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Sample records for affect arsenite oxidase

  1. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

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    Coppée Jean-Yves

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III to As(V as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III. To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54 of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III in this microorganism.

  2. Constitutive arsenite oxidase expression detected in arsenic-hypertolerant Pseudomonas xanthomarina S11.

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    Koechler, Sandrine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Heinrich-Salmeron, Audrey; Jost, Bernard; Lièvremont, Didier; Philipps, Muriel; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bertin, Philippe N; Lett, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas xanthomarina S11 is an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an arsenic-contaminated former gold mine in Salsigne, France. This bacterium showed high resistance to arsenite and was able to oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations up to 42.72 mM As[III]. The genome of this strain was sequenced and revealed the presence of three ars clusters. One of them is located on a plasmid and is organized as an "arsenic island" harbouring an aio operon and genes involved in phosphorous metabolism, in addition to the ars genes. Neither the aioXRS genes nor a specific sigma-54-dependent promoter located upstream of aioBA genes, both involved in regulation of arsenite oxidase expression in other arsenite-oxidizing bacteria, could be identified in the genome. This observation is in accordance with the fact that no difference was observed in expression of arsenite oxidase in P. xanthomarina S11, whether or not the strain was grown in the presence of As[III].

  3. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases

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    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L.; Lowe, Todd M.; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle.

  4. The Respiratory Arsenite Oxidase: Structure and the Role of Residues Surrounding the Rieske Cluster

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    Warelow, Thomas P.; Oke, Muse; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Dahl, Jan U.; Bruselat, Nicole; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Leimkühler, Silke; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Kappler, Ulrike; Naismith, James H.; Santini, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    The arsenite oxidase (Aio) from the facultative autotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Rhizobium sp. NT-26 is a bioenergetic enzyme involved in the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate. The enzyme from the distantly related heterotroph, Alcaligenes faecalis, which is thought to oxidise arsenite for detoxification, consists of a large α subunit (AioA) with bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide at its active site and a 3Fe-4S cluster, and a small β subunit (AioB) which contains a Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster. The successful heterologous expression of the NT-26 Aio in Escherichia coli has resulted in the solution of its crystal structure. The NT-26 Aio, a heterotetramer, shares high overall similarity to the heterodimeric arsenite oxidase from A. faecalis but there are striking differences in the structure surrounding the Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster which we demonstrate explains the difference in the observed redox potentials (+225 mV vs. +130/160 mV, respectively). A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance was used to explore the differences observed in the structure and redox properties of the Rieske cluster. In the NT-26 AioB the substitution of a serine (S126 in NT-26) for a threonine as in the A. faecalis AioB explains a −20 mV decrease in redox potential. The disulphide bridge in the A. faecalis AioB which is conserved in other betaproteobacterial AioB subunits and the Rieske subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex is absent in the NT-26 AioB subunit. The introduction of a disulphide bridge had no effect on Aio activity or protein stability but resulted in a decrease in the redox potential of the cluster. These results are in conflict with previous data on the betaproteobacterial AioB subunit and the Rieske of the bc1 complex where removal of the disulphide bridge had no effect on the redox potential of the former but a decrease in cluster stability was observed in the latter. PMID:24023621

  5. The respiratory arsenite oxidase: structure and the role of residues surrounding the rieske cluster.

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    Thomas P Warelow

    Full Text Available The arsenite oxidase (Aio from the facultative autotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Rhizobium sp. NT-26 is a bioenergetic enzyme involved in the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate. The enzyme from the distantly related heterotroph, Alcaligenes faecalis, which is thought to oxidise arsenite for detoxification, consists of a large α subunit (AioA with bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide at its active site and a 3Fe-4S cluster, and a small β subunit (AioB which contains a Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster. The successful heterologous expression of the NT-26 Aio in Escherichia coli has resulted in the solution of its crystal structure. The NT-26 Aio, a heterotetramer, shares high overall similarity to the heterodimeric arsenite oxidase from A. faecalis but there are striking differences in the structure surrounding the Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster which we demonstrate explains the difference in the observed redox potentials (+225 mV vs. +130/160 mV, respectively. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance was used to explore the differences observed in the structure and redox properties of the Rieske cluster. In the NT-26 AioB the substitution of a serine (S126 in NT-26 for a threonine as in the A. faecalis AioB explains a -20 mV decrease in redox potential. The disulphide bridge in the A. faecalis AioB which is conserved in other betaproteobacterial AioB subunits and the Rieske subunit of the cytochrome bc 1 complex is absent in the NT-26 AioB subunit. The introduction of a disulphide bridge had no effect on Aio activity or protein stability but resulted in a decrease in the redox potential of the cluster. These results are in conflict with previous data on the betaproteobacterial AioB subunit and the Rieske of the bc 1 complex where removal of the disulphide bridge had no effect on the redox potential of the former but a decrease in cluster stability was observed in the latter.

  6. Organization and regulation of the arsenite oxidase operon of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

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    Slyemi, Djamila; Moinier, Danielle; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-11-01

    Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is an acidophilic and facultatively autotrophic bacterium that can grow by oxidizing arsenite to arsenate. A comparative genomic analysis showed that the T. arsenitoxydans aioBA cluster encoding the two subunits of arsenite oxidase is distinct from the other clusters, with two specific genes encoding a cytochrome c and a metalloregulator belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. These genes are cotranscribed with aioBA, suggesting that these cytochromes c are involved in arsenite oxidation and that this operon is controlled by the metalloregulator. The growth of T. arsenitoxydans in the presence of thiosulfate and arsenite, or arsenate, is biphasic. Real-time PCR experiments showed that the operon is transcribed during the second growth phase in the presence of arsenite or arsenate, whereas antimonite had no effect. These results suggest that the expression of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans is regulated by the electron donor present in the medium, i.e., is induced in the presence of arsenic but is repressed by more energetic substrates. Our data indicate that the genetic organization and regulation of the aioBA operon of T. arsenitoxydans differ from those of the other arsenite oxidizers.

  7. Linking microbial oxidation of arsenic with detection and phylogenetic analysis of arsenite oxidase genes in diverse geothermal environments.

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    Hamamura, N; Macur, R E; Korf, S; Ackerman, G; Taylor, W P; Kozubal, M; Reysenbach, A-L; Inskeep, W P

    2009-02-01

    The identification and characterization of genes involved in the microbial oxidation of arsenite will contribute to our understanding of factors controlling As cycling in natural systems. Towards this goal, we recently characterized the widespread occurrence of aerobic arsenite oxidase genes (aroA-like) from pure-culture bacterial isolates, soils, sediments and geothermal mats, but were unable to detect these genes in all geothermal systems where we have observed microbial arsenite oxidation. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to measure arsenite-oxidation rates in geochemically diverse thermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) ranging in pH from 2.6 to 8, and to identify corresponding 16S rRNA and aroA genotypes associated with these arsenite-oxidizing environments. Geochemical analyses, including measurement of arsenite-oxidation rates within geothermal outflow channels, were combined with 16S rRNA gene and aroA functional gene analysis using newly designed primers to capture previously undescribed aroA-like arsenite oxidase gene diversity. The majority of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences found in acidic (pH 2.6-3.6) Fe-oxyhydroxide microbial mats were closely related to Hydrogenobaculum spp. (members of the bacterial order Aquificales), while the predominant sequences from near-neutral (pH 6.2-8) springs were affiliated with other Aquificales including Sulfurihydrogenibium spp., Thermocrinis spp. and Hydrogenobacter spp., as well as members of the Deinococci, Thermodesulfobacteria and beta-Proteobacteria. Modified primers designed around previously characterized and newly identified aroA-like genes successfully amplified new lineages of aroA-like genes associated with members of the Aquificales across all geothermal systems examined. The expression of Aquificales aroA-like genes was also confirmed in situ, and the resultant cDNA sequences were consistent with aroA genotypes identified in the same environments. The aroA sequences

  8. Spatio-temporal detection of the Thiomonas population and the Thiomonas arsenite oxidase involved in natural arsenite attenuation processes in the Carnoulès Acid Mine Drainage

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    Agnès eHovasse

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acid mine drainage (AMD impacted creek of the Carnoulès mine (Southern France is characterized by acid waters with a high heavy metal content. The microbial community inhabiting this AMD was extensively studied using isolation, metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, and the results showed that a natural arsenic (and iron attenuation process involving the arsenite oxidase activity of several Thiomonas strains occurs at this site. A sensitive quantitative Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM-based proteomic approach was developed for detecting and quantifying the two subunits of the arsenite oxidase and RpoA of two different Thiomonas groups. Using this approach combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based on pyrosequencing and FISH, it was established here for the first time that these Thiomonas strains are ubiquitously present in minor proportions in this AMD and that they express the key enzymes involved in natural remediation processes at various locations and time points. In addition to these findings, this study also confirms that targeted proteomics applied at the community level can be used to detect weakly abundant proteins in situ.

  9. An ArsR/SmtB family member is involved in the regulation by arsenic of the arsenite oxidase operon in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

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    Moinier, Danielle; Slyemi, Djamila; Byrne, Deborah; Lignon, Sabrina; Lebrun, Régine; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2014-10-01

    The genetic organization of the aioBA operon, encoding the arsenite oxidase of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, is different from that of the aioBA operon in the other arsenite oxidizers, in that it encodes AioF, a metalloprotein belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. AioF is stabilized by arsenite, arsenate, or antimonite but not molybdate. Arsenic is tightly attached to AioF, likely by cysteine residues. When loaded with arsenite or arsenate, AioF is able to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the aio operon at two distinct positions. In Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, the promoters of aioX and aioB are convergent, suggesting that transcriptional interference occurs. These results indicate that the regulation of the aioBA operon is more complex in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans than in the other aioBA containing arsenite oxidizers and that the arsenic binding protein AioF is involved in this regulation. On the basis of these data, a model to explain the tight control of aioBA expression by arsenic in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is proposed.

  10. X-ray crystal structure of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase: μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the active site.

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    Cao, Hongnan; Hall, James; Hille, Russ

    2011-08-17

    Xanthine oxidoreductase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation reaction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers of a variety of substrates, including purines, aldehydes, and other heterocyclic compounds. The complex of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase has been characterized previously by UV-vis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and the catalytically essential sulfido ligand of the square-pyrimidal molybdenum center has been suggested to be involved in arsenite binding through either a μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridge or a single μ-sulfido bridge. However, this is contrary to the crystallographically observed single μ-oxo bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the desulfo form of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (an enzyme closely related to xanthine oxidase), whose molybdenum center has an oxo ligand replacing the catalytically essential sulfur, as seen in the functional form of xanthine oxidase. Here we use X-ray crystallography to characterize the molybdenum center of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase and solve the structures of the oxidized and reduced inhibition complexes at 1.82 and 2.11 Å resolution, respectively. We observe μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridges between molybdenum and arsenic in the active sites of both complexes. Arsenic is four-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-pyramidal geometry in the oxidized complex and three-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-planar geometry in the reduced complex. The doubly bridged binding mode is in agreement with previous XAS data indicating that the catalytically essential sulfur is also essential for the high affinity of reduced xanthine oxidoreductase for arsenite.

  11. Diversity and abundance of the arsenite oxidase gene aioA in geothermal areas of Tengchong, Yunnan, China.

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    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Wu, Geng; Dong, Hailiang; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Bing; Wang, Yanxin; Guo, Qinghai

    2014-01-01

    A total of 12 samples were collected from the Tengchong geothermal areas of Yunnan, China, with the goal to assess the arsenite (AsIII) oxidation potential of the extant microbial communities as inferred by the abundance and diversity of the AsIII oxidase large subunit gene aioA relative to geochemical context. Arsenic concentrations were higher (on average 251.68 μg/L) in neutral or alkaline springs than in acidic springs (on average 30.88 μg/L). aioA abundance ranged from 1.63 × 10(1) to 7.08 × 10(3) per ng of DNA and positively correlated with sulfide and the ratios of arsenate (AsV):total dissolved arsenic (AsTot). Based on qPCR estimates of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundance, aioA-harboring organisms comprised as much as ~15% of the total community. Phylogenetically, the major aioA sequences (270 total) in the acidic hot springs (pH 3.3-4.4) were affiliated with Aquificales and Rhizobiales, while those in neutral or alkaline springs (pH 6.6-9.1) were inferred to be primarily bacteria related to Thermales and Burkholderiales. Interestingly, aioA abundance at one site greatly exceeded bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance, suggesting these aioA genes were archaeal even though phylogenetically these aioA sequences were most similar to the Aquificales. In summary, this study described novel aioA sequences in geothermal features geographically far removed from those in the heavily studied Yellowstone geothermal complex.

  12. 三价砷氧化细菌Acidovorax sp.GW2中As(Ⅲ)氧化酶基因和调控序列的克隆鉴定%Isolation and identification of arsenite oxidase gene and regulatory sequences in an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. GW2

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    赵凯; 黄银燕; 王倩; 王革娇

    2011-01-01

    Using reverse transcriptase PCR method and a bacterial fosmid library screening, an arsenite oxidase gene cluster were isolated from an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. GW2. There are seven genes including aoxRSXABCD putatively encoding the transcriptional regulator AoxR of a two-component signal transduction system (68% identity), a periplasmic sensor histidine kinase AoxS (55 % identity), a periplasmic binding protein AoxX (55 % identity), arsenite oxidase AoxAB(74 % and 71% identity, respectively), nitroreductase AoxC (46 % identity) and cytochrome c AoxD (63 % identity) respectively. According to the reverse transcriptase PCR experiments,aoxR and aoxS encoding for a two-component system proteins are co-transcribed and located in opposite to structural genes aoxABCD.aoxX and aoxRS are not in the same operon. Functional analyses through gene knock-out of aoxS, aoxX and aoxD showed that aoxS and aoxX are the essential genes in arsenite oxidation of GW2, and the loss of aoxD did not show significant effects on arsenite oxidation.%通过反向PCR和细菌Fosmid文库筛选,克隆得到1株二三价砷[As(Ⅲ)]氧化细菌Acidovorax sp.GW2的As(Ⅲ)氧化酶Aox基因簇,包括aoxRSXABCD 7个基因,分别预测编码双组分信号传导系统转录调控子AoxR(同源性68%),周质感应组氨酸激酶AoxS(同源性55%),周质结合蛋白AoxX(同源性55%),砷氧化酶AoxAB(同源性分别为74%和71%),硝基还原酶AoxC(同源性46%),细胞色素C AoxD(同源性63%).反转录PCR结果显示,编码双组分系统的aoxRS基因共转录,而与之转录方向相反的结构基因aoxABCD处于同一操纵子中,aoxX基因和aoxRS基因不在同一操纵子中.通过对aoxS、aoxX、aoxD的基因敲除功能研究发现aoxS和aoxX基因为GW2三价砷氧化的必需基因,aoxD的功能丧失减慢了三价砷的氧化速率,但非关键基因.

  13. Sorption of Arsenite onto Mackinawite Coated Sand

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    Gallegos, T. J.; Hayes, K. F.; Abriola, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem affecting aquifers in the United States as well as abroad. Recent strengthening of the US EPA MCL for arsenic has prompted the need for technology capable of removing both arsenite and arsenate from solution. Arsenite, the more toxic form of arsenic, is more difficult to remove from anoxic zones in the subsurface. Studies by others have demonstrated the affinity of some types of iron sulfides for arsenite, such as troilite, pyrite, amorphous iron sulfide and mackinawite. However, these studies have not provided a comprehensive investigation of the macroscopic behavior of arsenite in the presence of crystalline mackinawite in a form that can be readily applied to real-world treatment technologies. This study examines the behavior of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sand. PH edge results demonstrate that arsenite sorption onto mackinawite coated sand increases with increasing pH, reaching maximum removal at pH 10. Arsenite removal, albeit slight, occurring below pH 5 is independent of pH indicative of a different removal mechanism. Isotherm studies show that at low concentrations, removal is Langmuirian in nature. Arsenite sorption abruptly converts to linear behavior at high concentrations, possibly attributed to the saturation of the monolayer. Ionic strength effects were assessed by comparing pH edge data developed for three different concentrations of NaCl background electrolyte solution. Increases in ionic strength enhance the removal of arsenite from solution, suggesting possible inner-sphere surface complexation removal mechanisms. Information gathered in this study can be used to further develop surface complexation models to describe and predict reactivity of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sands in anoxic regions. Mackinawite coated sands investigated here may provide a feasible reactive medium for implementation in above-ground sorption reactors or subsurface

  14. Ozone affects pollen viability and NAD(P)H oxidase release from Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen

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    Pasqualini, Stefania, E-mail: spas@unipg.it [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Tedeschini, Emma; Frenguelli, Giuseppe [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Wopfner, Nicole; Ferreira, Fatima [Department of Molecular Biology, CD Laboratory for Allergy Diagnosis and Therapy, University of Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); D' Amato, Gennaro [Division of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, ' A. Cardarelli' High Speciality Hospital, Naples (Italy); Ederli, Luisa [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Air pollution is frequently proposed as a cause of the increased incidence of allergy in industrialised countries. We investigated the impact of ozone (O{sub 3}) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and allergen content of ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). Pollen was exposed to acute O{sub 3} fumigation, with analysis of pollen viability, ROS and nitric oxide (NO) content, activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase, and expression of major allergens. There was decreased pollen viability after O{sub 3} fumigation, which indicates damage to the pollen membrane system, although the ROS and NO contents were not changed or were only slightly induced, respectively. Ozone exposure induced a significant enhancement of the ROS-generating enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase. The expression of the allergen Amb a 1 was not affected by O{sub 3}, determined from the mRNA levels of the major allergens. We conclude that O{sub 3} can increase ragweed pollen allergenicity through stimulation of ROS-generating NAD(P)H oxidase. - Highlights: > O{sub 3} reduces the viability of ragweed pollen. > ROS and allergens of ragweed pollen were not affected by O{sub 3} exposure. > O{sub 3} enhances the activity of the ROS-generating enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase. > O{sub 3} increases ragweed pollen allergenicity through NAD(P)H-oxidase stimulation. - This study focuses on the effects of the atmospheric pollutant ozone on ROS content and NAD(P)H oxidase activity of ragweed pollen grains.

  15. Peroxisomal Polyamine Oxidase and NADPH-Oxidase cross-talk for ROS homeostasis which affects respiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Efthimios A. Andronis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the intracellular compartments is of critical importance as ROS have been linked with nearly all cellular processes and more importantly with diseases and aging. PAs are nitrogenous molecules with an evolutionary conserved role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic status of cells. Recent evidence also suggests that polyamines (PA are major regulators of ROS homeostasis. In Arabidopsis the backconversion of the PAs spermidine (Spd and spermine (Spm to putrescine (Put and Spd, respectively is catalyzed by two peroxisomal PA oxidases (AtPAO. However, the physiological role of this pathway remains largely elusive. Here we explore the role of peroxisomal PA backconversion and in particular that catalyzed by the highly expressed AtPAO3 in the regulation of ROS homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory burst. Exogenous PAs exert an NADPH-oxidase dependent stimulation of oxygen consumption, with Spd exerting the strongest effect. This increase is attenuated by treatment with the NADPH-oxidase blocker diphenyleneiodonium iodide (DPI. Loss-of-function of AtPAO3 gene results to increased NADPH-oxidase-dependent production of superoxide anions (O2.-, but not H2O2, which activate the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway (AOX. On the contrary, overexpression of AtPAO3 results to an increased but balanced production of both H2O2 and O2.-. These results suggest that the ratio of O2.-/H2O2 regulates respiratory chain in mitochondria, with PA-dependent production of O2.- by NADPH-oxidase tilting the balance of electron transfer chain in favor of the AOX pathway. In addition, AtPAO3 seems to be an important component in the regulating module of ROS homeostasis, while a conserved role for PA backconversion and ROS across kingdoms is discussed.

  16. Diversity of arsenite oxidizing bacterial communities in arsenic-rich deltaic aquifers in West Bengal, India

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    Devanita eGhosh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High arsenic (As concentration in groundwater has affected human health, particularly in South-East Asia putting millions of people at risk. Biogeochemical cycling of As carried out by different bacterial groups are suggested to control the As fluxes in aquifers. A functional diversity approach in link with As precipitation was adopted to study bacterial community structures and their variation within the As contaminated Bengal Delta Plain (BDP aquifers of India. Groundwater samples collected from two shallow aquifers in Karimpur II (West Bengal, India, during years 2010 and 2011, were investigated to trace the effects of inter-annual variability in precipitation on community structure and diversity of bacterial assemblages. The study focused on amplification, clone library generation and sequencing of the arsenite oxidase large sub-unit gene aioA and 16S rRNA marker, with respect to changes in elemental concentrations. New set of primers were designed to amplify the aioA gene as a phylogenetic marker to study taxonomically diverse arsenite oxidizing bacterial groups in these aquifers. Overall narrow distribution of bacterial communities based on aioA and 16S rRNA sequences observed was due to poor nutrient status and anoxic conditions in these As contaminated aquifers. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum detected, within which Acidovorax, Hydrogenophaga, Albidiferax, Bosea and Polymorphum were the major arsenite oxidizing bacterial genera. The structure of bacterial assemblages including those of arsenite oxidizing bacteria were affected by an increase in major elemental concentrations (e.g., As, iron, sulfur, and silica within two sampling sessions, which was supported by PCA analysis. One of the significant findings of this study is detection of novel lineages of 16S rRNA-like bacterial sequences indicating presence of indigenous bacterial communities across both wells of BDP that can play important role in biogeochemical cycling of

  17. Arsenite transport in plants.

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    Ali, Waqar; Isayenkov, Stanislav V; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2009-07-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid which is toxic to living organisms. Natural occurrence of arsenic and human activities have led to widespread contamination in many areas of the world, exposing a large section of the human population to potential arsenic poisoning. Arsenic intake can occur through consumption of contaminated crops and it is therefore important to understand the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and tolerance that plants display in response to arsenic. Plants are mainly exposed to the inorganic forms of arsenic, arsenate and arsenite. Recently, significant progress has been made in the identification and characterisation of proteins responsible for movement of arsenite into and within plants. Aquaporins of the NIP (nodulin26-like intrinsic protein) subfamily were shown to transport arsenite in planta and in heterologous systems. In this review, we will evaluate the implications of these new findings and assess how this may help in developing safer and more tolerant crops.

  18. Xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase impact plant hormone homeostasis and affect fruit size in 'Hass' avocado.

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    Taylor, Nicky J; Cowan, A Keith

    2004-04-01

    The contribution of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH, EC 1.1.1.204) to fruit size was investigated using the normal and small-fruit variants of Persea americana Mill. cv. 'Hass'. Inhibition of XDH by treatment of normal fruit, in the linear phase of growth (phase II), with allopurinol (Allo) arrested fruit growth. Adenine (Ade), a less effective inhibitor of this enzyme, also arrested fruit growth when applied in phase II and slowed fruit growth when applied in phase III. A time-course study on the activity of XDH in mesocarp tissue from normal and small fruit showed that maximum activity occurred late in phase II and that the peak in activity was absent in mesocarp of the small fruit. Feeding Ade to growing fruit in phase III caused a transient decline in fruit growth (measured as change in fruit length). Thereafter, growth resumed although fruit size was irreversibly affected. Treatment of fruit with Ade and Ade-containing cytokinins altered activity of another molybdenum enzyme, aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1). Cytokinin oxidase was induced by cytokinin and auxin. Purine catabolism via hypoxanthine/xanthine was operative in normal fruit and in mesocarp from the small-fruit variant and as expected, Allo treatment caused accumulation of xanthine and adenine. In the absence of an increase in XDH during growth of the small-fruit phenotype, low levels of Ade were interpreted as resulting from respiration-enhanced adenylate depletion. Stress and/or pathogen induction of the alternative oxidase pathway is proposed as a possible cause.

  19. Exposure to GSM 900 MHz electromagnetic fields affects cerebral cytochrome c oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Mohamed; Lecomte, Anthony; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; de-Seze, René

    2008-08-19

    The world-wide and rapidly growing use of mobile phones has raised serious concerns about the biological and health-related effects of radio frequency (RF) radiation, particularly concerns about the effects of RFs upon the nervous system. The goal of this study was conducted to measure cytochrome oxidase (CO) levels using histochemical methods in order to evaluate regional brain metabolic activity in rat brain after exposure to a GSM 900 MHz signal for 45 min/day at a brain-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1.5 W/Kg or for 15 min/day at a SAR of 6 W/Kg over seven days. Compared to the sham and control cage groups, rats exposed to a GSM signal at 6 W/Kg showed decreased CO activity in some areas of the prefrontal and frontal cortex (infralimbic cortex, prelimbic cortex, primary motor cortex, secondary motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex areas 1 and 2 (Cg1 and Cg2)), the septum (dorsal and ventral parts of the lateral septal nucleus), the hippocampus (dorsal field CA1, CA2 and CA3 of the hippocampus and dental gyrus) and the posterior cortex (retrosplenial agranular cortex, primary and secondary visual cortex, perirhinal cortex and lateral entorhinal cortex). However, the exposure to GSM at 1.5 W/Kg did not affect brain activity. Our results indicate that 6 W/Kg GSM 900 MHz microwaves may affect brain metabolism and neuronal activity in rats.

  20. The genetic basis of anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jamie; Sanchez-Sedillo, Benjamin; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence G.; McCann, Shelley; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2017-01-01

    “Photoarsenotrophy”, the use of arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis, is thought to be an ancient form of phototrophy along with the photosynthetic oxidation of Fe(II), H2S, H2, and NO2-. Photoarsenotrophy was recently identified from Paoha Island's (Mono Lake, CA) arsenic-rich hot springs. The genomes of several photoarsenotrophs revealed a gene cluster, arxB2AB1CD, where arxA is predicted to encode for the sole arsenite oxidase. The role of arxA in photosynthetic arsenite oxidation was confirmed by disrupting the gene in a representative photoarsenotrophic bacterium, resulting in the loss of light-dependent arsenite oxidation. In situ evidence of active photoarsenotrophic microbes was supported by arxA mRNA detection for the first time, in red-pigmented microbial mats within the hot springs of Paoha Island. This work expands on the genetics for photosynthesis coupled to new electron donors and elaborates on known mechanisms for arsenic metabolism, thereby highlighting the complexities of arsenic biogeochemical cycling.

  1. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobo, J.M. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  2. Structural analysis of tissues affected by cytochrome C oxidase deficiency due to mutations in the SCO2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesela, Katerina; Hulkova, Helena; Hansikova, Hana; Zeman, Jiri; Elleder, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Structural and histochemical studies carried out in a series of seven cases (from five families) with isolated cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency caused by mutations in the SCO2 gene (1, 2) disclosed changes concentrated in the nervous system, skeletal muscle and myocardium. In five patients homozygous for the E140K mutation, the phenotype was predominantly neuromuscular and the average life span ranged between 9 and 15 months. In two cases, the course was more rapid (death at 7 and 11 weeks of life) and featured marked cardiac hypertrophy (3- and 4-fold increase in heart weight). This predominantly cardiomyopathic phenotype was associated with compound heterozygosity (E140K with another nonsense mutation) in the SCO2 gene. Polioencephalopathy with neurodegeneration and neuronal drop out was present in all cases with evidence that retinal neurons might be seriously affected too. Involvement of spinal motoneurons together with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in muscle represents a "double hit" for the skeletal muscle. The mitochondrial population was not found to be significantly increased or structurally altered, with the exception of two compound heterozygotes in which the cardiac mitochondria were increased in number and size. Our report extends knowledge of the pathology of COX deficiency caused by mutations in the SCO2 gene.

  3. Mutations affecting the expression of the MOX gene encoding peroxisomal methanol oxidase in Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallini, V; Berardi, E; Strabbioli, R

    2000-11-01

    In this study, aimed at identifying genetic factors acting positively upon the MOX gene, we report the isolation and characterisation of several methanol utilisation-defective (Mut-) mutants of Hansenula polymorpha. These fall into 12 complementation groups, eight of which show significant reductions in alcohol (methanol) oxidase activity in methanol. Three of these groups, identifying the MUT3, MUT5 and MUT10 loci, exhibit extremely low levels of MOX promoter activity, not only in methanol medium, but also during growth in glycerol or methylamine. We suggest that these loci play a significant role in the derepression of the MOX gene expression. One of these genes (MUT10) also seems to be involved in the utilisation of carbon sources other than methanol, and it is apparent that the same gene plays some role in the biogenesis or in the enlargement of the peroxisome. Three other genes (MUT7, MUT8 and MUT9) appear to be involved in peroxisome biogenesis, whereas most other mutants harbour lesions that leave the peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation unaffected.

  4. Inhibition of polyamine oxidase activity affects tumor development during the maize-Ustilago maydis interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso-Robles, Francisco Ignacio; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Gonzalez, María Elisa; Pieckenstain, Fernando Luis; García de la Cruz, Ramón Fernando; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita

    2016-05-01

    Ustilago maydis is a biotrophic plant pathogenic fungus that leads to tumor development in the aerial tissues of its host, Zea mays. These tumors are the result of cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and are accompanied by the reprograming of primary and secondary metabolism of infected plants. Up to now, little is known regarding key plant actors and their role in tumor development during the interaction with U. maydis. Polyamines are small aliphatic amines that regulate plant growth, development and stress responses. In a previous study, we found substantial increases of polyamine levels in tumors. In the present work, we describe the maize polyamine oxidase (PAO) gene family, its contribution to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and its possible role in tumor development induced by U. maydis. Histochemical analysis revealed that chlorotic lesions and maize tumors induced by U. maydis accumulate H2O2 to significant levels. Maize plants inoculated with U. maydis and treated with the PAO inhibitor 1,8-diaminooctane exhibit a notable reduction of H2O2 accumulation in infected tissues and a significant drop in PAO activity. This treatment also reduced disease symptoms in infected plants. Finally, among six maize PAO genes only the ZmPAO1, which encodes an extracellular enzyme, is up-regulated in tumors. Our data suggest that H2O2 produced through PA catabolism by ZmPAO1 plays an important role in tumor development during the maize-U. maydis interaction.

  5. Light Intensity Affects Chlorophyll Synthesis During Greening Process by Metabolite Signal from Mitochondrial Alternative Oxidase in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Dawei; YUAN; Shu; 徐飞; ZHU; Feng; YUAN; Ming; YE; Huaxun; GUO; Hongqing; LV; Xin; YIN; Yanhai; 林宏辉

    2015-01-01

    Although mitochondrial alternative oxidase(AOX)has been proposed to play essential roles in high light stress tolerance,the effects of AOX on chlorophyll synthesis are unclear.Previous studies indicated that during greening,chlorophyll accumulation was largely delayed in plants whose mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was inhibited by knocking out nuclear encoded AOX gene.Here we show that this delay of chlorophyll accumulation was more significant under high light condition.Inhibition of cyanide-resistant respiration was also accompanied by the increase of plastid NADPH/NADP~+ratio,especially under high light treatment which subsequently blocked the import of multiple plastidial proteins,such as some components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain,the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes and malate/oxaloacetate shuttle components.Over expression of AOXla rescued the aoxla mutant phenotype,including the chlorophyll accumulation during greening and plastidial protein import.It thus suggests that light intensity affects chlorophyll synthesis during greening process by a metabolic signal,the AOX-derived plastidial NADPH/NADP~+ratio change.And our results thus revealed a molecular mechanism of chloroplast-mitochondria interactions.

  6. Transporters of arsenite in rice and their role in arsenic accumulation in rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian Feng; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani, Namiki; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Su, Yu-Hong; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2008-07-22

    Arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide. Human arsenic intake from rice consumption can be substantial because rice is particularly efficient in assimilating arsenic from paddy soils, although the mechanism has not been elucidated. Here we report that two different types of transporters mediate transport of arsenite, the predominant form of arsenic in paddy soil, from the external medium to the xylem. Transporters belonging to the NIP subfamily of aquaporins in rice are permeable to arsenite but not to arsenate. Mutation in OsNIP2;1 (Lsi1, a silicon influx transporter) significantly decreases arsenite uptake. Furthermore, in the rice mutants defective in the silicon efflux transporter Lsi2, arsenite transport to the xylem and accumulation in shoots and grain decreased greatly. Mutation in Lsi2 had a much greater impact on arsenic accumulation in shoots and grain in field-grown rice than Lsi1. Arsenite transport in rice roots therefore shares the same highly efficient pathway as silicon, which explains why rice is efficient in arsenic accumulation. Our results provide insight into the uptake mechanism of arsenite in rice and strategies for reducing arsenic accumulation in grain for enhanced food safety.

  7. A diminution in ascorbate oxidase activity affects carbon allocation and improves yield in tomato under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garchery, Cécile; Gest, Noé; Do, Phuc T; Alhagdow, Moftah; Baldet, Pierre; Menard, Guillaume; Rothan, Christophe; Massot, Capucine; Gautier, Hélène; Aarrouf, Jawad; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stevens, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of carbon allocation between photosynthetic source leaves and sink tissues in response to stress is an important factor controlling plant yield. Ascorbate oxidase is an apoplastic enzyme, which controls the redox state of the apoplastic ascorbate pool. RNA interference was used to decrease ascorbate oxidase activity in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Fruit yield was increased in these lines under three conditions where assimilate became limiting for wild-type plants: when fruit trusses were left unpruned, when leaves were removed or when water supply was limited. Several alterations in the transgenic lines could contribute to the improved yield and favour transport of assimilate from leaves to fruits in the ascorbate oxidase lines. Ascorbate oxidase plants showed increases in stomatal conductance and leaf and fruit sugar content, as well as an altered apoplastic hexose:sucrose ratio. Modifications in gene expression, enzyme activity and the fruit metabolome were coherent with the notion of the ascorbate oxidase RNAi lines showing altered sink strength. Ascorbate oxidase may therefore be a target for strategies aimed at improving water productivity in crop species.

  8. Purification and characterization of a novel caffeine oxidase from Alcaligenes species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, B R; Harris, N; Nordin, R; Mazumder, A

    2006-09-18

    Alcaligenes species CF8 isolated from surface water of a lake produced a novel serine type metallo-caffeine oxidase. The optimal medium for caffeine oxidase production by this strain was (w/v) NaNO(3), 0.4%; KH(2)PO(4), 0.15%; Na(2)HPO(4), 0.05%; FeCl(3).6H(2)O, 0.0005%; CaCl(2).2H(2)O, 0.001%; MgSO(4).7H(2)O, 0.02%; glucose, 0.2%; caffeine, 0.05%, pH 7.5. The enzyme was purified to 63-fold by using ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, ion exchange (diethylaminoethyl-cellulose) and gel filtration (Sephadex G-100) chromatographic techniques. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified caffeine oxidase was monomeric with a molecular mass of 65 kDa. The purified caffeine oxidase with a half-life of 20 min at 50 degrees C had maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 35 degrees C. The purified caffeine oxidase had strict substrate specificity towards caffeine (K(m) 8.94 microM and V(max) 47.62 U mg protein(-1)) and was not able to oxidize xanthine and hypoxanthine. The enzyme activity was not inhibited by para-chloromercuribenzoic acid, iodoacetamide, n-methylmaleimide, salicylic acid and sodium arsenite indicating the enzyme did not belong to xanthine oxidase family. The enzyme was not affected by Ca(+2), Mg(+2) and Na(+), but was completely inhibited by Co(+2), Cu(+2) and Mn(+2) at 1mM level. The novel caffeine oxidase isolated here from Alcaligenes species CF8 may be useful in biotechnological processes including waste treatment and biosensor development.

  9. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  10. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  11. Modified expression of alternative oxidase in transgenic tomato and petunia affects the level of tomato spotted wilt virus resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV has a very wide host range, and is transmitted in a persistent manner by several species of thrips. These characteristics make this virus difficult to control. We show here that the over-expression of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX in tomato and petunia is related to TSWV resistance. Results The open reading frame and full-length sequence of the tomato AOX gene LeAox1au were cloned and introduced into tomato 'Healani' and petunia 'Sheer Madness' using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Highly expressed AOX transgenic tomato and petunia plants were selfed and transgenic R1 seedlings from 10 tomato lines and 12 petunia lines were used for bioassay. For each assayed line, 22 to 32 tomato R1 progeny in three replications and 39 to 128 petunia progeny in 13 replications were challenged with TSWV. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays showed that the TSWV levels in transgenic tomato line FKT4-1 was significantly lower than that of wild-type controls after challenge with TSWV. In addition, transgenic petunia line FKP10 showed significantly less lesion number and smaller lesion size than non-transgenic controls after inoculation by TSWV. Conclusion In all assayed transgenic tomato lines, a higher percentage of transgenic progeny had lower TSWV levels than non-transgenic plants after challenge with TSWV, and the significantly increased resistant levels of tomato and petunia lines identified in this study indicate that altered expression levels of AOX in tomato and petunia can affect the levels of TSWV resistance.

  12. Developmental mechanisms of arsenite toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dan [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Lu Cailing [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Wang Ju; Hu Wei; Cao Zongfu; Sun Daguang [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xia Hongfei [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Ma Xu [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China) and Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China) and Department of Reproductive Genetics, WHO Collaborative Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Beijing (China)], E-mail: genetic@263.net.cn

    2009-02-19

    Arsenic usually accumulates in soil, water and airborne particles, from which it is taken up by various organisms. Exposure to arsenic through food and drinking water is a major public health problem affecting some countries. At present there are limited laboratory data on the effects of arsenic exposure on early embryonic development and the mechanisms behind its toxicity. In this study, we used zebrafish as a model system to investigate the effects of arsenite on early development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of sodium arsenite concentrations (0-10.0 mM) between 4 and 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Survival and early development of the embryos were not obviously influenced by arsenite concentrations below 0.5 mM. However, embryos exposed to higher concentrations (0.5-10.0 mM) displayed reduced survival and abnormal development including delayed hatching, retarded growth and changed morphology. Alterations in neural development included weak tactile responses to light (2.0-5.0 mM, 30 hpf), malformation of the spinal cord and disordered motor axon projections (2.0 mM, 48 hpf). Abnormal cardiac function was observed as bradycardia (0.5-2.0 mM, 60 hpf) and altered ventricular shape (2.0 mM, 48 hpf). Furthermore, altered cell proliferation (2.0 mM, 24 hpf) and apoptosis status (2.0 mM, 24 and 48 hpf), as well as abnormal genomic DNA methylation patterning (2.0 mM, 24 and 48 hpf) were detected in the arsenite-treated embryos. All of these indicate a possible relationship between arsenic exposure and developmental failure in early embryogenesis. Our studies suggest that the negative effects of arsenic on vertebrate embryogenesis are substantial.

  13. Arsenite toxicity and uptake rate of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Holger, E-mail: hoffmann@bgt.uni-hannover.de [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz University of Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Strasse 2, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Schenk, Manfred K., E-mail: schenk@pflern.uni-hannover.de [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz University of Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Strasse 2, D-30419 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Toxicity threshold of arsenite on intact rice seedlings was determined and arsenite uptake characteristics were investigated using non-toxic concentrations of arsenite. The arsenite toxicity threshold was 2.4 {mu}M arsenite which reduced growth by 10% (EC{sub 10}). The two highest arsenite levels induced wilting of seedlings and reduced both, transpiration rate and net photosynthetic rate. Arsenic content in plant tissue increased up to 10.7 {mu}M arsenite and then declined with increasing arsenite concentration in the treatment solution. The contents of Si, P, K, and of micronutrients Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in shoot d.m. were reduced by arsenite levels {>=} 5.3 {mu}M. In the non-toxic range, arsenite uptake rate was linearly related to arsenite concentration. High arsenite levels reduced growth without being taken up which might be due to increasing binding of arsenite to proteins at the outer side of the plasmalemma. - Highlights: > Arsenite toxicity and uptake rate were investigated with intact rice plants. > Arsenite toxicity threshold was 2.4 {mu}M arsenite. > Uptake rate was linearly related to arsenite concentration in the non-toxic range. > Arsenite concentrations above 10.6 {mu}M decreased arsenic content in plant matter. > Arsenite impaired uptake of arsenite, water and Si, P, K, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn. - Uptake of arsenite, water, and nutrients by rice seedlings was impaired by arsenite concentrations higher than the toxicity threshold of 2.4 {mu}M.

  14. Extraction of rice bran extract and some factors affecting its inhibition of polyphenol oxidase activity and browning in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsiripiphat, Kunnikar; Theerakulkait, Chockchai

    2009-01-01

    The extraction conditions of rice bran extract (RBE), including extraction ratio, extraction time, and extraction temperature, were studied in relation to enzymatic browning inhibition in potato. The inhibitory effect of RBE on potato polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and its total phenolic compound content were highest at an extraction ratio of 1:3 (rice bran:water, w/v), extraction time of 30 min, and extraction temperature of 40 degrees C. RBE showed the most inhibitory effect on PPO activity at pH 6.5. However, the inhibitory effect of RBE on potato PPO activity and its total phenolic compound content were decreased at the higher temperature and longer time.

  15. Effects of cultivation conditions on the uptake of arsenite and arsenic chemical species accumulated by Pteris vittata in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Masayoshi; Sato, Takahiko; Shinoda, Kozo; Inoue, Chihiro

    2011-03-01

    The physiological responses of the arsenic-hyperaccumulator, Pteris vittata, such as arsenic uptake and chemical transformation in the fern, have been investigated. However, a few questions remain regarding arsenic treatment in hydroponics. Incubation conditions such as aeration, arsenic concentration, and incubation period might affect those responses of P. vittata in hydroponics. Arsenite uptake was low under anaerobic conditions, as previously reported. However, in an arsenite uptake experiment, phosphorous (P) starvation-dependent uptake of arsenate was observed under aerobic conditions. Time course-dependent analysis of arsenite oxidation showed that arsenite was gradually oxidized to arsenate during incubation. Arsenite oxidation was not observed in any of the control conditions, such as exposure to a nutrient solution or to culture medium only, or with the use of dried root; arsenite oxidation was only observed when live root was used. This result suggests that sufficient aeration allows the rhizosphere system to oxidize arsenite and enables the fern to efficiently take up arsenite as arsenate. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses showed that long-duration exposure to arsenic using a hydroponic system led to the accumulation of arsenate as the dominant species in the root tips, but not in the whole roots, partly because up-regulation of arsenate uptake by P starvation of the fern was caused and retained by long-time incubation. Analysis of concentration-dependent arsenate uptake by P. vittata showed that the uptake switched from a high-affinity transport system to a low-affinity system at high arsenate concentrations, which partially explains the increased arsenate abundance in the whole root.

  16. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses.

  17. Quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Michael; Lagniel, Gilles; Kristiansson, Erik; Junot, Christophe; Nerman, Olle; Labarre, Jean; Tamás, Markus J

    2007-06-19

    Arsenic is ubiquitously present in nature, and various mechanisms have evolved enabling cells to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Herein, we explored how Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) respond to trivalent arsenic (arsenite) by quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling. Arsenite exposure affected transcription of genes encoding functions related to protein biosynthesis, arsenic detoxification, oxidative stress defense, redox maintenance, and proteolytic activity. Importantly, we observed that nearly all components of the sulfate assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis pathways were induced at both gene and protein levels. Kinetic metabolic profiling evidenced a significant increase in the pools of sulfur metabolites as well as elevated cellular glutathione levels. Moreover, the flux in the sulfur assimilation pathway as well as the glutathione synthesis rate strongly increased with a concomitant reduction of sulfur incorporation into proteins. By combining comparative genomics and molecular analyses, we pinpointed transcription factors that mediate the core of the transcriptional response to arsenite. Taken together, our data reveal that arsenite-exposed cells channel a large part of assimilated sulfur into glutathione biosynthesis, and we provide evidence that the transcriptional regulators Yap1p and Met4p control this response in concert.

  18. Mapping patterns of depression-related brain regions with cytochrome oxidase histochemistry: relevance of animal affective systems to human disorders, with a focus on resilience to adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Matrov, Denis; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    The search for novel antidepressants may be facilitated by pre-clinical animal models that relay on specific neural circuit and related neurochemical endpoint measures, which are anchored in concrete neuro-anatomical and functional neural-network analyzes. One of the most important initial considerations must be which regions of the brain are candidates for the maladaptive response to depressogenic challenges. Consideration of persistent differences or changes in the activity of cerebral networks can be achieved by mapping oxidative metabolism in ethologically or pathogenetically relevant animal models. Cytochrome oxidase histochemistry is a technique suitable to detect regional long-term brain activity changes relative to control conditions and has been used in a variety of animal models. This work is summarized and indicates that major changes occur mainly in subcortical areas, highlighting specific brain regions where some alterations in regional oxidative metabolism may represent adaptive changes to depressogenic adverse life events, while others may reflect failures of adaptation. Many of these changes in oxidative metabolism may depend upon the integrity of serotonergic neurotransmission, and occur in several brain regions shown by other techniques to be involved in endogenous affective circuits that control emotional behaviors as well as related higher brain regions that integrate learning and cognitive information processing. These brain regions appear as primary targets for further identification of endophenotypes specific to affective disorders.

  19. D-amino acid oxidase activator gene (DAOA) variation affects cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid concentrations in healthy Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Saetre, Peter; Werge, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    3918342 and rs1421292, were significantly associated with CSF HVA concentrations. Rs3918342 was found to be nominally associated with CSF 5-HIAA concentrations. None of the polymorphisms were significantly associated with MHPG concentrations. Our results indicate that DAOA gene variation affects dopamine...

  20. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  1. Arsenite Regulates Prolongation of Glycan Residues of Membrane Glycoprotein: A Pivotal Study via Wax Physisorption Kinetics and FTIR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chen, Ching-Iue; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-03-22

    Arsenic exposure results in several human cancers, including those of the skin, lung, and bladder. As skin cancers are the most common form, epidermal keratinocytes (KC) are the main target of arsenic exposure. The mechanisms by which arsenic induces carcinogenesis remains unclear, but aberrant cell proliferation and dysregulated energy homeostasis play a significant role. Protein glycosylation is involved in many key physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. To evaluate whether arsenite exposure affected protein glycosylation, the alteration of chain length of glycan residues in arsenite treated skin cells was estimated. Herein we demonstrated that the protein glycosylation was adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent and regulated by arsenite exposure by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy, and wax physisorption kinetics coupled with focal-plane-array-based FTIR (WPK-FPA-FTIR) imaging. We were able to estimate the relative length of surface protein-linked glycan residues on arsenite-treated skin cells, including primary KC and two skin cancer cell lines, HSC-1 and HaCaT cells. Differential physisorption of wax adsorbents adhered to long-chain (elongated type) and short-chain (regular type) glycan residues of glycoprotein of skin cell samples treated with various concentration of arsenite was measured. The physisorption ratio of beeswax remain/n-pentacosane remain for KC cells was increased during arsenite exposure. Interestingly, this increase was reversed after oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor) pretreatment, suggesting the chain length of protein-linked glycan residues is likely ATP-dependent. This is the first study to demonstrate the elongation and termination of surface protein-linked glycan residues using WPK-FPA-FTIR imaging in eukaryotes. Herein the result may provide a scientific basis to target surface protein-linked glycan

  2. Arsenite Regulates Prolongation of Glycan Residues of Membrane Glycoprotein: A Pivotal Study via Wax Physisorption Kinetics and FTIR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic exposure results in several human cancers, including those of the skin, lung, and bladder. As skin cancers are the most common form, epidermal keratinocytes (KC are the main target of arsenic exposure. The mechanisms by which arsenic induces carcinogenesis remains unclear, but aberrant cell proliferation and dysregulated energy homeostasis play a significant role. Protein glycosylation is involved in many key physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. To evaluate whether arsenite exposure affected protein glycosylation, the alteration of chain length of glycan residues in arsenite treated skin cells was estimated. Herein we demonstrated that the protein glycosylation was adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent and regulated by arsenite exposure by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR reflectance spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR (SR-FTIR microspectroscopy, and wax physisorption kinetics coupled with focal-plane-array-based FTIR (WPK-FPA-FTIR imaging. We were able to estimate the relative length of surface protein-linked glycan residues on arsenite-treated skin cells, including primary KC and two skin cancer cell lines, HSC-1 and HaCaT cells. Differential physisorption of wax adsorbents adhered to long-chain (elongated type and short-chain (regular type glycan residues of glycoprotein of skin cell samples treated with various concentration of arsenite was measured. The physisorption ratio of beeswax remain/n-pentacosane remain for KC cells was increased during arsenite exposure. Interestingly, this increase was reversed after oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor pretreatment, suggesting the chain length of protein-linked glycan residues is likely ATP-dependent. This is the first study to demonstrate the elongation and termination of surface protein-linked glycan residues using WPK-FPA-FTIR imaging in eukaryotes. Herein the result may provide a scientific basis to target surface protein

  3. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte

  4. Complexation of arsenite with phytochelatins reduces arsenite efflux and translocation from roots to shoots in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Ju; Wood, B Alan; Raab, Andrea; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Feldmann, Jörg

    2010-04-01

    Complexation of arsenite [As(III)] with phytochelatins (PCs) is an important mechanism employed by plants to detoxify As; how this complexation affects As mobility was little known. We used high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and accurate mass electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry coupled to HPLC to identify and quantify As(III)-thiol complexes and free thiol compounds in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to arsenate [As(V)]. As(V) was efficiently reduced to As(III) in roots. In wild-type roots, 69% of As was complexed as As(III)-PC4, As(III)-PC3, and As(III)-(PC2)2. Both the glutathione (GSH)-deficient mutant cad2-1 and the PC-deficient mutant cad1-3 were approximately 20 times more sensitive to As(V) than the wild type. In cad1-3 roots, only 8% of As was complexed with GSH as As(III)-(GS)3 and no As(III)-PCs were detected, while in cad2-1 roots, As(III)-PCs accounted for only 25% of the total As. The two mutants had a greater As mobility, with a significantly higher accumulation of As(III) in shoots and 4.5 to 12 times higher shoot-to-root As concentration ratio than the wild type. Roots also effluxed a substantial proportion of the As(V) taken up as As(III) to the external medium, and this efflux was larger in the two mutants. Furthermore, when wild-type plants were exposed to l-buthionine sulfoximine or deprived of sulfur, both As(III) efflux and root-to-shoot translocation were enhanced. The results indicate that complexation of As(III) with PCs in Arabidopsis roots decreases its mobility for both efflux to the external medium and for root-to-shoot translocation. Enhancing PC synthesis in roots may be an effective strategy to reduce As translocation to the edible organs of food crops.

  5. Ion Chromatographic Estimation of Arsenite and Arsenate at Trace Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Chavan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Present method shows simple and specific determination of traces of inorganic arsenic in water. This method enables simultaneous determination of arsenite by electrochemical detection and arsenate by suppressed conductivity detection. The applicability of this method was illustrated by determining the inorganic arsenite and arsenate content from bore-well water and river water samples without any special pretreatment. The present method for direct determination of arsenite and arsenate shows good sensitivity, selectivity, precision and accuracy. Detection limits determined using this procedure was found to be 2.0 μg/L for arsenite and 30.0 μg/L for Arsenate. The simplicity, ease of use, low detection limit and low running cost of this method makes it appealing for increasing capability of testing in the lab.

  6. Industrial experiment of copper electrolyte purification by copper arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ya-jie; XIAO Fa-xin; WANG Yong; LI Chun-hua; XU Wei; JIAN Hong-sheng; MA Yut-ian

    2008-01-01

    Copper electrolyte was purified by copper arsenite that was prepared with As2O3. And electrolysis experiments of purified electrolyte were carried out at 235 and 305 A/m2, respectively. The results show that the yield of copper arsenite is up to 98.64% when the molar ratio of Cu to As is 1.5 in the preparation of copper arsenite. The removal rates of Sb and Bi reach 74.11% and 65.60% respectively after copper arsenite is added in electrolyte. The concentrations of As, Sb and Bi in electrolyte nearly remain constant during electrolysis of 13 d. The appearances of cathode copper obtained at 235 and 305 A/m2 are slippery and even, and the qualification rate is 100% according to the Chinese standard of high-pure cathode copper(GB/T467-97).

  7. Sodium arsenite-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is related to inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression in mouse activated T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, Patricia; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV, Seccion Toxicologia, P.O. Box 14-740, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Goytia-Acevedo, Raquel C. [Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Facultad de Medicina, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    A proposed mechanism for the As-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is the inhibition of IL-2 secretion. However, the effects of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression or on the ERK pathway in activated-T cells have not yet been described. We examined the effect of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression, cell activation and proliferation in PHA-stimulated murine lymphocytes. Arsenite (1 and 10 {mu}M) decreased IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation. Arsenite (10 {mu}M) strongly inhibited ERK-phosphorylation. However, the partial inhibition (50%) of IL-2 mRNA produced by 1 {mu}M, consistent with the effects on IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation, could not be explained by the inhibition of ERK-phosphorylation, which was not affected at this concentration. The inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression caused by 1 {mu}M could be associated to effects on pathways located downstream or parallel to ERK. Arsenite also decreased early activation (surface CD69{sup +} expression) in both CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +}, and decreased total CD8{sup +} count without significantly affecting CD4{sup +}, supporting that the cellular immune response mediated by cytotoxic T cells is an arsenic target. Thus, our results suggest that arsenite decreases IL-2 mRNA levels and T-cell activation and proliferation. However, further studies on the effects of arsenite on IL-2 gene transcription and IL-2 mRNA stability are needed. (orig.)

  8. Photoinduced Oxidation of Arsenite to Arsenate on Ferrihydrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N Bhandari; R Reeder; D Strongin

    2011-12-31

    The photochemistry of an aqueous suspension of the iron oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, in the presence of arsenite has been investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and solution phase analysis. Both ATR-FTIR and XANES show that the exposure of ferrihydrite to arsenite in the dark leads to no change in the As oxidation state, but the exposure of this arsenite-bearing surface, which is in contact with pH 5 water, to light leads to the conversion of the majority of the adsorbed arsenite to the As(V) bearing species, arsenate. Analysis of the solution phase shows that ferrous iron is released into solution during the oxidation of arsenite. The photochemical reaction, however, shows the characteristics of a self-terminating reaction in that there is a significant suppression of this redox chemistry before 10% of the total iron making up the ferrihydrite partitions into solution as ferrous iron. The self-terminating behavior exhibited by this photochemical arsenite/ferrihydrite system is likely due to the passivation of the ferrihydrite surface by the strongly bound arsenate product.

  9. Adaptation of a methanogenic consortium to arsenite inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous metalloid known for its adverse effects to human health. Microorganisms are also impacted by As toxicity, including methanogenic archaea, which can affect the performance of process in which biological activity is required (i.e. stabilization of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants). The novel ability of a mixed methanogenic granular sludge consortium to adapt to the inhibitory effect of arsenic (As) was investigated by exposing the culture to approximately 0.92 mM of As(III) for 160 d in an arsenate (As(V)) reducing bioreactor using ethanol as the electron donor. The results of shaken batch bioassays indicated that the original, unexposed sludge was severely inhibited by arsenite (As(III)) as evidenced by the low 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined, i.e., 19 and 90 μM for acetoclastic- and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, respectively. The tolerance of the acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the sludge to As(III) increased 47-fold (IC50 = 910 μM) and 12-fold (IC50= 1100 μM), respectively, upon long-term exposure to As. In conclusion, the methanogenic community in the granular sludge demonstrated a considerable ability to adapt to the severe inhibitory effects of As after a prolonged exposure period.

  10. Sodium arsenite alters cell cycle and MTHFR, MT1/2, and c-Myc protein levels in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Ruben; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Albores, Arnulfo; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2009-12-15

    There is limited available information on the effects of arsenic on enzymes participating in the folate cycle. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of sodium arsenite on the protein levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its further relationship with the expression MT1/2 and c-myc in MCF-7 cells. Arsenite treatment (0-10 microM) for 4 h decreased MTHFR levels in a concentration-dependent fashion without significant effects on DHFR. The effects on MTHFR were observed at arsenite concentrations not significantly affecting cell viability. We also observed an increase in S-phase recruitment at all concentrations probed. Lower concentrations ( or =5 microM) or longer treatment periods induced apoptosis. Arsenite also induced dose-dependent increases in MT1/2 and c-Myc protein levels. The levels of MTHFR were inversely correlated to MT1/2 and c-Myc overexpression and increased S-phase recruitment. Our findings indicate that breast epithelial cells are responsive to arsenite and suggest that exposure may pose a risk for breast cancer. The reductions in MTHFR protein levels contribute to understand the mechanisms underlying the induction of genes influencing growth regulation, such as c-myc and MT1/2. However, further research is needed to ascertain if the effects here reported following short-time and high-dose exposure are relevant for human populations chronically exposed to low arsenic concentrations.

  11. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...

  12. Arsenite Oxidation and Arsenite Resistance by Bacillus sp. PNKP-S2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic causes human health problems after accumulate in the body for 10-15 years and arsenite [As(III] is generally regarded as being more mobile and toxic than other oxidation states. In this study, two-hundred and three bacterial strains were isolated from groundwater and soil samples collecting in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Thailand. All strains were screened for arsenic tolerant efficiency at 1-10 mM of sodium arsenite. Eighteen selected strains which had the highest resistance to 10 mM of As(III were further studied for their As(III-oxidizing activity and growth in enrichment and growth medium (EG medium supplemented with 0.58 mM of As(III. It was found that strain PNKP-S2 was able to grow in the medium with As(III as a sole energy source and had 89.11% As(III removal within 48 h. The PCR-based 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the strain PNKP-S2 was closed relative to Bacillus sp. This is the first report on Bacillus sp. chemolithoautotrophic As(III-oxidizer and this strain could be a potential candidate for application in arsenic remediation of contaminated water.

