.

  18. Characterization of a clock based on coherent population trapping in a thermal cesium vapor. Main effects that may affect its mid- and long-term frequency stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a Cs - buffer gas vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT), and the main frequency shifts affecting its mid- and long-term stability. The developed atomic clock based on CPT uses two original techniques: a so-called double-Λ scheme for the CPT-resonance excitation and a temporal Ramsey interrogation technique, which produce a high contrast and narrow resonances with reduced light shift dependence. Generally, the mid and long term stability of the vapor cell atomic clock is limited by the collisional shift induced by alkali-buffer gas collisions and the light shift (or the effects depending on the laser intensity). We report on the study of the collisional shift of Cs clock frequency in the presence of Ne, N2 or Ar buffer gas, and its temperature dependence. The coefficient values of this dependence for these three buffer gases were revealed (some of them for the first time), allowing us to realise a cell with optimal combination of buffer gases to cancel the temperature dependence around the working temperature. Following the study of the signal amplitude and the coherence relaxation rate the optimal values for such parameters as interrogation cycle, magnetic field, cell temperature, pressure of the buffer gas mixture, etc. were found for the chosen cell. The investigation on the light shift and the effects depending on the laser intensity allowed us to determine the most sensitive parameters (laser intensity ratio, temperature) and to implement the required stabilizations in order to better control them. Finally, the mid- and long-term clock frequency stability was improved by a factor 40, reaching 2.5 10-14 at 1 hour. (author)

  19. Rewards Affecting the Organizational Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Doina I. POPESCU

    2011-01-01

    To obtain and maintain a high-performing workforce, an enterprise must develop a well-conceived compensation program. In addition to a salary, employees may be rewarded with benefit plans, bonuses, perquisites, stock options, and other long-term incentives. The main purpose of this article is to study how rewards affect employee perceptions, attitudes, and behavior in a variety of ways. Also, the purpose of this article is to analyze how organizational efficiency and effectiveness are affecte...

  20. Effect of oil sands process-affected water on toxicity of retene to early life-stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Morandi, Garrett; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-07-01

    Toxicity of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) to aquatic organisms has been studied, but effects of co-exposure to OSPW and polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are an important class of chemicals in tailings ponds used to store OSPW, has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was to determine if organic compounds extracted from the aqueous phase of relatively fresh OSPW from Base-Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) or aged OSPW from Pond 9 experimental reclamation pond (P9-OSPW) modulated toxic potency of the model alkyl-PAH, retene, to early life-stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Embryos were exposed to retene by use of a partition controlled delivery (PCD) system made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) until day of hatch. Incidences of pericardial edema and expression of CYP1A were not significantly greater in larvae exposed only to dissolved organic compounds from either OSPW but were significantly greater in larvae exposed only to retene. Expression of CYP1A and incidences of pericardial edema were significantly greater in larvae co-exposed to retene and 5×equivalent of dissolved organic compounds from BML-OSPW compared to retene alone. However, there was no effect of co-exposure to retene and either a 1×equivalent of dissolved organic compounds from BML-OSPW or 5×equivalent of dissolved organic compounds from P9-OSPW. While there was evidence that exposure to 5×equivalent of dissolved organic compounds from BML-OSPW caused oxidative stress, there was no evidence of this effect in larvae exposed only to retene or co-exposed to retene and a 5×equivalent of dissolved organic compounds from BML-OSPW. These results suggest that oxidative stress is not a mechanism of pericardial edema in early-life stages of Japanese medaka. Relatively fresh OSPW from Base Mine Lake might influence toxicity of alkylated-PAHs to early life stages of fishes but this effect would not be expected to occur at current concentrations of OSPW and is attenuated by

  1. The effect of diagnostic labels on the affective responses of college students towards peers with 'Asperger's Syndrome' and 'Autism Spectrum Disorder'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Mills, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Given the removal of Asperger's Syndrome label inDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition, the impact of clinical labels upon the affective responses of college students was explored. A total of 120 college students read two vignettes depicting social interactions typical of a person with autism spectrum disorder. In one vignette, they were informed that the character was a typical college student and in the other, the character had a clinical disorder (either autism spectrum disorder, Asperger's Syndrome or Schizophrenia). Participants' affective responses were measured on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. No significant differences in positive and negative affective responses were found between the clinical labels. However, affective responses were significantly more positive and less negative towards behaviours associated with clinical groups compared to the typical college student. The implications for students disclosing their diagnosis at university are discussed. PMID:26045542

  2. A Structural Equation Model of the Effects of Negative Affectivity, Leader-Member Exchange, and Perceived Job Mobility on In-role and Extra-role Performance: A Chinese Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui; Law; Chen

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we contrast the effects of leader-member exchange (LMX) with the effects of perceived job mobility on in-role performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). We further model negative affectivity as the antecedent of both LMX and perceived job mobility and suggest that LMX and perceived job mobility mediated the relationship between negative affectivity and performance. We obtained matching data from supervisor and subordinates in a major battery manufacturing company in southern China. Subordinates provided the negative affectivity, perceived job mobility, and LMX assessment, and their immediate supervisors provided the in-role performance and OCB assessment. Results from a structural equation analysis show that both LMX and perceived job mobility predicted OCB. Instead of being a direct antecedent of OCB, the relationship between negative affectivity and OCB is found to be mediated by LMX and perceived job mobility. Theoretical implications of the results are discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9924139

  3. Effects of Oxides on Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties and Fracture Toughness in Heat Affected Zones of Oxide-Containing API X80 Linepipe Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Oh, Kyung Shik; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-06-01

    This study is concerned with effects of complex oxides on acicular ferrite (AF) formation, tensile and Charpy impact properties, and fracture toughness in heat affected zones (HAZs) of oxide-containing API X80 linepipe steels. Three steels were fabricated by adding Mg and O2 to form oxides, and various HAZ microstructures were obtained by conducting HAZ simulation tests under different heat inputs. The no. of oxides increased with increasing amount of Mg and O2, while the volume fraction of AF present in the steel HAZs increased with increasing the no. of oxides. The strengths of the HAZ specimens were generally higher than those of the base metals because of the formation of hard microstructures of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite. When the total Charpy absorbed energy was divided into the fracture initiation and propagation energies, the fracture initiation energy was maintained constant at about 75 J at room temperature, irrespective of volume fraction of AF. The fracture propagation energy rapidly increased from 75 to 150 J and saturated when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 30 pct. At 253 K (-20 °C), the total absorbed energy increased with increasing volume fraction of AF, as the cleavage fracture was changed to the ductile fracture when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 45 pct. Thus, 45 vol pct of AF at least was needed to improve the Charpy impact energy, which could be achieved by forming a no. of oxides. The fracture toughness increased with increasing the no. of oxides because of the increased volume fraction of AF formed around oxides. The fracture toughness did not show a visible correlation with the Charpy absorbed energy at room temperature, because toughness properties obtained from these two toughness testing methods had different significations in view of fracture mechanics.