  13. Arsenite exposure compromises early embryonic development in the Golden hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unis, Dave; Osborne, Cassandra; Diawara, Moussa M

    2009-11-01

    The toxicity of arsenite to 8-cell stage hamster embryos was evaluated. Females were superovulated and mated; embryos were collected and grown for 72 h in culture medium containing vehicle control, 25, 50, 250, 500, or 750 nM arsenite. Morphological observations were taken at 0 and 24h increments. A TUNEL assay was used for determining DNA damage. Survival was expressed by the ability to undergo zona escape. The control group had 78% survival and no evidence of deformities. Embryos in the 25, 50 and 250 nM groups had survival rates of 63%, 55% and 27%, respectively. Arsenite exposure caused total embryo lethality, major deformities, complete failure to undergo zona lysis, and significantly higher number of cells with fragmented DNA in embryos at the 500 and 750 nM concentrations. The study underscores the sensitivity of preimplantation stage embryos to the presence of even relatively small amounts of arsenic in luminal fluid.

  14. Gamma radiation affects the anti-Leishmania activity of Bothrops moojeni venom and correlates with L-amino acid oxidase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempone, A.G.; Lourenco, C.O.; Spencer, P.J.; Rogero, J.R.; Nascimento, N. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Radiobiologia; Andrade Junior, H.F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Inst. de Medicina Tropical

    1999-11-01

    Leishmania causes human disfiguring skin disease in endemic areas of Amazon and North Eastern Brazil. Those parasites present a remarkable resistance to most treatments, except those using toxic antimonial salts. We detected a specific anti-Leishmania activity in snake venoms, using an in vitro promastigote assay. In this report, we analyzed the activity of Bothrops moojeni venom against L. Amazonensis, using whole venom or fractions of L-amino acid oxidase (L-AO). Crude venom of B.moojeni, was fractionated by molecular exclusion chromatography. Activity against promastigotes was detected by respiratory oxidative conversion of MTT in a colorimetric assay and L-AO activity was detected by a colorimetric assay with peroxidase and OPD as revealing reagents. Crude venom was irradiated with 500, 1000, and 2000 Gy in a {sup 60} Co gamma radiation source. The venom had an anti-Leishmania activity of 33 pg/promastigote and the active fraction migrates as 100-150 kDa, close to the size described for L-AOs, and also presented L-AO activity. The radiation reduces both the L-AO and anti-Leishmania activity in a dose dependent effect. Those data suggests the anti-Leishmania activity in this venom is closely related to the L-amino acid oxidase activity and also that radiation could be used as a tool to detect specific activities reduction in water solutions, similarly to observed in dry preparations. (author) 13 refs., 3 figs.

  15. The role of the rice aquaporin Lsi1 in arsenite efflux from roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ago, Yukiko; Mitani, Namiki; Li, Ren-Ying; Su, Yu-Hong; Yamaji, Naoki; McGrath, Steve P; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-04-01

    *When supplied with arsenate (As(V)), plant roots extrude a substantial amount of arsenite (As(III)) to the external medium through as yet unidentified pathways. The rice (Oryza sativa) silicon transporter Lsi1 (OsNIP2;1, an aquaporin channel) is the major entry route of arsenite into rice roots. Whether Lsi1 also mediates arsenite efflux was investigated. *Expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes enhanced arsenite efflux, indicating that Lsi1 facilitates arsenite transport bidirectionally. *Arsenite was the predominant arsenic species in arsenate-exposed rice plants. During 24-h exposure to 5 mum arsenate, rice roots extruded arsenite to the external medium rapidly, accounting for 60-90% of the arsenate uptake. A rice mutant defective in Lsi1 (lsi1) extruded significantly less arsenite than the wild-type rice and, as a result, accumulated more arsenite in the roots. By contrast, Lsi2 mutation had little effect on arsenite efflux to the external medium. *We conclude that Lsi1 plays a role in arsenite efflux in rice roots exposed to arsenate. However, this pathway accounts for only 15-20% of the total efflux, suggesting the existence of other efflux transporters.

  16. In vitro effect of sodium arsenite on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guoqiang; Wang, Bo; Lei, Ying; Liu, Chunli; Wang, Zhuo; Shi, Hongjuan; Yang, Rentan; Qin, Wenjuan; Jiang, Yufeng; Lv, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the metacestodes of Echinococcus granulosus is an important cosmopolitan zoonosis. Surgery is the main treatment option for CE. Meanwhile, chemotherapy is used as an significant adjunct to surgery. However, the benzimidazole carbamate group and the existing scolicidal agents may not be as effective as hoped. In this study, we aimed to explore the in vitro effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces, the causative agents of CE. Protoscoleces of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20μM NaAsO2. Viability and changes in morphology were investigated by 0.1% eosin staining. The ultrastructural alterations were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, caspase-3 activity was measured by colorimetric assay. Obvious protoscolicidal effect was seen with NaAsO2 at concentrations of 16μM and 20μM. Protoscolex mortality was 83.24% (16μM) and 100% (20μM) after 6 days post-incubation. SEM showed that the primary site of drug damage was the tegument of the protoscoleces. TEM analysis demonstrated that the internal tissues were severely affected and revealed an increase in the number of lipid droplets and vacuoles after treatment with 16μM NaAsO2. Meanwhile, the caspase-3 activity significantly increased in protoscoleces after 24h of NaAsO2 incubation compared to the untreated controls. Our study demonstrated the clear in vitro scolicidal effect of NaAsO2 against E. granulosus protoscoleces. However, the in vivo efficacy, specific mechanism, and any possible side effects of NaAsO2 remain to be investigated.

  17. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  18. Auxin and its transport play a role in plant tolerance to arsenite-induced oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-10-01

    The role of auxin in plant development is well known; however, its possible function in root response to abiotic stress is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role of auxin transport in plant tolerance to oxidative stress caused by arsenite. Plant response to arsenite [As(III)] was evaluated by measuring root growth and markers for stress on seedlings treated with control or As(III)-containing medium. Auxin transporter mutants aux1, pin1 and pin2 were significantly more sensitive to As(III) than the wild type (WT). Auxin transport inhibitors significantly reduced plant tolerance to As(III) in the WT, while exogenous supply of indole-3-acetic acid improved As(III) tolerance of aux1 and not that of WT. Uptake assays using H(3) -IAA showed As(III) affected auxin transport in WT roots. As(III) increased the levels of H2 O2 in WT but not in aux1, suggesting a positive role for auxin transport through AUX1 on plant tolerance to As(III) stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signalling. Compared to the WT, the mutant aux1 was significantly more sensitive to high-temperature stress and salinity, also suggesting auxin transport influences a common element shared by plant tolerance to arsenite, salinity and high-temperature stress.

  19. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  20. Filaria martis Gmelin 1790 (Spirurida, Filariidae) affecting beech marten (Martes foina): morphological description and molecular characterisation of the cytochrome oxidase c subunit I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Brianti, Emanuele; Traversa, Donato; Giannetto, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    Filaria martis causes a poorly known subcutaneous filariosis in mustelids. Few information is available about lesions that F. martis causes in beech martens, on its morphology, biology and the occurrence of the infection. From 1997 to 2006, 29 beech martens from two sites of southern Italy (Sites A and B) have been necropsied. Ectoparasites and nematodes were collected and morphologically identified. A variable region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) of F. martis has been characterised to compare females presenting caudal tips smooth without spines (i.e. Morphotype 1-Mrph. 1) and with spines (i.e. Mrph. 2). All ticks collected were identified as Haemaphysalis erinacei. Eleven animals from Site A were found infected by F. martis nematodes in subcutaneous tissue in both membranous capsules or free under the inner skin surface. The most important morphological characters of F. martis have been reported and discussed. The molecular analysis showed 100% homology among cox1 sequences from Mrph. 1 and 2 thus indicating that the shape of female posterior edge may vary among specimens of F. martis. The results here presented provide new insights into the biology, ecology and morphological characteristics of this scantly known nematode.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide produced by glucose oxidase affects the performance of laccase cathodes in glucose/oxygen fuel cells: FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase as a replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Ross D; Giroud, Fabien; Thumser, Alfred E; Minteer, Shelley D; Slade, Robert C T

    2013-11-28

    Hydrogen peroxide production by glucose oxidase (GOx) and its negative effect on laccase performance have been studied. Simultaneously, FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH), an O2-insensitive enzyme, has been evaluated as a substitute. Experiments focused on determining the effect of the side reaction of GOx between its natural electron acceptor O2 (consumed) and hydrogen peroxide (produced) in the electrolyte. Firstly, oxygen consumption was investigated by both GOx and FAD-GDH in the presence of substrate. Relatively high electrocatalytic currents were obtained with both enzymes. O2 consumption was observed with immobilized GOx only, whilst O2 concentration remained stable for the FAD-GDH. Dissolved oxygen depletion effects on laccase electrode performances were investigated with both an oxidizing and a reducing electrode immersed in a single compartment. In the presence of glucose, dramatic decreases in cathodic currents were recorded when laccase electrodes were combined with a GOx-based electrode only. Furthermore, it appeared that the major loss of performance of the cathode was due to the increase of H2O2 concentration in the bulk solution induced laccase inhibition. 24 h stability experiments suggest that the use of O2-insensitive FAD-GDH as to obviate in situ peroxide production by GOx is effective. Open-circuit potentials of 0.66 ± 0.03 V and power densities of 122.2 ± 5.8 μW cm(-2) were observed for FAD-GDH/laccase biofuel cells.

  2. 余甘子果实多酚氧化酶活性影响因素研究%Factors Affecting Activities of Polyphenol Oxidase in Phyllanthus emblica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丽平; 丘春秀; 陈晓虹; 王惠敏; 张福平

    2014-01-01

    多酚氧化酶(PPO)是酶促褐变的关键酶,以余甘子(Phyllanthus emblica)果实PPO为研究对象,采用分光光度法研究余甘子果实PPO作用的最适底物,同时探究反应体系pH、反应温度、底物浓度、抑制剂对余甘子果实中PPO活性的影响。结果表明,余甘子果实PPO作用的最佳底物为焦性没食子酸,最适pH为6.0,最适反应温度为10℃,底物最佳浓度为0.14 mol/L,抗坏血酸(VC)、柠檬酸、亚硫酸钠、L-半胱氨酸4种抑制剂对余甘子果实PPO活性均表现出不同程度的抑制作用,其中抗坏血酸对余甘子果实PPO活性抑制效果最好。%Polyphenol oxidase (PPO﹚ was the key enzyme of enzymatic browning. The optimal substrate to PPO of Phyllanthus emblica and effects of pH,temperature,concentration of substrate and inhibitor on PPO activity were studied with spectrophotometry. The results showed that the optimal substrate was pyrogallic acid. The optimal pH, temperature and concentration of substrate were 6.0, 10℃ and 0.14 mol/L, respectively. Vitamin C, citric acid, Na2SO3 and L-Cysteine had inhibition effects on PPO activity in different degree. Vitamin C had the best inhibition effect on PPO activity in the fruit of phyllanthus emblica.

  3. A novel frameshift mutation of the mtDNA COIII gene leads to impaired assembly of cytochrome c oxidase in a patient affected by Leigh-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, V; Corona, P; Greco, M; Taanman, J W; Carrara, F; Lamantea, E; Nijtmans, L; Uziel, G; Zeviani, M

    2000-11-01

    We report on a novel frameshift mutation in the mtDNA gene encoding cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit III. The proband is an 11-year-old girl with a negative family history and an apparently healthy younger brother. Since 4 years of age, she has developed a progressive spastic paraparesis associated with ophthalmoparesis and moderate mental retardation. The presence of severe lactic acidosis and Leigh-like lesions of putamina prompted us to perform muscle and skin biopsies. In both, a profound, isolated defect of COX was found by histochemical and biochemical assays. Sequence analysis of muscle mtDNA resulted in the identification of a virtually homoplasmic frameshift mutation in the COIII gene, due to the insertion of an extra C at nucleotide position 9537 of mtDNA. Although the 9537C(ins) does not impair transcription of COIII, no full-length COX III protein was detected in mtDNA translation assays in vivo. Western blot analysis of two-dimensional blue-native electrophoresis showed a reduction of specific crossreacting material and the accumulation of early-assembly intermediates of COX, whereas the fully assembled complex was absent. One of these intermediates had an electrophoretic mobility different from those seen in controls, suggesting the presence of a qualitative abnormality of COX assembly. Immunostaining with specific antibodies failed to detect the presence of several smaller subunits in the complex lacking COX III, in spite of the demonstration that these subunits were present in the crude mitochondrial fraction of patient's cultured fibroblasts. Taken together, the data indicate a role for COX III in the incorporation and maintenance of smaller COX subunits within the complex.

  4. Involvement of HIF-2α-mediated inflammation in arsenite-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Luo, Fei; Wang, Bairu; Li, Yuan; Pang, Ying; Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is a well established human carcinogen that causes diseases of the lung. Some studies have suggested a link between inflammation and lung cancer; however, it is unknown if arsenite-induced inflammation causally contributes to arsenite-caused malignant transformation of cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation during neoplastic transformation induced in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells by chronic exposure to arsenite. The results showed that, on acute or chronic exposure to arsenite, HBE cells over-expressed the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The data also indicated that HIF-2α was involved in arsenite-induced inflammation. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-8 were essential for the malignant progression of arsenite-transformed HBE cells. Thus, these experiments show that HIF-2α mediates arsenite-induced inflammation and that such inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. The results provide a link between the inflammatory response and the acquisition of a malignant transformed phenotype by cells chronically exposed to arsenite and thus establish a previously unknown mechanism for arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite induces inflammation. • Arsenite-induced the increases of IL-6 and IL-8 via HIF-2α. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced carcinogenesis.

  5. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite in Mono Lake water and by a facultative, arsenite-oxidizing chemoautotroph, strain MLHE-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Hoeft, S.E.; Santini, J.M.; Bano, N.; Hollibaugh, R.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-enriched anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, produced arsenate [As(V)] during incubation with either nitrate or nitrite. No such oxidation occurred in killed controls or in live samples incubated without added nitrate or nitrite. A small amount of biological As(III) oxidation was observed in samples amended with Fe(III) chelated with nitrolotriacetic acid, although some chemical oxidation was also evident in killed controls. A pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that was capable of growth with As(III) as its electron donor and nitrate as its electron acceptor was isolated in a defined mineral salts medium. Cells were also able to grow in nitrate-mineral salts medium by using H2 or sulfide as their electron donor in lieu of As(III). Arsenite-grown cells demonstrated dark 14CO2 fixation, and PCR was used to indicate the presence of a gene encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Strain MLHE-1 is a facultative chemoautotroph, able to grow with these inorganic electron donors and nitrate as its electron acceptor, but heterotrophic growth on acetate was also observed under both aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence placed strain MLHE-1 within the haloalkaliphilic Ectothiorhodospira of the ??-Proteobacteria. Arsenite oxidation has never been reported for any members of this subgroup of the Proteobacteria.

  6. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G., E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  7. An Oxidoreductase AioE is Responsible for Bacterial Arsenite Oxidation and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Han, Yushan; Shi, Kaixiang; Fan, Xia; Wang, Lu; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that arsenite (AsIII) oxidation could improve the generation of ATP/NADH to support the growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4. In this study, we found that aioE is induced by AsIII and located in the arsenic island near the AsIII oxidase genes aioBA and co-transcripted with the arsenic resistant genes arsR1-arsC1-arsC2-acr3-1. AioE belongs to TrkA family corresponding the electron transport function with the generation of NADH and H+. An aioE in-frame deletion strain showed a null AsIII oxidation and a reduced AsIII resistance, while a cytC mutant only reduced AsIII oxidation efficiency. With AsIII, aioE was directly related to the increase of NADH, while cytC was essential for ATP generation. In addition, cyclic voltammetry analysis showed that the redox potential (ORP) of AioBA and AioE were +0.297 mV vs. NHE and +0.255 mV vs. NHE, respectively. The ORP gradient is AioBA > AioE > CytC (+0.217 ~ +0.251 mV vs. NHE), which infers that electron may transfer from AioBA to CytC via AioE. The results indicate that AioE may act as a novel AsIII oxidation electron transporter associated with NADH generation. Since AsIII oxidation contributes AsIII detoxification, the essential of AioE for AsIII resistance is also reasonable. PMID:28128323

  8. Autecology of an arsenite chemolithotroph: sulfide constraints on function and distribution in a geothermal spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Imperio, Seth; Lehr, Corinne R; Breary, Michele; McDermott, Timothy R

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies in an acid-sulfate-chloride spring in Yellowstone National Park found that microbial arsenite [As(III)] oxidation is absent in regions of the spring outflow channel where H(2)S exceeds approximately 5 microM and served as a backdrop for continued efforts in the present study. Ex situ assays with microbial mat samples demonstrated immediate As(III) oxidation activity when H(2)S was absent or at low concentrations, suggesting the presence of As(III) oxidase enzymes that could be reactivated if H(2)S is removed. Cultivation experiments initiated with mat samples taken from along the H(2)S gradient in the outflow channel resulted in the isolation of an As(III)-oxidizing chemolithotroph from the low-H(2)S region of the gradient. The isolate was phylogenetically related to Acidicaldus and was characterized in vitro for spring-relevant properties, which were then compared to its distribution pattern in the spring as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR. While neither temperature nor oxygen requirements appeared to be related to the occurrence of this organism within the outflow channel, H(2)S concentration appeared to be an important constraint. This was verified by in vitro pure-culture modeling and kinetic experiments, which suggested that H(2)S inhibition of As(III) oxidation is uncompetitive in nature. In summary, the studies reported herein illustrate that H(2)S is a potent inhibitor of As(III) oxidation and will influence the niche opportunities and population distribution of As(III) chemolithotrophs.

  9. Aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) protect against sodium arsenite-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbadegesin, M A; Odunola, O A

    2010-11-25

    We evaluated the effects of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) on sodium arsenite-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. We observed that treatment of the animals with the extracts before or just after sodium arsenite administration significantly (p basilicum before the administration of sodium arsenite resulted in the attenuation of the sodium arsenite-induced aspartate and alanine aminotransferase activities: ALT (from 282.6% to 167.7% and 157.8%), AST (from 325.1% to 173.5% and 164.2%) for the group administered sodium arsenite alone, the aqueous extracts plus sodium arsenite, and ethanolic extracts plus sodium arsenite respectively, expressed as percentage of the negative control. These findings support the presence of hepatoprotective activity in the O.basilicum extracts.

  10. Arsenite exposure accelerates aging process regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chan-Wei; How, Chun Ming; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and high levels of arsenic contamination in food, soils, water, and air are of toxicology concerns. Nowadays, arsenic is still a contaminant of emerging interest, yet the effects of arsenic on aging process have received little attention. In this study, we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of chronic arsenite exposure on the aging process in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that prolonged arsenite exposure caused significantly decreased lifespan compared to non-exposed ones. In addition, arsenite exposure (100 μM) caused significant changes of age-dependent biomarkers, including a decrease of defecation frequency, accumulations of intestinal lipofuscin and lipid peroxidation in an age-dependent manner in C. elegans. Further evidence revealed that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was significantly increased in an age-dependent manner upon 100 μM arsenite exposure. Moreover, the mRNA levels of transcriptional makers of aging (hsp-16.1, hsp-16.49, and hsp-70) were increased in aged worms under arsenite exposure (100 μM). Finally, we showed that daf-16 mutant worms were more sensitive to arsenite exposure (100 μM) on lifespan and failed to induce the expression of its target gene sod-3 in aged daf-16 mutant under arsenite exposure (100 μM). Our study demonstrated that chronic arsenite exposure resulted in accelerated aging process in C. elegans. The overproduction of intracellular ROS and the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO play roles in mediating the accelerated aging process by arsenite exposure in C. elegans. This study implicates a potential ecotoxicological and health risk of arsenic in the environment.

  11. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings.

  12. Arsenite Sorption by Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals: Redox Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, K. C.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a major human carcinogen and could pose a serious human health risk at concentrations as low as 50 ppb in drinking water. Elevated As concentrations in soils currently used for residential purposes (located on former agricultural lands amended with arsenical pesticides) have increased the possibility of human contact with soil-As. Studies have shown that As bioavailability in the environment is primarily a function of its chemical speciation, which depends upon the redox potential. Arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity to living organisms is primarily due to exposure to the reduced species of As - arsenite, i.e., As(III), rather than the oxidized species - arsenate, i.e., As(V); the mobility of As(III) is much higher than As(V). One of the most promising methods to decrease the mobility of arsenite in the soil-water system is promoting its retention onto amorphous Fe/Al hydroxides. Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals (WTRs) are an inexpensive source of such Fe/Al hydroxides, which can be land-applied following the USEPA-regulated biosolids application rules. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking-water purification processes and generally contain sediment, organic carbon, and Al/Fe hydroxides. The hydroxides are typically amorphous and have tremendous affinity for oxyanions (e.g., arsenate). Preliminary work showed that WTRs are characterized by large internal surface area and porosity that partly explains their high affinity for As(V). The current study examines the potential of two WTRs (Fe-based and Al-based) to adsorb arsenite from solution. We hypothesize that As(III) adsorption onto the Fe-based WTR (whose stability is highly redox-sensitive) would be vastly different from the adsorption of As(III) onto the redox-insensitive Al-based WTR. Our main objective is to characterize As(III) sorption by both Fe- and Al-based WTRs by changing critical factors, such as the solid:solution ratio, contact time, and initial As(III) load. Results from this study

  13. Arsenic and phosphate rock impacted the abundance and diversity of bacterial arsenic oxidase and reductase genes in rhizosphere of As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-He; Fu, Jing-Wei; Xiang, Ping; Cao, Yue; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-01-05

    Microbially-mediated arsenic (As) transformation in soils affects As speciation and plant uptake. However, little is known about the impacts of As on bacterial communities and their functional genes in the rhizosphere of As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. In this study, arsenite (AsIII) oxidase genes (aroA-like) and arsenate (AsV) reductase genes (arsC) were amplified from three soils, which were amended with 50mgkg(-1) As and/or 1.5% phosphate rock (PR) and grew P. vittata for 90 d. The aroA-like genes in the rhizosphere were 50 times more abundant than arsC genes, consistent with the dominance of AsV in soils. According to functional gene alignment, most bacteria belonged to α-, β- and γ-Proteobacteria. Moreover, aroA-like genes showed a higher biodiversity than arsC genes based on clone library analysis and could be grouped into nine clusters based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. Besides, AsV amendment elevated aroA-like gene diversity, but decreased arsC gene diversity. Redundancy analysis indicated that soil pH, available Ca and P, and AsV concentration were key factors driving diverse compositions in aroA-like gene community. This work identified new opportunities to screen for As-oxidizing and/or -reducing bacteria to aid phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils.

  14. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance of studying different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy.

  15. Altered Hepatic Transport by Fetal Arsenite Exposure in Diet-Induced Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzel, Eric J; Li, Hui; Foy, Caroline E; Perrera, Alec B; Parker, Patricia; Renquist, Benjamin J; Cherrington, Nathan J; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can result in changes to drug metabolism and disposition potentiating adverse drug reactions. Furthermore, arsenite exposure during development compounds the severity of diet-induced fatty liver disease. This study examines the effects of arsenite potentiated diet-induced fatty liver disease on hepatic transport in male mice. Changes were detected for Mrp2/3/4 hepatic transporter gene expression as well as for Oatp1a4/2b1/1b2. Plasma concentrations of Mrp and Oatp substrates were increased in arsenic exposure groups compared with diet-only controls. In addition, murine embryonic hepatocytes and adult primary hepatocytes show significantly altered transporter expression after exposure to arsenite alone: a previously unreported phenomenon. These data indicate that developmental exposure to arsenite leads to changes in hepatic transport which could increase the risk for ADRs during fatty liver disease.

  16. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  17. Synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite on DNA damage in HBE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Sun, Bin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nie, Jihua; Chen, Zhihai; An, Yan; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiological studies showed that radon and arsenic exposures are major risk factors for lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. However, biological evidence for this phenomenon is absent. In this study, HBE cells were exposed to different concentrations of sodium arsenite, different radon exposure times, or a combination of these two factors. The results showed a synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in cell cytotoxicity as determined by cell viability. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and increased DNA damage indexed by comet assay and γ-H2AX were detected. Moreover, DNA HR repair in terms of Rad51 declined when the cells were exposed to both radon and sodium arsenite. The synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in HBE cells may be attributed to the enhanced DSBs and inhibited HR pathway upon co-exposure.

  18. Selenite modulates the level of phenolics and nutrient element to alleviate the toxicity of arsenite in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Reshu; Awasthi, Surabhi; Tripathi, Preeti; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Niranjan, Abhishek; Mallick, Shekhar; Tripathi, Pratibha; Pande, Veena; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy rice is a serious threat all over the world particularly in South East Asia. Selenium (Se) plays important role in protection of plants against various abiotic stresses including heavy metals. Moreover, arsenite (AsIII) and selenite (SeIV) can be biologically antagonistic due to similar electronic configuration and sharing the common transporter for their uptake in plant. In the present study, the response of oxidative stress, phenolic compounds and nutrient elements was analyzed to investigate Se mediated As tolerance in rice seedlings during AsIII and SeIV exposure in hydroponics. Selenite (25µM) significantly decreased As accumulation in plant than As (25µM) alone treated plants. Level of oxidative stress related parameters viz., reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, electrical conductivity, nitric oxide and pro-oxidant enzyme (NADPH oxidase), were in the order of As>As+Se>control>Se. Selenium ameliorated As phytotoxicity by increased level of phenolic compounds particularly gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid and rutin and thiol metabolism related enzymes viz., serine acetyl transferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS). Selenium supplementation enhanced the uptake of nutrient elements viz., Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, and improved plant growth. The results concluded that Se addition in As contaminated environment might be an important strategy to reduce As uptake and associated phytotoxicity in rice plant by modulation of phenolic compounds and increased uptake of nutrient elements.

  19. Arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with proteotoxicity in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Zhao, Fei; Pacheco, Samantha; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiological studies of arsenic-exposed populations have provided evidence that arsenic exposure in humans is associated with immunosuppression. Previously, we have reported that arsenite-induced toxicity is associated with the induction of autophagy in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). Autophagy is a cellular process that functions in the degradation of damaged cellular components, including protein aggregates formed by misfolded or damaged proteins. Accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In an effort to investigate the mechanism of autophagy induction by arsenite in the LCL model, we examined the potential contribution of ER stress and activation of the UPR. LCL exposed to sodium arsenite for 8-days induced expression of UPR-activated genes, including CHOP and GRP78, at the RNA and the protein level. Evidence for activation of the three arms of the UPR was observed. The arsenite-induced activation of the UPR was associated with an accumulation of protein aggregates containing p62 and LC3, proteins with established roles in the sequestration and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Taken together, these data provide evidence that arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with the generation of ER stress, activation of the UPR, and formation of protein aggregates that may be targeted to the lysosome for degradation. -- Highlights: ► Arsenite induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. ► Arsenite induces the formation of protein aggregates that contain p62 and LC3-II. ► Time-course data suggests that arsenite-induced autophagy precedes ER stress.

  20. Silymarin protects plasma membrane and acrosome integrity in sperm treated with sodium arsenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Eskandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to arsenic is associated with impairment of male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress. Silymarin with an antioxidant property scavenges free radicals. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if silymarin can prevent the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on ram sperm plasma membrane and acrosome integrity. Materials and Methods: Ram epidydimal spermatozoa were divided into five groups: spermatozoa at 0 hr, spermatozoa at 180 min (control, spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM + sodium arsenite (10 μM for 180 min, spermatozoa treated with sodium arsenite (10 μM for 180 min and spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM for 180 min. Double staining of Hoechst and propidium iodide was performed to evaluate sperm plasma membrane integrity, whereas comassie brilliant blue staining was used to assess acrosome integrity. Results: Plasma membrane (p< 0.001 and acrosome integrity (p< 0.05 of the spermatozoa were significantly reduced in sodium arsenite group compared to the control. In silymarin + sodium arsenite group, silymarin was able to significantly (p< 0.001 ameliorate the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on these sperm parameters compared to sodium arsenite group. The incubation of sperm for 180 min (control group showed a significant (p< 0.001 decrease in acrosome integrity compared to the spermatozoa at 0 hour. The application of silymarin alone for 180 min could also significantly (p< 0.05 increase sperm acrosome integrity compared to the control. Conclusion: Silymarin as a potent antioxidant could compensate the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on the ram sperm plasma membrane and acrosome integrity.

  1. The defensive effect of benfotiamine in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjali; Reddy, Krishna; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-10-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Sodium arsenite (1.5 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) i.p., 2 weeks) was administered in rats to produce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating the serum and aortic concentrations of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium in thoracic aorta was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of sodium arsenite markedly produced VED by attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, decreasing serum and aortic concentrations of nitrite/nitrate, and impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium. Further, sodium arsenite produced oxidative stress by increasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. The treatment with benfotiamine (25, 50, and 100 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED and oxidative stress. However, the beneficial effects of benfotiamine in preventing the sodium arsenite-induced VED were attenuated by co-administration with N-omega-nitro-L: -arginine methyl ester (L: -NAME) (25 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1), i.p.), an inhibitor of NOS. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces oxidative stress and activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase to enhance the generation and bioavailability of NO and subsequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium to prevent sodium arsenite-induced experimental VED.

  2. Physico chemical studies on the composition of complex arsenites of metals Part IV: conductometric and potentiometric studies on the composition of cadmium arsenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Bhadraver

    1962-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation and precipitation of cadmium arsenite has been studied by conductometric and potentiometric titrations between cadmium nitrate and sodium arsenite (meta at different concentrations with either of the substances used as the reagent in titration. In the case of direct titrations (cadmium nitrate added to sodium arsenite in the conductivity cell, one distinct break in the curves is observed corresponding to the formation of the Cd (AsO/sub 2//sub 2/ where the molecular ratio is 2:1. The direct and reverse potentiometric titrations curves give one maxima in dE/dV at point corresponding to the formation of the complex Cd (AsO/sub/2/sub/2 where the molecular ratio of reactants Cd:AsO/sub/2 is 1:2. The composition has been arrived at by comparing the calculated values with observed values by conductometric and potentiometric titrations. The composition of cadmium arsenite arrived at both by conductometry and potentiometry is best representative as Cd(AsO/sub/2/sub/2

  3. Direct regulation of cytochrome c oxidase by calcium ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vygodina

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+ reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+ shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed previously to determine the kinetics and equilibrium characteristics of the binding. However, no effect of Ca(2+ on the functional characteristics of cytochrome oxidase was revealed earlier. Here we report that Ca(2+ inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity of isolated bovine heart enzyme by 50-60% with Ki of ∼1 µM, close to Kd of calcium binding with the oxidase determined spectrophotometrically. The inhibition is observed only at low, but physiologically relevant, turnover rates of the enzyme (∼10 s(-1 or less. No inhibitory effect of Ca(2+ is observed under conventional conditions of cytochrome c oxidase activity assays (turnover number >100 s(-1 at pH 8, which may explain why the effect was not noticed earlier. The inhibition is specific for Ca(2+ and is reversed by EGTA. Na(+ ions that compete with Ca(2+ for binding with the Cation Binding Site, do not affect significantly activity of the enzyme but counteract the inhibitory effect of Ca(2+. The Ca(2+-induced inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase is observed also with the uncoupled mitochondria from several rat tissues. At the same time, calcium ions do not inhibit activity of the homologous bacterial cytochrome oxidases. Possible mechanisms of the inhibition are discussed as well as potential physiological role of Ca(2+ binding with cytochrome oxidase. Ca(2+- binding at the Cation Binding Site is proposed to inhibit proton-transfer through the exit part of the proton conducting pathway H in the mammalian oxidases.

  4. Label-free signal-on aptasensor for sensitive electrochemical detection of arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Wu, Jie; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-05-15

    A signal-on aptasensor was fabricated for highly sensitive and selective electrochemical detection of arsenite with a label-free Ars-3 aptamer self-assembled on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) via Au-S bond. The Ars-3 aptamer could adsorb cationic polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA) via electrostatic interaction to repel other cationic species. In the presence of arsenite, the change of Ars-3 conformation due to the formation of Ars-3/arsenite complex led to less adsorption of PDDA, and the complex could adsorb more positively charged [Ru(NH3)6](3+) as an electrochemically active indicator on the aptasensor surface, which produced a sensitive "turn-on" response. The target-induced structure switching could be used for sensitive detection of arsenite with a linear range from 0.2 nM to 100 nM and a detection limit down to 0.15 nM. Benefiting from Ars-3 aptamer, the proposed system exhibited excellent specificity against other heavy metal ions. The SPCE-based aptasensor exhibited the advantages of low cost and simple fabrication, providing potential application of arsenite detection in environment.

  5. A Comparative Study on Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Resident Gut Bacteria (ii) Effect of Arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to use facultative gut bacteria as an alternate to animals for the initial gastrointestinal toxicity screening of heavy metals, a comparative study on rat intestinal epithelial cells and resident gut bacteria was undertaken.Methods in vitro growth rate of four gut bacteria, dehydrogenase (DHA) and esterase (EA) activity test, intestinal epithelial and bacterial cell membrane enzymes and in situ effect of arsenite were analysed. Results Growth profile of mixed resident population of gut bacteria and pure isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Staphylococcus sp.revealed an arsenite (2-20 ppm) concentration-dependent inhibition. The viability pattern of epithelial cells also showed similar changes. DHA and EA tests revealed significant inhibition (40%-72%) with arsenite exposure of 5 and 10 ppm in isolated gut bacteria and epithelial cells. Decrease in membrane alkaline phosphatase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities was in the range of 33%-55% in four bacteria at the arsenite exposure of 10 ppm, whereas it was 60%-65% in intestinal epithelial villus cells. in situ incubation of arsenite using intestinal loops also showed more or less similar changes in membrane enzymes of resident gut bacterial population and epithelial cells. Conclusion The results indicate that facultative gut bacteria can be used as suitable in vitro model for the preliminary screening of arsenical gastrointestinal cytotoxic effects.

  6. [Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals with different grain sizes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jia-Rui; Wu, Hao; Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) with different grain sizes was studied. The results indicated that the content of active Fe and Al, the specific surface area and pore volume in FARs with different grain sizes were in the range of 523.72-1 861.72 mmol x kg(-1), 28.15-265.59 m2 x g(-1) and 0.03-0.09 cm3 x g(-1), respectively. The contents of organic matter, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin were in the range of 46.97-91.58 mg x kg(-1), 0.02-32.27 mg x kg(-1), 22.27-34.09 mg x kg(-1) and 10.76-34.22 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Results of SEM and XRD analysis further demonstrated that FARs with different grain sizes were amorphousness. Batch experiments suggested that both the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations could well describe the kinetics adsorption processes of arsenite by FARs. Moreover, the contents of arsenite absorbed by FARs increased with the increase of arsenite concentrations. The theoretical saturated adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir isotherm model were in the range of 6.72-21.79 mg x g(-1). Interestingly, pH showed little effect on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs. The capability of FARs had a close relationship with their physicochemical properties. Correlation analysis showed that the active Fe and Al contents and pore volume had major effects on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs.

  7. Effect of rosiglitazone in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tajpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-04-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The rats were administered sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) to induce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, the integrity of the aortic endothelium was assessed histologically using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aortic reactive oxygen species and reduced form of glutathione. The administration of sodium arsenite produced VED by impairing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, diminishing the integrity of vascular endothelium and decreasing the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. In addition, sodium arsenite was noted to produce oxidative stress as it increased serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and aortic reactive oxygen species and consequently decreased glutathione. Treatment with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks and 5 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks) significantly prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED by enhancing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the nitrite/nitrate concentration and decreasing the oxidative stress. However, the vascular protective effect of rosiglitazone was markedly abolished by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-Omega-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks). Thus, it may be concluded that rosiglitazone reduces oxidative stress, activates eNOS and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent sodium arsenite-induced VED in rats.

  8. Arsenite treatment induces oxidative stress, upregulates antioxidant system, and causes phytochelatin synthesis in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shruti; Jha, A B; Dubey, R S

    2011-07-01

    The effects of arsenite treatment on generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of oxidative stress, response of antioxidative system, and synthesis of phytochelatins were investigated in two indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) cvs. Malviya-36 and Pant-12 grown in sand cultures for a period of 5-20 days. Arsenite (As(2)O(3); 25 and 50 μM) treatment resulted in increased formation of superoxide anion (O (2) (.-) ), elevated levels of H(2)O(2) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, showing enhanced lipid peroxidation. An enhanced level of ascorbate (AA) and glutathione (GSH) was observed irrespective of the variation in the level of dehydroascorbate (DHA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) which in turn influenced redox ratios AA/DHA and GSH/GSSG. With progressive arsenite treatment, synthesis of total acid soluble thiols and phytochelatins (PC) increased in the seedlings. Among antioxidative enzymes, the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), total ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.6.5.4), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) increased in arsenite treated seedlings, while dehyroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1) activity declined initially during 5-10 days and increased thereafter. Results suggest that arsenite treatment causes oxidative stress in rice seedlings, increases the levels of many enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, and induces synthesis of thiols and PCs, which may serve as important components in mitigating arsenite-induced oxidative damage.

  9. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M; Braun, Caroline L; Davis, Lawrence C; Kanost, Michael R; Gorman, Maureen J

    2015-04-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surprising because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism.

  10. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms of arsenite and arsenate on hematite nanoparticles and aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Dionne; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2017-01-15

    Iron (Fe) nanoparticles, e.g., zerovalent iron (ZVI) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP), have been used for remediation and environmental management of arsenic (As) contamination. These Fe nanoparticles, although originally nanosized, tend to form aggregates, in particular in the environment. The interactions of As with both nanoparticles and micron-sized aggregates should be considered when these Fe nanomaterials are used for mitigation of As issue. The objective of this study was to compare the adsorption kinetics and isotherm of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) on bare hematite nanoparticles and aggregates and how this affects the fate of arsenic in the environment. The adsorption kinetic process was investigated with regards to the aggregation of the nanoparticles and the type of sorbed species. Kinetic data were best described by a pseudo second-order model. Both As species had similar rate constants, ranging from 3.82 to 6.45 × 10(-4) g/(μg·h), as rapid adsorption occurred within the first 8 h regardless of particle size. However, hematite nanoparticles and aggregates showed a higher affinity to adsorb larger amounts of As(V) (4122 ± 62.79 μg/g) than As(III) (2899 ± 71.09 μg/g) at equilibrium. We were able to show that aggregation and sedimentation of hematite nanoparticles occurs during the adsorption process and this might cause the immobilization and reduced bioavailability of arsenic. Isotherm studies were described by the Freundlich model and it confirmed that hematite nanoparticles have a significantly higher adsorption capacity for both As(V) and As(III) than hematite aggregates. This information is useful and can assist in predicting arsenic adsorption behavior and assessing the role of iron oxide nanoparticles in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic.

  11. Arsenite alters heme synthesis in long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-González, M G; Hernández, A; López, M L; Mendoza-Figueroa, T; Albores, A

    1999-06-01

    Arsenite (As[III]) effects on the intermediate steps of heme biosynthesis were studied in adult rat hepatocytes seeded on a feeder layer of 3T3 cells (3T3-hepatocytes) and maintained for 2 weeks with culture medium non-supplemented or supplemented with 150 microM 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The activities of the intracellular enzymes porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D), uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROIII-S), and uroporphyrinogen III decarboxylase (URO-D), and the intermediary uroporphyrins (URO), coproporphyrins (COPRO) and protoporphyrin IX (PROTO) were determined in these cultures. The 3T3-hepatocytes maintained the activities of PBG-D, UROIII-S and URO-D during 2 weeks and ALA addition to the culture medium increased PBG-D (2-3-fold) and UROIII-S (50%) activities and porphyrin production, which accumulated as PROTO. Exposure to 3.9 microM As(III) inhibited UROIII-S activity (down to 34%), and PBG-D and URO-D activities to a lower extent; these effects were magnified by ALA supplementation. As(III) also produced an intracellular accumulation and a decreased excretion of PROTO, and a 31% reduction of the COPRO/URO ratio in the culture medium. Additionally, As(III) caused cytoplasmic vacuolization and lipid accumulation. Our results show that As(III) exposure selectively inhibits several intermediary enzymes of heme metabolism and affects the intra- and extracellular content of porphyrins and their ratio in the culture medium. They also confirm that 3T3-hepatocytes are a suitable in vitro model to study hepatic heme metabolism and its alterations by hepatotoxic chemicals.

  12. From the Cover: Arsenite Uncouples Mitochondrial Respiration and Induces a Warburg-like Effect in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Godebo, Tewodros R; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Maurer, Laura L; Hirschey, Matthew D; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-08-01

    Millions of people worldwide are chronically exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. Despite decades of research studying the carcinogenic potential of arsenic, the mechanisms by which arsenic causes cancer and other diseases remain poorly understood. Mitochondria appear to be an important target of arsenic toxicity. The trivalent arsenical, arsenite, can induce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, inhibit enzymes involved in energy metabolism, and induce aerobic glycolysis in vitro, suggesting that metabolic dysfunction may be important in arsenic-induced disease. Here, using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a novel metabolic inhibition assay, we report an in vivo induction of aerobic glycolysis following arsenite exposure. Furthermore, arsenite exposure induced severe mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered pyruvate metabolism; reduced steady-state ATP levels, ATP-linked respiration and spare respiratory capacity; and increased proton leak. We also found evidence that induction of autophagy is an important protective response to arsenite exposure. Because these results demonstrate that mitochondria are an important in vivo target of arsenite toxicity, we hypothesized that deficiencies in mitochondrial electron transport chain genes, which cause mitochondrial disease in humans, would sensitize nematodes to arsenite. In agreement with this, nematodes deficient in electron transport chain complexes I, II, and III, but not ATP synthase, were sensitive to arsenite exposure, thus identifying a novel class of gene-environment interactions that warrant further investigation in the human populace.

  13. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Taiwan (China)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Adsorption and oxidation of arsenite by iron minerals in the presence of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelomov, Leonid; Corsini, Anna; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2010-05-01

    It is known the two most commonly occurring forms of As in the environment are anionic arsenate [AsO43-, As(V)] and arsenite [AsO33-, As(III)]. Arsenite has been found to be the more mobile and toxic species in soil environments (Tamaki and Frankenberger, 1992). Arsenic speciation and toxicity are functions of pH, redox potential, the presence and type of adsorbing surfaces, and microbial populations. Biotransformation of arsenic species (reduction or oxidation) is mainly enzymatic process, while biosorption is metabolism independent process that governed by physico-chemical interactions on the cell surface. Special ternary bio-mineral systems, consisting of iron minerals (synthetic goethite, and magnetite, which was prepared by oxidation from special commercial product - nano-iron), special strains of arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms (Ancylobacter dichlorometanicus) and arsenite solution, were constructed and processes of arsenic compounds adsorption and oxidation were studied. As control experiments without microorganisms or without minerals were carried out. For determination of arsenic species, adsorbed on the surface of the minerals, desorption experiments were carried out also. Desorption ability of several chemicals, used for arsenic extraction from soils, was tested. Magnetite and goethite, with very small size of particles, have high chemical affinity to arsenite at wide range of pH values, but at pH above 9 adsorption of arsenite decreased in comparison with pH below of the isoelectric points of the minerals. We carried out experiments at initial pH 7,2. Experiments on kinetics of adsorption showed that equilibrium time for adsorption is 2 hours. In the ternary bio-mineral systems consisting of fresh-prepared magnetite,the effect of arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms on the oxidation process was negligible in all cases, because magnetite demonstrated very high oxidation ability in comparison with bacteria. During 4 hours all arsenite, adsorbed on the

  15. Absorption of Arsenite on Several Iron (Hydro-)Oxides and Impact from Pre-processing Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Ying; JI Shanshan; WU Daidai; LI Jun; ZHANG Weirui

    2006-01-01

    The absorption reactions of arsenite on Fe (hydro-)oxides are studied. The three absorbent types are Fe(OH)3 gel and two Fe (hydro-)oxides, in which the Fe(OH)3 gel was dried in a microwave oven under vacuum at 80℃. It is found that pH changes from 9.71 to 10.36 in 6 minutes after the Fe (OH)3 gel was mixed with NaAsO2 solution, as the arsenite replaces the OH- in goethite and Fe(OH)3.At the 40th minute after the start of the reaction, pH decreases, which is most probably because that the monodentate surface complex of absorbed arsenite has changed into mononuclear-bidentate complex and released proton. The decline in pH values indicates not the end of the absorption but a change in the reaction type. Temperature and dissolved gas has little effect on these two types of reactions. The total absorption of arsenite increases after the absorbent is irradiated with ultrasound, which also lead to difficulty in separating the solids from solution. The absorption capacity for arsenite of Fe(OH)3 gel dried in a microwave oven under vacuum is 53.18% and 17.22% respectively better than that of Fe (OH)3 gel and gel dried at 80℃. The possible reasons are that the water molecules in the gel vibrates with high frequency under the effect of microwave irradiation, thereby producing higher porosity and improved surface activity.

  16. Effect of curcumin on kidney histopathological changes, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity of serum in sodium arsenite-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Eskandari, Najmeh

    2017-02-01

    Sodium arsenite is an environmental pollutant with the ability to generate free radicals and curcumin acts as a potent antioxidant. This study investigates the effect of curcumin on kidney histopathology, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity of serum in the mice treated with sodium arsenite. Adult male mice were divided into four groups: control, sodium arsenite, curcumin and curcumin+sodium arsenite. The treatments were delivered for 5 weeks. After the treatment period, blood samples were collected and the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity of serum were determined. Left kidney was dissected, weighed and used for histopathological and histomorphometrical studies. Sodium arsenite-treated mice showed a significant decrease in the diameter of glomerulus and proximal tubule, glomerular area, total antioxidant capacity of serum as well as a significant increase in serum concentration of MDA compared to the control group. However, no significant difference was found in kidney weight, area and diameter of Bowman's capsule as well as the diameter of distal tubule in mice treated with sodium arsenite compared to the control. In curcumin+sodium arsenite group, curcumin significantly reversed the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on the diameter of glomerulus and proximal tubule, glomerular area, total antioxidant capacity of serum and serum concentration of MDA compared to the sodium arsenite group. The application of curcumin alone significantly increased the total antioxidant capacity of serum compared to the control. Curcumin compensated the adverse effects of sodium arsenite on kidney tissue, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity of serum.

  17. Cultivable diversity of thermophilic arsenite/ferrous-oxidizing microorganisms in hot springs of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Lin, Y.; Chang, Y.; Wang, P.; Lin, L.

    2009-12-01

    Elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater and surface water bodies have posed a stringent threat to the deterioration of the water quality for drinking and agriculture purposes around the world. In particular, arsenic liberated from volcanic and sedimentary rocks at high temperatures would be immobilized through adsorption on iron oxide and/or crystallization of iron-bearing minerals downstream at low temperatures. Understanding how microbially-catalytic reactions are involved in the changes of the redox state of arsenic and iron along a flow path would provide important constraints on the arsenic mobility in natural occurrences. The aims of this study were to isolate and characterize thermophilic arsenite- and iron-oxidizing microbes that would facilitate to establish the linkages between microbial distribution and in situ Fe/As cycling processes. Four source waters (LH05, LH08, SYK and MT) from acid-sulfate springs (pH 2-3, 60-97oC) located in the Tatun volcanic area of northern Taiwan were collected and inoculated into media targeting on autotrophic ferrous iron (FC3), arsenite (AC3 ,ACC3, AC7, ACC7), arsenite-resistant hydrogen (AH23), arsenite-resistant hydrogen-sulfur (AH2S3), and arsenite-resistant sulfur oxidations(AS3), and heterotrophic arsenite oxidation(AH3, AH7) at pH 3, and 7 at temperatures of 50, 70 and 80oC. Samples from the Kuantzuling mud springs (KTL) in southwestern Taiwan known with elevated arsenic levels (0.4 ppm) were also collected, inoculated into the heterotrophic medium and incubated at 50, 60, 70 and 80oC. Isolates obtained from KTL were subject to test on the AH7 and ACC7. Two positive enrichments for iron oxidation at 50oC and 70oC were confirmed by the steadily decrease of ferrous iron and increase of precipitates over 4 transfers for samples from the SYK spring. Diverse morphological types of microbes were enriched in all types of arsenite-bearing media at 50oC except for AH23. At 70oC, positive enrichments were found in media

  18. The novel role of fenofibrate in preventing nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Reddy, Krishna; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fenofibrate, an agonist of PPAR-alpha, in nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) and sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The scanning electron microscopy study in thoracic aorta revealed that administration of nicotine or sodium arsenite impaired the integrity of vascular endothelium. Further, administration of nicotine or sodium arsenite significantly decreased serum and aortic concentrations of nitrite/nitrate and subsequently reduced acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Moreover, nicotine or sodium arsenite produced oxidative stress by increasing serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg/kg/day p.o., a standard agent) significantly prevented nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentrations of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Conversely, co-administration of L-NAME (25 mg/kg/day, i.p.), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, markedly attenuated these vascular protective effects of fenofibrate. The administration of nicotine or sodium arsenite altered the lipid profile by increasing serum cholesterol and triglycerides and consequently decreasing high-density lipoprotein levels, which were significantly prevented by treatment with fenofibrate or atorvastatin. It may be concluded that fenofibrate improves the integrity and function of vascular endothelium, and the vascular protecting potential of fenofibrate in preventing the development of nicotine- and sodium arsenite-induced VED may be attributed to its

  19. Expression of alternative oxidase in tomato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakefuda, M.; McIntosh, L. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is characterized by an increase in ethylene biosynthesis, a burst in respiration (i.e. the climacteric), fruit softening and pigmentation. As whole tomatoes ripened from mature green to red, there was an increase in the alternative oxidase capacity. Aging pink tomato slices for 24 and 48 hrs also showed an increase of alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase capacities. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase were used to follow the appearance of alternative oxidase in tomato fruits. There is a corresponding increase in a 36kDa protein with an increase in alternative oxidase capacity. Effects of ethylene and norbornadiene on alternative oxidase capacity were also studied. We are using an alternative oxidase cDNA clone from potato to study the expression of mRNA in ripening and wounded tomatoes to determine if the gene is transcriptionally regulated.

  20. The Arsenite Oxidation Potential of Native Microbial Communities from Arsenic-Rich Freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Crognale, Simona; Casentini, Barbara; Amalfitano, Stefano; Lotti, Francesca; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in speciation and mobility of arsenic in the environment, by mediating redox transformations of both inorganic and organic species. Since arsenite [As(III)] is more toxic than arsenate [As(V)] to the biota, the microbial driven processes of As(V) reduction and As(III) oxidation may play a prominent role in mediating the environmental impact of arsenic contamination. However, little is known about the ecology and dynamics of As(III)-oxidizing populations within native microbial communities exposed to natural high levels of As. In this study, two techniques for single cell quantification (i.e., flow cytometry, CARD-FISH) were used to analyze the structure of aquatic microbial communities across a gradient of arsenic (As) contamination in different freshwater environments (i.e., groundwaters, surface and thermal waters). Moreover, we followed the structural evolution of these communities and their capacity to oxidize arsenite, when experimentally exposed to high As(III) concentrations in experimental microcosms. Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the main groups retrieved in groundwaters and surface waters, while Beta and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the bacteria community in thermal waters. At the end of microcosm incubations, the communities were able to oxidize up to 95 % of arsenite, with an increase of Alphaproteobacteria in most of the experimental conditions. Finally, heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing strains (one Alphaproteobacteria and two Gammaproteobacteria) were isolated from As rich waters. Our findings underlined that native microbial communities from different arsenic-contaminated freshwaters can efficiently perform arsenite oxidation, thus contributing to reduce the overall As toxicity to the aquatic biota.

  1. Effect of arsenite on urea production by long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Santoyo, A; Hernández, A; López, M L; Mendoza-Figueroa, T

    1996-01-01

    Urea cycle is a hepatic metabolic pathway involving five enzymes and several intermediary metabolites and can be altered by different chemicals. To investigate the effect of arsenic, an ubiquitous hepatotoxic agent, on urea production we exposed long-term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes, which produce urea, to 1.33 and 6.67 microM arsenite for 2 weeks. In cultures exposed to 6.67 microM, urea production decreased 60-70% and cellular arginase activity decreased 30, 70 and 85% after 4, 7 and 14 days of exposure, respectively. The arginase activity released to the medium increased significantly after 4, 7 and 14 days, with a maximum value after 7 days of exposure that was 27-fold higher than that of the untreated controls. The total arginase activity also decreased 35, 52 and 82% after 4, 7 and 14 days of exposure and protein content decreased 57 and 65% after 7 and 14 days of exposure, respectively. Exposure to 6.67 microM arsenite also produced accumulation of intracytoplasmic lipid droplets, vacuolizations and enlargement of the intercellular spaces. On the other hand, exposure of hepatocytes to 1.33 microM arsenite caused an initial decrease of 20% in urea production, did not change cellular, released and total arginase activity and cellular protein content and produced accumulation of intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. These results show that long-term exposure of cultured rat hepatocytes to 6.67 microM arsenite decreases urea production, cellular and total arginase activity and protein content and increases the release of arginase into the culture medium. These alterations could be useful markers of hepatotoxicity in in vitro assays.

  2. Arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with arsenic-rich groundwater in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chu, Yu-Ju; Su, Yu-Chen; Hsiao, Sung-Yun; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liao, Chung-Min; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fi-John

    2011-04-01

    Drinking highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a likely cause of blackfoot disease in Taiwan, but microorganisms that potentially control arsenic mobility in the subsurface remain unstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the relevant arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing microbial community that exists in highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Taiwan. We cultured and identified arsenic-transforming bacteria, analyzed arsenic resistance and transformation, and determined the presence of genetic markers for arsenic transformation. In total, 11 arsenic-transforming bacterial strains with different colony morphologies and varying arsenic transformation abilities were isolated, including 10 facultative anaerobic arsenate-reducing bacteria and one strictly aerobic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium. All of the isolates exhibited high levels of arsenic resistance with minimum inhibitory concentrations of arsenic ranging from 2 to 200 mM. Strain AR-11 was able to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations relevant to environmental groundwater samples without the addition of any electron donors or acceptors. We provide evidence that arsenic-reduction activity may be conferred by the ars operon(s) that were not amplified by the designed primers currently in use. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis grouped the isolates into the following genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Psychrobacter, Vibrio, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Bosea. Among these genera, we present the first report of the genus Psychrobacter being involved in arsenic reduction. Our results further support the hypothesis that bacteria capable of either oxidizing arsenite or reducing arsenate coexist and are ubiquitous in arsenic-contaminated groundwater.

  3. Effects of arsenic on modification of promyelocytic leukemia (PML): PML responds to low levels of arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp [Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Watanabe, Takayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Kobayashi, Yayoi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Center for Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) is a two-edged sword. iAs{sup 3+} is a well-known human carcinogen; nevertheless, it has been used as a therapeutic drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), which is caused by a fusion protein comprising retinoic acid receptor-α and promyelocytic leukemia (PML). PML, a nuclear transcription factor, has a RING finger domain with densely positioned cysteine residues. To examine PML-modulated cellular responses to iAs{sup 3+}, CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells were each used to establish cell lines that expressed ectopic human PML. Overexpression of PML increased susceptibility to iAs{sup 3+} in CHO-K1 cells, but not in HEK293 cells. Exposure of PML-transfected cells to iAs{sup 3+} caused PML to change from a soluble form to less soluble forms, and this modification of PML was observable even with just 0.1 μM iAs{sup 3+} (7.5 ppb). Western blot and immunofluorescent microscopic analyses revealed that the biochemical changes of PML were caused at least in part by conjugation with small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOylation). A luciferase reporter gene was used to investigate whether modification of PML was caused by oxidative stress or activation of antioxidant response element (ARE) in CHO-K1 cells. Modification of PML protein occurred faster than activation of the ARE in response to iAs{sup 3+}, suggesting that PML was not modified as a consequence of oxidative stress-induced ARE activation. - Highlights: • PML was found in nuclear microspecles in response to arsenite. • Arsenite triggers SUMOylation of PML. • Arsenite modifies PML at as low as 0.1 μM. • Modification of PML is not caused by ARE activation.

  4. Flavoprotein oxidases : classification and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Willem P.; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of oxidases that utilise a flavin cofactor for catalysis. This class of oxidative flavoenzymes has shown to harbour a large number of biotechnologically interesting enzymes. Applications range from their use as biocatalysts for the synthesis of pharmaceutical compoun

  5. Cox26 is a novel stoichiometric subunit of the yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Maria; Wuttke, Jan-Moritz; Römpler, Katharina; Schmidt, Bernhard; Neifer, Klaus; Juris, Lisa; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. The complex accepts electrons from cytochrome c and passes them onto molecular oxygen. This process contributes to energy capture in the form of a membrane potential across the inner membrane. The enzyme complex assembles in a stepwise process from the three mitochondria-encoded core subunits Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, which associate with nuclear-encoded subunits and cofactors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytochrome c oxidase associates with the bc1-complex into supercomplexes, allowing efficient energy transduction. Here we report on Cox26 as a protein found in respiratory chain supercomplexes containing cytochrome c oxidase. Our analyses reveal Cox26 as a novel stoichiometric structural subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. A loss of Cox26 affects cytochrome c oxidase activity and respirasome organization.

  6. Protective effect of Juglans nigra on sodium arsenite-induced toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon E Owumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumption of arsenic contaminated water has been implicated in metalloid-induced carcinogenesis. Dietary intake of certain plant products with chemoprotective properties may protect against the onset of diseases and promote maintenance of health. Objectives: We investigated the outcome of black walnut Juglans nigra (JN consumption on sodium arsenite (SA-induced toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Wister albino rats were treated as follows: Control, SA only (positive control (2.5 mg/kg body weight, JN only (100 mg/kg weight, and JN+SA coadministered. After 5 weeks animals were sacrificed whole blood, femur, liver and testis harvested were assessed for hepatic transaminases and clastogenicity. Histology of the liver, sperm morphology and quality were also assessed. Data were analyzed (ANOVA and expressed as means ±SD. Results: SA treatment elevated hepatic transaminases level in serum (P < 0.05, induced histological changes in liver: fibroplasia and periportal hepatocytes infiltration by mononuclear cells. These changes were ameliorated by JN (P < 0.05 coadministration. SA induced micronuclei formation (P < 0.05. Again JN decreased (P < 0.05 micronuclei formation by 50%. Sperm count and motility decreased (P < 0.05 in all groups compared to control. Conclusion: JN showed no protection against arsenite effect on sperm quality. Hepatoprotective and anticlastogenic effects were apparent suggesting a chemopreventive potential active against arsenite genotoxicity and chromosomal instability which have implication for metalloid-induced carcinogenesis.

  7. Sodium arsenite induced biochemical perturbations in rats: ameliorating effect of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; El-Demerdash, Fatma M; Radwan, Fatma M E

    2008-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin in terms of normalization of altered biochemical parameters following sodium arsenite treatment in rats. Animals were divided into four groups. The first group was used as control. While, groups 2, 3 and 4 were orally treated with curcumin (Cur, 15 mg/kg BW), sodium arsenite (Sa, 5 mg/kg BW) and sodium arsenite plus curcumin, respectively. Results showed that the activities of transaminases and phosphatases were significantly decreased in liver due to Sa administration, whereas increased in plasma. The activity of brain and plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was decreased in rats treated with Sa. Also, Sa significantly decreased plasma total protein (TP), albumin (Alb) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), while increased glucose, urea, creatinine, bilirubin, total lipid (TL), cholesterol, triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c). Curcumin alone decreased the levels of glucose, urea, creatinine, TL, cholesterol, TG and LDL-c. Curcumin reduced Sa-induced transaminases, phosphatases, glucose, urea, creatinine, bilirubin, TL, cholesterol and TG. Moreover, curcumin induced Sa-reduced liver transaminases and phosphatases, plasma and brain AChE, and the levels of TP and Alb. Experimental results, therefore suggested that curcumin protects arsenic induced biochemical alterations in rats.

  8. Bioaccumulation and oxidative stress in Daphnia magna exposed to arsenite and arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Ren, Jinqian; Li, Xiaomin; Wei, Chaoyang; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Nan

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic pollution and its toxicity to aquatic organisms have attracted worldwide attention. The bioavailability and toxicity of arsenic are highly related to its speciation. The present study investigated the differences in bioaccumulation and oxidative stress responses in an aquatic organism, Daphnia magna, induced by 2 inorganic arsenic species (As(III) and As(V)). The bioaccumulation of arsenic, Na(+) /K(+) -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidative capability, and malondialdehyde content in D. magna were determined after exposure to 500 µg/L of arsenite and arsenate for 48 h. The results showed that the oxidative stress and antioxidative process in D. magna exposed to arsenite and arsenate could be divided into 3 phases, which were antioxidative response, oxidation inhibition, and antioxidative recovery. In addition, differences in bioaccumulation, Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity, and total SOD activity were also found in D. magna exposed to As(III) and As(V). These differences might have been the result of the high affinity of As(III) with sulfhydryl groups in enzymes and the structural similarity of As(V) to phosphate. Therefore, arsenate could be taken up by organisms through phosphate transporters, could substitute for phosphate in biochemical reactions, and could lead to a change in the bioaccumulation of arsenic and activity of enzymes. These characteristics were the possible reasons for the different toxicity mechanisms in the oxidative stress process of arsenite and arsenate.

  9. Aquaglyceroporins are involved in uptake of arsenite into murine gastrointestinal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Chen, Gang; Jiang, Junkang; Qiu, Lianglin; Hosoi, Kazuo; Yao, Chenjuan

    2009-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins (AQGPs) are members of aquaporin (AQP) family and belong to a subgroup of this water channel family; they are transmembrane proteins that transport water as well as glycerol and other solutes of small molecules. Recent studies have also identified that AQGPs are important transporters of trivalent metalloid in some mammalian cells. However, the uptake routes of arsenite in mammals are still less defined. In this study, to understand the routes of arsenite intake in mammals, mice were treated with Hg(II), glycerol, and As(III) and uptake of As(III) into the gastrointestinal tissues was measured. The level of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in gastrointestinal tissues after As(III) stimulation was much higher than Hg(II) +As(III) or glycerol+As(III) group. RT-PCR results showed that AQGPs were extensively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues of mice. We also treated Caco-2 cells with Hg(II) and As(III); the level of iAs in a group treated with Hg(II)+As(III) decreased compared with As(III)-treated group. Our results suggested that AQGPs could be important transporters in arsenite uptake into gastrointestinal tissues of mice, but more data are need to prove if AQGPs is the only pathway involved in As transport in mammals or just one of them.

  10. Arabidopsis NIP3;1 Plays an Important Role in Arsenic Uptake and Root-to-Shoot Translocation under Arsenite Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenzhong; Dai, Wentao; Yan, Huili; Li, Sheng; Shen, Hongling; Chen, Yanshan; Xu, Hua; Sun, Yangyang; He, Zhenyan; Ma, Mi

    2015-05-01

    In Arabidopsis, the nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of aquaporin proteins consists of nine members, five of which (NIP1;1, NIP1;2, NIP5;1, NIP6;1, and NIP7;1) were previously identified to be permeable to arsenite. However, the roles of NIPs in the root-to-shoot translocation of arsenite in plants remain poorly understood. In this study, using reverse genetic strategies, Arabidopsis NIP3;1 was identified to play an important role in both the arsenic uptake and root-to-shoot distribution under arsenite stress conditions. The nip3;1 loss-of-function mutants displayed obvious improvements in arsenite tolerance for aboveground growth and accumulated less arsenic in shoots than those of the wild-type plants, whereas the nip3;1 nip1;1 double mutant showed strong arsenite tolerance and improved growth of both roots and shoots under arsenite stress conditions. A promoter-β-glucuronidase analysis revealed that NIP3;1 was expressed almost exclusively in roots (with the exception of the root tips), and heterologous expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that NIP3;1 was able to mediate arsenite transport. Taken together, our results suggest that NIP3;1 is involved in arsenite uptake and root-to-shoot translocation in Arabidopsis, probably as a passive and bidirectional arsenite transporter.

  11. Effects of chronic exposure to sodium arsenite on hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular activities in adult rats: possible an estrogenic mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Subarna

    2006-02-01

    -HSD, 17 beta-HSD, and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH were significantly decreased, but those of acid phosphatase (ACP, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were significantly increased. A decrease in dopamine or an increase in noradrenaline and 5-HT in hypothalamus and pituitary were also noted after arsenic exposure. Histological evaluation revealed extensive degeneration of different varieties of germ cells at stage VII of spermatogenic cycle in arsenic exposed rats. Administration of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG along with sodium arsenite partially prevented the degeneration of germ cells and enhanced paired testicular weights, epididymal sperm count, plasma and intratesticular testosterone concentrations, activities of delta 5, 3beta-HSD, 17 beta-HSD and sorbitol dehydrogenase along with diminution in the activities of ACP, ALP and LDH. Since many of the observed arsenic effects could be enhanced by oestradiol, it is suggested that arsenic might somehow acts through an estrogenic mode of action. Conclusion The results indicate that arsenic causes testicular toxicity by germ cell degeneration and inhibits androgen production in adult male rats probably by affecting pituitary gonadotrophins. Estradiol treatment has been associated with similar effects on pituitary testicular axis supporting the hypothesis that arsenite might somehow act through an estrogenic mode of action.

  12. Prenatal Exposure to Sodium Arsenite Alters Placental Glucose 1, 3, and 4 Transporters in Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sarahí Gutiérrez-Torres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs exposure induces a decrease in glucose type 4 transporter (GLUT4 expression on the adipocyte membrane, which may be related to premature births and low birth weight infants in women exposed to iAs at reproductive age. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 exposure on GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 protein expression and on placental morphology. Female Balb/c mice (n=15 were exposed to 0, 12, and 20 ppm of NaAsO2 in drinking water from 8th to 18th day of gestation. Morphological changes and GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 expression were evaluated in placentas by immunohistochemical and image analysis and correlated with iAs and arsenical species concentration, which were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. NaAsO2 exposure induced a significant decrease in fetal and placental weight (P<0.01 and increases in infarctions and vascular congestion. Whereas GLUT1 expression was unchanged in placentas from exposed group, GLUT3 expression was found increased. In contrast, GLUT4 expression was significantly lower (P<0.05 in placentas from females exposed to 12 ppm. The decrease in placental GLUT4 expression might affect the provision of adequate fetal nutrition and explain the low fetal weight observed in the exposed groups.

  13. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Xiang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46-0.72 mg kg(-1), induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4-2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3-1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish.

  14. Members of rice plasma membrane intrinsic proteins subfamily are involved in arsenite permeability and tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Mcdermott, Joseph; Liu, Zijuan; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2012-12-01

    Rice accumulates high level of arsenic (As) in its edible parts and thus plays an important role in the transfer of As into the food chain. However, the mechanisms of As uptake and its detoxification in rice are not well understood. Recently, members of the Nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of plant aquaporins were shown to transport arsenite in rice and Arabidopsis. Here we report that members of the rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are also involved in As tolerance and transport. Based on the homology search with the mammalian AQP9 and yeast Fps1 arsenite transporters, we identified and cloned five rice PIP gene subfamily members. qRT-PCR analysis of PIPs in rice root and shoot tissues revealed a significant down regulation of transcripts encoding OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3, OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in response to arsenite treatment. Heterologous expression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of arsenite. Overexpression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Arabidopsis yielded enhanced arsenite tolerance and higher biomass accumulation. Further, these transgenic plants showed no significant accumulation of As in shoot and root tissues in long term uptake assays. Whereas, short duration exposure to arsenite caused both active influx and efflux of As in the roots. The data suggests a bidirectional arsenite permeability of rice PIPs in plants. These rice PIPs genes will be highly useful for engineering important food and biofuel crops for enhanced crop productivity on contaminated soils without increasing the accumulation of toxic As in the biomass or edible tissues.

  15. Syntheses, crystal structures and characterizations of new vanadium arsenites and arsenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Junhui [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); He Zhangzhen; Kong Fang; Xu Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Sun Chuanfu [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Mao Jianggao, E-mail: mjg@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Systematic explorations in vanadium arsenites and arsenates led to the isolation four new compounds, namely, {alpha}-(V{sup IV}O){sub 3}(As{sup III}O{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), {beta}-(V{sup IV}O){sub 3}(As{sup III}O{sub 3}){sub 2} (2), (V{sup IV}O)[V{sup IV}O(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(As{sup V}O{sub 4}){sub 2} (3), V{sup III}V{sup IV}O{sub 2}(As{sup V}O{sub 4}) (4). Compounds 1, 2 and 4 were synthesized by standard solid-state reactions, and compound 3 is a vanadium arsenate dihydrate synthesized through hydrothermal reactions. Compounds 1 and 2 are isomers, and they represent the first examples of ternary inorganic vanadium(IV) arsenites. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the four compounds display four different structural types. Magnetic property measurements for compound 1 indicated that it exhibits ferromagnetism with the Curie temperature T{sub c}=65 K. Thermal stability and optical properties for compounds 1 and 3 were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal or solid state reactions of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (or VO{sub 2}) and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} yielded four new ternary compounds with four different types of structures, namely, {alpha}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), {beta}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (2), (VO)[VO(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} (3), (VO){sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}) (4). {alpha}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), {beta}-(VO){sub 3}(AsO{sub 3}){sub 2} (2) represent the first examples of ternary inorganic vanadium(IV) arsenites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal or solid state reactions of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (or VO{sub 2}) and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} yielded two new arsenites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They represent the first examples of ternary vanadium arsenites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new ternary vanadium arsenates were also obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They exhibit four different structural types.

  16. Multiple amine oxidases in cucumber seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, F W; Purves, W K

    1974-10-01

    Cell-free extracts of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. National Pickling) seedlings were found to have amine oxidase activity when assayed with tryptamine as a substrate. Studies of the effect of lowered pH on the extract indicated that this activity was heterogeneous, and three amine oxidases could be separated by ion exchange chromatography. The partially purified enzymes were tested for their activities with several substrates and for their sensitivities to various amine oxidase inhibitors. One of the enzymes may be a monoamine oxidase, although it is inhibited by some diamine oxidase inhibitors. The other two enzymes have properties more characteristic of the diamine oxidases. The possible relationship of the amine oxidases to indoleacetic acid biosynthesis in cucumber seedlings is discussed.

  17. Sodium arsenite down-regulates the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein via translational and post-translational mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong; Hao, Yuqing; Wang, Lijing; Jia, Dongwei [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ruan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuanruan@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite down-regulates the protein expression level of XIAP in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite inhibits the de novo XIAP synthesis and its IRES activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite decreases XIAP stability and promotes its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of XIAP attenuates the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite. -- Abstract: X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, and has been reported to exhibit elevated expression levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and promote cell survival, metastasis and tumor recurrence. Targeting XIAP has proven effective for the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and restoration of cancer cell chemosensitivity. Arsenic (or sodium arsenite) is a potent anti-tumor agent used to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Additionally, arsenic induces cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HCC cells. In this study, we identified XIAP as a target for sodium arsenite-induced cytotoxicity in HCC. The exposure of HCC cell lines to sodium arsenite resulted in inhibition of XIAP expression in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sodium arsenite blocked the de novo XIAP synthesis and the activity of its internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Moreover, treatment with sodium arsenite decreased the protein stability of XIAP and induced its ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Overexpression of XIAP attenuated the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite in HCC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that sodium arsenite suppresses XIAP expression via translational and post-translational mechanisms in HCC.

  18. Oxidase-based biocatalytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Woodley, John; Krühne, Ulrich

    solvent-resistant oxygen sensors as supporting technology for oxidase-basedreactions using a glucose oxidase reaction system as an example.iiImplementation of biocatalytic oxidation at scale still requires process knowledge which includes thelimitations of the system and the knowledge about the potential......Biocatalytic processes are gaining significant focus in frontiers where they offer unique advantages(selectivity and mild operating conditions) over chemical catalysts. It is therefore not surprising that therehave been many industrial biocatalytic processes implemented.Despite past successes......, the implementation of a new biocatalytic process still presents some challenges (demands placed on the biocatalyst) in terms of the requirements to make a viable industrial process. Inorder for a biocatalytic process to be economically successful, it is necessary that certain a set of targetmetrics (product titre...

  19. Lysyl oxidase in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine T

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for cancer-associated deaths and therapies are desperately needed to target the progression of cancer. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, including metastasis, and is therefore is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review we will breakdown the process of cancer progression and the various roles that LOX plays has in the advancement of cancer. We will highlight why LOX is an exciting therapeutic target for the future.

  20. The accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Li, Huiqiao [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2α. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1α degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1α by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1α and HIF-2α by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ► Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ► Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ► Different regulation of HIF1α or HIF 2α by arsenite.

  1. Possible vasculoprotective role of linagliptin against sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Uma; Kansal, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Goyal, Sandeep

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) interrupts the integrity and function of endothelial lining through enhanced markers of oxidative stress and decrease endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. The main aim of the present study has been designed to investigate the possible vasculoprotective role of linagliptin against sodium arsenite-induced VED. Sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 weeks) abrogated the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by depicting the decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, reduced glutathione level, and simultaneously enhance the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, superoxide level, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These elevated markers interrupt the integrity of endothelial lining of thoracic aorta which was assessed histologically. The study elicits dose dependent effect of linagliptin (1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or atorvastatin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) treatment, improved the endothelium-dependent independent relaxation, improve the integrity of endothelium lining which was assessed histologically by enhancing the serum nitrite/nitrate level, reduced glutathione level and simultaneously decreasing the TBARS level, superoxide anion level and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level. L-NAME (25 mg/kg, i.p.), eNOS inhibitor, abrogated the ameliorative potential of linagliptin. However, the ameliorative potential of linagliptin has been enhanced by l-arginine (200 mg/kg, i.p.) which elicits that ameliorative potential of linagliptin was through eNOS signaling cascade and it may be concluded that linagliptin 3 mg/kg, i.p. has more significantly activated the eNOS and decreased the oxidative markers than linagliptin 1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED.

  2. Arsenite induced oxidative damage in mouse liver is associated with increased cytokeratin 18 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsebatt, M.E. [UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Dept. Medicina Genomica y Toxicologia Ambiental, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Mexico (Mexico); Razo, L.M. del; Sanchez-Pena, L.C. [Seccion de Toxicologia, CINVESTAV, Mexico (Mexico); Cerbon, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Departamento de Biologia, Mexico (Mexico); Zuniga, O.; Ramirez, P. [Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlan, UNAM, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Celular, Coordinacion General de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Cuautitlan Izcalli, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-09-15

    Cytokeratins (CK) constitute a family of cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are typically expressed in epithelial cells. An abnormal structure and function are effects that are clearly related to liver diseases as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We have previously observed that sodium arsenite (SA) induced the synthesis of CK18 protein and promotes a dose-related disruption of cytoplasmic CK18 filaments in a human hepatic cell line. Both abnormal gene expression and disturbance of structural organization are toxic effects that are likely to cause liver disease by interfering with normal hepatocyte function. To investigate if a disruption in the CK18 expression pattern is associated with arsenite liver damage, we investigated CK18 mRNA and protein levels in liver slices treated with low levels of SA. Organotypic cultures were incubated with 0.01, 1 and 10 {mu}M of SA in the absence and presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Cell viability and inorganic arsenic metabolism were determined. Increased expression of CK18 was observed after exposure to SA. The addition of NAC impeded the oxidative effects of SA exposure, decreasing the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and significantly diminishing the up regulation of CK18 mRNA and protein. Liver arsenic levels correlated with increased levels of mRNA. Mice treated with intragastric single doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of SA showed an increased expression of CK18. Results suggest that CK18 expression may be a sensible early biomarker of oxidative stress and damage induced by arsenite in vitro and in vivo. Then, during SA exposure, altered CK expression may compromise liver function. (orig.)

  3. Low Dose and Long Term Toxicity of Sodium Arsenite Caused Caspase Dependent Apoptosis Based on Morphology and Biochemical Character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hussein Abnosi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although arsenite is toxic it is currently recommended for the treatment of malignancies. In this study the effects of sub-micromolar concentrations of sodium arsenite on the viability, morphology and mechanism of cell death of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMCs over 21 days was investigated.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, BMCs were extracted in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM containing 15% of fetal bovine serum (FBS and expanded till the 3rd passage. The cells were treated with 1, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 nM of sodium arsenite for 21 days and the viability of the cells estimated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5 diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT and trypan blue staining. Cells were then treated with the selected dose (25 nM of sodium arsenite to determine their colony forming ability (CFA and population doubling number (PDN. Morphology of the cells was studied using florescent dyes, and the integrity of the DNA was investigated using the comet assay and agarose gel electrophoresis. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL and the caspase 3 assay were then applied to understand the mechanism of cell death. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA, Tukey test.Results: A significant reduction of viability, PDN and CFA was found following treatment of BMCs with 25 nM sodium arsenite (p<0.05. Cytoplasm shrinkage and a significant decrease in the diameter of the nuclei were also seen. Comet assay and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed DNA breakage, while positive TUNEL and activated caspase 3 confirmed the apoptosis.Conclusion: A low concentration of sodium arsenite (25 nM caused reduction of viability due to induction of apoptosis. Therefore, long term exposure to low dose of this chemical may have unwanted effects on BMCs.

  4. Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, A.; Danielsson, R.G.; Dencker, L. (Department of Toxicology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Sweden); Vahter, M. (National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of /sup 74/As-labelled and arsenite in pregnant mice and a monkey has been studied by autoradiography and gamma counting of isolated tissues, and their in vitro toxicity to a chondrogenic system has been investigated. With both arsenic forms, given as single intravenous injections to the mother, the /sup 74/As-arsenic appeared to pass the mouse placenta relatively freely and approximately to the same extent. The retention time in material tissues including the placenta was, however, around three times longer with arsenite than with arsenate. In early gestation, high activity was registered in the embryonic neuroepithelium, which correlates well with reported CNS malformations in rodents. In late gestation, the distribution pattern was more like that in the adults. Accumulation in skin and squamous epithelia of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oral cavity, oesophagus and oesophageal region of stomach) dominated the distribution picture, especially at a long survival interval. Arsenate, but not arsenite, showed affinity for the calcified areas of the skeleton. A marmoset monkey in late gestation receiving arsenite showed a somewhat lower rate of placental transfer than the mice. Skin and liver had the highest concentrations (at 8 hrs), both in mother and foetuses. This species is known not to methylate arsenic, resulting in stronger binding and longer retention times of arsenic as compared with other species. The stronger binding in maternal tissues may possibly explain the lower rate of placental transfer. Arsenite was shown to inhibit cartilage formation in a chick limb bud mesenchymal spot culture system (ED50 approximately 5-10..mu..M) while arsenate seemed to be without effect at concentrations up to 200 ..mu..M (highest tested). Arsenate, however, showed a potential of the arsenite toxicity.

  5. Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, A.; Danielsson, R.G.; Dencker, L. (Department of Toxicology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Sweden); Vahter, M. (National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of /sup 74/As-labelled arsenate and arsenite in pregnant mice and a monkey has been studied by autoradiography and gamma counting of isolated tissues, and their in vitro toxicity to a chondrogenic system has been investigated. With both arsenic forms, given as single intravenous injections to the mother, the /sup 74/As-arsenic appeared to pass the mouse placenta relatively freely and approximately to the same extent. The retention time in material tissues including the placenta was, however, around three times longer with arsenite than with arsenate. In early gestation, high activity was registered in the embryonic neuroepithelium, which correlates well with reported CNS malformations in rodents. In late gestation, the distribution pattern was more like that in the adults. Accumulation in skin and squamous epithelia of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oral cavity, oesophagus and oesophageal region of stomach) dominated the distribution pucture, especially at a long survival interval. Arsenate, but not arsenite, showed affinity for the calcified areas of the skeleton. A marmoset monkey in late gestation receiving arsenite showed a somewhat lower rate of placental transfer than the mice. Skin and liver had the highest concentrations (at 8 hrs), both in mother and foetuses. This species is known not to methylate arsenic, resulting in stronger binding and longer retention times of arsenic as compared with other species. The stronger binding in maternal tissues may possibly explain the lower rate of placental transfer. Arsenite was shown to inhibit cartilage formation in a chick limb bud mesenchymal spot culture system (ED50 approximately 5-10..mu..M) while arsenate seemed to be without effect at concentrations up to 200 ..mu..M (highest tested). Arsenate, however, showed a potential of the arsenite toxicity.

  6. Acute Sodium Arsenite-Induced Hematological and Biochemical Changes in Wistar Rats: Protective Effects of Ethanol Extract of Ageratum conyzoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola-Davies, Olufunke Eunice; Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ageratum conyzoides L. (Asteraceae) is an annual herbaceous plant used in folklore medicine for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. Objective: To investigate the protective effect of the ethanol leaf extract of A. conyzoides (EEAC) against hematological, serum biochemical and histological alterations induced by Sodium arsenite administration to Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups of five rats each. Group I received propylene glycol and Group II rats were given the (EEAC, 100 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 7 days. Group III were given a single oral dose of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 2.5 mg/kg b.w.). Animals in Group IV were pretreated with 100 mg/kg EEAC for 7 days followed by a single oral dose of sodium arsenite. Results: Arsenic exposure resulted in significant reductions (P produced significant reversal of the reduction in the erythrocytic indices (packed cell volume, red blood cell, and Hb) caused by sodium arseniteSodium arsenite-induced slight elevations in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), correlating with the histopathological lesions observedAgeratum conyzoides produced only slight reductions in AST, ALT, and ALP compared to the sodium arsenite group, but significantly reduced the severity of histopathological lesions. Abbreviations Used: EEAC: Ethanol extract of Ageratum conyzoides; RBC: Red blood cell; WBC: White blood cell; Hb: Hemoglobin; ALT: Alanine transaminase; AST: Aspartate transaminase or Aspartate aminotransferase; ALP: Alkaline phosphatase; GGT: Gamma glutamyl transferase. PMID:27114688

  7. The terminal oxidases of Paracoccus denitrificans

    OpenAIRE

    de Gier, Jan-Willem L.; Lübben, Mathias; Reijnders, Willem N.M.; Tipker, Corinne A.; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Van Spanning, Rob J. M.; Stouthamer, Adriaan H.; van der Oost, John

    1994-01-01

    Three distinct types of terminal oxidases participate in the aerobic respiratory pathways of Paracoccus denitrificans. Two alternative genes encoding subunit I of the aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase have been isolated before, namely ctaDI and ctaDII. Each of these genes can be expressed separately to complement a double mutant (ΔctaDI, ΔctaDII), indicating that they are isoforms of subunit I of the aa3-type oxidase. The genomic locus of a quinol oxidase has been isolated: cyoABC. This protohaem...

  8. Photocatalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite by titanium dioxide supported on granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu Hua; Jia, Yong Feng; Zhao, Shan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a worldwide concern. Photocatalysis can rapidly oxidize arsenite, i.e. As(III), to less labile arsenate, i.e. As(V), which then can be removed by adsorption on to various adsorbents. This study investigated the photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite in aqueous solution by granular activated carbon supporting a titanium dioxide photocatalyst (GAC-TiO2). The effects of photocatalyst dosage, solution pH values, initial concentration of As(III) and co-anions (SO4(2-), PO4(3-), SiO3(2-) and Cl-) on the oxidation of As(III) were studied. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) took place in minutes and followed first-order kinetics. The presence of phosphate and silicate significantly decreased As(III) oxidation, while the effect of sulphate, chloride was insignificant. The oxidation efficiency of As(III) was observed to increase with increasing pH. The results suggest that the supported photocatalyst developed in this study is an ideal candidate for pre-oxidation treatment of arsenic-contaminated water.

  9. Effect of sodium arsenite on spermatogenesis,plasma gonadotrophins and testosterone in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MahitoshSarkar; GargiRayChaudhuri; AlokeChattopadhyay; NarendraMohanBiswas

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of arsenic on spermatogenesis.Methods:Mature(4 months old)Wistar rats were intraperitoneally administered sodium arsenite at doses of 4,5 or 6mg·kg-1·day-1 for 26 days.Different varieties of germ cells at stage Ⅶ seminiferous epithelium cycle,namely,type A spermatogonia(ASg),preleptotene spermatocytes(pLSc),midpachytene spermatocytes(mPSc) and step 7 spermatids(7Sd) were quantitatively evaluated, along with radioimmunoassay of plasma follicle-stimulating hormone(FSH),lutuneizing hormone(LH),testosterone and assessment of the epididymal sperm count.Results:In the 5 and 6 mg/kg groups,there were significant dosedependent decreases in the accessory sex organ weights,epididymal sperm count and plasma concentrations of LH,FSH and testosterone with massive degeneration of all the germ cells at stage Ⅶ,The changes were insignificant in the 4 mg/kg group.Conclusion:Arsenite has a suppressive influence on spermatogenesis and gonadotrophin and testosterone release in rats.

  10. In Vitro Protective Potentials of Annona muricata Leaf Extracts Against Sodium Arsenite-induced Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Vazhappilly Cijo; Kumar, Devanga Ragupathi Naveen; Suresh, Palamadai Krishnan; Kumar, Rangasamy Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) is a metalloid which is present widely in the environment and its chronic exposure can contribute to the induction of oxidative stress, resulting in disturbances in various metabolic functions including liver cell death. Hence, there is a need to develop drugs from natural sources, which can reduce arsenic toxicity. While there have been reports regarding the antioxidant and protective potentials of Annona muricataleaf extracts, our study is the first ofits kind to extend these findings by specifically evaluating its ability to render protection against sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) induced toxicity (10 μM) in WRL-68 (human hepatic cells) and human erythrocytes by employing XTT and haemolysis inhibition assays respectively. The methanolic extract exhibited higher activity than the aqueous extract in both assays. The results showed a dose-dependent decrease in arsenic toxicity in both WRL-68 cells and erythrocytes, suggesting the protective nature of Annona muricatato mitigate arsenic toxicity. Hence the bioactive extracts can further be scrutinized for the identification and characterization of their principal contributors.

  11. Arsenite tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) involves coordinated role of metabolic pathways of thiols and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Preeti; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Rana Pratap; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Adhikari, Bijan

    2013-02-01

    Thiolic ligands and several amino acids (AAs) are known to build up in plants against heavy metal stress. In the present study, alteration of various AAs in rice and its synchronized role with thiolic ligand was explored for arsenic (As) tolerance and detoxification. To understand the mechanism of As tolerance and stress response, rice seedlings of one tolerant (Triguna) and one sensitive (IET-4786) cultivar were exposed to arsenite (0-25 μM) for 7 days for various biochemical analyses using spectrophotometer, HPLC and ICPMS. Tolerant and sensitive cultivars respond differentially in terms of thiol metabolism, essential amino acids (EEAs) and nonessential amino acids (NEEAs) vis-á-vis As accumulation. Thiol biosynthesis-related enzymes were positively correlated to As accumulation in Triguna. Conversely, these enzymes, cysteine content and GSH/GSSG ratio declined significantly in IET-4786 upon As exposure. The level of identified phytochelatin (PC) species (PC(2), PC(3) and PC(4)) and phytochelatin synthase activity were also more pronounced in Triguna than IET-4786. Nearly all EAAs were negatively affected by As-induced oxidative stress (except phenylalanine in Triguna), but more significantly in IET-4786 than Triguna. However, most of the stress-responsive NEAAs like glutamic acid, histidine, alanine, glycine, tyrosine, cysteine and proline were enhanced more prominently in Triguna than IET-4786 upon As exposure. The study suggests that IET-4786 appears sensitive to As due to reduction of AAs and thiol metabolic pathway. However, a coordinated response of thiolic ligands and stress-responsive AAs seems to play role for As tolerance in Triguna to achieve the effective complexation of As by PCs.

  12. Isolation and study of two mutants of Streptomyces cattleya affected in DNA repair and genetic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromic, A; Kirby, R

    1989-01-15

    Two mutants of Streptomyces cattleya affecting DNA repair were isolated. These mutants were analysed using spore survival curves and phage reactivation curves in the presence and absence of caffeine and arsenite. Two DNA repair systems (uvr1 and uvr2) were identified, the latter of which seems to influence genetic instability.

  13. The inhibition of tissue respiration and alcoholic fermentation at different catabolic levels by ethyl carbamate (urethan) and arsenite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, E.; Gruber, M.; Leijnse, B.; Huisman, T.H.J.

    1950-01-01

    1. A hypothesis is given concerning the action of urethan and arsenite on malignant growth. Two assumptionsares made:- (a) the enzyme system responsible for energy production in malignant tumours is working at maximal rate, contrary to the corresponding enzyme system in normal tissues. (b) a give

  14. Fe/Ti co-pillared clay for enhanced arsenite removal and photo oxidation under UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guang Dong Electric Power Design Institute, China Energy Engineering Group Co. Ltd., Guangzhou 510663 (China); Cai, Xiaojiao [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jingwei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); The 718th Research Institute of CSIC, Handan 056027 (China); Zhou, Shimin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Na, Ping, E-mail: naping@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An iron and titanium co-pillared montmorillonite (Fe-Ti/MMT) was synthesized for arsenite removal. • Variety of characterization results indicated that Fe and Ti species were pillared in MMT. • A possible mechanism of arsenite adsorption/oxidation with UV light was established. • The participation of Fe component can promote the process of photocatalytic oxidation in Fe-Ti/MMT + As(III) system. • Fe-Ti/MMT can function as both photocatalyst and adsorbent for arsenite removal. - Abstract: A series of iron and titanium co-pillared montmorillonites (Fe-Ti/MMT) were prepared using hydrolysis of inserted titanium and different iron content in montmorillonite (MMT). The Fe-Ti/MMT were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confirming the effective insertion of Fe species and TiO{sub 2} in the MMT. The Fe-Ti/MMT was used to remove arsenite (As(III)) from aqueous solutions under different conditions. The result of As(III) adsorption under UV irradiation showed that the photo activity can be enhanced by incorporating Fe and Ti in MMT. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the hydroxyl groups bonded to metal oxide (M–OH) played an important role in the adsorption of As(III)

  15. Fate of arsenite and arsenate in flooded and not flooded soils of southwest Bangladesh irrigated with arsenic contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria; Violante, Antonio; Barberis, Elisabetta

    2007-10-01

    In Bangladesh and West Bengal, India, tons of arsenic are added every year to wide extensions of agricultural soils after irrigation with arsenic polluted groundwater, and the fate of the added arsenic in these water-soil environments is not yet clear. This work was aimed to investigate the accumulation and potential release of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] in two adjacent soils of Bangladesh, irrigated with arsenic contaminated groundwater and cultivated under flooded or not flooded conditions. Both soils showed a scarce As accumulation, in spite of a good adsorption capacity, higher for As(III) than for As(V). The poorly ordered Fe oxides dominated As adsorption in the topsoil of the flooded soil, whereas the crystalline forms were more important in the well aerated soil. A high percentage of the native arsenic was exchangeable with phosphate and the freshly added arsenate or arsenite were even much more mobile. In our experimental conditions, the high As mobility was not dependent on the surface coverage, and, in the flooded soil, 60-70% of the freshly added arsenite or arsenate were desorbed with an infinite sink method, while in the not flooded soil arsenate was less desorbed than arsenite. Depending on their characteristics, some soils, in particular when cultivated under flooded conditions, can represent only a temporary sink for the added As, that can be easily released to waters and possibly enter the food chain from the water-soil system.

  16. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Du, Libo [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Wenlan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Yang [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hudson, Laurie G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Ke Jian, E-mail: kliu@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  17. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells modulate immune responses independently of NADPH oxidase in the ovarian tumor microenvironment in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi E Godoy

    Full Text Available The phagocyte NADPH oxidase generates superoxide anion and downstream reactive oxidant intermediates in response to infectious threat, and is a critical mediator of antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory responses. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that are recruited by cancer cells, accumulate locally and systemically in advanced cancer, and can abrogate anti-tumor immunity. Prior studies have implicated the phagocyte NADPH oxidase as being an important component promoting MDSC accumulation and immunosuppression in cancer. We therefore used engineered NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47 (phox-/- mice to delineate the role of this enzyme complex in MDSC accumulation and function in a syngeneic mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer. We found that the presence of NADPH oxidase did not affect tumor progression. The accumulation of MDSCs locally and systemically was similar in tumor-bearing wild-type (WT and p47 (phox-/- mice. Although MDSCs from tumor-bearing WT mice had functional NADPH oxidase, the suppressive effect of MDSCs on ex vivo stimulated T cell proliferation was NADPH oxidase-independent. In contrast to other tumor-bearing mouse models, our results show that MDSC accumulation and immunosuppression in syngeneic epithelial ovarian cancer is NADPH oxidase-independent. We speculate that factors inherent to the tumor, tumor microenvironment, or both determine the specific requirement for NADPH oxidase in MDSC accumulation and function.

  19. Inactivation of nitric oxide by cytochrome c oxidase under steady-state oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unitt, David C; Hollis, Veronica S; Palacios-Callender, Miriam; Frakich, Nanci; Moncada, Salvador

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a respiration chamber that allows intact cells to be studied under controlled oxygen (O(2)) conditions. The system measures the concentrations of O(2) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cell suspension, while the redox state of cytochrome c oxidase is continuously monitored optically. Using human embryonic kidney cells transfected with a tetracycline-inducible NO synthase we show that the inactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase is dependent on both O(2) concentration and electron turnover of the enzyme. At a high O(2) concentration (70 microM), and while the enzyme is in turnover, NO generated by the NO synthase upon addition of a given concentration of l-arginine is partially inactivated by cytochrome c oxidase and does not affect the redox state of the enzyme or consumption of O(2). At low O(2) (15 microM), when the cytochrome c oxidase is more reduced, inactivation of NO is decreased. In addition, the NO that is not inactivated inhibits the cytochrome c oxidase, further reducing the enzyme and lowering O(2) consumption. At both high and low O(2) concentrations the inactivation of NO is decreased when sodium azide is used to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and decrease electron turnover.

  20. NADPH Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target for Neuroprotection against Ischaemic Stroke: Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carli L. Roulston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS is known to contribute to stroke injury, particularly during reperfusion, and antioxidants targeting this process have resulted in improved outcomes experimentally. Unfortunately these improvements have not been successfully translated to the clinical setting. Targeting the source of oxidative stress may provide a superior therapeutic approach. The NADPH oxidases are a family of enzymes dedicated solely to ROS production and pre-clinical animal studies targeting NADPH oxidases have shown promising results. However there are multiple factors that need to be considered for future drug development: There are several homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. All have differing physiological roles and may contribute differentially to oxidative damage after stroke. Additionally, the role of ROS in brain repair is largely unexplored, which should be taken into consideration when developing drugs that inhibit specific NADPH oxidases after injury. This article focuses on the current knowledge regarding NADPH oxidase after stroke including in vivo genetic and inhibitor studies. The caution required when interpreting reports of positive outcomes after NADPH oxidase inhibition is also discussed, as effects on long term recovery are yet to be investigated and are likely to affect successful clinical translation.

  1. Investigation of the Interaction Between Sodium(meta) Arsenite and Catechin via ESI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Sheng-yun; WEN Jin-feng; KIM Seung-jin; LEE Yong-ill

    2007-01-01

    Catechin, one of the main components of green tea, is considered to have the remedy effect of arsenic poison,although the chemical mechanism is not well known. In this study, sodium(meta) selenite, which is used as herbisolution to investigate the interaction between toxic inorganic arsenic compound and catechin via ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The interaction products of mono-methylated arsenic with catechin in the presence of methanol were identified in the negative mode. Collission induced dissociation(CID) mass spectrometric measurements indicate that monomethylated arsenic was "alkylated" strongly by conjugation at the sites of C2' and C5' in the phenyl ring B of the catechin. The interaction mechanism between sodium(meta) arsenite and catechin was proposed. The results provide useful information to understand the chemical pathway of the detoxification of the arsenic toxicity by catechin.

  2. The oxidative and adsorptive effectiveness of hydrous manganese dioxide for arsenite removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ruiping; Yuan Baoling; Li Xing; Xia Shengji; Yang Yanling; Li Guibai

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of hydrous manganese dioxides (δMnO2) removing arsenite (As(Ⅲ)) from aqueous solution. Effects of such factors as permanganate oxidation, pH, humic acid and Ca2+ on As removal and possible mechanisms involved in have been investigated. Permanganate oxidation increases As removal to a certain extent; the higher pH results in the formation of more easily adsorbed As species, contributing to higher As removal; humic acid occupies adsorbing sites and decreases ζ potential of δMnO2, therefore inhibiting As removal; Ca2+ facilitates As adsorption on δMnO2, mainly through increasing ζ potential and decreasing repulsive forces between As and surface sites. δMnO2 exhibits oxidative and adsorptive potential for As(Ⅲ), and may be employed as adsorbents or filter coating for As removal in water treatment process.

  3. Comparative Molecular Docking Studies with ABCC1 and Aquaporin 9 in the Arsenite Complex Efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojan, Shiv; Dhasmana, Anupam; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Haneef, Mohd; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most toxic metalloid present in the natural environment in both organic and inorganic arsenic forms. Inorganic arsenic is often more hazardous than the organic form. Arsenite and arsenate compounds are the major inorganic forms which are toxic causing severe human health dysfunction including cancer. Excretion of arsenic from the system is found elusive. Therefore, it is of interest to screen channel proteins with the arsenic complex in the different combination of arsenic, GSH (glutathione) and arsenic, selenium using docking methods. The mode of arsenic removal. The complex structure revealed the mode of arsenic binding efficiency with the receptor aquaporine 9 and ABCC1 channel protein. This provides insights to understand the mechanism of arsenic efflux. These inferences find application in the design, identification and development of novel nutracetucal or any other formulation useful in the balance of arsenic efflux. PMID:25258480

  4. Comparative Molecular Docking Studies with ABCC1 and Aquaporin 9 in the Arsenite Complex Efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojan, Shiv; Dhasmana, Anupam; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Haneef, Mohd; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most toxic metalloid present in the natural environment in both organic and inorganic arsenic forms. Inorganic arsenic is often more hazardous than the organic form. Arsenite and arsenate compounds are the major inorganic forms which are toxic causing severe human health dysfunction including cancer. Excretion of arsenic from the system is found elusive. Therefore, it is of interest to screen channel proteins with the arsenic complex in the different combination of arsenic, GSH (glutathione) and arsenic, selenium using docking methods. The mode of arsenic removal. The complex structure revealed the mode of arsenic binding efficiency with the receptor aquaporine 9 and ABCC1 channel protein. This provides insights to understand the mechanism of arsenic efflux. These inferences find application in the design, identification and development of novel nutracetucal or any other formulation useful in the balance of arsenic efflux.

  5. Sodium arsenite reduces severity of dextran sulfate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua J. MALAGO; Hortensia NONDOLI

    2008-01-01

    The histopathological features and the associated clinical findings of ulcerative colitis (UC) are due to persistent inflammatory response in the colon mucosa. Interventions that suppress this response benefit UC patients. We tested whether sodium arsenite (SA) benefits rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-colitis. The DSS-colitis was induced by 5% DSS in drinking water. SA (10 mg/kg; intraperitoneally) was given 8 h before DSS treatment and then every 48 h for 3 cycles of 7,14 or 21 d. At the end of each cycle rats were sacrificed and colon sections processed for histological examination. DSS induced diarrhea, loose stools, hemoccult positive stools, gross bleeding, loss of body weight, loss of epithelium, crypt damage, depletion of goblet cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The severity of these changes increased ir the order of Cycles 1,2 and 3. Treatment of rats with SA significantly reduced this severity and improved the weight gain.

  6. Characterization of adsorption of aqueous arsenite and arsenate onto charred dolomite in microcolumn systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Yousef; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala'a H; Mousa, Hasan; Walker, Gavin M; Ahmad, Mohammad N M

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the removal of arsenite, As(III), and arsenate, As(V), from aqueous solutions onto thermally processed dolomite (charred dolomite) via microcolumn was evaluated. The effects of mass of adsorbent (0.5-2 g), initial arsenic concentration (50-2000 ppb) and particle size (dolomite in a microcolumn were investigated. It was found that the adsorption of As(V) and As(III) onto charred dolomite exhibited a characteristic 'S' shape. The adsorption capacity increased as the initial arsenic concentration increased. A slow decrease in the column adsorption capacity was noted as the particle size increased from>0.335 to 0.710-2.00 mm. For the binary system, the experimental data show that the adsorption of As(V) and As(III) was independent of both ions in solution. The experimental data obtained from the adsorption process were successfully correlated with the Thomas Model and Bed Depth Service Time Model.

  7. Arsenic methylation by an arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase from Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqing; Xue, Ximei; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yongguan; Yang, Guidi; Ye, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic-contaminated water is a serious hazard for human health. Plankton plays a critical role in the fate and toxicity of arsenic in water by accumulation and biotransformation. Spirulina platensis (S. platensis), a typical plankton, is often used as a supplement or feed for pharmacy and aquiculture, and may introduce arsenic into the food chain, resulting in a risk to human health. However, there are few studies about how S. platensis biotransforms arsenic. In this study, we investigated arsenic biotransformation by S. platensis. When exposed to arsenite (As(III)), S. platensis accumulated arsenic up to 4.1mg/kg dry weight. After exposure to As(III), arsenate (As(V)) was the predominant species making up 64% to 86% of the total arsenic. Monomethylarsenate (MMA(V)) and dimethylarsenate (DMA(V)) were also detected. An arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase from S. platensis (SpArsM) was identified and characterized. SpArsM showed low identity with other reported ArsM enzymes. The Escherichia coli AW3110 bearing SparsM gene resulted in As(III) methylation and conferring resistance to As(III). The in vitro assay showed that SpArsM exhibited As(III) methylation activity. DMA(V) and a small amount of MMA(V) were detected in the reaction system within 0.5hr. A truncated SpArsM derivative lacking the last 34 residues still had the ability to methylate As(III). The three single mutants of SpArsM (C59S, C186S, and C238S) abolished the capability of As(III) methylation, suggesting the three cysteine residues are involved in catalysis. We propose that SpArsM is responsible for As methylation and detoxification of As(III) and may contribute to As biogeochemistry.

  8. Molecular basis of arsenite (As+3-induced acute cytotoxicity in human cervical epithelial carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nauman Arshad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid industrialization is discharging toxic heavy metals into the environment, disturbing human health in many ways and causing various neurologic, cardiovascular, and dermatologic abnormalities and certain types of cancer. The presence of arsenic in drinking water from different urban and rural areas of the major cities of Pakistan, for example, Lahore, Faisalabad, and Kasur, was found to be beyond the permissible limit of 10 parts per billion set by the World Health Organization. Therefore the present study was initiated to examine the effects of arsenite (As+3 on DNA biosynthesis and cell death. Methods: After performing cytotoxic assays on a human epithelial carcinoma cell line, expression analysis was done by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and flow cytometry. Results: We show that As+3 ions have a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect through the activation of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. In contrast to previous research, the present study was designed to explore the early cytotoxic effects produced in human cells during exposure to heavy dosage of As+3 (7.5 µg/ml. Even treatment for 1 h significantly increased the mRNA levels of p21 and p27 and caspases 3, 7, and 9. It was interesting that there was no change in the expression levels of p53, which plays an important role in G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusion: Our results indicate that sudden exposure of cells to arsenite (As+3 resulted in cytotoxicity and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis resulting from up-regulation of caspases.

  9. EFFECTS OF ARSENITE IN TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE IN RELATION TO CELL PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES AND LEUKEMIA CELLS IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telomeres are critical in maintaining chromosome and genomic stability. Arsenic, a human carcinogen as well as an anticancer agent, is known for its clastogenicity. To better understand molecular mechanisms of arsenic actions, we investigated arsenite effects on telomere and telo...

  10. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase, a tasteful biocatalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, Robert H.H. van den; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea; Laane, Colja; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    2001-01-01

    The covalent flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO) is a versatile biocatalyst. It converts a wide range of phenolic compounds by catalysing oxidation, deamination, demethylation, dehydrogenation and hydroxylation reactions. The production of natural vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, coniferyl al

  11. Crystallization of recombinant 1-amino cyclo propane-1-carboxylate (Acc) oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, L.; Arni, R.K. [UNESP, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Dilley, D. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Biophysics

    1996-12-31

    Full text. Ethylene is an important harmone in plant biology because it activates gene expression with consequences at all phases of plant growth and development spanning seed germination to fruit ripening and senesense of plant organs. In climacteric fruits, the sharp increase in ethylene production at the onset of ripening is throught to trigger the changes in colour, aroma, texture and flavour. The final step in ethylene biosynthesis is catalyzed by ACC oxidase. Biothechnological methods have been used to inhibit ethylene biosynthesis and ripening in tomato by down-regulating ACC synthase and ACC oxidase gene expression using the antisense RNA strategy. A similar goal has been achieved by overexpressing a bacterial ACC deaminase or a viral-S-adenosylmethionine hydrolase gene, which reduces the availability of the ethylene precursors., ACC and S-adenosylmethionine, respectively. C0{sub 2} at concentrations commonly found in the intracellular space of plant tissues is required to active ACC oxidase to produce ethylene and can elevate enzyme activity 20-fold in a concentration dependent manner. Consequently, the intracellular ethylene level is modulated from low inactive levels when C0{sub 2} is not limiting and this may alter gene expression. ACC oxidase undergoes catalytic inactivation as the reaction to make ethylene procedes and this too may involve CO{sub 2}. It has been suggested that CO{sub 2}acts as a modulator of ACC oxidase activity and therby helps regulate ethylene levels in the cell and thus may explain many ethylene related phenomena in plant biology. CO{sub 2} is know to affect O{sub 2} binding in hemoglobin and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco). Catalytic inactivation is a common phenomena in enzyme turnover, ACC oxidase is a Fe{sup +2}/ascorbate requiring enzyme and this makes it a prime candidate for metal ion oxidation-based inactivation. Charentais melon with an antisense ACC oxidase cDNA. A trangenic line exhibits reduction

  12. Evaluation of the toxic effects of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper using a battery of four bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Lee, Pyeong-Koo [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Geologic Environment Div.; Kong, In Chul [Yeungnam Univ., Kyungbuk (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2012-09-15

    The sensitivities of four different kinds of bioassays to the toxicities of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper were compared. The different bioassays exhibited different sensitivities, i.e., they responded to different levels of toxicity of each of the different metals. However, with the exception of the {alpha}-glucosidase enzyme activity, arsenite was the most toxic compound towards all the tested organisms, exhibiting the highest toxic effect on the seeds of Lactuca, with an EC{sub 50} value of 0.63 mg/L. The sensitivities of Lactuca and Raphanus were greater than the sensitivities of two other kinds of seeds tested. Therefore, these were the seeds appropriate for use in a seed germination assay. A high revertant mutagenic ratio (5:1) of Salmonella typhimurium was observed with an arsenite concentration of 0.1 {mu}g/plate, indicative of a high possibility of mutagenicity. These different results suggested that a battery of bioassays, rather than one bioassay alone, is needed as a more accurate and better tool for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants. (orig.)

  13. In vitro development of resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI in Lactobacilli strains as perspective attenuation of gastrointestinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Raj K; Sinha, Vartika; Mishra, Ritesh; Kannan, Ambrose

    2011-05-01

    Inadvertent intake of inorganic arsenic and chromium through drinking water and food causing their toxic insults is a major health problem. Intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli play important regulatory roles on intestinal homeostasis, and their loss is known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Probiotic Lactobacilli resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI could be an importantfactorfor the perspective attenuation of Gl-disorders caused by these toxic metals/metalloid. In the present study resistance of arsenite (up to 32 ppm), Cr-VI (up to 64 ppm), and arsenite plus Cr-VI (32 ppm each) were developed under in vitro condition following chronological chronic exposures in Lactobacilli strains. Comparative study of biochemical parameters such as membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents; dehydrogenase and esterase activity tests, which are respective indicators for respiratory and energy producing processes, and the general heterotrophic activity of cells, of resistant strains showed similarities with their respective normal parent strains. The resistant strains were also found to be sensitive to antibiotics. Findings indicate that these resistant probiotic Lactobacilli would be useful in the prophylactic interventions of arsenic and chromium GI-toxicity.

  14. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); Ling, Min [Jiangsu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu (China); Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); Liang, Xiao [Mental Health Center of Xuhui-CDC, Shanghai 200232 (China); Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); Bian, Qian [Jiangsu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. • IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  15. Intracellular lysyl oxidase: Effect of a specific inhibitor on nuclear mass in proliferating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Fawzy A. [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Torres, Marie [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Hao [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Graham, Lila, E-mail: lilagraham@cs.com [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    LOX, the principal enzyme involved in crosslinking of collagen, was the first of several lysyl oxidase isotypes to be characterized. Its active form was believed to be exclusively extracellular. Active LOX was later reported to be present in cell nuclei; its function there is unknown. LOX expression opposes the effect of mutationally activated Ras, which is present in about 30% of human cancers. The mechanism of LOX in countering the action of Ras is also unknown. In the present work, assessment of nuclear protein for possible effects of lysyl oxidase activity led to the discovery that proliferating cells dramatically increase their nuclear protein content when exposed to BAPN ({beta}-aminopropionitrile), a highly specific lysyl oxidase inhibitor that reportedly blocks LOX inhibition of Ras-induced oocyte maturation. In three cell types (PC12 cells, A7r5 smooth muscle cells, and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts), BAPN caused a 1.8-, 1.7-, and 2.1-fold increase in total nuclear protein per cell, respectively, affecting all major components in both nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. Since nuclear size is correlated with proliferative status, enzyme activity restricting nuclear growth may be involved in the lysyl oxidase tumor suppressive effect. Evidence is also presented for the presence of apparent lysyl oxidase isotype(s) containing a highly conserved LOX active site sequence in the nuclei of PC12 cells, which do not manufacture extracellular lysyl oxidase substrates. Results reported here support the hypothesis that nuclear lysyl oxidase regulates nuclear growth, and thereby modulates cell proliferation.

  16. Evidence for toxicity differences between inorganic arsenite and thioarsenicals in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranmandura, Hua; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Iwata, Katsuya; Lee, Jane; Suzuki, Kazuo T; Weinfeld, Michael; Le, X Chris

    2009-07-15

    Arsenic toxicity is dependent on its chemical species. In humans, the bladder is one of the primary target organs for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced carcinogenicity, and what arsenic species are responsible for this carcinogenicity. The present study aimed at comparing the toxic effect of DMMTA(V) with that of inorganic arsenite (iAs(III)) on cell viability, uptake efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) toward human bladder cancer EJ-1 cells. The results were compared with those of a previous study using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Although iAs(III) was known to be toxic to most cells, here we show that iAs(III) (LC(50)=112 microM) was much less cytotoxic than DMMTA(V) (LC(50)=16.7 microM) in human bladder EJ-1 cells. Interestingly, pentavalent sulfur-containing DMMTA(V) generated a high level of intracellular ROS in EJ-1 cells. However, this was not observed in the cells exposed to trivalent inorganic iAs(III) at their respective LC(50) dose. Furthermore, the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine completely inhibited the cytotoxicity of DMMTA(V) but not iAs(III), suggesting that production of ROS was the main cause of cell death from exposure to DMMTA(V), but not iAs(III). Because the cellular uptake of iAs(III) is mediated by aquaporin proteins, and because the resistance of cells to arsenite can be influenced by lower arsenic uptake due to lower expression of aquaporin proteins (AQP 3, 7 and 9), the expression of several members of the aquaporin family was also examined. In human bladder EJ-1 cells, mRNA/proteins of AQP3, 7 and 9 were not detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)/western blotting. In A431 cells, only mRNA and protein of AQP3 were detected. The large difference in toxicity between the two cell lines could be related to their differences in uptake of arsenic species.

  17. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Vaillancourt, Richard R., E-mail: vaillancourt@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data

  18. A Novel Redox State Heme a Marker in Cytochrome c Oxidase Revealed by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, C.; Perna, G.; Scrima, R.; Cela, O.; Rinaldi, R.; Boffoli, D.; Capozzi, V.; Capitanio, N.

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed to characterize by Raman spectroscopy (excitation line 633 nm) different redox states of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. The results obtained from a systematic analysis carried out on the mitochondrial enzyme prepared under redox conditions, differently affecting the valence state of the metal prosthetic groups, and a comparison with homologous bacterial heme-copper oxidases, cytochrome c and pyridine hemo-chrome extract revealed a novel redox state marker specifically linked to the redox transition of heme a, peaking at 1645 cm-1, and tentatively assigned to the C=C and/or C=N streching mode of the imidazole ring of a proxymal histidine ligand. The possible involvment of this redox-linked conformational change in the catalytic activity of cytochrome oxidase is discussed.

  19. The C-terminal region controls correct folding of genus Trametes pyranose 2-oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresová, Helena; Palyzová, Andrea; Kyslík, Pavel

    2007-06-30

    The pyranose 2-oxidases from Trametes ochracea and Trametes pubescens share markedly similar amino acid sequences with identity of 93.4%. When expressed from the recombinant plasmids based on the same vector in the Escherichia coli host strain BL21(DE3) at higher growth temperatures, they differ strikingly in the formation of the inclusion bodies. Upon overexpression in the cultures performed at 28 degrees C, the specific activity of pyranose 2-oxidase from T. pubescens was eight times higher than that from T. ochracea: 93% of pyranose 2-oxidase from T. ochracea and only 15% of that from T. pubescens was present in the form of inclusion bodies. To ascertain the cause of this difference, both cloned genes were shuffled. Site-directed recombination of p2o cDNAs revealed that DNA constructs ending with 3' end of p2o cDNA from T. pubescens code for proteins that are folded into an active form to the greater extent, regardless of the gene expression level. "In silicio" analysis of physico-chemical properties of the protein sequences of pyranose 2-oxidases revealed that the sequence of amino acid residues 368-430, constituting the small, head domain of pyranose 2-oxidase from T. pubescens, affects positively the enzyme folding at higher cultivation temperatures. The domain differs in six amino acid residues from that of T. ochracea.

  20. Development of a biosorbent for arsenite: structural modeling based on X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Monica Cristina; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2005-02-01

    This work describes a biological route for direct sorption of aqueous As(III) species, which are the most toxic and mobile arsenic species found in soils. Based upon the biochemical mechanisms that explain arsenic toxicity, we propose that a waste biomass with a high fibrous protein content obtained from chicken feathers can be used for selective As(III) adsorption. Prior to adsorption, the disulfide bridges present in the biomass are reduced by thioglycolate. Our investigations demonstrated that As(III) is specifically adsorbed on the biomass and, contrary to the behavior observed with inorganic sorbents, the lower is the pH the more effective is the removal. Arsenic uptake reaches values of up to 270 micromol As(III)/g of biomass. Analyses by synchrotron light techniques, such as XANES, demonstrated that arsenic is adsorbed in its trivalent state, an advantage over conventional techniques for As uptake, which usually require a previous oxidation stage. EXAFS analyses showed that each As atom is directly bound to three S atoms with an estimated distance of 2.26 A. The uptake mechanism is explained in terms of the structural similarities between the As(III)-biomass complex structure and that of arsenite ions and Ars-Operon system encoded proteins and phytochelatins. The biological route presented here offers the perspective of a direct removal of arsenic in its reduced form.

  1. Protective effects of phyllanthus emblica leaf extract on sodium arsenite-mediated adverse effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Sadia; Ahsan, Nazmul; Kato, Masashi; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Rashid, Abdur; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). 'Control' mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated 'SA' and 'SA+PLE' were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity.

  2. Arsenite-loaded nanoparticles inhibit PARP-1 to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Zongjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Huang, Dengtong; Jin, Jianbin; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the highest incidences in cancers; however, traditional chemotherapy often suffers from low efficiency caused by drug resistance. Herein, we report an arsenite-loaded dual-drug (doxorubicin and arsenic trioxide, i.e., DOX and ATO) nanomedicine system (FeAsOx@SiO2-DOX, Combo NP) with significant drug synergy and pH-triggered drug release for effective treatment of DOX resistant HCC cells (HuH-7/ADM). This nano-formulation Combo NP exhibits the synergistic effect of DNA damage by DOX along with DNA repair interference by ATO, which results in unprecedented killing efficiency on DOX resistant cancer cells. More importantly, we explored the possible mechanism is that the activity of PARP-1 is inhibited by ATO during the treatment of Combo NP, which finally induces apoptosis of HuH-7/ADM cells by poly (ADP-ribosyl) ation suppression and DNA lesions accumulation. This study provides a smart drug delivery strategy to develop a novel synergistic combination therapy for effectively overcome drug- resistant cancer cells.