  4. A study on the post-weld heat treatment effect to mechanical properties and hydrogen embrittlement for heating affected zone of a RE 36 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cathodic protection method is being widely used marine structural steel, however a high tensile steel like RE 36 steel for marine structural steel is easy to get hydrogen embrittlement due to over protection during cathodic protection as well as preferential corrosion of HAZ(Heating Affected Zone) part. In this paper, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties such as elongation and hydrogen embrittlement were investigated with not only in terms of electrochemical view but also SSRT(Slow Strain Rate Test) method with applied constant cathodic potential, analysis of SEM fractography in case of both As-welded and PWHT(Post-Weld Heat Treatment) of 550 .deg. C. The best effect for corrosion resistance was apparently indicated at PWHT of 550 .deg. C and elongation was increased with PWHT of 550 .deg. C than that of As-welded condition. On the other hand. Elongation was decreased with applied potential shifting to low potential direction which may be caused by hydrogen embrittlement, however the susceptibility of hydrogen embrittlement was decreased with PWHT of 550 .deg. C than that of As-welded condition and Q.C(quasi cleavage) fracture mode was also observed significantly according to increasing of susceptibility of hydrogen embrittlement. Eventually it is suggested that an optimum cathodic protection potential range not causing hydrogen embrittlement is from -770 mV(SCE) to-850mV(SCE) in As-welded condition while is from-770 mV(SCE) to -875 mV(SCE) in PWHT of 550 .deg. C

  5. Factors affecting the effects of EDU on growth and yield of field-grown bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), with varying degrees of sensitivity to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elagoez, Vahram [Plant Biology Graduate Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)]. E-mail: velagoz@nsm.umass.edu; Manning, William J. [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2005-08-15

    The effects of foliar applications of ethylenediurea (EDU) on responses to ozone by field-grown bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines 'S156' (O{sub 3}-sensitive) and 'R123' (O{sub 3}-tolerant), and cultivars 'BBL 290' (O{sub 3}-sensitive) and 'BBL 274' (O{sub 3}-tolerant) were investigated during the 2001 and 2002 growing seasons. EDU was applied weekly to designated plants between primary leaf expansion and pod senescence. Results were compared with control plants at harvests made at pod maturation and pod senescence. In 2001, average hourly ambient O{sub 3} concentrations ranged between 41 and 59 ppb for a total of 303 h; in 2002, for 355 h. EDU applications prior to pod maturation significantly increased the number of marketable pods in 'R123', but not for the other cultivars. Harvests at pod senescence showed significant improvements in crop yield production in EDU-treated 'S156' plants, whereas for EDU-treated 'R123' plants significant reductions were determined in above-ground biomass and seed production. In contrast, results from 'BBL 290' and 'BBL 274' at both harvest points were inconclusive. Growth and reproductive responses of O{sub 3}-sensitive and O{sub 3}-tolerant bush bean plants to EDU applications varied, depending on developmental stages, duration of EDU applications, and fluctuations in ambient O{sub 3}. - Plant sensitivity to ozone, stage of plant development, number of applications of EDU and ambient ozone affect bean plant responses to EDU.

  6. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Cognition and Mood in Recently Postmenopausal Women: Findings from the Randomized, Controlled KEEPS-Cognitive and Affective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey E Gleason

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT reportedly increases the risk of cognitive decline in women over age 65 y. It is unknown whether similar risks exist for recently postmenopausal women, and whether MHT affects mood in younger women. The ancillary Cognitive and Affective Study (KEEPS-Cog of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS examined the effects of up to 4 y of MHT on cognition and mood in recently postmenopausal women.KEEPS, a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial, was conducted at nine US academic centers. Of the 727 women enrolled in KEEPS, 693 (95.3% participated in the ancillary KEEPS-Cog, with 220 women randomized to receive 4 y of 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (o-CEE plus 200 mg/d micronized progesterone (m-P for the first 12 d of each month, 211 women randomized to receive 50 μg/d transdermal estradiol (t-E2 plus 200 mg/d m-P for the first 12 d of each month, and 262 women randomized to receive placebo pills and patches. Primary outcomes included the Modified Mini-Mental State examination; four cognitive factors: verbal learning/memory, auditory attention/working memory, visual attention/executive function, and speeded language/mental flexibility; and a mood measure, the Profile of Mood States (POMS. MHT effects were analyzed using linear mixed-effects (LME models, which make full use of all available data from each participant, including those with missing data. Data from those with and without full data were compared to assess for potential biases resulting from missing observations. For statistically significant results, we calculated effect sizes (ESs to evaluate the magnitude of changes. On average, participants were 52.6 y old, and 1.4 y past their last menstrual period. By month 48, 169 (24.4% and 158 (22.8% of the 693 women who consented for ancillary KEEPS-Cog were lost to follow-up for cognitive assessment (3MS and cognitive factors and mood evaluations (POMS, respectively

  7. Empirical Testing of an Affective Learning Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Edward P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This investigation of a college music course examined the effectiveness of a cyclical affective learning paradigm based on the premise that student affect toward a course of instruction will dictate, in part, cognitive performance. Results suggest that teachers would be better advised to concentrate on cognitive instruction than on affect.…

  8. Pain, Affect, and Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Carl Eduard Scheidt; Elisabeth Waller

    2015-01-01

    Various psychodynamic processes may underlie the development of psychogenic pain disorder such as conversion, the displacement of affect, or narcissistic defenses. However, many of the processes suggested are related to a disorder of affect regulation. The term affect regulation in psychoanalytic literature refers to phenomena which are often described by the concept of alexithymia. Empirical observations suggest that alexithymia is correlated to insecure attachment, especially an insecure di...

  9. The affect structure revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Elefant-Yanni, Véronique Rica; Victoria-Feser, Maria-Pia

    2005-01-01

    In affective psychology, there is a persistent controversy about the number, the nature and the definition of the affect structure dimensions. Responding to the methodological criticisms addressed to the preceding studies, we conciliated the principal theories regarding the affect structure with the same experimental setting. In particular, using the semantic items all around the circumplex we found three bipolar independent dimensions and using only the PANAS semantic items, we found two uni...