  3. Metalloid tolerance based on phytochelatins is not functionally equivalent to the arsenite transporter Acr3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Robert; Clemens, Stephan; Augustyniak, Daria; Golik, Pawel; Maciaszczyk, Ewa; Tamás, Markus J; Dziadkowiec, Dorota

    2003-05-01

    Active transport of metalloids by Acr3p and Ycf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and chelation by phytochelatins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, nematodes, and plants represent distinct strategies of metalloid detoxification. In this report, we present results of functional comparison of both resistance mechanisms. The S. pombe and wheat phytochelatin synthase (PCS) genes, when expressed in S. cerevisiae, mediate only modest resistance to arsenite and thus cannot functionally compensate for Acr3p. On the other hand, we show for the first time that phytochelatins also contribute to antimony tolerance as PCS fully complement antimonite sensitivity of ycf1Delta mutant. Remarkably, heterologous expression of PCS sensitizes S. cerevisiae to arsenate, while ACR3 confers much higher arsenic resistance in pcsDelta than in wild-type S. pombe. The analysis of PCS and ACR3 homologues distribution in various organisms and our experimental data suggest that separation of ACR3 and PCS genes may lead to the optimal tolerance status of the cell.

  4. Adsorption of Arsenite by Six Submerged Plants from Nansi Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nansi Lake is the largest and the most important freshwater lake in north China for the South-North Water Transfer Project. Due to long-time and large-scale fish farming of history, the excess fish food and excretion usually release pentavalent arsenic, which is converted into trivalent arsenic (As (III in the lake sediment and released into lake water. Adsorption of arsenite using six submerged plants (Mimulicalyx rosulatus, Potamogeton maackianus, Hydrilla, Watermifoil, Pteris vittata, and Potamogeton crispus as adsorbing materials was investigated. The experimental data obtained have been analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models and the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion kinetics models. According to the results, the As (III equilibrium data agreed well with the Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption capacity of the plants was in the following order: Potamogeton crispus > Pteris vittata > Potamogeton maackianus > Mimulicalyx rosulatus > Hydrilla > Watermifoil. The sorption system with the six submerged plants was better described by pseudo-second-order than by first-order kinetics. Moreover, the adsorption with Potamogeton crispus could follow intraparticle diffusion (IPD model. The initial adsorption and rate of IPD using Potamogeton crispus and Pteris vittata were higher than those using other plants studied.

  5. Bacterial community succession during the enrichment of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria at high arsenic concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nguyen Ai Le; Akiko Sato; Daisuke Inoue; Kazunari Sei; Satoshi Soda; Michihiko Ike

    2012-01-01

    To generate cost-effective technologies for the removal of arsenic from water,we developed an enrichment culture of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria (CAOs) that could effectively oxidize widely ranging concentrations of As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ).In addition,we attempted to elucidate the enrichment process and characterize the microbial composition of the enrichment culture.A CAOs enrichment culture capable of stably oxidizing As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ) was successfully constructed through repeated batch cultivation for more than 700 days,during which time the initial As(Ⅲ) concentrations were increased in a stepwise manner from l to 10-12 mmol/L.As(Ⅲ) oxidation activity of the enrichment culture gradually improved,and 10-12 mmol/L As(Ⅲ) was almost completely oxidized within four days.Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the enrichment culture varied drastically during the enrichment process depending on the As(Ⅲ) concentration.Isolation and characterization of bacteria in the enrichment culture revealed that the presence of multiple CAOs with various As(Ⅲ) oxidation abilities enabled the culture to adapt to a wide range of As(Ⅲ) concentrations.The CAOs enrichment culture constructed here may he useful for pretreatment of water from which arsenic is being removed.

  6. Pyruvate oxidase is a determinant of Avery's rough morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Aimee E; Clague, Melissa J; Glass, John I; Leblanc, Donald J

    2004-12-01

    In pioneering studies, Avery et al. identified DNA as the hereditary material (A. T. Avery, C. M. MacLeod, and M. McCarty, J. Exp. Med. 79:137-158, 1944). They demonstrated, by means of variation in colony morphology, that this substance could transform their rough type 2 Streptococcus pneumoniae strain R36A into a smooth type 3 strain. It has become accepted as fact, from modern textbook accounts of these experiments, that smooth pneumococci make capsule, while rough strains do not. We found that rough-to-smooth morphology conversion did not occur in rough strains R36A and R6 when the ability to synthesize native type 2 capsule was restored. The continued rough morphology of these encapsulated strains was attributed to a second, since-forgotten, morphology-affecting mutation that was sustained by R36A during strain development. We used a new genome-PCR-based approach to identify spxB, the gene encoding pyruvate oxidase, as the mutated locus in R36A and R6 that, with unencapsulation, gives rise to rough colony morphology, as we know it. The variant spxB allele of R36A and R6 is associated with increased cellular pyruvate oxidase activity relative to the ancestral strain D39. Increased pyruvate oxidase activity alters colony shape by mediating cell death. R36A requires a wild-type spxB allele for the expression of smooth type 2 morphology but not for the expression of smooth type 3 morphology, the phenotype monitored by Avery et al. Thus, the mutated spxB allele did not impact their use of smooth morphology to identify the transforming principle.

  7. Accumulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells treated with sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride or proteasomal inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Ena; Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2014-11-01

    The present study examined the effect of sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride, heat shock and the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, withaferin A and celastrol on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; also known as HSP32) accumulation in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed that HO-1 accumulation was not induced by heat shock but was enhanced by sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Immunocytochemistry revealed that these metals induced HO-1 accumulation in a granular pattern primarily in the cytoplasm. Additionally, in 20% of the cells arsenite induced the formation of large HO-1-containing perinuclear structures. In cells recovering from sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride treatment, HO-1 accumulation initially increased to a maximum at 12h followed by a 50% reduction at 48 h. This initial increase in HO-1 levels was likely the result of new synthesis as it was inhibited by cycloheximide. Interestingly, treatment of cells with a mild heat shock enhanced HO-1 accumulation induced by low concentrations of sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride. Finally, we determined that HO-1 accumulation was induced in A6 cells by the proteasomal inhibitors, MG132, withaferin A and celastrol. An examination of heavy metal and proteasomal inhibitor-induced HO-1 accumulation in amphibians is of importance given the presence of toxic heavy metals in aquatic habitats.

  8. Effects of Arsenite Resistance on the Growth and Functional Gene Expression of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in Pure Culture and Coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huidan; Liang, Yili; Yin, Huaqun; Xiao, Yunhua; Guo, Xue; Xu, Ying; Hu, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-01-01

    The response of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK and sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans A01 to arsenite under pure culture and coculture was investigated based on biochemical characterization (concentration of iron ion and pH value) and related gene expression. L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01 in pure culture could adapt up to 400 mM and 800 mM As(III) after domestication, respectively, although arsenite showed a negative effect on both strains. The coculture showed a stronger sulfur and ferrous ion oxidation activity when exposed to arsenite. In coculture, the pH value showed no significant difference when under 500 mM arsenite stress, and the cell number of At. thiooxidans was higher than that in pure culture benefiting from the interaction with L. ferriphilum. The expression profile showed that the arsenic efflux system in the coculture was more active than that in pure culture, indicating that there is a synergetic interaction between At. thiooxidans A01 and L. ferriphilum YSK. In addition, a model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between arsenite and the ars operon in L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01. This study will facilitate the effective application of coculture in the bioleaching process by taking advantage of strain-strain communication and coordination.

  9. Effects of Arsenite Resistance on the Growth and Functional Gene Expression of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in Pure Culture and Coculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huidan Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK and sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans A01 to arsenite under pure culture and coculture was investigated based on biochemical characterization (concentration of iron ion and pH value and related gene expression. L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01 in pure culture could adapt up to 400 mM and 800 mM As(III after domestication, respectively, although arsenite showed a negative effect on both strains. The coculture showed a stronger sulfur and ferrous ion oxidation activity when exposed to arsenite. In coculture, the pH value showed no significant difference when under 500 mM arsenite stress, and the cell number of At. thiooxidans was higher than that in pure culture benefiting from the interaction with L. ferriphilum. The expression profile showed that the arsenic efflux system in the coculture was more active than that in pure culture, indicating that there is a synergetic interaction between At. thiooxidans A01 and L. ferriphilum YSK. In addition, a model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between arsenite and the ars operon in L. ferriphilum YSK and At. thiooxidans A01. This study will facilitate the effective application of coculture in the bioleaching process by taking advantage of strain-strain communication and coordination.

  10. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single-and double-mixing st

  11. Bilirubin Oxidase Activity of Bacillus subtilis CotA

    OpenAIRE

    Sakasegawa, S; Ishikawa, H.; Imamura, S.; Sakuraba, H.; Goda, S.; Ohshima, T.

    2006-01-01

    The spore coat protein CotA from Bacillus subtilis was previously identified as a laccase. We have now found that CotA also shows strong bilirubin oxidase activity and markedly higher affinity for bilirubin than conventional bilirubin oxidase. This is the first characterization of bilirubin oxidase activity in a bacterial protein.

  12. THERMOSTABILITY OF RESPIRATORY TERMINAL OXIDASES IN THE LIPID ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, Marieke G.L.; Bosmal, Tjibbe; Lolkema, Juke S.; Gleiszner, Michael; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the lipid environment on the thermostability of three respiratory terminal oxidases was determined. Cytochrome-e oxidase from beef heart and Bacillus stearothermophilus were used as representative proteins from mesophilic and thermophilic origin, respectively. Quinol oxidase from the a

  13. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420 Oxidase... ingredient that will react with cytochrome oxidase. When cytochrome oxidase is present, the swab turns a...

  14. A colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libreros-Minotta, C A; Tipton, P A

    1995-11-01

    A simple and rapid colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase is described. The assay is based on the formation of a Schiff base between the enzymatic reaction product 3-methyl-2-butenal and p-aminophenol. The assay is effective in the submicromolar concentration range and can be used in crude plant extracts as well as in more highly purified preparations.

  15. Spectrophotometric Assay of Immobilized Glucose Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nojan Noorbehesht

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme results in change the substrate of product. Each enzyme may act on specific substrates, resulting in product or different products. The enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX is a bio catalyst. It accelerates the process of transforming glucose into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 . These enzymes are used in the chemical industry, food industry, cosmetics and kits for diagnosis of glucose. There are many researches about immobilizations of Glucose Oxide to increase specifications such as repeated use, recovery, stability, shelf life and other features In this work, glucose oxidase enzyme using covalent bonding is placed on the carrier of carbon nanotubes. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been used as adsorbents. Also, carbon nanotubes have been functionalized by sulfuric acid and nitric acid with a high concentration. Glucose oxidase is a biological biocatalyst enzyme. It accelerates changing glucose to H2O2. This enzyme is used in the chemical industry, food industry, cosmetics and glucose diagnostic kits. For example, as a result of ongoing research working focuses on the development of glucose biosensors, GOX in practice as standard enzyme has been revealed for immobilization of oxidative enzyme.GOX correct fixation on the MWNTs carrier is a way to reuse enzyme and miniature of biosensor devices and structures. In this study, a spectrophotometer was used to determine the absorbance of the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX to review its activities after stabilizing the carbon nanotubes.

  16. Lysyl oxidase mediates hypoxic control of metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Giaccia, Amato J

    2006-01-01

    Hypoxic cancer cells pose a great challenge to the oncologist because they are especially aggressive, metastatic, and resistant to therapy. Recently, we showed that elevation of the extracellular matrix protein lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic disease and is essential for hypoxia...

  17. Status and Advances of Researches on GA 20-oxidases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Chen Xiaoyang; Li Hui; Guo Hai

    2003-01-01

    GA 20-oxidase, the most important limiting enzyme, can catalyze a series of oxidization of GA biosynthesis pathwayfrom GA12 to GA9 and from GA53 to GA20 in the higher plants. This paper reviews the studies on the characters of GA 20-oxidase,the gene and the protein of GA 20-oxidase and the regulation of GA 20-oxidase gene expression in recent years. At the same time,the prospects for the gene transformation of GA 20-oxidase in agriculture, forestry and horticulture are also discussed.

  18. Arsenite tolerance is related to proportional thiolic metabolite synthesis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Richa; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Tripathi, Preeti; Shri, Manju; Dixit, Garima; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Dhankher, Om Prakash; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Barroso, Juan B; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2013-02-01

    Thiol metabolism is the primary detoxification strategy by which rice plants tolerate arsenic (As) stress. In light of this, it is important to understand the importance of harmonised thiol metabolism with As accumulation and tolerance in rice plant. For this aim, tolerant (T) and sensitive (S) genotypes were screened from 303 rice (Oryza sativa) genotypes on exposure to 10 and 25 μM arsenite (As(III)) in hydroponic culture. On further As accumulation estimation, contrasting (13-fold difference) T (IC-340072) and S (IC-115730) genotypes were selected. This difference was further evaluated using biochemical and molecular approaches to understand involvement of thiolic metabolism vis-a-vis As accumulation in these two genotypes. Various phytochelatin (PC) species (PC(2), PC(3) and PC(4)) were detected in both the genotypes with a dominance of PC(3). However, PC concentrations were greater in the S genotype, and it was noticed that the total PC (PC(2) + PC(3 )+ PC(4))-to-As(III) molar ratio (PC-SH:As(III)) was greater in T (2.35 and 1.36 in shoots and roots, respectively) than in the S genotype (0.90 and 0.15 in shoots and roots, respectively). Expression analysis of several metal(loid) stress-related genes showed significant upregulation of glutaredoxin, sulphate transporter, and ascorbate peroxidase in the S genotype. Furthermore, enzyme activity of phytochelatin synthase and cysteine synthase was greater on As accumulation in the S compared with the T genotype. It was concluded that the T genotype synthesizes adequate thiols to detoxify metalloid load, whereas the S genotype synthesizes greater but inadequate levels of thiols to tolerate an exceedingly greater load of metalloids, as evidenced by thiol-to-metalloid molar ratios, and therefore shows a phytotoxicity response.

  19. An aquaporin PvTIP4;1 from Pteris vittata may mediate arsenite uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenyan; Yan, Huili; Chen, Yanshan; Shen, Hongling; Xu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ma, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The fern Pteris vittata is an arsenic hyperaccumulator. The genes involved in arsenite (As(III)) transport are not yet clear. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new P. vittata aquaporin gene, PvTIP4;1, which may mediate As(III) uptake. PvTIP4;1 was identified from yeast functional complement cDNA library of P. vittata. Arsenic toxicity and accumulating activities of PvTIP4;1 were analyzed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis. Subcellular localization of PvTIP4;1-GFP fusion protein in P. vittata protoplast and callus was conducted. The tissue expression of PvTIP4;1 was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Site-directed mutagenesis of the PvTIP4;1 aromatic/arginine (Ar/R) domain was studied. Heterologous expression in yeast demonstrates that PvTIP4;1 was able to facilitate As(III) diffusion. Transgenic Arabidopsis showed that PvTIP4;1 increases arsenic accumulation and induces arsenic sensitivity. Images and FM4-64 staining suggest that PvTIP4;1 localizes to the plasma membrane in P. vittata cells. A tissue location study shows that PvTIP4;1 transcripts are mainly expressed in roots. Site-directed mutation in yeast further proved that the cysteine at the LE1 position of PvTIP4;1 Ar/R domain is a functional site. PvTIP4;1 is a new represented tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) aquaporin from P. vittata and the function and location results imply that PvTIP4;1 may be involved in As(III) uptake.

  20. Arsenite Removal from Simulated Groundwater by Biogenic Schwertmannite: A Column Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yue; ZHOU Li-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of biogenic schwertmannite to act as a sorbent for removing arsenite from groundwater,a series of biogenic schwertmannite-packed column adsorption experiments were conducted on simulated As(Ⅲ)-containing groundwater.Empty bed contact time (EBCT),As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent,and the removal efficiency of As(Ⅲ) through the column were investigated at pH 8.0 and temperature 25 ± 0.5 ℃.The results showed that the breakthrough curves were mainly dependent on EBCT values when the influent As(Ⅲ) concentration was 500 μg L-1 and the optimum EBCT was 4.0 min.When the effluent As(Ⅲ) concentration reached 10 and 50 μg L-1,the breakthrough volumes for the schwertmannite adsorption column were 4200 and 5600 bed volume (BV),with As(Ⅲ) adsorption capacity of 2.1 and 2.8 mg g-1,respectively.Biogenic schwertmannite could be regenerated by 1.0 mol L-1 NaOH solution,and more than 80% of As(Ⅲ) adsorbed on the surface of schwertmannite could be released after 3 successive regenerations.The breakthrough volume for the regenerated schwertmannite-packed column still maintained 4 000-4 200 BV when the As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent was below 10 μg L-1.Compared with other sorbents for As(Ⅲ) removal,the biogenic schwertmannitepacked column had a higher breakthrough volume and a much higher adsorption capacity,implying that biogenic schwertmannite was a highly efficient and potential sorbent to purify As(Ⅲ)-contaminated groundwater.

  1. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  2. Synergism between arsenite and proteasome inhibitor MG132 over cell death in myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and the induction of low levels of intracellular superoxide anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Tomás [Laboratorio de Immunotoxicologia (LaITO), IDEHU-CONICET, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cavaliere, Victoria; Costantino, Susana N. [Laboratorio de Inmunología Tumoral (LIT), IDEHU-CONICET, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kornblihtt, Laura [Servicio de Hematología, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, Elida M. [Laboratorio de Inmunología Tumoral (LIT), IDEHU-CONICET, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Blanco, Guillermo A., E-mail: gblanco@ffyb.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Immunotoxicologia (LaITO), IDEHU-CONICET, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxygen species production has often been cited as a mechanism determining synergism on cell death and growth inhibition effects of arsenic-combined drugs. However the net effect of drug combination may not be easily anticipated solely from available knowledge of drug-induced death mechanisms. We evaluated the combined effect of sodium arsenite with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and the anti-leukaemic agent CAPE, on growth-inhibition and cell death effect in acute myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and Burkitt's lymphoma-derived Raji cells, by the Chou–Talalay method. In addition we explored the association of cytotoxic effect of drugs with changes in intracellular superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}) levels. Our results showed that combined arsenite + MG132 produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h after exposure and were synergic on cell death induction in U937 cells over the whole dose range, although the combination was antagonistic on growth inhibition effect. Exposure to a constant non-cytotoxic dose of 80 μM hydrogen peroxide together with arsenite + MG132 changed synergism on cell death to antagonism at all effect levels while increasing O{sub 2}{sup −} levels. Arsenite + hydrogen peroxide also resulted in antagonism with increased O{sub 2}{sup −} levels in U937 cells. In Raji cells, arsenite + MG132 also produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h but resulted in antagonism on cell death and growth inhibition. By contrast, the combination arsenite + CAPE showed high levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} production at 6 h and 24 h post exposure but resulted in antagonism over cell death and growth inhibition effects in U937 and Raji cells. We conclude that synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 cells is negatively associated to O{sub 2}{sup −} levels at early time points after exposure. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic combined cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects by Chou–Talalay method. ► Cytotoxic effect

  3. The molecular pathway of low concentration of sodium arsenite in inducing differentiation of liver cancer stem cells by down-regulating promyelocytic leukemia protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-long JIN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the molecular pathway of low concentration of sodium arsenite in inducing differentiation of liver cancer stem cells. Methods  Western blotting analysis, immunofluorescence assay and quantitative PCR were used to examine the gene and protein expression of promyelocytic leukemia (PML, Oct4 and Sox2 in HCC tissue and cell lines, and the molecule pathway of low concentration of sodium arsenite inducing differentiation of liver cancer stem cells was confirmed by comparing the changes in the gene and protein expression of PML,Oct4 and Sox2 in HCC cells and biological function of LCSCs after the treatment with low concentration of sodium arsenite. Results  0.5μg/ml of sodium arsenite was shown to alter the biological characteristics of LCSCs in HuH7 and primary HCC cells, including the ability to form tumor spheres, resistance to pirarubicin (P<0.01, and the capability of forming tumors after allogeneic transplantation (P<0.05. Both HCC cells and tissues expressed the gene and protein of PML,Oct4 and Sox2, and 0.5μg/ml of sodium arsenite not only downregulated the gene and protein expression of Oct4 (P<0.05 and Sox2 in HCC cells (P<0.05, but also downregulated the protein expression of PML (P<0.05. In contrast, sodium arsenite did not inhibit the gene expression of PML in Hep3B, HepG2, SMCC-7721, HuH7 and primary HCC cells. Furthermore, through down-regulated PML protein expression with arsenite, the biological characteristics of HuH7 and primary HCC cells containing LCSCs was simultaneously altered, and the expression of stem gene Oct4 and Sox2 was downregulated (P<0.05, while HCC cells proliferation was inhibited as well. Conclusions  Both HCC tissues and cells can express the PML gene and PML protein. Low concentrations of sodium arsenite would directly bind to PML protein in HCC cells, resulting in degradation of the PML protein, followed by collapse of PML-NBs, inhibition of transcription of the proliferation

  4. Combined effects of fluoride and arsenite on the expression of Runx-related transcription 2 mRNA in bone of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑冲

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the combined effects of fluoride and arsenite on the expression of Runx-related transcription 2(Runx2)mRNA in bone of Sprague Dawley(SD)rats.Methods Fifty four SD rats were selected[body mass(109.71±10.52)g,half male and half female].3×3 Factorial experimental design was used to evaluate the combined effects of fluoride and arsenite on the expression of Runx2 mRNA by random number table.

  5. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase from plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Dongfeng; FENG Yi; JIANG Dazong

    2004-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) which can mediate browning reaction is a bifunctional copper-containing enzyme encoded by plant nucleolus gene. It usually leads to excessive browning reaction which reduces the coercial profits of fruits and vegetables. In this paper, PPO genes and enzymes in plants are characterized systematically, and the latest progress is reviewed. Some clonings of PPOs genes are reported; the specific temporal and spatial expression pattern of PPOs genes is described; the model of the structure of the precursor form of catechol oxidase is introduced; the possible functions of PPOs in defending against pathogen, wounding, surrounding stress and other inducing factors are demonstrated; the induction and activation of latent PPOs in some plants is elucidated; the scheme of browning inhibition by L-cysteine is clarified; the mechanism of suicide inhibition of latent PPO and kinetic synergism are established. Furthermore, the area for future study is also discussed.

  6. Plasma diamine oxidase activity in asthmatic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoichiro Toyoshima

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine plays an important role in the development of asthmatic symptoms. Diamine oxidase (DAO histaminase, which inactivates histamine, is located in the intestine and kidney and is released into plasma. Plasma DAO activity in asthmatic children was measured by a recently developed high performance liquid chromatographic method using histamine as the DAO substrate. Diamine oxidase activity was higher in severely asthmatic children than in those with mild asthma. A time course study during the acute exacerbation phase revealed that DAO activity rose during acute asthmatic attacks and then decreased gradually over several days. Although the mechanisms of plasma DAO activity increase during acute asthmatic attacks could not be explained, data showed that plasma DAO activity is an important index of histamine metabolism in asthmatics and may relate to some mechanisms of acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Consequently, fluctuations in plasma DAO can be used as one of various indices of instability in management of asthma.

  7. Xanthine oxidase biosensor for monitoring meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have designed an electrochemical biosensor for real-time detection of specific biomarkers of bacterial metabolism related to meat spoilage (hypoxanthine and xanthine). The selective biosensor was developed by assembling a `sandwich' of nanomaterials and enzymes on a platinum-iridium electrode (1.6 mm tip diameter). The materials deposited on the sensor tip include amorphous platinum nanoclusters (i.e. Pt black), reduced graphene oxide, nanoceria, and xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase was encapsulated in laponite hydrogel and used for the biorecognition of hypoxanthine and xanthine (two molecules involved in the rotting of meat by spoilage microorganisms). The developed biosensor demonstrated good electrochemical performance toward xanthine with sensitivity of 2.14 +/- 1.48 μA/mM, response time of 5.2 +/- 1.5 sec, lower detection limit of 150 +/- 39 nM, and retained at least 88% of its activity after 7 days of continuous use.

  8. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by esomeprazole

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Virtual screening of a library of drugs has suggested that esomeprazole, the S-enantiomer of omeprazole, may possess binding affinities for the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. Based on this finding, the current study examines the MAO inhibitory properties of esomeprazole. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, IC50 values for the inhibition of these enzymes by esomeprazole were experimentally determined. To examine the reversibility of MAO inhibition by esomepra...

  9. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  10. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist, reversibly inhibits monoamine oxidase A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenow, S; Stasiak, A; Ramsay, R R; Stark, H

    2017-01-13

    Ciproxifan is a well-investigated histamine H3 receptor (H3R) inverse agonist/antagonist, showing an exclusively high species-specific affinity at rodent compared to human H3R. It is well studied as reference compound for H3R in rodent models for neurological diseases connected with neurotransmitter dysregulation, e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or Alzheimer's disease. In a screening for potential monoamine oxidase A and B inhibition ciproxifan showed efficacy on both enzyme isoforms. Further characterization of ciproxifan revealed IC50 values in a micromolar concentration range for human and rat monoamine oxidases with slight preference for monoamine oxidase B in both species. The inhibition by ciproxifan was reversible for both human isoforms. Regarding inhibitory potency of ciproxifan on rat brain MAO, these findings should be considered, when using high doses in rat models for neurological diseases. As the H3R and monoamine oxidases are all capable of affecting neurotransmitter modulation in brain, we consider dual targeting ligands as interesting approach for treatment of neurological disorders. Since ciproxifan shows only moderate activity at human targets, further investigations in animals are not of primary interest. On the other hand, it may serve as starting point for the development of dual targeting ligands.

  11. Insights into proton translocation in cbb3 oxidase from MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheda, Catarina A; Pisliakov, Andrei V

    2017-03-01

    Heme-copper oxidases are membrane protein complexes that catalyse the final step of the aerobic respiration, namely the reduction of oxygen to water. The energy released during catalysis is coupled to the active translocation of protons across the membrane, which contributes to the establishment of an electrochemical gradient that is used for ATP synthesis. The distinctive C-type (or cbb3) cytochrome c oxidases, which are mostly present in proteobacteria, exhibit a number of unique structural and functional features, including high catalytic activity at low oxygen concentrations. At the moment, the functioning mechanism of C-type oxidases, in particular the proton transfer/pumping mechanism presumably via a single proton channel, is still poorly understood. In this work we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and continuum electrostatics calculations to obtain atomic-level insights into the hydration and dynamics of a cbb3 oxidase. We provide the details of the water dynamics and proton transfer pathways for both the "chemical" and "pumped" protons, and show that formation of protonic connections is strongly affected by the protonation state of key residues, namely H243, E323 and H337.

  12. Complexation of arsenite with dissolved organic matter: conditional distribution coefficients and apparent stability constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2010-11-01

    The complexation of arsenic (As) with dissolved organic matter (DOM), although playing an important role in regulating As mobility and transformation, is poorly characterized, as evidenced by scarce reporting of fundamental parameters of As-DOM complexes. The complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with Aldrich humic acid (HA) at different pHs was characterized using a recently developed analytical technique to measure both free and DOM-bound As. Conditional distribution coefficient (KD), describing capacity of DOM in binding AsIII from the mass perspective, and apparent stability constant (Ks), describing stability of resulting AsIII-DOM complexes, were calculated to characterize AsIII-DOM complexation. LogKD of AsIII ranged from 3.7 to 2.2 (decreasing with increase of As/DOM ratio) at pH 5.2, from 3.6 to 2.6 at pH 7, and from 4.3 to 3.2 at pH=9.3, respectively. Two-site ligand binding models can capture the heterogeneity of binding sites and be used to calculate Ks by classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) groups. LogKs for S1 sites are 7.0, 6.5, and 5.9 for pH 5.2, 7, and 9.3, respectively, which are approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than for weak S2 sites. The results suggest that AsIII complexation with DOM increases with pH, as evidenced by significant spikes in concentrations of DOM-bound AsIII and in KD values at pH 9.3. In contrary to KD, logKs decreased with pH, in particular for S1 sites, probably due to the presence of negatively charged H2AsO3- and the involvement of metal-bridged AsIII-DOM complexation at pH 9.3.

  13. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. [Komipharm International Co. Ltd., 3188, Seongnam-dong, Jungwon-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 462-827 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C.S. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, H.S., E-mail: hsjun@gachon.ac.kr [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  14. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE REMOVAL BY ZERO-VALENT IRON: EFFECTS OF PHOSPHATE, SILICATE, CARBONATE, BORATE, SULFATE, CHROMATE, MOLYBDATE, AND NITRATE, RELATIVE TO CHLORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch tests were performed to evaluate the effects of inorganic anion competition on the kinetics of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) removal by zerovalent iron (Peerless Fe0) in aqueous solution. The oxyanions underwent either sorption-dominated reactions (phosphate, sil...

  15. Ribosomal protein S7 regulates arsenite-induced GADD45α expression by attenuating MDM2-mediated GADD45α ubiquitination and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Li, Xiaoguang; Dong, Wen; Jin, Rui; Ma, Hanghang; Yang, Pingxun; Hu, Meiru; Li, Yi; Hao, Yi; Yuan, Shengtao; Huang, Junjian; Song, Lun

    2013-05-01

    The stress-responding protein, GADD45α, plays important roles in cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair and apoptosis. In our recent study, we demonstrate that GADD45α undergoes a dynamic ubiquitination and degradation in vivo, which process can be blocked by the cytotoxic reagent, arsenite, resulting in GADD45α accumulation to activate JNKs cell death pathway, thereby revealing a novel mechanism for the cellular GADD45α functional regulation. But the factors involved in GADD45α stability modulations are unidentified. Here, we demonstrated that MDM2 was an E3 ubiquitin ligase for GADD45α. One of MDM2-binding partner, ribosomal protein S7, interacted with and stabilized GADD45α through preventing the ubiquitination and degradation of GADD45α mediated by MDM2. This novel function of S7 is unrelated to p53 but seems to depend on S7/MDM2 interaction, for the S7 mutant lacking MDM2-binding ability lost its function to stabilize GADD45α. Further investigations indicated that arsenite treatment enhanced S7-MDM2 interaction, resulting in attenuation of MDM2-dependent GADD45α ubiquitination and degradation, thereby leading to GADD45α-dependent cell death pathway activation. Silencing S7 expression suppressed GADD45α-dependent cytotoxicity induced by arsenite. Our findings thus identify a novel function of S7 in control of GADD45α stabilization under both basal and stress conditions and its significance in mediating arsenite-induced cellular stress.

  16. Marked and variable inhibition by chemical fixation of cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in single motoneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of tissue fixation on succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activity in single motoneurons of the rat was demonstrated using a computer image processing system. Inhibition of enzyme activity by chemical fixation was variable, with some motoneurons being affected more than others. It was concluded that quantification of enzymatic activity in chemically fixed tissue provides an imprecise estimate of enzyme activities found in fresh-frozen tissues.

  17. Genetic studies of two inherited human phenotypes : Hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Balciuniene, Jorune

    2001-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of genetic factors underlying two inherited human phenotypes: hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity. Non-syndromic hearing loss segregating in a Swedish family was tested for linkage to 13 previously reported candidate loci for hearing disabilities. Linkage was found to two loci: DFNA12 (llq22-q24) and DFNA2 (lp32). A detailed analysis of the phenotypes and haplotypes shared by the affected individuals supported the hypothesis of digenic inheri...

  18. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Kiehl

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+ but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+ are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase.

  19. The nature of CuA in cytochrome c oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Tom H.; Martin, Craig T.; Wang, Hsin; Brudvig, Gary W.; Scholes, Charles P.; Chan, Sunney I.

    1982-01-01

    The isolation and purification of yeast cytochrome c oxidase is described. Characterization of the purified protein indicates that it is spectroscopically identical with cytochrome c oxidase isolated from beef heart. Preparations of isotopically substituted yeast cytochrome c oxidase are obtained incorporating [1,3-15N2]histidine or [beta,beta- 2H2]cysteine. Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance spectra of the isotopically substituted proteins identify unambigu...

  20. NADH/NADPH Oxidase and Vascular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griendling, K K; Ushio-Fukai, M

    1997-11-01

    The vascular NADH/NADPH oxidase has been shown to be the major source of superoxide in the vessel wall. Recent work has provided insight into its structure and activity in vascular cells. This enzyme is involved in both vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy and in some forms of impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation. Because oxidative stress in general participates in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis, the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species may be important determinants of the course of vascular disease. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:301-307). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  1. NADPH oxidase: an enzyme for multicellularity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Multicellularity has evolved several times during the evolution of eukaryotes. One evolutionary pressure that permits multicellularity relates to the division of work, where one group of cells functions as nutrient providers and the other in specialized roles such as defence or reproduction. This requires signalling systems to ensure harmonious development of multicellular structures. Here, we show that NADPH oxidases are specifically present in organisms that differentiate multicellular structures during their life cycle and are absent from unicellular life forms. The biochemical properties of these enzymes make them ideal candidates for a role in intercellular signalling.

  2. OXIDASE REACTION OF VARIOUS GROUPS OF BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, L D

    1923-08-31

    1. A simple technique is described for studying the oxidase action of bacteria by means of the oxidation of p-aminoleucomalachite green. 2. It is shown that pneumococci under aerobic conditions produced an oxidase when grown on suitable medium. The sera of any of seven different animal species constitute such a medium, the degree of oxidation by the pneumococcus depending upon the animal from which the serum was taken-rat, guinea pig, rabbit, horse, man, cat, and chicken in order of diminishing suitability. 3. Conditions favoring the oxidation of p-aminoleucomalachite green by a single strain of pneumococci are: the presence of a slight amount of hemoglobin, dextrose, H ion concentration on the add side, and heating of fresh serum for 30 minutes at 56 degrees C. Conditions preventing the oxidation are: sterilized meat infusion, 1 per cent peptone, plain broth, a high concentration of hemoglobin, and absence of oxygen. In a quantitative fashion, meat infusion, 1 per cent peptone, and plain broth interfere with the suitability of serum as a substratum of oxidase production by the pneumococcus. 4. Twenty-three microbic species were studied with reference to oxidative power. They were grown upon 10 per cent horse serum, with and without dextrose, upon 10 per cent guinea pig serum, and upon plain broth. Only three of the twenty-three gave evidence of oxidative power as tested by p-aminoleucomalachite green; namely, the pneumococcus, Streptococcus viridans, and Streptococcus haemolyticus. Among the strains, of these three pneumococci gave the most intense reaction, after which Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus haemolyticus follow in the order named, but with a noticeable variation among the different strains of Streptococcus haemolyticus. 5. Hemolytic streptococci of human and bovine origin were studied. The only variation in the type of reaction was manifested by the streptococci of milk and cheese origin. Strains from these sources showed definitely the least

  3. A possible relationship between bumblefoot responsive to potassium arsenite and micrococci in the blood of three birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarello, W

    2002-01-01

    Pododermatitis (bumblefoot) is a major health problem of falcons world-wide because healing processes in the talons are difficult and lengthy. A peregrine (Falco peregrinus), a merlin (Falco columbarius) and a saker falcon (Falco cherrug) with bumblefoot at different stages ranging from III to V, were all found to be carriers of micrococcus-like organisms in the blood and two of them were successfully treated with 0.5% potassium arsenite in low dosage given intravenously. A number of considerations are made on the immune dysfunction aspects of bumblefoot in birds of prey and on the emerging role of arsenic-based medicaments in the treatment of animal and human immune dysfunction syndromes.

  4. A Raman spectroscopic study of arsenite and thioarsenite species in aqueous solution at 25°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janecky David R

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The Raman spectra of thioarsenite and arsenite species in aqueous solution were obtained at room temperature. Solutions at constant ΣAs + ΣS of 0.1 and 0.5 mol kg-1 were prepared with various ΣS/ΣAs ratios (0.1–9.0 and pH values (~7–13.2. Our data suggest that the speciation of As under the conditions investigated is more complicated than previously thought. The Raman measurements offer evidence for at least six separate S-bearing As species whose principal bands are centered near 365, 385, 390, 400, 415 and 420 cm-1. The data suggest that at least two different species may give rise to bands at 385 cm-1, bringing the probable minimum number of species to seven. Several additional species are possible but could not be resolved definitively. In general, the relative proportions of these species are dependent on total As concentration, ΣS/ΣAs ratio and pH. At very low ΣS/ΣAs ratios we also observe Raman bands attributable to the dissociation products of H3AsO3(aq. Although we were unable to assign precise stoichiometries for the various thioarsenite species, we were able to map out general pH and ΣS/ΣAs conditions under which the various thioarsenite and arsenite species are predominant. This study provides a basis for more detailed Raman spectroscopic and other types of investigations of the nature of thioarsenite species.

  5. Enzymatic Characterization and In Vivo Function of Five Terminal Oxidases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Takuro; Osamura, Tatsuya; Hirai, Takehiro; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has five aerobic terminal oxidases: bo3-type quinol oxidase (Cyo), cyanide-insensitive oxidase (CIO), aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase (aa3), and two cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases (cbb3-1 and cbb3-2). These terminal oxidases are differentially regulated under various growth conditions and are thought to contribute to the survival of this microorganism in a wide variety of environmental niches. Here, we constructed multiple mutant str...

  6. Endothelins and NADPH oxidases in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammanahalli, Karigowda J; Sun, Zhongjie

    2008-01-01

    1. The endothelin (ET) system and NADPH oxidase play important roles in the regulation of cardiovascular function, as well as in the pathogenesis of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. 2. Endothelins activate NADPH oxidases and thereby increase superoxide production, resulting in oxidative stress and cardiovascular dysfunction. Thus, NADPH oxidases may mediate the role of endothelins in some cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating ET-induced vasoconstriction and cardiovascular disease remains under debate, as evidenced by conflicting reports from different research teams. Conversely, activation of NADPH oxidase can stimulate ET secretion via ROS generation, which further enhances the cardiovascular effects of NADPH oxidase. However, little is known about how ROS activate the endothelin system. It seems that the relationship between ET-1 and ROS may vary with cardiovascular disorders. 3. Endothelins activate NADPH oxidase via the ET receptor-proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2)-Rac1 pathway. Rac1 is an important regulator of NADPH oxidase. There is ample evidence supporting direct stimulation by Rac1 of NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, Rac1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is mediated by the generation of ROS.

  7. Laboratory-evolved vanillyl-alcohol oxidase produces natural vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Rovida, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2004-01-01

    The flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase was subjected to random mutagenesis to generate mutants with enhanced reactivity to creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol). The vanillyl-alcohol oxidase-mediated conversion of creosol proceeds via a two-step process in which the initially formed vanillyl alcohol

  8. Modulation of NADPH oxidase activity by known uraemic retention solutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna Marta; Terne, Cindy; Jankowski, Vera

    2014-01-01

    as the strongest inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (90% of DPI inhibition). Surprisingly, none of the uraemic retention solutes we investigated was found to increase NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, plasma from patients with CKD-5D before dialysis caused significantly higher inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase...... inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity in the presence of plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis compared with before dialysis, we investigated the effect of 48 known and commercially available uraemic retention solutes on the enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase. METHODS: Mononuclear leucocytes...... isolated from buffy coats of healthy volunteers were isolated, lysed and incubated with NADH in the presence of plasma from healthy controls and patients with CKD-5D. Furthermore, the leucocytes were lysed and incubated in the presence of uraemic retention solute of interest and diphenyleneiodonium...

  9. The NADH oxidase-Prx system in Amphibacillus xylanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimura, Youichi

    2007-01-01

    Amphibacillus NADH oxidase belongs to a growing new family of peroxiredoxin-linked oxidoreductases including alkyl hydroperoxide reductase F (AhpF). Like AhpF it displays extremely high hydroperoxide reductase activity in the presence of a Prx, thus making up the NADH oxidase-Prx system. The NADH oxidase primarily catalyzes the reduction of oxygen by NADH to form H2O2, while the Prx immediately reduces H2O2 (or ROOH) to water (or ROH). Consequently, the NADH oxidase-Prx system catalyzes the reduction of both oxygen and hydrogen peroxide to water with NADH as the preferred electron donor. The NADH oxidase-Prx system is widely distributed in aerobically growing bacteria lacking a respiratory chain and catalase, and plays an important role not only in scavenging hydroperoxides but also in regenerating NAD in these bacteria.

  10. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  11. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  12. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy X. Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidases (NOXs are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases.

  13. Subunit structure of bovine milk xanthine oxidase. Effect of limited cleavage by proteolytic enzymes on activity and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, L G; Vartanyan, L S

    1976-03-18

    Bovine milk xanthine oxidase (xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.2.3.2) has been purified by a modified method without the use of proteases, and its structure has been analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Native xanthine oxidase is found to consist of only two polypeptide chains A with molecular weights of 150 000 each. These chains have NH2-terminal methionine. Limited proteolysis with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or subtilisin at pH 8 did not affect molecular weight and activities of the enzyme while each of the A chains was cleaved under these conditions to three fragments C, E, and F with molecular weights of 92 00, 42 000 and 20 000, respectively. These fragments remained bound to each other and were relatively resistant to subsequent proteolysis. The isolation of xanthine oxidase in the presence of pancreatin as described by Hart et al. (1970, Biochem. J. 116, 851) gives partially digested enzyme composed mainly of chains C, E (Mr 35 000) and a small component (Mr approx. 15 0-0). The action of subtilisin on xanthine oxidase at pH 11 resulted in complete digestion of E chains, FAD separation, and total loss of xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase activity while xanthine:indophenol oxidoreductase activity was relatively little affected. The residual enzyme has a molecular weight of about 200 000, is composed mainly of two C chains (and may probably contain F and/or proteolytic fragments of low molecular weight), contains molybdenum, and does not contain FAD.

  14. Elevated connexin 43 expression in arsenite-and cadmium-transformed human bladder cancer cells, tumor transplants and selected high grade human bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wang, Liping; Garrett, Scott H; Sens, Donald A; Dunlevy, Jane R; Zhou, Xu Dong; Somji, Seema

    2016-10-01

    Connexin 43 has been shown to play a role in cell migration and invasion; however, its role in bladder cancer is not well defined. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the environmental pollutants arsenite and cadmium can cause malignant transformation of the immortalized urothelial cell line UROtsa. These transformed cells can form tumors in immune-compromised mice. The goal of the present study was to determine if connexin 43 is expressed in the normal human bladder, the arsenite and cadmiun-transformed UROtsa cells as well as human urothelial cancer. The results obtained showed that connexin 43 is not expressed in the epithelial cells of the human bladder but is expressed in immortalized cultures of human urothelial cells and the expression is variable in the arsenite and cadmium- transformed urothelial cell lines derived from these immortalized cells. Tumor heterotransplants generated from the transformed cells expressed connexin 43 and the expression was localized to areas of squamous differentiation. Immuno-histochemical analysis of human bladder cancers also showed that the expression of connexin 43 was localized to areas of the tumor that showed early features of squamous differentiation. Treatment of UROtsa cells with various concentrations of arsenite or cadmium did not significantly alter the expression level of connexin 43. In conclusion, our results show that the expression of connexin 43 is localized to the areas of the tumor that show squamous differentiation, which may be an indicator of poor prognosis. This suggests that connexin 43 has the potential to be developed as a biomarker for bladder cancer that may have the ability to invade and metastasize.

  15. The insert region of the Rac GTPases is dispensable for activation of superoxide-producing NADPH oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kei; Koga, Hirofumi; Minakami, Reiko; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2009-08-13

    Rac1 and Rac2, which belong to the Rho subfamily of Ras-related GTPases, play an essential role in activation of gp91phox/Nox2 (cytochrome b-245, beta polypeptide; also known as Cybb), the catalytic core of the superoxide-producing NADPH oxidase in phagocytes. Rac1 also contributes to activation of the non-phagocytic oxidases Nox1 (NADPH oxidase 1) and Nox3 (NADPH oxidase 3), each related closely to gp91phox/Nox2. It has remained controversial whether the insert region of Rac (amino acids 123-135), unique to the Rho subfamily proteins, is involved in gp91phox/Nox2 activation. In the present study we show that removal of the insert region from Rac1 neither affects activation of gp91phox/Nox2, which is reconstituted under cell-free and whole-cell conditions, nor blocks its localization to phagosomes during ingestion of IgG-coated beads by macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The insert region of Rac2 is also dispensable for gp91phox/Nox2 activation at the cellular level. Although Rac2, as well as Rac1, is capable of enhancing superoxide production by Nox1 and Nox3, the enhancements by the two GTPases are both independent of the insert region. We also demonstrate that Rac3, a third member of the Rac family in mammals, has an ability to activate the three oxidases and that the activation does not require the insert region. Thus the insert region of the Rac GTPases does not participate in regulation of the Nox family NADPH oxidases.

  16. Mimicking a SURF1 allele reveals uncoupling of cytochrome c oxidase assembly from translational regulation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Robert; Bareth, Bettina; Balleininger, Martina; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Mick, David U

    2011-06-15

    Defects in mitochondrial energy metabolism lead to severe human disorders, mainly affecting tissues especially dependent on oxidative phosphorylation, such as muscle and brain. Leigh Syndrome describes a severe encephalomyopathy in infancy, frequently caused by mutations in SURF1. SURF1, termed Shy1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved assembly factor for the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase. Although the molecular function of SURF1/Shy1 is still enigmatic, loss of function leads to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and reduced expression of the central subunit Cox1 in yeast. Here, we provide insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to disease through missense mutations in codons of the most conserved amino acids in SURF1. Mutations affecting G(124) do not compromise import of the SURF1 precursor protein but lead to fast turnover of the mature protein within the mitochondria. Interestingly, an Y(274)D exchange neither affects stability nor localization of the protein. Instead, SURF1(Y274D) accumulates in a 200 kDa cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediate. Using yeast as a model, we demonstrate that the corresponding Shy1(Y344D) is able to overcome the stage where cytochrome c oxidase assembly links to the feedback regulation of mitochondrial Cox1 expression. However, Shy1(Y344D) impairs the assembly at later steps, most apparent at low temperature and exhibits a dominant-negative phenotype upon overexpression. Thus, exchanging the conserved tyrosine (Y(344)) with aspartate in yeast uncouples translational regulation of Cox1 from cytochrome c oxidase assembly and provides evidence for the dual functionality of Shy1.

  17. CotA, a multicopper oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, exhibits manganese-oxidase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Su

    Full Text Available Multicopper oxidases (MCOs are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II oxidase activity was obtained at 53°C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0 supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II were 14.85±1.17 mM, 3.01×10(-6±0.21 M·min(-1 and 0.32±0.02 s(-1, respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II oxidation mechanisms, but also offers

  18. Biological Effects of Potato Plants Transformation with Glucose Oxidase Gene and their Resistance to Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Grabelnych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It is known that regulation of plant tolerance to adverse environmental factors is connected with short term increase of the concentration of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are signalling molecules for the induction of protective mechanisms. Introduction and expression of heterologous gox gene, which encodes glucose oxidase enzyme in plant genome, induce constantly higher content of hydrogen peroxide in plant tissues. It is not known how the introduction of native or modified gox gene affects the plant resistance to high-temperature stress, one of the most commonly used model for the study of stress response and thermal tolerance. In this study, we investigated biological effects of transformation and evaluated the resistance to temperature stress of potato plants with altered levels of glucose oxidase expression. Transformation of potato plants by gox gene led to the more early coming out from tuber dormancy of transformed plants and slower growth rate. Transformants containing the glucose oxidase gene were more sensitive to lethal thermal shock (50 °C, 90 min than the transformant with the empty vector (pBI or untransformed plants (CK. Pre-heating of plants at 37 °C significantly weakened the damaging effect of lethal thermal shock. This attenuation was more significant in the non-transformed plants.

  19. Multilayered polyelectrolyte microcapsules: interaction with the enzyme cytochrome C oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A M; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties.

  20. Multilayered polyelectrolyte microcapsules: interaction with the enzyme cytochrome C oxidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pastorino

    Full Text Available Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties.

  1. Lysyl oxidase is associated with increased thrombosis and platelet reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shinobu; Mi, Rongjuan; Koupenova, Milka; Eliades, Alexia; Patterson, Shenia; Toselli, Paul; Thon, Jonathan; Italiano, Joseph E; Trackman, Philip C; Papadantonakis, Nikolaos; Ravid, Katya

    2016-03-17

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is overexpressed in various pathologies associated with thrombosis, such as arterial stenosis and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). LOX is elevated in the megakaryocytic lineage of mouse models of MPNs and in patients with MPNs. To gain insight into the role of LOX in thrombosis and platelet function without compounding the influences of other pathologies, transgenic mice expressing LOX in wild-type megakaryocytes and platelets (Pf4-Lox(tg/tg)) were generated. Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) mice had a normal number of platelets; however, time to vessel occlusion after endothelial injury was significantly shorter in Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) mice, indicating a higher propensity for thrombus formation in vivo. Exploring underlying mechanisms, we found that Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) platelets adhere better to collagen and have greater aggregation response to lower doses of collagen compared with controls. Platelet activation in response to the ligand for collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (cross-linked collagen-related peptide) was unaffected. However, the higher affinity of Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) platelets to the collagen sequence GFOGER implies that the collagen receptor integrin α2β1 is affected by LOX. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that LOX enhances platelet activation and thrombosis.

  2. Aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Henrik J; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2002-12-04

    In the present study, the aldehyde-induced pro-oxidative activity of xanthine oxidase was followed in an accelerated raw milk system using spin-trap electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The aldehydes acetaldehyde, propanal, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, trans-2-heptenal, trans-2-nonenal, and 3-methyl-2-butenal were all found to initiate radical reactions when added to milk. Formation of superoxide through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity is suggested as the initial reaction, as all tested aldehydes were shown to trigger superoxide formation in an ultrahigh temperature (UHT) milk model system with added xanthine oxidase. It was found that addition of aldehydes to milk initially increased the ascorbyl radical concentration with a subsequent decay due to ascorbate depletion, which renders the formation of superoxide in milk with added aldehyde. The present study shows for the first time potential acceleration of oxidative events in milk through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity.

  3. Activation of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Keith B; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2012-12-01

    Upon infection of the respiratory system with the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus various leukoctytes, in particular neutrophils, are recruited to the lung to mount an immune response. Neutrophils respond by both phagocytosing conidia and mediating extracellular killing of germinated, invasive hyphae. Of paramount importance to an appropriate immune response is the neutrophil NADPH oxidase enzyme, which mediates the production of various reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is evidenced by the acute sensitivity of both oxidase-deficient humans and mice to invasive aspergillosis. Herein we briefly review the mechanisms and functions of oxidase activation and discuss our recent work identifying at least some of the important players in hyphal-induced oxidase activation and neutrophil function. Among these we define the phosphoinositide 3-kinase enzyme and the regulatory protein Vav to be of critical importance and allude to a kinase-independent role for Syk.

  4. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised and the ......1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... the increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle there were no detectable changes in the levels of muscle malondialdehyde or in plasma antioxidant capacity up to 4 days post-exercise. 5. It is concluded that eccentric exercise leads to an increased level of xanthine oxidase in human muscle and that the increase...

  5. Regulation of the NADPH Oxidase RBOHD During Plant Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen recognition induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases in both plants and animals. ROS have direct antimicrobial properties, but also serve as signaling molecules to activate further immune outputs. However, ROS production has to be tightly controlled to avoid detrimental effects on host cells, but yet must be produced in the right amount, at the right place and at the right time upon pathogen perception. Plant NADPH oxidases belong to the respiratory b...

  6. Heterologous expression of glucose oxidase in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gombert Andreas K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of its advantageous physiological properties for bioprocess applications, the use of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein production has been very limited, in constrast to its close relative Kluyveromyces lactis. In the present work, the model protein glucose oxidase (GOX from Aspergillus niger was cloned into K. marxianus CBS 6556 and into K. lactis CBS 2359 using three different expression systems. We aimed at verifying how each expression system would affect protein expression, secretion/localization, post-translational modification, and biochemical properties. Results The highest GOX expression levels (1552 units of secreted protein per gram dry cell weight were achieved using an episomal system, in which the INU1 promoter and terminator were used to drive heterologous gene expression, together with the INU1 prepro sequence, which was employed to drive secretion of the enzyme. In all cases, GOX was mainly secreted, remaining either in the periplasmic space or in the culture supernatant. Whereas the use of genetic elements from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to drive heterologous protein expression led to higher expression levels in K. lactis than in K. marxianus, the use of INU1 genetic elements clearly led to the opposite result. The biochemical characterization of GOX confirmed the correct expression of the protein and showed that K. marxianus has a tendency to hyperglycosylate the protein, in a similar way as already observed for other yeasts, although this tendency seems to be smaller than the one of e.g. K. lactis and S. cerevisiae. Hyperglycosylation of GOX does not seem to affect its affinity for the substrate, nor its activity. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that K. marxianus is indeed a good host for the expression of heterologous proteins, not only for its physiological properties, but also because it correctly secretes and folds these proteins.

  7. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  8. Modular assembly of yeast cytochrome oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, Gavin P; Su, Chen Hsien; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies of yeast cytochrome oxidase (COX) biogenesis identified Cox1p, one of the three mitochondrially encoded core subunits, in two high-molecular weight complexes combined with regulatory/assembly factors essential for expression of this subunit. In the present study we use pulse-chase labeling experiments in conjunction with isolated mitochondria to identify new Cox1p intermediates and place them in an ordered pathway. Our results indicate that before its assimilation into COX, Cox1p transitions through five intermediates that are differentiated by their compositions of accessory factors and of two of the eight imported subunits. We propose a model of COX biogenesis in which Cox1p and the two other mitochondrial gene products, Cox2p and Cox3p, constitute independent assembly modules, each with its own complement of subunits. Unlike their bacterial counterparts, which are composed only of the individual core subunits, the final sequence in which the mitochondrial modules associate to form the holoenzyme may have been conserved during evolution.

  9. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function.

  11. Sodium arsenite mediated immuno-disruption through alteration of transcription profile of cytokines in chicken splenocytes under in vitro system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhashree; Pan, Diganta; Bera, Asit Kumar; Rana, Tanmoy; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Bandyapadyay, Subhasis; De, Sumanta; Sreevatsava, V; Bhattacharya, Somnath; Das, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhayay, Sandip

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitously found metalloid that commonly contaminates drinking water and agricultural food. To understand the ecotoxicological effects of arsenic in environment, it is essential to ameliorate the deleterious effects on human and animal health, particularly on the immune response. We investigated the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAs) on the immune response of chicken splenocytes. Both 1 and 10 mM concentrations of sodium arsenite treatment significantly reduced (Ptreatment also revealed time dependent differences. Relative quantification of expression of IFNγ and IL2 revealed that both genes were significantly down regulated (P<0.001) at both concentrations at each time point. iNOS gene was rapidly down regulated in splenocytes at 24 h at the high doses of As treated splenocyte, a gradual decreasing trend at low doses. Down regulation of IL-2 gene expression in response to As was further evidenced by a significant reduction (P<0.001) in the release of IL-2 into the splenocyte culture medium. We suggest that arsenic, a potent immunotoxic agent, modulates non-specific immune responses and alters the expression of cytokines in a dose and time dependent manner.

  12. Arsenate and arsenite exposure modulate antioxidants and amino acids in contrasting arsenic accumulating rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Richa; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tripathi, Preeti; Dixit, Garima; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2013-11-15

    Carcinogenic arsenic (As) concentrations are found in rice due to irrigation with contaminated groundwater in South-East Asia. The present study evaluates comparative antioxidant property and specific amino acid accumulation in contrasting rice genotypes corresponding to differential As accumulation during arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) exposures. The study was conducted on two contrasting As accumulating rice genotypes selected from 303 genotype accessions, in hydroponic conditions. Maximum As accumulation was up to 1181 μg g(-1) dw in the roots of high As accumulating genotype (HARG), and 89 μg g(-1) dw in low As accumulating genotype (LARG) under As(III) exposures. The inorganic As was correlated more significantly upon exposures to As(III) than As(V). In the presence of As(V) various antioxidant enzymes guiacol peroxidase (GPX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were highly stimulated in HARG. The stress responsive amino acids proline, cysteine, glycine, glutamic acid and methionine showed higher accumulation in HARG than LARG. A clear correlation was found between stress responsive amino acids, As accumulation and antioxidative response. The comparisons between the contrasting genotypes helped to determine the significance of antioxidants and specific amino acid response to As stress.

  13. Protective effects of the dietary supplementation of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) on sodium arsenite-induced biochemical perturbation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md Rezaul; Haque, Abedul; Islam, Khairul; Ali, Nurshad; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Hossain, Ekhtear; Fajol, Abul; Akhand, Anwarul Azim; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2010-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of turmeric powder on arsenic toxicity through mice model. Swiss albino male mice were divided into four groups. The first group was used as control, while groups 2, 3, and 4 were treated with turmeric powder (T, 50 mg/kg body weight/day), sodium arsenite (Sa, 10 mg/kg body weight/day) and turmeric plus Sa (T+Sa), respectively. Results showed that oral administration of Sa reduced the weight gain of the mice compared to the control group and food supplementation of turmeric prevented the reduction of weight gain. Turmeric abrogated the Sa-induced elevation of serum urea, glucose, triglyceride (TG) level and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity except the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Turmeric also prevented the Sa-induced perturbation of serum butyryl cholinesterase activity (BChE). Therefore, ameliorating effect of turmeric on Sa-treated mice suggested the future application of turmeric to reduce or to prevent arsenic toxicity in human.

  14. Photosynthesis is induced in rice plants that associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and are grown under arsenate and arsenite stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Sara Adrian Lopez; Domingues, Adilson Pereira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The metalloid arsenic (As) increases in agricultural soils because of anthropogenic activities and may have phytotoxic effects depending on the available concentrations. Plant performance can be improved by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) association under challenging conditions, such as those caused by excessive soil As levels. In this study, the influence of AM on CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll a fluorescence, SPAD-chlorophyll contents and plant growth was investigated in rice plants exposed to arsenate (AsV) or arsenite (AsIII) and inoculated or not with Rhizophagus irregularis. Under AsV and AsIII exposure, AM rice plants had greater biomass accumulation and relative chlorophyll content, increased water-use efficiency, higher carbon assimilation rate and higher stomatal conductance and transpiration rates than non-AM rice plants did. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis revealed significant differences in the response of AM-associated and -non-associated plants to As. Mycorrhization increased the maximum and actual quantum yields of photosystem II and the electron transport rate, maintaining higher values even under As exposure. Apart from the negative effects of AsV and AsIII on the photosynthetic rates and PSII efficiency in rice leaves, taken together, these results indicate that AM is able to sustain higher rice photosynthesis efficiency even under elevated As concentrations, especially when As is present as AsV.

  15. Tissue distribution and subcellular binding of arsenic in marmoset monkeys after injection of /sup 74/As-arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahter, M.; Marafante, E.; Lindgren, A.; Dencker, L.

    1982-10-01

    The distribution and retention of arsenic in Marmoset monkeys, given /sup 74/As-arsenite (0.4 mg As/kg body weight) i.p., were studied by means of whole-body autoradiography and determination of /sup 74/As-levels in tissues and excreta. Only about 30% of the dose was eliminated over 4 days, mainly via the kidneys. All of the arsenic in urine and tissues was found to be in inorganic form. Tissues with highest accumulation 4 days after dosing were liver (about 20% of the dose), squamous epithelium of oral cavity and esophagus, kidney cortex, skin, testes (mainly tubuli seminiferi) and intestinal wall. As a rule the major part of the arsenic in these tissues was found to be associated with cellular organelles. In the liver about 50% of the arsenic was strongly bound to the rough microsomal membranes. In the soluble extract of tissues, arsenic was mainly associated with macromolecular constituents. The long retention time and tight binding of arsenic could partly be explained by the fact that no biotransformation into methylated arsenic occurred, in contrast to all other species studied so far.

  16. Genetically Engineering Bacillus subtilis with a Heat-Resistant Arsenite Methyltransferase for Bioremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Organic Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Chen, Chuan; Shen, Qirong; Rosen, Barry P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2015-10-01

    Organic manures may contain high levels of arsenic (As) due to the use of As-containing growth-promoting substances in animal feed. To develop a bioremediation strategy to remove As from organic waste, Bacillus subtilis 168, a bacterial strain which can grow at high temperature but is unable to methylate and volatilize As, was genetically engineered to express the arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase gene (CmarsM) from the thermophilic alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The genetically engineered B. subtilis 168 converted most of the inorganic As in the medium into dimethylarsenate and trimethylarsine oxide within 48 h and volatized substantial amounts of dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine. The rate of As methylation and volatilization increased with temperature from 37 to 50°C. When inoculated into an As-contaminated organic manure composted at 50°C, the modified strain significantly enhanced As volatilization. This study provides a proof of concept of using genetically engineered microorganisms for bioremediation of As-contaminated organic waste during composting.

  17. Coordination effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site of cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Okuyama, Orio; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2012-04-01

    The CuA site is the electron mediator in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), providing an appropriate electronic structure for rapid electron transfer. We have studied the coordinating effects of His, Met, and the peptide carbonyl group of Glu of the CuA site, using the density functional theory. Our computation demonstrates that the His ligation provides strong orbital and electrostatic effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site, while that the Met coordination gives weak orbital and electrostatic effects. A coordination of the peptide carbonyl group affects the electronic structure of the CuA site only electrostatically.

  18. Properties of recombinant human N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase (hPAO): potential role in determining drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Hacker, Amy; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Frydman, Benjamin; Valasinas, Aldonia; Fraser, Alison V; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    The recent cloning of the mammalian gene coding for N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO) provides the opportunity to directly examine the role of human PAO (hPAO) in polyamine homeostasis as well as its potential role in determining cellular response to antitumor polyamine analogues. To facilitate the study of this enzyme, the production, purification, and characterization of the recombinant hPAO is reported. hPAO oxidizes N(1)-acetylspermidine (K(m)=2.1 microM, K(cat)=15.0 s(-1)) and has very high affinity for N(1)-acetylspermine (K(m)=0.85 microM, K(cat)=31.7 s(-1)). The recombinant hPAO does not efficiently oxidize spermine, thereby demonstrating a significant difference in substrate specificity from the previously described human spermine oxidase PAOh1/SMO. Importantly, hPAO demonstrates the ability to oxidize a subset of antitumor polyamine analogues, suggesting that this oxidase activity could have a significant effect on determining tumor sensitivity to these or similar agents. Transfection of A549 human lung cancer cells with an hPAO-expressing plasmid leads to a profound decrease in sensitivity to those analogues which act as substrates, confirming its potential to alter drug response. One similarity that hPAO shares with human PAOh1/SMO, is that certain oligoamine analogues are potent inhibitors of its oxidase activity. The results of these studies demonstrate how changes in polyamine catabolism may affect drug response.

  19. Thermal properties of milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins in pulsed electric field-treated bovine whole milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Oey, Indrawati; Everett, David W

    2016-09-15

    Thermodynamics of milk components (milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins) in pulsed electric field (PEF)-treated milk were compared with thermally treated milk (63 °C for 30 min and 73 °C for 15s). PEF treatments were applied at 20 or 26 kV cm(-1) for 34 μs with or without pre-heating of milk (55 °C for 24s), using bipolar square wave pulses in a continuous mode of operation. PEF treatments did not affect the final temperatures of fat melting (Tmelting) or xanthine oxidase denaturation (Tdenaturation), whereas thermal treatments increased both the Tmelting of milk fat and the Tdenaturation for xanthine oxidase by 2-3 °C. Xanthine oxidase denaturation was ∼13% less after PEF treatments compared with the thermal treatments. The enthalpy change (ΔH of denaturation) of whey proteins decreased in the treated-milk, and denaturation increased with the treatment intensity. New endothermic peaks in the calorimetric thermograms of treated milk revealed the formation of complexes due to interactions between MFGM (milk fat globule membrane) proteins and skim milk proteins. Evidence for the adsorption of complexes onto the MFGM surface was obtained from the increase in surface hydrophobicity of proteins, revealing the presence of unfolded hydrophobic regions.

  20. Existence of aa3-type ubiquinol oxidase as a terminal oxidase in sulfite oxidation of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Tsuyoshi; Hisazumi, Tomohiro; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Fumiaki; Negishi, Atsunori

    2006-07-01

    It was found that Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans has sulfite:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and ubiquinol oxidase activities in the cells. Ubiquinol oxidase was purified from plasma membranes of strain NB1-3 in a nearly homogeneous state. A purified enzyme showed absorption peaks at 419 and 595 nm in the oxidized form and at 442 and 605 nm in the reduced form. Pyridine ferrohaemochrome prepared from the enzyme showed an alpha-peak characteristic of haem a at 587 nm, indicating that the enzyme contains haem a as a component. The CO difference spectrum of ubiquinol oxidase showed two peaks at 428 nm and 595 nm, and a trough at 446 nm, suggesting the existence of an aa(3)-type cytochrome in the enzyme. Ubiquinol oxidase was composed of three subunits with apparent molecular masses of 57 kDa, 34 kDa, and 23 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature for ubiquinol oxidation were pH 6.0 and 30 degrees C. The activity was completely inhibited by sodium cyanide at 1.0 mM. In contrast, the activity was inhibited weakly by antimycin A(1) and myxothiazol, which are inhibitors of mitochondrial bc(1) complex. Quinone analog 2-heptyl-4-hydoroxyquinoline N-oxide (HOQNO) strongly inhibited ubiquinol oxidase activity. Nickel and tungstate (0.1 mM), which are used as a bacteriostatic agent for A. thiooxidans-dependent concrete corrosion, inhibited ubiquinol oxidase activity 100 and 70% respectively.

  1. Current status of NADPH oxidase research in cardiovascular pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiño-Janeiro BK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bruno K Rodiño-Janeiro,1,2 Beatriz Paradela-Dobarro,1 María Isabel Castiñeiras-Landeira,1 Sergio Raposeiras-Roubín,1,3 José R González-Juanatey,1,3,4 Ezequiel Álvarez1,4 1Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 2European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble, France; 3Cardiology Department, University Clinic Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 4Medicine Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Abstract: The implications of reactive oxygen species in cardiovascular disease have been known for some decades. Rationally, therapeutic antioxidant strategies combating oxidative stress have been developed, but the results of clinical trials have not been as good as expected. Therefore, to move forward in the design of new therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular disease based on prevention of production of reactive oxygen species, steps must be taken on two fronts, ie, comprehension of reduction-oxidation signaling pathways and the pathophysiologic roles of reactive oxygen species, and development of new, less toxic, and more selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase inhibitors, to clarify both the role of each NADPH oxidase isoform and their utility in clinical practice. In this review, we analyze the value of NADPH oxidase as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease and the old and new pharmacologic agents or strategies to prevent NADPH oxidase activity. Some inhibitors and different direct or indirect approaches are available. Regarding direct NADPH oxidase inhibition, the specificity of NADPH oxidase is the focus of current investigations, whereas the chemical structure-activity relationship studies of known inhibitors have provided pharmacophore models with which to search for new molecules. From a general point of view, small-molecule inhibitors are preferred because of their hydrosolubility

  2. HIF-1α activation by intermittent hypoxia requires NADPH oxidase stimulation by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Vaddi, Damodara Reddy; Khan, Shakil A; Wang, Ning; Makarenko, Vladislav; Semenza, Gregg L; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) mediates many of the systemic and cellular responses to intermittent hypoxia (IH), which is an experimental model that simulates O2 saturation profiles occurring with recurrent apnea. IH-evoked HIF-1α synthesis and stability are due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases, especially Nox2. However, the mechanisms by which IH activates Nox2 are not known. We recently reported that IH activates xanthine oxidase (XO) and the resulting increase in ROS elevates intracellular calcium levels. Since Nox2 activation requires increased intracellular calcium levels, we hypothesized XO-mediated calcium signaling contributes to Nox activation by IH. We tested this possibility in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells subjected to IH consisting alternating cycles of hypoxia (1.5% O2 for 30 sec) and normoxia (21% O2 for 5 min). Kinetic analysis revealed that IH-induced XO preceded Nox activation. Inhibition of XO activity either by allopurinol or by siRNA prevented IH-induced Nox activation, translocation of the cytosolic subunits p47phox and p67phox to the plasma membrane and their interaction with gp91phox. ROS generated by XO also contribute to IH-evoked Nox activation via calcium-dependent protein kinase C stimulation. More importantly, silencing XO blocked IH-induced upregulation of HIF-1α demonstrating that HIF-1α activation by IH requires Nox2 activation by XO.

  3. Cytochemical localization of catalase and several hydrogen peroxide-producing oxidases in the nucleoids and matrix of rat liver peroxisomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of catalase, amino acid oxidase, α-hydroxy acid oxidase, urate oxidase and alcohol oxidase was studied cytochemically in rat hepatocytes. The presence of catalase was demonstrated with the conventional diaminobenzidine technique. Oxidase activities were visualized with methods based

  4. Pentamines as substrate for human spermine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Koichi; Shirahata, Akira; Samejima, Keijiro; Casero, Robert A.; Igarashi, Kazuei; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Substrate activities of various linear polyamines to human spermine oxidase (hSMO) were investigated. The activities were evaluated by monitoring the amount of H2O2 released from sample polyamines by hSMO. H2O2 was measured by a HPLC method that analyzed fluorescent dimers derived from the oxidation of homovanillic acid in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. Six triamines were tested and were found not to be hSMO substrates. Of sixteen tetramines tested, spermine (Spm) was the most active substrate, followed by homospermine and N-butylated Spm. Pentamines showed a characteristic pattern of substrate activity. Of thirteen pentamines tested, 3343 showed higher substrate activity than Spm, and 4343 showed similar activity to Spm. The activities of the other pentamines were as follows: 3443, 4443, 4344, 3344, 4334, 4444, and 3334 (in decreasing order). Product amines released from these pentamines by hSMO were then analyzed by HPLC. Triamine was the only observed product, and the amount of triamine was nearly equivalent to that of released H2O2. A marked difference in the pH dependency curves between tetramines and pentamines suggested that hSMO favored reactions with a non-protonated secondary nitrogen at the cleavage site. The Km and Vmax values for Spm and 3343 at pH 7.0 and 9.0 were consistent with the higher substrate activity of 3343 compared to Spm, as well as with the concept of a non-protonated secondary nitrogen at the cleavage site being preferred, and 3343 was well degraded at a physiological pH by hSMO. PMID:23449327

  5. Coronatine Inhibits Stomatal Closure through Guard Cell-Specific Inhibition of NADPH Oxidase-Dependent ROS Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toum, Laila; Torres, Pablo S.; Gallego, Susana M.; Benavídes, María P.; Vojnov, Adrián A.; Gudesblat, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Microbes trigger stomatal closure through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) synthesizes the polyketide toxin coronatine, which inhibits stomatal closure by MAMPs and by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The mechanism by which coronatine, a jasmonic acid-isoleucine analog, achieves this effect is not completely clear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential second messengers in stomatal immunity, therefore we investigated the possible effect of coronatine on their production. We found that coronatine inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production induced by ABA, and by the flagellin-derived peptide flg22. This toxin also inhibited NADPH oxidase-dependent stomatal closure induced by darkness, however, it failed to prevent stomatal closure by exogenously applied H2O2 or by salicylic acid, which induces ROS production through peroxidases. Contrary to what was observed on stomata, coronatine did not affect the oxidative burst induced by flg22 in leaf disks. Additionally, we observed that in NADPH oxidase mutants atrbohd and atrbohd/f, as well as in guard cell ABA responsive but flg22 insensitive mutants mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3, and lecrk-VI.2-1, the inhibition of ABA stomatal responses by both coronatine and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium was markedly reduced. Interestingly, coronatine still impaired ABA-induced ROS synthesis in mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3, and lecrk-VI.2-1, suggesting a possible feedback regulation of ROS on other guard cell ABA signaling elements in these mutants. Altogether our results show that inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS synthesis in guard cells plays an important role during endophytic colonization by Pst through stomata. PMID:28018388

  6. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure through guard cell-specific inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Toum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes trigger stomatal closure through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs. The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst synthesizes the polyketide toxin coronatine, which inhibits stomatal closure by MAMPs and the hormone abscisic acid (ABA. The mechanism by which coronatine, a jasmonic acid-isoleucine analog, achieves this effect is not completely clear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential second messengers in stomatal immunity, therefore we investigated the possible effect of coronatine on their production. We found that coronatine inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production induced by ABA, and by the flagellin-derived peptide flg22. This toxin also inhibited NADPH oxidase-dependent stomatal closure induced by darkness, however it failed to prevent stomatal closure by exogenously applied H2O2 or by salicylic acid, which induces ROS production through peroxidases. Contrary to what was observed on stomata, coronatine did not affect the oxidative burst induced by flg22 in leaf discs. Additionally, we observed that in NADPH oxidase mutants atrbohd and atrbohd/f, as well as in guard cell ABA responsive but flg22 insensitive mutants mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3 and lecrk-VI.2-1, the inhibition of ABA stomatal responses by both coronatine and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium was markedly reduced. Interestingly, coronatine still impaired ABA-induced ROS synthesis in mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3 and lecrk-VI.2-1, suggesting a possible feedback regulation of ROS on other guard cell ABA signalling elements in these mutants. Altogether our results show that inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS synthesis in guard cells plays an important role during endophytic colonization by Pst through stomata.

  7. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%.

  8. How hydrogen peroxide is metabolized by oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancura, Daniel; Stanicova, Jana; Palmer, Graham; Fabian, Marian

    2014-06-10

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3-CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3-CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3-CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO.

  9. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and arsenite with reduction and pH dual-sensitive vesicle for synergistic cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Xiao, Hong; Li, Jingguo; Cheng, Du; Shuai, Xintao

    2016-06-01

    Drug resistance is the underlying cause for therapeutic failure in clinical cancer chemotherapy. A prodrug copolymer mPEG-PAsp(DIP-co-BZA-co-DOX) (PDBD) was synthesized and assembled into a nanoscale vesicle comprising a PEG corona, a reduction and pH dual-sensitive hydrophobic membrane and an aqueous lumen encapsulating doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX.HCl) and arsenite (As). The dual stimulation-sensitive design of the vesicle gave rise to rapid release of the physically entrapped DOX.HCl and arsenite inside acidic lysosomes, and chemically conjugated DOX inside the cytosol with high glutathione (GSH) concentration. In the optimized concentration range, arsenite previously recognized as a promising anticancer agent from traditional Chinese medicine can down-regulate the expressions of anti-apoptotic and multidrug resistance proteins to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy. Consequently, the DOX-As-co-loaded vesicle demonstrated potent anticancer activity. Compared to the only DOX-loaded vesicle, the DOX-As-co-loaded one induced more than twice the apoptotic ratio of MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells at a low As concentration (0.5 μM), due to the synergistic effects of DOX and As. The drug loading strategy integrating chemical conjugation and physical encapsulation in stimulation-sensitive carriers enabled efficient drug loading in the formulation.Drug resistance is the underlying cause for therapeutic failure in clinical cancer chemotherapy. A prodrug copolymer mPEG-PAsp(DIP-co-BZA-co-DOX) (PDBD) was synthesized and assembled into a nanoscale vesicle comprising a PEG corona, a reduction and pH dual-sensitive hydrophobic membrane and an aqueous lumen encapsulating doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX.HCl) and arsenite (As). The dual stimulation-sensitive design of the vesicle gave rise to rapid release of the physically entrapped DOX.HCl and arsenite inside acidic lysosomes, and chemically conjugated DOX inside the cytosol with high glutathione (GSH) concentration. In the

  10. Regulation of NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes: relationship between FAD/NADPH binding and oxidase complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeurme, Franck; Picciocchi, Antoine; Dagher, Marie-Claire; Grunwald, Didier; Beaumel, Sylvain; Fieschi, Franck; Stasia, Marie-José

    2010-10-22

    The X(+)-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X(+)-CGD) variants are natural mutants characterized by defective NADPH oxidase activity but with normal Nox2 expression. According to the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic Nox2 domain, most of the X(+)-CGD mutations are located in/or close to the FAD/NADPH binding regions. A structure/function study of this domain was conducted in X(+)-CGD PLB-985 cells exactly mimicking 10 human variants: T341K, C369R, G408E, G408R, P415H, P415L, Δ507QKT509-HIWAinsert, C537R, L546P, and E568K. Diaphorase activity is defective in all these mutants. NADPH oxidase assembly is normal for P415H/P415L and T341K mutants where mutation occurs in the consensus sequences of NADPH- and FAD-binding sites, respectively. This is in accordance with their buried position in the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic Nox2 domain. FAD incorporation is abolished only in the T341K mutant explaining its absence of diaphorase activity. This demonstrates that NADPH oxidase assembly can occur without FAD incorporation. In addition, a defect of NADPH binding is a plausible explanation for the diaphorase activity inhibition in the P415H, P415L, and C537R mutants. In contrast, Cys-369, Gly-408, Leu-546, and Glu-568 are essential for NADPH oxidase complex assembly. However, according to their position in the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic domain of Nox2, only Cys-369 could be in direct contact with cytosolic factors during oxidase assembly. In addition, the defect in oxidase assembly observed in the C369R, G408E, G408R, and E568K mutants correlates with the lack of FAD incorporation. Thus, the NADPH oxidase assembly process and FAD incorporation are closely related events essential for the diaphorase activity of Nox2.

  11. Crystal Structure of Alcohol Oxidase from Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Koch

    Full Text Available FAD-dependent alcohol oxidases (AOX are key enzymes of methylotrophic organisms that can utilize lower primary alcohols as sole source of carbon and energy. Here we report the crystal structure analysis of the methanol oxidase AOX1 from Pichia pastoris. The crystallographic phase problem was solved by means of Molecular Replacement in combination with initial structure rebuilding using Rosetta model completion and relaxation against an averaged electron density map. The subunit arrangement of the homo-octameric AOX1 differs from that of octameric vanillyl alcohol oxidase and other dimeric or tetrameric alcohol oxidases, due to the insertion of two large protruding loop regions and an additional C-terminal extension in AOX1. In comparison to other alcohol oxidases, the active site cavity of AOX1 is significantly reduced in size, which could explain the observed preference for methanol as substrate. All AOX1 subunits of the structure reported here harbor a modified flavin adenine dinucleotide, which contains an arabityl chain instead of a ribityl chain attached to the isoalloxazine ring.

  12. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K/sup +/ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K/sup +/ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  13. Cation binding site of cytochrome c oxidase: progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed earlier the determination of the kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of the binding, and, as shown recently, the binding of calcium to the site inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity at low turnover rates of the enzyme [Vygodina, Т., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A.A (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c Oxidase by Calcium Ions. PloS ONE 8, e74436]. This paper summarizes further progress in the studies of the Cation Binding Site in this group presenting the results to be reported at 18th EBEC Meeting in Lisbon, 2014. The paper revises specificity of the bovine oxidase Cation Binding Site for different cations, describes dependence of the Ca(2+)-induced inhibition on turnover rate of the enzyme and reports very high affinity binding of calcium with the "slow" form of cytochrome oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  14. Some properties of active and latent catechol oxidase of mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Czapski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Latent form of mushroom catechol oxidase was activated by O,1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. Catalytic power of the latent form, calculated from the kinetic parameters was 1,8 times higher than that of active one. Salicyl hydroxamic acid (SHAM appeared as a powerful inhibitor for both active and latent forms of catechol oxidase. However, in the range of 150-250 μM SHAM the inhibitory effect for active catechol oxidase was significantly higher than that for the latent one. Non-competitive and irreversible characteristics of inhibition of latent and active catechol oxidase was calculated from kinetic data. Electrophoretic analysis followed by scanning of the gels was used. The spots' absorbance was determined from a computer image of the isoenzyme band patterns. It allowed us to estimate gels quantitatively. Presence of one additional clearly defined slow moving isoform of SDS-activated catechol oxidase, differed in the respect of 3 bands for the active and 4 bands for the total.

  15. Arsenite removal from aqueous solutions by γ-Fe2O3-TiO2 magnetic nanoparticles through simultaneous photocatalytic oxidation and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lian; Peng, Xianjia; Ni, Fan; Li, Jin; Wang, Dongsheng; Luan, Zhaokun

    2013-02-15

    A novel Fe-Ti binary oxide magnetic nanoparticles which combined the photocatalytic oxidation property of TiO(2) and the high adsorption capacity and magnetic property of γ-Fe(2)O(3) have been synthesized using a coprecipitation and simultaneous oxidation method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by powder XRD, TEM, TG-DTA, VSM and BET methods. Photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite, the effect of solution pH values and initial As(III) concentration on arsenite removal were investigated in laboratory experiments. Batch experimental results showed that under UV light, As(III) can be efficiently oxidized to As(V) by dissolved O(2) in γ-Fe(2)O(3)-TiO(2) nanoparticle suspensions at various pH values. At the same time, As(V) was effectively removed by adsorption onto the surface of nanoparticles. The maximum removal capability of the nano-material for arsenite was 33.03 mg/g at pH 7.0. Among all the common coexisting ions investigated, phosphate was the greatest competitor with arsenic for adsorptive sites on the nano-material. Regeneration studies verified that the γ-Fe(2)O(3)-TiO(2) nanoparticles, which underwent five successive adsorption-desorption processes, still retained comparable catalysis and adsorption performance, indicating the excellent stability of the nanoparticles. The excellent photocatalytic oxidation performance and high uptake capability of the magnetic nano-material make it potentially attractive material for the removal of As(III) from water.

  16. Phytochelatins and antioxidant systems respond differentially during arsenite and arsenate stress in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Tripathi, R D; Dwivedi, S; Trivedi, P K; Tandon, P K

    2007-04-15

    Serious contamination of aquatic systems by arsenic (As) in different parts of the world calls for the development of an in situ cost-effective phytoremediation technology. In the present investigation, plants of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle were exposed to various concentrations of arsenate (As(V)) (0-250 microM) and arsenite (AsIII) (0-25 microM) and analyzed for accumulation responses vis-à-vis biochemical changes. Total As accumulation was found to be higher in plants exposed to AsIII (315 microg g(-1) dw at 25 microM) compared to As(V) (205 microg g(-1) dw at 250 microM) after 7 d of treatment. Plants tolerated low concentrations of As(III) and As(V) by detoxifying the metalloid through augmented synthesis of thiols such as phytochelatins and through increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. While As(V) predominantly stimulated antioxidant enzyme activity, As(III) primarily caused enhanced levels of thiols. The maximum amount of As chelated by PCs was found to be about 39% in plants exposed to As(III) (at 10 microM) and 35% in As(V) exposed plants (at 50 microM) after 4 d. Only the respective highest concentrations of As(III) (25 microM) and As(V) (250 microM) proved toxic for normal plant growth after prolonged treatment. Thus, H. verticillata forms a promising candidate for the phytoremediation of As contaminated water.

  17. Arsenite and ferrous iron oxidation linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification for the immobilization of arsenic in anoxic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Milner, L.; Oremland, R.; Field, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a bioremediation strategy based on injecting NO3- to support the anoxic oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and arsenite (As(III)) in the subsurface as a means to immobilize As in the form of arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto biogenic ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides. Continuous flows and filled columns were used to simulate a natural anaerobic groundwater and sediment system with co-occurring As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence (column SF1) or absence (column SF2) of nitrate, respectively. During operation for 250 days, the average influent arsenic concentration of 567 ??g L-1 was reduced to 10.6 (??9.6) ??g L-1 in the effluent of column SF1. The cumulative removal of Fe(II) and As(III) in SF1 was 6.5 to 10-fold higher than that in SF2. Extraction and measurement of the mass of iron and arsenic immobilized on the sand packing of the columns were close to the iron and arsenic removed from the aqueous phase during column operation. The dominant speciation of the immobilized iron and arsenic was Fe(III) and As(V) in SF1, compared with Fe(II) and As(III) in SF2. The speciation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that microbial oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II) linked to denitrification resulted in the enhanced immobilization of aqueous arsenic in anaerobic environments by forming Fe(III) (hydr)oxide coated sands with adsorbed As(V). ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  18. Fluorescent Probes for Analysis and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dokyoung; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monoamine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of dietary amines and amine neurotransmitters, and assist in maintaining the homeostasis of the amine neurotransmitters in the brain. Dysfunctions of these enzymes can cause neurological and behavioral disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To understand their physiological roles, efficient assay methods for monoamine oxidases are essential. Reviewed in this Perspective are the recent progress in the development of fluorescent probes for monoamine oxidases and their applications to enzyme assays in cells and tissues. It is evident that still there is strong need for a fluorescent probe with desirable substrate selectivity and photophysical properties to challenge the much unsolved issues associated with the enzymes and the diseases.

  19. Characterization of wheat germin (oxalate oxidase) expressed by Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Heng-Yen; Whittaker, Mei M.; Bouveret, Romaric; Berna, Anne; Bernier, François; Whittaker, James W.

    2007-01-01

    High-level secretory expression of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin/oxalate oxidase was achieved in Pichia pastoris fermentation cultures as an α-mating factor signal peptide fusion, based on the native wheat cDNA coding sequence. The oxalate oxidase activity of the recombinant enzyme is substantially increased (7-fold) by treatment with sodium periodate, followed by ascorbate reduction. Using these methods, approximately 1 g (4×104 U) of purified, activated enzyme was obtained following eight days of induction of a high density Pichia fermentation culture, demonstrating suitability for large-scale production of oxalate oxidase for biotechnological applications. Characterization of the recombinant protein shows that it is glycosylated, with N-linked glycan attached at Asn47. For potential biomedical applications, a nonglycosylated (S49A) variant was also prepared which retains essentially full enzyme activity, but exhibits altered protein-protein interactions. PMID:17399681

  20. NADPH oxidase deficient mice develop colitis and bacteremia upon infection with normally avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-deficient Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Boas; Songhet, Pascal; Slack, Emma Marie Caroline; Müller, Andreas J; Kremer, Marcus; Van Maele, Laurye; Cayet, Delphine; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn's disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb (-/-)) affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tm(avir); invGsseD), which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb (-/-) mice are efficiently infected by S.Tm(avir) and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb (-/-) Myd88 (-/-) mice indicated that the S.Tm(avir)-inflicted disease in Cybb (-/-) mice hinges on CD11c(+)CX3CR1(+) monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tm(avir) in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the large

  1. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh (Michigan)

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  2. Functional characterization of gibberellin oxidases from cucumber, Cucumis sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta Lange, Maria João; Liebrandt, Anja; Arnold, Linda; Chmielewska, Sara-Miriam; Felsberger, André; Freier, Eduard; Heuer, Monika; Zur, Doreen; Lange, Theo

    2013-06-01

    Cucurbits have been used widely to elucidate gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. With the recent availability of the genome sequence for the economically important cucurbit Cucumis sativus, sequence data became available for all genes potentially involved in GA biosynthesis for this species. Sixteen cDNAs were cloned from root and shoot of 3-d to 7-d old seedlings and from mature seeds of C. sativus. Two cDNAs code for GA 7-oxidases (CsGA7ox1, and -2), five for GA 20-oxidases (CsGA20ox1, -2, -3, -4, and -5), four for GA 3-oxidases (CsGA3ox1, -2, -3, and -4), and another five for GA 2-oxidases (CsGA2ox1, -2, -3, -4, and -5). Their enzymatic activities were investigated by heterologous expression of the cDNAs in Escherichia coli and incubation of the cell lysates with (14)C-labelled, D2-labelled, or unlabelled GA-substrates. The two GA 7-oxidases converted GA12-aldehyde to GA12 efficiently. CsGA7ox1 converted GA12 to GA14, to 15α-hydroxyGA12, and further to 15α-hydroxyGA14. CsGA7ox2 converted GA12 to its 12α-hydroxylated analogue GA111. All five GA 20-oxidases converted GA12 to GA9 as a major product, and to GA25 as a minor product. The four GA 3-oxidases oxidized the C19-GA GA9 to GA4 as the only product. In addition, three of them (CsGA3ox2, -3, and -4) converted the C20-GA GA12 to GA14. The GA 2-oxidases CsGA2ox1, -2, -3, and -4 oxidized the C19-GAs GA9 and GA4 to GA34 and GA51, respectively. CsGA2ox2, -3, and -4 converted GA51 and GA34 further to respective GA-catabolites. In addition to C19-GAs, CsGA2ox4 also converted the C20-GA GA12 to GA110. In contrast, CsGA2ox5 oxidized only the C20 GA12 to GA110 as the sole product. As shown for CsGA20ox1 and CsGA3ox1, similar reactions were catalysed with 13-hydroxlyated GAs as substrates. It is likely that these enzymes are also responsible for the biosynthesis of 13-hydroxylated GAs in vivo that occur at low levels in cucumber.

  3. Colloidal properties of biomacromolecular solutions: Towards urate oxidase crystal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneté, Françoise

    2013-02-01

    Crystallization of biological macromolecules is governed by weak interaction forces, attractive and repulsive. Knowledge of solution properties, via second virial coefficient measurements, makes it possible to select physico-chemical parameters that govern and control phase diagrams and thus to grow crystals for specific applications (bio-crystallography or pharmaceutical processes). We highlight here with urate oxidase a salting-in effect that increases its solubility and the depletion effect of amphiphilic polymer, at a polymer concentration above its cmc, in order to grow diffracting crystals of urate oxidase. These two effects were used to grow crystals for high pressure crystallography and in a purification process.

  4. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Janaina A.; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. Objective To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Results Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Conclusion Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. PMID:27812679

  5. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Hidalgo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP and platelet-activating factor (PAF induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8 release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils.

  6. Computer-controlled system for the study of oxidase reactions: application to the peroxidase-oxidase oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew G; Tipton, Keith F

    2010-12-16

    An apparatus for the study of bisubstrate oxidase reactions at maintained steady-state substrate concentrations is described, and its specific application to the peroxidase-oxidase biochemical oscillator is reported. Instrument control and data acquisition are provided by custom software written in LabVIEW. The software allows measurement, recording, and control of dissolved oxygen through a Clark-type oxygen electrode, reaction monitoring by a UV/vis spectrophotometer, and controlled substrate delivery by a syringe infusion pump. For peroxidase from horseradish, the optimal pH for oscillatory behavior was found to be in the range 4.5-5.5.

  7. Life in an arsenic-containing gold mine: genome and physiology of the autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium rhizobium sp. NT-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Jérémy; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Barbe, Valérie; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Cleiss-Arnold, Jessica; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Geist, Lucie; Joublin, Aurélie; Koechler, Sandrine; Lassalle, Florent; Marchal, Marie; Médigue, Claudine; Muller, Daniel; Nesme, Xavier; Plewniak, Frédéric; Proux, Caroline; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Vallenet, David; Santini, Joanne M; Bertin, Philippe N

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is widespread in the environment and its presence is a result of natural or anthropogenic activities. Microbes have developed different mechanisms to deal with toxic compounds such as arsenic and this is to resist or metabolize the compound. Here, we present the first reference set of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data of an Alphaproteobacterium isolated from an arsenic-containing goldmine: Rhizobium sp. NT-26. Although phylogenetically related to the plant-associated bacteria, this organism has lost the major colonizing capabilities needed for symbiosis with legumes. In contrast, the genome of Rhizobium sp. NT-26 comprises a megaplasmid containing the various genes, which enable it to metabolize arsenite. Remarkably, although the genes required for arsenite oxidation and flagellar motility/biofilm formation are carried by the megaplasmid and the chromosome, respectively, a coordinate regulation of these two mechanisms was observed. Taken together, these processes illustrate the impact environmental pressure can have on the evolution of bacterial genomes, improving the fitness of bacterial strains by the acquisition of novel functions.

  8. Arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis: Description of three strains of Ectothiorhodospria from Mono Lake, California, and Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Shelley; Boren, Alison; Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Stoneburner, Brendon; Saltikov, Chad W; Stolz, John F.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    Three novel strains of photosynthetic bacteria from the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae were isolated from soda lakes of the Great Basin Desert, USA by employing arsenite (As(III)) as the sole electron donor in the enrichment/isolation process. Strain PHS-1 was previously isolated from a hot spring in Mono Lake, while strain MLW-1 was obtained from Mono Lake sediment, and strain BSL-9 was isolated from Big Soda Lake. Strains PHS-1, MLW-1, and BSL-9 were all capable of As(III)-dependent growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis and contained homologs of arxA, but displayed different phenotypes. Comparisons were made with three related species: Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 2111, Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 243T, and Halorhodospira halophila DSM 244. All three type cultures oxidized arsenite to arsenate but did not grow with As(III) as the sole electron donor. DNA–DNA hybridization indicated that strain PHS-1 belongs to the same species as Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 2111 (81.1% sequence similarity), distinct from Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 243T (58.1% sequence similarity). These results suggest that the capacity for light-driven As(III) oxidation is a common phenomenon among purple photosynthetic bacteria in soda lakes. However, the use of As(III) as a sole electron donor to sustain growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis is confined to novel isolates that were screened for by this selective cultivation criterion.

  9. Investigation of sodium arsenite, thioacetamide, and diethanolamine in the alkaline comet assay: Part of the JaCVAM comet validation exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Carol; Henderson, Debbie; Lillford, Lucinda

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), we examined sodium arsenite, thioacetamide, and diethanolamine. Using the JaCVAM approved study protocol version 14.2, each chemical was tested in male rats up to maximum tolerated dose levels and DNA damage in the liver and stomach was assessed approximately 3h after the final administration by gavage. Histopathology assessments of liver and stomach sections from the same animals were also examined for evidence of cytotoxicity or necrosis. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the stomach of animals treated with sodium arsenite at 7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg/day. However, equivocal findings were found in the liver, where increases in DNA migration were observed in two independent experiments, but not in all treated animals and not at the same dose levels. Thioacetamide caused an increase in DNA migration in the stomach of rats treated at 19, 38, and 75 mg/kg/day, but not in the liver, despite evidence of marked hepatotoxicity following histopathology assessments. No evidence of DNA damage was observed in the stomach or liver of animals treated with diethanolamine at 175, 350, or 700 mg/kg/day.

  10. Uptake and translocation of arsenite by Pteris vittata L.: Effects of glycerol, antimonite and silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Shiny [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rathinasabapathi, Bala [Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    AsIII uptake in living cells is through aquaglyceroporin transporters, but it is unknown in arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. We investigated the effects of AsIII analogs glycerol and antimonite (SbIII) at 0-100 mM and aquaporin inhibitor AgNO{sub 3} at 0-0.1 mM on the uptake of 0.1 mM AsIII or AsV by P. vittata over 1-2 h. Glycerol or SbIII didn't impact AsIII or AsV uptake by P. vittata (p < 0.05), with As concentrations in the fronds and roots being 4.4-6.3 and 3.9-6.2 mg/kg. However, 0.01 mM AgNO{sub 3} reduced As concentrations in the fronds and roots by 64% and 58%. Hence, AsIII uptake in P. vittata might be via an aquaporin transporter different from glycerol and SbIII transporters. Further as AsIII analogs and aquaporin inhibitor had no impact on AsV uptake, AsIII and AsV were likely taken up by different transporters in P. vittata. Our results imply a different AsIII transporter in P. vittata from other plants. - Highlights: > AsIII analogs glycerol and SbIII didn't impact AsIII or AsV uptake by P. vittata. > P. vittata took up substantial amount of SbIII but unable to translocate it to fronds. > Aquaglyceroporin inhibitor Ag reduced AsIII uptake by P. vittata. > AsIII transporter in P. vittata was Ag-sensitive, different from glycerol and SbIII. - AsIII uptake in P. vittata was via unusual aquaglyceroporins or other novel transporter proteins, which was not affected by glycerol or SbIII but was sensitive to 0.01 mM AgNO{sub 3}.

  11. Copper complexes as biomimetic models of catechol oxidase : mechanistic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koval, Iryna A.

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this thesis deals with the synthesis of copper(II) complexes with phenol-based or macrocyclic ligands, which can be regarded as model compounds of the active site of catechol oxidase, and with the mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of catechol mediated by these compounds.

  12. Inhibition of chickpea seedling copper amine oxidases by tetraethylenepentamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Talaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper amine oxidases are important enzymes, which contribute to the regulation of mono- and polyamine levels. Each monomer contains one Cu(II ion and 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine (TPQ as cofactors. They catalyze the oxidative deamination of primary amines to aldehydes with a ping-pong mechanism consisting of a transamination. The mechanism is followed by the transfer of two electrons to molecular oxygen which is reduced to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibitors are important tools in the study of catalytic properties of copper amine oxidases and they also have a wide application in physiological research. In this study, purification of the chickpea seedling amine oxidase, was done via salting out by ammonium sulfate and dialysis, followed by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. By using the Lineweaver - Burk plot, the Km and Vm of the enzyme were found to be 3.3 mM and 0.95 mmol/min/mg, respectively. In this study, the interaction of chickpea diamino oxidase with tetraethylene- pentamine was studied. Analysis of kinetic data indicated that tetraethylenepentamine (with Ki=0.1 mM inhibits the enzyme by linear mixed inhibitory effect.

  13. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossis, Fabrizio [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical Biology and Medical Physics (DIBIFIM), University of Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy); Palese, Luigi L., E-mail: palese@biochem.uniba.it [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical Biology and Medical Physics (DIBIFIM), University of Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  14. Cytokinin oxidase or dehydrogenase? Mechanism of cytokinin degradation in cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galuszka, P.; Frebort, I.; Sebela, M.

    2001-01-01

    wheat enzyme is a monomer 60 kDa, its N-terminal amino-acid sequence shows similarity to hypothetical cytokinin oxidase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, but not to the enzyme from maize. N-6-isopentenyl-2-(2-hydroxyethylamino)-9-methyladenine is the best substrate from all the cytokinins tested...

  15. Low activation barriers characterize intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1992-01-01

    Anaerobic reduction kinetics of the zucchini squash ascorbate oxidase (AO; L-ascorbate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.10.3.3) by pulse radiolytically produced CO2- radical ions were investigated. Changes in the absorption bands of type 1 [Cu(II)] (610 nm) and type 3 [Cu(II)] (330 nm) were monitored...

  16. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  17. Purification of gibberellin sub 53 -oxidase from spinach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T.M.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Spinach is a long-day rosette plants, in which stem growth is mediated by gibberellins. It has been shown that two enzymatic steps, GA{sub 53}-oxidase and GA{sub 19}-oxidase, are controlled by light. To develop an understanding into this light regulation, purification of GA{sub 53}-oxidase has been undertaken. The original assay relied on the HPLC separation of the product and substrate, but was considered too slow for the development of a purification scheme. A TLC system was developed which in conjunction with improvements to the assay conditions was sensitive and gave rapid results. The partial purification of the GA{sub 53}-oxidase is achieved by a high speed centrifugation, 40-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, an hydroxyapatite column, Sephadex G-100 column and an anion exchange FPLC column, Mono Q HR10/10, yielding 1000-fold purification and 15% recovery. Monoclonal antibodies to the protein will be raised and used to further characterize the enzyme.

  18. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase by fractions Crateva adansonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abdullahi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Enzyme inhibition mechanism indicated that the mode of inhibition was of a mixed type. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic use of these plants may be due to the observed Xanthine oxidase inhibition, thereby supporting their use in traditional folk medicine against inflammatory-related diseases, in particular, gout.

  19. Enantioselective Hydroxylation of 4-Alkylphenols by Vanillyl Alcohol Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, Falko P.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Jongejan, Hugo; Berkel, Willem J.H. van; Franssen, Maurice C.R.

    1998-01-01

    Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO) from Penicillium simplicissimum catalyzes the enantioselective hydroxylation of 4-ethylphenol, 4-propylphenol, and 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol into 1-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol, 1-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propanol, and 1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)propanol, respectively, with a

  20. Subcellular localization of vanillyl-alcohol oxidase in Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, MW; Sjollema, KA; Veenhuis, M; van Berkel, WJH; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Penicillium simplicissimum on anisyl alcohol, veratryl alcohol or 3-(methoxymethyl)phenol, is associated with the synthesis of relatively large amounts of the hydrogen peroxide producing flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO), Immunocytochemistry revealed that the enzyme has a dual lo

  1. ADP competes with FAD binding in putrescine oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hellemond, Erik W.; Mazon, Hortense; Heck, Albert J.; van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2008-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540 (PuORh) is a soluble homodimeric flavoprotein of 100 kDa, which catalyzes the oxidative deamination of putrescine and some other aliphatic amines. The initial characterization of PuORh uncovered an intriguing feature: the enzyme appeared t

  2. Overexpression of rice glutaredoxins (OsGrxs) significantly reduces arsenite accumulation by maintaining glutathione pool and modulating aquaporins in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Shikha; Meher, Alok Kumar; Pande, Veena; Mallick, Shekhar; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is an acute poison and class I carcinogen, can cause a serious health risk. Staple crops like rice are the primary source of As contamination in human food. Rice grown on As contaminated areas accumulates higher As in their edible parts. Based on our previous transcriptome data, two rice glutaredoxins (OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1) were identified that showed up-regulated expression during As stress. Here, we report OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 from rice involved in the regulation of intracellular arsenite (AsIII). To elucidate the mechanism of OsGrx mediated As tolerance, both OsGrxs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (Δars) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains (Δycf1, Δacr3). The expression of OsGrxs increased As tolerance in E. coli (Δars) mutant strain (up to 4 mM AsV and up to 0.6 mM AsIII). During AsIII exposure, S. cerevisiae (Δacr3) harboring OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 have lower intracellular AsIII accumulation (up to 30.43% and 24.90%, respectively), compared to vector control. Arsenic accumulation in As-sensitive S. cerevisiae mutant (Δycf1) also reduced significantly on exposure to inorganic As. The expression of OsGrxs in yeast maintained intracellular GSH pool and increased extracellular GSH concentration. Purified OsGrxs displays in vitro GSH-disulfide oxidoreductase, glutathione reductase and arsenate reductase activities. Also, both OsGrxs are involved in AsIII extrusion by altering the Fps1 transcripts in yeast and protect the cell by maintaining cellular GSH pool. Thus, our results strongly suggest that OsGrxs play a crucial role in the maintenance of the intracellular GSH pool and redox status of the cell during both AsV and AsIII stress and might be involved in regulating intracellular AsIII levels by modulation of aquaporin expression and functions.

  3. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii alternative oxidase 1 is regulated by heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Lapina, Tatiana; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-12-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase that has emerged as an important mitochondrial component of the cell stress responses. Although the most studied abiotic condition in relation to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is high temperature, changes in AOX capacity of the alga were studied only under oxidative stress and cold. To examine whether elevated temperatures affected AOX1 expression, we applied quantitative real-time PCR and pharmaceutical approaches. In this work, we demonstrated a sharp increase in AOX1 transcript and protein abundance under heat stress. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii cells displayed a large increase in alternative respiration in response to high temperature. Feeding with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine strongly retarded the AOX1 transcription. Finally, the addition of the calcium chelator EGTA prevented heat-induced AOX1 expression. Together, our results imply that heat-inducible Ca(2+) influx and protein kinase(s) may mediate AOX1 expression at elevated temperatures. Characterization of heat-induced AOX1 regulation in the green alga C. reinhardtii provides a framework for a more complete understanding of the function of this conserved protein.

  4. Cyanobacterial lactate oxidases serve as essential partners in N2-fixation and evolved into photorespiratory glycolate oxidases in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackenberg, C.; Kern, R.; Hüge, J; Stal, L.J.; Tsuji, Y.; Kopka, J.; Shiraiwa, Y.; Bauwe, H.; Hagemann, M.

    2011-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is an essential enzyme involved in photorespiratory metabolism in plants. In cyanobacteria and green algae, the corresponding reaction is catalyzed by glycolate dehydrogenases (GlcD). The genomes of N2-fixing cyanobacteria, such as Nostoc PCC 7120 and green algae, appear to h

  5. Cyanobacterial lactate oxidases serve as essential partners of N2-fixation and evolved to photorespiratory glycolate oxidases in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackenberg, C.; Kern, R.; Hüge, J.; Stal, L.J.; Tsuji, Y.; Kopka, J.; Shiraiwa, Y.; Bauwe, H.; Hagemann, M.

    2011-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is an essential enzyme involved in photorespiratory metabolism in plants. In cyanobacteria and green algae, the corresponding reaction is catalyzed by glycolate dehydrogenases (GlcD). The genomes of N2-fixing cyanobacteria, such as Nostoc PCC 7120 and green algae, appear to h

  6. Supramolecular organization of cytochrome c oxidase- and alternative oxidase-dependent respiratory chains in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Frank; Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Werner, Alexandra; Rexroth, Sascha; Reifschneider, Nicole H; Dencher, Norbert A; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2004-06-18

    To elucidate the molecular basis of the link between respiration and longevity, we have studied the organization of the respiratory chain of a wild-type strain and of two long-lived mutants of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. This established aging model is able to respire by either the standard or the alternative pathway. In the latter pathway, electrons are directly transferred from ubiquinol to the alternative oxidase and thus bypass complexes III and IV. We show that the cytochrome c oxidase pathway is organized according to the mammalian "respirasome" model (Schägger, H., and Pfeiffer, K. (2000) EMBO J. 19, 1777-1783). In contrast, the alternative pathway is composed of distinct supercomplexes of complexes I and III (i.e. I(2) and I(2)III(2)), which have not been described so far. Enzymatic analysis reveals distinct functional properties of complexes I and III belonging to either cytochrome c oxidase- or alternative oxidase-dependent pathways. By a gentle colorless-native PAGE, almost all of the ATP synthases from mitochondria respiring by either pathway were preserved in the dimeric state. Our data are of significance for the understanding of both respiratory pathways as well as lifespan control and aging.

  7. Cytochemical Studies on the Localization of Methanol Oxidase and Other Oxidases in Peroxisomes of Methanol-Grown Hansenula polyrnorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Dijken, J.P. van; Harder, W.

    1976-01-01

    The localization of methanol oxidase activity in cells of methanol-limited chemostat cultures of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been studied with different cytochemical staining techniques. The methods were based on enzymatic or chemical trapping of the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme d

  8. MITRAC7 Acts as a COX1-Specific Chaperone and Reveals a Checkpoint during Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Sven; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jans, Daniel; Hellwig, Christin; Bareth, Bettina; Jakobs, Stefan; Deckers, Markus; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter

    2015-09-08

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, is assembled from mitochondria- and nuclear-encoded subunits. The MITRAC complex represents the central assembly intermediate during this process as it receives imported subunits and regulates mitochondrial translation of COX1 mRNA. The molecular processes that promote and regulate the progression of assembly downstream of MITRAC are still unknown. Here, we identify MITRAC7 as a constituent of a late form of MITRAC and as a COX1-specific chaperone. MITRAC7 is required for cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. Surprisingly, loss of MITRAC7 or an increase in its amount causes selective cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells. We demonstrate that increased MITRAC7 levels stabilize and trap COX1 in MITRAC, blocking progression in the assembly process. In contrast, MITRAC7 deficiency leads to turnover of newly synthesized COX1. Accordingly, MITRAC7 affects the biogenesis pathway by stabilizing newly synthesized COX1 in assembly intermediates, concomitantly preventing turnover.

  9. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-02

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

  10. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  11. Brief maternal deprivation of rats reduces hepatic mixed function oxidase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesell, E.S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey (USA)); Heubel, F.; Netter, K.J. (Philipps-Universitaet, Lahnberge (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-01-01

    Deprivation of pups from mother and sibs for 3 min daily from day 5 today 41 of life reduced activities of 4 hepatic mixed function oxidases (MFO) expressed per mg protein in male rats compared to unhandled control rats. These decreases, though generally small, 22.4% and under, reached statistical significance for the substrates aminopyrine, benzphetamine and ethoxycoumarin. This handling procedure did not consistently affect the inductive response to phenobarbital. Previously ignored as a source of variability in response to xenobiotics, handling appears from these results to merit further investigation as such a factor in uninduced rats. Differences among rats in handling could contribute to large day-to-day variations in their metabolism of xenobiotics.

  12. Purification and characterisation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bibhuti B; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2012-10-15

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is a very rich source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which negatively affects its quality upon cutting and postharvest processing due to enzymatic browning. PPO inhibitors, from natural or synthetic sources, are used to tackle this problem. One isoform of PPO was 259-fold purified using standard chromatographic procedures. The PPO was found to be a 112 kDa homodimer. The enzyme showed very low K(m) (0.34 mM) and high catalytic efficiency (3.3×10(6)) with 4-methyl catechol. The substrate specificity was in the order: 4-methyl catechol>tert-butylcatechol>dihydrocaffeic acid>pyrocatechol. Cysteine hydrochloride, potassium metabilsulphite, ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid, resorcylic acid and kojic acid showed competitive inhibition, whereas, citric acid and sodium azide showed mixed inhibition of PPO activity. Cysteine hydrochloride was found to be an excellent inhibitor with the low inhibitor constant of 1.8 μM.

  13. Hyperactivity of the Ero1α Oxidase Elicits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress but No Broad Antioxidant Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Schmidt, Jonas Damgard; Soltoft, Cecilie Lutzen

    2012-01-01

    Oxidizing equivalents for the process of oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mammalian cells are mainly provided by the Ero1α oxidase. The molecular mechanisms that regulate Ero1α activity in order to harness its oxidative power are quite well understood. However......, the overall cellular response to oxidative stress generated by Ero1α in the lumen of the mammalian ER is poorly characterized. Here we investigate the effects of overexpressing a hyperactive mutant (C104A/C131A) of Ero1α. We show that Ero1α hyperactivity leads to hyperoxidation of the ER oxidoreductase ERp57...... the cellular glutathione redox buffer, we conclude that the observed effects of Ero1α-C104A/C131A overexpression are likely caused by an oxidative perturbation of the ER glutathione redox buffer. In accordance, we show that Ero1α hyperactivity affects cell viability when cellular glutathione levels...

  14. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  15. Properties of purified recombinant human polyamine oxidase, PAOh1/SMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Devereux, Wendy; Hacker, Amy; Frydman, Benjamin; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2003-05-16

    The discovery of an inducible oxidase whose apparent substrate preference is spermine indicates that polyamine catabolism is more complex than that originally proposed. To facilitate the study of this enzyme, the purification and characterization of the recombinant human PAOh1/SMO polyamine oxidase are reported. Purified PAOh1/SMO oxidizes both spermine (K(m)=1.6 microM) and N(1)-acetylspermine (K(m)=51 microM), but does not oxidize spermidine. The purified human enzyme also does not oxidize eight representative antitumor polyamine analogues; however, specific oligamine analogues were found to be potent inhibitors of the oxidation of spermine by PAOh1/SMO. The results of these studies are consistent with the hypothesis that PAOh1/SMO represents a new addition to the polyamine metabolic pathway that may represent a new target for antineoplastic drug development.

  16. Physiological roles of plastid terminal oxidase in plant stress responses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xin Sun; Tao Wen

    2011-12-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) is a plastoquinol oxidase localized in the plastids of plants. It is able to transfer electrons from plastoquinone (PQ) to molecular oxygen with the formation of water. Recent studies have suggested that PTOX is beneficial for plants under environmental stresses, since it is involved in the synthesis of photoprotective carotenoids and chlororespiration, which could potentially protect the chloroplast electron transport chain (ETC) from over-reduction. The absence of PTOX in plants usually results in photo-bleached variegated leaves and impaired adaptation to environment alteration. Although PTOX level and activity has been found to increase under a wide range of stress conditions, the functions of plant PTOX in stress responses are still disputed now. In this paper, the possible physiological roles of PTOX in plant stress responses are discussed based on the recent progress.

  17. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Ge

    Full Text Available Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation.

  18. Nitrogen heterocycles as potential monoamine oxidase inhibitors: Synthetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin O. Patil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review highlights the synthetic methods of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO belonging to a group of nitrogen heterocycles such as pyrazoline, indole, xanthine, oxadiazole, benzimidazole, pyrrole, quinoxaline, thiazole and other related compounds (1990–2012. Moreover, it emphasizes salient findings related to chemical structures and the bioactivities of these heterocycles as MAO inhibitors. The aim of this review is to find out different methods for the synthesis of nitrogen containing heterocycles and their bioactivity related aspects as MAO inhibitors.

  19. PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF SNAKE VENOM L- AMINO ACID OXIDASES

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Baby; Rajan Sheeja S; M.V Jeevitha; S.U Ajisha

    2011-01-01

    L-Amino acid oxidases are flavoenzymes which catalyze the stereospecific oxidative deamination of an L-amino acid substrate to a corresponding a-ketoacid with hydrogen peroxide and ammonia production. These enzymes, which are widely distributed in many different organisms, exhibit a marked affinity for hydrophobic amino acids, including phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and leucine. Snake venom LAAO induces platelet aggregation and cytotoxicity in various cancer cell lines. The enzyme has ...

  20. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  1. A novel fluorogenic probe for monoamine oxidase assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You You Lu; Yu Guang Wang; Bin Dai; Yi Qi Dai; Zhao Wang; Zheng Wei Fu; Qing Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase is flavoenzymes, widely distributed in mammals. It is well recognized that MAOs serve an important role in metabolism that they have close relationship with health .Along with the discoveries between MAOs and neurotic disease, more and more studies have been jumped in .In this paper, we design a new probe for assaying the activities of MAOs. The results showed that the probe [7-(3-aminopropoxy)coumarin] is simple, effective and sensitive for MAOB.

  2. Deglycosylation of glucose oxidase to improve biosensors and biofuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevoteau, Antonin; Courjean, Olivier; Mano, Nicolas [Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2010-02-15

    We demonstrate that a more efficient redox hydrogel structure can be achieved by engineering the size and the surface charge of the bioelectrocatalyst. Deglycosylated glucose oxidase (GOx) modified electrode exhibits higher current density than native GOx, for the same molar composition of the hydrogel. This improvement is very likely due to a more efficient hydrogel structure rather than a better intrinsic electron transfer between the FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox center and the redox mediator. (author)

  3. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation.

  4. N-acetylcysteine and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid alleviate oxidative stress and hepatic dysfunction induced by sodium arsenite in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Saad, Ahmed M; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed A; Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M

    2016-01-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic represents a serious challenge to humans and other animals. The aim of the present study was to test the protective effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) either individually or in combination with a chelating agent, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), against sodium arsenite oral toxicity in male rats. Five groups were used: control; arsenic group (orally administrated in a concentration of 2 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]); the other three groups were orally administrated sodium arsenite in a concentration of 2 mg/kg b.w. followed by either NAC (10 mg/kg b.w., intraperitoneally [i.p.]), DMSA (50 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) or NAC plus DMSA. Arsenic toxicity caused significant rise in serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin, and a significant decrease in total protein (TP) and albumin levels after 3 weeks of experimental period. In addition, arsenic-treated rats showed significantly higher arsenic content in liver and significant rise in hepatic malondialdehyde level. By contrast, sharp decreases in glutathione content and catalase and glutathione reductase activities were discernible. NAC and/or DMSA counteracted most of these physiologic and biochemical defects. NAC monotherapy was more effective than DMSA in increasing TP, while DMSA was more effective in decreasing alanine aminotransferase. The combined treatment was superior over monotherapies in recovery of TP and glutathione. Biochemical data were well supported by histopathological and ultrastructural findings. In conclusion, the combination therapy of NAC and DMSA may be an ideal choice against oxidative insult induced by arsenic poisoning.