  10. The good, the bad, and the expert: How consumer expertise affects review valence effects on purchase intentions in online product reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Willemsen, L.M.; Sleven, L.; Kerkhof, P.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to shed more light on the question whether, and under what circumstances, valence affects consumers' intention to buy a product after reading an online review. We hypothesize that receiver expertise could possibly moderate (a) the impact of review valence on consumers' purchase inten

  11. Effects of Future Mathematics Teachers' Affective, Cognitive and Socio-Demographic Characteristics on Their Knowledge at the End of the Teacher Education in Germany and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschke, Christin

    2013-01-01

    How individual characteristics affect the acquisition of knowledge in teacher education has been widely unexplored thus far. The "Teacher Education and Development Study--Learning to Teach Mathematics (TEDS-M)" provides a database for examining this research question across countries. Based on the Taiwanese and German sample of TEDS-M,…

  12. The Effect of Diagnostic Labels on the Affective Responses of College Students towards Peers with "Asperger's Syndrome" and "Autism Spectrum Disorder"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Mills, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Given the removal of Asperger's Syndrome label in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition," the impact of clinical labels upon the affective responses of college students was explored. A total of 120 college students read two vignettes depicting social interactions typical of a person with autism spectrum…

  13. Effects of acute psychosocial stress exposure on endocrine and affective reactivity in college students differing in the 5-HTTLPR genotype and trait neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoor, Ellen; Markus, C Rob

    2011-07-01

    Enhanced stress vulnerability has been implicated in the pathogenesis of affective disorders. Although both genetic (5-HTTLPR) and cognitive (neuroticism) factors are known to increase stress vulnerability, no experimental study has investigated the interaction between these two factors on psychobiological reactivity following acute stress exposure. This study used a balanced experimental design to examine the interaction between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and trait neuroticism in neuroendocrine and affective stress responses. From a large group of 771 students, 48 carriers of the short/short (S/S) allele and 48 carriers of the long/long (L/L) allele with the lowest and the highest neuroticism scores (77 females, 19 males; mean age ± SD: 20.6 ± 2 years) were selected and exposed to an acute psychosocial stressor. Mood was assessed before and after the stressor, and salivary cortisol concentrations were measured before and at 20, 30, and 60 min after stressor onset. Acute stress increased salivary cortisol concentration regardless of either 5-HTTLPR genotype or neuroticism, but it caused a less profound negative mood change in L/L compared to S/S-allele carriers with the lowest neuroticism scores. The 5-HTTLPR genotype influences affective reactivity to acute stress conditional upon neuroticism, improving resilience to acute stress in L/L-allele carriers if they do not already possess high cognitive-affective (neuroticism) vulnerability. PMID:21438771

  14. New product, familiar taste: Effects of slogans on cognitive and affective responses to an unknown food product among food neophobics and neophilics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenko, A.; Leufkens, Jean-Marie; Hoof, van J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Food neophobia is considered a potential barrier for the introduction of new food products. This study investigated how advertising slogans could influence cognitive and affective responses to a new product in food neophobics and food neophilics. An unknown dairy product was used to examine the effe

  15. Carry-over effects and compensation: late arrival on non-breeding grounds affects wing moult but not plumage or schedules of departing bar-tailed godwits Limosa lapponica baueri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conklin, Jesse R.; Battley, Phil F.

    2012-01-01

    In the annual cycle of migratory birds, temporal and energetic constraints can lead to carry-over effects, in which performance in one life history stage affects later stages. Bar-tailed godwits Limosa lapponica baueri, which achieve remarkably high pre-migratory fuel loads, undertake the longest no

  16. Affectivity and race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents new empirical studies of social difference in the Nordic welfare states, in order to advance novel theoretical perspectives on the everyday practices and macro-politics of race and gender in multi-ethnic societies. With attention to the specific political and cultural landscapes...... of the Nordic countries, Affectivity and Race draws on a variety of sources, including television programmes, news media, fictional literature, interviews, ethnographic observations, teaching curricula and policy documents, to explore the ways in which ideas about affectivity and emotion afford new...... insights into the experience of racial difference and the unfolding of political discourses on race in various social spheres. Organised around the themes of the politicisation of race through affect, the way that race produces affect and the affective experience of race, this interdisciplinary collection...

  17. Affectivity in the Liminal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    alternative interpretations of what liminality is, or could be, taking it to territories distant from its place of origin, quite the contrary: we are moving the concept back to its rightful place in intellectual history and back to the core of its significance, back to the centre of human emotions trembling......In this paper I propose a return to the work of Arnold van Gennep, in order to briefly discuss how the terms of liminality and affectivity were always already connected. By linking the concept of liminality that van Gennep made famous to affectivity, we are actually not proposing new and...... at the threshold. The paper contains three sections: a) liminality and affectivity in van Gennep’s life; b) liminality and affectivity as a theme in his work; c) liminality and affectivity as developed in the early reception of his work....

  18. Affect and Learning: a computational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Broekens, Douwe Joost

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we have studied the influence of emotion on learning. We have used computational modelling techniques to do so, more specifically, the reinforcement learning paradigm. Emotion is modelled as artificial affect, a measure that denotes the positiveness versus negativeness of a situation to an artificial agent in a reinforcement learning setting. We have done a range of different experiments to study the effect of affect on learning, including the effect on learning if affect is us...

  19. Smoking Affects You | Smokefree.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    */ 18 Ways Smoking Affects Your Health Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body. Some of these harmful effects are immediate. Find out the health effects of smoking and what happens to your body when you quit.

  20. Physic status and working ability of the persons affected at the Chernobyl accident during recovery and short-term effects of acute radiation disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the results of clinicopsychological investigation of persons developing ARS (1-3 degree of severity) as a result of the Chernobyl accident has shown that 4-6 mos. after the exposure the psychic status and mental working ability of the affected persons showed close correlation with a degree of ARS. In 12-18 mos. profession and adequate employment played a decisive role in the formation of unfavorable psychic conditions and limited working ability. Later on in 2.5-3 years after exposure a decrease in psychic working ability, the development of unfavorable psychic conditions was noted more frequently in patients with ARS of more severe types and in examinees of older age. At all stages of rehabilitation personality traits of the affected persons play an important role in the revival of working abilities

  1. Are age-related differences between young and older adults in an affective working memory test sensitive to the music effects?

    OpenAIRE

    Erika eBorella; Barbara eCarretti; Massimo eGrassi; Massimo eNucci; Roberta eSciore

    2014-01-01

    There are evidences showing that music can affect cognitive performance by improving our emotional state. The aim of the current study was to analyze whether age-related differences between young and older adults in a Working Memory (WM) Span test in which the stimuli to be recalled have a different valence (i.e., neutral, positive, or negative words), are sensitive to exposure to music. Because some previous studies showed that emotional words can sustain older adults’ performance in WM, we ...