  5. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M; Heuts, Dominic P H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-10-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectroscopy and putrescine as a substrate. During the fast and irreversible reductive half-reaction no radical intermediates were observed, suggesting a direct hydride transfer from the substrate to the FAD. The rate constant of flavin reoxidation depends on the ligand binding; when the imine product was bound to the enzyme the rate constant was higher than with free enzyme species. Similar results were obtained with product-mimicking ligands and this indicates that a ternary complex is formed during catalysis. The obtained kinetic data were used together with steady-state rate equations derived for ping-pong, ordered sequential and bifurcated mechanisms to explore which mechanism is operative. The integrated analysis revealed that PuO employs a bifurcated mechanism due to comparable rate constants of product release from the reduced enzyme and reoxidation of the reduced enzyme-product complex.

  6. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase by fractions Crateva adansonii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdullahi A; Kolo MZ; Hamzah RU; Jigam AA; Yahya A; Kabiru AY; Muhammad H; Sakpe S; Adefolalu FS; Isah MC

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the inhibitory effect of various extracts from Crateva adansonii (C. adansonii) used traditionally against several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatism, arthritis, and gout, was investigated on purified bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. Methods:Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295 nm associated with uric acid formation. Enzyme kinetics was carried out using Lineweaver-Burk plots using xanthine as the substrate. Results: Among the fractions tested, the chloroform fraction exhibited highest potency (IC50 20.2±1.6 μg/mL) followed by the petroleum ether (IC50 30.1±2.2 μg/mL), ethyl acetate (IC50 43.9±1.4 μg/mL) and residual (IC50 98.0±3.3 μg/mL) fractions. The IC50 value of allopurinol used, as the standard was 5.7±0.3 μg/mL. Conclusions: Enzyme inhibition mechanism indicated that the mode of inhibition was of a mixed type. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic use of these plants may be due to the observed Xanthine oxidase inhibition, thereby supporting their use in traditional folk medicine against inflammatory-related diseases, in particular, gout.

  7. Surface characterization and direct bioelectrocatalysis of multicopper oxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivnitski, Dmitri M., E-mail: ivnitski@unm.ed [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXQL, Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403 (United States); Khripin, Constantine [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131 (United States); Luckarift, Heather R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXQL, Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403 (United States)] [Universal Technology Corporation, 1270 N. Fairfield Road, Dayton, OH 45432 (United States); Johnson, Glenn R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXQL, Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403 (United States); Atanassov, Plamen, E-mail: plamen@unm.ed [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCO) have been extensively studied as oxygen reduction catalysts for cathodic reactions in biofuel cells. Theoretically, direct electron transfer between an enzyme and electrode offers optimal energy conversion efficiency providing that the enzyme/electrode interface can be engineered to establish efficient electrical communication. In this study, the direct bioelectrocatalysis of three MCO (Laccase from Trametes versicolor, bilirubin oxidase (BOD) from the fungi Myrothecium verrucaria and ascorbate oxidase (AOx) from Cucurbita sp.) was investigated and compared as oxygen reduction catalysts. Protein film voltammetry and electrochemical characterization of the MCO electrodes showed that DET had been successfully established in all cases. Atomic force microscopy imaging and force measurements indicated that enzyme was immobilized as a monolayer on the electrode surface. Evidence for three clearly separated anodic and cathodic redox events related to the Type 1 (T1) and the trinculear copper centers (T2, T3) of various MCO was observed. The redox potential of the T1 center was strongly modulated by physiological factors including pH, anaerobic and aerobic conditions and the presence of inhibitors.

  8. Biocompatibility selenium nanoparticles with an intrinsic oxidase-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Leilei; Huang, Kaixun; Liu, Hongmei

    2016-03-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) are considered to be the new selenium supplement forms with high biological activity and low toxicity; however, the molecular mechanism by which SeNPs exert the biological function is unclear. Here, we reported that biocompatibility SeNPs possessed intrinsic oxidase-like activity. Using Na2SeO3 as a precursor and glutathione as a reductant, biocompatibility SeNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical reduction method in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results of structure characterization revealed that synthesized SeNPs were amorphous red elementary selenium with spherical morphology, and ranged in size from 25 to 70 nm size with a narrow distribution (41.4 ± 6.7 nm). The oxidase-like activity of the as-synthesized SeNPs was tested with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a substrate. The results indicated that SeNPs could catalyze the oxidization of TMB by dissolved oxygen. These SeNPs showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 4 and 30 °C, and the oxidase-like activity was higher as the concentration of SeNPs increased and the size of SeNPs decreased. The Michaelis constant ( K m) values and maximal reaction velocity ( V max) of the SeNPs for TMB oxidation were 0.0083 mol/L and 3.042 μmol/L min, respectively.

  9. Role of amine oxidase expression to maintain putrescine homeostasis in Rhodococcus opacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Morris, Peter C; Keane, Mark A

    2013-04-10

    While applications of amine oxidases are increasing, few have been characterised and our understanding of their biological role and strategies for bacteria exploitation are limited. By altering the nitrogen source (NH4Cl, putrescine and cadaverine (diamines) and butylamine (monoamine)) and concentration, we have identified a constitutive flavin dependent oxidase (EC 1.4.3.10) within Rhodococcus opacus. The activity of this oxidase can be increased by over two orders of magnitude in the presence of aliphatic diamines. In addition, the expression of a copper dependent diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.22) was observed at diamine concentrations>1mM or when cells were grown with butylamine, which acts to inhibit the flavin oxidase. A Michaelis-Menten kinetic treatment of the flavin oxidase delivered a Michaelis constant (KM)=190μM and maximum rate (kcat)=21.8s(-1) for the oxidative deamination of putrescine with a lower KM (=60μM) and comparable kcat (=18.2s(-1)) for the copper oxidase. MALDI-TOF and genomic analyses have indicated a metabolic clustering of functionally related genes. From a consideration of amine oxidase specificity and sequence homology, we propose a putrescine degradation pathway within Rhodococcus that utilises oxidases in tandem with subsequent dehydrogenase and transaminase enzymes. The implications of PUT homeostasis through the action of the two oxidases are discussed with respect to stressors, evolution and application in microbe-assisted phytoremediation or bio-augmentation.

  10. Alkylamino derivatives of 4-aminomethylpyridine as inhibitors of copper-containing amine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Vincenzo; Buffoni, Franca; Ignesti, Giovanni; Picci, Nevio; Trombino, Sonia; Iemma, Francesca; Alfei, Silvana; Pocci, Marco; Lucchesini, Francesco; De Munno, Angela

    2005-02-10

    The first substratelike, reversible inhibitors of different copper amine oxidases (CAOs) with IC50 (M) as low as 2.0 x 10(-8) corresponding to derivatives of 4-aminomethylpyridine with alkoxy (1a-d), alkylthio (2a,b), and alkylamino (3a-e, 4a-j) groups in the positions 3 and 5 have been prepared and studied. The inhibitors 1a-d are active on benzylamine oxidase and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and are very selective with respect to diamine oxidase, lysyl oxidase, and monoamine oxidases. The inhibitors 2a,b are selective for benzylamine oxidase whereas 2a is also a new type of good substrate of diamine oxidase. The inhibitors 3a-e and 4a-j are substratelike, reversible, nonselective inhibitors of various CAOs including pea seedling amine oxidase and Hansenula polymorpha amine oxidase, whose enzymatic sites are known from X-ray structure determinations. The inhibitors 3b,c and 4b,c are excellent substratelike tools for studies correlating CAOs that afford crystals suitable for X-ray structure determinations with CAOs from mammals.

  11. Proton transfer in ba(3) cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Adelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory heme-copper oxidases catalyze reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, linking this process to transmembrane proton pumping. These oxidases have been classified according to the architecture, location and number of proton pathways. Most structural and functional studies to date have been performed on the A-class oxidases, which includes those that are found in the inner mitochondrial membrane and bacteria such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Paracoccus denitrificans (aa(3)-type oxidases in these bacteria). These oxidases pump protons with a stoichiometry of one proton per electron transferred to the catalytic site. The bacterial A-class oxidases use two proton pathways (denoted by letters D and K, respectively), for the transfer of protons to the catalytic site, and protons that are pumped across the membrane. The B-type oxidases such as, for example, the ba(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus, pump protons with a lower stoichiometry of 0.5 H(+)/electron and use only one proton pathway for the transfer of all protons. This pathway overlaps in space with the K pathway in the A class oxidases without showing any sequence homology though. Here, we review the functional properties of the A- and the B-class ba(3) oxidases with a focus on mechanisms of proton transfer and pumping.

  12. The lysyl oxidase LOX is absent in basal and squamous cell carcinomas and its knockdown induces an invading phenotype in a skin equivalent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouez, Charbel; Reynaud, Caroline; Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Thépot, Amélie; Gleyzal, Claudine; Kanitakis, Jean; Perrier, Eric; Damour, Odile; Sommer, Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Lysyl oxidase initiates the enzymatic stage of collagen and elastin cross-linking. Among five isoforms comprising the lysyl oxidase family, LOX is the better studied. LOX is associated to an antitumor activity in ras-transformed fibroblasts, and its expression is down-regulated in many carcinomas. The aim of this work was to shed light on LOX functions within the epidermis by studying its expression in human basal and squamous cell carcinomas and analyzing the effect of its enzymatic activity inhibition and protein absence on human keratinocytes behavior in a skin equivalent. In both carcinomas, LOX expression by epidermal tumor cells was lacking, while it was up-regulated around invading tumor cells in association with the stromal reaction. Lysyl oxidase activity inhibition using beta-aminoproprionitrile in a skin equivalent model prepared with both primary human keratinocytes and HaCaT cell line affected keratin 10 and filaggrin expression and disorganized the collagen network and the basement membrane. In spite of all these changes, no invasion phenotype was observed. Modelization of the invasive phenotype was only noticed in the skin equivalent developed with LOX antisense HaCaT cell line, where the protein LOX is specifically absent. Our results clearly indicate that lysyl oxidase enzymatic activity is essential not only for the integrity maintenance of the dermis but also for the homeostasis of the epidermis. Moreover, LOX protein plays a role in the skin carcinomas and invasion but not through its enzymatic activity.

  13. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play, expe...... affects can be choreographed and designed intentionally or whether it arises from unpredictable circumstances within urbanity itself....

  14. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  15. Involvement of NO in sodium arsenite-induced yeast cell death%NO参与亚砷酸钠诱导酵母细胞死亡的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丽华; 仪慧兰; 张虎芳

    2012-01-01

    以模式生物酵母细胞为材料,研究亚砷酸钠胁迫对细胞死亡率和胞内NO水平的影响,以探讨NO在砷诱导细胞死亡中的作用.结果显示,浓度为1~7mmol·L^-1的亚砷酸钠可降低酵母细胞活性,诱导细胞死亡,随着处理浓度的升高和作用时间的延长,细胞死亡率增高;死细胞出现核固缩和核降解等凋亡特征;凋亡抑制剂Z-Asp-CH2-DCB(2"mol·L^-1)与3mmol·L^-1亚砷酸钠共同作用后,酵母细胞死亡率下降.在亚砷酸钠胁迫的过程中,酵母细胞内NO水平升高;一定浓度的NO清除剂c-PTIO(0.2mmol·L^-1)或NO生成抑制剂NaN3(1mmol·L^-1)均可降低亚砷酸钠引起的酵母细胞死亡率.结果表明,砷胁迫诱导的胞内NO升高是酵母细胞死亡的一个诱因,亚砷酸钠诱发的酵母细胞死亡中可能存在细胞凋亡过程.%Arsenic is a toxic metalloid widely distributed in the environment. Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risk of various diseases, such as neurotoxicity, birth defects and metabolic disorders. People exposed to high levels of arsenic are prone to skin, bladder, and lung cancer and occlusive vascular disease. However, the exact mechanisms of arsenic toxicity are not yet well understood. In this study, cytotoxie effects of sodium arsenite on yeast Saccharomyees cerevisiae were investigated with or without some antagonists. For arsenic treatments, yeast cells harvested from the early log phase were incubated in the fresh yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) media containing varying amounts of sodium arsenite. For other combination treatments, selected antagonists including broad caspase inhibitor Z-Asp-2,6-dichlorobenzoyloxymethylketone (Z-Asp-CH2-DCB), nitric oxide (NO) scavenger 2-( 4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-teramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide ( c-PTIO ) and nitrate reductase inhibitor NaN3 were respectively added into YPD media in the presence of 3 mmol. L^-1 sodium arsenite. The results showed that

  16. Structural insights into electron transfer in caa 3-type cytochrome oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragão, David; Slattery, Orla; Pisliakov, Andrei V.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Caffrey, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Paragraph Cytochrome c oxidase is a member of the heme copper oxidase superfamily (HCO) 1 . HCOs function as the terminal enzymes in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and aerobic prokaryotes, coupling molecular oxygen reduction to transmembrane proton pumping. Integral to the enzyme’s function is the transfer of electrons from cytochrome c to the oxidase via a transient association of the two proteins. Electron entry and exit are proposed to occur from the same site on cytochrome ...

  17. Transplacental and early life exposure to inorganic arsenic affected development and behavior in offspring rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Shuhua; Jin, Yaping; Sun, Guifan [China Medical University, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengzhi [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2009-06-15

    To evaluate the developmental neurotoxicity of arsenic in offspring rats by transplacental and early life exposure to sodium arsenite in drinking water, the pregnant rats or lactating dams, and weaned pups were given free access to drinking water, which contained arsenic at concentrations of 0, 10, 50, 100 mg/L from GD 6 until PND 42. A battery of physical and behavioral tests was applied to evaluate the functional outcome of pups. Pups in arsenic exposed groups weighed less than controls throughout lactation and weaning. Body weight of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups decreased significantly on PND 42, 16 and 12, respectively. Physical development (pinna unfolding, fur appearance, incisor eruption, or eye opening) in pups displayed no significant differences between control and arsenic treated groups. The number of incidences within the 100 mg/L arsenic treated group, in tail hung, auditory startle and visual placing showed significant decrease compared to the control group (p<0.05). In square water maze test, the trained numbers to finish the trials successfully in 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups increased remarkably compared to control group, and there was a dose-related increase (p<0.01) observed. Taken together, these data show that exposure of inorganic arsenite to pregnant dams and offspring pups at levels up to 100 mg/L in drinking water may affect their learning and memory functions and neuromotor reflex. (orig.)

  18. Unsubstituted phenothiazine as a superior water-insoluble mediator for oxidases

    OpenAIRE

    Sekretaryova, Alina; Vagin, Mikhail; Beni, Valerio; Turner, Anthony P.F.; Karyakin, Arkady A

    2014-01-01

    The mediation of oxidases glucose oxidase (GOx), lactate oxidase (LOx) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) by a new electron shuttling mediator, unsubstituted phenothiazine (PTZ), was studied. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating-disk electrode measurements in nonaqueous media were used to determine the diffusion characteristics of the mediator and the kinetics of its reaction with GOx, giving a second-order rate constant of 7.6×103–2.1×104 M−1 s−1 for water–acetonitrile solutions containing 5–15% wate...

  19. A cytochrome cbb3 (cytochrome c) terminal oxidase in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 supports microaerobic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, K; Sun, J; Keijers, V; Haaker, H; Vanderleyden, J

    1998-11-01

    Spectral analysis indicated the presence of a cytochrome cbb3 oxidase under microaerobic conditions in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 cells. The corresponding genes (cytNOQP) were isolated by using PCR. These genes are organized in an operon, preceded by a putative anaerobox. The phenotype of an A. brasilense cytN mutant was analyzed. Under aerobic conditions, the specific growth rate during exponential phase (mu(e)) of the A. brasilense cytN mutant was comparable to the wild-type specific growth rate (m(e) of approximately 0.2 h-1). In microaerobic NH4+-supplemented conditions, the low respiration of the A. brasilense cytN mutant affected its specific growth rate (mu(e) of approximately 0.02 h-1) compared to the wild-type specific growth rate (mu(e) of approximately 0.2 h-1). Under nitrogen-fixing conditions, both the growth rates and respiration of the wild type were significantly diminished in comparison to those under NH4+-supplemented conditions. Differences in growth rates and respiration between the wild type and the A. brasilense cytN mutant were less pronounced under these nitrogen-fixing conditions (mu(e) of approximately 0.03 h-1 for the wild type and 0.02 h-1 for the A. brasilense cytN mutant). The nitrogen-fixing capacity of the A. brasilense cytN mutant was still approximately 80% of that determined for the wild-type strain. This leads to the conclusion that the A. brasilense cytochrome cbb3 oxidase is required under microaerobic conditions, when a high respiration rate is needed, but that under nitrogen-fixing conditions the respiration rate does not seem to be a growth-limiting factor.

  20. Molecular evolution of the polyamine oxidase gene family in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polticelli Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyamine oxidase enzymes catalyze the oxidation of polyamines and acetylpolyamines. Since polyamines are basic regulators of cell growth and proliferation, their homeostasis is crucial for cell life. Members of the polyamine oxidase gene family have been identified in a wide variety of animals, including vertebrates, arthropodes, nematodes, placozoa, as well as in plants and fungi. Polyamine oxidases (PAOs from yeast can oxidize spermine, N1-acetylspermine, and N1-acetylspermidine, however, in vertebrates two different enzymes, namely spermine oxidase (SMO and acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO, specifically catalyze the oxidation of spermine, and N1-acetylspermine/N1-acetylspermidine, respectively. Little is known about the molecular evolutionary history of these enzymes. However, since the yeast PAO is able to catalyze the oxidation of both acetylated and non acetylated polyamines, and in vertebrates these functions are addressed by two specialized polyamine oxidase subfamilies (APAO and SMO, it can be hypothesized an ancestral reference for the former enzyme from which the latter would have been derived. Results We analysed 36 SMO, 26 APAO, and 14 PAO homologue protein sequences from 54 taxa including various vertebrates and invertebrates. The analysis of the full-length sequences and the principal domains of vertebrate and invertebrate PAOs yielded consensus primary protein sequences for vertebrate SMOs and APAOs, and invertebrate PAOs. This analysis, coupled to molecular modeling techniques, also unveiled sequence regions that confer specific structural and functional properties, including substrate specificity, by the different PAO subfamilies. Molecular phylogenetic trees revealed a basal position of all the invertebrates PAO enzymes relative to vertebrate SMOs and APAOs. PAOs from insects constitute a monophyletic clade. Two PAO variants sampled in the amphioxus are basal to the dichotomy between two well supported

  1. Alternative oxidase: distribution, induction, properties, structure, regulation, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogov, A G; Sukhanova, E I; Uralskaya, L A; Aliverdieva, D A; Zvyagilskaya, R A

    2014-12-01

    The respiratory chain in the majority of organisms with aerobic type metabolism features the concomitant existence of the phosphorylating cytochrome pathway and the cyanide- and antimycin A-insensitive oxidative route comprising a so-called alternative oxidase (AOX) as a terminal oxidase. In this review, the history of AOX discovery is described. Considerable evidence is presented that AOX occurs widely in organisms at various levels of organization and is not confined to the plant kingdom. This enzyme has not been found only in Archaea, mammals, some yeasts and protists. Bioinformatics research revealed the sequences characteristic of AOX in representatives of various taxonomic groups. Based on multiple alignments of these sequences, a phylogenetic tree was constructed to infer their possible evolution. The ways of AOX activation, as well as regulatory interactions between AOX and the main respiratory chain are described. Data are summarized concerning the properties of AOX and the AOX-encoding genes whose expression is either constitutive or induced by various factors. Information is presented on the structure of AOX, its active center, and the ubiquinone-binding site. The principal functions of AOX are analyzed, including the cases of cell survival, optimization of respiratory metabolism, protection against excess of reactive oxygen species, and adaptation to variable nutrition sources and to biotic and abiotic stress factors. It is emphasized that different AOX functions complement each other in many instances and are not mutually exclusive. Examples are given to demonstrate that AOX is an important tool to overcome the adverse aftereffects of restricted activity of the main respiratory chain in cells and whole animals. This is the first comprehensive review on alternative oxidases of various organisms ranging from yeasts and protists to vascular plants.

  2. The HIV-1 Nef protein and phagocyte NADPH oxidase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhardt, Frederik; Plastre, Olivier; Sawada, Makoto;

    2002-01-01

    -regulation of phagocyte NADPH oxidase subunits. Nef mutants lacking motifs involved in the interaction with Vav and PAK failed to reproduce the effects of wild type Nef, suggesting a role for the Vav/Rac/PAK signaling pathway. The following results suggest a key role for Rac in the priming effect of Nef. (i) Inactivation...... of Rac by Clostridium difficile toxin B abolished the Nef effect. (ii) The fraction of activated Rac1 was increased in Nef-transduced cells, and (iii) the dominant positive Rac1(V12) mutant mimicked the effect of Nef. These results are to our knowledge the first analysis of the effect of Rac activation...

  3. Bioactive compounds of inhibiting xanthine oxidase from Selaginella labordei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen-Jie; Xu, Jia-Cheng; Li, Li; Chen, Ke-Li

    2009-01-01

    Four flavone compounds were isolated from the effective fractions inhibiting xanthine oxidase (XOD) of the medicinal plant Selaginella labordei with anti-virus activity, and the structures were elucidated as 4'-methylether robustaflavone (1), robustaflavone (2), eriodictyol (3) and amentoflavone (4). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the three compounds of inhibiting XOD were 61.0, 0.199, 16.0 and 32.0 mg L(-1), respectively. All of these compounds were isolated from the species for the first time, and eriodictyol was found from Selaginellaceae for the first time. Among these compounds, robustaflavone has been reported as an effective compound against the hepatitis B virus.

  4. Regulation of Glucose Oxidase Activity through Interaction with Fullerene Derivatives%Regulation of Glucose Oxidase Activity through Interaction with Fullerene Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao, Yunyan; Wang, Zhongli; Ou, Zhize; Li, Yi; Wang, Xuesong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    The 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine modified C60 (PY-C60) and methoxydiglycol modified C60 (MDG-C60) are synthesized using Bingel-Hirsch reaction and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectra. PY-C60 and MDG-C60 can bind to glucose oxidase (GOx) and quench the fluorescence of tryptophan (Trp) residue in GOx through static mechanism. The conformation of GOx is disturbed after formation of complex with these fullerene derivatives. Kinetic analysis indicates that PY-C60 and MDG-C60 may affect the catalytic activity of GOx with a partial mixed-type inhibition mechanism. In the plasma glucose concentration range (3.6--5.2 mmol·L-1), PY-C60 may significantly accelerate the catalytic velocity of GOx, however, MDG-C60 exerts almost no obvious change to the initial velocity of GOx, suggesting that elaborate design of molecular structure of fullerene derivative is very important for regulating the biological activity of fullerene-enzyme complex.

  5. [Soil enzyme activities under two forest types as affected by different levels of nitrogen deposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-tao; Li, Xue-feng; Han, Shi-jie; Hu, Yan-ling

    2008-12-01

    A simulation test was conducted to study the change trends of soil cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and sucrase activities under natural broadleaf-Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) and secondary poplar (Populus davidiana) -birch (Betula platyphylla) mixed forests as affected by 0, 25, and 50 kg x hm(-2) x a(-1) of N deposition. The results showed that the effects of elevated N deposition on test enzyme activities varied with forest type, and short-term nitrogen addition could significantly affect the test enzyme activities. High N deposition decreased soil polyphyneol oxidase activity, and correspondingly, soil cellulase and sucrase activities also had a trend of decrease.

  6. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gia-Ming [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Present address: The University of Chicago, Section of Hematology/Oncology, 900 E. 57th Street, Room 7134, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  7. Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii sp. nov., a novel, arsenite-oxidizing haloalkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium capable of chemoautotrophic or heterotrophic growth with nitrate or oxygen as the electron acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, S.E.; Blum, J.S.; Stolz, J.F.; Tabita, F.R.; Witte, B.; King, G.M.; Santini, J.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium, strain MLHE-1T, was isolated from Mono Lake, an alkaline hypersaline soda lake in California, USA. Cells of strain MLHE-1T were Gram-negative, short motile rods that grew with inorganic electron donors (arsenite, hydrogen, sulfide or thiosulfate) coupled with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. No aerobic growth was attained with arsenite or sulfide, but hydrogen sustained both aerobic and anaerobic growth. No growth occurred when nitrite or nitrous oxide was substituted for nitrate. Heterotrophic growth was observed under aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Cells of strain MLHE-1T could oxidize but not grow on CO, while CH4 neither supported growth nor was it oxidized. When grown chemoautotrophically, strain MLHE-1T assimilated inorganic carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway, with the activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) functioning optimally at 0.1 M NaCl and at pH 7.3. Strain MLHE-1T grew over broad ranges of pH (7.3-10.0; optimum, 9.3), salinity (115-190 g l-1; optimum 30 g l-1) and temperature (113-40 ??C; optimum, 30 ??C). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain MLHE-1T in the class Gammaproteobacteria (family Ectothiorhodospiraceae) and most closely related to Alkalispirillum mobile (98.5%) and Alkalilimnicola halodurans (98.6%), although none of these three haloalkaliphilic micro-organisms were capable of photoautotrophic growth and only strain MLHE-1T was able to oxidize As(III). On the basis of physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is suggested that strain MLHE-1T represents a novel species within the genus Alkalilimnicola for which the name Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is proposed. The type strain is MLHE-1T (=DSM 17681T =ATCC BAA-1101T). Aspects of the annotated full genome of Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii are discussed in the light of its physiology. ?? 2007 IUMS.

  8. N-acetylcysteine and meso-2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid alleviate oxidative stress and hepatic dysfunction induced by sodium arsenite in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu El-Saad AM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Abu El-Saad,1,4 Mohammed A Al-Kahtani,2 Ashraf M Abdel-Moneim3,4 1Department of Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt Abstract: Environmental exposure to arsenic represents a serious challenge to humans and other animals. The aim of the present study was to test the protective effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC either individually or in combination with a chelating agent, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, against sodium arsenite oral toxicity in male rats. Five groups were used: control; arsenic group (orally administrated in a concentration of 2 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]; the other three groups were orally administrated sodium arsenite in a concentration of 2 mg/kg b.w. followed by either NAC (10 mg/kg b.w., intraperitoneally [i.p.], DMSA (50 mg/kg b.w., i.p. or NAC plus DMSA. Arsenic toxicity caused significant rise in serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin, and a significant decrease in total protein (TP and albumin levels after 3 weeks of experimental period. In addition, arsenic-treated rats showed significantly higher arsenic content in liver and significant rise in hepatic malondialdehyde level. By contrast, sharp decreases in glutathione content and catalase and glutathione reductase activities were discernible. NAC and/or DMSA counteracted most of these physiologic and biochemical defects. NAC monotherapy was more effective than DMSA in increasing TP, while DMSA was more effective in decreasing alanine aminotransferase. The combined treatment was superior over monotherapies in recovery of TP and glutathione. Biochemical data were well supported by histopathological and

  9. Inhibition of Xanthine Oxidase Activity by Gnaphalium Affine Extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-qing Lin; Jian-xiang Xie; Xiao-mu Wu; Lin Yang; Hai-dong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the inhibitory effect of Gnaphalium affine extracts on xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of this effect. Methods In this in vitro study, Kinetic measurements were performed in 4 different inhibitor concentrations and 5 different xanthine concentrations (60, 100, 200, 300, 400 μmol/L). Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis were used to determine Ki values and the inhibition mode for the compounds isolated from Gnaphalium affine extract. Results Four potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors were found in 95% ethanolic (v/v) Gnaphalium affine extract. Among them, the flavone Eupatilin exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on XO with a inhibition constant (Ki) of 0.37μmol/L, lower than the Ki of allopurinol (4.56 mol/L), a known synthetic XO inhibitor. Apigenin (Ki of 0.56μmol/L, a proportion of 0.0053‰in Gnaphalium affine), luteolin (Ki of 2.63 μmol/L, 0.0032‰ in Gnaphalium affine) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3’,4’-tetramethoxyflavone (Ki of 3.15μmol/L, 0.0043‰ in Gnaphalium affine) also contributed to the inhibitory effect of Gnaphalium affine extract on XO activity. Conclusions These results suggest that the use of Gnaphalium affine in the treatment of gout could be attributed to its inhibitory effect on XO. This study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of Gnaphalium affine against gout.

  10. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legoabe LJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lesetja J Legoabe,1 Anél Petzer,1 Jacobus P Petzer1,21Centre of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South AfricaAbstract: Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15 and related compounds (two were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.Keywords: monoamine oxidase, MAO, inhibition, 2-acetylphenol, structure–activity relationship

  11. A broad distribution of the alternative oxidase in microsporidian parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony A P Williams

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are a group of obligate intracellular parasitic eukaryotes that were considered to be amitochondriate until the recent discovery of highly reduced mitochondrial organelles called mitosomes. Analysis of the complete genome of Encephalitozoon cuniculi revealed a highly reduced set of proteins in the organelle, mostly related to the assembly of iron-sulphur clusters. Oxidative phosphorylation and the Krebs cycle proteins were absent, in keeping with the notion that the microsporidia and their mitosomes are anaerobic, as is the case for other mitosome bearing eukaryotes, such as Giardia. Here we provide evidence opening the possibility that mitosomes in a number of microsporidian lineages are not completely anaerobic. Specifically, we have identified and characterized a gene encoding the alternative oxidase (AOX, a typically mitochondrial terminal oxidase in eukaryotes, in the genomes of several distantly related microsporidian species, even though this gene is absent from the complete genome of E. cuniculi. In order to confirm that these genes encode functional proteins, AOX genes from both A. locustae and T. hominis were over-expressed in E. coli and AOX activity measured spectrophotometrically using ubiquinol-1 (UQ-1 as substrate. Both A. locustae and T. hominis AOX proteins reduced UQ-1 in a cyanide and antimycin-resistant manner that was sensitive to ascofuranone, a potent inhibitor of the trypanosomal AOX. The physiological role of AOX microsporidia may be to reoxidise reducing equivalents produced by glycolysis, in a manner comparable to that observed in trypanosomes.

  12. Partial purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from persimmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, José L; Tárrega, Amparo; Sentandreu, Miguel A; Sentandreu, Enrique

    2014-08-15

    Activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from "Rojo Brillante" persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) fruits was characterized. Crude extracts were used for characterization of enzyme activity and stability at different temperatures (60, 70 and 80 °C), pHs (from 3.5 to 7.5) and substrate concentrations (catechol from 0 to 0.5M). Maximum enzyme activity was reached at pH 5.5 and 55 °C. Enzyme stability was higher than PPO activities found in other natural sources, since above pH 5.5 the minimum time needed to achieve an enzyme inactivation of 90% was 70 min at 80 °C. However, at pH 4.0 the enzyme stability decreased, reaching inactivation levels above 90% after 10 min even at 60 °C. Thus it was concluded that acidification can circumvent browning problems caused by PPO activity. Moreover, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the enriched extract revealed the presence of at least four bands with strong oxidase activity, suggesting the existence of different PPO isoforms.

  13. Differential Expression of the Three Multicopper Oxidases from Myxococcus xanthus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sutil, María Celestina; Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Martins, Lígia O.; Pérez, Juana; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2007-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium that undergoes a unique life cycle among the prokaryotes upon starvation, which includes the formation of macroscopic structures, the fruiting bodies, and the differentiation of vegetative rods into coccoid myxospores. This peculiarity offers the opportunity to study the copper response in this bacterium in two different stages. In fact, M. xanthus vegetative rods exhibit 15-fold-greater resistance against copper than developing cells. However, cells preadapted to this metal reach the same levels of resistance during both stages. Analysis of the M. xanthus genome reveals that many of the genes involved in copper resistance are redundant, three of which encode proteins of the multicopper oxidase family (MCO). Each MCO gene exhibits a different expression profile in response to external copper addition. Promoters of cuoA and cuoB respond to Cu(II) ions during growth and development; however, they show a 10-fold-increased copper sensitivity during development. The promoter of cuoC shows copper-independent induction upon starvation, but it is copper up-regulated during growth. Phenotypic analyses of deletion mutants reveal that CuoB is involved in the primary copper-adaptive response; CuoA and CuoC are necessary for the maintenance of copper tolerance; and CuoC is required for normal development. These roles seem to be carried out through cuprous oxidase activity. PMID:17483223

  14. ADP competes with FAD binding in putrescine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hellemond, Erik W; Mazon, Hortense; Heck, Albert J; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Heuts, Dominic P H M; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2008-10-17

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540 (PuO(Rh)) is a soluble homodimeric flavoprotein of 100 kDa, which catalyzes the oxidative deamination of putrescine and some other aliphatic amines. The initial characterization of PuO(Rh) uncovered an intriguing feature: the enzyme appeared to contain only one noncovalently bound FAD cofactor per dimer. Here we show that this low FAD/protein ratio is the result of tight binding of ADP, thereby competing with FAD binding. MS analysis revealed that the enzyme is isolated as a mixture of dimers containing two molecules of FAD, two molecules ADP, or one FAD and one ADP molecule. In addition, based on a structural model of PuO(Rh) that was built using the crystal structure of human monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), we constructed an active mutant enzyme, PuO(Rh) A394C, that contains covalently bound FAD. These findings show that the covalent FAD-protein linkage can be formed autocatalytically and hint to a new-found rationale for covalent flavinylation: covalent flavinylation may have evolved to prevent binding of ADP or related cellular compounds, which would prohibit formation of flavinylated and functional enzyme.

  15. NADPH oxidase deficient mice develop colitis and bacteremia upon infection with normally avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-deficient Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boas Felmy

    Full Text Available Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn's disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb (-/- affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tm(avir; invGsseD, which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb (-/- mice are efficiently infected by S.Tm(avir and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb (-/- Myd88 (-/- mice indicated that the S.Tm(avir-inflicted disease in Cybb (-/- mice hinges on CD11c(+CX3CR1(+ monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tm(avir in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the

  16. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  17. Spectral and catalytic properties of aryl-alcohol oxidase, a fungal flavoenzyme acting on polyunsaturated alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, P.; Medina, M.; Guillén, F.; Martínez, M.J.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Martínez, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    Spectral and catalytic properties of the flavoenzyme AAO (aryl-alcohol oxidase) from Pleurotus eryngii were investigated using recombinant enzyme. Unlike most flavoprotein oxidases, AAO does not thermodynamically stabilize a flavin semiquinone radical and forms no sulphite adduct. AAO catalyses the

  18. Effects of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin on the left ventricular dysfunction induced by cocaine administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MarcISABELLE; ChristelleMONTEIL; ChristianTHUILLEZ

    2004-01-01

    AIM: In a previous study, we have shown the role of alphaladrenoceptor in the left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after chronic cocaine administration via the induction of NADPH oxidase. In this study we used the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, to further investigate the real involvement of this prooxidant system in this LV dysfunction. METHODS: Wistar rats were treated

  19. Purification, characterization and decolorization of bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrothecium verrucaria 3.2190 is a nonligninolytic fungus that produces bilirubin oxidase. Both Myrothecium verrucaria and the extracellular bilirubin oxidase were tested for their ability to decolorize indigo carmine. The biosorption and biodegradation of the dye were detected during the process of...

  20. Hydroxychavicol: a potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor obtained from the leaves of betel, Piper betle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuya; Nakao, Kikuyo; Hirata, Noriko; Namba, Kensuke; Nomi, Takao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Moriyama, Kenzo; Shintani, Takahiro; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    The screening of Piperaceous plants for xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity revealed that the extract of the leaves of Piper betle possesses potent activity. Activity-guided purification led us to obtain hydroxychavicol as an active principle. Hydroxychavicol is a more potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor than allopurinol, which is clinically used for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  1. Azide binding to the trinuclear copper center in laccase and ascorbate oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, I; Marchesini, A; Farver, O

    1999-01-01

    Azide binding to the blue copper oxidases laccase and ascorbate oxidase (AO) was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies. As the laccase : azide molar ratio decreases from 1:1 to 1:7, the intensity of the type 2 (T2...

  2. Biocatalytic potential of laccase-like multicopper oxidases from Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamayo Ramos, J.A.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laccase-like multicopper oxidases have been reported in several Aspergillus species but they remain uncharacterized. The biocatalytic potential of the Aspergillus niger fungal pigment multicopper oxidases McoA and McoB and ascomycete laccase McoG was investigated. RESULTS: The laccase-li

  3. Structural analysis of the catalytic mechanism and stereo selectivity in Streptomyces coelicolor alditol oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forneris, Federico; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Delvecchio, Manuela; Rovida, Stefano; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Alditol oxidase (AldO) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is a soluble monomeric flavin-dependent oxidase that performs selective oxidation of the terminal primary hydroxyl group of several alditols. Here, we report the crystal structure of the recombinant enzyme in its native state and in complex w

  4. Process technology for the application of d-amino acid oxidases in pharmaceutical intermediate manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tindal, Stuart; Carr, Reuben; Archer, Ian V. J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in biocatalysis have seen increased interest in the use of D-amino acid oxidase to synthesize optically pure amino acids. However, the creation of a genuine oxidase based platform technology will require suitable process technology as well as an understanding of the challenges and...

  5. The Oxidation of Thiols by Flavoprotein Oxidases : a Biocatalytic Route to Reactive Thiocarbonyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewing, Tom A.; Dijkman, Willem P.; Vervoort, Jacques M.; Fraaije, Marco W.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Flavoprotein oxidases are a diverse class of biocatalysts, most of which catalyze the oxidation of C-O, C-N, or C-C bonds. Flavoprotein oxidases that are known to catalyze the oxidation of C-S bonds are rare, being limited to enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of thioethers. Herein, we rep

  6. The Oxidation of Thiols by Flavoprotein Oxidases: a Biocatalytic Route to Reactive Thiocarbonyls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewing, T.A.; Dijkman, W.P.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Fraaije, M.W.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Flavoprotein oxidases are a diverse class of biocatalysts, most of which catalyze the oxidation of C[BOND]O, C[BOND]N, or C[BOND]C bonds. Flavoprotein oxidases that are known to catalyze the oxidation of C[BOND]S bonds are rare, being limited to enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of thioet

  7. MUTATIONS IN THE FAD-BINDING FOLD OF ALCOHOL OXIDASE FROM HANSENULA-POLYMORPHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOOP, M; ASGEIRSDOTTIR, S; BLAAUW, M; VEENHUIS, M; CREGG, J; GLEESON, M; AB, G

    1991-01-01

    Alcohol oxidase of methylotrophic yeast is an FAD-containing enzyme. When in its active form, the enzyme is an octamer and located in the peroxisomes. To study the importance of FAD-binding on the activity, octamerization and intracellular localization of the enzyme, alcohol oxidase of Hansenula pol

  8. Vectorial nature of redox Bohr effects in bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, N; Capitanio, G; De Nitto, E; Papa, S

    1997-09-08

    The vectorial nature of redox Bohr effects (redox-linked pK shifts) in cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart incorporated in liposomes has been analyzed. The Bohr effects linked to oxido-reduction of heme a and CuB display membrane vectorial asymmetry. This provides evidence for involvement of redox Bohr effects in the proton pump of the oxidase.

  9. Aldehyde Oxidase 4 Plays a Critical Role in Delaying Silique Senescence by Catalyzing Aldehyde Detoxification1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Soltabayeva, Aigerim; Samani, Talya

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) aldehyde oxidases are a multigene family of four oxidases (AAO1–AAO4) that oxidize a variety of aldehydes, among them abscisic aldehyde, which is oxidized to the phytohormone abscisic acid. Toxic aldehydes are generated in plants both under normal conditions and in response to stress. The detoxification of such aldehydes by oxidation is attributed to aldehyde dehydrogenases but never to aldehyde oxidases. The feasibility of the detoxification of aldehydes in siliques via oxidation by AAO4 was demonstrated, first, by its ability to efficiently oxidize an array of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, including the reactive carbonyl species (RCS) acrolein, hydroxyl-2-nonenal, and malondialdehyde. Next, exogenous application of several aldehydes to siliques in AAO4 knockout (KO) Arabidopsis plants induced severe tissue damage and enhanced malondialdehyde levels and senescence symptoms, but not in wild-type siliques. Furthermore, abiotic stresses such as dark and ultraviolet C irradiation caused an increase in endogenous RCS and higher expression levels of senescence marker genes, leading to premature senescence of KO siliques, whereas RCS and senescence marker levels in wild-type siliques were hardly affected. Finally, in naturally senesced KO siliques, higher endogenous RCS levels were associated with enhanced senescence molecular markers, chlorophyll degradation, and earlier seed shattering compared with the wild type. The aldehyde-dependent differential generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by AAO4 and the induction of AAO4 expression by hydrogen peroxide shown here suggest a self-amplification mechanism for detoxifying additional reactive aldehydes produced during stress. Taken together, our results indicate that AAO4 plays a critical role in delaying senescence in siliques by catalyzing aldehyde detoxification. PMID:28188272

  10. Retinal ganglion cells of high cytochrome oxidase activity in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENLS; CHAURMW

    1990-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells in the rat were studied using the heavy metal intensified cytochrome oxidase and horseradish peroxidase histochemical methods.The results show that a population of large retinal ganglion cells was consistently observed with the cytochrome oxidase staining method in retinas of normal rats or rats which received unilateral thalamotomy at birth.These cytochrome oxidase rich ganglion cells appeared to have large somata,3-6 primary dendrites and extensive dendritic arbors,and are comparable to ganglion cells labeled by the wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP).However,the morphological details of some of the cells revealed by the cytochrome oxidase staining method are frequently better than those shown by the HRP histochemical method.These results suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome oxidase can be used as a simple but reliable marker for identifying and studying a population of retinal genglion cells with high metabolic rate in the rat.

  11. Cytochrome oxidase as an indicator of ice storage and frozen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2001-01-01

    The potential of cytochrome oxidase as an indicator of ice storage and frozen storage of fish was investigated. Optimal assay conditions for cytochrome oxidase in a crude homogenate from cod muscle were studied. Maximal cytochrome oxidase activity was found at pH 6.5-7.5 and an assay temperature...... in different cods was 21%, and the coefficient of variation of different analyses on the same homogenate was 5%. It was shown that ice storage of muscle samples before they were frozen and thawed resulted in a major freezing-induced activation of cytochrome oxidase activity. The enzyme may therefore be used...... as an indicator of frozen fish to determine if the fish has been stored on ice before freezing. Cytochrome oxidase activity showed also potential as an indicator of frozen storage, as it was possible to distinguish between the frozen storage temperatures -9, -20, and -40 degreesC....

  12. Rcf1 mediates cytochrome oxidase assembly and respirasome formation, revealing heterogeneity of the enzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukotic, Milena; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Wiese, Sebastian; Vögtle, F Nora; Meisinger, Chris; Meyer, Helmut E; Zieseniss, Anke; Katschinski, Doerthe M; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2012-03-01

    The terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome oxidase, transfers electrons to molecular oxygen, generating water. Within the inner mitochondrial membrane, cytochrome oxidase assembles into supercomplexes, together with other respiratory chain complexes, forming so-called respirasomes. Little is known about how these higher oligomeric structures are attained. Here we report on Rcf1 and Rcf2 as cytochrome oxidase subunits in S. cerevisiae. While Rcf2 is specific to yeast, Rcf1 is a conserved subunit with two human orthologs, RCF1a and RCF1b. Rcf1 is required for growth in hypoxia and complex assembly of subunits Cox13 and Rcf2, as well as for the oligomerization of a subclass of cytochrome oxidase complexes into respirasomes. Our analyses reveal that the cytochrome oxidase of mitochondria displays intrinsic heterogeneity with regard to its subunit composition and that distinct forms of respirasomes can be formed by complex variants.

  13. Affective Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Dean

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  14. The small heat shock protein, HSP30, is associated with aggresome-like inclusion bodies in proteasomal inhibitor-, arsenite-, and cadmium-treated Xenopus kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, treatment of Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells with the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, or the environmental toxicants, sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride, induced the accumulation of the small heat shock protein, HSP30, in total and in both soluble and insoluble protein fractions. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed the presence of relatively large HSP30 structures primarily in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm. All three of the stressors promoted the formation of aggresome-like inclusion bodies as determined by immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy using a ProteoStat aggresome dye and additional aggresomal markers, namely, anti-γ-tubulin and anti-vimentin antibodies. Further analysis revealed that HSP30 co-localized with these aggresome-like inclusion bodies. In most cells, HSP30 was found to envelope or occur within these structures. Finally, we show that treatment of cells with withaferin A, a steroidal lactone with anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, and proteasomal inhibitor properties, also induced HSP30 accumulation that co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. It is possible that proteasomal inhibitor or metal/metalloid-induced formation of aggresome-like inclusion bodies may sequester toxic protein aggregates until they can be degraded. While the role of HSP30 in these aggresome-like structures is not known, it is possible that they may be involved in various aspects of aggresome-like inclusion body formation or transport.

  15. Separation/Preconcentration and Speciation Analysis of Trace Amounts of Arsenate and Arsenite in Water Samples Using Modified Magnetite Nanoparticles and Molybdenum Blue Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, and fast method for the separation/preconcentration and speciation analysis of arsenate and arsenite ions using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide immobilized on alumina-coated magnetite nanoparticles (CTAB@ACMNPs followed by molybdenum blue method is proposed. The method is based on the adsorption of arsenate on CTAB@ACMNPs. Total arsenic in different samples was determined as As(V after oxidation of As(III to As(V using potassium permanganate. The arsenic concentration has been determined by UV-Visible spectrometric technique based on molybdenum blue method and amount of As(III was calculated by subtracting the concentration of As(V from total arsenic concentration. MNPs and ACMNPs were characterized by VSM, XRD, SEM, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the preconcentration factor, detection limit, linear range, and relative standard deviation (RSD of arsenate were 175 (for 350 mL of sample solution, 0.028 μg mL−1, 0.090–4.0 μg mL−1, and 2.8% (for 2.0 μg mL−1, n=7, respectively. This method avoided the time-consuming column-passing process of loading large volume samples in traditional SPE through the rapid isolation of CTAB@ACMNPs with an adscititious magnet. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination and speciation of arsenic in different water samples and suitable recoveries were obtained.

  16. [6]-Gingerol isolated from ginger attenuates sodium arsenite induced oxidative stress and plays a corrective role in improving insulin signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debrup; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sikdar, Sourav; Paul, Avijit; Ghosh, Samrat; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2012-04-05

    Arsenic toxicity induces type 2 diabetes via stress mediated pathway. In this study, we attempt to reveal how sodium arsenite (iAs) could induce stress mediated impaired insulin signaling in mice and if an isolated active fraction of ginger, [6]-gingerol could attenuate the iAs intoxicated hyperglycemic condition of mice and bring about improvement in their impaired insulin signaling. [6]-Gingerol treatment reduced elevated blood glucose level and oxidative stress by enhancing activity of super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and GSH. [6]-Gingerol also helped in increasing plasma insulin level, brought down after iAs exposure. iAs treatment to primary cell culture of β-cells and hepatocytes in vitro produced cyto-degenerative effect and accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes of mice. [6]-Gingerol appeared to inhibit/intervene iAs induced cyto-degeneration of pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes, helped in scavenging the free radicals. The over-expression of TNFα and IL6 in iAs intoxicated mice was down-regulated by [6]-gingerol treatment. iAs intoxication reduced expression levels of GLUT4, IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3K, AKT, PPARγ signaling molecules; [6]-gingerol mediated its action through enhancing the expressions of these signaling molecules, both at protein and mRNA levels. Thus, our results suggest that [6]-gingerol possesses an anti-hyperglycemic property and can improve impaired insulin signaling in arsenic intoxicated mice.

  17. Low platelet monoamine oxidase activity in pathological gambling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, J.L. [Department of Psychiatry, Centro de Salud Mental, Parla Madrid (Spain); Saiz-Ruiz, J. [Department of Psychiatry and Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Hollander, E. [Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Queens Hospital Center, New York (United States); Cesar, J. [Department of Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Ibor, J.J. Jr. [Department of Psychiatry, Hospital San Carlos, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain)

    1994-12-01

    Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity has been reported in association with sensation-seeking personality type and in some mental disorders associated with a lack of impulse control. Pathological gambling itself has been related with both sensation-seeking and reduced impulse control. Platelet MAO activity was investigated in 15 DSM-III-R pathological gamblers from our outpatient clinic. Gamblers had a significantly lower platelet MAO activity than a group of 25 healthy controls. The range of MAO levels in gamblers was also significantly shorter than in controls. In controls, platelet MAO levels showed the previously described negative correlations with sensation-seeking scores but not in gamblers. The findings are consistent with previous studies showing an association of low platelet MAO activity with impulse control disorders and raise some interesting therapeutic alternatives for pathological gambling. (au) (40 refs.).

  18. Potential role of NADPH oxidase in pathogenesis of pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Li; Cao; Xiao-Hui; Xiang; Kai; Chen; Wei; Xu; Shi-Hai; Xia

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species(ROS) are closely related to inflammatory disorders. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase(NOX), originally found in phagocytes, is the main source of ROS in nonphagocytic cells. Besides directly producing the detrimental highly reactive ROS to act on biomolecules(lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids), NOX can also activate multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis by producing ROS. Recently, research on pancreatic NOX is no longer limited to inflammatory cells, but extends to the aspect of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatic stellate cells, which are considered to be potentially associated with pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize the literature on NOX protein structure, activation, function and its role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  19. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Rita; Kemp, John P; Tuppen, Helen A L; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K N; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C; Coku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-11-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as 'benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy' is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNA(Glu) mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNA(Glu) may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis.

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury and NADPH Oxidase: A Deep Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Angeloni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox, ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  1. Process requirements of galactose oxidase catalyzed oxidation of alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; R. Birmingham, William; Rehn, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    biocatalyst for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. However, GOase requires a number of additives to sustain its catalytic function, such as the enzyme catalase for degradation of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide as well as single......-electron oxidants to reactivate the enzyme upon loss of the amino acid radical in its active site. In this work, the addition of catalase, single-electron oxidants, and copper ions was investigated systematically in order to find the minimum concentrations required to obtain a fully active GOase. Furthermore......, it was found that the concentration and type of buffer is essential for the activity of GOase, which was significantly more active in sodium phosphate buffer than in other buffers investigated. Enzyme stability and oxygen requirements are of crucial importance for the implementation of oxidase based processes...

  2. Cyanide - Mechanism of Prophylaxis and Effect on Cytochrome Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-15

    152:1074-1077, 1958. Cooperstein, S. J. and Lazaro , A.: A microspectrophotometric method for the determination of cytochrome oxidase. J. biol. Chem...5 mg/kg); A--A CPZ + NaNO (100 mg/kg) + KCN (10 mg/kg); 0 -- 0 CPZ + Na2S203 (1 gm/kg) + KCN (15 mg/kg); A---A CPZ + NaNO2 (100 mg/)Cg) + Na2S203...chlorpromazine (10 mg/kg), NaqO 2 (100 w.g/kg) and A Na S 03 (1gm/kg). G - C Saline control; A - A KCN; S - CPZ + Na 2S 20 3+ KCN; 0 - 0 CPZ + NaNO 2 + KCN

  3. Lysyl Oxidase, a Targetable Secreted Molecule Involved in Cancer Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metastatic cancer remains the single biggest cause of mortality and morbidity across most solid tumors. In breast cancer, 100% of deaths are attributed to metastasis. At present, there are no "cures" for secondary metastatic cancer of any form and there is an urgent unmet clinical need...... to improve the tools available in our arsenal against this disease, both in terms of treatment, but also prevention. Recently, we showed that hypoxic induction of the extracellular matrix modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic dissemination to the bone in estrogen receptor negative...... breast cancer and is essential for the formation of premetastatic osteolytic lesions. We showed that in models of breast cancer metastasis, targeting LOX, or its downstream effects, significantly inhibited premetastatic niche formation and the resulting metastatic burden, offering preclinical validation...

  4. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Hungarian wild-growing mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ványolós, Attila; Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Hohmann, Judit

    2014-08-01

    Mushrooms represent a remarkable and yet largely unexplored source of new, biologically active natural products. In this work, we report on the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of 47 wild-growing mushrooms native to Hungary. Aqueous and organic (n-hexane, chloroform, and 50% methanol) extracts of selected mushrooms from different families were screened for their XO inhibitory activities. Among the 188 extracts investigated, the chloroform and 50% methanol fractions proved to be the most effective. Some species exhibited high inhibitory activity, e.g., Hypholoma fasciculare (IC50  =67.76 ± 11.05 µg/mL), Suillus grevillei (IC50  =13.28 ± 1.58 µg/mL), and Tricholoma populinum (IC50  =85.08 ± 15.02 µg/mL); others demonstrated moderate or weak activity. Additional studies are warranted to characterize the compounds responsible for the XO inhibitory activity of mushroom extracts.

  5. Partial characterization of polyphenol oxidase activity in raspberry fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, E M; de Ancos, B; Cano, M P

    1999-10-01

    A partial characterization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in raspberry fruits is described. Two early cultivars harvested in May/June (Heritage and Autumm Bliss) and two late cultivars harvested in October-November (Ceva and Rubi) were analyzed for PPO activity. Stable and highly active PPO extracts were obtained using insoluble poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and Triton X-100 in sodium phosphate, pH 7.0 buffer. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of raspberry extracts under nondenaturing conditions resolved in one band (R(f)()(1) = 0.25). Raspberry PPO activity has pH optima of 8.0 and 5.5, both with catechol (0.1 M). Maximum activity was with D-catechin (catecholase activity), followed by p-coumaric acid (cresolase activity). Heritage raspberry also showed PPO activity toward 4-methylcatechol. Ceva and Autumm Bliss raspberries showed the higher PPO activity using catechol as substrate.

  6. [ROS and NADPH oxidase: key regulators of tumor vascularisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Urbani, Sarah; Jaquet, Vincent; Imhof, Beat A

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress is the result of an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant mechanisms. It is characterized by damage of all cellular components, DNA, proteins, lipids. ROS are nevertheless important for the physiology of an organism, as they are involved in the innate immune defense and several intracellular signaling pathways. They play an important role in tumorigenesis by promoting tumor vasculature, which is essential to their growth and metastatic processes. There are many sources of ROS in the cells, but the NOX enzymes (NADPH oxidase-dependent) are now recognized to have a major role in the oxidative stress process. Indeed, they are present in many tissues where their only function is to produce ROS. This article discusses the NOX in endothelial cells and their role in the tumor angiogenesis.

  7. Electrochemistry of xanthine oxidase and its interaction with nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Xu, Yi; Chen, Ting; Suzuki, Iwao; Li, Genxi

    2006-02-01

    With the help of nanocrystalline TiO2, the direct electrochemistry of xanthine oxidase (XOD) was achieved and two pairs of redox waves were observed. The interaction between XOD and nitric oxide (NO) was also investigated. The experimental results reveal that NO can be reduced at a XOD-nano TiO2 film modified electrode. When the NO concentration was low, the reduced product, HNO, would inactivate the protein. However, when the NO concentration was high, HNO would continue to react with NO to form N2O2- and N3O3-, which would not inhibit XOD, and thus the amount of active protein did not decrease any further.

  8. Melatonin activates the peroxidase-oxidase reaction and promotes oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, L F; Lunding, A; Lauritsen, F R; Allegra, M

    2001-06-22

    We have studied the peroxidase-oxidase reaction with NADH and O2 as substrates and melatonin as a cofactor in a semibatch reactor. We show for the first time that melatonin is an activator of the reaction catalyzed by enzymes from both plant and animal sources. Furthermore, melatonin promotes oscillatory dynamics in the pH range from 5 to 6. The frequency of the oscillations depends on the pH such that an increase in pH was accompanied by a decrease in frequency. Conversely, an increase in the flow rate of NADH or an increase in the average concentration of NADH resulted in an increase in oscillation frequency. Complex dynamics were not observed with melatonin as a cofactor. These results are discussed in relation to observations of oscillatory dynamics and the function of melatonin and peroxidase in activated neutrophils.

  9. STUDIES ON IMMOBILIZED GLUCOSE OXIDASE BY DIETHYLAMINOETHYL CELLULOSE COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lingzhi; YUAN Hong; FANG Shibi; JIANG Yingyan

    1993-01-01

    The properties of immobilized glucose oxidase (GOD) by the complexes of diethylaminoethyl cellu -lose(DEAEC) with different polymers, such as polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA), polyvinylalcohol (PVA), polyethylene oxide (PEO)and styrene-maleic acid copolymer (PSMA) were investigated. The activity of immobilized GOD was obviously influenced by the component of the DEAEC complexes. The relative activity of the immobilized GOD reached to maximum and over 90% of the native GOD. when the DEAEC-PMAA DEAEC-PAA complexes were used as a carrier with the molar ratio of DEAEC and polyacid of about one. Michaelis constants (Km) of the immobilized enzymes of DEAEC-GOD-PMAA and DEAEC-GOD-PAA were determined to be 1.25 and 1.00, respectively. Moreover, the immobilized GOD has a good storage stability and cyclic life.

  10. Alternative Splicing and Differential Expression of Two Transcripts of Nicotine Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase B Gene from Zea mays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lin; Yun Zhang; Ming-Yi Jiang

    2009-01-01

    With the exception of rice, little is known about the existence of respiratory burst oxidase homolog (rboh) gene in cereals. The present study reports the cloning and analysis of a novel rboh gene, termed ZmrbohB, from maize (Zea mays L.). The full-length cDNA of ZmrbohB encodes a 942 amino acid protein containing all of the respiratory burst oxidase homolog catalytically critical motifs.Altemative splicing of ZmrbohB has generated two transcript isoforms, ZmrbohB-α and -β. Spliced transcript ZmrbohB-β retains an unspliced intron 11 that carries a premature termination codon and probably leads to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Expression analysis showed that two splice isoforms were differentially expressed in various tissues and at different developmental stages, and the major product was ZmrbohB-α. The transcripts of ZmrbohB-α accumulated markedly when the maize seedlings were subjected to various abiotic stimuli, such as wounding, cold (4℃), heat (40℃), UV and salinity stress. In addition, several abiotic stimuli also affected the alternative splicing pattern of ZmrbohB except wounding. These results provide new insight into roles in the expression regulation of plant rboh genes and suggest that ZmrbohB gene may play a role in response to environmental stresses.

  11. Loss of the smallest subunit of cytochrome c oxidase, COX8A, causes Leigh-like syndrome and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Kerstin; Kudin, Alexei P; Zsurka, Gábor; Kornblum, Cornelia; Reimann, Jens; Stüve, Burkhard; Waltz, Stephan; Hattingen, Elke; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Rüb, Cornelia; Voos, Wolfgang; Kopatz, Jens; Neumann, Harald; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2016-02-01

    Isolated cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) deficiency is one of the most frequent respiratory chain defects in humans and is usually caused by mutations in proteins required for assembly of the complex. Mutations in nuclear-encoded structural subunits are very rare. In a patient with Leigh-like syndrome presenting with leukodystrophy and severe epilepsy, we identified a homozygous splice site mutation in COX8A, which codes for the ubiquitously expressed isoform of subunit VIII, the smallest nuclear-encoded subunit of complex IV. The mutation, affecting the last nucleotide of intron 1, leads to aberrant splicing, a frame-shift in the highly conserved exon 2, and decreased amount of the COX8A transcript. The loss of the wild-type COX8A protein severely impairs the stability of the entire cytochrome c oxidase enzyme complex and manifests in isolated complex IV deficiency in skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, similar to the frequent c.845_846delCT mutation in the assembly factor SURF1 gene. Stability and activity of complex IV could be rescued in the patient's fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of wild-type COX8A. Our findings demonstrate that COX8A is indispensable for function of human complex IV and its mutation causes human disease.

  12. Bilirubin oxidase-like proteins from Podospora anserina: promising thermostable enzymes for application in transformation of plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ning; Ruprich-Robert, Gwenaël; Silar, Philippe; Chapeland-Leclerc, Florence

    2015-03-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi is a critical step for production of biofuels, and laccases are common ligninolytic enzymes envisioned for ligninolysis. Bilirubin oxidases (BODs)-like are related to laccases, but their roles during lignocellulose degradation have not yet been fully investigated. The two BODs of the ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina were characterized by targeted gene deletions. Enzymatic assay revealed that the bod1(Δ) and bod2(Δ) mutants lost partly a thermostable laccase activity. A triple mutant inactivated for bod1, bod2 and mco, a previously investigated multicopper oxidase gene distantly related to laccases, had no thermostable laccase activity. The pattern of fruiting body production in the bod1(Δ) bod2(Δ) double mutant was changed. The bod1(Δ) and bod2(Δ) mutants were reduced in their ability to grow on ligneous and cellulosic materials. Furthermore, bod1(Δ) and bod2(Δ) mutants were defective towards resistance to phenolic substrates and H2 O2 , which may also impact lignocellulose breakdown. Double and triple mutants were more affected than single mutants, evidencing redundancy of function among BODs and mco. Overall, the data show that bod1, bod2 and mco code for non-canonical thermostable laccases that participate in the degradation of lignocellulose. Thanks to their thermal stability, these enzymes may be more promising candidate for biotechnological application than canonical laccases.

  13. Involvement of Acyl Coenzyme A Oxidase Isozymes in Biotransformation of Methyl Ricinoleate into γ-Decalactone by Yarrowia lipolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Yves; Laroche, Céline; Bergmark, Karin; Møller-Andersen, Charlotte; Aguedo, Mario; Le Dall, Marie-Thérèse; Wang, Huijie; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Belin, Jean-Marc

    2000-01-01

    We reported previously on the function of acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) oxidase isozymes in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica by investigating strains disrupted in one or several acyl-CoA oxidase-encoding genes (POX1 through POX5) (H. Wang et al., J. Bacteriol. 181:5140–5148, 1999). Here, these mutants were studied for lactone production. Monodisrupted strains produced similar levels of lactone as the wild-type strain (50 mg/liter) except for Δpox3, which produced 220 mg of γ-decalactone per liter after 24 h. The Δpox2 Δpox3 double-disrupted strain, although slightly affected in growth, produced about 150 mg of lactone per liter, indicating that Aox2p was not essential for the biotransformation. The Δpox2 Δpox3 Δpox5 triple-disrupted strain produced and consumed lactone very slowly. On the contrary, the Δpox2 Δpox3 Δpox4 Δpox5 multidisrupted strain did not grow or biotransform methyl ricinoleate into γ-decalactone, demonstrating that Aox4p is essential for the biotransformation. PMID:10698800

  14. Involvement of acyl coenzyme A oxidase isozymes in biotransformation of methyl ricinoleate into gamma-decalactone by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Y; Laroche, C; Bergmark, K; Møller-Andersen, C; Aguedo, M; Le Dall, M T; Wang, H; Nicaud, J M; Belin, J M

    2000-03-01

    We reported previously on the function of acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) oxidase isozymes in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica by investigating strains disrupted in one or several acyl-CoA oxidase-encoding genes (POX1 through POX5) (H. Wang et al., J. Bacteriol. 181:5140-5148, 1999). Here, these mutants were studied for lactone production. Monodisrupted strains produced similar levels of lactone as the wild-type strain (50 mg/liter) except for Deltapox3, which produced 220 mg of gamma-decalactone per liter after 24 h. The Deltapox2 Deltapox3 double-disrupted strain, although slightly affected in growth, produced about 150 mg of lactone per liter, indicating that Aox2p was not essential for the biotransformation. The Deltapox2 Deltapox3 Deltapox5 triple-disrupted strain produced and consumed lactone very slowly. On the contrary, the Deltapox2 Deltapox3 Deltapox4 Deltapox5 multidisrupted strain did not grow or biotransform methyl ricinoleate into gamma-decalactone, demonstrating that Aox4p is essential for the biotransformation.

  15. Molecular Dynamic Studies of the Complex Polyethylenimine and Glucose Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szefler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose oxidase (GOx is an enzyme produced by Aspergillus, Penicillium and other fungi species. It catalyzes the oxidation of β-d-glucose (by the molecular oxygen or other molecules, like quinones, in a higher oxidation state to form d-glucono-1,5-lactone, which hydrolyses spontaneously to produce gluconic acid. A coproduct of this enzymatic reaction is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. GOx has found several commercial applications in chemical and pharmaceutical industries including novel biosensors that use the immobilized enzyme on different nanomaterials and/or polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI. The problem of GOx immobilization on PEI is retaining the enzyme native activity despite its immobilization onto the polymer surface. Therefore, the molecular dynamic (MD study of the PEI ligand (C14N8_07_B22 and the GOx enzyme (3QVR was performed to examine the final complex PEI-GOx stabilization and the affinity of the PEI ligand to the docking sites of the GOx enzyme. The docking procedure showed two places/regions of major interaction of the protein with the polymer PEI: (LIG1 of −5.8 kcal/mol and (LIG2 of −4.5 kcal/mol located inside the enzyme and on its surface, respectively. The values of enthalpy for the PEI-enzyme complex, located inside of the protein (LIG1 and on its surface (LIG2 were computed. Docking also discovered domains of the GOx protein that exhibit no interactions with the ligand or have even repulsive characteristics. The structural data clearly indicate some differences in the ligand PEI behavior bound at the two places/regions of glucose oxidase.

  16. Molecular Dynamic Studies of the Complex Polyethylenimine and Glucose Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Beata; Diudea, Mircea V.; Putz, Mihai V.; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an enzyme produced by Aspergillus, Penicillium and other fungi species. It catalyzes the oxidation of β-d-glucose (by the molecular oxygen or other molecules, like quinones, in a higher oxidation state) to form d-glucono-1,5-lactone, which hydrolyses spontaneously to produce gluconic acid. A coproduct of this enzymatic reaction is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). GOx has found several commercial applications in chemical and pharmaceutical industries including novel biosensors that use the immobilized enzyme on different nanomaterials and/or polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI). The problem of GOx immobilization on PEI is retaining the enzyme native activity despite its immobilization onto the polymer surface. Therefore, the molecular dynamic (MD) study of the PEI ligand (C14N8_07_B22) and the GOx enzyme (3QVR) was performed to examine the final complex PEI-GOx stabilization and the affinity of the PEI ligand to the docking sites of the GOx enzyme. The docking procedure showed two places/regions of major interaction of the protein with the polymer PEI: (LIG1) of −5.8 kcal/mol and (LIG2) of −4.5 kcal/mol located inside the enzyme and on its surface, respectively. The values of enthalpy for the PEI-enzyme complex, located inside of the protein (LIG1) and on its surface (LIG2) were computed. Docking also discovered domains of the GOx protein that exhibit no interactions with the ligand or have even repulsive characteristics. The structural data clearly indicate some differences in the ligand PEI behavior bound at the two places/regions of glucose oxidase. PMID:27801788

  17. Putrescine biosensor based on putrescine oxidase from Kocuria rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bóka, Beáta; Adányi, Nóra; Szamos, Jenő; Virág, Diána; Kiss, Attila

    2012-10-10

    The novel putrescine oxidase based amperometric biosensor selectively measures putrescine, which can be considered as an indicator of microbial spoilage. Putrescine oxidase (PUOX, EC 1.4.3.10) was isolated from Kocuria rosea (Micrococcus rubens) by an improved and simplified purification process. Cells were grown on brain heart infusion medium supplemented with putrescine. Cell-free extract was prepared in Tris buffer (pH 8.0) by Bead-beater. A newly elaborated step based on three-phase partitioning (TPP) was applied in the purification protocol of PUOX. The purified enzyme was immobilized on the surface of a spectroscopic graphite electrode in redox hydrogel with horseradish peroxidase, Os mediator and poly(ethylene glycol) (400) diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) as crosslinking agent. This modified working electrode was used in wall-jet type amperometric cell together with the Ag/AgCl (0.1M KCl) reference electrode and a platinum wire as auxiliary electrode in flow injection analysis system (FIA). Hydrogel composition, pH and potential dependence were studied. Optimal working conditions were 0.45 mLmin(-1) flow rate of phosphate buffer (66 mM, pH 8.0) and +50 mV polarizing potential vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear measuring range of the method was 0.01-0.25 mM putrescine, while the detection limit was 5 μM. Beer samples were investigated by the putrescine biosensor and the results were compared by those of HPLC reference method.

  18. Role of NADPH Oxidase-4 in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakami, Nora Y.; Ranjan, Amaresh K.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Dusting, Greg J.; Peshavariya, Hitesh M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) display a unique ability to promote angiogenesis and restore endothelial function in injured blood vessels. NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) serves as a signaling molecule and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and migration as well as protecting against cell death. However, the role of NOX4 in EPC function is not completely understood. Methods: EPCs were isolated from human saphenous vein and mammary artery discarded during bypass surgery. NOX4 gene and protein expression in EPCs were measured by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis respectively. NOX4 gene expression was inhibited using an adenoviral vector expressing human NOX4 shRNA (Ad-NOX4i). H2O2 production was measured by Amplex red assay. EPC migration was evaluated using a transwell migration assay. EPC proliferation and viability were measured using trypan blue counts. Results: Inhibition of NOX4 using Ad-NOX4i reduced Nox4 gene and protein expression as well as H2O2 formation in EPCs. Inhibition of NOX4-derived H2O2 decreased both proliferation and migration of EPCs. Interestingly, pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) decreased NOX4 expression and reduced survival of EPCs. However, the survival of EPCs was further diminished by TNF-α in NOX4-knockdown cells, suggesting that NOX4 has a protective role in EPCs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that NOX4-type NADPH oxidase is important for proliferation and migration functions of EPCs and protects against pro-inflammatory cytokine induced EPC death. These properties of NOX4 may facilitate the efficient function of EPCs which is vital for successful neovascularization.

  19. Protonation State-Dependent Communication in Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Ghane, Tahereh; Reidelbach, Marco; Woelke, Anna Lena; Knapp, Ernst Walter; Imhof, Petra

    2016-08-09

    Proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase from the cellular inside to the binuclear redox center (BNC) can occur through two distinct pathways, the D- and K-channels. For the protein to function as both redox enzyme and proton pump, proton transfer out of either of the channels toward the BNC or into the protein toward a proton loading site, and ultimately through the membrane, must be highly regulated. The O→E intermediate of cytochrome c oxidase is the first redox state in its catalytic cycle, where proton transfer through the K-channel, from K362 to Y288 at the BNC, is important. Molecular dynamics simulations of this intermediate with 16 different combinations of protonation states of key residues in the D- and K-channel show the mutual impact of the two proton-conducting channels to be protonation state-dependent. Strength as well as means of communication, correlations in positions, or connections along the hydrogen-bonded network, change with the protonation state of the K-channel residue K362. The conformational and hydrogen-bond dynamics of the D-channel residue N139 regulated by an interplay of protonation in the D-channel and K362. N139 thus assumes a gating function by which proton passage through the D-channel toward E286 is likely facilitated for states with protonated K362 and unprotonated E286, which would in principle allow proton transfer to the BNC, but no proton pumping until a proton has reached E286.

  20. Engineering pyranose 2-oxidase for modified oxygen reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Brugger

    Full Text Available Pyranose 2-oxidase (POx, a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, catalyzes the regioselective oxidation of aldopyranoses at position C2 to the corresponding 2-ketoaldoses. During the first half-reaction, FAD is reduced to FADH2 and reoxidized in the second half-reaction by reducing molecular oxygen to H2O2. Alternative electron acceptors including quinones, radicals or chelated metal ions show significant and in some cases even higher activity. While oxygen as cheap and abundantly available electron acceptor is favored for many processes, reduced oxygen reactivity is desirable for some applications such as in biosensors/biofuel cells because of reduced oxidative damages to the biocatalyst from concomitant H2O2 production as well as reduced electron "leakage" to oxygen. The reactivity of flavoproteins with oxygen is of considerable scientific interest, and the determinants of oxygen activation and reactivity are the subject of numerous studies. We applied site-saturation mutagenesis on a set of eleven amino acids around the active site based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. Using microtiter plate screening assays with peroxidase/2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, variants of POx with decreased oxidase activity and maintained dehydrogenase activity were identified. Variants T166R, Q448H, L545C, L547R and N593C were characterized with respect to their apparent steady-state constants with oxygen and the alternative electron acceptors DCPIP, 1,4-benzoquinone and ferricenium ion, and the effect of the mutations was rationalized based on structural properties.

  1. Skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase is increased and triggers stretch-induced damage in the mdx mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Yeung, Ella W; Froehner, Stanley C; Allen, David G

    2010-12-20

    Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of muscle damage in dystrophic (mdx) mice. In this study we have investigated the role of NADPH oxidase as a source of the oxidative stress in these mice. The NADPH oxidase subunits gp91(phox), p67(phox) and rac 1 were increased 2-3 fold in tibilais anterior muscles from mdx mice compared to wild type. Importantly, this increase occurred in 19 day old mice, before the onset of muscle necrosis and inflammation, suggesting that NADPH oxidase is an important source of oxidative stress in mdx muscle. In muscles from 9 week old mdx mice, gp91(phox) and p67(phox) were increased 3-4 fold and NADPH oxidase superoxide production was 2 times greater than wild type. In single fibers from mdx muscle NADPH oxidase subunits were all located on or near the sarcolemma, except for p67(phox),which was expressed in the cytosol. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase significantly reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) rise following stretched contractions in mdx single fibers, and also attenuated the loss of muscle force. These results suggest that NADPH oxidase is a major source of reactive oxygen species in dystrophic muscle and its enhanced activity has a stimulatory effect on stretch-induced Ca(2+) entry, a key mechanism for muscle damage and functional impairment.

  2. Processing optimization of probiotic yogurt containing glucose oxidase using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, A G; Faria, J A F; Walter, E H M; Andrade, R R; Cavalcanti, R N; Oliveira, C A F; Granato, D

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to oxygen may induce a lack of functionality of probiotic dairy foods because the anaerobic metabolism of probiotic bacteria compromises during storage the maintenance of their viability to provide benefits to consumer health. Glucose oxidase can constitute a potential alternative to increase the survival of probiotic bacteria in yogurt because it consumes the oxygen permeating to the inside of the pot during storage, thus making it possible to avoid the use of chemical additives. This research aimed to optimize the processing of probiotic yogurt supplemented with glucose oxidase using response surface methodology and to determine the levels of glucose and glucose oxidase that minimize the concentration of dissolved oxygen and maximize the Bifidobacterium longum count by the desirability function. Response surface methodology mathematical models adequately described the process, with adjusted determination coefficients of 83% for the oxygen and 94% for the B. longum. Linear and quadratic effects of the glucose oxidase were reported for the oxygen model, whereas for the B. longum count model an influence of the glucose oxidase at the linear level was observed followed by the quadratic influence of glucose and quadratic effect of glucose oxidase. The desirability function indicated that 62.32 ppm of glucose oxidase and 4.35 ppm of glucose was the best combination of these components for optimization of probiotic yogurt processing. An additional validation experiment was performed and results showed acceptable error between the predicted and experimental results.

  3. Cytochrome c oxidase-intermediate fibres: importance in understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Julie L; Ratnaike, Thiloka E; Shang, Ersong; Falkous, Gavin; Blakely, Emma L; Alston, Charlotte L; Taivassalo, Tanja; Haller, Ronald G; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M

    2012-08-01

    An important diagnostic muscle biopsy finding in patients with mitochondrial DNA disease is the presence of respiratory-chain deficient fibres. These fibres are detected as cytochrome c oxidase-deficient following a sequential cytochrome c oxidase-succinate dehydrogenase reaction, often in a mosaic pattern within a population of cytochrome c oxidase-normal fibres. Detailed analysis of muscle biopsies from patients with various mitochondrial DNA defects shows that a spectrum of deficiency exists, as there are a large number of fibres which do not correspond to being either completely cytochrome c oxidase-normal (brown staining) or cytochrome c oxidase-deficient (blue staining). We have used a combination of histochemical and immunocytochemical techniques to show that a population of cytochrome c oxidase-intermediate reacting fibres are a gradation between normal and deficient fibres. We show that cytochrome c oxidase-intermediate fibres also have different genetic characteristics in terms of amount of mutated and wild-type mtDNA, and as such, may represent an important transition between respiratory normal and deficient fibres. Assessing changes in intermediate fibres will be crucial to evaluating the responses to treatment and in particular to exercise training regimes in patients with mitochondrial DNA disease.

  4. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Aryl-2H-pyrazole Derivatives as Potent Non-purine Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Xiao-Jing; Zhu, Ming-Li; Ding, Wen-Ze; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2015-01-01

    A series of aryl-2H-pyrazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Among them, 2 aryl-2H-pyrazole derivatives showed significant inhibitory activities against xanthine oxidase. Compound 19 emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50=9.8 µM) in comparison with allopurinol (IC50=9.5 µM). The docking study revealed that compound 19 might have strong interactions with the active site of xanthine oxidase. This compound is thus a new candidate for further development for the treatment of gout.

  5. Urate oxidase purification by salting-in crystallization: towards an alternative to chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Giffard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rasburicase (Fasturtec® or Elitek®, Sanofi-Aventis, the recombinant form of urate oxidase from Aspergillus flavus, is a therapeutic enzyme used to prevent or decrease the high levels of uric acid in blood that can occur as a result of chemotherapy. It is produced by Sanofi-Aventis and currently purified via several standard steps of chromatography. This work explores the feasibility of replacing one or more chromatography steps in the downstream process by a crystallization step. It compares the efficacy of two crystallization techniques that have proven successful on pure urate oxidase, testing them on impure urate oxidase solutions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigate the possibility of purifying urate oxidase directly by crystallization from the fermentation broth. Based on attractive interaction potentials which are known to drive urate oxidase crystallization, two crystallization routes are compared: a by increased polymer concentration, which induces a depletion attraction and b by decreased salt concentration, which induces attractive interactions via a salting-in effect. We observe that adding polymer, a very efficient way to crystallize pure urate oxidase through the depletion effect, is not an efficient way to grow crystals from impure solution. On the other hand, we show that dialysis, which decreases salt concentration through its strong salting-in effect, makes purification of urate oxidase from the fermentation broth possible. CONCLUSIONS: The aim of this study is to compare purification efficacy of two crystallization methods. Our findings show that crystallization of urate oxidase from the fermentation broth provides purity comparable to what can be achieved with one chromatography step. This suggests that, in the case of urate oxidase, crystallization could be implemented not only for polishing or concentration during the last steps of purification, but also as an initial capture step, with minimal

  6. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  7. Mild exposure of RIN-5F β-cells to human islet amyloid polypeptide aggregates upregulates antioxidant enzymes via NADPH oxidase-RAGE: An hormetic stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Borchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of amyloid aggregates of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, contributes to pancreatic β-cell impairment, where oxidative stress plays a key role. A contribution of NADPH oxidase to reactive oxygen species (ROS generation after cell exposure to micromolar concentrations of hIAPP aggregates has been suggested. However, little is known about β-cells exposure to lower amounts of hIAPP aggregates, similar to those found in human pancreas. Thus, we aimed to investigate the events resulting from RIN-5F cells exposure to nanomolar concentrations of toxic hIAPP aggregates. We found an early and transient rise of NADPH oxidase activity resulting from increased Nox1 expression following the engagement of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE by hIAPP aggregates. Unexpectedly, NADPH oxidase activation was not accompanied by a significant ROS increase and the lipoperoxidation level was significantly reduced. Indeed, cell exposure to hIAPP aggregates affected the antioxidant defences, inducing a significant increase of the expression and activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase. We conclude that exposure of pancreatic β-cells to nanomolar concentrations of hIAPP aggregates for a short time induces an hormetic response via the RAGE-Nox1 axis; the latter stimulates the enzymatic antioxidant defences that preserve the cells against oxidative stress damage.

  8. Respiratory system of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5. Evidence for a cyanide-sensitive cytochrome bb and cyanide-resistant cytochrome ba quinol oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, B; Martínez, S; Chávez, J L; Lee, S; Castro, N A; Domínguez, M A; Gómez, S; Contreras, M L; Kennedy, C; Escamilla, J E

    2006-12-01

    In highly aerobic environments, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus uses a respiratory protection mechanism to preserve nitrogenase activity from deleterious oxygen. Here, the respiratory system was examined in order to ascertain the nature of the respiratory components, mainly of the cyanide sensitive and resistant pathways. The membranes of G. diazotrophicus contain Q(10), Q(9) and PQQ in a 13:1:6.6 molar ratios. UV(360 nm) photoinactivation indicated that ubiquinone is the electron acceptor for the dehydrogenases of the outer and inner faces of the membrane. Strong inhibition by rotenone and capsaicin and resistance to flavone indicated that NADH-quinone oxidoreductase is a NDH-1 type enzyme. KCN-titration revealed the presence of at least two terminal oxidases that were highly sensitive and resistant to the inhibitor. Tetrachorohydroquinol was preferentially oxidized by the KCN-sensitive oxidase. Neither the quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase nor its associated cytochromes c were instrumental components of the cyanide resistant pathway. CO-difference spectrum and photodissociation of heme-CO compounds suggested the presence of cytochromes b-CO and a(1)-CO adducts. Air-oxidation of cytochrome b (432 nm) was arrested by concentrations of KCN lower than 25 microM while cytochrome a(1) (442 nm) was not affected. A KCN-sensitive (I(50)=5 microM) cytochrome bb and a KCN-resistant (I(50)=450 microM) cytochrome ba quinol oxidases were separated by ion exchange chromatography.

  9. On-line radiochemical assay for monoamine oxidase utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissinen, E.; Linko-Loeppoenen SMae; Maennistoe P4

    1984-12-01

    A fast and sensitive assay for the determination of monoamine oxidase activity was developed. The method is based on the separation and quantitation of /sup 14/C-labeled assay products by high-performance liquid chromatography, which is interfaced directly into a flow-through radioactivity detector. This allows on-line quantitation of the radioactive compounds with picomole sensitivity. The method makes possible the complete separation and detection of the deaminated products of monoamine oxidase A and B substrates benzylamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine, respectively. This assay has been applied to the measurement of monoamine oxidase A and B activities in rat brain.

  10. The Cytochrome bd Oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis Contributes to Oxidative Stress Resistance and Dioxygen Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Leclerc

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is an etiologic agent of periodontal disease in humans. The disease is associated with the formation of a mixed oral biofilm which is exposed to oxygen and environmental stress, such as oxidative stress. To investigate possible roles for cytochrome bd oxidase in the growth and persistence of this anaerobic bacterium inside the oral biofilm, mutant strains deficient in cytochrome bd oxidase activity were characterized. This study demonstrated that the cytochrome bd oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis, encoded by cydAB, was able to catalyse O2 consumption and was involved in peroxide and superoxide resistance, and dioxygen tolerance.

  11. Intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase is enhanced in the presence of oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Wherland, S; Pecht, I

    1994-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer from the type 1 copper center to the type 3 copper(II) pair is induced in the multi-copper enzyme, ascorbate oxidase, following pulse radiolytic reduction of the type 1 Cu(II) ion. In the presence of a slight excess of dioxygen over ascorbate oxidase, interaction...... between the trinuclear copper center and O2 is observed even with singly reduced ascorbate oxidase molecules. Under these conditions, the rate constant for intramolecular electron transfer from type 1 Cu(I) to type 3 Cu(II) increases 5-fold to 1100 +/- 300 s-1 (20 degrees C, pH 5.8) as compared...

  12. Allosteric modulation of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activities in vitro by imidazoline receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Evidence indicates that imidazoline I2 binding sites (I2BSs) are present on monoamine oxidase (MAO) and on soluble (plasma) semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase enzymes. The binding site on MAO has been described as a modulatory site, although no effects on activity are thought to have been observed as a result of ligands binding to these sites.We examined the effects in vitro of several imidazoline binding site ligands on activities of bovine plasma amine oxidase (BPAO) and porcine kidney d...

  13. Bioelectrochemical Response and Kinetics of Choline Oxidase Entrapped in Polyaniline-Polyacrylonitrile Composite Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE,Huai-Guo(薛怀国); SHEN,Zhi-Quan(沈之荃)

    2002-01-01

    A novel choline oxidase electrode was constructed by entrapping choline oxidase into polyaniline-polyacrylonitrile composite film. The enzyme film was prepared by in situ electropolymerization of aniline into porous polyacrylonitrile-coated platinum electrode in the presence of choline oxidase. The enzyme electrode exhibited sensitive and stable electrochemical response to choline. The kinetics analysis showed that the mass transport is partially rate-limiting. The influences of pH, applied potential and temperature on the response of the enzyme electrode were also described.

  14. The inhibitory binding site(s) of Zn2+ in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Giachini, Lisa; Boscherini, Federico; Venturoli, Giovanni; Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Papa, Sergio

    2007-02-20

    EXAFS analysis of Zn binding site(s) in bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase and characterization of the inhibitory effect of internal zinc on respiratory activity and proton pumping of the liposome reconstituted oxidase are presented. EXAFS identifies tetrahedral coordination site(s) for Zn(2+) with two N-histidine imidazoles, one N-histidine imidazol or N-lysine and one O-COOH (glutamate or aspartate), possibly located at the entry site of the proton conducting D pathway in the oxidase and involved in inhibition of the oxygen reduction catalysis and proton pumping by internally trapped zinc.

  15. Hippocampal mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase activity and gene expression in a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Zhao; Yingli Zhang; Mingming Zhao; Yu Wang; Ming Ma; Xinquan Gu; Xia Cao

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia using bilateral common carotid artery permanent ligation to analyze cytochrome C oxidase activity and mRNA expression in hippocampal mitochondria.Results showed significantly decreased cytochrome C oxidase activity and cytochrome C oxidase II mRNA expression with prolonged ischemia time.Further analysis revealed five mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase II gene mutations, two newly generated mutations, and four absent mutational sites at 1 month after cerebral ischemia, as well as three mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase III gene mutations, including two newly generating mutations, and one disappeared mutational site at 1 month after cerebral ischemia.Results demonstrated that decreased cytochrome C oxidase gene expression and mutations, as well as decreased cytochrome C oxidase activity, resulting in energy dysmetabolism, which has been shown to be involved in the pathological process of ischemic brain injury.

  16. Disruption of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 gene leads to cytochrome c oxidase depletion and reorchestrated respiratory metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Jennifer; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Macherel, David; Benamar, Abdelilah; Belcram, Katia; Quadrado, Martine; Arnal, Nadège; Mireau, Hakim

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the last respiratory complex of the electron transfer chain in mitochondria and is responsible for transferring electrons to oxygen, the final acceptor, in the classical respiratory pathway. The essentiality of this step makes it that depletion in complex IV leads to lethality, thereby impeding studies on complex IV assembly and respiration plasticity in plants. Here, we characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryo-lethal mutant lines impaired in the expression of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 (COD1) gene, which encodes a mitochondria-localized PentatricoPeptide Repeat protein. Although unable to germinate under usual conditions, cod1 homozygous embryos could be rescued from immature seeds and developed in vitro into slow-growing bush-like plantlets devoid of a root system. cod1 mutants were defective in C-to-U editing events in cytochrome oxidase subunit2 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit4 transcripts, encoding subunits of respiratory complex IV and I, respectively, and consequently lacked cytochrome c oxidase activity. We further show that respiratory oxygen consumption by cod1 plantlets is exclusively associated with alternative oxidase activity and that alternative NADH dehydrogenases are also up-regulated in these plants. The metabolomics pattern of cod1 mutants was also deeply altered, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways compensated for the probable resulting restriction in NADH oxidation. Being the first complex IV-deficient mutants described in higher plants, cod1 lines should be instrumental to future studies on respiration homeostasis.

  17. Genome wide association mapping for the tolerance to the polyamine oxidase inhibitor guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostadin Evgeniev eAtanasov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines. Here we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1 within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2. The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2 and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine.

  18. Cytochrome c oxidase deficiency accelerates mitochondrial apoptosis by activating ceramide synthase 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüll, S; Günther, S D; Brodesser, S; Seeger, J M; Tosetti, B; Wiegmann, K; Pongratz, C; Diaz, F; Witt, A; Andree, M; Brinkmann, K; Krönke, M; Wiesner, R J; Kashkar, H

    2015-03-12

    Although numerous pathogenic changes within the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) have been associated with an elevated occurrence of apoptosis within the affected tissues, the mechanistic insight into how mitochondrial dysfunction initiates apoptotic cell death is still unknown. In this study, we show that the specific alteration of the cytochrome c oxidase (COX), representing a common defect found in mitochondrial diseases, facilitates mitochondrial apoptosis in response to oxidative stress. Our data identified an increased ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) activity as an important pro-apoptotic response to COX dysfunction induced either by chemical or genetic approaches. The elevated CerS6 activity resulted in accumulation of the pro-apoptotic C16 : 0 ceramide, which facilitates the mitochondrial apoptosis in response to oxidative stress. Accordingly, inhibition of CerS6 or its specific knockdown diminished the increased susceptibility of COX-deficient cells to oxidative stress. Our results provide new insights into how mitochondrial RC dysfunction mechanistically interferes with the apoptotic machinery. On the basis of its pivotal role in regulating cell death upon COX dysfunction, CerS6 might potentially represent a novel target for therapeutic intervention in mitochondrial diseases caused by COX dysfunction.

  19. Investigating the effects of metals on phenol oxidase-producing nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter chroococcum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Susanne; Schmidt, Marlen; Thompson, Mark L; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    Expression of phenol oxidases (PO) in bacteria is often observed during physiological and morphological changes; in the nitrogen-fixing strain Azotobacter chroococcum SBUG 1484, it is accompanied by the formation of encysted cells and melanin. Herein, we studied the effects of copper and the depletion of the nitrogenase-relevant metals molybdenum and iron on physiological characteristics such as culture pigmentation, release of ortho-dihydroxylated melanin precursors, and expression of PO activity in A. chroococcum. Biomass production and melanogenic appearance were directly affected by the depletion of either iron or molybdenum, or in the absence of both metals. Only nitrogen-fixing cells growing in the presence of both metals and cultures supplemented with iron (molybdenum starved) showed the ability to produce an intensively brown-black melanin pigment typically associated with A. chroococcum. Accordingly, PO production was only detected in the presence of both metals and in iron-supplemented cultures starved of molybdenum. The total amount of catecholate siderophores produced by nitrogen-fixing melanogenic cells was considerably higher than in cultures starved of metal ions. Induction of enhanced PO activity was stimulated by additional copper sulfate, possibly related to cellular processes involved in the detoxification of this particular metal, and revealed distinct release of the ortho-dihydroxylated melanin precursors catechol and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid.

  20. Psychological traits and platelet monoamine oxidase activity in eating disorder patients: their relationship and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Iris; Jaanisk, Maiken; Allik, Jüri; Harro, Jaanus

    2007-01-30

    Self-reported behavior and attitudes towards eating [Eating Disorder Inventory-2; Garner DM (1991). Eating Disorder Inventory-2: Professional Manual. Odessa, Fl.: Psychological Assessment Resources; Estonian version Podar I, Hannus A, Allik J (1999). Personality and Affectivity Characteristics Associated With Eating Disorders: a Comparison of Eating Disordered, Weight-Preoccupied, and Normal Samples. J Pers Assess; 73(1), 133-147] and the activity of platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) was studied in 11 patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), 43 patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and a healthy control group (n=138). Nineteen patients filled in the EDI-2 questionnaire and donated blood samples three times with three month intervals in order to determine platelet MAO activity. Eating disordered (ED) patients scored higher on all EDI-2 subscales and had lower MAO activity compared to the control group. They also scored higher than the control group on the Neuroticism domain but lower on the Extraversion, Openness, and Conscientiousness domains of the NEO-PI-R questionnaire. The average stability of MAO on different occasions (r=.56) was slightly smaller than the stability of the EDI-2 scores (r=.70). The lack of correlations between personality dispositions and MAO activity indicates that they have independent influence on eating disorders. A possible relationship between neurochemical mechanisms and psychological symptoms of eating disordered behavior is discussed.

  1. Bilirubin oxidase based enzymatic air-breathing cathode: Operation under pristine and contaminated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Erable, Benjamin; Schuler, Andrew; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-04-01

    The performance of bilirubin oxidase (BOx) based air breathing cathode was constantly monitored over 45 days. The effect of electrolyte composition on the cathode oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) output was investigated. Particularly, deactivation of the electrocatalytic activity of the enzyme in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and in activated sludge (AS) was evaluated. The greatest drop in current density was observed during the first 3 days of constant operation with a decrease of ~60 μA cm(-2) day(-1). The rate of decrease slowed to ~10 μA cm(-2) day(-1) (day 3 to 9) and then to ~1.5 μA cm(-2)day(-1) thereafter (day 9 to 45). Despite the constant decrease in output, the BOx cathode generated residual current after 45 days operations with an open circuit potential (OCP) of 475 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Enzyme deactivation was also studied in AS to simulate an environment close to the real waste operation with pollutants, solid particles and bacteria. The presence of low-molecular weight soluble contaminants was identified as the main reason for an immediate enzymatic deactivation within few hours of cathode operation. The presence of solid particles and bacteria does not affect the natural degradation of the enzyme.

  2. Role of subunit III and its lipids in the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Ala-Vannesluoma, Pauliina; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Wikström, Mårten; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    The terminal respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces molecular oxygen to water, and pumps protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane, or the plasma membrane of bacteria. A two-subunit CcO harbors all the elements necessary for oxygen reduction and proton pumping. However, it rapidly undergoes turnover-induced irreversible damage, which is effectively prevented by the presence of subunit III and its tightly bound lipids. We have performed classical atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a three-subunit CcO, which show the formation of water wires between the polar head groups of lipid molecules bound to subunit III and the proton uptake site Asp91 (Bos taurus enzyme numbering). Continuum electrostatic calculations suggest that these lipids directly influence the proton affinity of Asp91 by 1-2pK units. We surmise that lipids bound to subunit III influence the rate of proton uptake through the D-pathway, and therefore play a key role in preventing turnover-induced inactivation. Atomistic MD simulations show that subunit III is rapidly hydrated in the absence of internally bound lipids, which is likely to affect the rate of O2 diffusion into the active-site. The role of subunit III with its indigenous lipids in the molecular mechanism of CcO is discussed.

  3. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Rumney, Robin M H; Schoof, Erwin M; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2015-06-04

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in patients with oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified lysyl oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonize and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications.

  4. Reduced mitochondria cytochrome oxidase activity in adult children of mothers with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Lisa; de Leon, Mony; Murray, John; E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Javier, Elizabeth; McHugh, Pauline; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2011-01-01

    Biomarker studies demonstrate inheritance of glucose hypometabolism and increased amyloid-β deposition in adult offspring of mothers, but not fathers, affected by late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). The underlying genetic mechanisms are unknown. We investigated whether cognitively normal (NL) individuals with a maternal history of LOAD (MH) have reduced platelet mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity (COX, electron transport chain complex IV) compared to those with paternal (PH) or negative family history (NH). Thirty-six consecutive NL individuals (age 55 ± 15 y, range 27-71 y, 56% female, CDR = 0, MMSE ≥28, 28% APOE-4 carriers), including 12 NH, 12 PH, and 12 MH, received a blood draw to measure platelet mitochondrial COX activity. Citrate synthase activity (CS) was measured as a reference. Groups were comparable for clinical and neuropsychological measures. We found that after correcting for CS, COX activity was reduced by 29% in MH compared to NH, and by 30% in MH compared to PH (p ≤ 0.006). Results remained significant controlling for age, gender, education, and APOE. No differences were found between PH and NH. COX measures discriminated MH from the other groups with accuracy ≥75%, and relative risk ≥3 (p ≤ 0.005). Among NL with LOAD-parents, only those with MH showed reduced COX activity in platelet mitochondria compared to PH and NH. The association between maternal history of LOAD and systemic COX reductions suggests transmission via mitochondrial DNA, which is exclusively maternally inherited in humans.

  5. A rapid and sensitive alcohol oxidase/catalase conductometric biosensor for alcohol determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnaien, M; Lagarde, F; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2010-04-15

    A new conductometric biosensor has been developed for the determination of short chain primary aliphatic alcohols. The biosensor assembly was prepared through immobilization of alcohol oxidase from Hansenula sp. and bovine liver catalase in a photoreticulated poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane at the surface of interdigitated microelectrodes. The local conductivity increased rapidly after alcohol addition, reaching steady-state within 10 min. The sensitivity was maximal for methanol (0.394+/-0.004 microS microM(-1), n=5) and decreased by increasing the alcohol chain length. The response was linear up to 75 microM for methanol, 70 microM for ethanol and 65 microM for 1-propanol and limits of detection were 0.5 microM, 1 microM and 3 microM, respectively (S/N=3). No significant loss of the enzyme activities was observed after 3 months of storage at 4 degrees C in a 20mM phosphate buffer solution pH 7.2 (two or three measurements per week). After 4 months, 95% of the initial signal still remained. The biosensor response to ethanol was not significantly affected by acetic, lactic, ascorbic, malic, oxalic, citric, tartaric acids or glucose. The bi-enzymatic sensor was successfully applied to the determination of ethanol in different alcoholic beverages.

  6. The distribution of arsenate and arsenite in shoots and roots of Holcus lanatus is influenced by arsenic tolerance and arsenate and phosphate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaghebeur, Mieke; Rengel, Zdenko

    2003-07-01

    The recent discovery that phytochelatins are important for arsenic (As) detoxification in terrestrial plants results in the necessity to understand As speciation and metabolism in plant material. A hydroponic study was therefore conducted to examine the effects of different levels of phosphate and arsenate [As(V)] on As speciation and distribution in tolerant and non-tolerant clones of Holcus lanatus. Speciation of As in tissue (using high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) revealed that the predominant species present were the inorganic As species (As(V) and arsenite [As(III)]), although small levels (<1%) of organic As species (dimethylarsinic acid and monomethylarsonic acid) were detected in shoot material. In roots, the proportion of total As present as As(III) generally increased with increasing levels of As(V) in the nutrient solution, whereas in shoots, the proportion of total As present as As(III) generally decreased with increasing levels of As(V). H. lanatus plants growing in the high-phosphorus (P) (100 micro M) solution contained a higher proportion of As(V) (with regard to total As) in both roots and shoots than plants supplied with low P (10 micro M); in addition, tolerant clones generally contained a higher proportion of As(V) with regard to total As than non-tolerant clones. The study further revealed that As(V) can be reduced to As(III) in both roots and shoots. Although the reduction capacity was limited, the reduction was closely regulated by As influx for all treatments. The results therefore provide a new understanding about As metabolism in H. lanatus.

  7. Gastrointestinal protective efficacy of Kolaviron (a bi-flavonoid from Garcinia kola following a single administration of sodium arsenite in rats: Biochemical and histopathological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinleye S Akinrinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arsenic intoxication is known to produce symptoms including diarrhea and vomiting, which are indications of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Objective: We investigated whether Kolaviron (KV administration protected against sodium arsenite (NaAsO 2 -induced damage to gastric and intestinal epithelium in rats. Materials and Methods: Control rats (Group I were given a daily oral dose of corn oil. Rats in other groups were given a single dose of NaAsO 2 (100 mg/kg; intraperitoneal alone (Group II or after pretreatment for 7 days with KV at 100 mg/kg (Group III and 200 mg/kg (Group IV. Rats were sacrificed afterward and portions of the stomach, small intestine and colon were processed for histopathological examination. Hydrogen peroxide, reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde (MDA concentrations as well as activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, glutathione S-transferase (GST and myeloperoxidase (MPO were measured in the remaining portions of the different gastrointestinal tract (GIT segments. Results: NaAsO 2 caused significant increases (P < 0.05 in MDA levels and MPO activity, with significant reductions (P < 0.05 in GST, GPX, CAT and SOD activities in the stomach and intestines. KV significantly reversed the changes (P < 0.05 in a largely dose-dependent manner. The different segments had marked inflammatory cellular infiltration, with hyperplasia of the crypts, which occurred to much lesser degrees with KV administration. Conclusion: The present findings showed that KV might be a potent product for mitigating NaAsO 2 toxicity in the GIT.

  8. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As(III)) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As(III) on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As(III) on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As(III) were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As(III) than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As(III) in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As(III) cytotoxicity between these cells.

  9. NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species as signaling molecules in carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WANG

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are small molecule metabolites of oxygen that are prone to participate in redox reactions via their high reactivity. Intracellular ROS could be generated in reduced nicotina-mide-adenine dinucleotidephosphate (NADPH) oxidase-dependent and/or NADPH oxidase-independent manners. Physiologically, ROS are involved in many signaling cascades that contribute to normal processes. One classical example is that ROS derived from the NADPH oxidase and released in neurotrophils are able to digest invading bacteria. Excessive ROS, however, contribute to patho-genesis of various human diseases including cancer, aging, dimentia and hypertension. As signaling messengers, ROS are able to oxidize many targets such as DNA, proteins and lipids, which may be linked with tumor growth, invasion or metastasis. The present review summarizes recent advances in our comprehensive understanding of ROS-linked signaling pathways in regulation of tumor growth, invasion and metastasis, and focuses on the role of the NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in cancer pathogenesis.

  10. Action of DCCD on the H+/O stoichiometry of mitoplast cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Costa, L

    1985-01-01

    The mechanistic H+/O ejection stoichiometry of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction in rat liver mitoplasts is close to 4 at level flow when the reduced oxidase is pulsed with O2. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) up to 30 nmol/mg protein fails to influence the rate of electron flow through the mitoplast oxidase, but inhibits H+ ejection. The inhibition of H+ ejection appears to be biphasic; ejection of 2-3 H+ per O is completely inhibited by very low DCCD, whereas inhibition of the remaining H+ ejection requires very much higher concentrations of DCCD. This effect suggests the occurrence of two types of H+ pumps in the native cytochrome oxidase of mitoplasts.

  11. In vivo oxalate degradation by liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in rat model of hyperoxaluria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: EMA-oxalate oxidase encapsulated liposome caused oxalate degradation in experimental hyperoxaluria indicating that the enzyme could be used as a therapeutic agent in hyperoxaluria leading to urinary stones.

  12. Polystyrene Attached Pt(IV)–Azomethine, Synthesis and Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, Nurşen; Antepli, Esin; Nartop, Dilek; Yetim, Nurdan Kurnaz

    2012-01-01

    Modified polystyrene with Pt(IV)–azomethine (APS–Sch–Pt) was synthesized by means of condensation and demonstrated to be a promising enzyme support by studying the enzymatic properties of glucose oxidase enzyme (GOx) immobilized on it. The characteristics of the immobilized glucose oxidase (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx) enzyme showed two optimum pH values that were pH = 4.0 and pH = 7. The insertion of stable Pt(IV)–azomethine spacers between the polystyrene backbone and the immobilized GOx, (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx), increases the enzymes’ activity and improves their affinity towards the substrate even at pH = 4. The influence of temperature, reusability and storage capacity on the free and immobilized glucose oxidase enzyme was investigated. The storage stability of the immobilized glucose oxidase was shown to be eleven months in dry conditions at +4 °C. PMID:23109888

  13. Hydralazine is involved in tele-methylhistamine metabolism by inhibiting monoamine oxidase B in pregnancy-associated hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Shohei; Kako, Koichiro; Nagashima, Yusuke; Kanou, Akihiko; Ishida, Junji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-07

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy globally affect 6-8% of gestation and remain a major cause of both foetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. However, the antihypertensive medications for the patients of this disease are strictly limited due to the teratogenic potentials. Here, we found that tele-methylhistamine (tMH) increased in response to the administration of hydralazine (Hdz), a vasodilative agent, in the pregnancy-associated hypertensive (PAH) mice. Hdz abrogated the degradation of tMH catalyzed by monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in vitro These results suggested that Hdz inhibited the MAO-B activity and consequently tMH increased in the maternal circulation of PAH mice.

  14. Effect of short-time exposures to nickel and lead on brain monoamine oxidase from Danio rerio and Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatori, Ornella; Setini, Andrea; Scirocco, Annunziata; Nicotra, Antonietta

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to verify, in two small size freshwater teleosts Danio rerio and Poecilia reticulata, the effects of short-time exposures (24 and 72 h) to a sublethal dose (500 microg/L) of nickel and lead, on brain monoamine oxidase (MAO), an important neural enzyme. The 24-h treatment using both metals caused a strong reduction of MAO activity in D. rerio brain, whereas causing a slight MAO activity stimulation in P. reticulata brain. The same treatment in both species did not affect the brain MAO mRNA production as showed by RT-PCR. Extending the duration of treatment as far as 72 h, partly (D. rerio) or completely (P. reticulata) reversed the metal effects on brain MAO activity suggesting that mechanisms to neutralize the metals had been activated.

  15. The role of lysyl oxidase in SRC-dependent proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Ann-Marie; Cox, Thomas Robert; Bird, Demelza;

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme, in promoting metastasis of solid tumors. We investigated whether LOX plays an important role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC).......Emerging evidence implicates lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme, in promoting metastasis of solid tumors. We investigated whether LOX plays an important role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC)....

  16. A predicted structure of the cytochrome c oxidase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Raih,Mohd. Firdaus; Sailan,Ahmad Tarmidi; Zamrod,Zulkeflie; Embi,Mohd. Noor; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chains of mitochondria and aerobic bacteria, catalyzes electron transfer from cytochrome c to molecular oxygen. The enzyme belongs to the haem-copper-containing oxidases superfamily. A recombinant plasmid carrying a 2.0 kb insert from a Burkholderia pseudomallei genomic library was subjected to automated DNA sequencing utilizing a primer walking strategy. Analysis of the 2002 bp insert revealed a 1536 bp open reading frame predicted...

  17. Growth Kinetics and Production of Glucose Oxidase Using Aspergillus niger NRRL 326

    OpenAIRE

    Gera, N.; Uppaluri, R. V. S.; Sen, S.; Venkata Dasu, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the substrate inhibition phenomena for growth kinetics of Aspergillus niger NRRL 326 grown on sucrose during glucose oxidase production. The initial set of experiments were carried out using three different substrates, viz., glucose, sucrose and raffinose of which it was observed that sucrose serves better for higher production of glucose oxidase. Experiments involving sensitivity studies conveyed that substrate inhibition became predominant when sucrose mass con...

  18. Enzymatic characterization and in vivo function of five terminal oxidases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Takuro; Osamura, Tatsuya; Hirai, Takehiro; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has five aerobic terminal oxidases: bo(3)-type quinol oxidase (Cyo), cyanide-insensitive oxidase (CIO), aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase (aa3), and two cbb(3)-type cytochrome c oxidases (cbb(3)-1and cbb(3)-2). These terminal oxidases are differentially regulated under various growth conditions and are thought to contribute to the survival of this microorganism in a wide variety of environmental niches. Here, we constructed multiple mutant strains of P. aeruginosa that express only one aerobic terminal oxidase to investigate the enzymatic characteristics and in vivo function of each enzyme. The Km values of Cyo, CIO, and aa3 for oxygen were similar and were 1 order of magnitude higher than those of cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2, indicating that Cyo, CIO, and aa3 are low-affinity enzymes and that cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 are high-affinity enzymes. Although cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 exhibited different expression patterns in response to oxygen concentration, they had similar Km values for oxygen. Both cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 utilized cytochrome c4 as the main electron donor under normal growth conditions. The electron transport chains terminated by cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 generate a proton gradient across the cell membrane with similar efficiencies. The electron transport chain of aa3 had the highest proton translocation efficiency, whereas that of CIO had the lowest efficiency. The enzymatic properties of the terminal oxidases reported here are partially in agreement with their regulatory patterns and may explain the environmental adaptability and versatility of P. aeruginosa.

  19. Single catalytic site model for the oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Speck, S.H.; Dye, D.; Margoliash, E

    1984-01-01

    A single catalytic site model is proposed to account for the multiphasic kinetics of oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1). This model involves nonproductive binding of substrate to sites near the catalytic site on cytochrome c oxidase for cytochrome c, decreasing the binding constant for cytochrome c at the catalytic site. This substrate inhibition results in an increase in the first-order rate constant for the dissociati...

  20. NADPH oxidase limits innate immune responses in the lungs in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahm H Segal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, an inherited disorder of the NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generating superoxide anion and downstream reactive oxidant intermediates (ROIs, is characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and by excessive inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease. The mechanisms by which NADPH oxidase regulates inflammation are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that NADPH oxidase restrains inflammation by modulating redox-sensitive innate immune pathways. When challenged with either intratracheal zymosan or LPS, NADPH oxidase-deficient p47(phox-/- mice and gp91(phox-deficient mice developed exaggerated and progressive lung inflammation, augmented NF-kappaB activation, and elevated downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-17, and G-CSF compared to wildtype mice. Replacement of functional NADPH oxidase in bone marrow-derived cells restored the normal lung inflammatory response. Studies in vivo and in isolated macrophages demonstrated that in the absence of functional NADPH oxidase, zymosan failed to activate Nrf2, a key redox-sensitive anti-inflammatory regulator. The triterpenoid, CDDO-Im, activated Nrf2 independently of NADPH oxidase and reduced zymosan-induced lung inflammation in CGD mice. Consistent with these findings, zymosan-treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from X-linked CGD patients showed impaired Nrf2 activity and increased NF-kappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies support a model in which NADPH oxidase-dependent, redox-mediated signaling is critical for termination of lung inflammation and suggest new potential therapeutic targets for CGD.

  1. Production of mycotoxins by galactose oxidase producing Fusarium using different culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Angela Maria

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The original isolate of the galactose oxidase producing fungus Dactylium dendroides, and other five galactose oxidase producing Fusarium isolates were cultivated in different media and conditions, in order to evaluate the production of 11 mycotoxins, which are characteristic of the genus Fusarium: moniliformin, fusaric acid, deoxynivalenol, fusarenone-X, nivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, neosolaniol, zearalenol, zearalenone, acetyl T-2, and iso T-2. The toxicity of the culture extracts to Artemia salina larvae was tested.

  2. An Internal Reaction Chamber in Dimethylglycine Oxidase Provides Efficient Protection from Exposure to Toxic Formaldehyde*

    OpenAIRE

    Tralau, Tewes; Lafite, Pierre; Levy, Colin; Combe, John P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David

    2009-01-01

    We report a synthetic biology approach to demonstrate substrate channeling in an unusual bifunctional flavoprotein dimethylglycine oxidase. The catabolism of dimethylglycine through methyl group oxidation can potentially liberate toxic formaldehyde, a problem common to many amine oxidases and dehydrogenases. Using a novel synthetic in vivo reporter system for cellular formaldehyde, we found that the oxidation of dimethylglycine is coupled to the synthesis of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate thr...

  3. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents.

  4. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor imipramine-blue in the treatment of Burkitt lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, Marcel; Becker, Jürgen; Eberth, Sonja; Kube, Dieter; Wilting, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a rare malignancy arising from B cells. Current chemotherapeutic regimens achieve excellent overall survival rates in children, but less impressive rates in adults. There are cases with poor outcome caused by toxic effects of the therapy, tumor lysis syndrome, or metastatic spread of lymphomas to the central nervous system. Modulators of reactive oxygen species are currently discussed as potential drugs for the treatment of cancer. The NADPH oxidase 4 inhibitor imipramine-blue might satisfy the aforementioned requirements, and was studied here. We used MTT assay, crystal violet assay, and thymidine 3H-incorporation assay to analyze the effects of imipramine-blue on Burkitt lymphoma (BL2, BL2B95, BL30B95, BL41B95), neuroblastoma (KELLY, SH-SY5Y, SMS-KAN), cervix carcinoma (HeLa), breast cancer (MDA-MB231), angiosarcoma (AS-M), human embryonic kidney (HEK293WT), and nonmalignant (FLP1) cell lines. The effects of imipramine-blue on BL2B95 cells in vivo were investigated in xenografts on the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). We report that imipramine-blue is a potent growth inhibitor for several cancer cell lines in vitro with IC(50) values comparable to those of doxorubicin (0.16-7.7 μmol/L). Tumor size of BL2B95 cells inoculated in the CAM was reduced significantly (P imipramine-blue. Lymphogenic dissemination of BL2B95 and the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels in experimental tumors were not affected. We show that imipramine-blue can be used to decrease the viability of cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Imipramine-blue reduces the size of experimental Burkitt lymphoma significantly but does not affect the dissemination of BL2B95 cells, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis.

  5. Ferricytochrome c protects mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlák, Erik; Fabian, Marian; Robinson, Neal C; Musatov, Andrej

    2010-11-30

    An excess of ferricytochrome c protects purified mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and bound cardiolipin from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative modification. All of the peroxide-induced changes within cytochrome c oxidase, such as oxidation of Trp(19,IV) and Trp(48,VIIc), partial dissociation of subunits VIa and VIIa, and generation of cardiolipin hydroperoxide, no longer take place in the presence of ferricytochrome c. Furthermore, ferricytochrome c suppresses the yield of H(2)O(2)-induced free radical detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy within cytochrome c oxidase. These protective effects are based on two mechanisms. The first involves the peroxidase/catalase-like activity of ferricytochrome c, which results in the decomposition of H(2)O(2), with the apparent bimolecular rate constant of 5.1±1.0M(-1)s(-1). Although this value is lower than the rate constant of a specialized peroxidase, the activity is sufficient to eliminate H(2)O(2)-induced damage to cytochrome c oxidase in the presence of an excess of ferricytochrome c. The second mechanism involves ferricytochrome c-induced quenching of free radicals generated within cytochrome c oxidase. These results suggest that ferricytochrome c may have an important role in protection of cytochrome c oxidase and consequently the mitochondrion against oxidative damage.

  6. Construction of Mutant Glucose Oxidases with Increased Dye-Mediated Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sode

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenesis studies on glucose oxidases (GOxs were conducted to construct GOxs with reduced oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity. We focused on two representative GOxs, of which crystal structures have already been reported—Penicillium amagasakiense GOx (PDB ID; 1gpe and Aspergillus niger GOx (PDB ID; 1cf3. We constructed oxygen-interacting structural models for GOxs, and predicted the residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen on the basis of the crystal structure of cholesterol oxidase as well as on the fact that both enzymes are members of the glucose/methanol/choline (GMC oxidoreductase family. Rational amino acid substitution resulted in the construction of an engineered GOx with drastically decreased oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity, which was higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase ratio of the engineered enzyme was more than 11-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that alteration of the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of GOxs is possible by introducing a mutation into the putative functional residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen of these enzymes, resulting in a further increased dehydrogenase activity. This is the first study reporting the alteration of GOx electron acceptor preference from oxygen to an artificial electron acceptor.

  7. Involvement of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalachova, Tetiana; Iakovenko, Oksana; Kretinin, Sergii; Kravets, Volodymyr

    2013-05-01

    Salicylic acid is associated with the primary defense responses to biotic stress and formation of systemic acquired resistance. However, molecular mechanisms of early cell reactions to phytohormone application are currently undisclosed. The present study investigates the participation of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signal transduction cascade. The activation of lipid signaling enzymes within 15 min of salicylic acid application was shown in Arabidopsis thaliana plants by measuring the phosphatidic acid accumulation. Adding of primary alcohol (1-butanol) to the incubation medium led to phosphatidylbutanol accumulation as a result of phospholipase D (PLD) action in wild-type and NADPH-oxidase RbohD deficient plants. Salicylic acid induced rapid increase in NADPH-oxidase activity in histochemical assay with nitroblue tetrazolium but the reaction was not observed in presence of 1-butanol and NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodide (DPI). The further physiological effect of salicylic acid and inhibitory analysis of the signaling cascade were made in the guard cell model. Stomatal closure induced by salicylic acid was inhibited by 1-butanol and DPI treatment. rbohD transgenic plants showed impaired stomatal reaction upon phytohormone effect, while the reaction to H2O2 did not differ from that of wild-type plants. Thus a key role of NADPH-oxidase D-isoform in the process of stomatal closure in response to salicylic acid has been postulated. It has enabled to predict a cascade implication of PLD and NADPH oxidase to salicylic acid signaling pathway.