  2. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models – the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A

    2014-01-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water...

  3. Depression Affects the Scores of All Facets of the WHOQOL-BREF and May Mediate the Effects of Physical Disability among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yu-Chen; Yao, Grace; Hu, Susan C; Wang, Jung-Der

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric depression is associated with the overall quality of life (QOL). However, how depressive symptoms affect the different domains and facets of QOL in older adults, and whether depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between physical disability and QOL in older adults are unclear. Methods A total of 490 ambulatory community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years or above were interviewed using the brief version of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life instrument (W...

  4. A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in terrorist-affected people in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Richard A; EKASAWIN, SUPARAT; CHAKRABHAND, SOMCHAI; SUWANMITRI, SOAWALUK; DUANGCHUN, ORAWAN; CHANTALUCKWONG, THANANET

    2011-01-01

    Although cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there is no evidence of its success with PTSD patients still under direct threat of terrorist attacks. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of CBT for PTSD terrorist-affected people. Twenty-eight survivors of terrorist attacks in southern Thailand were randomized to 8 sessions of either CBT or treatment as usual (TAU). CBT was modified to accom...

  5. Factors That Affect Proliferation of Salmonella in Tomatoes Post-Harvest: The Roles of Seasonal Effects, Irrigation Regime, Crop and Pathogen Genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Hochmuth, George J.; Giurcanu, Mihai C.; George, Andrée S; Noel, Jason T.; Bartz, Jerry; Teplitski, Max

    2013-01-01

    Main Objectives Fresh fruits and vegetables become increasingly recognized as vehicles of human salmonellosis. Physiological, ecological, and environmental factors are all thought to contribute to the ability of Salmonella to colonize fruits and vegetables pre- and post-harvest. The goal of this study was to test how irrigation levels, fruit water congestion, crop and pathogen genotypes affect the ability of Salmonella to multiply in tomatoes post-harvest. Experimental Design Fruits from thre...

  6. Pain, Affect, and Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Eduard Scheidt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various psychodynamic processes may underlie the development of psychogenic pain disorder such as conversion, the displacement of affect, or narcissistic defenses. However, many of the processes suggested are related to a disorder of affect regulation. The term affect regulation in psychoanalytic literature refers to phenomena which are often described by the concept of alexithymia. Empirical observations suggest that alexithymia is correlated to insecure attachment, especially an insecure dismissing representation of attachment. Psychodynamic psychotherapy in psychogenic pain disorder should focus on the reintegration of split-off affects which may provoke intensive counter-transference and which in order to be used therapeutically must be linked to attachment experiences within and outside of the therapeutic relationship.

  7. Colors Can Affect Us!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊斌

    2006-01-01

    Different colors affect us differently.The following will show us how they work. Experiment proves that math problems worked on yellow paper have fewer mistakes than problems written on other colors of paper.

  8. Effect of long-term aging on microstructure and local behavior in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ming-Liang, E-mail: mlzhu@ecust.edu.cn; Wang, De-Qiang; Xuan, Fu-Zhen

    2014-01-15

    Evolution of microstructure, micro-hardness and micro-tensile strength behavior was investigated in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint after the artificial aging at 350 °C for 3000 h. After detailed characterization of microstructures in optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the change of martensite–bainite constituent promotes more homogeneous microstructure distribution. The aging treatment facilitates redistribution of carbon and chromium elements along the welded joint, and the micro-hardness is increased slightly through the welds due to enrichment of carbon. The types of precipitates in the weldment mainly include M{sub 3}C, MC, M{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The carbides in base metal, weld metal and coarse-grained heat-affected zone are prone to change from ellipsoidal to platelet form whereas more uniform spherical carbides are observed in the fine-grained zone. Precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} near the fusion line, and formation of MC and M{sub 2}C, are responsible for the tensile strength decrease and its smooth distribution in the aged heat-affected zone. This implies that the thermal aging can relieve strength mismatch in the weldments. - Highlights: • Microstructure homogeneity improved in HAZ after long-term aging. • Tensile strength decreased in HAZ due to precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. • Strength mismatch in NiCrMoV steel welds was relieved after aging at 350 °C × 3000 h.

  9. Effect of long-term aging on microstructure and local behavior in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolution of microstructure, micro-hardness and micro-tensile strength behavior was investigated in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint after the artificial aging at 350 °C for 3000 h. After detailed characterization of microstructures in optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the change of martensite–bainite constituent promotes more homogeneous microstructure distribution. The aging treatment facilitates redistribution of carbon and chromium elements along the welded joint, and the micro-hardness is increased slightly through the welds due to enrichment of carbon. The types of precipitates in the weldment mainly include M3C, MC, M2C and M23C6. The carbides in base metal, weld metal and coarse-grained heat-affected zone are prone to change from ellipsoidal to platelet form whereas more uniform spherical carbides are observed in the fine-grained zone. Precipitation and coarsening of M23C6 near the fusion line, and formation of MC and M2C, are responsible for the tensile strength decrease and its smooth distribution in the aged heat-affected zone. This implies that the thermal aging can relieve strength mismatch in the weldments. - Highlights: • Microstructure homogeneity improved in HAZ after long-term aging. • Tensile strength decreased in HAZ due to precipitation and coarsening of M23C6. • Strength mismatch in NiCrMoV steel welds was relieved after aging at 350 °C × 3000 h

  10. Trade Finance Affects Trade Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    ARESPA CASTELLÓ, Marta; Gruber, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Existent literature is by no means conclusive on the effects of trade finance on trade and the economy. We propose a suitable framework to explore the linkages between international trade and finance based on an international real business cycle model where firms require external finance to import and can be financially constrained. We find that credit shocks do affect the dynamic properties of the economy and they have the potential to cause significant deviations in trade and economic perfo...

  11. Internal factors affecting brand performance

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Fiona J.

    2002-01-01

    In terms of effective branding, several recent trends have indicated the need for greater attention within the organisation than has traditionally been the case. With increased emphasis on corporate branding, the team responsible for managing a brand is becoming larger and more diverse and all staff, as the corporate brand's representatives, affect consumers' perceptions of the corporate brand. Furthermore, the shift in emphasis in the literature from the externally perceived brand image to t...

  12. The Interaction Effect Between Cognitive Reappraisal and Expressive Suppression on the Elderly’s Daily Affection%认知重评和表达抑制对老年人日常情绪的交互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗利

    2014-01-01

    采用情绪调节问卷、正性情感和负性情感量表对378名60岁以上的老年人进行了入户调查,以考察两种情绪调节的交互作用对老年人日常情绪体验的影响。结果表明:老年人更习惯采用认知重评的调节方式,正情绪体验较多,负情绪体验较少;认知重评、表达抑制和正情绪存在显著的城乡差异,负情绪差异不显著。分层回归分析表明,教育、健康是影响老年人正情绪体验的两个重要的人口学变量,来源地和收入是影响老年人负情绪体验的两个重要的人口学变量;认知重评正向预测老年人的正情绪,负向预测负性情绪,且认知重评与表达抑制交互效应对老年人正情绪预测显著,对负情绪预测不显著。%By adopting Emotion Regulation Questionnaire,Positive Affection and Negative Affection Scale (PNANS),a door-to-door survey is conducted to investigate 378 people above the age of 60 about the interaction effect between cognitive re-appraisal and expressive suppression on their Daily Affection.The results show that:the elderly are more likely to use cogni-tive reappraisal to regulate emotion,and they tend to have more positive affection experiences than the negative ones;there ex-ist significant differences on cognitive reappraisal,expressive suppression and positive affection between urban and rural elderly people,with no significant difference observed in term of the negative affection;the stratified regression analysis finds that ed-ucation and health are two important demographic variables that affect senior people’s positive emotional experience;while source place and income are two important demographic variables to affect their negative emotional experience;and the interac-tion between cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression is of statistical significance,but no significance is found in term of the negative affection.

  13. The Affective Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alí Lara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade studies on affect and emotions have become relevant in the social sciences. This is not just a fad guideline, but instead a simultaneous reader of public life changes and subjective experience, from which it is also being transformed the knowledge production. Such a trend has been known as ‘The Affective Turn’ within the Anglophone Academy. Here we will translate it as ‘El Giro Afectivo’. This turn, so far, has not dabbled in the social science literature that is written in Spanish. This paper draws on a singular panorama of discussions about contemporary social studies of affect and emotion, and it’s vertebrate by some of its expressions in the contemporary academy.

  14. The Affective Turn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carnera, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper confronts biopolitics with modern labour addressing questions of ‘governmentality’, ‘self-management’ and ‘social innovation’. It argues that the new modes of production within immaterial labour involve a new complex relation between on the one hand the ‘Art of Governance......-management that human individuation ties together modes of productions with affects and emotions. Introducing Spinoza's concept of ‘affect’, and Gilles Deleuze's reading of Spinoza's ethics focusing on the ‘affective turn’ in relation to the new economy and society, the paper argues for a more positive notion of...... biopolitics that surpasses that of governmentality. The affective self-relation is used as a research tool to analyse the creation of social and economic values in our new modes of productions, for instance, within free labour of the cultural industry. The movie The Five Obstructions is used to show how...

  15. Affective and Cognitive Characteristics of Nigerian Student-Teachers : Towards Developing an Effective Teacher Education Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Adeosun, Oyenike; Oni, Soji; Oladipo, Bayo

    2013-01-01

    The study analyzes the affective and cognitive traits of teacher trainees in higher educational institutions in Nigeria. This is with the view to develop an effective teacher education framework by using inputs from the trainees, in-service teachers and teacher educators and incorporate their ideas into the structuring and organization of not only the educational programmes but also the admission processes into such programmes. Using inputs from classroom teachers, teacher trainees, teacher e...

  16. The Effects of Supplementation with a Vitamin and Mineral Complex with Guaraná Prior to Fasted Exercise on Affect, Exertion, Cognitive Performance, and Substrate Metabolism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel C. Veasey; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F.; Kennedy, David O.; Karl Wishart; Silvia Maggini; Fuchs, Caspar J.; Emma J. Stevenson

    2015-01-01

    Exercise undertaken in a fasted state can lead to higher post-exercise mental fatigue. The administration of a vitamin and mineral complex with guaraná (MVM + G) has been shown to attenuate mental fatigue and improve performance during cognitively demanding tasks. This placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, balanced cross-over study examined the effect of MVM + G consumed prior to morning exercise on cognitive performance, affect, exertion, and substrate metabolism. Forty active males ...

  17. Effect of Protein-Lipid-Salt Interactions on Sodium Availability in the Mouth and Consequent Perception of Saltiness: As Affected by Hydration in Powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Umut; Peterson, Devin G

    2015-09-01

    There is a broad need to reformulate lower sodium food products without affecting their original taste. The present study focuses on characterizing the role of protein-salt interactions on the salt release in low-moisture systems and saltiness perception during hydration. Sodium release from freeze-dried protein powders and emulsion powders formulated at different protein/lipid ratios (5:0 to 1:4) were characterized using a chromatography column modified with a porcine tongue. Emulsion systems with protein structured at the interface were found to have faster initial sodium release rates and faster hydration and were perceived to have a higher initial salt intensity with a lower salty aftertaste. In summary, exposure of the hydrophilic segments of the interface-structured proteins in emulsions was suggested to facilitate hydration and release of sodium during dissolution of low-moisture powder samples. PMID:26255668

  18. How indoor environment affects performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David Peter; Wargocki, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    , in the form of answers to 40 frequently asked questions. Our answers are based on the results of behavioral experiments conducted to date. We offer no opinions on long-term health effects of indoor environmental quality. We provide some references to relevant sources, but there is not enough space......As experienced researchers in the effects of thermal comfort and indoor air quality on performance, we are often asked to give our best estimate of how, and to what extent, performance is affected by different aspects of indoor climate. This article provides a brief summary of our personal opinions...

  19. Dietary Patterns in Pregnancy and Effects on Nutrient Intake in the Mid-South: The Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances A. Tylavsky

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary patterns are sensitive to differences across socio-economic strata or cultural habits and may impact programing of diseases in later life. The purpose of this study was to identify distinct dietary patterns during pregnancy in the Mid-South using factor analysis. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze the differences in the food groups and in macro- and micronutrients among the different food patterns. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 1155 pregnant women (mean age 26.5 ± 5.4 years; 62% African American, 35% Caucasian, 3% Other; and pre-pregnancy BMI 27.6 ± 7.5 kg/m2. Using food frequency questionnaire data collected from participants in the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE study between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation, dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Three major dietary patterns, namely, Healthy, Processed, and US Southern were identified among pregnant women from the Mid-South. Further analysis of the three main patterns revealed four mixed dietary patterns, i.e., Healthy-Processed, Healthy-US Southern, Processed-US Southern, and overall Mixed. These dietary patterns were different (p < 0.001 from each other in almost all the food items, macro- and micro nutrients and aligned across socioeconomic and racial groups. Our study describes unique dietary patterns in the Mid-South, consumed by a cohort of women enrolled in a prospective study examining the association of maternal nutritional factors during pregnancy that are known to affect brain and cognitive development by age 3.

  20. The bystander effect-induced formation of micronucleated cells is inhibited by antioxidants, but the parallel induction of apoptosis and loss of viability are not affected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-rays induce various DNA damages including strand breaks that lead to formation of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations as well as increased number of apoptotic cells. Similar effects appear when non-irradiated cells are treated with medium collected from cultures of irradiated cells (irradiation conditioned medium - ICM). This phenomenon was termed 'bystander effect'. A number of studies suggest that bystander effect appears to be associated with up-regulation of oxidative metabolism. We thus compared the effects of antioxidant Vitamins C and E on the frequency of micronuclei and apoptotic cells in both directly irradiated cell cultures and in cultures exposed to ICM. Addition of Vitamins C or E (1-40 μg/ml) to culture medium after exposure to radiation or ICM reduced the frequency of micronuclei in a concentration-dependent manner. These vitamins had no effect on cell viability, clonogenic survival or the frequency of apoptotic cells under both conditions tested. These results show that the bystander effect causes micronucleation in addition to other known effects and suggest that the factors causing micronucleation by X-irradiation, oxidative DNA damage and incomplete repair, are regulated by apoptosis-independent pathways

  1. Effects of 8 months of exercise therapy in warm water for fibromyalgia on physical function, fitness and disease impact in affected women

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas-Carus, Pablo; Gusi, Narcis; Häkkinen, Arja; Häkkinen, Keijo; Leal, Alejo; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic disorder characterised by generalised pain, muscle stiffness, reduced physical condition and fatigue that limit their daily life activities. Little knowledge is available on the feasibility and effects of long-lasting physical training in warm water on major physical abilities related with everyday life in patients with FM. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and effects of 8 months of supervised exercise therapy in...

  2. Does health affect portfolio choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, David A; Smith, Paul A

    2010-12-01

    A number of recent studies find that poor health is empirically associated with a safer portfolio allocation. It is difficult to say, however, whether this relationship is truly causal. Both health status and portfolio choice are influenced by unobserved characteristics such as risk attitudes, impatience, information, and motivation, and these unobserved factors, if not adequately controlled for, can induce significant bias in the estimates of asset demand equations. Using the 1992-2006 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, we investigate how much of the connection between health and portfolio choice is causal and how much is due to the effects of unobserved heterogeneity. Accounting for unobserved heterogeneity with fixed effects and correlated random effects models, we find that health does not appear to significantly affect portfolio choice among single households. For married households, we find a small effect (about 2-3 percentage points) from being in the lowest of five self-reported health categories. PMID:19937612

  3. Affected in the nightclub

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob Johan

    2013-01-01

    experiences within a club as a way of understanding the complexities of pleasure. The study does so by addressing experiences through the concept of affects, which is situated within a framework of a non-representational theory of space. Anxiety, pride, anger, shame and embarrassment are embodied...

  4. Musical affect regulation in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Ghazban, Niusha; Corbeil, Mariève

    2015-03-01

    Adolescents and adults commonly use music for various forms of affect regulation, including relaxation, revitalization, distraction, and elicitation of pleasant memories. Mothers throughout the world also sing to their infants, with affect regulation as the principal goal. To date, the study of maternal singing has focused largely on its acoustic features and its consequences for infant attention. We describe recent laboratory research that explores the consequences of singing for infant affect regulation. Such work reveals that listening to recordings of play songs can maintain 6- to 9-month-old infants in a relatively contented or neutral state considerably longer than recordings of infant-directed or adult-directed speech. When 10-month-old infants fuss or cry and are highly aroused, mothers' multimodal singing is more effective than maternal speech at inducing recovery from such distress. Moreover, play songs are more effective than lullabies at reducing arousal in Western infants. We explore the implications of these findings along with possible practical applications. PMID:25773634

  5. Effective Antibiotics against ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in HLB-Affected Citrus Plants Identified via the Graft-Based Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles A.; Doud, Melissa S.; Yang, Chuanyu; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), caused by three species of fastidious, phloem-limited ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. To date, there is no established cure for this century-old and yet, newly emerging disease. As a potential control strategy for citrus HLB, 31 antibiotics were screened for effectiveness and phytotoxicity using the optimized graft-based screening system with ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las)-infected citrus scions. Actidione and Oxytetracycline were the most phytotoxic to citrus with less than 10% of scions surviving and growing; therefore, this data was not used in additional analyses. Results of principal component (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analyses (HCA) demonstrated that 29 antibiotics were clustered into 3 groups: highly effective, partly effective, and not effective. In spite of different modes of actions, a number of antibiotics such as, Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, Penicillin, Cefalexin, Rifampicin and Sulfadimethoxine were all highly effective in eliminating or suppressing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus indicated by both the lowest Las infection rate and titers of the treated scions and inoculated rootstock. The non-effective group, including 11 antibiotics alone with three controls, such as Amikacin, Cinoxacin, Gentamicin, Kasugamycin, Lincomycin, Neomycin, Polymixin B and Tobramycin, did not eliminate or suppress Las in the tested concentrations, resulting in plants with increased titers of Las. The other 12 antibiotics partly eliminated or suppressed Las in the treated and graft-inoculated plants. The effective and non-phytotoxic antibiotics could be potential candidates for control of citrus HLB, either for the rescue of infected citrus germplasm or for restricted field application. PMID:25372135

  6. Affective priming with auditory speech stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Degner

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments explored the applicability of auditory stimulus presentation in affective priming tasks. In Experiment 1, it was found that standard affective priming effects occur when prime and target words are presented simultaneously via headphones similar to a dichotic listening procedure. In

  7. Effect of inter-critically reheating temperature on microstructure and properties of simulated inter-critically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone in X70 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhixiong, E-mail: zhixiongzhu@gmail.com [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Kuzmikova, Lenka; Li, Huijun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Barbaro, Frank [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); CBMM Technology Suisse, 14, Rue du Rhone, Geneva 1204 (Switzerland)

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of the inter-critical reheating temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) in an API 5L grade X70 pipeline steel seam weld. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was employed to duplicate particular weld thermal cycles in order to accurately assess specific regions of the weld HAZ. Detailed microstructural analysis, including investigation of the martensite–austenite (M–A) constituent, was performed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and selective etching techniques. It is shown that the fracture toughness of the CGHAZ is significantly reduced following exposure to a subsequent inter-critical thermal cycle. Fracture toughness gradually improves as the inter-critical temperature is increased, but does not return to the value of the original CGHAZ due to the presence of isolated large M–A particles and coarse microstructure. Significance of M–A particles to the HAZ fracture toughness is first related to the location of particles along prior austenite grain boundaries, followed by the size of individual M–A particles.

  8. Thermal effects on microbial composition and microbiologically induced corrosion and mineral precipitation affecting operation of a geothermal plant in a deep saline aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerm, Stephanie; Westphal, Anke; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Alawi, Mashal; Seibt, Andrea; Wolfgramm, Markus; Würdemann, Hilke

    2013-03-01

    The microbial diversity of a deep saline aquifer used for geothermal heat storage in the North German Basin was investigated. Genetic fingerprinting analyses revealed distinct microbial communities in fluids produced from the cold and warm side of the aquifer. Direct cell counting and quantification of 16S rRNA genes and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes by real-time PCR proved different population sizes in fluids, showing higher abundance of bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in cold fluids compared with warm fluids. The operation-dependent temperature increase at the warm well probably enhanced organic matter availability, favoring the growth of fermentative bacteria and SRB in the topside facility after the reduction of fluid temperature. In the cold well, SRB predominated and probably accounted for corrosion damage to the submersible well pump and iron sulfide precipitates in the near wellbore area and topside facility filters. This corresponded to lower sulfate content in fluids produced from the cold well as well as higher content of hydrogen gas that was probably released from corrosion, and maybe favored growth of hydrogenotrophic SRB. This study reflects the high influence of microbial populations for geothermal plant operation, because microbiologically induced precipitative and corrosive processes adversely affect plant reliability. PMID:23358731

  9. Effect of welding conditions on transformation and properties of heat-affected zones in LWR [light-water reactor] vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous cooling transformation behavior (CCT) and isothermal transformation (IT) behavior were determined for SA-508 and SA-533 materials for conditions pertaining to standard heat treatment and for the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The resulting diagrams help to select welding conditions that produce the most favorable microconstituent for the development of optimum postweld heat treatment (PWHT) toughness levels. In the case of SA-508 and SA-533, martensite responds more favorably to PWHT than does bainite. Bainite is to be avoided for the optimum toughness characteristics of the HAZ. The reheat cracking tendency for both steels was evaluated by metallographic studies of simulated HAZ structures subjected to PWHT cycles and simultaneous restraint. Both SA-533, Grade B, Class 1, and SA-508, Class 2, cracked intergranularly. The stress rupture parameter (the product of the stress for a rupture life of 10 min and the corresponding reduction of area) calculated for both steels showed that SA-508, Class 2, was more susceptible to reheat cracking than SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Cold cracking tests (Battelle Test and University of Tennessee modified hydrogen susceptibility test) indicated that a higher preheat temperature is required for SA-508, Class 2, to avoid cracking than is required for SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Further, the Hydrogen Susceptibility Test showed that SA-508, Class 2, is more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than is SA-533, Grade B, Class 1

  10. Effect of Lipid Partitioning on Predictions of Acute Toxicity of Oil Sands Process Affected Water to Embryos of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Garrett D; Zhang, Kun; Wiseman, Steve B; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2016-08-16

    Dissolved organic compounds in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) are known to be responsible for most of its toxicity to aquatic organisms, but the complexity of this mixture prevents use of traditional bottom-up approaches for predicting toxicities of mixtures. Therefore, a top-down approach to predict toxicity of the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW was developed and tested. Accurate masses (i.e., m/z) determined by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in negative and positive ionization modes were used to assign empirical chemical formulas to each chemical species in the mixture. For each chemical species, a predictive measure of lipid accumulation was estimated by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to poly(dimethyl)siloxane, or by partitioning to solid-supported lipid membranes (SSLM). A narcosis mode of action was assumed and the target-lipid model was used to estimate potencies of mixtures by assuming strict additivity. A model developed using a combination of the SBSE and SSLM lipid partitioning estimates, whereby the accumulation of chemicals to neutral and polar lipids was explicitly considered, was best for predicting empirical values of LC50 in 96-h acute toxicity tests with embryos of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Model predictions were within 4-fold of observed toxicity for 75% of OSPW samples, and within 8.5-fold for all samples tested, which is comparable to the range of interlaboratory variability for in vivo toxicity testing. PMID:27420640

  11. Effects of Nb on microstructure and continuous cooling transformation of coarse grain heat-affected zone in 610 MPa class high-strength low-alloy structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)], E-mail: yingqiaozhang@yahoo.com.cn; Zhang, H.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Research Institute for Advanced Structural Steel, R and D Center, Baoshan Iron and Steel Limited Company, Shanghai 201900 (China); Liu, W.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Hou, H. [Research Institute for Advanced Structural Steel, R and D Center, Baoshan Iron and Steel Limited Company, Shanghai 201900 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Continuous cooling transformation diagrams of the coarse grain heat-affected zone and microstructure after continuous cooling were investigated for 610 MPa class high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) structural steels with and without niobium. For the steel without Nb, grain boundary ferrite, degenerate pearlite and acicular ferrite are produced at slower cooling rates. Bainite phase is formed at faster cooling rates. However, for the steel with Nb, granular bainite is dominant at a large range of cooling rates. At cooling rates <32 K/s, transformation start temperature is decreased by 20 K approximately in the steel with Nb compared with that without Nb. Ferrite nucleation at prior austenite grain boundaries is suppressed and the cooling rate region for granular bainite transformation is broadened. At cooling rates >32 K/s, Nb addition has no obvious influence on transformation start temperature, but it influences microstructure transformation significantly. Martensite is observed in steel with Nb at faster cooling rates, but not produced in steel without Nb.

  12. Implementing the CASPiE course-based research experience at the United States Military Academy: Affective responses and effects on critical thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Anthony Michael

    The Center for Authentic Science Practices in Education (CASPiE) pioneered a course-based research experience approach to teaching chemistry laboratory courses. The method had previously been studied in a variety of institutional settings. Recently, the United States Military Academy at West Point decided to develop CASPiE-style modules for the introductory honors chemistry course. This research setting presents clean experimental-control comparisons and a group of faculty who were completely new to the method. Equipping students with authentic research experiences early in their education is important regardless of the institution. However, cadets at a military academy must make decisions relatively early (the outset of their second year) as to what their career trajectory will be as eventual officers. In the new CASPiE-based experience, cadets are given the opportunity to select from one of three different modules (analytical chemistry, toxicology, and chemical engineering) in which to participate during the course. These three modules represent subsections of an overall Army waste-to-energy research project. Cadets generate unique hypotheses, real data, and research posters towards the advancement of the project. Posters are then presented in a session. that includes an audience of project stakeholders, course instructors, and other academy faculty and staff. Here, I will present my research methods, evaluative procedures, and findings in the affective domain, critical thinking, and laboratory content comprehension.

  13. Effect of inter-critically reheating temperature on microstructure and properties of simulated inter-critically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone in X70 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the influence of the inter-critical reheating temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) in an API 5L grade X70 pipeline steel seam weld. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was employed to duplicate particular weld thermal cycles in order to accurately assess specific regions of the weld HAZ. Detailed microstructural analysis, including investigation of the martensite–austenite (M–A) constituent, was performed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and selective etching techniques. It is shown that the fracture toughness of the CGHAZ is significantly reduced following exposure to a subsequent inter-critical thermal cycle. Fracture toughness gradually improves as the inter-critical temperature is increased, but does not return to the value of the original CGHAZ due to the presence of isolated large M–A particles and coarse microstructure. Significance of M–A particles to the HAZ fracture toughness is first related to the location of particles along prior austenite grain boundaries, followed by the size of individual M–A particles

  14. Food aroma affects bite size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wijk René A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined bite size, was controlled by the subject via a push button. Over 30 trials with 10 subjects, the custard was presented randomly either without an aroma, or with aromas presented below or near the detection threshold. Results Results for ten subjects (four females and six males, aged between 26 and 50 years, indicated that aroma intensity affected the size of the corresponding bite as well as that of subsequent bites. Higher aroma intensities resulted in significantly smaller sizes. Conclusions These results suggest that bite size control during eating is a highly dynamic process affected by the sensations experienced during the current and previous bites.

  15. Systematic analysis of off-target effects in an RNAi screen reveals microRNAs affecting sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Anton J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA inhibition by siRNAs is a frequently used approach to identify genes required for specific biological processes. However RNAi screening using siRNAs is hampered by non-specific or off target effects of the siRNAs, making it difficult to separate genuine hits from false positives. It is thought that many of the off-target effects seen in RNAi experiments are due to siRNAs acting as microRNAs (miRNAs, causing a reduction in gene expression of unintended targets via matches to the 6 or 7 nt 'seed' sequence. We have conducted a careful examination of off-target effects during an siRNA screen for novel regulators of the TRAIL apoptosis induction pathway(s. Results We identified 3 hexamers and 3 heptamer seed sequences that appeared multiple times in the top twenty siRNAs in the TRAIL apoptosis screen. Using a novel statistical enrichment approach, we systematically identified a further 17 hexamer and 13 heptamer seed sequences enriched in high scoring siRNAs. The presence of one of these seeds sequences (which could explain 6 of 8 confirmed off-target effects is sufficient to elicit a phenotype. Three of these seed sequences appear in the human miRNAs miR-26a, miR-145 and miR-384. Transfection of mimics of these miRNAs protects several cell types from TRAIL-induced cell death. Conclusions We have demonstrated a role for miR-26a, miR-145 and miR-26a in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Further these results show that RNAi screening enriches for siRNAs with relevant off-target effects. Some of these effects can be identified by the over-representation of certain seed sequences in high-scoring siRNAs and we demonstrate the usefulness of such systematic analysis of enriched seed sequences.

  16. Effects of phosphorus segregation on stress corrosion cracking in the heat-affected zone of a dissimilar weld joint between a Ni-base alloy and a low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of P segregation on SCC in Alloy 182-A533B dissimilar weld was studied. • Segregation of solutes was mainly induced by welding and step cooling. • P segregation promoted crack growth/reactivation in heat-affected zone of A533B. • Crack in heat-affected zone prefers grain boundary and cementite–matrix interface. - Abstract: Effects of phosphorus segregation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the heat-affected zone of an Alloy 182-A533B dissimilar weld joint in high-temperature, oxygenated water doped with SO42− and Cl− were evaluated by creviced bent beam test. Results indicate that step cooling and the addition of Cl− promoted SCC propagation and reactivation in the HAZ after cracks reach the fusion boundary. It is also suggested that phosphorus segregation at grain/packet boundaries and precipitate–matrix interfaces have promoted SCC, especially in coarse-grained HAZ and intercritically reheated coarse-grained HAZ

  17. Factors Affecting Training Effectiveness in the Context of the Introduction of a New Technology--A U.S. Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghes, Constantine

    2001-01-01

    The following factors were identified as most influential on training effectiveness by 264 of 971 members of the American Society for Training and Development: pre- and posttraining measurement of trainee knowledge, supervisor support and encouragement for application of new skills, intrinsic rewards, organizations with a high degree of employer…

  18. Do Brothers Affect Their Sisters' Chances to Graduate? An Analysis of Sibling Sex Composition Effects on Graduation from a University or a "Fachhochschule" in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Marita

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper on gender inequality in higher education Buchman and DiPrete (2006) assume that the decrease in the gender gap in college completion in the US can partly be explained by changes in the allocation of familial resources in favour of women. However, they do not test this hypothesis empirically. In this paper I examine the effects of…

  19. Effect of periodontal treatment on serum C-reactive protein level in obese and normal-weight women affected with chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Zahrani, M.S.; Alghamdi, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of conventional periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level and periodontal status in obese and normal-weight chronic periodontitis patients. METHODS: This is a controlled clinical trial conducted at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentis

  20. Effectiveness of a mining simulation cooperative learning activity on the cognitive and affective achievement of students in a lower division physical geology course: A confluent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Jeffrey Wayne

    Most students enrolled in lower division physical geology courses are non-majors and tend to finish the course with little appreciation of what it is geologists really do. They may also be expected to analyze, synthesize, and apply knowledge from previous laboratory experiences with little or no instruction and/or practice in utilizing the critical thinking skills necessary to do so. This study sought to answer two research questions: (1) do physical geology students enrolled in a course designed around a mining simulation activity perform better cognitively than students who are taught the same curriculum in the traditional fashion; and (2) do students enrolled in the course gain a greater appreciation of physical geology and the work that geologists do. Eighty students enrolled in the course at Columbia College, Sonora, California over a two year period. During the first year, thirty-one students were taught the traditional physical geology curriculum. During the second year, forty-nine students were taught the traditional curriculum up until week nine, then they were taught a cooperative learning mining simulation activity for three weeks. A static group, split plot, repeated measures design was used. Pre- and post-tests were administered to students in both the control and treatment groups. The cognitive assessment instrument was validated by content area experts in the University of South Carolina Geological Sciences Department. Students were given raw lithologic, gravimetric, topographic, and environmental data with which to construct maps and perform an overlay analysis. They were tested on the cognitive reasoning and spatial analysis they used to make decisions about where to test drill for valuable metallic ores. The affective instrument used a six point Likert scale to assess students' perceived enjoyment, interest, and importance of the material. Gains scores analysis of cognitive achievement data showed a mean of 2.43 for the control group and 4.47 for