  8. Blockade of TGF-β 1 Signalling Inhibits Cardiac NADPH Oxidase Overactivity in Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Miguel-Carrasco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases constitute a major source of superoxide anion (⋅O2 - in hypertension. Several studies suggest an important role of NADPH oxidases in different effects mediated by TGF-β 1. In this study we show that chronic administration of P144, a peptide synthesized from type III TGF-β 1 receptor, significantly reduced the cardiac NADPH oxidase expression and activity as well as in the nitrotyrosine levels observed in control spontaneously hypertensive rats (V-SHR to levels similar to control normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats. In addition, P144 was also able to reduce the significant increases in the expression of collagen type I protein and mRNA observed in hearts from V-SHR. In addition, positive correlations between collagen expression, NADPH oxidase activity, and nitrotyrosine levels were found in all animals. Finally, TGF-β 1-stimulated Rat-2 exhibited significant increases in NADPH oxidase activity that was inhibited in the presence of P144. It could be concluded that the blockade of TGF-β 1 with P144 inhibited cardiac NADPH oxidase in SHR, thus adding new data to elucidate the involvement of this enzyme in the profibrotic actions of TGF-β 1.

  9. The pea gene NA encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Sandra E; Elliott, Robert C; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2003-01-01

    The gibberellin (GA)-deficient dwarf na mutant in pea (Pisum sativum) has severely reduced internode elongation, reduced root growth, and decreased leaflet size. However, the seeds develop normally. Two genes, PsKAO1 and PsKAO2, encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the subfamily CYP88A were isolated. Both PsKAO1 and PsKAO2 had ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO) activity, catalyzing the three steps of the GA biosynthetic pathway from ent-kaurenoic acid to GA(12) when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In addition to the intermediates ent-7alpha-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA(12)-aldehyde, some additional products of the pea KAO activity were detected, including ent-6alpha,7alpha-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and 7beta-hydroxykaurenolide. The NA gene encodes PsKAO1, because in two independent mutant alleles, na-1 and na-2, PsKAO1 had altered sequences and the five-base deletion in PsKAO1 associated with the na-1 allele cosegregated with the dwarf na phenotype. PsKAO1 was expressed in the stem, apical bud, leaf, pod, and root, organs in which GA levels have previously been shown to be reduced in na plants. PsKAO2 was expressed only in seeds and this may explain the normal seed development and normal GA biosynthesis in seeds of na plants.

  10. Upregulation of Mitochondrial Content in Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficient Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Saada, Ann; Leibowitz, Gil; Soiferman, Devorah; Douiev, Liza; Raz, Itamar; Weksler-Zangen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome-c-oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent cause of mitochondrial disease and is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We studied mitochondrial function and biogenesis in fibroblasts derived from the Cohen (CDs) rat, an animal model of COX deficiency. COX activity in CDs-fibroblasts was 50% reduced compared to control rat fibroblasts (P<0.01). ROS-production in CDs fibroblasts increased, along with marked mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane-potential, indicating mitochondrial dysfunction. Surprisingly, cellular ATP content, oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) were unchanged. To clarify the discrepancy between mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP production, we studied mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover. The content of mitochondria was higher in CDs-fibroblasts. Consistently, AMPK activity and the expression of NRF1-target genes, NRF2 and PGC1-α that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were increased (P<0.01 vs control fibroblast). In CDs-fibrobalsts, the number of autophagosomes (LC3+ puncta) containing mitochondria in CDs fibroblasts was similar to that in control fibroblasts, suggesting that mitophagy was intact. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are associated with an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in preservation of ATP generation.

  11. Xanthine oxidase activity regulates human embryonic brain cells growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevorkian G. A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidase (XO; EC1.1.3.22 in cellular proliferation and differentiation has been suggested by the numerous investigations. We have proposed that XO might have undoubtedly important role during the development, maturation as well as the death of human embryos brain cells. Methods. Human abortion material was utilized for the cultivation of brain cells (E90. XO activity was measured by the formation of uric acid in tissue. Cell death was detected by the utility of Trypan Blue dye. Results. Allopurinol suppressed the XO activity in the brain tissue (0.12 ± 0.02; 0.20 ± 0.03 resp., p < 0.05. On day 12th the number of cells in the culture treated with the Allopurinol at the early stage of development was higher in comparison with the Control (2350.1 ± 199.0 vs 2123 ± 96 and higher in comparison with the late period of treatment (1479.6 ± 103.8, p < < 0.05. In all groups, the number of the dead cells was less than in Control, indicating the protective nature of Allopurinol as an inhibitor of XO. Conclusions. Allopurinol initiates cells proliferation in case of the early treatment of the human brain derived cell culture whereas at the late stages it has an opposite effect.

  12. Functional Heterogeneity of Nadph Oxidases in Atherosclerotic and Aneurysmal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigawa, Yasuyoshi; Lei, Xiao-Feng; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Miyazaki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOX) are enzymes that catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Four species of NOX catalytic homologs (NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and NOX5) are reportedly expressed in vascular tissues. The pro-atherogenic roles of NOX1, NOX2, and their organizer protein p47phox were manifested, and it was noted that the hydrogen peroxide-generating enzyme NOX4 possesses atheroprotective effects. Loss of NOX1 or p47phox appears to ameliorate murine aortic dissection and subsequent aneurysmal diseases; in contrast, the ablation of NOX2 exacerbates the aneurysmal diseases. It is possible that the loss of NOX2 activates inflammatory cascades in macrophages in the lesions. Roles of NOX5 in vascular functions are currently undetermined, owing to the absence of this enzyme in rodents and the limitation of the experimental procedure. Thus, it is possible that the NOX family of enzymes exhibits heterogeneity in the atherosclerotic diseases. In this aspect, subtype-selective NOX inhibitor may be promising when NOX systems serve as a molecular target for atherosclerotic and aneurysmal diseases. PMID:27476665

  13. PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF SNAKE VENOM L- AMINO ACID OXIDASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Baby

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available L-Amino acid oxidases are flavoenzymes which catalyze the stereospecific oxidative deamination of an L-amino acid substrate to a corresponding a-ketoacid with hydrogen peroxide and ammonia production. These enzymes, which are widely distributed in many different organisms, exhibit a marked affinity for hydrophobic amino acids, including phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and leucine. Snake venom LAAO induces platelet aggregation and cytotoxicity in various cancer cell lines. The enzyme has antibacterial activity inhibiting the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli bacteria. Specific substrates for the isolated protein are L-phenylalanine, L-tryptophan, L-methionine and L-leucine. The enzyme is stable at low temperatures (−20 ºC, −70 ºC and loses its activity by heating at 70 ºC. These enzymes are postulated to be toxins that may be involved in the allergic inflammatory response and specifically associated with mammalian endothelial cells damage. However, in the last decade these enzymes have become an interesting subject for pharmacological, structural and molecular characterizations. Structural and functional investigations of these enzymes can contribute to the advancement of toxinology and to the elaboration of novel therapeutic agents.

  14. Monomolecular films of cholesterol oxidase and S-Layer proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Helen Conceição; Guimarães, Juliana Aguilar; Alves, Tito Livio Moitinho; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo

    2011-05-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-5-en-3-one and subsequently the isomerization to cholest-4-en-3-one. ChOx has been very commonly studied as the detection element in cholesterol biosensors. In the biosensor development field, a relatively new approach is the use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers, known as S-Layer proteins. These proteins exhibit the ability of self-assembling at surfaces, opening a vast spectrum of applications, both in basic and applied researches. In our study, monomolecular films of ChOx and mixed films of ChOx/S-Layer proteins and DPPC/S-Layer proteins were produced using the Langmuir technique. Characterization of the films was performed by means of surface pressure-molecular area ( π- A) isotherms. Stable monolayers were obtained, which means that they can be transferred to solid substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Mixed monolayers showed an ideal like behavior.

  15. Polyphenol Oxidase as a Biochemical Seed Defense Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Patrick Fuerst

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, when wild oat (Avena fatua L. caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea, non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems.

  16. The Membrane Modulates Internal Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öjemyr, Linda Nasvik; Ballmoos, Christoph von; Faxén, Kristina;

    2012-01-01

    The functionality of membrane proteins is often modulated by the surrounding membrane. Here, we investigated the effect of membrane reconstitution of purified cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) on the kinetics and thermodynamics of internal electron and proton-transfer reactions during O-2 reduction....... Reconstitution of the detergent-solubilized enzyme in small unilamellar soybean phosphatidylcholine vesicles resulted in a lowering of the pK(a) in the pH dependence profile of the proton-uptake rate. This pK(a) change resulted in decreased proton-uptake rates in the pH range of similar to 6.5-9.5, which...... is explained in terms of lowering of the pK(a) of an internal proton donor within CytcO. At pH 7.5, the rate decreased to the same extent when vesicles were prepared from the pure zwitterionic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC),or the anionic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-glycero-3-phospho (1-rac...

  17. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Si-Yin; Houska, Milan; Reed, Shawndrika

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens. Since high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts containing caffeic acid were treated with each of the following: (1) HP; (2) HP+PPO; (3) PPO; and (4) none. HP was conducted at 300 and 500 MPa, each for 3 and 10 min, 37 °C. After treatment, SDS-PAGE was performed and allergenic capacity (IgE binding) was determined colorimetrically in inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots, using a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic patients. Data showed that HP alone had no effect on major peanut allergens. However, HP at 500 MPa combined with PPO (HP500/PPO) induced a higher (approximately twofold) reduction of major peanut allergens and IgE binding than PPO alone or HP300/PPO. There was no difference between treatment times. We concluded that HP500/PPO at 3-min enhanced a twofold reduction of the allergenic capacity of peanut extracts, as compared to PPO itself.

  18. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J; Traverso, José Á; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen-pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed.

  19. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of compounds from Chythrantus claneianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anar Sahib Gojayev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the stem bark and the trunk of Chythrantus claneianus led to the isolation of six known compounds named β-sitosterol (1, umbelliferone (2, scopoletin (3, benjaminamide (4, β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5 and Panconoside B (6. All these compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant species. The chemical structures of isolates were elucidated on the basis of 1 and 2 D-NMR spectra and other spectroscopic techniques including UV–vis, FT-IR, HR-ESIMS and HR-FABMS. The isolates were tested in vitro for their inhibitory properties towards xanthine oxidase enzyme. Compounds 2, 3 and 6 showed weak inhibi-tory activities on the enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 307 µM for com-pound 6 to 475 µM for compound 3, while the extract and compounds 1, 4 and 5 showed extremely weak activities with inhibition percentage less than 50%.

  20. Lysyl Oxidase, a Targetable Secreted Molecule Involved in Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-15

    Secondary metastatic cancer remains the single biggest cause of mortality and morbidity across most solid tumors. In breast cancer, 100% of deaths are attributed to metastasis. At present, there are no "cures" for secondary metastatic cancer of any form and there is an urgent unmet clinical need to improve the tools available in our arsenal against this disease, both in terms of treatment, but also prevention. Recently, we showed that hypoxic induction of the extracellular matrix modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic dissemination to the bone in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer and is essential for the formation of premetastatic osteolytic lesions. We showed that in models of breast cancer metastasis, targeting LOX, or its downstream effects, significantly inhibited premetastatic niche formation and the resulting metastatic burden, offering preclinical validation of this enzyme as a therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer. Our work is the latest in an emerging body of work supporting the targeting of LOX and calls for greater efforts in developing therapeutics against this extracellular secreted factor in the prevention of cancer progression across multiple solid tumor types.

  1. Isolation and characterization of sulfite oxidase from Alligator mississipiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, A.; Neame, P.J.; Barber, M.J. (Univ. of South Florida College, Tampa (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Sulfite oxidase has been isolated from fresh alligator liver using ammonium sulfate and acetone fractionation, DEAE chromatography and FPLC on Mono Q. The enzyme is dimeric and exhibits a subunit M. Wt. of approximately 58 kDa, larger than that of chicken SO. EPR spectroscopy of the partially-reduced enzyme revealed a single Mo(V) species while visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of cytochrome b{sub 557}. Maximal activities were obtained at pH 8 and 9, respectively. K{sub m}'s for SO{sub 3}{sup 2 {minus}}, cyt. c and Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3 {minus}} were 23.5 uM, 2.9 uM and 8.0 uM, respectively. Sequencing of peptides obtained by endoprotease K digestion indicated regions of extensive sequence similarity to chicken and rat enzymes in both heme and Mo-pterin domains. Regions of sequence dissimilarity were also found.

  2. Biofabrication Using Pyrrole Electropolymerization for the Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase and Lactate Oxidase on Implanted Microfabricated Biotransducers

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    Christian N. Kotanen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dual responsive Electrochemical Cell-on-a-Chip Microdisc Electrode Array (ECC MDEA 5037 is a recently developed electrochemical transducer for use in a wireless, implantable biosensor system for the continuous measurement of interstitial glucose and lactate. Fabrication of the biorecognition membrane via pyrrole electropolymerization and both in vitro and in vivo characterization of the resulting biotransducer is described. The influence of EDC-NHS covalent conjugation of glucose oxidase with 4-(3-pyrrolyl butyric acid (monomerization and with 4-sulfobenzoic acid (sulfonization on biosensor performance was examined. As the extent of enzyme conjugation was increased sensitivity decreased for monomerized enzymes but increased for sulfonized enzymes. Implanted biotransducers were examined in a Sprague-Dawley rat hemorrhage model. Resection after 4 h and subsequent in vitro re-characterization showed a decreased sensitivity from 0.68 (±0.40 to 0.22 (±0.17 µA·cm−2·mM−1, an increase in the limit of detection from 0.05 (±0.03 to 0.27 (±0.27 mM and a six-fold increase in the response time from 41 (±18 to 244 (±193 s. This evidence reconfirms the importance of biofouling at the bio-abio interface and the need for mitigation strategies to address the foreign body response.

  3. Correlation of oxygen consumption, cytochrome c oxidase, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene expression in the termination of larval diapause in the bamboo borer, Omphisa fuscidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singtripop, Tippawan; Saeangsakda, Manasawan; Tatun, Nujira; Kaneko, Yu; Sakurai, Sho

    2007-09-01

    The moth Omphisa fuscidentalis (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) is a univoltine insect with a larval diapause period lasting up to 9 months. We studied changes in O(2) consumption in conjunction with cytochrome c oxidase activity and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene expression. O(2) consumption changed within a day, showing a supradian rhythm with a ca.12-h cycle at 25 degrees C. During the first two-thirds of the diapause period, from October to March, O(2) consumption was constant until January and then increased by March. Topical application of methoprene, a juvenile hormone analog (JHA), to diapausing larvae terminated the diapause and was associated with an increase in O(2) consumption rate at diapause termination. In JHA-treated larvae, cytochrome c oxidase activity in fat bodies was high at the beginning of the prepupal period and highest at pupation. cox1 expression in fat bodies displayed a transient peak 8 days after JHA application and peaked in the prepupal period. Taken together, our results show that the break of diapause by JHA is associated with the activation of cox1, bringing about an increase in cytochrome c oxidase activity, followed by an increase in O(2) consumption rate.

  4. Significance of membrane bioreactor design on the biocatalytic performance of glucose oxidase and catalase: Free vs. immobilized enzyme systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Meyer, Anne S.; Jørgensen, Henning;

    2017-01-01

    Membrane separation of xylose and glucose can be accomplished via oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid by enzymatic glucose oxidase catalysis. Oxygen for this reaction can be supplied via decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by enzymatic catalase catalysis. In order to maximize the biocatalytic...... productivity of glucose oxidase and catalase (gluconic acid yield per total amount of enzyme) the following system set-ups were compared: immobilization of glucose oxidase alone; co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase; glucose oxidase and catalase free in the membrane bioreactor. Fouling......-induced enzyme immobilization in the porous support of an ultrafiltration membrane was used as strategy for entrapment of glucose oxidase and catalase. The biocatalytic productivity of the membrane reactor was found to be highly related to the oxygen availability, which in turn depended on the reactor...

  5. Purification and characterization of methylamine oxidase induced in Aspergillus niger AKU 3302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frébort, I; Matsushita, K; Toyama, H; Lemr, K; Yamada, M; Adachi, O

    1999-01-01

    Crude extract of Aspergillus niger AKU 3302 mycelia incubated with methylamine showed a single amine oxidase activity band in a developed polyacrylamide gel that weakly cross-reacted with the antibody against a copper/topa quinone-containing amine oxidase (AO-II) from the same strain induced by n-butylamine. Since the organism cannot grow on methylamine and the already known quinoprotein amine oxidases of the organism cannot catalyze oxidation of methylamine, the organism was forced to produce another enzyme that could oxidize methylamine when the mycelia were incubated with methylamine. The enzyme was separated and purified from the already known two quinoprotein amine oxidases formed in the same mycelia. The purified enzyme showed a sharp symmetric sedimentation peak in analytical ultracentrifugation showing S20,w0 of 6.5s. The molecular mass of 133 kDa estimated by gel chromatography and 66.6 kDa found by SDS-PAGE confirmed the dimeric structure of the enzyme. The purified enzyme was pink in color with an absorption maximum at 494 nm. The enzyme readily oxidized methylamine, n-hexylamine, and n-butylamine, but not benzylamine, histamine, or tyramine, favorite substrates for the already known two quinoprotein amine oxidases. Inactivation by carbonyl reagents and copper chelators suggested the presence of a copper/topa quinone cofactor. Spectrophotometric titration by p-nitrophenylhydrazine showed one reactive carbonyl group per subunit and redox-cyclic quinone staining confirmed the presence of a quinone cofactor. pH-dependent shift of the absorption spectrum of the enzyme-p-nitrophenylhydrazone (469 nm at neutral to 577 nm at alkaline pH) supported the identity of the cofactor with topaquinone. Nothern blot analysis indicated that the methylamine oxidase encoding gene is largely different from the already known amine oxidase in the organism.

  6. Alternative oxidase in the branched mitochondrial respiratory network: an overview on structure, function, regulation, and role

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    Sluse F.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants and some other organisms including protists possess a complex branched respiratory network in their mitochondria. Some pathways of this network are not energy-conserving and allow sites of energy conservation to be bypassed, leading to a decrease of the energy yield in the cells. It is a challenge to understand the regulation of the partitioning of electrons between the various energy-dissipating and -conserving pathways. This review is focused on the oxidase side of the respiratory chain that presents a cyanide-resistant energy-dissipating alternative oxidase (AOX besides the cytochrome pathway. The known structural properties of AOX are described including transmembrane topology, dimerization, and active sites. Regulation of the alternative oxidase activity is presented in detail because of its complexity. The alternative oxidase activity is dependent on substrate availability: total ubiquinone concentration and its redox state in the membrane and O2 concentration in the cell. The alternative oxidase activity can be long-term regulated (gene expression or short-term (post-translational modification, allosteric activation regulated. Electron distribution (partitioning between the alternative and cytochrome pathways during steady-state respiration is a crucial measurement to quantitatively analyze the effects of the various levels of regulation of the alternative oxidase. Three approaches are described with their specific domain of application and limitations: kinetic approach, oxygen isotope differential discrimination, and ADP/O method (thermokinetic approach. Lastly, the role of the alternative oxidase in non-thermogenic tissues is discussed in relation to the energy metabolism balance of the cell (supply in reducing equivalents/demand in energy and carbon and with harmful reactive oxygen species formation.

  7. In silico docking studies and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of commercially available terpenoids

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    MUTHUSWAMY UMAMAHESWARI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Xanthine oxidase is a highly versatile enzyme that is widely distributed among different species. The hydroxylation of purines is catalysed by xanthine oxidase and especially the conversion of xanthine to uric acid. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors are much useful, since they possess lesser side effects compared to uricosuric and anti-inflammatory agents. The present study deals with in silico and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory analysis of commercially available terpenoids (bisabolol, β-caryophyllene, limonene, and α- terpinene. Methods Molecular docking studies were performed using AutoDock 4.2 and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was carried out using xanthine as the substrate. In addition, enzyme kinetics was performed using Lineweaver Burkplot analysis. Allopurinol, a known xanthine oxidase inhibitor was used as the standard. Results The results revealed that bisabolol exhibited a lowest binding energy value of about -7.33 kcal/mol. All other compounds showed binding energy values ranging between -7.33 to -5.87 kcal/mol which was less than the standard (-4.78 kcal/mol. In the xanthine oxidase assay, IC50 value of bisabolol was found to be 34.70 µg/ml, whereas that of allopurinol was 8.48 µg/ml. All the remaining compounds exhibited IC50 values ranging between 34.70 to 68.45 µg/ml.  In the enzyme kinetic studies, bisabolol, β-caryophyllene showed non competitive and Limonene, α- terpinene and allopurinol showed competitive type of enzyme inhibition. Conclusion It can be concluded that terpenoids could be a promising remedy for the treatment of gout and related inflammatory disorders. Further in vivo studies are required to develop potential compounds with lesser side effects.

  8. Oxidative phenols in forage crops containing polyphenol oxidase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Ifat; Threadgill, Michael D; Moorby, Jon M; Winters, Ana

    2010-02-10

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are copper-containing enzymes that catalyze oxidation of endogenous monophenols to ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds and of ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds to ortho-quinones. Subsequent nucleophilic addition reactions of phenols, amino acids, and proteins with the electrophilic ortho-quinones form brown-, black-, or red-colored secondary products associated with the undesired discolouration of fruit and vegetables. Several important forage plants also exhibit significant PPO activity, and a link with improved efficiency of ruminant production has been established. In ruminant animals, extensive degradation of forage proteins, following consumption, can result in high rates of excretion of nitrogen, which contributes to point-source and diffuse pollution. Reaction of quinones with forage proteins leads to the formation of protein-phenol complexes that are resistant to proteolytic activity during ensilage and during rumen fermentation. Thus, PPO in red clover (Trifolium pratense) has been shown to improve protein utilization by ruminants. While PPO activity has been demonstrated in a number of forage crops, little work has been carried out to identify substrates of PPO, knowledge of which would be beneficial for characterizing this trait in these forages. In general, a wide range of 1,2-dihydroxyarenes can serve as PPO substrates because these are readily oxidized because of the ortho positioning of the hydroxy groups. Naturally occurring phenols isolated from forage crops with PPO activity are reviewed. A large number of phenols, which may be directly or indirectly oxidized as a consequence of PPO activity, have been identified in several forage grass, legume, cereal, and brassica species; these include hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamates, and flavonoids. In conclusion, a number of compounds are known or postulated to enable PPO activity in important PPO-expressing forage crops. Targeting the matching of these compounds with PPO activity

  9. The subunit composition and function of mammalian cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadenbach, Bernhard; Hüttemann, Maik

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from mammals and birds is composed of 13 subunits. The three catalytic subunits I-III are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, the ten nuclear-coded subunits (IV, Va, Vb, VIa, VIb, VIc, VIIa, VIIb, VIIc, VIII) by nuclear DNA. The nuclear-coded subunits are essentially involved in the regulation of oxygen consumption and proton translocation by COX, since their removal or modification changes the activity and their mutation causes mitochondrial diseases. Respiration, the basis for ATP synthesis in mitochondria, is differently regulated in organs and species by expression of tissue-, developmental-, and species-specific isoforms for COX subunits IV, VIa, VIb, VIIa, VIIb, and VIII, but the holoenzyme in mammals is always composed of 13 subunits. Various proteins and enzymes were shown, e.g., by co-immunoprecipitation, to bind to specific COX subunits and modify its activity, but these interactions are reversible, in contrast to the tightly bound 13 subunits. In addition, the formation of supercomplexes with other oxidative phosphorylation complexes has been shown to be largely variable. The regulatory complexity of COX is increased by protein phosphorylation. Up to now 18 phosphorylation sites have been identified under in vivo conditions in mammals. However, only for a few phosphorylation sites and four nuclear-coded subunits could a specific function be identified. Research on the signaling pathways leading to specific COX phosphorylations remains a great challenge for understanding the regulation of respiration and ATP synthesis in mammalian organisms. This article reviews the function of the individual COX subunits and their isoforms, as well as proteins and small molecules interacting and regulating the enzyme.

  10. Prognostic relevance of cytochrome C oxidase in primary glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Corinne E Griguer

    Full Text Available Patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM have one of the lowest overall survival rates among cancer patients, and reliable biomarkers are necessary to predict patient outcome. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to OXPHOS metabolism, and increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure. Thus, we investigated the relationship between tumor CcO activity and the survival of patients diagnosed with primary GBM. A total of 84 patients with grade IV glioma were evaluated in this retrospective cohort study. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test, and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox regression model. Mitochondrial CcO activity was determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the oxidation of cytochrome c. High CcO activity was detected in a subset of glioma tumors (∼30%, and was an independent prognostic factor for shorter progression-free survival and overall survival [P = 0.0087 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 3.57 for progression-free survival; P<0.001 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 10.75 for overall survival]. The median survival time for patients with low tumor CcO activity was 14.3 months, compared with 6.3 months for patients with high tumor CcO activity. High CcO activity occurs in a significant subset of high-grade glioma patients and is an independent predictor of poor outcome. Thus, CcO activity may serve as a useful molecular marker for the categorization and targeted therapy of GBMs.

  11. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  12. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by phenformin and pentamidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, M; Petzer, A; Petzer, J P

    2014-09-01

    A computational study has suggested that phenformin, an oral hypoglycaemic drug, may bind to the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. The present study therefore investigates the MAO inhibitory properties of phenformin. Pentamidine, a structurally related diamidine compound, has previously been reported to be a MAO inhibitor and was included in this study as a reference compound. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, this study finds that phenformin acts as a moderately potent MAO-A selective inhibitor with an IC50 value of 41 µM. Pentamidine, on the other hand, potently inhibits both MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 0.61 μM and 0.22 μM, respectively. An examination of the recoveries of the enzymatic activities after dilution and dialysis of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes shows that both compounds interact reversibly with the MAO enzymes. A kinetic analysis suggests that pentamidine acts as a competitive inhibitor with estimated Ki values of 0.41 μM and 0.22 μM for the inhibition of MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. Phenformin also exhibited a competitive mode of MAO-A inhibition with an estimated Ki value of 65 µM. This study concludes that biguanide and amidine functional groups are most likely important structural features for the inhibition of the MAOs by phenformin and pentamidine, and compounds containing these and closely related functional groups should be considered as potential MAO inhibitors. Furthermore, the biguanide and amidine functional groups may act as useful moieties in the future design of MAO inhibitors.

  13. Purification and characterization of Ocimum basilicum L. polyphenol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Serap; Turan, Pinar; Dogan, Mehmet; Arslan, Oktay; Alkan, Mahir

    2005-12-28

    A partial characterization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in Ocimum basilicum L. is described. PPO in O. basilicum L. was extracted and purified through (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, dialysis, and a Sepharose 4B-l-tyrosine-p-aminobenzoic acid affinity column. The samples obtained from (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and dialysis were used for the characterization of PPO. At the end of purification by affinity chromatography, 11.5-fold purification was achived. The purified enzyme exhibited a clear single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be approximately 54 kDa. The contents of total phenolic and protein of O. basilicum L. extracts were determined. The total phenolic content of O. basilicum L. was determined spectrophotometrically according to the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and was found to be 280 mg 100 g(-1) on a fresh weight basis. The protein content was determined according to the Bradford method. The enzyme showed activity to 4-methylcatechol, catechol, and pyrogallol substrates, but not to tyrosine. Therefore, of these three substrates, 4-methylcatecol was the best substrate due to the highest V(max)/K(m) value, followed by pyrogallol and catechol. The optimum pH was at 6, 8, and 9 for 4-methylcatechol, catechol, and pyrogallol, respectively. The enzyme had an optimum temperature of 20, 40, and 50 degrees C for 4-methylcatechol, catechol, and pyrogallol, respectively. It was found that optimum temperature and pH were dependent on the substrates studied. The enzyme activity with increasing temperature and inactivation time for 4-methylcatechol, catechol, and pyrogallol substrates decreased due to heat denaturation of the enzyme.

  14. Characterizing the proton loading site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianxun; Gunner, M R

    2014-08-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) uses the energy released by reduction of O2 to H2O to drive eight charges from the high pH to low pH side of the membrane, increasing the electrochemical gradient. Four electrons and protons are used for chemistry, while four more protons are pumped. Proton pumping requires that residues on a pathway change proton affinity through the reaction cycle to load and then release protons. The protonation states of all residues in CcO are determined in MultiConformational Continuum Electrostatics simulations with the protonation and redox states of heme a, a3, Cu(B), Y288, and E286 used to define the catalytic cycle. One proton is found to be loaded and released from residues identified as the proton loading site (PLS) on the P-side of the protein in each of the four CcO redox states. Thus, the same proton pumping mechanism can be used each time CcO is reduced. Calculations with structures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Paracoccus denitrificans, and bovine CcO derived by crystallography and molecular dynamics show the PLS functions similarly in different CcO species. The PLS is a cluster rather than a single residue, as different structures show 1-4 residues load and release protons. However, the proton affinity of the heme a3 propionic acids primarily determines the number of protons loaded into the PLS; if their proton affinity is too low, less than one proton is loaded.

  15. A subset of N-substituted phenothiazines inhibits NADPH oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredenina, Tamara; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Filippova, Aleksandra; Nayernia, Zeynab; Mahiout, Zahia; Fioraso-Cartier, Laetitia; Plastre, Olivier; Scapozza, Leonardo; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Jaquet, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) constitute a family of enzymes generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are increasingly recognized as interesting drug targets. Here we investigated the effects of 10 phenothiazine compounds on NOX activity using an extensive panel of assays to measure production of ROS (Amplex red, WST-1, MCLA) and oxygen consumption. Striking differences between highly similar phenothiazines were observed. Two phenothiazines without N-substitution, including ML171, did not inhibit NOX enzymes, but showed assay interference. Introduction of an aliphatic amine chain on the N atom of the phenothiazine B ring (promazine) conferred inhibitory activity toward NOX2, NOX4, and NOX5 but not NOX1 and NOX3. Addition of an electron-attracting substituent in position 2 of the C ring extended the inhibitory activity to NOX1 and NOX3, with thioridazine being the most potent inhibitor. In contrast, the presence of a methylsulfoxide group at the same position (mesoridazine) entirely abolished NOX-inhibitory activity. A cell-free NOX2 assay suggested that inhibition by N-substituted phenothiazines was not due to competition with NADPH. A functional implication of NOX-inhibitory activity of thioridazine was demonstrated by its ability to block redox-dependent myofibroblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that NOX-inhibitory activity is not a common feature of all antipsychotic phenothiazines and that substitution on the B-ring nitrogen is crucial for the activity, whereas that on the second position of the C ring modulates it. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of NOX pharmacology and might pave the path to discovery of more potent and selective NOX inhibitors.

  16. Alternative oxidase involvement in Daucus carota somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, António Miguel; Campos, Maria Doroteia; Cardoso, Hélia Guerra; Imani, Jafargholi; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2009-12-01

    Plant alternative oxidase (AOX) is a mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme involved in alternative respiration. The critical importance of the enzyme during acclimation upon stress of plant cells is not fully understood and is still an issue of intensive research and discussion. Recently, a role of AOX was suggested for the ability of plant cells to change easily its fate upon stress. In order to get new insights about AOX involvement in cell reprogramming, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inhibitor studies were performed during cell redifferentiation and developmental stages of Daucus carota L. somatic embryogenesis. Transcript level analysis shows that D. carota AOX genes (DcAOX1a and DcAOX2a) are differentially expressed during somatic embryogenesis. DcAOX1a shows lower expression levels, being mainly down-regulated, whereas DcAOX2a presented a large up-regulation during initiation of the realization phase of somatic embryogenesis. However, when globular embryos start to develop, both genes are down-regulated, being this state transient for DcAOX2a. In addition, parallel studies were performed using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) in order to inhibit AOX activity during the realization phase of somatic embryogenesis. Embryogenic cells growing in the presence of the inhibitor were unable to develop embryogenic structures and its growth rate was diminished. This effect was reversible and concentration dependent. The results obtained contribute to the hypothesis that AOX activity supports metabolic reorganization as an essential part of cell reprogramming and, thus, enables restructuring and de novo cell differentiation.

  17. Regulation of NADPH oxidase 5 by protein kinase C isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase5 (Nox5 is a novel Nox isoform which has recently been recognized as having important roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, fetal ventricular septal defect and cancer. The activity of Nox5 and production of reactive oxygen species is regulated by intracellular calcium levels and phosphorylation. However, the kinases that phosphorylate Nox5 remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the phosphorylation of Nox5 is PKC dependent, but this contention was based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors and the isoforms of PKC involved remain unknown. Thus, the major goals of this study were to determine whether PKC can directly regulate Nox5 phosphorylation and activity, to identify which isoforms are involved in the process, and to understand the functional significance of this pathway in disease. We found that a relatively specific PKCα inhibitor, Ro-32-0432, dose-dependently inhibited PMA-induced superoxide production from Nox5. PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity was significantly reduced in cells with genetic silencing of PKCα and PKCε, enhanced by loss of PKCδ and the silencing of PKCθ expression was without effect. A constitutively active form of PKCα robustly increased basal and PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity and promoted the phosphorylation of Nox5 on Ser490, Thr494, and Ser498. In contrast, constitutively active PKCε potently inhibited both basal and PMA-dependent Nox5 activity. Co-IP and in vitro kinase assay experiments demonstrated that PKCα directly binds to Nox5 and modifies Nox5 phosphorylation and activity. Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose significantly increased PKCα activation, and enhanced Nox5 derived superoxide in a manner that was in prevented by a PKCα inhibitor, Go 6976. In summary, our study reveals that PKCα is the primary isoform mediating the activation of Nox5 and this maybe of significance in our understanding of the vascular

  18. IL-6 mediated degeneration of forebrain GABAergic interneurons and cognitive impairment in aged mice through activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Dugan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have shown that plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 are elevated in patients with important and prevalent adverse health conditions, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and frailty. Higher plasma levels of IL-6, in turn, increase the risk of many conditions associated with aging including age-related cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying this association between IL-6 and cognitive vulnerability remain unclear. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the role of IL-6 in brain aging in young (4 mo and aged (24 mo wild-type C57BL6 and genetically-matched IL-6(-/- mice, and determined that IL-6 was necessary and sufficient for increased neuronal expression of the superoxide-producing immune enzyme, NADPH-oxidase, and this was mediated by non-canonical NFkappaB signaling. Furthermore, superoxide production by NADPH-oxidase was directly responsible for age-related loss of parvalbumin (PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons, neurons essential for normal information processing, encoding, and retrieval in hippocampus and cortex. Targeted deletion of IL-6 or elimination of superoxide by chronic treatment with a superoxide-dismutase mimetic prevented age-related loss of PV-interneurons and reversed age-related cognitive deficits on three standard tests of spatial learning and recall. CONCLUSIONS: Present results indicate that IL-6 mediates age-related loss of critical PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons through increased neuronal NADPH-oxidase-derived superoxide production, and that rescue of these interneurons preserves cognitive performance in aging mice, suggesting that elevated peripheral IL-6 levels may be directly and mechanistically linked to long-lasting cognitive deficits in even normal older individuals. Further, because PV-interneurons are also selectively affected by commonly used anesthetic agents and drugs, our findings

  19. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Yuta [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Yuan, Bo, E-mail: yuanbo@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Kaise, Toshikazu [Laboratory of Environmental Chemodynamics, School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Takeichi, Makoto [Yoneyama Maternity Hospital, 2-12 Shin-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0065 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kroetz, Deanna L. [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Toyoda, Hiroo [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  20. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Peng [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Sun, Guifan [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Andersen, Melvin E. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  1. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushi Ishibashi

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA / abscisic acid (ABA metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells.

  2. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Kai, Kyohei; Yuasa, Takashi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA) / abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells.

  3. Hyperactivity of the Ero1α Oxidase Elicits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress but No Broad Antioxidant Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Schmidt, Jonas Damgård; Søltoft, Cecilie Lützen; Ramming, Thomas; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Christensen, Brian; Sørensen, Esben Skipper; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Ellgaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Oxidizing equivalents for the process of oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mammalian cells are mainly provided by the Ero1α oxidase. The molecular mechanisms that regulate Ero1α activity in order to harness its oxidative power are quite well understood. However, the overall cellular response to oxidative stress generated by Ero1α in the lumen of the mammalian ER is poorly characterized. Here we investigate the effects of overexpressing a hyperactive mutant (C104A/C131A) of Ero1α. We show that Ero1α hyperactivity leads to hyperoxidation of the ER oxidoreductase ERp57 and induces expression of two established unfolded protein response (UPR) targets, BiP (immunoglobulin-binding protein) and HERP (homocysteine-induced ER protein). These effects could be reverted or aggravated by N-acetylcysteine and buthionine sulfoximine, respectively. Because both agents manipulate the cellular glutathione redox buffer, we conclude that the observed effects of Ero1α-C104A/C131A overexpression are likely caused by an oxidative perturbation of the ER glutathione redox buffer. In accordance, we show that Ero1α hyperactivity affects cell viability when cellular glutathione levels are compromised. Using microarray analysis, we demonstrate that the cell reacts to the oxidative challenge caused by Ero1α hyperactivity by turning on the UPR. Moreover, this analysis allowed the identification of two new targets of the mammalian UPR, CRELD1 and c18orf45. Interestingly, a broad antioxidant response was not induced. Our findings suggest that the hyperoxidation generated by Ero1α-C104A/C131A is addressed in the ER lumen and is unlikely to exert oxidative injury throughout the cell. PMID:23027870

  4. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and polymorphisms in Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA): a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Maximilian; Bajanowski, Thomas; Vennemann, Mechtild; Poetsch, Micaela

    2014-01-01

    Literature describes multiple possible links between genetic variations in the neuroadrenergic system and the occurrence of sudden infant death syndrome. The X-chromosomal Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is one of the genes with regulatory activity in the noradrenergic and serotonergic neuronal systems and a polymorphism of the promoter which affects the activity of this gene has been proclaimed to contribute significantly to the prevalence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in three studies from 2009, 2012 and 2013. However, these studies described different significant correlations regarding gender or age of children. Since several studies, suggesting associations between genetic variations and SIDS, were disproved by follow-up analysis, this study was conducted to take a closer look at the MAOA gene and its polymorphisms. The functional MAOA promoter length polymorphism was investigated in 261 SIDS cases and 93 control subjects. Moreover, the allele distribution of 12 coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MAOA gene was examined in 285 SIDS cases and 93 controls by a minisequencing technique. In contrast to prior studies with fewer individuals, no significant correlations between the occurrence of SIDS and the frequency of allele variants of the promoter polymorphism could be demonstrated, even including the results from the abovementioned previous studies. Regarding the SNPs, three statistically significant associations were observed which had not been described before. This study clearly disproves interactions between MAOA promoter polymorphisms and SIDS, even if variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms of MAOA should be subjected to further analysis to clarify their impact on SIDS.

  5. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor.

  6. Overexpression of GA20-OXIDASE1 impacts plant height, biomass allocation and saccharification efficiency in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorend, Wannes; Nelissen, Hilde; Vanholme, Ruben; De Vliegher, Alex; Van Breusegem, Frank; Boerjan, Wout; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Muylle, Hilde; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Increased biomass yield and quality are of great importance for the improvement of feedstock for the biorefinery. For the production of bioethanol, both stem biomass yield and the conversion efficiency of the polysaccharides in the cell wall to fermentable sugars are of relevance. Increasing the endogenous levels of gibberellic acid (GA) by ectopic expression of GA20-OXIDASE1 (GA20-OX1), the rate-limiting step in GA biosynthesis, is known to affect cell division and cell expansion, resulting in larger plants and organs in several plant species. In this study, we examined biomass yield and quality traits of maize plants overexpressing GA20-OX1 (GA20-OX1). GA20-OX1 plants accumulated more vegetative biomass than control plants in greenhouse experiments, but not consistently over two years of field trials. The stems of these plants were longer but also more slender. Investigation of GA20-OX1 biomass quality using biochemical analyses showed the presence of more cellulose, lignin and cell wall residue. Cell wall analysis as well as expression analysis of lignin biosynthetic genes in developing stems revealed that cellulose and lignin were deposited earlier in development. Pretreatment of GA20-OX1 biomass with NaOH resulted in a higher saccharification efficiency per unit of dry weight, in agreement with the higher cellulose content. On the other hand, the cellulose-to-glucose conversion was slower upon HCl or hot-water pretreatment, presumably due to the higher lignin content. This study showed that biomass yield and quality traits can be interconnected, which is important for the development of future breeding strategies to improve lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol production.

  7. Monoamine oxidase A polymorphism moderates stability of attention problems and susceptibility to life stress during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohsel, K; Bianchi, V; Mascheretti, S; Hohm, E; Schmidt, M H; Esser, G; Brandeis, D; Banaschewski, T; Nobile, M; Laucht, M

    2015-11-01

    Attention problems affect a substantial number of children and adolescents and are predictive of academic underachievement and lower global adaptive functioning. Considerable variability has been observed with regard to the individual development of attention problems over time. In particular, the period of adolescence is characterized by substantial maturation of executive functioning including attentional processing, with the influence of genetic and environmental factors on individual trajectories not yet well understood. In the present investigation, we evaluated whether the monoamine oxidase A functional promoter polymorphism, MAOA-LPR, plays a role in determining continuity of parent-rated attention problems during adolescence. At the same time, a potential effect of severe life events (SLEs) was taken into account. A multi-group path analysis was used in a sample of 234 adolescents (149 males, 85 females) who took part in an epidemiological cohort study at the ages of 11 and 15 years. Attention problems during early adolescence were found to be a strong predictor of attention problems in middle adolescence. However, in carriers of the MAOA-LPR low-activity variant (MAOA-L), stability was found to be significantly higher than in carriers of the high-activity variant (MAOA-H). Additionally, only in MAOA-L carriers did SLEs during adolescence significantly impact on attention problems at the age of 15 years, implying a possible gene × environment interaction. To conclude, we found evidence that attention problems during adolescence in carriers of the MAOA-L allele are particularly stable and malleable to life stressors. The present results underline the usefulness of applying a more dynamic GxE perspective.

  8. Renal denervation attenuates NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress and hypertension in rats with hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleli, Maria; Al-Mashhadi, Ammar; Yang, Ting; Larsson, Erik; Wåhlin, Nils; Jensen, Boye L; G Persson, A Erik; Carlström, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is associated with the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Studies have suggested that increased sympathetic nerve activity and oxidative stress play important roles in hypertension and the modulation of salt sensitivity. The present study primarily aimed to examine the role of renal sympathetic nerve activity in the development of hypertension in rats with hydronephrosis. In addition, we aimed to investigate if NADPH oxidase (NOX) function could be affected by renal denervation. Partial unilateral ureteral obstruction (PUUO) was created in 3-wk-old rats to induce hydronephrosis. Sham surgery or renal denervation was performed at the same time. Blood pressure was measured during normal, high-, and low-salt diets. The renal excretion pattern, NOX activity, and expression as well as components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were characterized after treatment with the normal salt diet. On the normal salt diet, rats in the PUUO group had elevated blood pressure compared with control rats (115 ± 3 vs. 87 ± 1 mmHg, P Renal denervation in PUUO rats attenuated both hypertension (97 ± 3 mmHg) and salt sensitivity (5 ± 1 mmHg, P renal excretion pattern, whereas the degree of renal fibrosis and inflammation was not changed. NOX activity and expression as well as renin and ANG II type 1A receptor expression were increased in the renal cortex from PUUO rats and normalized by denervation. Plasma Na(+) and K(+) levels were elevated in PUUO rats and normalized after renal denervation. Finally, denervation in PUUO rats was also associated with reduced NOX expression, superoxide production, and fibrosis in the heart. In conclusion, renal denervation attenuates hypertension and restores the renal excretion pattern, which is associated with reduced renal NOX and components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This study emphasizes a link between renal nerves, the development of hypertension, and modulation of NOX function.

  9. Aldehyde oxidase importance in vivo in xenobiotic metabolism: imidacloprid nitroreduction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Tami L; Casida, John E

    2013-05-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) metabolizes many xenobiotics in vitro, but its importance in vivo is usually unknown relative to cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and other detoxification systems. Currently, the most important insecticides are neonicotinoids, which are metabolized in vitro by AOX on reduction of the nitroimino group and by CYPs via oxidation reactions. The goal of this study was to establish the relative importance of AOX and CYPs in vivo using the mouse model. The procedure was to reduce liver AOX activity by providing tungsten or hydralazine in the drinking water or to use the AOX-deficient DBA/2 mouse strain. None of these approaches reduced CYP activity measured in vitro with an isozyme nonspecific substrate. Liver AOX activity was reduced by 45% with tungsten and 61% with hydralazine and 81% in AOX-deficient mice relative to controls. When mice were treated ip with the major neonicotinoid imidacloprid (IMI), metabolism by CYP oxidation reactions was not appreciably affected, whereas the AOX-generated nitrosoguanidine metabolite was decreased by 30% with tungsten and 56% with hydralazine and 86% in the AOX-deficient mice. The other IMI nitroreduction metabolite, desnitro-IMI, was decreased by 55%, 65%, and 81% with tungsten, hydralazine, and in the AOX-deficient mice, respectively. Thus, decreasing liver AOX activity by three quite different procedures gave a corresponding decrease for in vivo reductive metabolites in the liver of IMI-treated mice. Possible AOX involvement in IMI metabolism in insects was evaluated using AOX-expressing and AOX-deficient Drosophila, but no differences were found in IMI nitroreduction or sensitivity between the two strains. This is the first study to establish the in vivo relevance of AOX in neonicotinoid metabolism in mammals and one of the first for xenobiotics in general.

  10. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  11. The electron-transfer reaction between azurin and the cytochrome c oxidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, S R; Barber, D; Greenwood, C; Brunori, M

    1977-11-01

    A stopped-flow investigation of the electron-transfer reaction between oxidized azurin and reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase and between reduced azurin and oxidized Ps. aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase was performed. Electrons leave and enter the oxidase molecule via its haem c component, with the oxidation and reduction of the haem d1 occurring by internal electron transfer. The reaction mechanism in both directions is complex. In the direction of oxidase oxidation, two phases assigned on the basis of difference spectra to haem c proceed with rate constants of 3.2 X 10(5)M-1-S-1 and 2.0 X 10(4)M-1-S-1, whereas the haem d1 oxidation occurs at 0.35 +/- 0.1S-1. Addition of CO to the reduced enzyme profoundly modifies the rate of haem c oxidation, with the faster process tending towards a rate limit of 200S-1. Reduction of the oxidase was similarly complex, with a fast haem c phase tending to a rate limit of 120S-1, and a slower phase with a second-order rate of 1.5 X 10(4)M-1-S-1; the internal transfer rate in this direction was o.25 +/- 0.1S-1. These results have been applied to a kinetic model originally developed from temperature-jump studies.

  12. Redox-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cytochrome c Oxidase Suggest a Gating Mechanism for Proton Uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ling; Liu, Jian; Mills, Denise A.; Proshlyakov, Denis A.; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh; (MSU)

    2009-08-05

    A role for conformational change in the coupling mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase is the subject of controversy. Relatively small conformational changes have been reported in comparisons of reduced and oxidized crystal structures of bovine oxidase but none in bacterial oxidases. Comparing the X-ray crystal structures of the reduced (at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution) and oxidized forms of cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we observe a displacement of heme a3 involving both the porphyrin ring and the hydroxyl farnesyl tail, accompanied by protein movements in nearby regions, including the mid part of helix VIII of subunit I which harbors key residues of the K proton uptake path, K362 and T359. The conformational changes in the reduced form are reversible upon reoxidation. They result in an opening of the top of the K pathway and more ordered waters being resolved in that region, suggesting an access path for protons into the active site. In all high-resolution structures of oxidized R. sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase, a water molecule is observed in the hydrophobic region above the top of the D path, strategically positioned to facilitate the connection of residue E286 of subunit I to the active site or to the proton pumping exit path. In the reduced and reduced plus cyanide structures, this water molecule disappears, implying disruption of proton conduction from the D path under conditions when the K path is open, thus providing a mechanism for alternating access to the active site.

  13. Dimer interface of bovine cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by local posttranslational modifications and lipid binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liko, Idlir; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Mohammed, Shabaz; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Bovine cytochrome c oxidase is an integral membrane protein complex comprising 13 protein subunits and associated lipids. Dimerization of the complex has been proposed; however, definitive evidence for the dimer is lacking. We used advanced mass spectrometry methods to investigate the oligomeric state of cytochrome c oxidase and the potential role of lipids and posttranslational modifications in its subunit interfaces. Mass spectrometry of the intact protein complex revealed that both the monomer and the dimer are stabilized by large lipid entities. We identified these lipid species from the purified protein complex, thus implying that they interact specifically with the enzyme. We further identified phosphorylation and acetylation sites of cytochrome c oxidase, located in the peripheral subunits and in the dimer interface, respectively. Comparing our phosphorylation and acetylation sites with those found in previous studies of bovine, mouse, rat, and human cytochrome c oxidase, we found that whereas some acetylation sites within the dimer interface are conserved, suggesting a role for regulation and stabilization of the dimer, phosphorylation sites were less conserved and more transient. Our results therefore provide insights into the locations and interactions of lipids with acetylated residues within the dimer interface of this enzyme, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of its structure in the natural membrane. Moreover dimeric cytochrome c oxidase, comprising 20 transmembrane, six extramembrane subunits, and associated lipids, represents the largest integral membrane protein complex that has been transferred via electrospray intact into the gas phase of a mass spectrometer, representing a significant technological advance.

  14. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  15. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  16. Cholesterol: A modulator of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase activity - A cell-free study

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    Rawand Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The NADPH oxidase Nox2, a multi-subunit enzyme complex comprising membrane and cytosolic proteins, catalyzes a very intense production of superoxide ions O2•−, which are transformed into other reactive oxygen species (ROS. In vitro, it has to be activated by addition of amphiphiles like arachidonic acid (AA. It has been shown that the membrane part of phagocyte NADPH oxidase is present in lipid rafts rich in cholesterol. Cholesterol plays a significant role in the development of cardio-vascular diseases that are always accompanied by oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the influence of cholesterol on the activation process of NADPH oxidase. Our results clearly show that, in a cell-free system, cholesterol is not an efficient activator of NADPH oxidase like arachidonic acid (AA, however it triggers a basal low superoxide production at concentrations similar to what found in neutrophile. A higher concentration, if present during the assembly process of the enzyme, has an inhibitory role on the production of O2•−. Added cholesterol acts on both cytosolic and membrane components, leading to imperfect assembly and decreasing the affinity of cytosolic subunits to the membrane ones. Added to the cytosolic proteins, it retains their conformations but still allows some conformational change induced by AA addition, indispensable to activation of NADPH oxidase.

  17. Metabolism of an alkyl polyamine analog by a polyamine oxidase from the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

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    Bacchi, Cyrus J; Yarlett, Nigel; Faciane, Evangeline; Bi, Xiangdong; Rattendi, Donna; Weiss, Louis M; Woster, Patrick M

    2009-06-01

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a microsporidium responsible for systemic illness in mammals. In the course of developing leads to new therapy for microsporidiosis, we found that a bis(phenylbenzyl)3-7-3 analog of spermine, 1,15-bis{N-[o-(phenyl)benzylamino}-4,12-diazapentadecane (BW-1), was a substrate for an E. cuniculi amine oxidase activity. The primary natural substrate for this oxidase activity was N'-acetylspermine, but BW-1 had activity comparable to that of the substrate. As the sole substrate, BW-1 gave linear reaction rates over 15 min and K(m) of 2 microM. In the presence of N'-acetylspermine, BW-1 acted as a competitive inhibitor of oxidase activity and may be a subversive substrate, resulting in increased peroxide production. By use of (13)C-labeled BW-1 as a substrate and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, two products were determined to be oxidative metabolites, a hydrated aldehyde or dicarboxylate and 2(phenyl)benzylamine. These products were detected after exposure of (13)C-labeled BW-1 to E. cuniculi preemergent spore preparations and to uninfected host cells. In previous studies, BW-1 was curative in a rodent model of infection with E. cuniculi. The results in this study demonstrate competitive inhibition of oxidase activity by BW-1 and support further studies of this oxidase activity by the parasite and host.

  18. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

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    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  19. Single mutations that redirect internal proton transfer in the ba3 oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

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    Smirnova, Irina; Chang, Hsin-Yang; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Ädelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2013-10-08

    The ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus is a membrane-bound proton pump. Results from earlier studies have shown that with the aa3-type oxidases proton uptake to the catalytic site and "pump site" occurs simultaneously. However, with ba3 oxidase the pump site is loaded before proton transfer to the catalytic site because the proton transfer to the latter is slower than that with the aa3 oxidases. In addition, the timing of formation and decay of catalytic intermediates is different in the two types of oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated two mutant ba3 CytcOs in which residues of the proton pathway leading to the catalytic site as well as the pump site were exchanged, Thr312Val and Tyr244Phe. Even though ba3 CytcO uses only a single proton pathway for transfer of the substrate and "pumped" protons, the amino-acid residue substitutions had distinctly different effects on the kinetics of proton transfer to the catalytic site and the pump site. The results indicate that the rates of these reactions can be modified independently by replacement of single residues within the proton pathway. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Thr312Val and Tyr244Phe mutations interfere with a structural rearrangement in the proton pathway that is rate limiting for proton transfer to the catalytic site.

  20. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase Activity Limits Ethylene Biosynthesis in Rumex palustris during Submergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriezen, Wim H.; Hulzink, Raymond; Mariani, Celestina; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Submergence strongly stimulates petiole elongation in Rumex palustris, and ethylene accumulation initiates and maintains this response in submerged tissues. cDNAs from R. palustris corresponding to a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene (RP-ACO1) were isolated from elongating petioles and used to study the expression of the corresponding gene. An increase in RP-ACO1 messenger was observed in the petioles and lamina of elongating leaves 2 h after the start of submergence. ACC oxidase enzyme activity was measured in homogenates of R. palustris shoots, and a relevant increase was observed within 12 h under water with a maximum after 24 h. We have shown previously that the ethylene production rate of submerged shoots does not increase significantly during the first 24 h of submergence (L.A.C.J. Voesenek, M. Banga, R.H. Thier, C.M. Mudde, F.M. Harren, G.W.M. Barendse, C.W.P.M. Blom [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 783–791), suggesting that under these conditions ACC oxidase activity is inhibited in vivo. We found evidence that this inhibition is caused by a reduction of oxygen levels. We hypothesize that an increased ACC oxidase enzyme concentration counterbalances the reduced enzyme activity caused by low oxygen concentration during submergence, thus sustaining ethylene production under these conditions. Therefore, ethylene biosynthesis seems to be limited at the level of ACC oxidase activity rather than by ACC synthase in R. palustris during submergence. PMID:10482674

  1. Spatiotemporal Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by NADPH Oxidase Is Critical for Tapetal Programmed Cell Death and Pollen Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Tao; Wan, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Sha; Zhang, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Male sterility in angiosperms has wide applications in agriculture, particularly in hybrid crop breeding and gene flow control. Microspores develop adjacent to the tapetum, a layer of cells that provides nutrients for pollen development and materials for pollen wall formation. Proper pollen development requires programmed cell death (PCD) of the tapetum, which requires transcriptional cascades and proteolytic enzymes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) also affect tapetal PCD, and failures in ROS scavenging cause male sterility. However, many aspects of tapetal PCD remain unclear, including what sources generate ROS, whether ROS production has a temporal pattern, and how the ROS-producing system interacts with the tapetal transcriptional network. We report here that stage-specific expression of NADPH oxidases in the Arabidopsis thaliana tapetum contributes to a temporal peak of ROS production. Genetic interference with the temporal ROS pattern, by manipulating RESPIRATORY-BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG (RBOH) genes, affected the timing of tapetal PCD and resulted in aborted male gametophytes. We further show that the tapetal transcriptional network regulates RBOH expression, indicating that the temporal pattern of ROS production intimately connects to other signaling pathways regulated by the tapetal transcriptional network to ensure the proper timing of tapetal PCD.

  2. A neuroanatomical analysis of the effects of a memory impairing dose of scopolamine in the rat brain using cytochrome c oxidase as principle marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hescham, Sarah; Temel, Yasin; Casaca-Carreira, João; Arslantas, Kemal; Yakkioui, Youssef; Blokland, Arjan; Jahanshahi, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Acetylcholine plays a role in mnemonic and attentional processes, but also in locomotor and anxiety-related behavior. Receptor blockage by scopolamine can therefore induce cognitive as well as motor deficits and increase anxiety levels. Here we show that scopolamine, at a dose that has previously been found to affect learning and memory performance (0.1 mg/kg i.p.), has a widespread effect on cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in various regions of the rat brain. We found a down-regulation of cytochrome c oxidase in the nucleus basalis, in movement-related structures such as the primary motor cortex and the globus pallidus, memory-related structures such as the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex and in anxiety-related structures like the amygdala, which also plays a role in memory. However choline acetyltransferase levels were only affected in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and both, choline acetyltransferase and c-Fos expression levels were decreased in the amygdala. These findings corroborate strong cognitive behavioral effects of this drug, but also suggest possible anxiety- and locomotor-related changes in subjects. Moreover, they present histochemical evidence that the effects of scopolamine are not ultimately restricted to cognitive parameters.

  3. A temperature-induced absorption band centered in the region of 666 nm related to the configuration of the active site in frozen cytochrome oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; Clore, G M

    1979-03-15

    The existence of a temperature-induced absorption band centred in the region of 666 nm is demonstrated for both membrane-bound and soluble cytochrome oxidase in the frozen state. The 666 nm band is generated solely by an increase in temperature of both fully reduced and mixed valence state cytochrome oxidase in the presence of CO or O2 within the 'pocket' containing the active site; it is not formed in the absence of both CO and O2 from the sample. The formation of the 666 nm band is entirely reversible when the temperature is decreased again and its formation is not dependent on the presence of liganded CO at the sixth coordination site of haem a3 in the low temperature range (below --120 degrees C) prior to photolysis. The shape and intensity of the 666 nm band are not affected by the extent of CO recombination following flash and photolysis and temperature increase and are not affected by changes in the valence states of the four metal centres when the O2 reaction is in progress.

  4. Functional Analysis of Polyphenol Oxidases by Antisense/Sense Technology

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    Jutharat Attajarusit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs