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Sample records for aerosol optical depth

  1. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  2. Aerosol optical depths and their contributing sources in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. L.; Chan, K. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a quantitative investigation of the contributions of different aerosols to the aerosol optical depths (AODs) in Taiwan using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and remote sensing measurements. The study focus is on the period from June 2012 to October 2013. Five different types of aerosols are investigated: sea salt, dust, sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon. Three of these aerosols, namely sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon, have significant anthropogenic sources. Model simulation results were compared with both ground based sun photometer measurements and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The model data shows good agreement with satellite observations (R = 0.72) and moderate correlation with sun photometer measurements (R = 0.52). Simulation results show the anthropogenic aerosols contribute ∼65% to the total AOD in Taipei, while natural originated aerosols only show a minor impact (∼35%). Among all the aerosols, sulfate is the dominating species, contributing 62.4% to the annual average total AOD. Organic carbon and black carbons respectively contribute 7.3% and 1.5% to the annual averaged total AOD. The annual average contributions of sea salt and dust aerosols to the total AOD are 26.4% and 2.4%, respectively. A sensitivity study was performed to identify the contributions of anthropogenic aerosol sources in each region to the AODs in Taipei. North-East Asia was identified as the major contributing source region of anthropogenic aerosols to Taipei, accounting for more than 50% of total sulfate, 32% of total organic carbon and 51% of total black carbon aerosols. South-East Asia is the second largest contributing source region, contributing 35%, 24% and 34% of total sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon aerosols, respectively. The aerosols from continents other than Asia only show minor impacts to the aerosol load in Taipei. In addition, a case study of a biomass

  3. Spatial Correlations of Aerosol Optical Depth Over Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkevich, A. V.; Trishchenko, A. P.

    2009-05-01

    The accurate atmospheric correction of historical satellite long-term data is required to make them suitable for climate change application. This is essential to properly identify the impacts caused by changing surface properties, such as vegetation, soil and snow cover, rather than atmospheric effects, cloud contamination and artefacts. The correction of satellite data over land for aerosol effect constitutes the most challenging part of the processing. While a good progress in aerosol retrievals has been achieved in recent years using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), the aerosol properties and their associated impact on atmospheric correction for historical data over land from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard NOAA satellites for pre-MODIS period is still not adequately addressed. It seems promising to develop the AVHRR atmospheric correction algorithm based on the synthesis of aerosol retrievals over dark targets and optimum interpolation technique based on aerosol spatio-temporal statistics. The implementation of this approach requires the knowledge of aerosol spatial correlation function. The estimates of aerosol optical depth (AOD) spatial correlation function were obtained in this study using different data sources: MODIS level 2 and level 3 aerosol products, daily averages of ground sun photometer aerosol retrievals from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the global chemistry and aerosol atmospheric transport model results from NASA's GOCART. The AOD correlation properties obtained from different types of MODIS aerosol products were found in reasonably good agreement with each other. The AOD correlation radius for different types of MODIS data varied from 418 km to 900 km. The AOD correlation radius obtained from AERONET data was found to be close to 500km. Substantial differences were detected between AOD spatial correlation function derived from

  4. Seasonal variability of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A.K.; Singh, R.P.; Singh, A.; Kafatos, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ganga basin extends 2000 km E-W and about 400 km N-S and is bounded by Himalayas in the north. This basin is unequivocally found to be affected by high aerosols optical depth (AOD) (>0.6) throughout the year. Himalayas restricts movement of aerosols toward north and as a result dynamic nature of aerosol is seen over the Ganga basin. High AOD in this region has detrimental effects on health of more than 460 million people living in this part of India besides adversely affecting clouds formation, monsoonal rainfall pattern and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Severe drought events (year 2002) in Ganga basin and unexpected failure of monsoon several times, occurred in different parts of Indian subcontinent. Significant rise in AOD (18.7%) over the central part of basin (Kanpur region) have been found to cause substantial decrease in NDVI (8.1%) since 2000. A negative relationship is observed between AOD and NDVI, magnitude of which differs from region to region. Efforts have been made to determine general distribution of AOD and its dominant departure in recent years spatially using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The seasonal changes in aerosol optical depth over the Indo-Gangetic basin is found to very significant as a result of the increasing dust storm events in recent years. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  5. Aerosol Optical Depth over Africa retrieved from AATSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Rodriques, Edith

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols produced over the African continent have important consequences for climate. In particular, large amounts of desert dust are produced over the Sahara and transported across the North Atlantic where desert dust deposition influences the eco system by iron fertilization, and further North over Europe with outbreaks as far as Scandinavia. Biomass burning occurs in most of the African continent south of the Sahara and causes a net positive radiating forcing resulting in local warming of the atmosphere layers. These effects have been studied during large field campaigns. Satellites can systematically provide information on aerosols over a large area such as Africa and beyond. To this end, we retrieved the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at three wavelengths (555nm, 670nm, and 1600nm) over Africa from the reflectance measured at the top of the atmosphere by the AATSR (Advances Along Track Scanning Radiometer) flying on ENVISAT, for one year (1 May 2008 to 30 April 2009) to obtain information on the seasonal and spatial behaviour of the AOD, episodes of high AOD events and connect the retrieved AOD with the ground-based aerosol measurements. The AOD retrieval algorithm, which is applied to cloud-free pixels over land, is based on the comparison of the measured and modeled reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The algorithm uses look-up-tables (LUTs) to compute the modeled TOA reflectance. For AOD retrieval, an aerosol in the atmosphere is assumed to be an external mixture of fine and coarse mode particles. The two aerosol types are mixed such that the spectral behavior of the reflectance due to aerosol best fits the measurements. Comparison with AERONET (Aerosol Roboric NETwork), which is a network of ground-based sun photometers which measure atmospheric aerosol properties, shows good agreement but with some overestimation of the AATSR retrieved AOD. Different aerosol models have been used to improve the comparison. The lack of AERONET stations in Africa

  6. Effect of Aerosol Size and Hygroscopicity on Aerosol Optical Depth in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Charles; Wagner, Nick; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is affected by the size, optical characteristics, and hygroscopicity of particles, confounding attempts to link remote sensing observations of AOD to measured or modeled aerosol mass concentrations. In situ airborne observations of aerosol optical, chemical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties were made in the southeastern United States in the daytime in summer 2013. We use these observations to constrain a simple model that is used to test the sensitivity of AOD to the various measured parameters. As expected, the AOD was found to be most sensitive to aerosol mass concentration and to aerosol water content, which is controlled by aerosol hygroscopicity and the ambient relative humidity. However, AOD was also fairly sensitive to the mean particle diameter and the width of the size distribution. These parameters are often prescribed in global models that use simplified modal parameterizations to describe the aerosol, suggesting that the values chosen could substantially bias the calculated relationship between aerosol mass and optical extinction, AOD, and radiative forcing.

  7. Estimating aerosol emissions by assimilating observed aerosol optical depth in a global aerosol model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Huneeus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the emission fluxes of a range of aerosol species and aerosol precursor at the global scale. These fluxes are estimated by assimilating daily total and fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS into a global aerosol model of intermediate complexity. Monthly emissions are fitted homogenously for each species over a set of predefined regions. The performance of the assimilation is evaluated by comparing the AOD after assimilation against the MODIS observations and against independent observations. The system is effective in forcing the model towards the observations, for both total and fine mode AOD. Significant improvements for the root mean square error and correlation coefficient against both the assimilated and independent datasets are observed as well as a significant decrease in the mean bias against the assimilated observations. The assimilation is more efficient over land than over ocean. The impact of the assimilation of fine mode AOD over ocean demonstrates potential for further improvement by including fine mode AOD observations over continents. The Angström exponent is also improved in African, European and dusty stations. The estimated emission flux for black carbon is 14.5 Tg yr−1, 119 Tg yr−1 for organic matter, 17 Pg yr−1 for sea salt, 82.7 TgS yr−1 for SO2 and 1383 Tg yr−1 for desert dust. They represent a difference of +45%, +40%, +26%, +13% and −39% respectively, with respect to the a priori values. The initial errors attributed to the emission fluxes are reduced for all estimated species.

  8. Estimating aerosol emissions by assimilating observed aerosol optical depth in a global aerosol model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Huneeus

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the emission fluxes of a range of aerosol species and one aerosol precursor at the global scale. These fluxes are estimated by assimilating daily total and fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS into a global aerosol model of intermediate complexity. Monthly emissions are fitted homogenously for each species over a set of predefined regions. The performance of the assimilation is evaluated by comparing the AOD after assimilation against the MODIS observations and against independent observations. The system is effective in forcing the model towards the observations, for both total and fine mode AOD. Significant improvements for the root mean square error and correlation coefficient against both the assimilated and independent datasets are observed as well as a significant decrease in the mean bias against the assimilated observations. These improvements are larger over land than over ocean. The impact of the assimilation of fine mode AOD over ocean demonstrates potential for further improvement by including fine mode AOD observations over continents. The Angström exponent is also improved in African, European and dusty stations. The estimated emission flux for black carbon is 15 Tg yr−1, 119 Tg yr−1 for particulate organic matter, 17 Pg yr−1 for sea salt, 83 TgS yr−1 for SO2 and 1383 Tg yr−1 for desert dust. They represent a difference of +45 %, +40 %, +26 %, +13 % and −39 % respectively, with respect to the a priori values. The initial errors attributed to the emission fluxes are reduced for all estimated species.

  9. Assessment of error in aerosol optical depth measured by AERONET due to aerosol forward scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Eck, Thomas F.; Slutsker, Ilya; Schafer, Joel S.; Giles, David M.; Sorokin, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the accuracy of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by CIMEL Sun photometers. The effect is quantified in terms of AOD and solar zenith angle using radiative transfer modeling. The analysis is based on aerosol size distributions derived from multi-year climatologies of AERONET aerosol retrievals. The study shows that the modeled error is lower than AOD calibration uncertainty (0.01) for the vast majority of AERONET level 2 observations, ∼99.53%. Only ∼0.47% of the AERONET database corresponding mostly to dust aerosol with high AOD and low solar elevations has larger biases. We also show that observations with extreme reductions in direct solar irradiance do not contribute to level 2 AOD due to low Sun photometer digital counts below a quality control cutoff threshold.

  10. Characteristics of spectral aerosol optical depths over India during ICARB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Naseema Beegum; K Krishna Moorthy; Vijayakumar S Nair; S Suresh Babu; S K Satheesh; V Vinoj; R Ramakrishna Reddy; K Rama Gopal; K V S Badarinath; K Niranjan; Santosh Kumar Pandey; M Behera; A Jeyaram; P K Bhuyan; M M Gogoi; Sacchidanand Singh; P Pant; U C Dumka; Yogesh Kant; J C Kuniyal; Darshan Singh

    2008-07-01

    Spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements, carried out regularly from a network of observatories spread over the Indian mainland and adjoining islands in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea, are used to examine the spatio-temporal and spectral variations during the period of ICARB (March to May 2006). The AODs and the derived Ångström parameters showed considerable variations across India during the above period. While at the southern peninsular stations the AODs decreased towards May after a peak in April, in the north Indian regions they increased continuously from March to May. The Ångström coefficients suggested enhanced coarse mode loading in the north Indian regions, compared to southern India. Nevertheless, as months progressed from March to May, the dominance of coarse mode aerosols increased in the columnar aerosol size spectrum over the entire Indian mainland, maintaining the regional distinctiveness. Compared to the above, the island stations showed considerably low AODs, so too the northeastern station Dibrugarh, indicating the prevalence of cleaner environment. Long-range transport of aerosols from the adjoining regions leads to remarkable changes in the magnitude of the AODs and their wavelength dependencies during March to May. HYSPLIT back-trajectory analysis shows that enhanced long-range transport of aerosols, particularly from the west Asia and northwest coastal India, contributed significantly to the enhancement of AOD and in the flattening of the spectra over entire regions; if it is the peninsular regions and the island Minicoy are more impacted in April, the north Indian regions including the Indo Gangetic Plain get affected the most during May, with the AODs soaring as high as 1.0 at 500 nm. Over the islands, the Ångström exponent () remained significantly lower (∼1) over the Arabian Sea compared to Bay of Bengal (BoB) (∼1.4) as revealed by the data respectively from Minicoy and Port Blair. Occurrences of higher values of

  11. Deriving atmospheric visibility from satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffler, M.; Schneider, Ch.; Popp, Ch.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric visibility is a measure that reflects different physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere. In general, poor visibility conditions come along with risks for transportation (e.g. road traffic, aviation) and can negatively impact human health since visibility impairment often implies the presence of atmospheric pollution. Ambient pollutants, particulate matter, and few gaseous species decrease the perceptibility of distant objects. Common estimations of this parameter are usually based on human observations or devices that measure the transmittance of light from an artificial light source over a short distance. Such measurements are mainly performed at airports and some meteorological stations. A major disadvantage of these observations is the gap between the measurements, leaving large areas without any information. As aerosols are one of the most important factors influencing atmospheric visibility in the visible range, the knowledge of their spatial distribution can be used to infer visibility with the so called Koschmieder equation, which relates visibility and atmospheric extinction. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to infer atmospheric visibility on large spatial scale. First results applying AOD values scaled with the planetary boundary layer height are promising. For the comparison we use a full automated and objective procedure for the estimation of atmospheric visibility with the help of a digital panorama camera serving as ground truth. To further investigate the relation between the vertical measure of AOD and the horizontal visibility data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site Laegeren (Switzerland), where the digital camera is mounted, are included as well. Finally, the derived visibility maps are compared with synoptical observations in central

  12. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    KAUST Repository

    Klingmüller, Klaus

    2016-04-22

    We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite product of the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. We relate the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface winds to identify regions where these attributes are directly related to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. Regarding precipitation and soil moisture, a relatively small area in and surrounding Iraq turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD over these countries. Regarding surface wind speed, the African Red Sea coastal area is relevant for the Saudi Arabian AOD. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trends and interannual variability can be attributed to soil moisture, precipitation and surface winds, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle. Our results confirm the dust driven AOD trends and variability, supported by a decreasing MODIS-derived Ångström exponent and a decreasing AERONET-derived fine mode fraction that accompany the AOD increase over Saudi Arabia. The positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. As a lower soil moisture translates into enhanced dust emissions, it is not needed to assume growing anthropogenic aerosol and aerosol precursor emissions to explain the observations. Instead, our results suggest that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change.

  13. Validation of MODIS aerosol optical depth over the Mediterranean Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Martínez, J. Vicente; Segura, Sara; Estellés, Víctor; Utrillas, M. Pilar; Martínez-Lozano, J. Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, due to their high spatial and temporal variability, are considered one of the largest sources of uncertainty in different processes affecting visibility, air quality, human health, and climate. Among their effects on climate, they play an important role in the energy balance of the Earth. On one hand they have a direct effect by scattering and absorbing solar radiation; on the other, they also have an impact in precipitation, modifying clouds, or affecting air quality. The application of remote sensing techniques to investigate aerosol effects on climate has advanced significatively over last years. In this work, the products employed have been obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). MODIS is a sensor located onboard both Earth Observing Systems (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, which provide almost complete global coverage every day. These satellites have been acquiring data since early 2000 (Terra) and mid 2002 (Aqua) and offer different products for land, ocean and atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosol products are presented as level 2 products with a pixel size of 10 x 10 km2 in nadir. MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) is retrieved by different algorithms depending on the pixel surface, distinguishing between land and ocean. For its validation, ground based sunphotometer data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) has been employed. AERONET is an international operative network of Cimel CE318 sky-sunphotometers that provides the most extensive aerosol data base globally available of ground-based measurements. The ground sunphotometric technique is considered the most accurate for the retrieval of radiative properties of aerosols in the atmospheric column. In this study we present a validation of MODIS C051 AOD employing AERONET measurements over different Mediterranean coastal sites centered over an area of 50 x 50 km2, which includes both pixels over land and ocean. The validation is done comparing spatial

  14. A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements

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    R. S. Stone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aerosols, transported from distant source regions, influence the Arctic surface radiation budget. When deposited on snow and ice, carbonaceous particles can reduce the surface albedo, which accelerates melting, leading to a temperature-albedo feedback that amplifies Arctic warming. Black carbon (BC, in particular, has been implicated as a major warming agent at high latitudes. BC and co-emitted aerosols in the atmosphere, however, attenuate sunlight and radiatively cool the surface. Warming by soot deposition and cooling by atmospheric aerosols are referred to as “darkening” and “dimming” effects, respectively. In this study, climatologies of spectral aerosol optical depth AOD (2001–2011 and Equivalent BC (EBC (1989–2011 from three Arctic observatories and from a number of aircraft campaigns are used to characterize Arctic aerosols. Since the 1980s, concentrations of BC in the Arctic have decreased by more than 50% at ground stations where in situ observations are made. AOD has increased slightly during the past decade, with variations attributed to changing emission inventories and source strengths of natural aerosols, including biomass smoke and volcanic aerosol, further influenced by deposition rates and airflow patterns.

  15. Variability of aerosol optical depth and aerosol radiative forcing over Northwest Himalayan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Shaik Darga; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, D.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the aerosol loading in India is increasing that has significant impact on the weather/climatic conditions. The present study discusses the analysis of temporal (monthly and seasonal) variation of aerosol optical depth(AOD) by the ground based observations from sun photometer and estimate the aerosol radiative forcing and heating rate over selected station Dehradun in North western Himalayas, India during 2015. The in-situ measurements data illustrate that the maximum seasonal average AOD observed during summer season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.59+/-0.27 with an average angstrom exponent, α ≍0.86 while minimum during winter season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.33+/-0.10 with angstrom exponent, α ≍1.18. The MODIS and MISR derived AOD was also compared with the ground measured values and are good to be in good agreement. Analysis of air mass back trajectories using HYSPLIT model reveal that the transportation of desert dust during summer months. The Optical Properties of Aerosols and clouds (OPAC) model was used to compute the aerosol optical properties like single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom coefficient (α) and Asymmetry(g) parameter for each day of measurement and they are incorporated in a Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model, i.e Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) to estimate the direct short-wave (0.25 to 4 μm) Aerosol Radiative forcing at the Surface (SUR), the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and Atmosphere (ATM). The maximum Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) was observed during summer months at SUR ≍ -56.42 w/m2, at TOA ≍-21.62 w/m2 whereas in ATM ≍+34.79 w/m2 with corresponding to heating rate 1.24°C/day with in lower atmosphere.

  16. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingmueller, Klaus; Pozzer, Andrea; Metzger, Swen; Abdelkader, Mohamed; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite product of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. By relating the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface wind, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle, we identify regions where these attributes are significantly correlated to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. The Fertile Crescent turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD trend over these countries. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trend and interannual variability can be attributed to the above mentioned dust cycle parameters, confirming that the AOD increase is predominantly driven by dust. In particular, the positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. This suggests that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change. Based on simulations using the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry-climate model (EMAC), we interpret the correlations identified in the observational data in terms of causal relationships.

  17. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. Q.; Kanniah, K. D.; Lau, A. M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols.

  18. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Toledo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds. In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10−3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  19. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  20. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I - Overview and Impact of Elevated Aerosol Layers on Aerosol Optical Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, K.; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rogers, Ray; Russell, P.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Art; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which was conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique field study that was designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere at a number of altitudes, from near the surface to as high as 8 km, within two atmospheric columns; one located near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. TCAP included the yearlong deployment of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) that was located at the base of the Cape Cod column, as well as summer and winter aircraft intensive observation periods of the ARM Aerial Facility. One important finding from TCAP is the relatively common occurrence (on four of six nearly cloud-free flights) of elevated aerosol layers in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed in the column. Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning aerosol and nitrate compared to the aerosol found near the surface.

  1. Aerosol optical depth as observed by the Mars Science Laboratory REMS UV photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Zorzano, María-Paz; Lemmon, Mark; Martín-Torres, Javier; Mendaza de Cal, Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Systematic observations taken by the REMS UV photodiodes on a daily basis throughout the landed Mars Science Laboratory mission provide a highly useful tool for characterizing aerosols above Gale Crater. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the approximately 1.75 Mars Years of observations taken to date taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the extended field of view of the REMS UV photodiodes. The retrievals show in detail the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, which is punctuated with numerous short timescale events of increased optical depth. Dust deposition onto the photodiodes is accounted for by comparison with aerosol optical depth derived from direct imaging of the Sun by Mastcam. The effect of dust on the photodiodes is noticeable, but does not dominate the signal. Cleaning of dust from the photodiodes was observed in the season around Ls=270°, but not during other seasons. Systematic deviations in the residuals from the retrieval fit are indicative of changes in aerosol effective particle size, with larger particles present during periods of increased optical depth. This seasonal dependence of aerosol particle size is expected as dust activity injects larger particles into the air, while larger aerosols settle out of the atmosphere more quickly leading to a smaller average particle size over time.

  2. Aerosol Optical Depth as Observed by the Mars Science Laboratory REMS UV Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. D.; Zorzano, M.-P.; Lemmon, M.; Martin-Torres, J.; Mendaza de Cal, T.

    2017-01-01

    Systematic observations taken by the REMS UV photodiodes on a daily basis throughout the landed Mars Science Laboratory mission provide a highly useful tool for characterizing aerosols above Gale Crater. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the approximately two Mars Years of observations taken to date taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the extended field of view of the REMS UV photodiodes. The retrievals show in detail the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, which is punctuated with numerous short timescale events of increased optical depth. Dust deposition onto the photodiodes is accounted for by comparison with aerosol optical depth derived from direct imaging of the Sun by Mastcam. The effect of dust on the photodiodes is noticeable, but does not dominate the signal. Cleaning of dust from the photodiodes was observed in the season around Ls=270deg, but not during other seasons. Systematic deviations in the residuals from the retrieval fit are indicative of changes in aerosol effective particle size, with larger particles present during periods of increased optical depth. This seasonal dependence of aerosol particle size is expected as dust activity injects larger particles into the air, while larger aerosols settle out of the atmosphere more quickly leading to a smaller average particle size over time. A full description of these observations, the retrieval algorithm, and the results can be found in Smith et al. (2016).

  3. ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 μm aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulphate, pure elementary carbon (hydrophobic, mixed elemental carbon (hydrophilic, hydrophobic organic matter, hydrophilic organic matter, sea salt, mineral dust, ammonium, and aerosol-associated water. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a bulk aerosol model. Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement with observations of sulphur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as the bulk aerosol model cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulphur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean possibly due to overly strong convective transport. The TOMAS model successfully captures observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in the bulk aerosol model running in the same host model as TOMAS (ModelE2 differ by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. Larger differences are found

  4. Influence of observed diurnal cycles of aerosol optical depth on aerosol direct radiative effect

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    A. Arola

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE. The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally. We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on

  5. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  6. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Bias Adjustment Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, A.; Wei, J. C.; Petrenko, M.; Lary, D. J.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, global aerosol observations have been conducted by space-borne sensors, airborne instruments, and ground-base network measurements. Unfortunately, quite often we encounter the differences of aerosol measurements by different well-calibrated instruments, even with a careful collocation in time and space. The differences might be rather substantial, and need to be better understood and accounted for when merging data from many sensors. The possible causes for these differences come from instrumental bias, different satellite viewing geometries, calibration issues, dynamically changing atmospheric and the surface conditions, and other "regressors", resulting in random and systematic errors in the final aerosol products. In this study, we will concentrate on the subject of removing biases and the systematic errors from MODIS (both Terra and Aqua) aerosol product, using Machine Learning algorithms. While we are assessing our regressors in our system when comparing global aerosol products, the Aerosol Robotic Network of sun-photometers (AERONET) will be used as a baseline for evaluating the MODIS aerosol products (Dark Target for land and ocean, and Deep Blue retrieval algorithms). The results of bias adjustment for MODIS Terra and Aqua are planned to be incorporated into the AeroStat Giovanni as part of the NASA ACCESS funded AeroStat project.

  7. A merged aerosol dataset based on MODIS and MISR Aerosol Optical Depth products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj K.; Gautam, Ritesh; Venkatachalam, Parvatham

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products available from MODIS and MISR observations are widely used for aerosol characterization, and global/environmental change studies. These products are based on different retrieval-algorithms, resolutions, sampling, and cloud-screening schemes, which have led to global/regional biases. Thus a merged product is desirable which bridges this gap by utilizing strengths from each of the sensors. In view of this, we have developed a "merged" AOD product based on MODIS and MISR AOD datasets, using Bayesian principles which takes error distributions from ground-based AOD measurements (from AERONET). Our methodology and resulting dataset are especially relevant in the scenario of combining multi-sensor retrievals for satellite-based climate data records; particularly for long-term studies involving AOD. Specifically for MISR AOD product, we also developed a methodology to produce a gap-filled dataset, using geostatistical methods (e.g. Kriging), taking advantage of available MODIS data. Merged and spatially-complete AOD datasets are inter-compared with other satellite products and with AERONET data at three stations- Kanpur, Jaipur and Gandhi College, in the Indo-Gangetic Plains. The RMSE of merged AOD (0.08-0.09) is lower than MISR (0.11-0.20) and MODIS (0.15-0.27). It is found that merged AOD has higher correlation with AERONET data (r within 0.92-0.95), compared to MISR (0.74-0.86) and MODIS (0.69-0.84) data. In terms of Expected Error, the accuracy of valid merged AOD is found to be superior as percent of merged AOD within error envelope are larger (71-92%), compared to MISR (43-61%) and MODIS (50-70%).

  8. Relationship between wind speed and aerosol optical depth over remote ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Grainger

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wind speed on aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm over remote ocean regions is investigated. Remote ocean regions are defined by the combination of AOD from satellite observation and wind direction from ECMWF. According to our definition, many oceanic regions cannot be taken as remote ocean regions due to long-range transportation of aerosols from continents. Highly correlated linear relationships are found in remote ocean regions with a wind speed range of 4–20 ms−1. The enhancement of AOD at high wind speed is explained as the increase of sea salt aerosol production.

  9. Empirical Relationship between particulate matter and Aerosol Optical Depth over Northern Tien-Shan, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements were obtained at two sites in northern Tien-Shan in Central Asia during a 1-year period beginning July 2008 to examine the statistical relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and of fine [PM2.5, particles less than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (AD)] and coars...

  10. Spatiotemporal variability and contribution of different aerosol types to the aerosol optical depth over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Alexandri, Georgia; Kourtidis, Konstantinos A.; Lelieveld, Jos; Zanis, Prodromos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Levy, Robert; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Tsikerdekis, Athanasios

    2016-11-01

    This study characterizes the spatiotemporal variability and relative contribution of different types of aerosols to the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Eastern Mediterranean as derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra (March 2000-December 2012) and Aqua (July 2002-December 2012) satellite instruments. For this purpose, a 0.1° × 0.1° gridded MODIS dataset was compiled and validated against sun photometric observations from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The high spatial resolution and long temporal coverage of the dataset allows for the determination of local hot spots like megacities, medium-sized cities, industrial zones and power plant complexes, seasonal variabilities and decadal averages. The average AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) for the entire region is ˜ 0.22 ± 0.19, with maximum values in summer and seasonal variabilities that can be attributed to precipitation, photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols, transport of pollution and smoke from biomass burning in central and eastern Europe and transport of dust from the Sahara and the Middle East. The MODIS data were analyzed together with data from other satellite sensors, reanalysis projects and a chemistry-aerosol-transport model using an optimized algorithm tailored for the region and capable of estimating the contribution of different aerosol types to the total AOD550. The spatial and temporal variability of anthropogenic, dust and fine-mode natural aerosols over land and anthropogenic, dust and marine aerosols over the sea is examined. The relative contribution of the different aerosol types to the total AOD550 exhibits a low/high seasonal variability over land/sea areas, respectively. Overall, anthropogenic aerosols, dust and fine-mode natural aerosols account for ˜ 51, ˜ 34 and ˜ 15 % of the total AOD550 over land, while, anthropogenic aerosols, dust and marine aerosols account ˜ 40, ˜ 34 and ˜ 26 % of the total AOD550 over the sea, based on

  11. Studies of aerosol optical depth with use of Microtops sun photometers and MODIS detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Przemyslaw; Zawadzka, Olga; Markowicz, Krzystof M.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Strzalkowska, Agata; Rozwadowska, Anna; Gutowska, Dorota

    2013-04-01

    We would like to describe the results of a research campaign aimed at the studies of aerosol optical properties in the regions of the open Baltic Sea as well as coastal areas. During the campaign we carried out simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth at 4 stations with use of the hand-held Microtops II sunphotometers. The studies were complemented with the MODIS aerosol data. In order to obtain the full picture of the aerosol situation over the study area we added air mass back-trajectories at various altitudes and wind fields. Such complex information facilitated the proper conclusions regarding aerosol optical depth and Angstroem exponent for the four locations and discussion of the changes of aerosol properties with distance and meteorological factors. We show that Microtops II sunphotometers are reliable instruments for field campaigns. They are easy to operate and provide good quality results. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09.

  12. Measurements and estimation of the columnar optical depth of tropospheric aerosols in the UV spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Cachorro

    Full Text Available We report values of the columnar tropospheric aerosol optical depth at UV wavelengths based on experimental measurements of the direct spectral irradiances carried out by a commercial spectroradiometer (Li1800 of Licor company covering the range from 300–1100 nm at two stations with different climate characteristics in Spain. The first station is located in a rural site in north central Spain with continental climate. The data extend from March to the end of October of 1995. The other station is a coastal site in the Gulf of Cádiz (southwest Spain of maritime climate type. This study is mainly focused on the capability of estimating aerosol optical depth values in the UV region based on the extracted information in the visible and near infrared ranges. A first method has been used based on the Ångström turbidity parameters. However, since this method requires detailed spectral information, a second method has also been used, based on the correlation between wavelengths. A correlation has been established between the experimental aerosol optical depth values at 350 nm and 500 nm wavelengths. Although the type of aerosol seems to be the key factor that determines the quality of these estimations, the evaluation of the associated error is necessary to know the behaviour of these estimations in each area of study.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; transmission and scattering of radiation; troposphere – composition and chemistry

  13. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Bias Adjustment Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Arif; Wei, Jennifer; Petrenko, Maksym; Lary, David; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the earth atmosphere and its surface changes, satellite based instruments collect continuous data. While some of the data is directly used, some others such as aerosol properties are indirectly retrieved from the observation data. While retrieved variables (RV) form very powerful products, they don't come without obstacles. Different satellite viewing geometries, calibration issues, dynamically changing atmospheric and earth surface conditions, together with complex interactions between observed entities and their environment affect them greatly. This results in random and systematic errors in the final products.

  14. An analysis of the collection 5 MODIS over-ocean aerosol optical depth product for its implication in aerosol assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to our previous use of the collection 4 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS over-ocean aerosol optical depth (AOD data, we examined ten years of Terra and eight years of Aqua collection 5 data for its potential usage in aerosol assimilation. Uncertainties in the over-ocean MODIS AOD were studied as functions of observing conditions, such as surface characteristics, aerosol optical properties, and cloud artifacts. Empirical corrections and quality assurance procedures were developed and compared to collection 4 data. After applying these procedures, the Root-Mean-Square-Error (RMSE in the MODIS Terra and Aqua AOD are reduced by 30% and 10–20%, respectively, with respect to AERONET data. Ten years of Terra and eight years of Aqua quality-assured level 3 MODIS over-ocean aerosol products were produced. The newly developed MODIS over-ocean aerosol products will be used in operational aerosol assimilation and aerosol climatology studies, as well as other research based on MODIS products.

  15. CALIOP and AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth Comparisons: One Size Fits None

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, A. H.; Winker, D. M.; Tackett, J. L.; Giles, D. M.; Kar, J.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M. A.; Powell, K. A.; Trepte, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the aerosol optical depths (AOD) retrieved from backscatter measurements of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite with coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. Overpass coincidence criteria of +/- 2 h and within a 40 km radius are satisfied at least once at 149 globally distributed AERONET sites from 2006 to 2010. Most data pairs (>80%) use AERONET measurements acquired +/- 30 min of the overpass. We examine the differences in AOD estimates between CALIOP and AERONET for various aerosol, environmental, and geographic conditions. Results show CALIOP AOD are lower than AERONET AOD especially at low optical depths as measured by AERONET (500 nm AOD0.1. Differences in AOD between CALIOP and AERONET are possibly due to cloud contamination, scene inhomogeneity, instrument view angle differences, CALIOP retrieval errors, and detection limits. Comparison of daytime to nighttime number of 5 km 60m (60m in the vertical) features detected by CALIOP show that there are 20% more aerosol features at night. We find that CALIPSO and AERONET do not agree on the cloudiness of scenes. Of the scenes that meet the above coincidence criteria, CALIPSO finds clouds in more than 45% of the coincident atmospheric columns AERONET classifies as clear.

  16. Observationally-constrained estimates of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over East Asia via data assimilation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Not only aerosol's direct effect on climate by scattering and absorbing the incident solar radiation, but also they indirectly perturbs the radiation budget by influencing microphysics and dynamics of clouds. Aerosols also have a significant adverse impact on human health. With an importance of aerosols in climate, considerable research efforts have been made to quantify the amount of aerosols in the form of the aerosol optical depth (AOD). AOD is provided with ground-based aerosol networks such as the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), and is derived from satellite measurements. However, these observational datasets have a limited areal and temporal coverage. To compensate for the data gaps, there have been several studies to provide AOD without data gaps by assimilating observational data and model outputs. In this study, AODs over East Asia simulated with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) observation are interpolated via different data assimilation (DA) techniques such as Cressman's method, Optimal Interpolation (OI), and Kriging for the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March - May 2012). Here, the interpolated results using the three DA techniques are validated intensively by comparing with AERONET AODs to examine the optimal DA method providing the most reliable AODs over East Asia.

  17. Smartphone-Based Android app for Determining UVA Aerosol Optical Depth and Direct Solar Irradiances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, Damien P; Parisi, Alfio; Carter, Brad

    2014-01-01

    This research describes the development and evaluation of the accuracy and precision of an Android app specifically designed, written and installed on a smartphone for detecting and quantifying incident solar UVA radiation and subsequently, aerosol optical depth at 340 and 380 nm. Earlier studies demonstrated that a smartphone image sensor can detect UVA radiation and the responsivity can be calibrated to measured direct solar irradiance. This current research provides the data collection, calibration, processing, calculations and display all on a smartphone. A very strong coefficient of determination of 0.98 was achieved when the digital response was recalibrated and compared to the Microtops sun photometer direct UVA irradiance observations. The mean percentage discrepancy for derived direct solar irradiance was only 4% and 6% for observations at 380 and 340 nm, respectively, lessening with decreasing solar zenith angle. An 8% mean percent difference discrepancy was observed when comparing aerosol optical depth, also decreasing as solar zenith angle decreases. The results indicate that a specifically designed Android app linking and using a smartphone image sensor, calendar and clock, with additional external narrow bandpass and neutral density filters can be used as a field sensor to evaluate both direct solar UVA irradiance and low aerosol optical depths for areas with low aerosol loads.

  18. Measurements and estimation of the columnar optical depth of tropospheric aerosols in the UV spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachorro, V.E.; Vergaz, R.; Martin, M.J.; Frutos, A.M. de [Grupo de Optica Atmosferica, Univ. de Valladolid (GOA-UVA), Valladolid (Spain); Vilaplana, J.M.; Morena, B. de la [Estacion de Sondeos Atmosfericos ESAT ' ' El Arenosillo' ' , INTA, Huelva (Spain)

    2002-04-01

    We report values of the columnar tropospheric aerosol optical depth at UV wavelengths based on experimental measurements of the direct spectral irradiances carried out by a commercial spectroradiometer (Li1800 of Licor company) covering the range from 300-1100 nm at two stations with different climate characteristics in Spain. The first station is located in a rural site in north central Spain with continental climate. The data extend from March to the end of October of 1995. The other station is a coastal site in the Gulf of Cadiz (southwest Spain) of maritime climate type. This study is mainly focused on the capability of estimating aerosol optical depth values in the UV region based on the extracted information in the visible and near infrared ranges. A first method has been used based on the Aangstroem turbidity parameters. However, since this method requires detailed spectral information, a second method has also been used, based on the correlation between wavelengths. A correlation has been established between the experimental aerosol optical depth values at 350 nm and 500 nm wavelengths. Although the type of aerosol seems to be the key factor that determines the quality of these estimations, the evaluation of the associated error is necessary to know the behavior of these estimations in each area of study. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of aerosol optical depth evaluation in polar regions and associated uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ortiz de Galisteo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some available processing algorithms used to calculate the aerosol optical depth from radiometric measurements were tested. The aim was to evaluate the associated uncertainties in polar regions due to the data processing, in order to adjust the methodology of the calculation and illustrate the importance of these error sources. The measurements were obtained during a sun photometer campaign in Ny-Ålesund within the framework of the POLAR-AOD project.

  20. Observations of rapid aerosol optical depth enhancements in the vicinity of polluted cumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Arola, A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Crumeyrolle, S. N.; Berkoff, T. A.; Welton, E. J.; Lolli, S.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Anderson, B. E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Minnis, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Loughner, C. P.; Smirnov, A.; Sinyuk, A.

    2014-11-01

    During the July 2011 Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field experiment in Maryland, significant enhancements in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometer measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) were observed in the immediate vicinity of non-precipitating cumulus clouds on some days. Both measured Ångström exponents and aerosol size distribution retrievals made before, during and after cumulus development often suggest little change in fine mode particle size; therefore, implying possible new particle formation in addition to cloud processing and humidification of existing particles. In addition to sun-sky radiometer measurements of large enhancements of fine mode AOD, lidar measurements made from both ground-based and aircraft-based instruments during the experiment also measured large increases in aerosol signal at altitudes associated with the presence of fair weather cumulus clouds. These data show modifications of the aerosol vertical profile as a result of the aerosol enhancements at and below cloud altitudes. The airborne lidar data were utilized to estimate the spatial extent of these aerosol enhancements, finding increased AOD, backscatter and extinction out to 2.5 km distance from the cloud edge. Furthermore, in situ measurements made from aircraft vertical profiles over an AERONET site during the experiment also showed large increases in aerosol scattering and aerosol volume after cloud formation as compared to before. The 15-year AERONET database of AOD measurements at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Maryland site, was investigated in order to obtain a climatological perspective of this phenomenon of AOD enhancement. Analysis of the diurnal cycle of AOD in summer showed significant increases in AOD from morning to late afternoon, corresponding to the diurnal cycle of cumulus development.

  1. Preliminary investigations toward nighttime aerosol optical depth retrievals from the VIIRS day/night band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A great need exists for reliable nighttime aerosol products at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this concept demonstration study, using Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB observations on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP satellite, a new method is proposed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical depth (τ using the contrast between regions with and without artificial surface lights. Evaluation of the retrieved τ values against daytime AERONET data from before and after the overpass of the VIIRS satellite over the Cape Verde, Grand Forks, and Alta Floresta AERONET stations yields a coefficient of determination (r2 of 0.71. This study suggests that the VIIRS DNB has the potential to provide useful nighttime aerosol detection and property retrievals.

  2. Automated Solar Tracking Spectrophotometer for Remote Sensing of Column Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater, B.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Karr, D.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere are poorly understood in terms of how they affect weather and climate. In an effort to advance this knowledge, an automated solar tracking spectrophotometer has been constructed to measure direct solar radiation from the ultraviolet to infrared. This instrument facilitates determination of solar irradiance, precipitable water, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and the Ångström turbidity exponent related to aerosol size distribution. Measurements with a CIMEL CE-318 sun photometer (part of the global NASA AERONET network) and a manual solar spectrophotometer are being used to evaluate the accuracy of our instrument. Upon successful evaluation, this instrument will provide a basis for research into spectral information that will supplement CIMEL measurements. Presented is the design of this instrument and measurement comparisons with the aforementioned instruments for the air above Reno, Nevada, USA.

  3. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Ma, Yaoming; You, Chao; Zhu, Zhikun

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35°N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  4. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K.  Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  5. Estimation of aerosol optical depth at different wavelengths by multiple regression method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fuyi; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Holben, Brent

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to investigate and establish a suitable model that can help to estimate aerosol optical depth (AOD) in order to monitor aerosol variations especially during non-retrieval time. The relationship between actual ground measurements (such as air pollution index, visibility, relative humidity, temperature, and pressure) and AOD obtained with a CIMEL sun photometer was determined through a series of statistical procedures to produce an AOD prediction model with reasonable accuracy. The AOD prediction model calibrated for each wavelength has a set of coefficients. The model was validated using a set of statistical tests. The validated model was then employed to calculate AOD at different wavelengths. The results show that the proposed model successfully predicted AOD at each studied wavelength ranging from 340 nm to 1020 nm. To illustrate the application of the model, the aerosol size determined using measure AOD data for Penang was compared with that determined using the model. This was done by examining the curvature in the ln [AOD]-ln [wavelength] plot. Consistency was obtained when it was concluded that Penang was dominated by fine mode aerosol in 2012 and 2013 using both measured and predicted AOD data. These results indicate that the proposed AOD prediction model using routine measurements as input is a promising tool for the regular monitoring of aerosol variation during non-retrieval time.

  6. Total Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depths and Implications for Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, D. A.; Solomon, S.; Barnes, J. E.; Burlakov, V. D.; Deshler, T.; Dolgii, S. I.; Herber, A. B.; Nagai, T.; Neely, R. R., III; Nevzorov, A. V.; Ritter, C.; Sakai, T.; Santer, B. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, A.; Uchino, O.; Vernier, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cooling effect of recent volcanoes is of particular interest in the context of the post-2000 slowing of the rate of global warming. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth above 15 km have demonstrated that small-magnitude volcanic eruptions substantially perturb incoming solar radiation. Here we use lidar, Aerosol Robotic Network, and balloon-borne observations to provide evidence that currently available satellite databases neglect substantial amounts of volcanic aerosol between the tropopause and 15 km at middle to high latitudes and therefore underestimate total radiative forcing resulting from the recent eruptions. Incorporating these estimates into a simple climate model, we determine the global volcanic aerosol forcing since 2000 to be 0.19 +/- 0.09W/sq m. This translates into an estimated global cooling of 0.05 to 0.12 C. We conclude that recent volcanic events are responsible for more post-2000 cooling than is implied by satellite databases that neglect volcanic aerosol effects below 15 km.

  7. AERONET-based microphysical and optical properties of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-09-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad ''families'' of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA ∼0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA ∼0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA ∼0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysical/optical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  8. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Naeger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT aerosol optical depth (AOD product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15 and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2 to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  9. Ground-based aerosol optical depth inter-comparison campaigns at European EUSAAR super-sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyeki, S.; Gröbner, J.; Wehrli, C.

    2013-05-01

    This work summarizes eight aerosol optical depth (AOD) inter-comparison campaigns conducted during the 2008-2011 period. A PFR (precision filter radiometer) travelling standard from the GAW-PFR network (based at PMOD/WRC, Switzerland) was run alongside existing CIMEL sun-photometers from the PHOTONS/AERONET network located at European stations. Basic statistical analysis of coincident measurements at λ = 500 and 862 nm illustrated good agreement. However, when WMO criteria for traceability were applied only one wavelength at three stations was traceable. Other stations were close to being traceable but had slight issues with window cleanliness and calibration.

  10. Intercomparison of aerosol optical depth from Brewer ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficient are above 0.83. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower.

  11. Comparing mesoscale chemistry-transport model and remote-sensed Aerosol Optical Depth

    CERN Document Server

    Carnevale, C; Pisoni, E; Volta, M

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of modeled and observed Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is presented. 3D Eulerian multiphase chemistry-transport model TCAM is employed for simulating AOD at mesoscale. MODIS satellite sensor and AERONET photometer AOD are used for comparing spatial patterns and temporal timeseries. TCAM simulations for year 2004 over a domain containing Po-Valley and nearly whole Northern Italy are employed. For the computation of AOD, a configuration of external mixing of the chemical species is considered. Furthermore, a parametrization of the effect of moisture affecting both aerosol size and composition is used. An analysis of the contributions of the granulometric classes to the extinction coefficient reveals the dominant role of the inorganic compounds of submicron size. For the analysis of spatial patterns, summer and winter case study are considered. TCAM AOD reproduces spatial patterns similar to those retrieved from space, but AOD values are generally smaller by an order of magnitude. However, accounting a...

  12. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992–2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, Joseph; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor; Hodges, Gary; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2010-04-13

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month-by-month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

  13. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Schwartz, S.; Denn, F.; Flynn, C.; Hodges, G.; Kiedron, P.; Koontz, A.; Schlemmer, J., and Schwartz, S. E

    2010-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloud-screening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun's elevation is greater than 9.25{sup o}. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month-by-month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

  14. Aerosol optical depth under "clear" sky conditions derived from sea surface reflection of lidar signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Hu, Yongxiang; Huang, Jian Ping; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-12-26

    There are considerable demands for accurate atmospheric correction of satellite observations of the sea surface or subsurface signal. Surface and sub-surface reflection under "clear" atmospheric conditions can be used to study atmospheric correction for the simplest possible situation. Here "clear" sky means a cloud-free atmosphere with sufficiently small aerosol particles. The "clear" aerosol concept is defined according to the spectral dependence of the scattering cross section on particle size. A 5-year combined CALIPSO and AMSR-E data set was used to derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the lidar signal reflected from the sea surface. Compared with the traditional lidar-retrieved AOD, which relies on lidar backscattering measurements and an assumed lidar ratio, the AOD retrieved through the surface reflectance method depends on both scattering and absorption because it is based on two-way attenuation of the lidar signal transmitted to and then reflected from the surface. The results show that the clear sky AOD derived from the surface signal agrees with the clear sky AOD available in the CALIPSO level 2 database in the westerly wind belt located in the southern hemisphere, but yields significantly higher aerosol loadings in the tropics and in the northern hemisphere.

  15. Multiple regression method to determine aerosol optical depth in atmospheric column in Penang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Zubir Matjafri, M.; Holben, B.

    2014-02-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) from AERONET data has a very fine resolution but air pollution index (API), visibility and relative humidity from the ground truth measurements are coarse. To obtain the local AOD in the atmosphere, the relationship between these three parameters was determined using multiple regression analysis. The data of southwest monsoon period (August to September, 2012) taken in Penang, Malaysia, was used to establish a quantitative relationship in which the AOD is modeled as a function of API, relative humidity, and visibility. The highest correlated model was used to predict AOD values during southwest monsoon period. When aerosol is not uniformly distributed in the atmosphere then the predicted AOD can be highly deviated from the measured values. Therefore these deviated data can be removed by comparing between the predicted AOD values and the actual AERONET data which help to investigate whether the non uniform source of the aerosol is from the ground surface or from higher altitude level. This model can accurately predict AOD if only the aerosol is uniformly distributed in the atmosphere. However, further study is needed to determine this model is suitable to use for AOD predicting not only in Penang, but also other state in Malaysia or even global.

  16. Improving Calculation Accuracies of Accumulation-Mode Fractions Based on Spectral of Aerosol Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zhang; Zhengqiang, Li; Yan, Wang

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are released into the atmosphere, which cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation, thus exerting a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. Anthropogenic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) calculations are important in the research of climate changes. Accumulation-Mode Fractions (AMFs) as an anthropogenic aerosol parameter, which are the fractions of AODs between the particulates with diameters smaller than 1μm and total particulates, could be calculated by AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm, and then the anthropogenic AODs are obtained using AMFs. In this study, we present a parameterization method coupled with an AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm to calculate AMFs in Beijing over 2011. All of data are derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) website. The parameterization method is used to improve the accuracies of AMFs compared with constant truncation radius method. We find a good correlation using parameterization method with the square relation coefficient of 0.96, and mean deviation of AMFs is 0.028. The parameterization method could also effectively solve AMF underestimate in winter. It is suggested that the variations of Angstrom indexes in coarse mode have significant impacts on AMF inversions.

  17. Aerosol data assimilation in the chemical transport model MOCAGE during the TRAQA/ChArMEx campaign: aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sič, Bojan; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Piacentini, Andrea; Marécal, Virginie; Emili, Emanuele; Cariolle, Daniel; Prather, Michael; Attié, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we describe the development of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) assimilation module in the chemistry transport model (CTM) MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle). Our goal is to assimilate the spatially averaged 2-D column AOD data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, and to estimate improvements in a 3-D CTM assimilation run compared to a direct model run. Our assimilation system uses 3-D-FGAT (first guess at appropriate time) as an assimilation method and the total 3-D aerosol concentration as a control variable. In order to have an extensive validation dataset, we carried out our experiment in the northern summer of 2012 when the pre-ChArMEx (CHemistry and AeRosol MEditerranean EXperiment) field campaign TRAQA (TRAnsport à longue distance et Qualité de l'Air dans le bassin méditerranéen) took place in the western Mediterranean basin. The assimilated model run is evaluated independently against a range of aerosol properties (2-D and 3-D) measured by in situ instruments (the TRAQA size-resolved balloon and aircraft measurements), the satellite Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instrument and ground-based instruments from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) network. The evaluation demonstrates that the AOD assimilation greatly improves aerosol representation in the model. For example, the comparison of the direct and the assimilated model run with AERONET data shows that the assimilation increased the correlation (from 0.74 to 0.88), and reduced the bias (from 0.050 to 0.006) and the root mean square error in the AOD (from 0.12 to 0.07). When compared to the 3-D concentration data obtained by the in situ aircraft and balloon measurements, the assimilation consistently improves the model output. The best results as expected occur when the shape of the vertical profile is correctly simulated by the direct model. We

  18. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Gupta, Pawan; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2016-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean, in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America as the frequent geostationary observations lead to a greater coverage of cloud-free AOD retrievals equatorward of about 35° N, while the polar-orbiting satellites provide a greater coverage of AOD poleward of 35° N. However, we note several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the GOES-15 and MTSAT-2 retrieval algorithms can introduce significant uncertainties into the new product.

  19. Annual cycle of global distributions of aerosol optical depth from integration of MODIS retrievals and GOCART model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Dickinson, R. E.; Chin, M.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Holben, B. N.; Geogdzhayev, I. V.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2003-02-01

    The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to study aerosols from space with high accuracy and on a nearly global scale. However, difficulty with highly reflective arid and snow-covered lands introduces significant gaps in global or regional coverage that must be filled by some other means. This study provides a complete global coverage of an annual cycle of aerosol optical depth by combining the MODIS retrievals and Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) simulations weighted with the uncertainties in each product. The assimilated aerosol optical depths over land are better correlated with the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements than are either the MODIS retrievals or the GOCART simulations alone. The gaps in the MODIS retrievals are filled with values that are generally consistent with the AERONET aerosol climatology. The assimilated aerosol optical depths are in good agreement with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol climatology over the Atlantic and North Indian Oceans. In spring, large discrepancies between the MODIS retrievals in 2001 and the AVHRR climatology over the North Pacific are likely a result of extremely active transcontinental transport of Asian dust/pollutants to North America in the year 2001. Large model-satellite differences in the South Pacific and South Indian Oceans may be attributable to missing or underestimated sources in the model and/or cloud, whitecap, and glint contamination in satellite retrievals.

  20. Aerosol optical depth in a western Mediterranean site: An assessment of different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Romero, A.; González, J. A.; Calbó, J.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; Michalsky, J.

    2016-06-01

    Column aerosol optical properties were derived from multifilter rotating shadowing radiometer (MFRSR) observations carried out at Girona (northeast Spain) from June 2012 to June 2014. We used a technique that allows estimating simultaneously aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) at high time-resolution. For the period studied, mean AOD at 500 nm was 0.14, with a noticeable seasonal pattern, i.e. maximum in summer and minimum in winter. Mean AE from 500 to 870 nm was 1.2 with a strong day-to-day variation and slightly higher values in summer. So, the summer increase in AOD seems to be linked with an enhancement in the number of fine particles. A radiative closure experiment, using the SMARTS2 model, was performed to confirm that the MFRSR-retrieved aerosol optical properties appropriately represent the continuously varying atmospheric conditions in Girona. Thus, the calculated broadband values of the direct flux show a mean absolute difference of less than 5.9 W m- 2 (0.77%) and R = 0.99 when compared to the observed fluxes. The sensitivity of the achieved closure to uncertainties in AOD and AE was also examined. We use this MFRSR-based dataset as a reference for other ground-based and satellite measurements that might be used to assess the aerosol properties at this site. First, we used observations obtained from a 100 km away AERONET station; despite a general similar behavior when compared with the in-situ MFRSR observations, certain discrepancies for AOD estimates in the different channels (R < 0.84 and slope < 1) appear. Second, AOD products from MISR and MODIS satellite observations were compared with our ground-based retrievals. Reasonable agreements are found for the MISR product (R = 0.92), with somewhat poorer agreement for the MODIS product (R = 0.70). Finally, we apply all these methods to study in detail the aerosol properties during two singular aerosol events related to a forest fire and a desert dust intrusion.

  1. Modeling South America regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and shortwave surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, N. E.; Longo, K. M.; Freitas, S. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Fonseca, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD) and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS). Measurements of AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET) were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon Basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon Basin the model systematically underestimated AOD. This is likely due to the cloudy nature of the region, preventing accurate detection of the fire spots used in the emission model. Moreover, measured AOD were very often close to background conditions and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Therefore, under the background scenario, one would expect the model to underestimate AOD. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon and cerrado is also discussed in the context of emission shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the model and observations decreased from 0.48 to 0.17 when extreme AOD events (AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0) and Cuiabá were excluded from analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extremes AOD were excluded. This highlights the need to improve the modelling of the regional smoke plume in order to enhance the accuracy of the radiative energy budget. Aerosol optical model based on the mean intensive properties of smoke from the southern part of the

  2. Trends in aerosol optical depth in northern China retrieved from sunshine duration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Liu, Run; Liu, Shaw Chen; Shiu, Chein-Jung; Wang, Jingli; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-01-01

    A new method has been developed to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from sunshine duration (SSD). Retrieved AODs from SSD at the six stations in northern China in 2003-2005 agree reasonably well with AODs retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer observations near the six stations. Values and trends in AOD retrieved from SSD in Beijing and Tianjin in the period 1961-2005 also agree with those retrieved from solar radiation and visibility. These agreements allow the retrieval of credible upper and lower limits for anthropogenic AODs from SSD at the six stations during 1961-2005. The trends in anthropogenic AODs are approximately a factor of 3 to 5 lower than the trends in emissions of gas-phase precursors of aerosols in 1973-2005, implying a significant sublinear relationship between the level of aerosols and emissions of their gas phase precursors. This finding has important implications for formulating a control strategy for PM2.5 or haze pollution in northern China.

  3. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth retrieval over land considering surface BRDF effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere play an important role in the climate system and human health. Retrieval from satellite data, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), one of most important indices of aerosol optical properties, has been extensively investigated. Benefiting from the high resolution at spatial and temporal and the maturity of the aerosol retrieval algorithm, MOderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Dark Target AOD product has been extensively applied in other scientific research such as climate change and air pollution. The latest product - MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target AOD (C6_DT) has been released. However, the accuracy of C6_DT AOD (global mean ±0.03) over land is still too low for the constraint on radiative forcing in the climate system, where the uncertainty should be reduced to ±0.02. The major uncertainty mainly lies on the underestimation/overestimation of the surface contribution to the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) radiance since a lambertian surface is assumed in the C6_DT land algorithm. In the real world, it requires considering the heterogeneity of the surface reflection in the radiative transfer process. Based on this, we developed a new algorithm to retrieve AOD by considering surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effects. The surface BRDF is much more complicated than isotropic reflection, described as 4 elements: directional-directional, directional-hemispherical, hemispherical-directional and hemispherical-hemispherical reflectance, and coupled into radiative transfer equation to generate an accurate top of atmosphere reflectance. The limited MODIS measurements (three channels available) allow us to retrieve only three parameters, which including AOD, the surface directional-directional reflectance and fine aerosol ratio η. The other three elements of the surface reflectance are expected to be constrained by ancillary data and assumptions or "a priori" information since there are more unknowns than MODIS

  4. A consistent aerosol optical depth (AOD) dataset over mainland China by integration of several AOD products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Guang, J.; Xue, Y.; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Che, Y. H.; Guo, Jianping; He, X. W.; Wang, T. K.

    2015-08-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provide validated aerosol optical depth (AOD) products over both land and ocean. However, the values of the AOD provided by each of these satellites may show spatial and temporal differences due to the instrument characteristics and aerosol retrieval algorithms used for each instrument. In this article we present a method to produce an AOD data set over Asia for the year 2007 based on fusion of the data provided by different instruments and/or algorithms. First, the bias of each satellite-derived AOD product was calculated by comparison with ground-based AOD data derived from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET) for different values of the surface albedo and the AOD. Then, these multiple AOD products were combined using the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) method using weights derived from the root mean square error (RMSE) associated with the accuracies of the original AOD products. The original and merged AOD dataset has been validated by comparison with AOD data from the CARSNET. Results show that the mean bias error (MBE) and mean absolute error (MAE) of the merged AOD dataset are not larger than that of any of the original AOD products. In addition, for the merged AOD dataset the fraction of pixels with no data is significantly smaller than that of any of the original products, thus increasing the spatial coverage. The fraction of retrievable area is about 50% for the merged AOD dataset and between 5% and 20% for the MISR, SeaWiFS, MODIS-DT and MODIS-DB algorithms.

  5. MODIS 3 km and 10 km aerosol optical depth for China: Evaluation and comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingqing; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Bo; Tong, Xuelian

    2017-03-01

    The recently released Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Collection 6 introduced a fine scale aerosol optical depth (AOD) distribution, the 3 km product, which is expected to perform well in analyzing aerosols and identifying local air pollution, especially in the severely polluted atmosphere of China. However, few detailed evaluations of regional variations have been conducted. In this paper, we evaluate MODIS 3 km and 10 km AOD products for China against ground-based measurements and compare their performance with respect to spatial and temporal variations. The ground validations indicate that the two products are generally correlated well to ground-based observations. Spatially, the 3 km product slightly outperform the 10 km product in well-developed areas of southern China. Temporally, both products perform worse during spring and summer. Atmospheric clouds and underlying surface are two key factors that influence the accuracy and number of retrievals for both products. The comparison analysis reveals the newly introduced AOD product clearly shows good relationships with the coarse resolution retrievals in spatial and temporal variation but significant differences regarding details. The 3 km AOD product provides better aerosol gradients, more retrievals in bare areas of western China and some spikes of diurnal variation in cloudy days. Seasonal comparisons show the 3 km AOD product is higher than the 10 km product in all seasons, especially during spring and summer. Although the 3 km product for China generally performs slightly worse than the 10 km product, the added information of the MODIS 3 km AOD product shows potential for studying local aerosol characterization, and may facilitate studies of air pollution.

  6. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (2 (−40 % and ammonia (+38 % from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  7. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth in the visible range with a Brewer spectrophotometer in Athens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diémoz, Henri; Eleftheratos, Kostas; Kazadzis, Stelios; Amiridis, Vassilis; Zerefos, Christos S.

    2016-04-01

    A MkIV Brewer spectrophotometer has been operating in Athens since 2004. Direct-sun measurements originally scheduled for nitrogen dioxide retrievals were reprocessed to provide aerosol optical depths (AODs) at a wavelength of about 440 nm. A novel retrieval algorithm was specifically developed and the resulting AODs were compared to those obtained from a collocated Cimel filter radiometer belonging to the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The series are perfectly correlated, with Pearson's correlation coefficients being as large as 0.996 and with 90 % of AOD deviations between the two instruments being within the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) traceability limits. In order to reach such a high agreement, several instrumental factors impacting the quality of the Brewer retrievals must be taken into account, including sensitivity to the internal temperature, and the state of the external optics and pointing accuracy must be carefully checked. Furthermore, the long-term radiometric stability of the Brewer was investigated and the performances of in situ Langley extrapolations as a way to track the absolute calibration of the Brewer were assessed. Other sources of error, such as slight shifts of the wavelength scale, are discussed and some recommendations to Brewer operators are drawn. Although MkIV Brewers are rarely employed to retrieve AODs in the visible range, they represent a key source of information about aerosol changes in the past three decades and a potential worldwide network for present and future coordinated AOD measurements. Moreover, a better understanding of the AOD retrieval at visible wavelengths will also contribute in improving similar techniques in the more challenging UV range.

  8. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from Brewer Ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements at 320 nm and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer at 340 nm or 440 nm (shifted to 320 nm in using the Angström's law, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot Method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficients are above 0.82. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower. In applying the Angström's law the intercomparison is improved compared to previous study.

  9. Measurements of UV aerosol optical depth in the French Southern Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lenoble

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Routine measurements of global and diffuse UV irradiances at Briançon station (1310 m a.s.l. are used to retrieve the direct solar irradiance and the aerosol optical depth (AOD, for cloudless days. Data of three years (2003, 2004, 2005 are analyzed; the results confirm those of a preliminary analysis for 2001, 2002.

    The atmosphere is very clear in winter, with AODs between 0.05 and 0.1. The turbidity increases slowly in spring, starting end of February, with AODs around 0.2–0.3 in mid summer, some values reaching 0.4. A similar behaviour is observed for all years, with somewhat higher values in late summer for the year 2003.

  10. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  11. Long-term trend in aerosol optical depth from 1980 to 2001 in north China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangxia Xie; Xiangao Xia

    2008-01-01

    Using the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm data from 1980 to 2001 in north China, the spatial and temporal variations of AOD were examined. Seasonal AODs in Taldimakan Desert were 0.69 and 0.44 in spring and summer,respectively, which were mainly due to frequent occurrences of dust events in this region. Dust activities in spring also led to high aerosol loading in Gobi Desert and in northeast China where spring AODs were 0.33 and 0.29, respectively. Heavily impacted by events such as volcano eruption, forest fires and extraordinary dust storms, AODs showed large inter-annual variations. A decreasing tendency in AOD was observed in north China during 1980-1991, though a reverse tendency was revealed during 1997-2001, especially for spring AOD in northeast China. Further study is required to figure out how much human activities have contributed to the AOD tendency in north China.

  12. Comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) determined from UVMRP and AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Manyi; Liu, Chaoshun; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is critically important for a better understanding of how Earth's climate is radiatively forced. To compensate for the conventional satellite observations, several types of ground-based radiometers are operated by AOD measurement programs. This study compares the Bratts Lake climate station's long-term AOD measurements from 1999 to 2012 which are derived from two ground-based programs with high accuracy: the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program. The comparison shows that, in the 14-year period, the AOD values have an excellent agreement at six wavelengths (368, 415, 500, 610, 665, and 860 nm) with varying slopes (ranging from 0.95763 to 1.04089), intercepts (ranging from 0.0219 to 0.03945), correlation coefficients (R) (ranging from 0.82005 to 0.96155), and root mean square errors (RMSE) (ranging from 0.02639 to 0.03663). The correlations of both monthly and hourly averaged AOD measurements are highly consistent for each band. Specifically, the shorter (with larger AOD values) the wavelength is, the better the correlation is. Also, the results show that the peaks of relative errors generally occur in summer each year, and at noon each day. Our analyses suggest that AOD products derived from UVMRP are accurate and can serve as an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD measurements.

  13. High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Using Gaofen-1 WFV Camera Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD is crucial for urban air quality assessment. However, the frequently used moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS AOD product at 10 km resolution is too coarse to be applied in a regional-scale study. Gaofen-1 (GF-1 wide-field-of-view (WFV camera data, with high spatial and temporal resolution, has great potential in estimation of AOD. Due to the lack of shortwave infrared (SWIR band and complex surface reflectivity brought from high spatial resolution, it is difficult to retrieve AOD from GF-1 WFV data with traditional methods. In this paper, we propose an improved AOD retrieval algorithm for GF-1 WFV data. The retrieved AOD has a spatial resolution of 160 m and covers all land surface types. Significant improvements in the algorithm include: (1 adopting an improved clear sky composite method by using the MODIS AOD product to identify the clearest days and correct the background atmospheric effect; and (2 obtaining local aerosol models from long-term CIMEL sun-photometer measurements. Validation against MODIS AOD and ground measurements showed that the GF-1 WFV AOD has a good relationship with MODIS AOD (R2 = 0.66; RMSE = 0.27 and ground measurements (R2 = 0.80; RMSE = 0.25. Nevertheless, the proposed algorithm was found to overestimate AOD in some cases, which will need to be improved upon in future research.

  14. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land surfaces from AVHRR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mei

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR radiance data provide a global, long-term, consistent time series having high spectral and spatial resolution and thus being valuable for the retrieval of surface spectral reflectance, albedo and surface temperature. Long term time series of such data products are necessary for studies addressing climate change, sea ice distribution and movement, and ice sheet coastal configuration. These data have also been used to retrieve aerosol properties over ocean and land surfaces. However, the retrieval of aerosol over land and land surface albedo are challenging because of the information content of the measurement is limited and the inversion of these data products being ill defined. Solving the radiative transfer equations requires additional information and knowledge to reduce the number of unknowns. In this contribution we utilise an empirical linear relationship between the surface reflectances in the AVHRR channels at wavelengths of 3.75 μm and 2.1 μm, which has been identified in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Next, following the MODIS dark target approach, the surface reflectance at 0.64 μm was obtained. The comparison of the estimated surface reflectance at 0.64 μm with MODIS reflectance products (MOD09 shows a strong correlation (R = 0.7835. Once this was established, the MODIS "dark-target" aerosol retrieval method was adapted to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR data. A simplified Look-Up Table (LUT method, adopted from Bremen AErosol Retrieval (BAER algorithm, was used in the retrieval. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values retrieved from AVHRR with this method compare favourably with ground-based measurements, with a correlation coefficient R = 0.861 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 0.17. This method can be easily applied to other satellite instruments which do not have a 2.1 μm channel, such as those currently planned to

  15. Characteristics of atmospheric aerosol optical depth variation in China during 1993-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jinhuan; Xia, Xiangao; Sun, Ling; Min, Min

    2015-10-01

    The long-term variations of atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) over 14 first-class solar radiation stations in China during 1993-2012 are studied. The AOD at 750 nm wavelength is retrieved with the hourly accumulated direct solar radiation by using a broadband extinction method. The retrievals are validated in comparison with AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOD products. For the comparison with AERONET, the correlation coefficient (R), mean bias error (MBE) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the monthly mean AODs are respectively 0.848, 0.029 and 0.101. Based on the statistical analysis, the monthly, seasonal and annual AOD variation characteristics are categorized as follow: (1) There are three major types of the seasonal AOD variations, which shows the largest seasonal averaged AOD appearing in spring, summer and winter. The smallest seasonal averaged AOD appears mostly in autumn. (2) Beijing and Guangzhou show a significant decreasing trend of the yearly AOD, while an increasing tendency appears in Zhengzhou, Shanghai, Kunming, Kashi and Wuhan. Although no significant variation trends are found, some fluctuations appear in the 20-year period in other cities. (3) The 20-year mean AOD ranges from 0.135 (Lhasa) to 0.678 (Zhengzhou). The aerosol hygroscopic growth contributes a lot to AOD in major cities in the eastern part of China, while not in most cities in the western part. A simple correction method is applied for enhancing the relationship of AOD and PM2.5 concentration.

  16. Analysis of marine aerosol optical depth retrieved from IRS-P4 OCM sensor and comparison with the aerosol derived from SeaWiFS and MODIS sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mishra; V K Dadhwal; C B S Dutt

    2008-07-01

    Aerosol optical depth is regularly derived from SeaWiFS and MODIS sensor and used by the scientific community in various climatic studies. In the present study an attempt has been made to retrieve the aerosol optical depth using the IRS-P4 OCM sensor data and a comparison has been carried out using few representative datasets. The results show that the IRS-P4 OCM retrieved aerosol optical depth is in good agreement with the aerosols retrieved from SeaWiFS as well as MODIS. The RMSE are found to be ± 0.0522 between OCM and SeaWIFS and ± 0.0638 between OCM and MODIS respectively. However, IRS-P4 OCM sensor retrieved aerosol optical depth is closer to SeaWiFS (correlation = 0.88, slope = 0.96 and intercept = −0.013) compared to MODIS (correlation = 0.75, slope = 0.91 and intercept = 0.0198). The mean percentage difference indicates that OCM retrieved AOD is +12% higher compared to SeaWiFS and +8% higher compared to MODIS. The mean absolute percentage between OCM derived AOD and SeaWiFS is found to be less (16%) compared to OCM and MODIS (20%).

  17. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Ship, Aircraft and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, J. M.; Kapustin, V. N.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Covert, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We present analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements taken with a shipboard six-channel tracking sunphotometer during ACE-2. For 10 July 1997, results are also shown for measurements acquired 70 km from the ship with a fourteen-channel airborne tracking sunphotometer.

  18. Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, D. N.; Coulter, R. L.

    2013-07-01

    This paper focuses on climatology of the vertical distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD (z)) from micropulse lidar (MPL) observations for climatically different locations worldwide. For this, a large data set obtained by MPL systems operating at 532 nm during the 4 year period 2007-2010 was used to derive vertical profiles of AOD (z) by combining the corresponding AOD data as an input from an independent measurement using nearly colocated multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) systems at five different U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites—three permanent sites (SGP in north-central Oklahoma, at 36.6°N, 97.5°W, 320 m; TWP-Darwin in the tropical western Pacific, at 12.4°S, 130.9°E, 30 m; and NSA at Barrow on the North Slope of Alaska, at 71.3°N, 156.6°W, 8 m) and two mobile facility sites (GRW at Graciosa Island in the Azores, at 39°N, 28°W, 15 m; and FKB in the Black Forest of Germany, at 48.5°N, 8.4°E, 511 m). Therefore, amount of data used in this study is constrained by the availability of the MFRSR data. The MPL raw data were averaged for 30 s in time and 30 m in altitude. The diurnally averaged AOD (z) profiles from 4 years were combined to obtain a multiyear vertical profile of AOD (z) climatology at various ARM sites, including diurnal, day-to-day, and seasonal variabilities. Most aerosols were found to be confined to 0-2 km (approximately the planetary boundary layer region) at all sites; however, all sites exhibited measurable aerosols well above the mixed layer, with different height maxima. The entire data set demonstrates large day-to-day variability at all sites. However, there is no significant diurnal variation in AOD (z) at all sites. Significant interannual variability was observed at the SGP site. Clear seasonal variations in AOD (z) profiles exist for all five sites, but seasonal behavior was distinct. Moreover, the different seasonal variability for the lower level (0 to ~2

  19. Aerosol optical depth over central north Asia based on MODIS-Aqua data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousta Foutsi, Athina; Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Matsoukas, Christos; Biskos, George

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can affect the regional and global climate through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. To quantify these effects it is important to determine the aerosol load, and an effective way to do that is by measuring the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The central Asia region (mainly the Caspian and Aral sea basins), the arid and semi-arid regions of Western China as well as Siberia are of great interest due to the significant natural sources of mineral aerosols originating from local deserts and biomass burning from wildfires in boreal forests. What is of particular interest in the region is the phenomenal shrinking and desertification of the Aral Sea that drives an intense salt and dust transport from the exposed sea-bed to the surrounding regions with important implications in regional air quality. Anthropogenic particles are also observed due to fossil-fuel combustion occurring mainly at oil refineries in the Caspian Sea basin. Here we investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the AOD at 550 nm over central Asia, Siberia and western China, in the region located between 35° N - 65° N and 45° E - 110° E. For our analysis we use Level-3 daily MODIS - Aqua Dark Target - Deep Blue combined product, from the latest collection (006), available in a 1°×1° resolution (ca. 100 km × 100 km) over the period 2002-2014. Our results indicate a significant spatial variability of the aerosol load over the study region. The highest AODs are observed over the Aral Sea year-round, with extreme values reaching 2.1 during July. In the rest of our study region a clear seasonal cycle with highest AOD values (up to 1.2 over the Taklamakan Desert) during spring and summer is observed. The arid parts of central north Asia are characterized by larger aerosol loads during spring, lower but still high AOD in summer and much lower values in autumn and spring

  20. The regime of aerosol optical depth over Central Asia based on MODIS Aqua Deep Blue data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floutsi, Athina; KorrasCarraca, Marios; Matsoukas, Christos; Biskos, George

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can affect the regional and global climate through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. To quantify these effects it is therefore important to determine the aerosol load, and an effective way to do that is by measuring the aerosol optical depth (AOD). In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the AOD over the climatically sensitive region of Central Asia (36° N - 50° N, 46° E - 75° E), which has significant sources of both natural and anthropogenic particles. The primary source of anthropogenic particles is fossil fuel combustion occurring mainly at oil refineries in the Caspian Sea basin. Natural particles originate mostly from the two deserts in the region (namely Kara-Kum and Kyzyl-Kum), where persistent dust activity is observed. Another source is the Aral Sea region, which due to its phenomenal desertification also drives an intense salt and dust transport from the exposed sea-bed to the surrounding regions. This transport is of particular interest because of health-hazardous materials contained in the Aral Sea sea-bed. For our analysis we use Level-3 daily MODIS - Aqua Dark Target - Deep Blue combined product, from the latest MODIS collection (006), available in 1° x 1° resolution (about 100 km x 100 km) over the period 2002-2014.Our first results indicate a significant spatial variability of the aerosol load over the study region. The data also show a clear seasonal cycle, with large aerosol load being associated with strong dust activity during spring and summer (AOD up to 0.5), and low during autumn and winter (AOD up to 0.4). In spring and summer significant aerosol load is observed in the Garabogazköl basin, Northeast and South-southeast Caspian Sea (offshore North Iran and Azerbaijan), as well as southwest of the Aral Sea. In the later region, the high AOD values can be explained by export of

  1. Variations in optical properties of aerosols on monsoon seasonal change and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Holben, B.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon) based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) against the Angstrom exponent. A modified algorithm based on the prototype model of Tan et al. (2014a) was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index) were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET because of frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on the coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests. The predicted AOD in the proposed model yielded a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.68. The corresponding percent mean relative error was less than 0.33% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Validation tests were performed on the model against selected LIDAR data and yielded good correspondence. The predicted AOD can beneficially monitor short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information in atmospheric corrections.

  2. Variations in optical properties of aerosols on monsoon seasonal change and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the aerosol optical depth (AOD against the Angstrom exponent. A modified algorithm based on the prototype model of Tan et al. (2014a was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET because of frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on the coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests. The predicted AOD in the proposed model yielded a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.68. The corresponding percent mean relative error was less than 0.33% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Validation tests were performed on the model against selected LIDAR data and yielded good correspondence. The predicted AOD can beneficially monitor short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information in atmospheric corrections.

  3. Spatio-temporal variability of aerosols over East China inferred by merged visibility-GEOS-Chem aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jintai; Li, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Long-term visibility measurements offer useful information for aerosol and climate change studies. Recently, a new technique to converting visibility measurements to aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been developed on a station-to-station basis (Lin et al., 2014). However, factors such as human observation differences and local meteorological conditions often impair the spatial consistency of the visibility converted AOD dataset. Here we further adopt AOD spatial information from a chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, and merge visibility inferred and modeled early-afternoon AOD over East China on a 0.667° long. × 0.5° lat. grid for 2005-2012. Comparisons with MODIS/Aqua retrieved AOD and subsequent spectral decomposition analyses show that the merged dataset successfully corrects the low bias in the model while preserving its spatial pattern, resulting in very good agreement with MODIS in both magnitude and spatio-temporal variability. The low bias is reduced from 0.10 in GEOS-Chem AOD to 0.04 in the merged data averaged over East China, and the correlation in the seasonal and interannual variability between MODIS and merged AOD is well above 0.75 for most regions. Comparisons between the merged and AERONET data also show an overall small bias and high correlation. The merged dataset reveals four major pollution hot spots in China, including the North China Plain, the Yangtze River Delta, the Pearl River Delta and the Sichuan Basin, consistent with previous works. AOD peaks in spring-summer over the North China Plain and Yangtze River Delta and in spring over the Pearl River Delta, with no distinct seasonal cycle over the Sichuan Basin. The merged AOD has the largest difference from MODIS over the Sichuan Basin. We also discuss possible benefits of visibility based AOD data that correct the sampling bias in MODIS retrievals related to cloud-free sampling and misclassified heavy haze conditions.

  4. A Synergic Algorithm for Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth over Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jianping; XUE Yong; CAO Chunxiang; ZHANG Hao; GUANG Jie; ZHANG Xiaoye; LI Xiaowen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,a novel algorithm for aerosol optical depth(AOD) retrieval with a 1 km spatial resolution over land is presented using the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) dual-view capability at 0.55,0.66 and 0.87 μm,in combination with the Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model,a product of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS).The BRDF characteristics of the land surface,i.e.prior input parameters for this algorithm,are computed by extracting the geometrical information from AATSR and reducing the kernels from the MODIS BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters Product.Finally,AOD,with a 1 km resolution at 0.55,0.66 and 0.87 μm for the forward and nadir views of AATSR,can be simultaneously obtained.Extensive validations of AOD derived from AATSR during the period from August 2005 to July 2006 in Beijing and its surrounding area,against in-situ AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) measurements,were performed.The AOD difference between the retrievals from the forward and nadir views of AATSR was less than 5.72%,1.9% and 13.7%,respectively.Meanwhile,it was found that the AATSR retrievals using the synergic algorithm developed in this paper are more favorable than those by assuming a Lambert surface,for the coefficient of determination between AATSR derived AOD and AERONET mearured AOD,decreased by 15.5% and 18.5%,compared to those derived by the synergic algorithm.This further suggests that the synergic algorithm can be potentially used in climate change and air quality monitoring.

  5. Microphysical properties of transported biomass burning aerosols in coastal regions, and application to improving retrievals of aerosol optical depth from SeaWiFS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the limited measurement capabilities of heritage and current spaceborne passive imaging radiometers, algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related quantities must make assumptions relating to aerosol microphysical properties and surface reflectance. Over the ocean, surface reflectance can be relatively well-modelled, but knowledge of aerosol properties can remain elusive. Several field campaigns and many studies have examined the microphysical properties of biomass burning (smoke) aerosol. However, these largely focus on properties over land and near to the source regions. In coastal and open-ocean regions the properties of transported smoke may differ, due to factors such as aerosol aging, wet/dry deposition, and mixture with other aerosol sources (e.g. influence of maritime, pollution, or mineral dust aerosols). Hence, models based on near-source aerosol observations may be less representative of such transported smoke aerosols, introducing additional uncertainty into satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This study examines case studies of transported smoke from select globally-distributed coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. These are used to inform improved models for over-ocean transported smoke aerosol for AOD retrievals from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). These models are used in an updated version of the SeaWiFS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval (SOAR) algorithm, which has been combined with the Deep Blue algorithm over land to create a 13-year (1997-2010) high-quality record of AOD over land and ocean. Applying these algorithms to other sensors will enable the creation of a long-term global climate data record of spectral AOD.

  6. A revisit to decadal change of aerosol optical depth and its impact on global radiation over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenjun; Yang, Kun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Lin, Changgui; Jing, Xianwen

    2017-02-01

    Global radiation over China decreased between the 1960s and 1990, since when it has remained stable. As the total cloud cover has continued to decrease since the 1960s, variations in aerosols were suggested in previous studies to be the primary cause for variations in global radiation over China. However, the effect of aerosols on global radiation on a decadal scale has not been physically quantified over China. In this study, aerosol optical depth (AOD) data since 1980 are estimated by combining horizontal visibility data at stations in China and AOD observed by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS). It is found that the AOD exhibits decadal changes, with two decreasing periods (before the end of 1980s and after 2006) and one increasing period (from 1990 to 2006). With the derived AOD, a clear-sky model is then applied to quantify the role of aerosols in the variations in global radiation over China. The results show that aerosol direct effect cannot fully explain the decadal variations in the global radiation over China between 1980 and 2010, though it has a considerable effect on global radiation climatology. There are significant differences between the trends of clear-sky global radiation impacted by aerosols and those of all-sky global radiation impacted by aerosols and clouds, and the correlation coefficient for the comparison is very low. Therefore, the variations in all-sky global radiation over China are likely to be due to changes in cloud properties and to interactions between clouds and aerosols.

  7. Monsoonal variations in aerosol optical properties and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Holben, B.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining continuous aerosol-optical-depth (AOD) measurements is a difficult task due to the cloud-cover problem. With the main motivation of overcoming this problem, an AOD-predicting model is proposed. In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon) based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the Ångström exponent against the AOD. A new empirical algorithm was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index) were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET due to frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The calibrated model coefficients have a coefficient of determination, R2, of 0.72. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on these calibrated coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests, yielding a R2 of 0.68 as validation accuracy. The error in weighted mean absolute percentage error (wMAPE) was less than 0.40% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Performance of our model was compared against selected LIDAR data to yield good correspondence. The predicted AOD can enhance measured short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information for climatological studies and monitoring aerosol variation.

  8. Observations of Black Carbon and Aerosol Optical Depth in the Kali Gandaki Valley, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    During recent years there has been increasing concern about the deposition of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic Plains onto the glaciers and snowfields of the Tibetan Plateau. There has also been increasing concern about the rapid increase in air temperature at high altitudes over the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya. To date, there is very little knowledge about the transport pathways for pollutants traveling from the Indo-Gangetic Plains across the Himalaya to the Tibetan Plateau. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from South Asia to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Observations of BC and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from Aeronet are analyzed and presented. Diurnal and seasonal patterns of BC have been observed with higher values during the day and lower at night and also highest during pre-monsoon and lowest during monsoon season, with observed BC concentrations exceeding 5 μg while average concentration around 3.7 μg.

  9. High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Mapping of Beijing Using LANSAT8 Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Yuanliang; Wu, Jianliang

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is one of the most important parameters in the atmospheric correction of remote sensing images. We present a new method of per pixel AOD retrieval using the imagery of Landsat8. It is based on Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). General dark target method takes dense vegetation pixels as dark targets and derives their 550nm AODs directly from the LUT, and interpolates the AODs of other pixels according to spatial neighbourhood using those of dark target pixels. This method will down estimate the AOD levels for urban areas. We propose an innovative method to retrieval the AODs using multiple temporal data. For a pixel which has nothing change between the associated time, there must exists an intersection of surface albedo. When there are enough data to find the intersection it ought to be a value that meet the error tolerance. In this paper, we present an example of using three temporal Landsat ETM+ image to retrieve AOD taking Beijing as the testing area. The result is compared to the commonly employed dark target algorithm to show the effectiveness of the methods.

  10. Characteristics of Aerosol Spectral Optical Depths over Manora Peak, Nainital $-$ A High Altitude Station in the Central Himalayas

    CERN Document Server

    Sagar, R; Dumka, U C; Moorthy, K K; Pant, P

    2003-01-01

    We present for the first time spectral behaviour of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over Manora Peak, Nainital located at an altitude of ~2 km in the central Himalayas. The observations were carried out using a Multi-Wavelength Solar Radiometer during January to December 2002. The primary features of the study are (i) larger AOD during afternoon periods compared to forenoon, attributable to change in the ray path from comparatively cleaner environment in the forenoon to polluted environment in the afternoon (ii) extremely low AODs during local winter and a remarkable increase to high values in summer (iii) a distinct change in the spectral dependencies of AODs from a relatively steeper spectra during winter to a shallower one in summer representing both transparent (meteorological aerosols) and polluted summer (urban haze aerosols) skies.The mean aerosol extinction law at Nainital during 2002 is best represented by $0.10 \\lambda^{-0.61}$.

  11. AERONET-based models of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-10-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol system. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of aerosol microphysical/optical parameters at 10 sites reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke observed at coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at the near-source sites. Differences between sites tend to be larger than variability at an individual site, although optical properties for some sites in different regions can be quite similar. Across the sites, typical midvisible SSA ranges from ~ 0.95-0.97 (sites dominated by boreal forest or peat burning, typically with larger fine-mode particle radius and spread) to ~ 0.88-0.9 (sites most influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning, typically smaller fine-mode particle radius and spread). The tropical forest site Alta Floresta (Brazil) is closer to this second category, although with intermediate SSA ~ 0.92. The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average midvisible SSA ~ 0.85. Sites with stronger absorption also tend to have stronger spectral gradients in SSA, becoming more absorbing at longer wavelengths. Microphysical/optical models are presented in detail so as to facilitate their use in radiative transfer calculations, including extension to UV (ultraviolet) wavelengths, and lidar ratios. One intended application is to serve as candidate optical models for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean often have insufficient absorption (i.e. too high SSA) to represent these biomass burning aerosols. The underestimates in satellite-retrieved AOD in smoke outflow regions, which have important consequences for applications of these satellite data sets, are consistent with

  12. Aerosol optical depth thresholds as a tool to assess diffuse radiation fertilization of the land carbon uptake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xu; Unger, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    China suffers from frequent haze pollution episodes that alter the surface solar radiation and influence regional carbon uptake by the land biosphere. Here, we apply combined vegetation and radiation modeling and multiple observational datasets to assess the radiative effects of aerosol pollution in China on the regional land carbon uptake for the 2009-2011 period. First, we assess the inherent sensitivity of China's land biosphere to aerosol pollution by defining and calculating two thresholds of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, (i) AODt1, resulting in the maximum net primary productivity (NPP), and (ii) AODt2, such that if local AOD pollution on land ecosystems. In the northeast, observed AOD is 55 % lower than AODt1, indicating a strong aerosol DFE on local NPP. In the southeastern coastal regions, observed AOD is close to AODt1, suggesting that regional NPP is promoted by the current level of aerosol loading, but that further increases in AOD in this region will weaken the fertilization effects. The North China Plain experiences limited enhancement of NPP by aerosols because observed AOD is 77 % higher than AODt1 but 14 % lower than AODt2. Aerosols always inhibit regional NPP in the southwest because of the persistent high cloud coverage that already substantially reduces the total light availability there. Under clear-sky conditions, simulated NPP shows widespread increases of 20-60 % (35.0 ± 0.9 % on average) by aerosols. Under all-sky conditions, aerosol pollution has spatially contrasting opposite sign effects on NPP from -3 % to +6 % (1.6 ± 0.5 % on average), depending on the local AOD relative to the regional thresholds. Stringent aerosol pollution reductions motivated by public health concerns, especially in the North China Plain and the southwest, will help protect land ecosystem functioning in China and mitigate long-term global warming.

  13. Inter-comparison of model-simulated and satellite-retrieved componential aerosol optical depths in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenshen; Yu, Chao; Chen, Liangfu; Tao, Jinhua; Letu, Husi; Ge, Wei; Si, Yidan; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    China's large aerosol emissions have major impacts on global climate change as well as regional air pollution and its associated disease burdens. A detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of aerosol components is necessary for the calculation of aerosol radiative forcing and the development of effective emission control policy. Model-simulated and satellite-retrieved aerosol components can support climate change research, PM2.5 source appointment and epidemiological studies. This study evaluated the total and componential aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the GEOS-Chem model (GC) and the Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART), and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) from 2006 to 2009 in China. Linear regression analysis between the GC and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) in China yielded similar correlation coefficients (0.6 daily, 0.71 monthly) but lower slopes (0.41 daily, 0.58 monthly) compared with those in the U.S. This difference was attributed to GC's underestimation of water-soluble AOD (WAOD) west of the Heihe-Tengchong Line, the dust AOD (DAOD) in the fall and winter, and the soot AOD (SAOD) throughout the year and throughout the country. GOCART exhibits the strongest dust estimation capability among all datasets. However, the GOCART soot distribution in the Northeast and Southeast has significant errors, and its WAOD in the polluted North China Plain (NCP) and the South is underestimated. MISR significantly overestimates the water-soluble aerosol levels in the West, and does not capture the high dust loadings in all seasons and regions, and the SAOD in the NCP. These discrepancies can mainly be attributed to the uncertainties in the emission inventories of both models, the poor performance of GC under China's high aerosol loading conditions, the omission of certain aerosol tracers in GOCART, and the tendency of MISR to misidentify dust and non-dust mixtures.

  14. Evaluating Nighttime CALIOP 0.532 micron Aerosol Optical Depth and Extinction Coefficient Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. R.; Tackett, J. L.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Curtis, C. A.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W. R.; Westphal, D. L.; Prospero, J. M.; Welton, E. J.; Omar, A. H.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) Version 3.01 5-km nighttime 0.532 micron aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from 2007 are screened, averaged and evaluated at 1 deg X 1 deg resolution versus corresponding/co-incident 0.550 micron AOD derived using the US Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of quality-assured NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD. In the absence of sunlight, since passive radiometric AOD retrievals rely overwhelmingly on scattered radiances, the model represents one of the few practical global estimates available from which to attempt such a validation. Daytime comparisons, though, provide useful context. Regional-mean CALIOP vertical profiles of night/day 0.532 micron extinction coefficient are compared with 0.523/0.532 micron ground-based lidar measurements to investigate representativeness and diurnal variability. In this analysis, mean nighttime CALIOP AOD are mostly lower than daytime (0.121 vs. 0.126 for all aggregated data points, and 0.099 vs. 0.102 when averaged globally per normalised 1 deg. X 1 deg. bin), though the relationship is reversed over land and coastal regions when the data are averaged per normalised bin (0.134/0.108 vs. 0140/0.112, respectively). Offsets assessed within single bins alone approach +/- 20 %. CALIOP AOD, both day and night, are higher than NAAPS over land (0.137 vs. 0.124) and equal over water (0.082 vs. 0.083) when averaged globally per normalised bin. However, for all data points inclusive, NAAPS exceeds CALIOP over land, coast and ocean, both day and night. Again, differences assessed within single bins approach 50% in extreme cases. Correlation between CALIOP and NAAPS AOD is comparable during both day and night. Higher correlation is found nearest the equator, both as a function of sample size and relative signal magnitudes inherent at

  15. An improved algorithm for the determination of aerosol optical depth in the ultraviolet spectral range from Brewer spectrophotometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, P.; di Sarra, A.; Siani, A. M.

    2006-10-01

    Methods to derive aerosol optical depth in the UV spectral range from ground-based remote-sensing stations equipped with Brewer spectrophotometers have been recently developed. In this study a modified Langley plot method has been implemented to retrieve aerosol optical depth from direct sun Brewer measurements. The method uses measurements over an extended range of atmospheric airmasses obtained with two different neutral density filters, and accounts for short-term variations of total ozone, derived from the same direct sun observations. The improved algorithm has been applied to data collected with a Brewer mark IV, operational in Rome, Italy, and with a Brewer mark III, operational in Lampedusa, Italy, in the Mediterranean. The efficiency of the improved algorithm has been tested comparing the number of determinations of the extraterrestrial constant against those obtained with a standard Langley plot procedure. The improved method produces a larger number of reliable Langley plots, allowing for a better statistical characterization of the extraterrestrial constant and a better study of its temporal variability. The values of aerosol optical depth calculated in Rome and Lampedusa compare well with simultaneous determinations in the 416-440 nm interval derived from MFRSR and CIMEL measurements.

  16. Performance of a FieldSpec spectroradiometer for aerosol optical depth retrieval: method and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Estellés, Víctor; Campanelli, Monica; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Martínez-Lozano, José Antonio

    2009-04-10

    The performance of a FieldSpec spectroradiometer for retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been assessed after modifying its basic configuration in order to measure direct solar irradiance at ground level. The FieldSpec measurements were obtained during four summertime days in the years 2004 and 2005, over a Spanish agricultural site in Barrax, Albacete (30 degrees 3(') N, 2 degrees 6(') W, 700 m a.s.l.), in the framework of two European Space Agency mission remote sensing field campaigns. From the whole FieldSpec spectral domain (350-2500 nm) the AOD was extracted for channels within atmospheric windows. The instrument was calibrated by means of the standard Langley plot method, performed at a high mountain site in Italy. The AOD retrieved by the FieldSpec has been validated by comparison with the AOD obtained from a colocated CIMEL CE318 Sun photometer. The FieldSpec AOD spectra were convoluted with the CE318 filter transmission functions in order to make both datasets comparable. Our results show that both datasets are very similar (R(2) around 0.9) for all the channels from the CE318, with an average deviation of about 0.02. The temporal evolution of the AOD was accurately monitored by the FieldSpec under different atmospheric conditions, as was the case for a previously reported mineral dust intrusion. As a conclusion, the comparison performed in this study shows that the FieldSpec spectroradiometer is a suitable instrument for retrieving the AOD in different atmospheric situations.

  17. The effect of aerosol optical depth on rainfall with reference to meteorology over metro cities in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaseelan, Indira; Bhaskar, B Vijay; Muthuchelian, K

    2014-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the global water cycle and a proxy for changing climate; therefore, proper assessment of the urban environment's impact on rainfall will be increasingly important in ongoing climate diagnostics and prediction. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements on the monsoon seasons of the years 2008 to 2010 were made over four metro regional hotspots in India. The highest average of AOD was in the months of June and July for the four cities during 3 years and lowest was in September. Comparing the four regions, Kolkata was in the peak of aerosol contamination and Chennai was in least. Pearson correlation was made between AOD with climatic parameters. Some changes in the parameters were found during drought year. Temperature, cloud parameters, and humidity play an important role for the drought conditions. The role of aerosols, meteorological parameters, and their impacts towards the precipitation during the monsoon was studied.

  18. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; Mao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  19. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  20. Aerosol spectral optical depths and size characteristics at a coastal industriallocation in India - effect of synoptic and mesoscale weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol spectral optical depths at ten discrete channels in the visible and near IR bands, obtained from a ground-based passive multi-wavelength solar radiometer at a coastal industrial location, Visakhapatnam, on the east coast of India, are used to study the response of the aerosol optical properties and size distributions to the changes in atmospheric humidity, wind speed and direction. It is observed that during high humidity conditions, the spectral optical depths show about 30% higher growth factors, and the size distributions show the generation of a typical new mode around 0.4 microns. The surface wind speed and direction also indicate the formation of new particles when the humid marine air mass interacts with the industrial air mass. This is interpreted in terms of new particle formation and subsequent particle growth by condensation and self-coagulation. The results obtained on the surface-size segregated aerosol mass distribution from a co-located Quartz Crystal Microbalance during different humidity conditions also show a large mass increase in the sub-micron size range with an increase in atmospheric humidity, indicating new particle formation at the sub-micron size range.

  1. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  2. Improved MODIS Dark Target aerosol optical depth algorithm over land: angular effect correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) product retrieved from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements has greatly benefited scientific research in climate change and air quality due to its high quality and large coverage over the globe. However, the current product (e.g., Collection 6) over land needs to be further improved. The is because AOD retrieval still suffers large uncertainty from the surface reflectance (e.g., anisotropic reflection) although the impacts of the surface reflectance have been largely reduced using the Dark Target (DT) algorithm. It has been shown that the AOD retrieval over dark surface can be improved by considering surface bidirectional distribution reflectance function (BRDF) effects in previous study. However, the relationship of the surface reflectance between visible and shortwave infrared band that applied in the previous study can lead to an angular dependence of the AOD retrieval. This has at least two reasons. The relationship based on the assumption of isotropic reflection or Lambertian surface is not suitable for the surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). However, although the relationship varies with the surface cover type by considering the vegetation index NDVISWIR, this index itself has a directional effect and affects the estimation of the surface reflection, and it can lead to some errors in the AOD retrieval. To improve this situation, we derived a new relationship for the spectral surface BRF in this study, using 3 years of data from AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN). To test the performance of the new algorithm, two case studies were used: 2 years of data from North America and 4 months of data from the global land. The results show that the angular effects of the AOD retrieval are largely reduced in most cases, including fewer occurrences of negative retrievals. Particularly, for the global land case, the AOD retrieval was improved by the new algorithm compared to the

  3. Variations of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom parameters at a suburban location in Iran During 2009–2010

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Khoshsima; A A Bidokhti; F Ahmadi-Giv

    2014-02-01

    Solar irradiance is attenuated spectrally when passing through the earth’s atmosphere and it is strongly dependent on sky conditions, cleanliness of the atmosphere, composition of aerosols and gaseous constituents. In this paper, aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent () and Angstrom turbidity coefficient () have been investigated during December 2009 to October 2010, in a suburban area of Zanjan (36°N, 43°E, 1700 m), in the north–west of Iran, using meteorological and sun photometric data. Results show that turbidity varies on all time scales, from the seasonal to hourly, because of changes in the atmospheric meteorological parameters. The values of range from near zero to 1.67. The diurnal variation of AOD in Zanjan is about 15%. The diurnal variability of AOD, showed a similar variation pattern in spring (including March, April, May) and winter (December, January, February) and had a different variation pattern in summer (June, July, August) and autumn (September and October). During February, spring and early summer winds transport continental aerosols mostly from the Iraq (dust events) and cause the increase of beta and turbidity of atmosphere of Zanjan.

  4. Use of satellite-based aerosol optical depth and spatial clustering to predict ambient PM2.5 concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Satellite-based PM2.5 monitoring has the potential to complement ground PM2.5 monitoring networks, especially for regions with sparsely distributed monitors. Satellite remote sensing provides data on aerosol optical depth (AOD), which reflects particle abundance in the atmospheric column. Thus AOD has been used in statistical models to predict ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. However, previous studies have shown that AOD may not be a strong predictor of PM2.5 ground levels. Another shortcom...

  5. Impact of continental meteorology and atmospheric circulation in the modulation of Aerosol Optical Depth over the Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandhya K Nair; S Sijikumar; S S Prijith

    2012-04-01

    Time series analysis of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) derived from NOAA-AVHRR data during the period 1996–1999 and the MODIS data during 2000–2009 over the Arabian Sea revealed a systematic biennial variability in the high AOD during summer months. The variability is more prominent over the northern and central parts of the Arabian Sea and became less significant towards southern latitudes. The possible mechanisms for these are examined by estimating the source strength over coastal Arabia and AOD flow rate through the western boundary of the Arabian Sea. Both these show clear signatures of biennial variability with same phase as AOD for most of the years. This result indicates that the observed biennial variability in AOD is likely to be the outcome of combined effects of biennial variability in wind generated sea-salt aerosols and dust transported from Arabia.

  6. Study of total column atmospheric aerosol optical depth, ozone and precipitable water content over Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Dani; R S Maheskumar; P C S Devara

    2003-06-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in aerosols and precursor gases over oceanic regions have special importance in the estimation of radiative forcing parameters and thereby in the refinement of general circulation models. Extensive observations of the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD), total column ozone (TCO) and precipitable water content (PWC) have been carried out using the on-line, multi-band solar radiometers onboard ORV Sagar Kanya (Cruise#SK 147B) over Bay of Bengal during 11th-28th August 1999. Aerosol optical and physical properties (optical depth and angstrom parameter) have been estimated at six wavelengths covering from UV to NIR (380-1020 nm) while TCO and PWC have been determined using the UV band around 300nm and NIR band around 940 nm, respectively. Added, concurrent meteorological and satellite observations during this field phase of BOBMEX-99 have been utilized to investigate spectral-temporal variations of AOD, TCO and PWC in marine environment. The results indicate lower AODs (around 0.4 at characteristic wavelength of 500 nm) and size distributions with abundance of coarse-mode particles as compared to those aerosols of typical land origin. An interesting result that is found in the present study is the significant reduction in AOD at all wavelengths from initial to later part of observation period due to cloud-scavenging and rain-washout effects as well as signature of coastal aerosol loading. The clear-sky daytime diurnal variation of TCO shows gradual increase during post-sunrise hours, broad maximum during afternoon hours and gradual decrease during pre-sunset hours, which is considered to be due to photochemical reactions. The diurnal variation curve of PWC showed maximum (∼4cm) during morning hours and gradual decrease (∼3.5cm) towards evening hours, which are found to be greater as compared to typical values over land. Another interesting feature observed is that although the PWC values are very high, there was no proportionate

  7. Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Flynn; AS Koontz; JH Mather

    2009-09-01

    The uncertainties in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are dominated by the effects of aerosols, both in relation to the direct absorption and scattering of radiation by aerosols and also with respect to aerosol-related changes in cloud formation, longevity, and microphysics (See Figure 1; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Assessment Report 4, 2008). Moreover, the Arctic region in particular is especially sensitive to changes in climate with the magnitude of temperature changes (both observed and predicted) being several times larger than global averages (Kaufman et al. 2009). Recent studies confirm that aerosol-cloud interactions in the arctic generate climatologically significant radiative effects equivalent in magnitude to that of green house gases (Lubin and Vogelmann 2006, 2007). The aerosol optical depth is the most immediate representation of the aerosol direct effect and is also important for consideration of aerosol-cloud interactions, and thus this quantity is essential for studies of aerosol radiative forcing.

  8. A surface reflectance scheme for retrieving aerosol optical depth over urban surfaces in MODIS Dark Target retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan; Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Remer, Lorraine A.; Munchak, Leigh A.

    2016-07-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, aboard the two Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua, provide aerosol information with nearly daily global coverage at moderate spatial resolution (10 and 3 km). Almost 15 years of aerosol data records are now available from MODIS that can be used for various climate and air-quality applications. However, the application of MODIS aerosol products for air-quality concerns is limited by a reduction in retrieval accuracy over urban surfaces. This is largely because the urban surface reflectance behaves differently than that assumed for natural surfaces. In this study, we address the inaccuracies produced by the MODIS Dark Target (MDT) algorithm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals over urban areas and suggest improvements by modifying the surface reflectance scheme in the algorithm. By integrating MODIS Land Surface Reflectance and Land Cover Type information into the aerosol surface parameterization scheme for urban areas, much of the issues associated with the standard algorithm have been mitigated for our test region, the continental United States (CONUS). The new surface scheme takes into account the change in underlying surface type and is only applied for MODIS pixels with urban percentage (UP) larger than 20 %. Over the urban areas where the new scheme has been applied (UP > 20 %), the number of AOD retrievals falling within expected error (EE %) has increased by 20 %, and the strong positive bias against ground-based sun photometry has been eliminated. However, we note that the new retrieval introduces a small negative bias for AOD values less than 0.1 due to the ultra-sensitivity of the AOD retrieval to the surface parameterization under low atmospheric aerosol loadings. Global application of the new urban surface parameterization appears promising, but further research and analysis are required before global implementation.

  9. Inversion of Aerosol Optical Depth Based on the CCD and IRS Sensors on the HJ-1 Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To perform a high-resolution aerosol optical depth (AOD inversion from the HJ-1 satellites, a dark pixel algorithm utilizing the HJ-1 satellite data was developed based on the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS algorithm. By analyzing the relationship between the apparent reflectance from the 1.65 μm and 2.1 μm channels of MODIS, a method for estimating albedo using the 1.65 μm channel data of the HJ-1 satellites was established, and a high-resolution AOD inversion in the Chengdu region based on the HJ-1 satellite was completed. A comparison of the inversion results with CE318 measured data produced a correlation of 0.957, respectively, with an absolute error of 0.106. An analysis of the AOD inversion results from different aerosol models showed that the rural aerosol model was suitable as a general model for establishing an aerosol inversion look-up table for the Chengdu region.

  10. The GAW-PFR aerosol optical depth network: The 2008-2013 time series at Cape Point Station, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Gröbner, J.; Kouremeti, N.; Wacker, S.; Labuschagne, C.; Mbatha, N.; Brunke, E.-G.

    2015-05-01

    A ground-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) climatology is presented for Cape Point (CPT) station, South Africa, for the 2008-2013 period. CPT is part of the Global Atmosphere Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer network which conducts long-term AOD measurements at remote background sites. AOD (λ = 500 nm) and Ångström exponent (368 to 862 nm; α368-862) averages for the entire period were 0.059 and 0.68, displaying only a weak seasonality. Based on an established method for air mass classification using the in situ wind direction and 222Rn concentration, the following four air mass types were used to further investigate AOD: background marine, marine, mixed, and continental. AOD was similar for all types, but α368-862 was distinctly lower (0.43) for background marine and higher (1.07) for continental air masses, illustrating the presence of coarse mode and anthropogenic aerosols, respectively. Trajectory cluster analysis of 5 day back trajectories confirmed/augmented this classification. AOD for background marine and marine air mass types were consistent with ship-based (Maritime Aerosol Network) and island (AErosol RObotic NETwork) measurements, suggesting that CPT is a suitable site to monitor pristine conditions in the South Atlantic and Southern Oceans when 222Rn concentrations are < 100 mBq m-3.

  11. Impact of wet scavenging of natural and anthropogenic aerosol components on the columnar aerosol optical depth over a tropical rural atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Jayaraman, Achuthan

    A typical feature of Indian monsoon is that, several dry days are observed even between the rain events. Atmospheric aerosol shows significant variations in their concentration between "before" and "after" the rain because of their efficient scavenging during the rain. The below cloud scavenging of several aerosol components during the rain has a direct impact on the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) between "before" and "after" the rain. In order to investigate the impact of the scavenging of several natural and anthropogenic aerosol components on spectral properties of aerosol, simultaneous studies on the characterization of aerosol, rainwater and AOD were done during July-December 2009 over a tropical rural atmosphere at Gadanki (13.5 0N, 79.2 0E) in southern peninsular India. Aerosols were collected and analyzed before, during and after the rain along with the collection and analysis of rainwater in several rain events during the entire study period. AOD data (at wavelengths of 400, 500, 675, 870, 1020 nm) was retrieved by processing the data obtained from an automatic sunphotomer (PREDE, PM 01) using the standard SKYRAD pack. Aerosols and rainwater samples were analyzed for water soluble ionic species using an Ion Chromatograph (Metrohm, 861). We observed that aerosols were highly loaded in the atmosphere just before the rain, efficiently scavenged during the rain and built-up slowly after the rain. Interestingly, the loading of sulphate aerosol after the rain was remarkably high whereas that of calcium and magnesium were remarkably low. The poor resuspension of soil dust from the wet soils after the rain could not allow calcium and magnesium to be loaded in the atmosphere whereas the high relative humidity favored the gas-to-particle conversion of SO2 to SO42-which allowed the high loading of sulphate aerosol in the atmosphere. Significant reductions in AOD both at lower (400 nm) and higher wavelength (1020 nm) were observed after the rain events. Two

  12. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth and Surface Reflectance over Land within Short Temporal Interval Using MSG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Xue, Y.; Li, Y. J.; Yang, L. K.; Hou, T. T.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols cause a major uncertainty in the research of climatology and global change, whereas satellite aerosol remote sensing over land still remains a big challenge. Due to their short time repeat cycle, geostationary satellites are capable of monitoring the temporal features of aerosols, while its limited number of visible bands is an obstacle. On the other hand, a main uncertainty in aerosol retrieval is the difficulty to separate the relatively weaker contribution of the atmosphere to the signal received by the satellite from the contribution of the Earth's surface. In this paper, an analytical retrieval strategy is presented to solve the both problems above. For the lack of surface reflectance, we use the Ross-Li BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model and assume that the surface reflective property changes mainly due to the change of illumination geometry in a short time interval while the kernals of Ross-Li model remain the same. For the limited visible band, we take advantage of the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) consistence within short distances, thus to reduce the number of unknown parameters. A parameterization of the atmospheric radiative transfer model is used which is proved to be proper to retrieve aerosol and surface parameters by sensitivity analysis. Taking the three kernels of kernel-driven BRDF model and AOD as unknown parameters and based on prior knowledge of aerosol types, a series of nonlinear equations can be established then. Both AOD and surface reflectance can be obtained by using a numerical method to solve these equations. By applying this method, called LABITS-MSG (Land Aerosol and Bidirectional reflectance Inversion by Time Series technique for MSG), to data from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) observations on board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), we obtain regional maps of AOD and surface reflectance in July 11, 2010 within a temporal interval of as short as 1 hour, and a spatial

  13. Evaluation of seven European aerosol optical depth retrieval algorithms for climate analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Holzer-Popp, T.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.H.; Descloitres, J.; Grainger, R.G.; Griesfeller, J.; Heckel, A.; Kinne, S.; Klüser, L.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; Martynenko, D.; North, P.; Ovigneur, B.; Pascal, N.; Poulsen, C.; Ramon, D.; Schulz, M.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanré, D.; Thomas, G.E.; Virtanen, T.H.; von Hoyningen Huene, W.; Vountas, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite data are increasingly used to provide observation-based estimates of the effects of aerosols on climate. The Aerosol-cci project, part of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (CCI), was designed to provide essential climate variables for aerosols from satellite data. Eight

  14. Identification of columnar aerosol types under high aerosol optical depth conditions for a single AERONET site in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Ghim, Young Sung; Holben, B. N.

    2016-02-01

    Dominant aerosol types were classified using level 2 inversion products for the Anmyon Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Korea for the period 1999-2007. The aerosol types were mineral dust (MD), MD mixed with carbon, and black carbon mixed coarse particles (BCCP) for coarse mode aerosols, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and secondary inorganic ions (SII) for fine mode aerosols, and mixed particles between. The classification was carried out using a clustering method based on parameters, including single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE), and fine mode volume fraction (FMVF). Among the seven aerosol types, MD was distinct, with the highest AAE and a very low FMVF and SII with the highest SSA and FMVF. BCCP was introduced to designate coarse particles mixed with BC, of which the AAE was lower than 1, despite a low FMVF. In addition to a large difference in AAE between BC and OC, the SSA of OC was larger than that of BC, indicating the effects of the white smoke produced from the smoldering phase of biomass burning. Monthly variations of the aerosol types were well interpreted by meteorology and emissions and coincided with those in the previous studies. Applying our results to well-characterized global AERONET sites, we confirmed that the aerosol types at Anmyon were valid at other sites. However, the results also showed that the mean properties for aerosol types were influenced by the specific aerosols prevalent at the study sites.

  15. Validation of MODIS and Deep Blue aerosol optical depth retrievals in an arid/semi-arid region of northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Li; Xiangao Xia; Shengli Wang; Jietai Mao; Yan Liu

    2012-01-01

    The global aerosol optical depth (AOD or τ) has been retrieved using the Dark Target algorithm (the C004 and C005 products) and the Deep Blue algorithm (DB product).Few validations have thus far been performed in arid/semi-arid regions,especially in northwest China.The ground-based remote sensing of AOD from sun photometers at four sites in Xinjiang during the years 2002-2003 is used to validate aerosol products,including C004,C005 and DB of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS).The results show substantial improvement in the C005 aerosol product over the C004 product.The average correlation coefficient of regression with ground measurements increased from 0.59 to 0.69,and the average offset decreased from 0.28 to 0.13.The slopes of the linear regressions tended to be close to unity.The percentage of AODs falling within the retrieval errors of 30% (or △τ =±0.1 ± 0.2τ)increased from 16.1% to 45.6%.The best retrievals are obtained over an oasis region,whereas the worst are obtained over urban areas.Both the MODIS C004 and C005 products overestimate AOD,which is likely related to improper assumptions of the aerosol model and of the estimation of surface reflectance.An encouraging result has been derived with regard to validation of the DB AOD.Overall,the average offset,slope and correlation coefficient of regression with sun-photometer measurements are -0.04,0.88 and 0.85,respectively.Approximately 73% of the DB AOD retrievals fall within the expected error of 30%.Underestimation of the AOD by the DB products is observed.The aerosol model and estimations of surface reflectance in this region require further improvements.

  16. Aerosol optical depth and fine-mode fraction retrieval over East Asia using multi-angular total and polarized remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T.; Gu, X.; Xie, D.; Li, Z.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.

    2012-03-01

    A new aerosol retrieval algorithm using multi-angular total and polarized measurements is presented. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF) for studying the impact of aerosol on climate change. The retrieval algorithm is based on a lookup table (LUT) method, which assumes that one fine and one coarse lognormal aerosol modes can be combined with proper weightings to represent the ambient aerosol properties. To reduce the ambiguity in retrieval algorithm, the key characteristics of aerosol model over East Asia are constrained using the cluster analysis technique based on the AERONET sun-photometer observation over East Asia, and the fine and coarse modes are not fixed but can vary. A mixing model of bare soil and green vegetation spectra and the Nadal and Breon model for the bidirectional polarized reflectance factor (BPDF) were used to simulate total and polarized surface reflectance of East Asia. By applying the present algorithm to POLDER measurements, three different aerosol cases of clear, polluted and dust are analyzed to test the algorithm. The comparison of retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and fine-mode fraction (FMF) with those of AERONET sun-photometer observations show reliable results. Preliminary validation is encouraging. Using the new aerosol retrieval algorithm for multi-angular total and polarized measurements, the spatial and temporal variability of anthropogenic aerosol optical properties over East Asia, which were observed during a heavy polluted event, were analyzed. Exceptionally high values of aerosol optical depth contributed by fine mode of up to 0.5 (at 0.865 μm), and high values of fine-mode fraction of up to 0.9, were observed in this case study.

  17. Regional trends of aerosol optical depth and their impact on cloud properties over Southern India using MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, K. Rama; Obul Reddy, K. Raja; Balakrishnaiah, G.; Arafath, S. MD.; Kumar Reddy, N. Siva; Rao, T. Chakradhar; Reddy, T. Lokeswara; Reddy, R. Ramakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Remote sensing of global aerosols has constituted a great scientific interest in a variety of applications related to global warming and climatic change. In the present study we investigate the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical properties and its impact on various properties of clouds over Southern India for the last ten years (2005-2014) by using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data retrieved from the onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. The spatial distributions of annual mean lowest Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) value is observed in Bangalore (BLR) (0.22±0.04) and the highest AOD value is noted in Visakhapatnam (VSK) (0.39±0.05). Similarly high Fine Mode Fraction (FMF) is noticed over VSK and Thiruvananthapuram (TVM), while lower values are observed in Anantapur (ATP), Hyderabad (HYD), Pune (PUNE) and BLR. From the results, a negative correlation was found between AOD and Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) where as, a positive correlation was observed between AOD and Cloud Fraction (CF), Water Vapor (WV) over the selected regions. Monthly average AOD and FMF are plotted for analysis of the trends of aerosol loading in a long-term scale and both values showed statistically significant enhancing trend over all regions as derived from the MODIS measurements. Further, the annual variation of spatial correlation between MODIS and MISR (Multi - Angle Imaging Spectro Radiometer) AOD has been analyzed and the correlation coefficients are found to be higher in two of the regions VSK and PUNE (>0.8), and considerably lower for TVM (<0.7).

  18. Algorithms and uncertainties for the determination of multispectral irradiance components and aerosol optical depth from a shipborne rotating shadowband radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthuhn, Jonas; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas; Bernhard, Germar

    2017-03-01

    The 19-channel rotating shadowband radiometer GUVis-3511 built by Biospherical Instruments provides automated shipborne measurements of the direct, diffuse and global spectral irradiance components without a requirement for platform stabilization. Several direct sun products, including spectral direct beam transmittance, aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent and precipitable water, can be derived from these observations. The individual steps of the data analysis are described, and the different sources of uncertainty are discussed. The total uncertainty of the observed direct beam transmittances is estimated to be about 4 % for most channels within a 95 % confidence interval for shipborne operation. The calibration is identified as the dominating contribution to the total uncertainty. A comparison of direct beam transmittance with those obtained from a Cimel sunphotometer at a land site and a manually operated Microtops II sunphotometer on a ship is presented. Measurements deviate by less than 3 and 4 % on land and on ship, respectively, for most channels and in agreement with our previous uncertainty estimate. These numbers demonstrate that the instrument is well suited for shipborne operation, and the applied methods for motion correction work accurately. Based on spectral direct beam transmittance, aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an uncertainty of 0.02 for all channels within a 95 % confidence interval. The different methods to account for Rayleigh scattering and gas absorption in our scheme and in the Aerosol Robotic Network processing for Cimel sunphotometers lead to minor deviations. Relying on the cross calibration of the 940 nm water vapor channel with the Cimel sunphotometer, the column amount of precipitable water can be estimated with an uncertainty of ±0.034 cm.

  19. Validation of aerosol optical depth and total ozone column in the ultraviolet retrieved from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry factor (g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths along with total column ozone (TOC) were retrieved based on Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March to November in 2009. To assess the accuracy of the OE technique, the AOD retrievals are compared to both the Beer's law derived ones and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product; and the TOC retrievals are compared to both the TOC product of the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the AOD estimated by the OE method with the Beer's law derived ones and the collocated AERONET AOD product both show a very good agreement: the correlation coefficients vary between 0.98 and 0.99; the slopes range from 0.95 to 1.0; and the offsets are less than 0.02 at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC also shows a promising accuracy of the OE method: the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). The validation of the OE retrievals on the selected dates suggests the OE technique has its merits and is a supplemental tool in analyzing UVMRP data.

  20. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals over a Tropical Urban Site, Pune, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sanjay; Kuman, P. Pradeep; Gupta, Pawan; Devara, P. C. S.; Aher, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, MODIS (Terra and Aqua; level 2, collection 5) derived aerosoloptical depths (AODs) are compared with the ground-based measurements obtained from AERONET (level 2.0) and Microtops - II sun-photometer over a tropical urban station, Pune (18 deg 32'N; 73 deg 49'E, 559 m amsl). This is the first ever systematic validation of the MODIS aerosol products over Pune. Analysis of the data indicates that the Terra and Aqua MODIS AOD retrievals at 550 nm have good correlations with the AERONET and Microtops - II sun-photometer AOD measurements. During winter the linear regression correlation coefficients for MODIS products against AERONET measurements are 0.79 for Terra and 0.62 for Aqua; however for premonsoon, the corresponding coefficients are 0.78 and 0.74. Similarly, the linear regression correlation coefficients for Microtops measurements against MODIS products are 0.72 and 0.93 for Terra and Aqua data respectively during winter and are 0.78 and 0.75 during pre-monsoon. On yearly basis in 2008-2009, correlation coefficients for MODIS products against AERONET measurements are 0.80 and 0.78 for Terra and Aqua respectively while the corresponding coefficients are 0.70 and 0.73 during 2009-2010. The regressed intercepts with MODIS vs. AERONET are 0.09 for Terra and 0.05 for Aqua during winter whereas their values are 0.04 and 0.07 during pre-monsoon. However, MODIS AODs are found to underestimate during winter and overestimate during pre-monsoon with respect to AERONET and Microtops measurements having slopes 0.63 (Terra) and 0.74 (Aqua) during winter and 0.97 (Terra) and 0.94 (Aqua) during pre-monsoon. Wavelength dependency of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) shows presence of absorbing and scattering aerosol particles. For winter, SSA decreases with wavelength with the values 0.86 +/- 0.03 at 440 nm and 0.82 +/- 0.04 at 1020nm. In pre-monsoon, it increases with wavelength (SSA is 0.87 +/- 0.02 at 440nm; and 0.88 +/-0.04 at 1020 nm).

  1. Data Filtering and Assimilation of Satellite Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellite observations of the Earth often contain excessive noise and extensive data voids. Aerosol measurements, for instance, are obscured and contaminated by...

  2. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and Angström exponent from ground-based Sun-photometer data of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Santo V; Chew, Boon N; Liew, Soo C

    2009-03-10

    The role of aerosols in climate and climate change is one of the factors that is least understood at the present. Aerosols' direct interaction with solar radiation is a well understood mechanism that affects Earth's net radiative forcing. However, quantifying its magnitude is more problematic because of the temporal and spatial variability of aerosol particles. To enhance our understanding of the radiative effects of aerosols on the global climate, Singapore has joined the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) worldwide network by contributing ground-based direct Sun measurements performed by means of a multiwavelength Sun-photometer instrument. Data are collected on an hourly basis, then are uploaded to be fully screened and quality assured by AERONET. We use a one year data record (level 1.5/2.0) of measured columnar atmospheric optical depth, spanning from November 2006 to October 2007, to study the monthly and seasonal variability of the aerosol optical depth and the Angström exponent. We performed independent retrievals of these parameters (aerosol optical depth and Angström exponent) by using the photometer's six available bands covering the near-UV to near-IR (380-1080 nm). As a validation, our independent retrievals were compared with AERONET 1.5/2.0 level direct Sun product.

  3. Aerosol optical depth retrieval in the Arctic region using MODIS data over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, L.; Xue, Y.; Leeuw, G. de; Hoyningen-Huene, W. von; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Istomina, L.; Guang, J.; Burrows, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic is vulnerable to the long-term transport of aerosols because they affect the surface albedo when particles are deposited on snow and ice. However, aerosol observations for this area are sparse and hence there is considerable uncertainty in the knowledge on the properties of the Arctic aer

  4. Merging aerosol optical depth data from multiple satellite missions to view agricultural biomass burning in Central and East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Xue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural biomass burning (ABB in Central and East China occurs every year from May to October and peaks in June. The biomass burning event in June 2007 was very strong. During the period from 26 May to 16 June 2007, ABB occurred mainly in Anhui, Henan, Jiangsu and Shandong provinces. A comprehensive set of aerosol optical depth (AOD data, produced by a merger of AOD product data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MIRS, is used to study the spatial and temporal distribution of agricultural biomass aerosols in Central and East China combining with ground observations from both AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET measurements. We compared merged AOD data with single-sensor single-algorithm AOD data (MODIS Dark Target AOD data, MODIS Deep Blue AOD data, SRAP-MODIS AOD data and MISR AOD data. In this comparison, we found merged AOD products can improve the quality of AOD products from single-sensor single-algorithm data sets by expanding the spatial coverage of the study area and keeping the statistical confidence in AOD parameters. There existed high correlation (0.8479 between the merged AOD data and AERONET measurements. Our merged AOD data make use of synergetic information conveyed in all of the available satellite data. The merged AOD data were used for the analysis of the biomass burning event from 26 May to 16 June 2007 together with meteorological data. The merged AOD products and the ground observations from China suggest that biomass burning in Central and East China has had great impact on AOD over China. Influenced by this ABB, the highest AOD value in Beijing on 12 June 2007 reached 5.71.

  5. Merging aerosol optical depth data from multiple satellite missions to view agricultural biomass burning in Central and East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y.; Xu, H.; Mei, L.; Guang, J.; Guo, J.; Li, Y.; Hou, T.; Li, C.; Yang, L.; He, X.

    2012-04-01

    Agricultural biomass burning (ABB) in Central and East China occurs every year from May to October and peaks in June. The biomass burning event in June 2007 was very strong. During the period from 26 May to 16 June 2007, ABB occurred mainly in Anhui, Henan, Jiangsu and Shandong provinces. A comprehensive set of aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, produced by a merger of AOD product data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MIRS), is used to study the spatial and temporal distribution of agricultural biomass aerosols in Central and East China combining with ground observations from both AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET) measurements. We compared merged AOD data with single-sensor single-algorithm AOD data (MODIS Dark Target AOD data, MODIS Deep Blue AOD data, SRAP-MODIS AOD data and MISR AOD data). In this comparison, we found merged AOD products can improve the quality of AOD products from single-sensor single-algorithm data sets by expanding the spatial coverage of the study area and keeping the statistical confidence in AOD parameters. There existed high correlation (0.8479) between the merged AOD data and AERONET measurements. Our merged AOD data make use of synergetic information conveyed in all of the available satellite data. The merged AOD data were used for the analysis of the biomass burning event from 26 May to 16 June 2007 together with meteorological data. The merged AOD products and the ground observations from China suggest that biomass burning in Central and East China has had great impact on AOD over China. Influenced by this ABB, the highest AOD value in Beijing on 12 June 2007 reached 5.71.

  6. Recovering long-term aerosol optical depth series (1976–2012 from an astronomical potassium-based resonance scattering spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barreto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year long-term series of monochromatic aerosol optical depth (AOD has been recovered from solar irradiance measurements performed with the solar spectrometer Mark-I, deployed at Izaña mountain since 1976. The instrument operation is based on the method of resonant scattering, which affords wavelength absolute reference and stability (long-term stability and high precision in comparison to other instruments based purely on interference filters. However, it has been specifically designed as a reference instrument for helioseismology, and its ability to determine AOD from transmitted and scattered monochromatic radiation at 769.9 nm inside a potassium vapour cell in the presence of a permanent magnetic field is evaluated in this paper. Particularly, the use of an exposed mirror arrangement to collect sunlight as well as the Sun–laboratory velocity dependence of the scattered component introduces some important inconveniences to overcome when we perform the instrument's calibration. We have solved this problem using a quasi-continuous Langley calibration technique and a refinement procedure to correct for calibration errors as well as for the fictitious diurnal cycle on AOD data. Our results showed similar calibration errors retrieved by means of this quasi-continuous Langley technique applied in different aerosol load events (from 0.04 to 0.3, provided aerosol concentration remains constant throughout the calibration interval. It assures the validity of this technique when it is applied in those periods with relatively high aerosol content. The comparative analysis between the recovered AOD data set from the Mark-I and collocated quasi-simultaneous data from the Cimel-AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR instruments showed an absolute mean bias ≤ 0.01 in the 10- and 12-year comparison, respectively. High correlation coefficients between AERONET and Mark-I and PFR/Mark-I pairs confirmed a very good linear

  7. Recovering Long-term Aerosol Optical Depth Series (1976–2012 from an Astronomical Potassium-based Resonance Scattering Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barreto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 37 year long-term series of monochromatic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD has been recovered from solar irradiance measurements performed with the solar spectrometer Mark-I, deployed at Izaña mountain since 1976. The instrument operation is based on the method of resonant scattering, which presents a long-term stability and high precision in comparison to other instruments based on interference filters. However, it has been specifically designed as a reference instrument for helioseismology, and its ability to determine AOD from transmitted and scattered monochromatic radiation at 769.9 nm inside a potassium vapor cell in the presence of a permanent magnetic field is evaluated in this paper. Particularly, the use of an exposed mirrors arrangement to collect sunlight as well as the Sun-laboratory velocity dependence of the scattered component introduces some inconveniences when we perform the instrument's calibration. We have solved this problem using a quasi-continuous Langley calibration technique and a refinement procedure to correct for calibration errors as well as for the fictitious diurnal cycle on AOD data. Our results showed that calibration errors associated to the quasi-continuous Langley technique are not dependent on aerosol load, provided aerosol concentration remains constant throughout the day, assuring the validity of this technique for those periods with relatively high aerosol content required to calibrate the scattered component. The comparative analysis between the recovered AOD dataset from Mark-I and collocated quasi-simultaneous data from Cimel AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR instruments showed an absolute mean bias ≤ 0.01 in the 11 year and 12 year comparison, respectively. High correlation coefficients between AERONET/Mark-I and PFR/Mark-I pairs confirmed a very good linear relationship between instruments, proving that recovered AOD data series from Mark-I can be used together PFR

  8. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land based on a time series technique using MSG/SEVIRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the joint retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD and aerosol type, using Meteosat Second Generation – Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imagers (MSG/SEVIRI observations in two solar channels, is presented. The retrieval is based on a Time Series (TS technique, which makes use of the two visible bands at 0.6 μm and 0.8 μm in three orderly scan times (15 min interval between two scans to retrieve the AOD over land. Using the radiative transfer equation for plane-parallel atmosphere, two coupled differential equations for the upward and downward fluxes are derived. The boundary conditions for the upward and downward fluxes at the top and at the bottom of the atmosphere are used in these equations to provide an analytic solution for the AOD. To derive these fluxes, the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA and asymmetry factor are required to provide a solution. These are provided from a set of six pre-defined aerosol types with the SSA and asymmetry factor. We assume one aerosol type for a grid of 1°×1° and the surface reflectance changes little between two subsequent observations. A k-ratio approach is used in the inversion to find the best solution of atmospheric properties and surface reflectance. The k-ratio approach assumes that the surface reflectance is little influenced by aerosol scattering at 1.6 μm and therefore the ratio of surface reflectances in the solar band for two subsequent observations can be well-approximated by the ratio of the reflectances at 1.6 μm. A further assumption is that the surface reflectance varies only slightly over a period of 30 min. The algorithm makes use of numerical minimisation routines to obtain the optimal solution of atmospheric properties and surface reflectance by selection of the most suitable aerosol type from pre-defined sets.

    A detailed analysis of the retrieval results shows that it is suitable for AOD retrieval over land from SEVIRI data

  9. Aerosol optical depth retrieval in the Arctic region using MODIS based on prior knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is especially vulnerable to the long-term transport of aerosols and other pollutants because aerosols can affect the albedo of the surface by deposition on snow and ice. However, aerosol observations for this area are sparse and hence there is considerable uncertainty in the knowledge on the properties of the Arctic aerosol. Arctic aerosol observations are needed to fill this gap because these are among the basic and most important parameters for researching the Arctic environment. Atmospheric remote sensing using satellites offers us an opportunity to describe the aerosol distribution in terms of both local, regional and global coverage. However, AOD retrieval over a bright surface remains a difficult task because it is hard to separate and explicitly describe the contribution of the observed signal reflected by the variable surface and back scattering by the semi-transparent aerosols, especially with a large solar or sensor zenith angle. In this paper, an approach using a synergetic approach with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data based on prior knowledge is presented. The detailed analysis of the model demonstrates that it is suitable for Arctic region AOD retrieval. Six AERONET stations at high latitude (Andenes, Barrow, Ittoqqortoormiit, OPAL, Thule, and Tiksi were used for validation, and the correlation coefficient between retrieved AODs and AERONET AODs was 0.75 and the retrieval absolute error is approximately 0.1, while the relative error is 20% (at some stations with clear skies as low as 10% was found. Furthermore, the Russian wildfires that occurred in late July of 2010 and their effect on the Arctic environment is presented; Satellite retrieved AODs in the Arctic increased to 1.0 during 1 August and 15 August 2010, even 2.0, during the burning phase, and subsequently returned to normal values (lower than 0.1, which was fully in line with the AERONET observations. This indicates that the fire plumes

  10. Aerus-GEO: newly available satellite-derived aerosol optical depth product over Europe and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, D.; Roujean, J. L.; Ceamanos, X.; Six, B.; Suman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The major difficulty in detecting the aerosol signal from visible and near-infrared remote sensing observations is to reach the proper separation of the components related to the atmosphere and the surface. A method is proposed to circumvent this issue by exploiting the directional and temporal dimensions of the satellite signal through the use of a semi-empirical kernel-driven model for the surface/atmosphere coupled system. This algorithm was implemented by the ICARE Data Center (http://www.icare.univ-lille1.fr), which operationally disseminates a daily AOD product at 670 nm over the MSG disk since 2014. The proposed method referred to as AERUS-GEO (Aerosol and surface albEdo Retrieval Using a directional Splitting method - application to GEO data) is applied to three spectral bands (0.6 mm, 0.8 mm, and 1.6 mm) of MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) observations, which scan Europe, Africa, and the Eastern part of South America every 15 minutes. The daily AOD estimates at 0.63μm has been extensively validated. In contrast, the Angstrom coefficient is still going through validation and we will show the differences between the MSG derived Angstrom exponent with that of CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) near-real time aerosol product. The impact of aerosol type on the aerosol radiative forcing will be presented as a part of future development plan.

  11. Dust Aerosol, Clouds, and the Atmospheric Optical Depth Record over 5 Mars Years of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Mark T.; Wolff, Michael J.; Bell, James F., III; Smith, Michael D.; Cantor, Bruce A.; Smith, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Dust aerosol plays a fundamental role in the behavior and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. The first five Mars years of Mars Exploration Rover data provide an unprecedented record of the dust load at two sites. This record is useful for characterization of the atmosphere at the sites and as ground truth for orbital observations. Atmospheric extinction optical depths have been derived from solar images after calibration and correction for time-varying dust that has accumulated on the camera windows. The record includes local, regional, and globally extensive dust storms. Comparison with contemporaneous thermal infrared data suggests significant variation in the size of the dust aerosols, with a 1 micrometer effective radius during northern summer and a 2 micrometer effective radius at the onset of a dust lifting event. The solar longitude (L (sub s)) 20-136 degrees period is also characterized by the presence of cirriform clouds at the Opportunity site, especially near LS = 50 and 115 degrees. In addition to water ice clouds, a water ice haze may also be present, and carbon dioxide clouds may be present early in the season. Variations in dust opacity are important to the energy balance of each site, and work with seasonal variations in insolation to control dust devil frequency at the Spirit site.

  12. Assessment of the aerosol optical depths measured by satellite-based passive remote sensors in the Alberta oil sands region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioris, Christopher E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Abboud, Ihab

    2017-02-01

    Several satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products are assessed in terms of their data quality in the Alberta oil sands region. The instruments consist of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), and AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer). The AOD data products are examined in terms of multiplicative and additive biases determined using local Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) (AEROCAN) stations. Correlation with ground-based data is used to assess whether the satellite-based AODs capture day-to-day, month-to-month, and spatial variability. The ability of the satellite AOD products to capture interannual variability is assessed at Albian mine and Shell Muskeg River, two neighbouring sites in the northern mining region where a statistically significant positive trend (2002-2015) in PM2.5 mass density exists. An increasing trend of similar amplitude (˜ 5 % year-1) is observed in this northern mining region using some of the satellite AOD products.

  13. Comparative measurements of total ozone amount and aerosol optical depth during a campaign at El Arenosillo, Huelva, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de La Casinière

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A one week field campaign took place in September 2002 at El Arenosillo, Spain. The objective was to compare total ozone column (TOC and aerosol optical depth (AOD from near ultraviolet to near infrared, measured by several Spanish and French instruments. Three spectroradiometers, Brewer, SPUV02, and LICOR, and a CIMEL photometer, have been used simultaneously and the results are presented for four clear days. TOC values are given by the Brewer instrument, and by SPUV02, using two different methods. The ground instruments compare satisfactorily (within 5 DU and the values are consistent with TOMS data (within 10 DU.

    AOD from the various instruments are compared at seven different wavelengths between 320 nm and 1020 nm: the agreement is very good at 350, 380, and 870 nm; at the four other wavelengths the difference is smaller than 0.03, which can be explained by a relative difference of 4% only between the calibrations of the various instruments. Larger AOD diurnal variations were observed at short wavelengths than in the visible and near infrared; this is most likely due to changes in aerosol size along the day, during the campaign.

  14. Dust aerosol, clouds, and the atmospheric optical depth record over 5 Mars years of the Mars Exploration Rover mission

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmon, Mark T; Bell, James F; Smith, Michael D; Cantor, Bruce A; Smith, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Dust aerosol plays a fundamental role in the behavior and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. The first five Mars years of Mars Exploration Rover data provide an unprecedented record of the dust load at two sites. This record is useful for characterization of the atmosphere at the sites and as ground truth for orbital observations. Atmospheric extinction optical depths have been derived from solar images after calibration and correction for time-varying dust that has accumulated on the camera windows. The record includes local, regional, and globally extensive dust storms. Comparison with contemporaneous thermal infrared data suggests significant variation in the size of the dust aerosols, with a 1 {\\mu}m effective radius during northern summer and a 2 {\\mu}m effective radius at the onset of a dust lifting event. The solar longitude (LS) 20-136{\\deg} period is also characterized by the presence of cirriform clouds at the Opportunity site, especially near LS=50 and 115{\\deg}. In addition to water ice clouds, ...

  15. Long-term trends in Aerosol Optical Depth over Indian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S. Suresh; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    The anthropogenic activities associated with modernization, industrialization and urbanization have been leading to a sustained increase in the amounts of aerosols (suspended particles in the atmosphere) and trace gases emitted into the atmosphere.With a view to address this issue, over the south-Asian region, a carefully planned activity has been taken up under the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) by setting up a national network of aerosol observatories, known as ARFINET (Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India Network), being established in a phased manner over a period of years.This activity, with the long-term objective of generating an aerosol database over the Indian sub-continent, initiated in mid 1980s has now matured well with a network consisting of 35 observatories spread over the mainland and adjoining oceans. Statistically significant and consistent increasing trends in AOD are seen at most of the locations, especially where the data goes back to 1980s.Examining the recent values of turbidity coefficients with those reported from sun photometric measurements ~ 50 years ago revealed that the trend has been consistent over the decades and a phenomenal increase in aerosol loading has taken place.Seasonally, the rate of increase is consistently high during the dry months (December to March) over the entire region where as the trends are rather inconsistent and weak during the pre-monsoon (April to May) and summer monsoon period (June to September). The trends in the spectral variation of AOD reveal the significance of anthropogenic activities on the increasing trend in AOD. Examining these with climate variables such as seasonal and regional rainfall, it is seen that the dry season depicts a decreasing trend in the total number of rainy days over the Indian region. The insignificant trend in AOD observed, over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), a regional hot spot of aerosols, during the pre-monsoon and summer monsoon season is mainly attributed to the

  16. Long term trend in Aerosol Optical Depth over India from ARFINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    BABU, S.; Moorthy, K.; Mr, M.; Gogoi, M.; Satheesh, S.; Niranjan, K.; Gopal, K.; Bhuyan, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The anthropogenic activities associated with modernization, industrialization and urbanization have been leading to a sustained increase in the amounts of aerosols (particles) and trace gases emitted into the atmosphere and this is believed to cause changes to Earth's climate that are irreversible at least at regional levels, if not globally (IPCC, 2007). In this context, daily analysis of long term (1985 - 2012) measurement of spectral AODs from a network (ARFINET) of aerosol observatories over Indian sub-continent, as a part of the Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India (ARFI) project of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) have been analyzed which revealed an increasing trend (~ 0.0065 per year) with significant seasonal variability. The trend is statistically significant and consistent, especially when the data goes back to 1980s, and the rate of increase appears to increase in the later decades. Examining the current values of columnar turbidity coefficients with those measured 40 years ago showed a phenomenal increase in aerosol loading with the long term average trend being comparable to the current. Seasonally, the rate of increase is consistently high during the dry winter months (December to March) over the entire region where as the trends are rather inconsistent during the pre-monsoon (April to May) and summer monsoon period (June to September). The trend in the spectral variation of AOD revealed the significant anthropogenic impact on the increasing trend in AOD. Examining these with climate variables such as seasonal and regional rainfall, it is seen that the dry season depicts a decreasing trend in the total number of rainy days over the Indian region while the number of rainy days during the pre-monsoon and monsoon season showed an increasing trend. The insignificant trend in AOD observed, over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), a regional hot spot of aerosols, during the pre-monsoon and summer monsoon season is mainly attributed to the combined

  17. Lidar Ratios for Dust Aerosols Derived From Retrievals of CALIPSO Visible Extinction Profiles Constrained by Optical Depths from MODIS-Aqua and CALIPSO/CloudSat Ocean Surface Reflectance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stuart A.; Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CALIPSO's (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) analysis algorithms generally require the use of tabulated values of the lidar ratio in order to retrieve aerosol extinction and optical depth from measured profiles of attenuated backscatter. However, for any given time or location, the lidar ratio for a given aerosol type can differ from the tabulated value. To gain some insight as to the extent of the variability, we here calculate the lidar ratio for dust aerosols using aerosol optical depth constraints from two sources. Daytime measurements are constrained using Level 2, Collection 5, 550-nm aerosol optical depth measurements made over the ocean by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the Aqua satellite, which flies in formation with CALIPSO. We also retrieve lidar ratios from night-time profiles constrained by aerosol column optical depths obtained by analysis of CALIPSO and CloudSat backscatter signals from the ocean surface.

  18. Aerosol optical depths at Mohal-Kullu in the northwestern Indian Himalayan high altitude station during ICARB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagdish C Kuniyal; Alpana Thakur; Harinder K Thakur; Sanjeev Sharma; P Pant; Pan S Rawat; K Krishna Moorthy

    2009-02-01

    First time observations of spectral aerosol optical depths (AODs) at Mohal (31.9°N, 77.11°E; altitude 1154m amsl) in the Kullu valley, located in the northwestern Indian Himalayan region, have been carried out during Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB), as a part of the Indian Space Research Organisation–Geosphere Biosphere Program (ISRO–GBP). AODs at six wavelengths are obtained using Microtops-II Sunphotometer and Ozonometer. The monthly mean values of AOD at 500 nm are found to be 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.24 ± 0.02 during March and April, 2006 respectively. However, their monthly mean values are 0.33 ± 0.04 at 380 nm and 0.20 ± 0.03 nm at 870 nm during March 2006 and 0.31 ± 0.3 at 380 nm and 0.17 ± 0.2 at 870 nm during April 2006, showing a gradual decrease in AOD with wavelength. The Ångstrom wavelength exponent '' had a mean value of 0.72 ± 0.05, implying reduced dominance of fine particles. Further, the afternoon AOD values are higher as compared to forenoon values by ∼33.0% during March and by ∼9.0% during April 2006 and are attributed to the pollutant lifted up from the valley by the evolving boundary layer. Besides the long-range transportation of aerosol particles by airmass from the Great Sahara and the Thar Desert regions to the observing site, the high values of AODs have also been influenced by biomass burning and frequent incidents of forest fire at local levels.

  19. The comparison of MODIS-Aqua (C5 and CALIOP (V2 & V3 aerosol optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Redemann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We assess the consistency between instantaneously collocated level-2 aerosol optical depth (AOD retrievals from MODIS-Aqua (C5 and CALIOP (Version 2 & 3, comparing the standard MODIS AOD (MYD04_L2 data to the AOD calculated from CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for both the previous release (V2 and the latest release (V3 of CALIOP data. Based on data collected in January 2007, we investigate the most useful criteria for screening the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals to achieve the best agreement between the two data sets. Applying these criteria to eight months of data (Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct 2007 and 2009, we find an order of magnitude increase for the CALIOP V3 data density (by comparison to V2, that is generally accompanied by equal or better agreement with MODIS AOD. Differences in global, monthly mean, over-ocean AOD (532 nm between CALIOP and MODIS range between 0.03 and 0.04 for CALIOP V3, with CALIOP generally biased low, when all available data from both sensors are considered. Root-mean-squares (RMS differences in instantaneously collocated AOD retrievals by the two instruments are reduced from values ranging between 0.14 and 0.19 using the unscreened V3 data to values ranging from 0.09 to 0.1 for the screened data. A restriction to scenes with cloud fractions less than 1% (as defined in the MODIS aerosol retrievals generally results in improved correlation (R2>0.5, except for the month of July when correlations remain relatively lower. Regional assessments show hot spots in disagreement between the two sensors in Asian outflow during April and off the coast of South Africa in July.

  20. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land based on a time series technique using MSG/SERIVI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mei

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the joint retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD and surface reflectance, using Meteosat Second Generation – Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imagers (MSG/SEVIRI observations in two solar channels, is presented. The retrieval is based on a time series (TS technique, which makes use of the two visible bands at 0.6 μm and 0.8 μm in three orderly scan times (15 min interval between two scans to retrieve the AOD over land. Using the radiative transfer equation for plane-parallel atmospheres two coupled differential equations for the upward and downward fluxes are derived. The boundary conditions for the upward and downward fluxes at the top and at the bottom of the atmosphere are used in these equations to provide an analytic solution for the surface reflectance. To derive these fluxes, the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA and asymmetry factor are required to provide a solution. These are provided from a set of six pre-defined aerosol types with the SSA and asymmetry factor (g. We assume one aerosol type for a grid of 1° × 1° and the surface reflectance changes little between two consequent scans. A k approximation was used in the inversion to find the best solution of atmospheric properties and surface reflectance. The algorithm makes use of numerical minimisation routines to obtain the optimal solution of atmospheric properties and surface reflectance by selection of the most suitable aerosol type from pre-defined sets. Also, it is assumed that the surface reflectance is little influenced by aerosol scattering at 1.6 μm and therefore the ratio of surface reflectances in the solar band for two consequent scans can be well-approximated by the ratio of the reflectances at 1.6 μm. A further assumption is that the surface reflectance varies only slightly over a period of 30 min.

    A detailed analysis of the retrieval results show that it is suitable for AOD retrieval over land. Six Aerosol

  1. Characteristics of distribution and seasonal variation of aerosol optical depth in eastern China with MODIS products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chengcai; MAO Jietai; LAU Kai-Hon Alexis; CHEN Jay-Chung; YUAN Zibing; LIU Xiaoyang; ZHU Aihua; LIU Guiqing

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of MODIS aerosol products from the NASA Terra Satellite is validated in comparison with the results of sun-photometer observations in Beijing and Hong Kong. By analyzing the MODIS aerosol products within the period of August 2000 to April 2003, it is believed that human activities are the main source of aerosols in the eastern part of China. This is based on the facts that all areas with relatively high values are consistent with regions of dense population and fast economic development, such as the North China Plain, the Sichuan Basin and the Pearl River Delta. It is also supported by the distribution of ?ngstr?m exponents showing that most aerosols in the eastern part of China are closely related to human activities, excepting the strong sandstorm episodes occurring in spring, fall and winter. In contrast to developed countries, the ?ngstr?m exponent of urban area in China is lower than its surroundings, indicating that the contribution of local floating dust and soot attributed to human activities is significant. Results presented in this paper provide important data for further research on climatic change and environmental study.

  2. Modeling Study of the Impact of Heterogeneous Reactions on Dust Surfaces on Aerosol Optical Depth and Direct Radiative Forcing over East Asia in Springtime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Wei; HAN Zhi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distributions and interannual variations of aerosol concentrations, aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol direct radiative forcings, and their responses to heterogeneous reactions on dust surfaces over East Asia in March 2006-10 were investigated by utilizing a regional coupled climate-chemistry/aerosol model. Anthropogenic aerosol concentrations (inorganic + carbonaceous) were higher in March 2006 and 2008, whereas soil dust reached its highest levels in March 2006 and 2010, resulting in stronger aerosol radiative forcings in these periods. The domain and five-year (2006-10) monthly mean concentrations of anthropogenic and dust aerosols, AOD, and radiative forcings at the surface (SURF) and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in March were 2.4 μg m 3 13.1 lag m^-3, 0.18, -19.0 W m^-2, and -7.4 W m^-2, respectively. Heterogeneous reactions led to an increase of total inorganic aerosol concentration; however, the ambient inorganic aerosol concentration decreased, resulting in a smaller AOD and weaker aerosol radiative forcings. In March 2006 and 2010, the changes in ambient inorganic aerosols, AOD, and aerosol radiative forcings were more evident. In terms of the domain and five-year averages, the total inorganic aerosol concentrations increased by 13.7% (0.17 μg m^-3) due to heterogeneous reactions, but the ambient inorganic aerosol concentrations were reduced by 10.5% (0.13 lag m-3). As a result, the changes in AOD, SURF and TOA radiative forcings were estimated to be -3.9% (-0.007), -1.7% (0.34 W m^-2), and -4.3% (0.34 W m^-2), respectively, in March over East Asia.

  3. Studies of aerosol optical depth with the use of Microtops II sun photometers and MODIS detectors in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzka, Olga; Makuch, Przemysław; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Zieliński, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Ulevičius, Vidmantas; Strzałkowska, Agata; Rozwadowska, Anna; Gutowska, Dorota

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we describe the results of a research campaign dedicated to the studies of aerosol optical properties in different regions of both the open Baltic Sea and its coastal areas. During the campaign we carried out simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth at 4 stations with the use of the hand-held Microtops II sun photometers. The studies were complemented with aerosol data provided by the MODIS. In order to obtain the full picture of aerosol situation over the study area, we added to our analyses the air mass back-trajectories at various altitudes as well as wind fields. Such complex information facilitated proper conclusions regarding aerosol optical depth and Ångström exponent for the four locations and discussion of the changes of aerosol properties with distance and with changes of meteorological factors. We also show that the Microtops II sun photometers are reliable instruments for field campaigns. They are easy to operate and provide good quality results.

  4. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth over Water and over Land from Multi-Spectral Electro-Optical Sensors on Satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Veefkind, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Aerosols have been identified as an important factor in the regulation of the Earth climate. The incoming solar radiation is scattered by aerosols, which induces a negative (cooling) effect on the atmospheric radiation balance. The present contribution is focused on the detection of aerosols by usin

  5. Temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth in the Sahel region in relation to vegetation remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, B. N.; Fraser, R. S.; Eck, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    In order to monitor the aerosol characteristics needed for atmospheric correction of remotely sensed data, a network of sun photometers was established in the Sahel region of Senegal, Mali, and Niger. Data analysis suggests that there is a high spatial variability of the aerosol optical thickness tau(a) in the western Sahel region. At a 67 percent confidence level the instantaneous values of tau(a) can be extrapolated approximately 270-400 km with an error tolerance of 50 percent. Spatial variability in the dry season is found to be of a similar magnitude. The ranges of variations in the NDVI in the Sahel region are shown to be approximately 0.02 and 0.01, respectively, due to commonly observed fluctuations in the aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size distribution.

  6. Determination of Aerosol Optical Depth with a Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer using in-place calibrations at a coastal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denn, F. M.; Fabbri, B. E.; Schuster, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Direct and indirect aerosol effects are identified among the largest sources of uncertainty in model projections of climate change (IPCC AR-4). Even though aerosol optical depths (AODs) are currently derived on a global scale from satellite measurements as well as within data assimilation models, ground-based sun photometer measurements of AOD are extremely important for validating these indirect retrievals. Calibration of surface sun photometers requires knowledge of the instrument-specific solar signal at each measurement channel (V0), determined by doing Langley extrapolations. V0s are often difficult to determine at ground sites, and are very difficult to obtain at the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy (CERES) Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) site. Some reasons for this difficulty are varying humidity, aerosol loading, and generally unstable atmospheric conditions. For these reasons, many researchers prefer to determine instrument V0s at pristine mountain sites, such as Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) Hawaii, where these problems are greatly reduced. However, taking an instrument to a mountain top location can introduce a new set of problems, such as shipping damage and potential environmental influences on the instrument (temperature). For instruments with an exposed Spectralon diffuser such as the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), diffuser bleaching by ultraviolet radiation and possible distortion of the diffuser by changes in atmospheric pressure can occur. For these reasons, our goal is to determine AODs for our MFRSR using V0s determined in-place at the COVE site. The reference AOD data is from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, which is part of NASA's Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET). We show that in-place V0s can be determined with nearly the same precision as at a mountain site, and that the resultant AODs obtained using these in-place V0s agree better with AERONET than the AODs determined using the mountain derived V0s. The

  7. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison and fine-mode fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations and fine-mode fraction. Arctic haze observed in <2 km and 2–4 km over Alaska in April 2008 originated mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively, according to aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements. The Ångström exponent for these air masses is 1.4 ± 0.3 and 1.7 ± 0.1, respectively, when derived at 499 nm from a second-order polynomial fit to the AOD spectra measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 over 354–2139 nm. We examine 55 vertical profiles selected from all phases of the experiment. For two thirds of them, the AOD spectra are within 3% + 0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes from local biomass burning observed in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Ångström exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD > 0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference (in both directions from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within ±0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements between 340–1640 nm for five overpass events.

  8. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and MODIS to AERONET AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 Mass at Bondville, Illinois Stratified by Chemical Composition, RH, Particle Size, and Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. C.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.

    2008-05-01

    The USEPA is interested in using satellite remote sensing data to estimate levels of PM2.5. Here we report on comparisons of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to IMPROVE network PM2.5 mass and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based AOD. Before we compare GASP and MODIS AOD to PM2.5, we first evaluate satellite AOD using the ground-based AERONET measurements and how it varies by aerosol chemical composition and size distribution. We focus attention on the Bondville, Illinois site because there is collocated IMPROVE sampling and an AERONET site. GASP provides aerosol optical depth at 0.55 um using top of atmosphere visible channel radiance measured from GOES east and GOES west. Time resolution is typically every 30 minutes during daylight hours. MODIS provides typically once per day AOD for any given location. The IMPROVE sampler provides a 24-hour integrated sample of PM10 mass, and PM2.5 mass and elemental composition on a one day in three schedule. AERONET provides aerosol optical depth at multiple wavelengths and aerosol size distribution as well as other derived parameters such as Angstrom exponent from ground based daytime measurements. We stratified cases by RH group, major chemical component, size distribution, and season. GOES AOD correlated best with PM2.5 mass during periods with mainly small particles, moderate RH, and sulfate dominated aerosol. It correlated poorly when RH is very high or low, aerosol is primarily organic, and when coarse to fine mass ratio is high. GASP AOD also correlated best with AERONET AOD when particles are mainly fine, suggesting the aerosol model assumptions (e.g. size distribution) may need to be varied geographically for GASP to achieve better AOD results.

  9. SMEX02 Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Properties Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of observations of atmospheric parameters including spectral aerosol optical depths, precipitable water, sky radiance distributions and...

  10. Aerosol optical depth over a remote semi-arid region of South Africa from spectral measurements of the daytime solar extinction and the nighttime stellar extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, P.; Winkler, H.; Fourie, P.; Piketh, S.; Makgopa, B.; Helas, G.; Andreae, M. O.

    Spectral daytime aerosol optical depths have been measured at Sutherland, South Africa (32°22'S, 20°48'E), from January 1998 to November 1999. Sutherland is located in the semi-arid Karoo desert, approximately 400-km northeast from Cape Town. The site, remote from major sources of aerosols, hosts the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), where nighttime stellar extinction is being measured. The comparison of daytime and nighttime measurements for the years 1998-1999 makes it possible to validate the astronomical dataset of aerosol optical depth ( τa) dating back to 1991. The 1998 and 1999 annually averaged daytime τa at 500 nm are 0.04±0.04 and 0.06±0.06, respectively. Half-day averages vary between 0.03 and 0.44, with peak values in August-September. This pronounced seasonality is linked to the biomass-burning season in the Southern Hemisphere. Smoke haze layers transported to Sutherland originated primarily on the African landmass at latitudes between 10° and 20°S and passed over Namibia and Angola. On one occasion, aerosols from fires in Brazil transported across the Atlantic Ocean were likely detected. The haze layers reaching Sutherland are therefore at least 2-3 days old. The spectral dependence of the aerosol optical depth for the smoke layers supports the bimodality of the volume size distribution for biomass burning aerosols. The accumulation mode has a volume modal diameter of 0.32 μm, consistent with the hypothesis of aged haze. The stellar measurements (1991-2001) show that, due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, the atmospheric extinction depth at 550 nm in the years 1991-1993 increased by 33% with respect to the average value (0.14±0.03) for the period 1994-2001. Outside the Pinatubo event, extinction is largest in the period 1997-1999.

  11. A new zenith-looking narrow-band radiometer-based system (ZEN) for dust aerosol optical depth monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, A. Fernando; Cuevas, Emilio; Torres, Benjamín; Barreto, África; García, Rosa D.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Ángel M.; López, César; Ramos, Ramón

    2017-02-01

    A new zenith-looking narrow-band radiometer based system (ZEN), conceived for dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) monitoring, is presented in this paper. The ZEN system comprises a new radiometer (ZEN-R41) and a methodology for AOD retrieval (ZEN-LUT). ZEN-R41 has been designed to be stand alone and without moving parts, making it a low-cost and robust instrument with low maintenance, appropriate for deployment in remote and unpopulated desert areas. The ZEN-LUT method is based on the comparison of the measured zenith sky radiance (ZSR) with a look-up table (LUT) of computed ZSRs. The LUT is generated with the LibRadtran radiative transfer code. The sensitivity study proved that the ZEN-LUT method is appropriate for inferring AOD from ZSR measurements with an AOD standard uncertainty up to 0.06 for AOD500 nm ˜ 0.5 and up to 0.15 for AOD500 nm ˜ 1.0, considering instrumental errors of 5 %. The validation of the ZEN-LUT technique was performed using data from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Cimel Electronique 318 photometers (CE318). A comparison between AOD obtained by applying the ZEN-LUT method on ZSRs (inferred from CE318 diffuse-sky measurements) and AOD provided by AERONET (derived from CE318 direct-sun measurements) was carried out at three sites characterized by a regular presence of desert mineral dust aerosols: Izaña and Santa Cruz in the Canary Islands and Tamanrasset in Algeria. The results show a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.99 to 0.97, and root mean square errors (RMSE) ranging from 0.010 at Izaña to 0.032 at Tamanrasset. The comparison of ZSR values from ZEN-R41 and the CE318 showed absolute relative mean bias (RMB) < 10 %. ZEN-R41 AOD values inferred from ZEN-LUT methodology were compared with AOD provided by AERONET, showing a fairly good agreement in all wavelengths, with mean absolute AOD differences < 0.030 and R2 higher than 0.97.

  12. Changes in ground-level PM mass concentration and column aerosol optical depth over East Asia during 2004-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, J.; Kim, S. W.; Park, R.; Yoon, S. C.; Sugimoto, N.; Park, J. S.; Hong, J.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-year records of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), ground-level particulate matter (PM) mass concentration, cloud-aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarization (CALIOP), and ground-level lidar were analyzed to investigate seasonal and annual changes of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM mass concentration over East Asia. Least mean square fit method is applied to detect the trends and their magnitudes for each selected regions and stations. Eleven-year MODIS measurements show generally increasing trends in both AOD (1.18 % yr-1) and Ångström exponent (0.98 % yr-1), especially over the east coastal industrialized region in China. Monthly variation of AOD show maximum value at April-July, which were related to the progress of summer monsoon rain band and stationary continental air mass on the northeast of Asia. Increasing trends of AOD were found for eight cites in China (0.80 % yr-1) and Seoul site, Korea (0.40 % yr-1), whereas no significant change were shown in Gosan background site (0.04 % yr-1) and decreasing trend at five background sites in Japan (-0.42 % yr-1). Contrasting to AOD trend, all fifteen sites in China (-1.28 % yr-1), Korea (-2.77 % yr-1), and Japan (-2.03 % yr-1) showed decreasing trend of PM10 mass concentration. Also, PM2.5 mass concentration at Beijing, Seoul, Rishiri, and Oki show significant decreasing trend of -1.16 % yr-1. To further discuss the opposite trend of surface PM mass concentration and column AOD, we investigate vertical aerosol profile from lidar measurements. AOD estimated for planetary boundary layer (surface~1.5 km altitude; AODPBL) from CALIOP measurements over East China show decreasing trend of -1.71 % yr-1 over the period of 2007-2014, wherever AOD estimated for free troposphere (1.5 km~5 km altitude; AODFT) show increasing trend of 2.92 % yr-1. In addition, ground-level lidar measurements in Seoul show decreasing AODPBL trend of -2.57 % yr-1, whereas, AODFT show no significant change (-0.44 % yr

  13. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  14. Comparison of GOES and MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) to aerosol robotic network (AERONET) AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 mass at Bondville, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Mark; Kondragunta, Shobha; Ciren, Pubu; Xu, Chuanyu

    2009-09-01

    Collocated Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) chemically speciated data, mass of PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and size distribution at Bondville, IL, were compared with satellite-derived AOD. This was done to evaluate the quality of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data and their potential to predict surface PM2.5 concentrations. MODIS AOD correlated better to AERONET AOD (r = 0.835) than did GOES AOD (r = 0.523). MODIS and GOES AOD compared better to AERONET AOD when the particle size distribution was dominated by fine mode. For all three AOD methods, correlation between AOD and PM2.5 concentration was highest in autumn and lowest in winter. The AERONET AOD-PM2.5 relationship was strongest with moderate relative humidity (RH). At low RH, AOD attributable to coarse mass degrades the relationship; at high RH, added AOD from water growth appears to mask the relationship. For locations such as many in the central and western United States with substantial coarse mass, coarse mass contributions to AOD may make predictions of PM2.5 from AOD data problematic. Seasonal and diurnal variations in particle size distributions, RH, and seasonal changes in boundary layer height need to be accounted for to use satellite AOD to predict surface PM2.5.

  15. Spectral Discrimination of Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosol Optical Depth from AERONET Direct Sun Data of Singapore and South-East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas Cortijo, S.; Chew, B.; Liew, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with Angstrom exp. values greater than 2 indicating small (fine mode) particles associated with urban pollution and bio-mass burning. Around this region, forest fires are a regular occurrence during the dry season, specially near the large land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. The practice of clearing land by burning the primary and sometimes secondary forest, results in a smog-like haze covering large areas of regional cities such as cities Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and sometimes the south of Thailand, often reducing visibility and increasing health problems for the local population. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from the industrial and urban areas. The proximity to the sea adds a possible oceanic source. However, as stated above and depending on the time of the year, there can be a strong bio-mass component coming from forest fires from various regions of the neighboring countries. Bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. In this work, we analyze three years of direct Sun measurements performed with a multi-channel Cimel Sun-Photometer (part of the AERONET network) located at our site. In order to identify bio-mass burning events in this region, we perform a spectral discrimination between coarse and fine mode optical depth; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponents (and its derivative) are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set.

  16. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over Mountains in Central China Based on a Sun-Sky Radiometer Site of SONET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 3 km Dark Target (DT aerosol optical depth (AOD products, 10 km DT and Deep Blue (DB AOD products from the Collection 6 (C6 product data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS are compared with Sun-sky Radiometer Network (SONET measurements at Song Mountain in central China, where ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol properties are still very limited. The seasonal variations of AODs are significant in the Song Mountain region, with higher AODs in spring and summer and lower AODs in autumn and winter. Annual mean AODs (0.55 µm vary in the range of 0.5–0.7, which indicates particle matter (PM pollutions in this mountain region. Validation against one-year ground-based measurements shows that AOD retrievals from the MODIS onboard Aqua satellite are better than those from the Terra satellite in Song Mountain. The 3 km and 10 km AODs from DT algorithms are comparable over this region, while the AOD accuracy of DB algorithm is relatively lower. However, the spatial coverage of DB products is higher than that of 10 km DT products. Moreover, the optical and microphysical characteristics of aerosols at Song Mountain are analyzed on the basis of SONET observations. It suggests that coarse-mode aerosol particles dominate in spring, and fine-mode particles dominate in summer. The aerosol property models are also established and compared to aerosol types used by MODIS algorithm.

  17. Improvement of aerosol optical depth retrieval from MODIS spectral reflectance over the global ocean using new aerosol models archived from AERONET inversion data and tri-axial ellipsoidal dust database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available New over-ocean aerosol models are developed by integrating the inversion data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun/sky radiometers with a database for the optical properties of tri-axial ellipsoid particles. The new aerosol models allow more accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS in the case of high AOD (AOD > 0.3. The aerosol models are categorized by using the fine-mode fraction (FMF at 550 nm and the single-scattering albedo (SSA at 440 nm from the AERONET inversion data to include a variety of aerosol types found around the globe. For each aerosol model, the changes in the aerosol optical properties (AOPs as functions of AOD are considered to better represent aerosol characteristics. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and MODIS for the period from 2003 to 2010 show that the use of the new aerosol models enhances the AOD accuracy with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93 and a regression slope of 0.99 compared to 0.92 and 0.85 calculated using the MODIS Collection 5 data. Moreover, the percentage of data within an expected error of ± (0.03 + 0.05 × AOD is increased from 62% to 64% for overall data and from 39% to 5% for AOD > 0.3. Errors in the retrieved AOD are further characterized with respect to the Ångström exponent (AE, scattering angle (Θ, SSA, and air mass factor (AMF. Due to more realistic AOPs assumptions, the new algorithm generally reduces systematic errors in the retrieved AODs compared with the current operational algorithm. In particular, the underestimation of fine-dominated AOD and the scattering angle dependence of dust-dominated AOD are significantly mitigated as results of the new algorithm's improved treatment of aerosol size distribution and dust particle nonsphericity.

  18. Validating MODIS above-cloud aerosol optical depth retrieved from "color ratio" algorithm using direct measurements made by NASA's airborne AATS and 4STAR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rosenheimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-10-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the "color ratio" method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASA's airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne matchups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference < 0.1), with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 %). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50 % for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite-based retrievals.

  19. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, conducted in North America in April and June–July 2008, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability. The AOD spectra spanning 354–2139 nm measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 are generally less wavelength-dependent below 2 km (499-nm Angstrom exponent 1.4 ± 0.3 than in 2–4 km (1.6–1.8 for Alaska in April 2008. Together with concurrent aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements, this corroborates the hypothesis that Arctic haze in these layers originates mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively. The spectra are within 3%+0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption for two thirds of the 55 vertical profiles examined. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Angstrom exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD>0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within 0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements for five overpass events. Evidently, the fresh local emission in Canada in June and July makes the horizontal distribution of AOD highly heterogeneous (standard deviation ~19% of the mean over 20 km and random (autocorrelation r=0.37 across 20 km, in contrast to long-range transport to Alaska in April (std~2%, r=0.95. The

  20. Detailed Aerosol Optical Depth Intercomparison between Brewer and Li-Cor 1800 Spectroradiometers and a Cimel Sun Photometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachorro, V. E.; Berjon, A.; Toledano, C.; Mogo, S.; Prats, N.; de Frutos, A. M.; Sorribas, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; de la Morena, B. A.; Grobner, Julian; Laulainen, Nels

    2009-08-01

    We present here representative results about a comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) using different instruments during three short and intensive campaigns carried out from 1999 to 2001 at El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain). The specific aim of this study is to determine the level of agreement between three different instruments operating at our station. This activity, however, is part of a broader objective to recover an extended data series of AOD in the UV range obtained from a Brewer spectroradiometer. This instrument may be used to obtain AOD at the same five UV wavelengths used during normal operation for ozone content determination. As part of the validation of the Brewer AOD data recovery process, a Cimel sun photometer and another spectroradiometer, a Licor1800, were used. The Licor1800 spectroradiometer (which covers the spectral range 300-1100 nm) was the first instrument used at this station for aerosol monitoring (1996-99) and it was operated during these intercomparison campaigns (1999-2001) specifically to assess the continuity of the AOD data series. The Cimel sunphotometer was installed at our station at the beginning of 2000 as part of AERONET to provide AOD data over the visible and near infrared spectrum. A detailed comparison of these three instruments is carried out by means of near-simultaneous measurements, with particular emphasis on examining any diurnal AOD variability that may be linked with calibration and/or measurement errors or real atmospheric variability. Because the comparison is carried out from UV (320nm) to near infrared (1020nm) wavelengths under all possible atmospheric conditions (including clouds), AOD values range from near zero up to 1. Absolute AOD uncertainties range from 0.02 for the Cimel to 0.08 for the Brewer, with intermediate values for the Licor1800. All the values during the comparison are in reasonable agreement, when taking into account the different performance characteristics of each instrument. The

  1. Exploring the effects of landscape structure on aerosol optical depth (AOD) patterns using GIS and HJ-1B images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Luping; Fang, Linchuan; Tan, Wenfeng; Wang, Yunqiang; Huang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    A GIS approach and HJ-1B images were employed to determine the effect of landscape structure on aerosol optical depth (AOD) patterns. Landscape metrics, fractal analysis and contribution analysis were proposed to quantitatively illustrate the impact of land use on AOD patterns. The high correlation between the mean AOD and landscape metrics indicates that both the landscape composition and spatial structure affect the AOD pattern. Additionally, the fractal analysis demonstrated that the densities of built-up areas and bare land decreased from the high AOD centers to the outer boundary, but those of water and forest increased. These results reveal that the built-up area is the main positive contributor to air pollution, followed by bare land. Although bare land had a high AOD, it made a limited contribution to regional air pollution due to its small spatial extent. The contribution analysis further elucidated that built-up areas and bare land can increase air pollution more strongly in spring than in autumn, whereas forest and water have a completely opposite effect. Based on fractal and contribution analyses, the different effects of cropland are ascribed to the greater vegetation coverage from farming activity in spring than in autumn. The opposite effect of cropland on air pollution reveals that green coverage and human activity also influence AOD patterns. Given that serious concerns have been raised regarding the effects of built-up areas, bare land and agricultural air pollutant emissions, this study will add fundamental knowledge of the understanding of the key factors influencing urban air quality.

  2. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth from surface solar radiation measurements using machine learning algorithms, non-linear regression and a radiative transfer-based look-up table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Jani; Kokkola, Harri; Mielonen, Tero; Esa Juhani Mononen, Mika; Lipponen, Antti; Reunanen, Juha; Vilhelm Lindfors, Anders; Mikkonen, Santtu; Erkki Juhani Lehtinen, Kari; Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkiviadis; Niska, Harri; Arola, Antti

    2016-07-01

    In order to have a good estimate of the current forcing by anthropogenic aerosols, knowledge on past aerosol levels is needed. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good measure for aerosol loading. However, dedicated measurements of AOD are only available from the 1990s onward. One option to lengthen the AOD time series beyond the 1990s is to retrieve AOD from surface solar radiation (SSR) measurements taken with pyranometers. In this work, we have evaluated several inversion methods designed for this task. We compared a look-up table method based on radiative transfer modelling, a non-linear regression method and four machine learning methods (Gaussian process, neural network, random forest and support vector machine) with AOD observations carried out with a sun photometer at an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Thessaloniki, Greece. Our results show that most of the machine learning methods produce AOD estimates comparable to the look-up table and non-linear regression methods. All of the applied methods produced AOD values that corresponded well to the AERONET observations with the lowest correlation coefficient value being 0.87 for the random forest method. While many of the methods tended to slightly overestimate low AODs and underestimate high AODs, neural network and support vector machine showed overall better correspondence for the whole AOD range. The differences in producing both ends of the AOD range seem to be caused by differences in the aerosol composition. High AODs were in most cases those with high water vapour content which might affect the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) through uptake of water into aerosols. Our study indicates that machine learning methods benefit from the fact that they do not constrain the aerosol SSA in the retrieval, whereas the LUT method assumes a constant value for it. This would also mean that machine learning methods could have potential in reproducing AOD from SSR even though SSA would have changed during

  3. Online Simulations of Global Aerosol Distributions in the NASA GEOS-4 Model and Comparisons to Satellite and Ground-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a module for tropospheric aerosols (GO CART) online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 model and simulated global aerosol distributions for the period 2000-2006. The new online system offers several advantages over the previous offline version, providing a platform for aerosol data assimilation, aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction studies, and short-range chemical weather forecasting and climate prediction. We introduce as well a methodology for sampling model output consistently with satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals to facilitate model-satellite comparison. Our results are similar to the offline GOCART model and to the models participating in the AeroCom intercomparison. The simulated AOT has similar seasonal and regional variability and magnitude to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations. The model AOT and Angstrom parameter are consistently low relative to AERONET in biomass-burning-dominated regions, where emissions appear to be underestimated, consistent with the results of the offline GOCART model. In contrast, the model AOT is biased high in sulfate-dominated regions of North America and Europe. Our model-satellite comparison methodology shows that diurnal variability in aerosol loading is unimportant compared to sampling the model where the satellite has cloud-free observations, particularly in sulfate-dominated regions. Simulated sea salt burden and optical thickness are high by a factor of 2-3 relative to other models, and agreement between model and satellite over-ocean AOT is improved by reducing the model sea salt burden by a factor of 2. The best agreement in both AOT magnitude and variability occurs immediately downwind of the Saharan dust plume.

  4. How do A-train Sensors Inter-Compare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to produce a net cooling effect in the cloud-free conditions. However, when present over the reflective cloud decks, absorbing aerosols such as biomass burning generated smoke and wind-blown dust can potentially exert a large positive forcing through enhanced atmospheric heating resulting from cloud-aerosol radiative interactions. The interest on this aspect of aerosol science has grown significantly in the recent years. Particularly, development of the satellite-based retrieval techniques and unprecedented knowledge on the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) is of great relevance. A direct validation of satellite ACAOD is a difficult task primarily due to lack of ample in situ and/or remote sensing measurements of aerosols above cloud. In these circumstances, a comparative analysis on the inter-satellite ACAOD retrievals can be performed for the sack of consistency check. Here, we inter-compare the ACAOD of biomass burning plumes observed from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS [Jethva et al., 2013], CALIOP [Chand et al., 2008], POLDER [Waquet et al., 2009], and OMI [Torres et al., 2012]. These sensors have been shown to acquire sensitivity and independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine stratocumulus clouds--a kind of situation often found over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods retrieve comparable ACAOD over homogeneous cloud fields. The high-resolution sensors (MODIS and CALIOP) are able to retrieve aerosols over thin clouds but with larger discrepancies. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, a reasonable agreement between them is encouraging. A direct validation of satellite-based ACAOD remains an open challenge for which dedicated field measurements over the region of frequent aerosol/cloud overlap are

  5. Utility of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth for Estimating PM2.5 Exposure in Environmental Public Health Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Crosson, William; Limaye, Ashutosh; Rickman, Doug; Quattrochi, Dale; Estes, Maury; Adeniyi, Kafayat; Qualters, Judith; Niskar, Amanda Sue

    2006-01-01

    , including PM(2.5). Thus, HELIX-Atlanta is focusing on methods for characterizing population exposure to PM(2.5) for the Atlanta metropolitan area that could be used in on-going surveillance. While use of the Air Quality System, (AQS) PM(2.5) data alone could meet HELIX Atlanta, specifications, there are only five AQS sites in the Atlanta area, thus the spatial coverage is not ideal. Also, the AQS ground observations are made at time intervals ranging from one hour to six days leaving some temporal gaps. NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data have the potential for estimating daily ground level PM(2.5) at 10 km resolution over the metropolitan Atlanta area supplementing the AQS ground observations and filling their spatial and temporal gaps.

  6. Spatial distribution and temporal variation of aerosol optical depth in the Sichuan basin, China, the recent ten years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Quanliang; Che, Huizheng; Zhang, Renjian; Gui, Ke; Zhang, Huan; Zhao, Tianliang

    2016-12-01

    The applicability of the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product was verified using CE-318 sun photometric data for the Sichuan area. The results show that MODIS_3K AOD agrees well with the AOD derived from the CE-318 sun photometer, with a high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.91). And we used the MODIS AOD product analyzed the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the annual, seasonal and monthly distribution of AOD in the Sichuan area over the last ten years (2006-2015). In the Sichuan area, the mean change of AOD over the 10-year period showed a significant decreasing trend, reaching its maximum in 2010 and its minimum in 2015. Considering only the first five years, the lowest value was reached in 2008 and the overall trend was a standard symmetrical "V" type. Over the later five years, the annual average AOD value showed an overall decreasing trend. The monthly averaged AOD indicated a "double peaks" fluctuation trend; the two peaks appeared in March and August, and AOD changes were relatively small between September and January. Overall, the average value of AOD reached its highest values in spring, and its lowest values in autumn. In the city of Chengdu, the monthly and seasonal changes in the trend were essentially the same as those of the whole Sichuan area; However, the Chengdu AOD monthly and seasonal average change rate was higher than that of Sichuan as a whole. This shows that Chengdu is still the main contributor to the enhanced AOD value for the entire Sichuan region. The spatial distribution of AOD values indicates an "east high, west low" situation across the Sichuan area and Chengdu is one of three cities with the highest AOD values. However, the spatial variation of AOD trend value indicated an "east low, west high" the spatial distribution across the Sichuan region, opposite to the spatial distribution. Moreover, in the past 10 years, the overall AOD changes in Sichuan showed a downward

  7. Aerosol Optical Depth measurements at 340 nm with a Brewer spectrophotometer and comparison with Cimel sunphotometer observations at Uccle, Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Bock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Langley Plot Method (LPM is adapted for the retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values at 340 nm from Brewer#178 sun scan measurements between 335 and 345 nm (convoluted with the band pass function of the Cimel sunphotometer filter at 340 nm performed in Uccle, Belgium. The use of sun scans instead of direct sun measurements simplifies the comparison of the AOD values with quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer values. Also, the irradiance at 340 nm is larger than the one at 320.1 nm due to lower ozone absorption, thus improving the signal to noise ratio. For the selection of the cloudless days (from now on referred to as calibration quality clear days, a new set of criteria is proposed. With the adapted method, individual clear sky AOD values, for which the selection criteria are also presented in this article, are calculated for a period from September 2006 until the end of August 2010. These values are then compared to quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer measurements, showing a very good agreement (the correlation coefficient, the slope and the intercept of the regression line are respectively 0.974, 0.968 and 0.011, which proves that good quality observations can be obtained from Brewer sun scan measurements at 340 nm. The analysis of the monthly and seasonal Brewer AODs at Uccle is consistent with studies at other sites reporting on the seasonal variation of AODs in Europe. The highest values can be observed in summer and spring, whereas more than 50% of the winter AODs are lower than 0.3. On a monthly scale, the lowest AOD are observed in December and the highest values occur in June and April. No clear weekly cycle is observed for Uccle. The current cloud-screening algorithm is still an issue, which means that some AOD values can still be influenced by scattered clouds. This effect can be seen when comparing the calculated monthly mean values of the Brewer with the AERONET measurements.

  8. Aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign, and implications for a single-channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth in spring from Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Hong, H.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    An aerosol model optimized for northeast Asia is updated with the inversion data from the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-northeast (NE) Asia campaign which was conducted during spring from March to May 2012. This updated aerosol model was then applied to a single visible channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from a Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the geostationary meteorological satellite, Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate AOD from a single visible channel measurement. For the single-channel retrieval, sensitivity tests showed that perturbations by 4 % (0.926 ± 0.04) in the assumed single scattering albedo (SSA) can result in the retrieval error in AOD by over 20 %. Since the measured reflectance at the top of the atmosphere depends on both AOD and SSA, the overestimation of assumed SSA in the aerosol model leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion data sets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed aerosol optical properties (AOPs) were categorized by SSAs at 675 nm of 0.92 ± 0.035 for spring (March, April, and May). After the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign in 2012, the SSA during spring showed a slight increase to 0.93 ± 0.035. In terms of the volume size distribution, the mode radius of coarse particles was increased from 2.08 ± 0.40 to 2.14 ± 0.40. While the original aerosol model consists of volume size distribution and refractive indices obtained before 2011, the new model is constructed by using a total data set after the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign. The large volume of data in high spatial resolution from this intensive campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the new AOD data sets retrieved from a single-channel algorithm, which uses a precalculated look-up table (LUT) with the new aerosol model, show an

  9. Daily spectral effects on concentrating PV solar cells as affected by realistic aerosol optical depth and other atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueymard, Christian A.

    2009-08-01

    provides a preliminary quantitative assessment of how local atmospheric conditions interact with the spectral response of different CPV technologies. Most importantly, it is shown that the effect of aerosol optical depth (AOD, also referred to as atmospheric turbidity) has the largest impact on both the average direct normal irradiance (DNI) during a given month and the cell's DSEF. It is found that DSEF can be as low as 0.993 under clean conditions (low AOD), and as high as 1.215 under hazy conditions (high AOD). Under most conditions, all simulated solar cells perform significantly better than under rating conditions due to the spectral effect alone. There is no important difference in DSEF from cell to cell, except in one instance of very high AOD. The methodology and results proposed here constitute a step towards a better performance prediction of CPV systems, by assessing the variable spectral effect more accurately. It is anticipated that a more detailed simulation, which would also model temperature effects, as well as current-limiting effects in multijunction cells, would indicate even larger DSEF values than found here. Accurate aerosol data with higher spatial resolution in the "sun belt" than what exists today would also be desirable for the development of CPV applications.

  10. Post-processing to remove residual clouds from aerosol optical depth retrieved using the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Rodriguez, Edith; Saponaro, Giulia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2017-02-01

    Cloud misclassification is a serious problem in the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which might considerably bias the AOD results. On the one hand, residual cloud contamination leads to AOD overestimation, whereas the removal of high-AOD pixels (due to their misclassification as clouds) leads to underestimation. To remove cloud-contaminated areas in AOD retrieved from reflectances measured with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR-2 and AATSR), using the ATSR dual-view algorithm (ADV) over land or the ATSR single-view algorithm (ASV) over ocean, a cloud post-processing (CPP) scheme has been developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) as described in Kolmonen et al. (2016). The application of this scheme results in the removal of cloud-contaminated areas, providing spatially smoother AOD maps and favourable comparison with AOD obtained from the ground-based reference measurements from the AERONET sun photometer network. However, closer inspection shows that the CPP also removes areas with elevated AOD not due to cloud contamination, as shown in this paper. We present an improved CPP scheme which better discriminates between cloud-free and cloud-contaminated areas. The CPP thresholds have been further evaluated and adjusted according to the findings. The thresholds for the detection of high-AOD regions (> 60 % of the retrieved pixels should be high-AOD (> 0.6) pixels), and cloud contamination criteria for low-AOD regions have been accepted as the default for AOD global post-processing in the improved CPP. Retaining elevated AOD while effectively removing cloud-contaminated pixels affects the resulting global and regional mean AOD values as well as coverage. Effects of the CPP scheme on both spatial and temporal variation for the period 2002-2012 are discussed. With the improved CPP, the AOD coverage increases by 10-15 % with respect to the existing scheme. The validation versus AERONET shows an improvement of the correlation

  11. Aerosol optical depth assimilation for a size-resolved sectional model: impacts of observationally constrained, multi-wavelength and fine mode retrievals on regional scale analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, P. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H. C.; da Silva, A. M.; Hyer, E.

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol optical depth (AOD) three-dimensional variational data assimilation technique is developed for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for which WRF-Chem forecasts are performed with a detailed sectional model, the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC). Within GSI, forward AOD and adjoint sensitivities are performed using Mie computations from the WRF-Chem optical properties module, providing consistency with the forecast. GSI tools such as recursive filters and weak constraints are used to provide correlation within aerosol size bins and upper and lower bounds for the optimization. The system is used to perform assimilation experiments with fine vertical structure and no data thinning or re-gridding on a 12 km horizontal grid over the region of California, USA, where improvements on analyses and forecasts is demonstrated. A first set of simulations was performed, comparing the assimilation impacts of using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) dark target retrievals to those using observationally constrained ones, i.e., calibrated with AERONET (Aerosol RObotic NETwork) data. It was found that using the observationally constrained retrievals produced the best results when evaluated against ground based monitors, with the error in PM2.5 predictions reduced at over 90% of the stations and AOD errors reduced at 100% of the monitors, along with larger overall error reductions when grouping all sites. A second set of experiments reveals that the use of fine mode fraction AOD and ocean multi-wavelength retrievals can improve the representation of the aerosol size distribution, while assimilating only 550 nm AOD retrievals produces no or at times degraded impact. While assimilation of multi-wavelength AOD shows positive impacts on all analyses performed, future work is needed to generate observationally constrained multi-wavelength retrievals, which when assimilated will generate size

  12. Assessment of the MODIS-Terra Collection 006 aerosol optical depth data over the greater Mediterranean basin and inter-comparison against MODIS C005 and AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsikas, Marios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew; Hsu, Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the key factors determining the Earth's solar radiation budget. The aerosol radiative effects are strongly dependent on aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a good measure of atmospheric aerosol loading. Therefore, understanding better the spatial and temporal patterns of AOD at both global and regional scales is important for more accurate estimations of aerosol radiative effects. Nowadays, improved globally distributed AOD products are available largely based on satellite observations. Currently, one of the most acknowledged accurate AOD dataset is the one derived from measurements of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the twin Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellite platforms. The MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm, which is used to produce AOD data, is continuously improved and updated, leading to releases of successive series, named as Collections. Recently, MODIS Collection 6 (C006) dataset has been made available. Despite their advantages, satellite AOD products have to be assessed through comparisons against ground based AOD products, such as those from AERosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The aim of the present study is to assess the newest MODIS C006 AOD product over the greater Mediterranean basin. The assessment is performed through comparisons of the MODIS-Terra C006 Level-3 AOD data against corresponding data from the previous C005 MODIS dataset, as well as versus AOD data from AERONET stations within the study region. The study period extends from 2001 to 2012 and our comparisons are performed on a monthly basis. Emphasis is given on differences between the MODIS C006 AOD data and corresponding previous C005 data, as to their spatial and temporal, seasonal and inter-annual, patterns. The results show a better agreement of MODIS C006 than C005 AOD data with AERONET, while the C006 data offer a complete spatial coverage of the study region, specifically over the northern African

  13. An Improved Retrieval Algorithm of Aerosol Optical Depth%一种反演气溶胶光学厚度的改进方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何涛; 赵凤生

    2011-01-01

    The algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical depth over land has been completely restructured to produce the collection 005 products based on the algorithm by Levy et al. But the accuracy of the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) products still has very large differences for different seasons and geographic locations in China. In order to improve the accuracy of aerosol retrieval products, an easier and faster algorithm for retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land with MODIS IB data is introduced. This algorithm deals with the surface reflectance relationships is the same way as MODIS V5. 2 algorithm. In order to better represent aerosol properties in China, the size distribution and refractive index of aerosol have been improved. Considering the fine structure of the aerosol size distribution has a little effect on satellite remote sensing of aerosol optical depth, this algorithm use the Junge aerosol size distribution to approximate the aerosol size distribution in an actual atmosphere. The real and imaginary index of refractive is 1. 5 and 0. 005, respectively. The complex refractive index is assumed for all wavelengths(0. 47,0. 55,0. 66 ^m and 2. 1 fjLm).In order to verify the accuracy and regional applicability of this algorithm, aerosol optical depth is derived with this algorithm using the MODIS IB data at Taihu and Xianghe, and this retrieval result is compared with equivalent measurements from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) site (Level 2. 0 data). The MODIS/AOD product and IB data from September 2006 to June 2008 at Taihu (MODISI/AOD product and IB data from May 2008 to July 2009 at Xianghe) has been matched with L2. 0 AOD product from AERONET stations during the same period. Data from the AERONET are averaged within 30 min before and after the satellite's passing, and the MODIS data are averaged over a 10 km (15 km at Xianghe) area centered at the ground stations.The comparison results show that the standard deviation of the new algorithm inversion

  14. Temporal variation of aerosol optical depth and associated shortwave radiative forcing over a coastal site along the west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Harilal B; Shirodkar, Shilpa; Kedia, Sumita; S, Ramachandran; Babu, Suresh; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2014-01-15

    Optical characterization of aerosol was performed by assessing the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) using data from the Microtops II Sunphotometer. The data were collected on cloud free days over Goa, a coastal site along the west coast of India, from January to December 2008. Along with the composite aerosol, the black carbon (BC) mass concentration from the Aethalometer was also analyzed. The AOD0.500 μm and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) were in the range of 0.26 to 0.7 and 0.52 to 1.33, respectively, indicative of a significant seasonal shift in aerosol characteristics during the study period. The monthly mean AOD0.500 μm exhibited a bi-modal distribution, with a primary peak in April (0.7) and a secondary peak in October (0.54), whereas the minimum of 0.26 was observed in May. The monthly mean BC mass concentration varied between 0.31 μg/m(3) and 4.5 μg/m(3), and the single scattering albedo (SSA), estimated using the OPAC model, ranged from 0.87 to 0.97. Modeled aerosol optical properties were used to estimate the direct aerosol shortwave radiative forcing (DASRF) in the wavelength range 0.25 μm4.0 μm. The monthly mean forcing at the surface, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and in the atmosphere varied between -14.1 Wm(-2) and -35.6 Wm(-2), -6.7 Wm(-2) and -13.4 Wm(-2) and 5.5 Wm(-2) to 22.5 Wm(-2), respectively. These results indicate that the annual SSA cycle in the atmosphere is regulated by BC (absorbing aerosol), resulting in a positive forcing; however, the surface forcing was governed by the natural aerosol scattering, which yielded a negative forcing. These two conditions neutralized, resulting in a negative forcing at the TOA that remains nearly constant throughout the year.

  15. Inter-annual variability of aerosol optical depth over the tropical Atlantic Ocean based on MODIS-Aqua observations over the period 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos

    2013-04-01

    The tropical Atlantic Ocean is affected by dust and biomass burning aerosol loads transported from the western parts of the Saharan desert and the sub-Sahel regions, respectively. The spatial and temporal patterns of this transport are determined by the aerosol emission rates, their deposition (wet and dry), by the latitudinal shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the prevailing wind fields. More specifically, in summer, Saharan dust aerosols are transported towards the Atlantic Ocean, even reaching the Gulf of Mexico, while in winter the Atlantic Ocean transport takes place in more southern latitudes, near the equator, sometimes reaching the northern parts of South America. In the later case, dust is mixed with biomass burning aerosols originating from agricultural activities in the sub-Sahel, associated with prevailing north-easterly airflow (Harmattan winds). Satellite observations are the appropriate tool for describing this African aerosol export, which is important to atmospheric, oceanic and climate processes, offering the advantage of complete spatial coverage. In the present study, we use satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth at 550nm (AOD550nm), on a daily and monthly basis, derived from MODIS-Aqua platform, at 1ox1o spatial resolution (Level 3), for the period 2002-2012. The primary objective is to determine the pixel-level and regional mean anomalies of AOD550nm over the entire study period. The regime of the anomalies of African export is interpreted in relation to the aerosol source areas, precipitation, wind patterns and temporal variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI). In order to ensure availability of AOD over the Sahara desert, MODIS-Aqua Deep Blue products are also used. As for precipitation, Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data at 2.5ox2.5o are used. The wind fields are taken from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Apart from the regime of African aerosol export

  16. Biogenic Aerosols – Effects on Climate and Clouds. Cloud Optical Depth (COD) Sensor Three-Waveband Spectrally-Agile Technique (TWST) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niple, E. R. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Scott, H. E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the data collected by the Three-Waveband Spectrally-agile Technique (TWST) sensor deployed at Hyytiälä, Finland from 16 July to 31 August 2014 as a guest on the Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Climate and Clouds (BAECC) campaign. These data are currently available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Archive website and consists of Cloud Optical Depth (COD) measurements for the clouds directly overhead approximately every second (with some dropouts described below) during the daylight periods. A good range of cloud conditions were observed from clear sky to heavy rainfall.

  17. Evaluation of Air Pollution Applications of AERONET and MODIS Aerosol Column Optical Depth by Comparison with In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Reno, NV, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria Salazar, S.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Colucci, D.

    2012-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is subject to typical urban aerosol, wind-blown dust, and occasional biomass burning smoke from anthropogenic and natural fires. Reno has complex air flow at levels relevant for aerosol transport. At times recirculating mountain and urban flow arrives from the Sierra Nevada, San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA. The urban plumes are further modified by biogenic forest emissions and secondary aerosol formation during transport over the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Reno. This complicates the use of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) for air quality measurements in Reno. Our laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno has collocated multispectral photoacoustic instruments and reciprocal nephelometers to measure light absorption and light scattering coefficients as well as an AERONET operated CIMEL CE-318 ground-based sunphotometer. Preliminary measurements from August 2011 indicate substantially larger Cimel AOD than could be accounted for by use of the in situ aerosol extinction measurements combined with mixing height estimate. This poster presents new results comparing AERONET AOD and single scattering albedo and MODIS AOD with in situ measurements for summer and fall 2012, along with extensive back trajectory analysis, to evaluate conditions when satellite measurement may be useful for air pollution applications in Reno.

  18. Aerosol optical depth retrievals at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory from 1941 to 2013 by using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, R. D.; García, O. E.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Barreto, A.; Guirado-Fuentes, C.; Kouremeti, N.; Bustos, J. J.; Romero-Campos, P. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the reconstruction of a 73-year time series of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm at the subtropical high-mountain Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) located in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). For this purpose, we have combined AOD estimates from artificial neural networks (ANNs) from 1941 to 2001 and AOD measurements directly obtained with a Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) between 2003 and 2013. The analysis is limited to summer months (July-August-September), when the largest aerosol load is observed at IZO (Saharan mineral dust particles). The ANN AOD time series has been comprehensively validated against coincident AOD measurements performed with a solar spectrometer Mark-I (1984-2009) and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) CIMEL photometers (2004-2009) at IZO, obtaining a rather good agreement on a daily basis: Pearson coefficient, R, of 0.97 between AERONET and ANN AOD, and 0.93 between Mark-I and ANN AOD estimates. In addition, we have analysed the long-term consistency between ANN AOD time series and long-term meteorological records identifying Saharan mineral dust events at IZO (synoptical observations and local wind records). Both analyses provide consistent results, with correlations > 85 %. Therefore, we can conclude that the reconstructed AOD time series captures well the AOD variations and dust-laden Saharan air mass outbreaks on short-term and long-term timescales and, thus, it is suitable to be used in climate analysis.

  19. Comparison of aerosol optical depth of UV-B monitoring and research program (UVMRP), AERONET and MODIS over continental united states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongzhao; Chen, Maosi; Davis, John; Gao, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The concern about the role of aerosols as to their effect in the Earth-Atmosphere system requires observation at multiple temporal and spatial scales. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS) is the main aerosol optical depth (AOD) monitoring satellite instrument, and its accuracy and uncertainty need to be validated against ground based measurements routinely. The comparison between two ground AOD measurement programs, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Ultraviolet-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program, confirms the consistency between them. The intercomparison between the MODIS AOD, the AERONET AOD, and the UVMRP AOD suggests that the UVMRP AOD measurements are suited to be an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD products. The experiments show that the spatial-temporal dependency between the MODIS AOD and the UVMRP AOD is positive in the sense that the MODIS AOD compare more favorably with the UVMRP AOD as the spatial and temporal intervals are increased. However, the analysis shows that the optimal spatial interval for all time windows is defined by an angular subtense of around 1° to 1.25°, while the optimal time window is around 423 to 483 minutes at most spatial intervals. The spatial-temporal approach around 1.25° & 423 minutes shows better agreement than the prevalent strategy of 0.25° & 60 minutes found in other similar investigations.

  20. Determination of the atmospheric optical depth due to the El Chichon stratospheric aerosol cloud in the polluted atmosphere of Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, Ignacio [Centro Universitario de Investigaciones en Ciencia del Ambiente, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Colima, (Mexico); Kondratyev, Kirill Ya. [Academician, Counsellor Center for Ecological Safety, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zenteno, Gerardo [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1996-01-01

    Direct solar radiation measurements were used to determine the aerosol optical depth (AOD) increase associated with the presence of aerosol and large particles (ash) originating from the 28 March to 4 April 1982 El Chichon eruptions (17.5 degrees N, 93.3 degrees W; Mexico) on Mexico City's polluted atmospheric aerosol layer. The results are compared with those obtained at Vancouver, British Columbia, revealing that a first AOD increase occurred in both locations during May, June, and July 1982, the Mexico City AOD decay is more extended, not reaching normal climatological values until February 1983. Meanwhile, Vancouver's AOD reached minimum values in September 1982, which subsequently increased over a period from October 1982 to September 1983. This secondary maximum was recorded in Mexico City from March to August 1983. Results suggest that the first AOD increases in May, June and July 1982, both at Vancouver and Mexico City, are due chiefly to short life-time volcanic ash particles being located near the surface. However, the second AOD increases, associated with anomalously colored twilights, corresponds to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. [Spanish] Se utilizaron mediciones de radiacion solar directa para determinar el incremento de la profundidad optica del aerosol (AOD) asociada a la presencia de aerosoles y particulas grandes (cenizas) organizadas por las erupciones de El Chichon (17.5 grados N, 93.3 grados W; Mexico) del 28 de marzo al 4 de abril de 1982 sobre la capa atmosferica contaminada de la Ciudad de Mexico. Los resultados se comparan con los obtenidos en Vancouver, Colombia Britanica, relevando que un primer aumento de AOD ocurrio en ambos lugares durante mayo, junio y julio de 1982. Sin embargo, la AOD decayo en Ciudad de Mexico mas lentamente, alcanzando los valores climatologicos normales hasta febrero de 1983. Mientras tanto la AOD para Vancouver alcanzo valores minimos en septiembre de 1982; estos subsecuentemente se incrementaron en

  1. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias; Covert, Dave S.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and colurnmn water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's 6-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V Professor Vodyanitskiy during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA-14/AVHRR satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering mearured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from radiosonde measurements during 8 soundings on 7 days and also with values calculated from measurements taken on 10 July with

  2. Comparison of aerosol optical depth of UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP), AERONET and MODIS over continental United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongzhao TANG; Maosi CHEN; John DAVIS; Wei GAO

    2013-01-01

    The concern about the role of aerosols as to their effect in the Earth-Atmosphere system requires observation at multiple temporal and spatial scales.The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS) is the main aerosol optical depth (AOD)monitoring satellite instrument,and its accuracy and uncertainty need to be validated against ground based measurements routinely.The comparison between two ground AOD measurement programs,the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Ultraviolet-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program,confirms the consistency between them.The intercomparison between the MODIS AOD,the AERONET AOD,and the UVMRP AOD suggests that the UVMRP AOD measurements are suited to be an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD products.The experiments show that the spatial-temporal dependency between the MODIS AOD and the UVMRP AOD is positive in the sense that the MODIS AOD compare more favorably with the UVMRP AOD as the spatial and temporal intervals are increased.However,the analysis shows that the optimal spatial interval for all time windows is defined by an angular subtense of around 1° to 1.25°,while the optimal time window is around 423 to 483 minutes at most spatial intervals.The spatial-temporal approach around 1.25° & 423 minutes shows better agreement than the prevalent strategy of 0.25° & 60 minutes found in other similar investigations.Research Program (UVMRP),Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET),Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS),validation,spatial-temporal approach

  3. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and total column ozone from Ultraviolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements based on an optimal estimation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) retrieval technique was used to retreive aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and an asymmetry factor ( g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths, along with total column ozone (TOC), from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March through November in 2009. The OE technique specifies appropriate error covariance matrices and optimizes a forward model (Tropospheric ultraviolet radiative transfer model, TUV), and thus provides a supplemental method for use across the network of the Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) for the retrieval of aerosol properties and TOC with reasonable accuracy in the UV spectral range under various atmospheric conditions. In order to assess the accuracy of the OE technique, we compared the AOD retreivals from this method with those from Beer's Law and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product. We also examine the OE retrieved TOC in comparison with the TOC from the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the estimated AOD from the OE method agree well with those derived from Beer's law and the collocated AERONETAOD product, showing high values of correlation coefficients, generally 0.98 and 0.99, and large slopes, ranging from 0.95 to 1.0, as well as small offsets, less than 0.02 especially at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC retrievals also indicates the promising accuracy of the OE method in that the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). Validation of the OE retrievals on these selected dates suggested that the OE technique has its merits and can serve as a supplemental tool in further analyzing UVMRP data.

  4. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  5. Empirical correction of multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) aerosol optical depths for the aerosol forward scattering and development of a long-term integrated MFRSR-Cimel dataset at Lampedusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Meloni, Daniela; Anello, Fabrizio; Bommarito, Carlo; Corradini, Stefano; De Silvestri, Lorenzo; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Monteleone, Francesco; Pace, Giandomenico; Piacentino, Salvatore; Pugnaghi, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol optical properties have been measured on the island of Lampedusa (35.5°N, 12.6°E) with seven-band multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) and a CE 318 Cimel sunphotometer (part of the AERONET network) since 1999. Four different MFRSRs have operated since 1999. The Cimel sunphotometer has been operational for a short period in 2000 and in 2003-2006 and 2010-present. Simultaneous determinations of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the two instruments were compared over a period of almost 4 years at several wavelengths between 415 and 870 nm. This is the first long-term comparison at a site strongly influenced by desert dust and marine aerosols and characterized by frequent cases of elevated AOD. The datasets show a good agreement, with MFRSR underestimating the Cimel AOD in cases with low Ångström exponent; the underestimate decreases for increasing wavelength and increases with AOD. This underestimate is attributed to the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the relatively wide field of view of the MFRSR. An empirical correction of the MFRSR data was implemented. After correction, the mean bias (MB) between MFRSR and Cimel simultaneous AOD determinations is always smaller than 0.004, and the root mean square difference is ≤0.031 at all wavelengths. The MB between MFRSR and Cimel monthly averages (for months with at least 20 days with AOD determinations) is 0.0052. Thus, by combining the MFRSR and Cimel observations, an integrated long-term series is obtained, covering the period 1999-present, with almost continuous measurements since early 2002. The long-term data show a small (nonstatistically significant) decreasing trend over the period 2002-2013, in agreement with independent observations in the Mediterranean. The integrated Lampedusa dataset will be used for aerosol climatological studies and for verification of satellite observations and model analyses.

  6. Comparison of aerosol optical depths from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on Aura with results from airborne sunphotometry, other space and ground measurements during MILAGRO/INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Livingston

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Airborne sunphotometer measurements are used to evaluate retrievals of extinction aerosol optical depth (AOD from spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the Aura satellite during the March 2006 Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (MILAGRO/INTEX-B. The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS flew on nine missions over the Gulf of Mexico and four in or near the Mexico City area. Retrievals of AOD from near-coincident AATS and OMI measurements are compared for three flights over the Gulf of Mexico for flight segments when the aircraft flew at altitudes 60–70 m a.s.l., and for one flight over Mexico City when the aircraft flew ~420–590 m a.g.l. OMI-measured top of atmosphere (TOA reflectances are routinely inverted to yield aerosol products such as AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD using two different retrieval algorithms: a near-UV (OMAERUV and a multiwavelength (OMAERO technique. This study uses the archived Collection 3 data products from both algorithms. In particular, AATS and OMI AOD comparisons are presented for AATS data acquired in 20 OMAERUV retrieval pixels (15 over water and 19 OMAERO pixels (also 15 over water. At least four pixels for one of the over-water coincidences and all pixels for the over-land case were cloud-free. Coincident AOD retrievals from 17 pixels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aboard Aqua are available for two of the over-water flights and are shown to agree with AATS AODs to within root mean square (RMS differences of 0.00–0.06, depending on wavelength. Near-coincident ground-based AOD measurements from ground-based sun/sky radiometers operated as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET at three sites in and near Mexico City are also shown and are generally consistent with the AATS AODs

  7. Comparison of aerosol optical depths from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on Aura with results from airborne sunphotometry, other space and ground measurements during MILAGRO/INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Livingston

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne sunphotometer measurements are used to evaluate retrievals of extinction aerosol optical depth (AOD from spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the Aura satellite during the March 2006 Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (MILAGRO/INTEX-B. The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS flew on nine missions over the Gulf of Mexico and four in or near the Mexico City area. Retrievals of AOD from near-coincident AATS and OMI measurements are compared for three flights over the Gulf of Mexico for flight segments when the aircraft flew at altitudes 60–70 m above sea level, and for one flight over the Mexico City area where the aircraft was restricted to altitudes ~320–800 m above ground level over the rural area and ~550–750 m over the city. OMI-measured top of atmosphere (TOA reflectances are routinely inverted to yield aerosol products such as AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD using two different retrieval algorithms: a near-UV (OMAERUV and a multiwavelength (OMAERO technique. This study uses the archived Collection 3 data products from both algorithms. In particular, AATS and OMI AOD comparisons are presented for AATS data acquired in 20 OMAERUV retrieval pixels (15 over water and 19 OMAERO pixels (also 15 over water. At least four pixels for one of the over-water coincidences and all pixels for the over-land case were cloud-free. Coincident AOD retrievals from 17 pixels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aboard Aqua are available for two of the over-water flights and are shown to agree with AATS AODs to within root mean square (RMS differences of 0.00–0.06, depending on wavelength. Near-coincident ground-based AOD measurements from ground-based sun/sky radiometers operated as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET

  8. Global Estimates of Average Ground-Level Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations from Satellite-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Brauer, M.; Kahn, R.; Levy, R.; Verduzco, C.; Villeneuve, P.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particles can cause acute or chronic respiratory disease and can exacerbate heart disease, some cancers, and other conditions in susceptible populations. Ground stations that monitor fine particulate matter in the air (smaller than 2.5 microns, called PM2.5) are positioned primarily to observe severe pollution events in areas of high population density; coverage is very limited, even in developed countries, and is not well designed to capture long-term, lower-level exposure that is increasingly linked to chronic health effects. In many parts of the developing world, air quality observation is absent entirely. Instruments aboard NASA Earth Observing System satellites, such as the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), monitor aerosols from space, providing once daily and about once-weekly coverage, respectively. However, these data are only rarely used for health applications, in part because the can retrieve the amount of aerosols only summed over the entire atmospheric column, rather than focusing just on the near-surface component, in the airspace humans actually breathe. In addition, air quality monitoring often includes detailed analysis of particle chemical composition, impossible from space. In this paper, near-surface aerosol concentrations are derived globally from the total-column aerosol amounts retrieved by MODIS and MISR. Here a computer aerosol simulation is used to determine how much of the satellite-retrieved total column aerosol amount is near the surface. The five-year average (2001-2006) global near-surface aerosol concentration shows that World Health Organization Air Quality standards are exceeded over parts of central and eastern Asia for nearly half the year.

  9. Future Projections of Aerosol Optical Depth, Radiative Forcing, and Climate Response Due to Declining Aerosol Emissions in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely expected that global emissions of atmospheric aerosols and their precursors will decrease strongly throughout the remainder of the 21st century, due to emission reduction policies enacted based on human health concerns. However, the resulting decrease in atmospheric aerosol burden will have unintended climate consequences. Since aerosols generally exert a net cooling influence on the climate, their removal will lead to an unmasking of global warming as well as other changes to the climate system. Aerosol and precursor global emissions decrease by as much as 80% by the year 2100, according to projections in four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3) to simulate future climate over the 21st century with and without aerosol emission changes projected by the RCPs in order to isolate the radiative forcing and climate response due to the aerosol reductions. We find that up to 1 W m-2 of radiative forcing may be unmasked globally by 2100 due to reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, leading to average global temperature increases up to 1 K and global precipitation rate increases up to 0.09 mm d-1 (3%). Regionally and locally, climate impacts are much larger, as RCP8.5 projects a 2.1 K warming over China, Japan, and Korea due to reduced aerosol emissions. Our results highlight the importance of crafting emissions control policies with both climate and air pollution benefits in mind. The expected unmasking of additional global warming from aerosol reductions highlights the importance of robust greenhouse gas mitigation policies and may require more aggressive policies than anticipated.

  10. Up/Down trend in the MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth and its relationship to the Sulfur Dioxide Emission Changes in China during 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Yumimoto, K.; Irie, H.; Osada, K.; Ogata, K.; Fukushima, H.; Wang, Z.; Ohara, T.

    2011-08-01

    Anthropogenic SO2 emissions increased alongside economic development in China at a rate of 12.7 % yr-1 from 2000 to 2005. However, under new Chinese government policy, SO2 emissions declined by 3.9 % yr-1 between 2005 and 2009. Between 2000 and 2010, we found that the variability in the fine-mode (submicron) aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the oceans adjacent to East Asia increased by 4-8 % yr-1 to a peak around 2005-2006 and subsequently decreased by 4-7 % yr-1, based on observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite and simulations by a chemical transport model. This trend is consistent with ground-based observations of the number-size distribution of aerosol particles at a mountainous background observation site in central Japan. These fluctuations in SO2 emission intensity and AOD are thought to reflect the widespread installation of fuel-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices in power plants in China because aerosol sulfate is a major determinant of the AOD in East Asia. Using a chemical transport model, we confirmed that the above-mentioned fluctuation in AOD is mainly caused by changes in SO2 emission rather than by varying meteorological conditions in East Asia. High correlation was also found between satellite-retrieved SO2 vertical column density and bottom-up SO2 emissions, both of which were also consistent with observed AOD trends. We proposed a simplified approach for evaluating changes in SO2 emissions in China, combining the use of modeled sensitivity coefficients that describe the variation of AOD with changes in SO2 emissions and satellite retrieval. Satellite measurements of the AOD above Sea of Japan marked the 4.1 % yr-1 declining between 2007 and 2010, and this correspond to the SO2 emissions from China decreased by ~9 % yr-1 between the same period.

  11. Global and regional trends of aerosol optical depth over land and ocean using SeaWiFS measurements from 1997 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. C.; Gautam, R.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Li, C.; Jeong, M. J.; Tsay, S.-C.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-09-01

    Both sensor calibration and satellite retrieval algorithm play an important role in the ability to determine accurately long-term trends from satellite data. Owing to the unprecedented accuracy and long-term stability of its radiometric calibration, SeaWiFS measurements exhibit minimal uncertainty with respect to sensor calibration. In this study, we take advantage of this well-calibrated set of measurements by applying a newly-developed aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm over land and ocean to investigate the distribution of AOD, and to identify emerging patterns and trends in global and regional aerosol loading during its 13-yr mission. Our correlation analysis between climatic indices (such as ENSO) and AOD suggests strong relationships for Saharan dust export as well as biomass-burning activity in the tropics, associated with large-scale feedbacks. The results also indicate that the averaged AOD trend over global ocean is weakly positive from 1998 to 2010 and comparable to that observed by MODIS but opposite in sign to that observed by AVHRR during overlapping years. On regional scales, distinct tendencies are found for different regions associated with natural and anthropogenic aerosol emission and transport. For example, large upward trends are found over the Arabian Peninsula that indicate a strengthening of the seasonal cycle of dust emission and transport processes over the whole region as well as over downwind oceanic regions. In contrast, a negative-neutral tendency is observed over the desert/arid Saharan region as well as in the associated dust outflow over the north Atlantic. Additionally, we found decreasing trends over the eastern US and Europe, and increasing trends over countries such as China and India that are experiencing rapid economic development. In general, these results are consistent with those derived from ground-based AERONET measurements.

  12. Long-term trend of aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS Aqua using linear regression and ensemble empirical mode decomposition over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol has played an important role in air quality for short term and climate change for long term. Especially, it is important to understand how aerosol optical depth (AOD) has changed to date for the prognosis of future atmospheric state and radiation budget which are related to human life. In this study, the trend of AOD at 550 nm from MODIS Aqua (MYD08) was estimated for 10 years from 2004 to 2014 using linear regression method and ensemble empirical mode decomposition method (EEMD). Search region was selected to East Asia [18.5°N-51.5°N, 85.5°E-150.5°E] which is considered to be of great interest in emission source. The result of linear regression shows remarkably increasing trend in North and East China including Sanjiang, Hailun, Beijing, Beijing forest and Jinozhou Bay, than rather downward trend in other neighboring regions. Actually, however, AOD has seasonality itself and its trend is also affected by external source consistently, so non-linear trend analysis was conducted to analyze the changing tendency of AOD trends. Consequently, secular trends of AOD defined by EEMD showed almost similar values over the entire region, but their shapes over time are quite different with those of linear regression. Here, AOD linear trend in Beijing has monotonically increased [0.03% yr-1] since 2004, but its non-linear trend shows that initial increasing trend has alleviated and even turned into downward trend from about 2010. Lastly, the validation of MODIS AOD with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) was conducted additionally which showed fairly good agreement with those of AERONET (R=0.901, RMSE=0.226, MAE=0.031, MBE=-0.001).

  13. High temporal resolution estimates of columnar aerosol microphysical parameters from spectrum of aerosol optical depth by linear estimation: application to long-term AERONET and star-photometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ramirez, D.; Veselovskii, I.; Whiteman, D. N.; Suvorina, A.; Korenskiy, M.; Kolgotin, A.; Holben, B.; Dubovik, O.; Siniuk, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-08-01

    This work deals with the applicability of the linear estimation technique (LE) to invert spectral measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) provided by AERONET CIMEL sun photometers. The inversion of particle properties using only direct-sun AODs allows the evaluation of parameters such as effective radius (reff) and columnar volume aerosol content (V) with significantly better temporal resolution than the operational AERONET algorithm which requires both direct sun and sky radiance measurements. Sensitivity studies performed demonstrate that the constraints on the range of the inversion are very important to minimize the uncertainties, and therefore estimates of reff can be obtained with uncertainties less than 30 % and of V with uncertainties below 40 %. The LE technique is applied to data acquired at five AERONET sites influenced by different aerosol types and the retrievals are compared with the results of the operational AERONET code. Good agreement between the two techniques is obtained when the fine mode predominates, while for coarse mode cases the LE results systematically underestimate both reff and V. The highest differences are found for cases where no mode predominates. To minimize these biases, correction functions are developed using the multi-year database of observations at selected sites, where the AERONET retrieval is used as the reference. The derived corrections are tested using data from 18 other AERONET stations offering a range of aerosol types. After correction, the LE retrievals provide better agreement with AERONET for all the sites considered. Finally, the LE approach developed here is applied to AERONET and star-photometry measurements in the city of Granada (Spain) to obtain day-to-night time evolution of columnar aerosol microphysical properties.

  14. Estimate of Aerosol Optical Depth Using Broadband Direct Normal Observations at Highest Polluted Area in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. A. Rahoma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The measurement of different components of direct solar radiation for this research has been carried out in Helwan, Egypt. Helwan (Latitude 29°52 N, Longitude 31°20 E. This is a considered as the largest polluted region in the world. The level of pollution in Helwan region is higher, compared to the international limit by about 7 or 10 times in industrial and populated region respectively. Approach: The daily variation for different components of solar radiation bands as global, direct (total, yellow, red and infrared and diffuse solar radiation had been studied and discussed. The data measurements have been taken for nine years (1991-2000. Hourly data of solar irradiance on a horizontal plane had also been recorded simultaneously together with relative humidity and wind speed along with some traditional techniques for selecting the clear sky days of the period examined. Results: The results clearly showed seasonal dynamics in aerosol loading, type and perceptible water. Conclusion: Background levels of aerosols, which we defined as yellow color less than 0.10, had observed at almost all sites but varying frequencies.

  15. Estimated total emissions of trace gases from the Canberra Wildfires of 2003: a new method using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth & the MOZART chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paton-Walsh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new method for estimating trace gas emissions from large vegetation fires using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm, combined with an atmospheric chemical transport model. The method uses a threshold value to screen out normal levels of AOD that may be caused by raised dust, sea salt aerosols or diffuse smoke transported from distant fires. Using this method we infer an estimated total emission of 15±5 Tg of carbon monoxide, 0.05±0.02 Tg of hydrogen cyanide, 0.11±0.03 Tg of ammonia, 0.25±0.07 Tg of formaldehyde, 0.03±0.01 of acetylene, 0.10±0.03 Tg of ethylene, 0.03±0.01 Tg of ethane, 0.21±0.06 Tg of formic acid and 0.28±0.09 Tg of methanol released to the atmosphere from the Canberra fires of 2003. An assessment of the uncertainties in the new method is made and we show that our estimate agrees (within expected uncertainties with estimates made using current conventional methods of multiplying together factors for the area burned, fuel load, the combustion efficiency and the emission factor for carbon monoxide. A simpler estimate derived directly from the satellite AOD measurements is also shown to be in agreement with conventional estimates, suggesting that the method may, under certain meteorological conditions, be applied without the complication of using a chemical transport model. The new method is suitable for estimating emissions from distinct large fire episodes and although it has some significant uncertainties, these are largely independent of the uncertainties inherent in conventional techniques. Thus we conclude that the new method is a useful additional tool for characterising emissions from vegetation fires.

  16. A theoretical study of the effect of subsurface oceanic bubbles on the enhanced aerosol optical depth band over the southern oceans as detected from MODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Christensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Submerged oceanic bubbles, which could have a much longer life span than whitecaps or bubble rafts, have been hypothesized to increase the water-leaving radiance and thus affect satellite based estimates of water-leaving radiance to non-trivial levels. This study explores this effect further to determine if such bubbles are of sufficient magnitude to impact satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD retrievals through perturbation of the lower boundary conditions. Indeed, there has been significant discussion in the community regarding the high positive biases in retrieved AODs in many remote ocean regions. In this study, for the first time, the effects of oceanic bubbles on satellite retrievals of AOD are studied by using a linked Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S atmospheric and HydroLight oceanic radiative transfer models. The results suggest an insignificant impact on AOD retrievals in regions with near-surface wind speeds of less than 12 m s−1. However, the impact of bubbles on aerosol retrievals could be on the order of 0.02–0.04 for higher wind conditions within the scope of our simulations (e.g., winds −1. This bias is propagated to global scales using one year of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth (AMSR-E data to investigate the possible impacts of oceanic bubbles on an enhanced AOD belt observed over the high latitude southern oceans (also called Enhanced Southern Oceans Anomaly, or ESOA by some passive satellite sensors. Ultimately, this study is supportive of the null hypothesis: submerged bubbles are not the major contributor to the ESOA feature. This said, as retrievals progress to higher and higher resolutions, such as from airborne platforms, in clean marine conditions the uniform bubble correction should probably be separately accounted for against individual bright whitecaps and bubble rafts.

  17. Interannual variation in the fine-mode MODIS aerosol optical depth and its relationship to the changes in sulfur dioxide emissions in China between 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Yumimoto, K.; Irie, H.; Osada, K.; Ogata, K.; Fukushima, H.; Wang, Z.; Ohara, T.

    2012-03-01

    Anthropogenic SO2 emissions increased alongside economic development in China at a rate of 12.7% yr-1 from 2000 to 2005. However, under new Chinese government policy, SO2 emissions declined by 3.9% yr-1 between 2005 and 2009. Between 2000 and 2010, we found that the variability in the fine-mode (submicron) aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the oceans adjacent to East Asia increased by 3-8% yr-1 to a peak around 2005-2006 and subsequently decreased by 2-7% yr-1, based on observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite and simulations by a chemical transport model. This trend is consistent with ground-based observations of aerosol particles at a mountainous background observation site in central Japan. These fluctuations in SO2 emission intensity and fine-mode AOD are thought to reflect the widespread installation of fuel-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices in power plants in China, because aerosol sulfate is a major determinant of the fine-mode AOD in East Asia. Using a chemical transport model, we confirmed that the contribution of particulate sulfate to the fine-mode AOD is more than 70% of the annual mean and that the abovementioned fluctuation in fine-mode AOD is caused mainly by changes in SO2 emission rather than by other factors such as varying meteorological conditions in East Asia. A strong correlation was also found between satellite-retrieved SO2 vertical column density and bottom-up SO2 emissions, both of which were also consistent with observed fine-mode AOD trends. We propose a simplified approach for evaluating changes in SO2 emissions in China, combining the use of modeled sensitivity coefficients that describe the variation of fine-mode AOD with changes in SO2 emissions and satellite retrieval. Satellite measurements of fine-mode AOD above the Sea of Japan marked a 4.1% yr-1 decline between 2007 and 2010, which corresponded to the 9% yr-1 decline in SO2 emissions from China during the same

  18. Interannual variation in the fine-mode MODIS aerosol optical depth and its relationship to the changes in sulfur dioxide emissions in China between 2000 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Itahashi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic SO2 emissions increased alongside economic development in China at a rate of 12.7% yr−1 from 2000 to 2005. However, under new Chinese government policy, SO2 emissions declined by 3.9% yr−1 between 2005 and 2009. Between 2000 and 2010, we found that the variability in the fine-mode (submicron aerosol optical depth (AOD over the oceans adjacent to East Asia increased by 3–8% yr−1 to a peak around 2005–2006 and subsequently decreased by 2–7% yr−1, based on observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board NASA's Terra satellite and simulations by a chemical transport model. This trend is consistent with ground-based observations of aerosol particles at a mountainous background observation site in central Japan. These fluctuations in SO2 emission intensity and fine-mode AOD are thought to reflect the widespread installation of fuel-gas desulfurization (FGD devices in power plants in China, because aerosol sulfate is a major determinant of the fine-mode AOD in East Asia. Using a chemical transport model, we confirmed that the contribution of particulate sulfate to the fine-mode AOD is more than 70% of the annual mean and that the abovementioned fluctuation in fine-mode AOD is caused mainly by changes in SO2 emission rather than by other factors such as varying meteorological conditions in East Asia. A strong correlation was also found between satellite-retrieved SO2 vertical column density and bottom-up SO2 emissions, both of which were also consistent with observed fine-mode AOD trends. We propose a simplified approach for evaluating changes in SO2 emissions in China, combining the use of modeled sensitivity coefficients that describe the variation of fine-mode AOD with changes in SO2 emissions and satellite retrieval. Satellite measurements of fine-mode AOD

  19. Aerosol optical depth in urban site of Hangzhou%杭州市大气气溶胶光学厚度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐冰; 杜荣光; 于之锋; 周斌

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom wavelength exponent (α) were analyzed and compared using Cimel sunphotometer data from 2011 to 2012 at national basic meteorological station in Hangzhou city of China. The results showed that the mean value of AOD500nm andα440-870nm were 0.86±0.47and 1.25±0.23, respectively. The averaged AOD over Hangzhou had no obviously seasonal variation characteristics. It was closely related to the weather patterns and internal and external sources influence in this region. The seasonal variation ofαwas not distinct. Due to dust aerosol spreading from north of china, theαmeasured in spring was a little lower compared to other seasons. The diurnal variation of averaged AOD showed a single peak distribution with the peak value and valley value at 15:00 and 06:00 respectively. The significantly increased value of AOD in the afternoon were due to the secondary aerosols generated from photochemical reactions that caused by strongly solar radiations and the aerosols in the surface layer spreading to upper layer influenced by turbulent transfer action. Both the AOD and α showed obvious single peak of frequencies based on the frequency distribution. It was found that the AOD and α can be better characterized by a lognormal distribution. The frequency of α, occurring in the high value range between 1.1and 1.7was 77.8%, which indicated that the average effective radii of aerosol particles were small and the aerosols should be classified as urban-industrial aerosols in Hangzhou. The data also showed high AOD(>1.0) both clustering in the fine mode growth wing and the coarse mode.%利用2011~2012年杭州国家基准气候站内太阳光度计(CE-318)观测资料,分析杭州市气溶胶光学厚度(AOD)和Angstrom波长指数(α)的变化特征.结果表明,2011~2012年杭州市AOD500nm年平均值为0.86±0.47,α440~870nm年平均值为1.25±0.23.AOD季节变化特征不明显,主要与该地区天气形势以及

  20. Temporal variability of mineral dust in southern Tunisia: analysis of 2 years of PM10 concentration, aerosol optical depth, and meteorology monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Christel; Taieb Labiadh, Mohamed; Bergametti, Gilles; Rajot, Jean Louis; Marticorena, Béatrice; Sekrafi, Saâd; Ltifi, Mohsen; Féron, Anaïs; des Tureaux, Thierry Henry

    2016-04-01

    The south of Tunisia is a region very prone to wind erosion. During the last decades, changes in soil management have led to an increase in wind erosion. In February 2013, a ground-based station dedicated to the monitoring of mineral dust (that can be seen in this region as a proxy of the erosion of soils by wind) was installed at the Institut des Régions Arides (IRA) of Médenine (Tunisia) to document the temporal variability of mineral dust concentrations. This station allows continuous measurements of surface PM10 concentration (TEOM™), aerosol optical depth (CIMEL sunphotometer), and total atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust (CARAGA automatic sampler). The simultaneous monitoring of meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitations) allows to analyse the factors controlling the variations of mineral dust concentration from the sub-daily to the annual scale. The results from the two first years of measurements of PM10 concentration are presented and discussed. In average on year 2014, PM10 concentration is 56 μg m-3. However, mineral dust concentration highly varies throughout the year: very high PM10 concentrations (up to 1,000 μg m-3 in daily mean) are frequently observed during wintertime and springtime, hardly ever in summer. These episodes of high PM10 concentration (when daily average PM10 concentration is higher than 240 μg m-3) sometimes last several days. By combining local meteorological data, air-masses trajectories, sunphotometer measurements, and satellite imagery, the part of the high PM10concentration due to local emissions and those linked to an advection of dusty air masses by medium and long range transport from the Sahara desert is quantified.

  1. Improved evaluation of optical depth components from Langley plot data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, S. F.; Gellman, D. I.; Slater, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple, iterative procedure to determine the optical depth components of the extinction optical depth measured by a solar radiometer is presented. Simulated data show that the iterative procedure improves the determination of the exponent of a Junge law particle size distribution. The determination of the optical depth due to aerosol scattering is improved as compared to a method which uses only two points from the extinction data. The iterative method was used to determine spectral optical depth components for June 11-13, 1988 during the MAC III experiment.

  2. Corrigendum to "Chemical apportionment of southern African aerosol mass and optical depth" published in Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 7643-7655, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, B. I.

    2011-05-01

    A correction to results by Magi (2009) is presented here. By combining the in situ measurements of speciated aerosol mass concentrations with concurrent measurements of total aerosol optical properties at a wavelength of 550 nm, it is shown that ~66 % of scattering is due to carbonaceous aerosol, where derived mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for OC and BC are 3.8 ± 0.5 m2 g-1 and 2.9 ± 0.8 m2 g-1, respectively. Derived values of mass absorption cross sections (MAC) for OC and BC are 0.7 ± 0.2 m2 g-1 and 12.1 ± 0.8 m2 g-1, respectively. The values of MAC imply that ~21 % of the mid-visible aerosol absorption in southern Africa is due to OC, with the remainder due to BC. SSA for BC and OC are about the same as Magi (2009). The results here are determined using an approach that accounts for the fact that OC and BC are partially scattering and absorbing.

  3. Using NASA Satellite Aerosol Optical Depth to Enhance PM2.5 Concentration Datasets for Use in Human Health and Epidemiology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, A. K.; Weber, S.; Braggio, J.; Talbot, T.; Hall, E.

    2012-12-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a criterion air pollutant, and its adverse impacts on human health are well established. Traditionally, studies that analyze the health effects of human exposure to PM2.5 use concentration measurements from ground-based monitors and predicted PM2.5 concentrations from air quality models, such as the U.S. EPA's Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. There are shortcomings associated with these datasets, however. Monitors are not distributed uniformly across the U.S., which causes spatially inhomogeneous measurements of pollutant concentrations. There are often temporal variations as well, since not all monitors make daily measurements. Air quality model output, while spatially and temporally uniform, represents predictions of PM2.5 concentrations, not actual measurements. This study is exploring the potential of combining Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites with PM2.5 monitor data and CMAQ predictions to create PM2.5 datasets that more accurately reflect the spatial and temporal variations in ambient PM2.5 concentrations on the metropolitan scale, with the overall goal of enhancing capabilities for environmental public health decision-making. AOD data provide regional information about particulate concentrations that can fill in the spatial and temporal gaps in the national PM2.5 monitor network. Furthermore, AOD is a measurement, so it reflects actual concentrations of particulates in the atmosphere, in contrast to PM2.5 predictions from air quality models. Results will be presented from the Battelle/U.S. EPA statistical Hierarchical Bayesian Model (HBM), which was used to combine three PM2.5 concentration datasets: monitor measurements, AOD data, and CMAQ model predictions. The study is focusing on the Baltimore, MD and New York City, NY metropolitan regions for the period 2004-2006. For each region, combined monitor/AOD/CMAQ PM2.5 datasets generated by the HBM

  4. Estimating ground-level PM_{2.5} concentrations over three megalopolises in China using satellite-derived aerosol optical depth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yixuan; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Yang; Geng, Guannan; He, Kebin

    2016-04-01

    Numerous previous studies have revealed that statistical models which combine satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM2.5 measurements acquired at scattered monitoring sites provide an effective method for deriving continuous spatial distributions of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. Using the national monitoring networks that have recently been established by central and local governments in China, we developed linear mixed-effects (LMEs) models that integrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD measurements, meteorological parameters, and satellite-derived tropospheric NO2 column density measurements as predictors to estimate PM2.5 concentrations over three major industrialized regions in China, namely, the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region (BTH), the Yangtze River Delta region (YRD), and the Pearl River Delta region (PRD). The models developed for these three regions exploited different predictors to account for their varying topographies and meteorological conditions. Considering the importance of unbiased PM2.5 predictions for epidemiological studies, the correction factors calculated from the surface PM2.5 measurements were applied to correct biases in the predicted annual average PM2.5 concentrations introduced by non-stochastic missing AOD measurements. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) was used to quantify the accuracy of our models. Cross-validation of the daily predictions yielded R2 values of 0.77, 0.8 and 0.8 and normalized mean error (NME) values of 22.4%, 17.8% and 15.2% for BTH, YRD and PRD, respectively. For the annual average PM2.5 concentrations, the LOOCV R2 values were 0.85, 0.76 and 0.71 for the three regions, respectively, whereas the LOOCV NME values were 8.0%, 6.9% and 8.4%, respectively. We found that the incorporation of satellite-based NO2 column density into the LMEs model contribute to considerable improvements in annual prediction accuracy for both BTH and YRD. The satisfactory performance of our

  5. Assessment and statistical modeling of the relationship between remotely sensed aerosol optical depth and PM2.5 in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciorek, Christopher J; Liu, Yang

    2012-05-01

    Research in scientific, public health, and policy disciplines relating to the environment increasingly makes use of high-dimensional remote sensing and the output of numerical models in conjunction with traditional observations. Given the public health and resultant public policy implications of the potential health effects of particulate matter (PM*) air pollution, specifically fine PM with an aerodynamic diameter information, in particular aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from satellites, to help characterize variability in ground-level PM2.5 concentrations in space and time. While the United States and some other developed countries have extensive PM monitoring networks, gaps in data across space and time necessarily occur; the hope is that remote sensing can help fill these gaps. In this report, we are particularly interested in using remote-sensing data to inform estimates of spatial patterns in ambient PM2.5 concentrations at monthly and longer time scales for use in epidemiologic analyses. However, we also analyzed daily data to better disentangle spatial and temporal relationships. For AOD to be helpful, it needs to add information beyond that available from the monitoring network. For analyses of chronic health effects, it needs to add information about the concentrations of long-term average PM2.5; therefore, filling the spatial gaps is key. Much recent evidence has shown that AOD is correlated with PM2.5 in the eastern United States, but the use of AOD in exposure analysis for epidemiologic work has been rare, in part because discrepancies necessarily exist between satellite-retrieved estimates of AOD, which is an atmospheric-column average, and ground-level PM2.5. In this report, we summarize the results of a number of empirical analyses and of the development of statistical models for the use of proxy information, in particular satellite AOD, in predicting PM2.5 concentrations in the eastern United States. We analyzed the spatiotemporal structure

  6. A 4-D climatology (1979–2009 of the monthly aerosol optical depth distribution over the Mediterranean region from a comparative evaluation and blending of remote sensing and model products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nabat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multi-year database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon. We use 8 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS, TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical data sets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, NIMBUS7/TOMS and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997, the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level-2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer, and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer. The comparison also shows limitations of certain data sets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products. Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences between dust aerosols which can be lifted up to 5000 m, and other continental and marine aerosols which are confined in the

  7. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I; Morcrette, J. J.; Solomon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F; Collins, W.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, V.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D.; Skeie, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust

  8. A 4-D climatology (1979–2009 of the monthly tropospheric aerosol optical depth distribution over the Mediterranean region from a comparative evaluation and blending of remote sensing and model products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nabat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multi-year database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon. We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products, TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth-Probe and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997, the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level-2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer, and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer. The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products. Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between

  9. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  10. OMI/Aura Near UV Aerosol Optical Depth and Single Scattering Albedo 1-orbit L2 Swath 13x24 km V003 NRT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OMI/Aura level-2 near UV Aerosol data product 'OMAERUV', recently re-processed using an enhanced algorithm, is now released (April 2012) to the public. The data...

  11. Recovery of surface reflectance spectra and evaluation of the optical depth of aerosols in the near-IR using a Monte-Carlo approach: Application to the OMEGA observations of high latitude regions of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Poulet, François; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Gondet, Brigitte; 10.1029/2006JE002845

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of radiative transfer through atmospheric particles based on Monte Carlo methods. This model can be used to analyze and remove the contribution of aerosols in remote sensing observations. We have developed a method to quantify the contribution of atmospheric dust in near-IR spectra of the Martian surface obtained by the OMEGA imaging spectrometer on board Mars Express. Using observations in the nadir pointing mode with significant differences in solar incidence angles, we can infer the optical depth of atmospheric dust, and we can retrieve the surface reflectance spectra free of aerosol contribution. Martian airborne dust properties are discussed and constrained from previous studies and OMEGA data. We have tested our method on a region at 90{\\deg}E and 77{\\deg}N extensively covered by OMEGA, where significant variations of the albedo of ice patches in the visible have been reported. The consistency between reflectance spectra of ice-covered and ice-free regions recovered at different incid...

  12. In-depth discrimination of aerosol types using multiple clustering techniques over four locations in Indo-Gangetic plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Humera; Alam, Khan; Bibi, Samina

    2016-11-01

    Discrimination of aerosol types is essential over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) because several aerosol types originate from different sources having different atmospheric impacts. In this paper, we analyzed a seasonal discrimination of aerosol types by multiple clustering techniques using AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) datasets for the period 2007-2013 over Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur and Kanpur. We discriminated the aerosols into three major types; dust, biomass burning and urban/industrial. The discrimination was carried out by analyzing different aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE), Abortion Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Real Refractive Index (RRI) and their interrelationship to investigate the dominant aerosol types and to examine the variation in their seasonal distribution. The results revealed that during summer and pre-monsoon, dust aerosols were dominant while during winter and post-monsoon prevailing aerosols were biomass burning and urban industrial, and the mixed type of aerosols were present in all seasons. These types of aerosol discriminated from AERONET were in good agreement with CALIPSO (the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) measurement.

  13. Retrieval of the optical depth using an all-sky CCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmo, Francisco J; Cazorla, Alberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; López-Alvarez, Miguel A; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2008-12-01

    A new method is presented for retrieval of the aerosol and cloud optical depth using a CCD camera equipped with a fish-eye lens (all-sky imager system). In a first step, the proposed method retrieves the spectral radiance from sky images acquired by the all-sky imager system using a linear pseudoinverse algorithm. Then, the aerosol or cloud optical depth at 500 nm is obtained as that which minimizes the residuals between the zenith spectral radiance retrieved from the sky images and that estimated by the radiative transfer code. The method is tested under extreme situations including the presence of nonspherical aerosol particles. The comparison of optical depths derived from the all-sky imager with those retrieved with a sunphotometer operated side by side shows differences similar to the nominal error claimed in the aerosol optical depth retrievals from sunphotometer networks.

  14. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  15. Optical characterization of continental and biomass-burning aerosols over Bozeman, Montana: A case study of the aerosol direct effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Reagan, John A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2011-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol optical properties were observed from 21 to 27 September 2009 over Bozeman, Montana, during a transitional period in which background polluted rural continental aerosols and well-aged biomass-burning aerosols were the dominant aerosol types of extremely fresh biomass-burning aerosols resulting from forest fires burning in the northwestern United States and Canada. Aerosol optical properties and relative humidity profiles were retrieved using an eye-safe micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) (MP-DIAL), a single-channel backscatter lidar, a CIMEL solar radiometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a ground-based integrating nephelometer, and aerosol products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua. Aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured during the case study ranged between 0.03 and 0.17 (0.015 and 0.075) at 532 nm (830 nm) as episodic combinations of fresh and aged biomass-burning aerosols dominated the optical depth of the pristinely clean background air. Here, a pristinely clean background refers to very low AOD conditions, not that the aerosol scattering and absorption properties are necessarily representative of a clean aerosol type. Diurnal variability in the aerosol extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa) of the background atmosphere derived from the two lidars, which ranged between 55 and 95 sr (50 and 90 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm), showed good agreement with retrievals from AERONET sun and sky measurements over the same time period but were consistently higher than some aerosol models had predicted. Sa measured during the episodic smoke events ranged on average from 60 to 80 sr (50 to 70 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm) while the very fresh biomass-burning aerosols were shown to exhibit significantly lower Sa ranging between 20 and 40 sr. The shortwave direct radiative forcing that was due to the intrusion of biomass-burning aerosols was calculated to be on average -10 W/m2 and was

  16. Study of Aerosol Chemical Composition Based on Aerosol Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Austin; Aryal, Rudra

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the variation of aerosol absorption optical properties obtained from the CIMEL Sun-Photometer measurements over three years (2012-2014) at three AERONET sites GSFC; MD Science_Center and Tudor Hill, Bermuda. These sites were chosen based on the availability of data and locations that can receive different types of aerosols from land and ocean. These absorption properties, mainly the aerosol absorption angstrom exponent, were analyzed to examine the corresponding aerosol chemical composition. We observed that the retrieved absorption angstrom exponents over the two sites, GSFC and MD Science Center, are near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low single scattering albedo values during summer seasons indicating presence of black carbon. Strong variability of aerosol absorption properties were observed over Tudor Hill and will be analyzed based on the air mass embedded from ocean side and land side. We will also present the seasonal variability of these properties based on long-range air mass sources at these three sites. Brent Holben, NASA GSFC, AERONET, Jon Rodriguez.

  17. Assessing the Role of Brewer Spectrophotometer in Determining Aerosol Optical Properties in the UK and Tropics.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumharn, Wilawan

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol effects are one of the major uncertainties in assessing global climate change, ecosystem processes and human health. This is because they critically change the balance between the radiation entering and leaving the atmosphere, as well as influencing cloud formation and having direct effects on biological systems e.g. through the respiratory system. It is the direct radiative effects of aerosol that are the focus of this work. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is a measure of the extinc...

  18. Seasonal differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over rural Oklahoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andrews

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A small airplane made more than 450 aerosol optical property (light absorption and light scattering vertical profile measurements (up to 4 km over a rural Oklahoma site between March 2000 and July 2005. These profiles suggest significant seasonal differences in aerosol properties. The highest amounts of scattering and absorbing aerosol are observed during the summer, while the relative contribution of aerosol absorption is highest in the winter (i.e., single scattering albedo is lowest in winter. Aerosol absorption generally decreased with altitude below ∼1.5 km and then was relatively constant above that. Aerosol scattering decreased sharply with altitude below ∼1.5 km but, unlike absorption, also decreased at higher altitudes, albeit less sharply. The seasonal variability observed for aerosol loading is consistent with other aerosol measurements in the region including AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD, CALIPSO vertical profiles, and IMPROVE aerosol mass. The column averaged single scattering albedo derived from in situ airplane measurements shows a similar seasonal cycle as the AERONET single scattering albedo inversion product, but a comparison of aerosol asymmetry parameter from airplane and AERONET platforms suggests differences in seasonal variability. The observed seasonal cycle of aerosol loading corresponds with changes in air mass back trajectories: the aerosol scattering was higher when transport was from polluted areas (e.g., the Gulf Coast and lower when the air came from cleaner regions and/or the upper atmosphere.

  19. Optical characteristics of the aerosol in Spain and Austria and its effect on radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, H.; Alados Arboledas, L.; Olmo, F. J.; Jovanović, O.; Gangl, M.; Kaller, W.; SáNchez, C.; Sauerzopf, H.; Seidl, S.

    2002-10-01

    The horizontal and vertical attenuation of the aerosol, the sky radiance, and the light absorption coefficient of the aerosol have been determined at wavelengths in the visible. From this set of data the following optical characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol could be derived: vertical optical depth, horizontal extinction and absorption coefficient, scattering phase function, asymmetry parameter, and single scattering albedo. Campaigns have been performed in Almería, Spain, and Vienna, Austria. The aerosol undergoes a considerable variation, as experienced by many other studies. Sometimes the vertical and the horizontal measurements gave similar data; on other days the aerosol at the surface and the aerosol aloft were completely different. The "clearest" aerosol always had the smallest single scattering albedo and thus relatively the highest light absorption. The optical characteristics of the aerosol in the two very different locations were very similar. Using the measured optical data, a radiative transfer calculation was performed, and the radiation reaching the ground was calculated. Comparing the values for the clear aerosol and the days with higher aerosol load, the radiative forcing due to the additional aerosol particles could be determined. The forcing of the aerosol at the ground is always negative, and at the top of the atmosphere it is close to zero or slightly negative. Its dependence on wavelength and zenith angle is presented. The preindustrial aerosol in Europe was estimated, and the forcing due to the present-day aerosol was determined. At the surface it is negative, but at the top of the atmosphere it is close to zero or positive. This is caused by the light absorption of the European aerosol, which is higher than in most other locations.

  20. Comparison of near surface and column-integrated atmospheric aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rudra Prasad

    Optical and chemical properties of size-resolved aerosols in near-surface air at Tudor Hill, Bermuda were measured between July 2006 and June 2009. Vertical distributions of aerosol backscattering and column-averaged aerosol optical properties were characterized with a Micro-pulse lidar (MPL) and a CIMEL automated sun-sky radiometer. The chemical species in size-segregated aerosols in marine air were compared with the surface level aerosol optical properties. The aerosol concentration, along with chemical components, was compared with the surface level wind speed and showed a significant correlation with the sea salt components. The non-sea salt components such as non-sea salt sulfate and ammonium did not show a correlation with the surface level wind speed. A comparison between scattering data at surface level with the extinction coefficient at the lowest altitude bin (75m) from the lidar inversion shows a consistent correlation but is quantitatively different. This quantitative discrepancy was explained based on the hygroscopic growth due to differences in relative humidity in measurement conditions. Aerosol optical properties measured near the surface were often significantly correlated with those averaged over the column. These include scattering by near-surface bulk aerosol at 530 nm versus column aerosol optical depth (AOD), near-surface sub-microm scattering fraction versus column averaged sub-microm scattering fraction, and the average angstrom exponent over column and lidar ratio derived using column integrated size distribution and complex refractive index. We also found that the single scattering albedo (ω o) measured at the surface by combining daily averages of the aerosol absorption and aerosol light scattering were in the same range as the instantaneous ω o retrieved for the column. The relative contribution of submicron aerosol light scattering to total aerosol light scattering is slightly higher in the column relative to the surface. Surface

  1. Climatology of aerosol optical depth over China from recent 10 years of MODIS remote sensing data%近10年中国大陆MODIS遥感气溶胶光学厚度特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗宇翔; 陈娟; 郑小波; T.L.Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Using the recent 10 year (2001?010) MODIS data of aerosol optical depth (AOD), the distributions of 10-year annual and seasonal mean AOD at 550 nm over China are presented, and the seasonal variations in AOD over 10 regions in China are ana-lyzed. A 10-year climatology of AOD over China is constructed. The spatial pattern of annual mean AOD is characterized generally with two low value centers and two high value centers over China. Two low AOD centers are located in the areas with a high vegeta-tion cover and a sparse population in (1) the high-latitude Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia in Northeast China with the AOD of about 0.2 and (2) the high-altitude Sichuan, Yunnan and Xizang in Southwest China with the AOD from 0.1 to 0.2. These two low AOD centers are connected by a low AOD ozone ( 0.2-0.3 ) in a northeast-southwest direction across China. Beside this low AOD ozone, two high centers with the AOD of about 0.8 are situated in (1) the most densely populated and industrialized regions in China with high anthropogenic aerosols stretching from North China Plain, Sichuan Basin, Hubei-Hunan and Yangtze River Delta to South China with Pearl River Delta region and (2) Taklimakan desert and the surrounding area in Northwest China with high natural aero-sols dominated by desert dust. The spatial structures of seasonal AOD pattern over China remain unchanged, but the strengths of AOD-centers vary seasonally. Seasonally averaged over China, the area of high AOD is biggest in spring followed by summer and autumn with the minimum in winter. The monthly AOD values in Southern China peak twice respectively from March to May and from August to September and drop between May and July accompanied by Asian summer monsoon rain belt movement from the south to north. The monthly AOD in Northern China change with a single peak in June and July and a low during November and February. Taking example of the AOD anomalies and meteorological data in July 2002 and 2003 for a weak and

  2. Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties over the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Jonsson, H.; Strawa, A.; Provencal, B.; Covert, D.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rissman, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. To this end, the ARM program will conduct an Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma. The IOP involves airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We will give an overview of early airborne results obtained aboard Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The aircraft will carry instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size including such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods. Aerosol optical depth and extinction will be measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore up- and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation will be measured using three different instruments. The up-looking radiation instruments will be mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, which will keep the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of 10 degrees. Additional effort will be directed toward measurement of cloud condensation nucleus concentration as a function of supersaturation and relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. This relation is central to description of the aerosol indirect effect.

  3. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  4. Optical closure experiments for biomass smoke aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Mack

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The FLAME experiments were a series of laboratory studies of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of fresh smokes from the combustion of wildland fuels that are burned annually in the western and southeastern US. The burns were conducted in the combustion chamber of the USFS Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. Here we discuss the retrieval of optical properties for a variety of fuels burned in FLAME 2, using nephelometer-measured scattering coefficients, photoacoustically-measured aerosol absorption coefficients, and size distribution measurements. Uncertainties are estimated from the various instrument characteristics and from instrument calibration studies. Our estimates of single scattering albedo for different dry smokes varied from 0.43–0.99, indicative of the wide variations in smoke aerosol chemical composition that were observed. In selected case studies, we retrieved the complex refractive index from the measurements, but show that these are highly sensitive to the uncertainties in measured size distributions.

  5. Optical closure experiments for biomass smoke aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Mack

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of laboratory experiments at the Fire Laboratory at Missoula (FLAME investigated chemical, physical, and optical properties of fresh smoke samples from combustion of wildland fuels that are burned annually in the western and southeastern US The burns were conducted in the combustion chamber of the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. Here we discuss retrieval of optical properties for a variety of fuels burned in FLAME 2, using nephelometer-measured scattering coefficients, photoacoustically-measured aerosol absorption coefficients, and size distribution measurements. Uncertainties are estimated from various instrument characteristics and instrument calibration studies. Our estimates of single scattering albedo for different dry smoke samples varied from 0.428 to 0.990, indicative of observed wide variations in smoke aerosol chemical composition. In selected case studies, we retrieved the complex refractive index from measurements but show that these are highly sensitive to uncertainties in measured size distributions.

  6. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Daniel

    The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a large number of different gases as well as tiny suspended particles, both in solid and liquid state. These tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, have an immense impact on our health and on our global climate. Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget both directly and indirectly. In the direct effect, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight changing the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols indirectly influence the Earth's radiation budget by modifying the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds as well as their water content and lifetime. In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. This dissertation presents the aerosol hygroscopicity experiment investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (sp) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (Jan 10-Feb 6, 2013), Baltimore, MD (Jul 3-30, 2013), and Golden, CO (Jul 12-Aug 10, 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored DISCOVER-AQ project. The measured sp under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2:5mass concentrations, particle composition measurements, and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of sp

  7. War Induced Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    The effect of war on air pollution and climate is assessed in this communication. War today in respect of civil wars and armed conflict in the Middle East area is taken into consideration. Impacts of war are not only in loss of human life and property, but also in the environment. It is well known that war effects air pollution and in the long run contribute to anthropogenic climate change, but general studies on this subject are few because of the difficulties of observations involved. In the current scenario of the ongoing conflict in the Middle East regions, deductions in parameters of atmosphere are discussed. Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol loads, Black Carbon, Ozone,Dust, regional haze and many more are analyzed using various satellite data. Multi-model analysis is also studied to verify the analysis. Type segregation of aerosols, in-depth constraints to atmospheric chemistry, biological effects and particularly atmospheric physics in terms of radiative forcing, etc. are discussed. Undergraduate in Earth Sciences.

  8. Aerosol Optical Properties During The SAMUM-2 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.; Seefeldner, M.; Gasteiger, J.; Garhammer, M.; Esselborn, M.; Wiegner, M.; Koepke, P.

    2009-03-01

    A field campaign of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-2) took place in the Cape Verde islands in January-February 2008, to investigate the properties of long-range transported dust over the Atlantic. The Meteorological Institute of the University of Munich deployed a set of active and passive remote sensing instruments: one sun photometer, for the measurement of the direct sun irradiance and sky radiances; a broad-band UV radiometer; and 2 tropospheric lidar systems. The measurements were made in close cooperation with the other participating groups. During the measurement period the aerosol scenario over Cape Verde mostly consisted of a dust layer below 2 km and a smoke layer above 2 km height. The Saharan dust arrived in the site from the NE, whereas the smoke originated in the African equatorial region is transported from the SE. The aerosol load was also very variable over this area, with AOD (500 nm) ranging from 0.04 to 0.74. The optical properties of the layers are shown: extinction and particle depolarization ratio profiles at 3 wavelengths, as well as aerosol optical depth (in the range 340-1550 nm), Ångström exponent, size distribution and single scattering albedo.

  9. Joint remote sensing of aerosol optical properties and surface reflectance by sun-photometer and satellite in the urban area of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jietai; Zhang, Junhua

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth in the urban area of Beijing has been measured by multi-wavelength sun-photometer during a one-year period from Apr. 1999 to Mar. 2000. Using the aerosol optical depth as the atmospheric correction parameter, the reflectance of the urban surface and the mean aerosol type have been retrieved by the apparent reflectance of the visible channel of the Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (VISSR) onboard the Japanese Geostationary Meteorology Satellite.

  10. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Flynn, M.; Highwood, E. J.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Coe, H.

    2011-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2) measurements of refractory BC (rBC) mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the UK. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM). We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA) did change for different air masses, with lower SSA observed in

  11. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Flynn, M.; Highwood, E. J.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Coe, H.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2) measurements of refractory BC (rBC) mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the United Kingdom. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM). We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA) did change for different air masses, with lower SSA

  12. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. McMeeking

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2 measurements of refractory BC (rBC mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the United Kingdom. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM. We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA. We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA did change for

  13. Aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties at regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël; Barragan, Rubén; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Mallet, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) program, the seasonal variability of the aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties derived from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network; http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is examined in two regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean Basin: Ersa (Corsica Island, France) and Palma de Mallorca (Mallorca Island, Spain). A third site, Alborán (Alborán Island, Spain), with only a few months of data is considered for examining possible northeast-southwest (NE-SW) gradients of the aforementioned aerosol properties. The AERONET dataset is exclusively composed of level 2.0 inversion products available during the 5-year period 2011-2015. AERONET solar radiative fluxes are compared with ground- and satellite-based flux measurements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that AERONET fluxes are compared with measurements at the top of the atmosphere. Strong events (with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm greater than 0.4) of long-range transport aerosols, one of the main drivers of the observed annual cycles and NE-SW gradients, are (1) mineral dust outbreaks predominant in spring and summer in the north and in summer in the south and (2) European pollution episodes predominant in autumn. A NE-SW gradient exists in the western Mediterranean Basin for the aerosol optical depth and especially its coarse-mode fraction, which all together produces a similar gradient for the aerosol direct radiative forcing. The aerosol fine mode is rather homogeneously distributed. Absorption properties are quite variable because of the many and different sources of anthropogenic particles in and around the western Mediterranean Basin: North African and European urban areas, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas, most forest fires and ship emissions. As a result, the aerosol direct forcing efficiency, more dependent to absorption than the absolute

  14. Retrieval of aerosol optical properties from OMI radiances using a multiwavelength algorithm : Application to Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curier, R.L.; Veefkind, J.P.; Braak, R.; Veihelmann, B.; Torres, O.; Leeuw, G. de

    2008-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) multiwavelength algorithm has been developed to retrieve aerosol optical depth using OMI-measured reflectance at the top of the atmosphere. This algorithm was further developed by using surface reflectance data from a field campaign in Cabauw (The Netherlands),

  15. Optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol properties in Kishinev, Moldova are being carried out within the framework of the international AERONET program managed by NASA/GSFC since 1999. Direct solar and sky diffuse radiances are measured by using of sunphotometer Cimel-318. Aerosol optical properties are retrieved from measured radiances by using of smart computational procedures developed by the AERONET's team. The instrument is situated at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station giving the opportunity to make simultaneous spectral (win sunphotometer) and broadband (with the set of sensors from radiometric complex) solar radiation. Detailed description of the station and investigations in progress can be found at the http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E; 205 m a.s.l). Summary of aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from direct solar and diffuse sky radiance observations at Moldova site from September 1999 to June 2009 are presented below. Number of measurements (total): 1695 Number of measurements (for ?o, n, k): 223 Range of aerosol optical depth (AOD) @440 nm: 0.03 =0.25 Range of Ångström parameter : 0.14 (440/670/870/1020): 0.93/0.92/0.90/0.89 ±0.04 Parameters of volume particle size distribution function: (fine mode) volume median radius r v,f , μm: 0.17 ± 0.06 particle volume concentration Cv,f, μm3/μm2: 0.04 ± 0.03 (coarse mode) volume median radius rv,c , μm: 3.08 ± 0.64 particle volume concentration Cv,c, μm3/μm2: 0.03 ± 0.03 Climatic norms of AOD@500 nm and Ångström parameter at the site of observation are equal to 0.21 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.14, respectively. The aerosol type in Moldova may be considered as 'urban-industrial and mixed' in accordance with the classification of aerosol type models systematized and developed by AERONET team (O.Dubovik et al., 2002, J. Atmosph. Sci., 59, 590-608) on the basis of datasets acquired from worldwide observations at the

  16. Multiwavelength multistatic optical scattering for aerosol characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrea M.

    The main focus of this research is the development of a technique to remotely characterize aerosol properties, such as particle size distribution, concentration, and refractive index as a function of wavelength, through the analysis of optical scattering measurements. The proposed technique is an extension of the multistatic polarization ratio technique that has been developed by prior students at the Penn State Lidar Lab to include multiple wavelengths. This approach uses the ratio of polarized components of the scattering phase functions at multiple wavelengths across the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum to extract the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols. The scattering intensities at each wavelength are vertically separated across the face of the imager using a transmission diffraction grating, so that scattering intensities for multiple wavelengths at many angles are available for analysis in a single image. The ratio of the scattering phase function intensities collected using parallel and perpendicular polarized light are formed for each wavelength and analysis of the ratio is used to determine the microphysical properties of the aerosols. One contribution of the present work is the development of an inversion technique based on a genetic algorithm that retrieves lognormal size distributions from scattering measurements by minimizing the squared error between measured polarization ratios and polarization ratios calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. The opportunities and limitations of using the polarization ratio are explored, and a genetic algorithm is developed to retrieve single mode and trimodal lognormal size distributions from multiwavelength, angular scattering data. The algorithm is designed to evaluate particles in the diameter size range of 2 nm to 60 im, and uses 1,000 linear spaced diameters within this range to compute the modeled polarization ratio. The algorithm returns geometric mean radii and

  17. Optical properties of different aerosol types: seven years of combined Raman-elastic backscatter lidar measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Giannakaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present our combined Raman/elastic backscatter lidar observations which were carried out at the EARLINET station of Thessaloniki, Greece, during the period 2001–2007. The largest optical depths are observed for Saharan dust and smoke aerosol particles. For local and continental polluted aerosols the measurements indicate high aerosol loads. However, measurements associated with the local path indicate enhanced aerosol load within the Planetary Boundary Layer. The lowest value of aerosol optical depth is observed for continental aerosols, from West directions with less free tropospheric contribution. The largest lidar ratios, of the order of 70 sr, are found for biomass burning aerosols. A significant and distinct correlation between lidar ratio and backscatter related Ångström exponent values were estimated for different aerosol categories. Scatter plot between lidar ratio values and Ångström exponent values for local and continental polluted aerosols does not show a significant correlation, with a large variation in both parameters possibly due to variable absorption characteristics of these aerosols. Finally for continental aerosols with west and northwest directions that follow downward movement when arriving at our site constantly low lidar ratios almost independent of size are found.

  18. Model Analysis of Influences of Aerosol Mixing State upon Its Optical Properties in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xiao; ZHANG Meigen; ZHU Lingyun; XU Liren

    2013-01-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e.,externally mixed,half externally and half internally mixed,and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia.The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed,while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased.Therefore,the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states.Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed.Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex.Generally,the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China,Korean peninsula,and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process,and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2.The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens.Conversely,the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols,including sulfate,nitrate,ammonium,black carbon,and organic carbon,could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  19. Characteristics and Possible Reasons of Global Trend in Aerosol Optical Depth over the Past Decade%近10a全球气溶胶光学厚度变化特征及其可能原因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡惠文; 杨军; 李晓静; 夏祥鳌

    2012-01-01

    基于2000年3月~2011年2月中分辨率光谱成像仪(MODIS)3级(Level3)日平均气溶胶光学厚度(AOD)数据分析了全球AOD变化趋势。近10 a来AOD减小的区域主要在欧洲和北美地区,增大的区域主要集中在东南亚、南美南部阿根廷和智利以及非洲东侧塞舌尔群岛附近。西欧和美国AOD夏季减小趋势最明显。亚马逊AOD减小的峰值出现在秋季。南美南部AOD主要在5~9月呈现增大趋势。东亚地区AOD在冬季增大的趋势最明显,增大值最高可达每年0.0036。除了7~9月印度其他月份的AOD都呈现增大趋势,增大的峰值出现在冬季。非洲地区AOD值在冬季和春季有所减小,而夏、秋两季则是增大的。%Using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectr0radiometer (MODIS) Level3 daily mean aerosol opti- cal depth (AOD) data during 2000~2011, global and regional AOD trends were derived. In general,nega- tive trends are found in Europe and North America, positive trends are mainly observed in South-East Asia Argentia,chile and seychelles which located to the east Africa. In both Western Europe and the United States, AOD decreases darmatically in summer. In Amazon the peak of AOD decreased value appears in au- tumn. AOD increases during May to September in Southern America. In East Asia, AOD increases most ob- viously in winter,the peak of AOD increased value is 0. 0036 every year. In Indian,AOD increase all the year except from July to September,the peak of AOD increased value appears in winter. In African AOD decreases mainly in winter and spring but increases in summer and autumn.

  20. On the variation of aerosol properties over Finland based on the optical columnar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Arola, A.; Amiridis, V.; Lihavainen, H.; de Leeuw, G.

    2012-10-01

    Long-range aerosol transport over Finland has been studied using ground-based sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical properties. Cimel sunphotometers were used at an urban site (Helsinki), a rural site (Hyytiälä) and a semiurban site (Kuopio) and PFR sunphotometer measurements were made at two rural sites, Jokioinen and Sodankylä. The CIMEL measurements are part of the AERONET (Aerosol robotic network) network and Jokioinen and Sodankylä are GAW-PFR (Global Atmosphere Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer) Associate Stations. Sunphotometers provide information on local columnar aerosol properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (ÅE) that were used to investigate the aerosol content and aerosol type in this region. A set of representative event days, i.e. days with high turbidity, covering the time period between March 2006 and June 2010 has been selected for further analysis. For these days the AOD results were combined with air mass back trajectories to provide information about the air mass origin, especially for cases with moderate turbidity produced by long-range transported aerosols from mid latitudes to Finland. As expected, episodes with high AOD are connected with the transport of polluted air masses originating from the east or southeast or from industrial areas in Central Europe. We distinguished events with long range transported air pollution from cases where pollution was accumulated in the area due to the local meteorological factors.

  1. Calibrated sky imager for aerosol optical properties determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cazorla

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The calibrated ground-based sky imager developed in the Marine Physical Laboratory, the Whole Sky Imager (WSI, has been tested to determine optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol. Different neural network-based models calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD for three wavelengths using the radiance extracted from the principal plane of sky images from the WSI as input parameters. The models use data from a CIMEL CE318 photometer for training and validation and the wavelengths used correspond to the closest wavelengths in both instruments. The spectral dependency of the AOD, characterized by the Ångström exponent α in the interval 440–870, is also derived using the standard AERONET procedure and also with a neural network-based model using the values obtained with a CIMEL CE318. The deviations between the WSI derived AOD and the AOD retrieved by AERONET are within the nominal uncertainty assigned to the AERONET AOD calculation (±0.01, in 80% of the cases. The explanation of data variance by the model is over 92% in all cases. In the case of α, the deviation is within the uncertainty assigned to the AERONET α (±0.1 in 50% for the standard method and 84% for the neural network-based model. The explanation of data variance by the model is 63% for the standard method and 77% for the neural network-based model.

  2. Optical closure study on light-absorbing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Andrews, Elizabeth; Hallar, Anna G.

    2014-05-01

    The in situ measurement of atmospheric aerosol optical properties is an important component of quantifying climate change. In particular, the in-situ measurement of the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA), which is the ratio of aerosol scattering to aerosol extinction, is identified as a key challenge in atmospheric sciences and climate change research. Ideally, the complete set of aerosol optical properties is measured through optical closure studies which simultaneous measure aerosol extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients. The recent development of new optical instruments have made real-time in situ optical closure studies attainable, however, many of these instruments are state-of-the-art but not practical for routine monitoring. In our studies we deployed a suit of well-established and recently developed instruments including the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) method for aerosol light extinction, multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for aerosol light absorption, and an integrating nephelometer (NEPH) for aerosol light scattering measurements. From these directly measured optical properties we calculated light absorption from extinction minus scattering (difference method), light extinction from scattering plus absorption, and aerosol single-scattering albedo from combinations CAPS + MAAP, NEPH + PSAP, NEPH + MAAP, CAPS + NEPH. Closure studies were conducted for laboratory-generated aerosols composed of various mixtures of black carbon (Regal 400R pigment black, Cabot Corp.) and ammonium sulphate, urban aerosol (Billerica, MA), and background aerosol (Storm Peak Lab.). Key questions addressed in our closure studies are: (1) how well can we measure aerosol light absorption by various methods, and (2) how well can we measure the aerosol single-scattering albedo by various instrument combinations? In particular we investigated (3) whether the combination of a CAPS and NEPH provides a reasonable

  3. The surface aerosol optical properties in the urban area of Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Bingliang; Wang, Tijian; Liu, Jane; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Chen, Pulong; Hu, Qiduo; Yang, Xiu-qun; Fu, Congbin; Zhu, Jialei

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies of aerosol optical properties are useful for reducing uncertainties in estimations of aerosol radiative forcing and forecasting visibility. In this study, the observed near-surface aerosol optical properties in urban Nanjing are analysed from March 2014 to February 2016. Results show that near-surface urban aerosols in Nanjing are mainly from local emissions and the surrounding regions. They have lower loadings but are more scattering than aerosols in most cities in China. The annual mean aerosol extinction coefficient (EC), single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP) at 550 nm are 381.96 Mm-1, 0.9 and 0.57, respectively. The aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is about 1 order of magnitude smaller than its scattering coefficient (SC). However, the absorbing aerosol has a larger Ångström exponent (AAE) value, 1.58 at 470/660 nm, about 0.2 larger than the scattering aerosols (SAE). All the aerosol optical properties follow a near-unimodal pattern, and their values are mostly concentrated around their averages, accounting for more than 60 % of the total samplings. Additionally, they have substantial seasonality and diurnal variations. High levels of SC and AAC all appear in winter due to higher aerosol and trace gas emissions. AAE (ASP) is the smallest (largest) in summer, possibly because of high relative humidity (RH) which also causes considerably larger SC and smaller SAE, although intensive gas-to-particle transformation could produce a large number of finer scattering aerosols in this season. Seasonality of EC is different from the columnar aerosol optical depth. Larger AACs appear during the rush hours of the day while SC and back-scattering coefficient (Bsp) only peak in the early morning. Aerosols are fresher in the daytime than at night-time, leading to their larger Ångström exponent and smaller ASP. Different temporal variations between AAC and SC cause the aerosols to be more absorbing (smaller SSA) in autumn

  4. An investigation of aerosol optical properties: Atmospheric implications and influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.

    An experimental, observational, and theoretical investigation of aerosol optical properties has been made in this work to study their implications and influences on the atmosphere. In the laboratory the scientific and instrumental methodology consisted of three parts, namely, aerosol generation, optical and mass concentration measurements, and computational calculations. In particular the optical properties of ammonium sulfate and caffeine aerosol were derived from measurements made with a transmissometer cell-reciprocal- integrating nephelometer (TCRIN), equipped with a laser beam at 632.8 nm, and by applying a Mie theory computer code The aerosol generators, optical equipment and calibration procedures were reviewed. The aerosol shape and size distribution were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and the Gumprecht- Sliepcevich/Lipofsky-Green extinction-sedimentation method. In particular the spherical and cylindrical shape were considered. During this investigation, an alternative method for obtaining the optical properties of monodisperse spherical non-absorbing aerosol using a cell-transmissometer, which is based on a linearisation of the Lambert-Beer law, was found. In addition, adapting the TCRIN to electrooptical aerosol studies, the optical properties of a circular-cylindrical aerosol of caffeine were undertaken under the condition of random orientation in relation with the laser beam, and perpendicular orientation to it. A theoretical study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of aerosol to a change of shape under different polarisation modes. The aerosol optical properties, obtained previously in the laboratory, were then used to simulate the direct radiative forcing. The calculations and results were obtained by applying a one- dimensional energy-balance box model. The influence of atmospheric aerosol on the sky brightness due to a total solar eclipse was studied using the photometric and meteorological observations made during the

  5. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-05

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality.

  6. Evaluating the Impact of Smoke Particle Absorption on Passive Satellite Cloud Optical Depth Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro-Contreras, R.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Campbell, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Absorbing aerosol particles, when lifted above clouds, can perturb top-of-atmosphere radiation radiances measured by passive satellite sensors through the absorption of reflected solar energy. This scenario, if not properly screened, impacts cloud physical retrievals, like cloud optical depth (COD), conducted using radiances/channels in the visible spectrum. We describe observations of smoke particle presence above cloud off the southwest coast of Africa, using spatially and temporally collocated Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (AQUA MODIS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements. Results from this study indicate that above cloud aerosol episodes happen rather frequent in the smoke outflow region during the Northern Hemisphere summer where above cloud aerosol plumes introduce a significant bias to MODIS COD retrievals in the visible spectrum. This suggests that individual COD retrievals as well as COD climatology from MODIS can be affected over the smoke outflow region by above cloud aerosol contamination and thus showing the need to account for the presence of above cloud absorbing aerosols in the MODIS visible COD retrievals.

  7. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG; ManSing; NICHOL; Janet; LEE; Kwon; Ho

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolution images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta region. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the determination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflectance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r = 0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  8. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG ManSing; NICHOL Janet; LEE Kwon Ho; LI ZhanQing

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolu-tion images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta re-gion. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the deter-mination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflec-tance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r=0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  9. Remote Marine Aerosol: A Characterization of Physical, Chemical and Optical Properties and their Relation to Radiative Transfer in the Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1997-01-01

    Our research effort is focused on improving our understanding of aerosol properties needed for optical models for remote marine regions. This includes in-situ and vertical column optical closure and involves a redundancy of approaches to measure and model optical properties that must be self consistent. The model is based upon measured in-situ aerosol properties and will be tested and constrained by the vertically measured spectral differential optical depth of the marine boundary layer, MBL. Both measured and modeled column optical properties for the boundary layer, when added to the free-troposphere and stratospheric optical depth, will be used to establish spectral optical depth over the entire atmospheric column for comparison to and validation of satellite derived radiances (AVHRR).

  10. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effects over Manora Peak in the Himalayan foothills: seasonal variability and role of transported aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, A.K. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (Branch), Prof Ramnath Vij Marg, New Delhi (India); Ram, K. [Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Singh, Sachchidanand, E-mail: ssingh@nplindia.org [Radio and Atmospheric Sciences Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Sanjeev [Radio and Atmospheric Sciences Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India); Tiwari, S. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (Branch), Prof Ramnath Vij Marg, New Delhi (India)

    2015-01-01

    The higher altitude regions of Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau are influenced by the dust and black carbon (BC) aerosols from the emissions and long-range transport from the adjoining areas. In this study, we present impacts of advection of polluted air masses of natural and anthropogenic emissions, on aerosol optical and radiative properties at Manora Peak (∼ 2000 m amsl) in central Himalaya over a period of more than two years (February 2006–May 2008). We used the most updated and comprehensive data of chemical and optical properties available in one of the most climatically sensitive region, the Himalaya, to estimate atmospheric radiative forcing and heating rate. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) was found to vary from 0.04 to 0.45 with significantly higher values in summer mainly due to an increase in mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols due to transport. In contrast, single scattering albedo (SSA) varied from 0.74 to 0.88 with relatively lower values during summer, suggesting an increase in absorbing BC and mineral dust aerosols. As a result, a large positive atmospheric radiative forcing (about 28 ± 5 Wm{sup −2}) and high values of corresponding heating rate (0.80 ± 0.14 Kday{sup −1}) has been found during summer. During the entire observation period, radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere varied from − 2 to + 14 Wm{sup −2} and from − 3 to − 50 Wm{sup −2} at the surface whereas atmospheric forcing was in the range of 3 to 65 Wm{sup −2} resulting in a heating rate of 0.1–1.8 Kday{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Aerosol chemical and optical properties at Manora Peak, in central Himalaya, were significantly affected by dust and black carbon (BC) aerosols from the emissions and long-range transport from the adjoining areas. • Elevated AOD and lower SSA values were observed at Manora Peak during summer. • Enhancement in absorbing aerosols was observed during summer. • Large aerosol radiative forcing and heating rate was observed

  11. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondo, Torsten; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    . For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter......In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases - abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays - by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation...... and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. In the cases where the output parameters from the model seem...

  12. Aerosol Optical Properties and Its Radiative Forcing over Yulin, China in 2001 and 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Huizheng; ZHANG Xiaoye; Stephane ALFRARO; Bernadette CHATENET; Laurent GOMES; ZHAO Jianqi

    2009-01-01

    The aerosol optical properties and direct radiative forcing over the Mu Us desert of northern China, acquired through a CE318 sunphotometer of the ground-bascd Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), are analyzed. The seasonal variations in the aerosol optical properties are examined. The effect of meteorological elements (pressure, temperature, water vapor pressure, relative humidity and wind speed) on the aerosol optical properties is also studied. Then, the sources and optical properties under two different cases, a dust event and a pollution event, are compared. The results show that the high aerosol optical depth (AOD) found in Yulin was mostly attributed to the occurrence of dust events in spring from the Mu Us desert and deserts of West China and Mongolia, as well as the impacts of anthropogenic pollutant particles from the middle part of China in the other seasons. The seasonal variation and the probability distribution of the radiative forcing and the radiative forcing efficiency at the surface and the top of the atmosphere are analyzed and regressed using the linear and Gaussian regression methods.

  13. Evaluating the representation of aerosol optical properties using an online coupled model over the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Peña, Laura; Baró, Rocío; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Brunner, Dominik; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric aerosol particles on the Earth's climate mainly depend on their optical, microphysical and chemical properties, which modify the Earth's radiative budget. The aerosol radiative effects can be divided into direct and semi-direct effects, produced by the aerosol-radiation interactions (ARIs), and indirect effects, produced by aerosol-cloud interactions (ACIs). In this sense the objective of this work is to assess whether the inclusion of aerosol radiative feedbacks in the online coupled WRF-Chem model improves the modelling outputs over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) and surrounding water areas. For this purpose, the methodology is based on the evaluation of modelled aerosol optical properties under different simulation scenarios. The evaluated data come from two WRF-Chem simulations for the IP differing in the inclusion/no-inclusion of ARIs and ACIs (RF/NRF simulations). The case studies cover two episodes with different aerosol types over the IP in 2010, namely a Saharan dust outbreak and a forest fire episode. The evaluation uses observational data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE). Experimental data of aerosol vertical distribution from the EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) Granada station are used for checking the models. The results indicate that for the spatial distribution the best-represented variable is AOD and the largest improvements when including the aerosol radiative feedbacks are found for the vertical distribution. In the case of the dust outbreak, a slight improvement (worsening) is produced over the areas with medium (high/low) levels of AOD(-9 % / +12 % of improvement) when including the aerosol radiative feedbacks. For the wildfire episode, improvements of AOD representation (up to 11 %) over areas further away from emission sources are estimated, which

  14. Towards Improved Cirrus Cloud Optical Depths from CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Anne; Vaughan, Mark; Pelon, Jacques; Winker, David; Trepte, Chip; Young, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    This paper reviews recent advances regarding the retrieval of optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds using synergetic analyses of perfectly collocated observations from the CALIOP lidar and the IIR infrared radiometer aboard the CALIPSO satellite.

  15. Aerosol optical properties retrieved from Sun photometer measurements over Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qianshan; Li, Chengcai; Geng, Fuhai; Yang, Hequn; Li, Peiren; Li, Tingting; Liu, Dongwei; Pei, Zhen

    2012-08-01

    Using a CIMEL Sun photometer, we conducted continuous observations over the urban area of Shanghai (31°14'N, 121°32'E) from 18 April 2007 to 31 January 2009. The aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom wavelength exponent, single scattering albedo (ω0), and aerosol particle size distribution were derived from the observational data. The monthly mean AOD reached a maximum value of 1.20 in June and a minimum value of 0.43 in January. The monthly averaged Angstrom wavelength exponent reached a minimum value of 1.15 in April and a maximum value of 1.41 in October. The frequencies of the AOD and Angstrom wavelength exponent presented lognormal distributions. The averaged ω0 at 550 nm was 0.94 throughout the observation period, indicating that the aerosols over Shanghai are composed mainly of scattering particles. The concentrations of coarse mode and accumulation mode aerosols over Shanghai were highest in spring compared with other seasons, especially for those particles with radii between 1.0 and 2.0 μm. The median radius of monthly averaged accumulation mode aerosols increased with increasing AOD, and fine particles accounted for the majority of the aerosol volume concentration. The ratios of the monthly averaged volume concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode aerosols (Vf/Vc) were over 0.6 for all months studied and reached up to 1.94 in August. The volumes of the two modes changed with AOD, but their correlations presented different sensitivities, that is, the volume concentration of accumulation mode aerosols was more sensitive to variations in AOD than that of coarse mode aerosols. The aerosol volume concentration decreased with increasing ω0, indicating that the higher the volume concentration of aerosols, the higher the absorption in particle extinction properties. The increase in absorption was caused primarily by secondary species coated on black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (POC) particles.

  16. Optical characteristics of biomass burning aerosols over Southeastern Europe determined from UV-Raman lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of smoke on the aerosol loading in the free troposphere over Thessaloniki, Greece is examined in this paper. Ten cases during 2001–2005 were identified when very high aerosol optical depth values in the free troposphere were observed with a UV-Raman lidar. Particle dispersion modeling (FLEXPART and satellite hot spot fire detection (ATSR showed that these high free tropospheric aerosol optical depths are mainly attributed to the advection of smoke plumes from biomass burning regions over Thessaloniki. The biomass burning regions were found to extend across Russia in the latitudinal belt between 45° N–55° N, as well as in Eastern Europe (Baltic countries, Western Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine. The highest frequency of agricultural fires occurred during the summer season (mainly in August. The data collected allowed the optical characterization of the smoke aerosols that arrived over Greece, where limited information has so far been available. Two-wavelength backscatter lidar measurements showed that the backscatter-related Ångström exponent ranged between 0.5 and 2.4 indicating a variety of particle sizes. UV-Raman lidar measurements showed that for smoke particles the extinction to backscatter ratios varied between 40 sr for small particles to 100 sr for large particles. Dispersion model estimations of the carbon monoxide tracer concentration profiles for smoke particles indicate that the variability of the optical parameters is a function of the age of the smoke plumes.

  17. Intercomparison of aerosol optical parameters from WALI and R-MAN510 aerosol Raman lidars in the framework of HyMeX campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytard, Mai-Lan; Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Shang, Xiaoxia; Marnas, Fabien; Totems, Julien; Bizard, Anthony; Bennai, Baya; Sauvage, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The HyMeX program (Hydrological cycle in Mediterranean eXperiment) aims at improving our understanding of hydrological cycle in the Mediterranen and at a better quantification and forecast of high-impact weather events in numerical weather prediction models. The first Special Observation Period (SOP1) took place in September/October 2012. During this period two aerosol Raman lidars have been deployed at Menorca Island (Spain) : one Water-vapor and Aerosol Raman LIdar (WALI) operated by LSCE/CEA (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement/Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) and one aerosol Raman and dual-polarization lidar (R-Man510) developed and commercialized by LEOSPHERE company. Both lidars have been continuously running during the campaign and have provided information on aerosol and cloud optical properties under various atmospheric conditions (maritime background aerosols, dust events, cirrus clouds...). We will present here the results of intercomparisons between R-Man510, and WALI aerosol lidar systems and collocated sunphotometer measurements. Limitations and uncertainties on the retrieval of extinction coefficients, depolarization ratio, aerosol optical depths and detection of atmospheric structures (planetary boundary layer height, aerosol/cloud layers) will be discussed according atmospheric conditions. The results will also be compared with theoretical uncertainty assessed with direct/inverse model of lidar profiles.

  18. The aerosol optical properties measurement by ground remote sensing in Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jian; Jiang, Zishan; Yu, Shuquan; Ma, Yuandan

    2009-10-01

    The aerosol optical depth was affected by the chemical composition, the particle size and the shape of aerosol as well as the water vapor in the atmosphere; it is an important indicator for air pollution. The special and temporal characteristics of aerosol optical depth (AOD) was measured by CE318 sun-photometer, Angstrom wavelength exponent (Alpha) and the aerosol turbidity coefficient (β) were calculated in Ningbo, Lin'an and Qiandaohu of Zhejiang province from 2007 to 2008. We also analyzed the relationship between AOD and Angstrom wavelength exponent (Alpha) in these stations. The results show that there are different pattern of AOD in this gradient of urban and suburban region. Lin'an station had two peaks of AOD, but Ningbo and Qiandaohu stations had single peak of AOD in measurement year. The difference of AOD seasonal pattern exists in three sites. The Angstrom wavelength exponent (Alpha) analysis suggests that the aerosol sizes in three stations various from fine particle in autumn to coarse particle in spring. The seasonal patterns show that spring air pollution is serious, summer is relatively clean, and autumn and winter are relative serious in three stations.

  19. Path radiance technique for retrieving aerosol optical thickness over land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Guoyong [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville (United States); Tsay, Si-Chee [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Cahalan, Robert F. [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Oreopoulos, Lazaros [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville (United States)

    1999-12-27

    The key issue in retrieving aerosol optical thickness over land from shortwave satellite radiances is to identify and separate the signal due to scattering by a largely transparent aerosol layer from the noise due to reflection by the background surface, where the signal is relatively uniform compared to the highly inhomogeneous surface contribution. Sensitivity studies in aerosol optical thickness retrievals reveal that the apparent reflectance at the top of the atmosphere is very susceptible to the surface reflectance, especially when aerosol optical thickness is small. Uncertainties associated with surface reflectance estimation can greatly amplify the error of the aerosol optical thickness retrieval. To reduce these uncertainties, we have developed a ''path radiance'' method to retrieve aerosol optical thickness over land by extending the traditional technique that uses the ''dark object'' approach to extract the aerosol signal. This method uses the signature of the correlation of visible and middle-IR reflectance at the surface and couples the correlation with the atmospheric effect. We have applied this method to a Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper) image acquired over the Oklahoma southern Great Plains site of the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program on September 27, 1997, a very clear day (aerosol optical thickness of 0.07 at 0.5 {mu}m) during the first Landsat Intensive Observation Period. The retrieved mean aerosol optical thickness for TM band 1 at 0.49 {mu}m and band 3 at 0.66 {mu}m agree very well with the ground-based Sun photometer measurements at the ARM site. The ability to retrieve small aerosol optical thickness makes this path radiance technique promising. More importantly, the path radiance is relatively insensitive to surface inhomogeneity. The retrieved mean path radiances in reflectance units have very small standard deviations for both TM blue and red bands. This small

  20. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode.

  1. Joint elastic side-scattering LIDAR and Raman LIDAR measurements of aerosol optical properties in south east Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, L.; Rizi, V.; Will, M.; Allen, C.; Botts, A.; Calhoun, M.; Carande, B.; Claus, J.; Coco, M.; Emmert, L.; Esquibel, S.; Grillo, A. F.; Hamilton, L.; Heid, T. J.; Iarlori, M.; Klages, H.-O.; Kleifges, M.; Knoll, B.; Koop, J.; Mathes, H.-J.; Menshikov, A.; Morgan, S.; Patterson, L.; Petrera, S.; Robinson, S.; Runyan, C.; Sherman, J.; Starbuck, D.; Wakin, M.; Wolf, O.

    2017-03-01

    We describe an experiment, located in south-east Colorado, U.S.A., that measured aerosol optical depth profiles using two LIDAR techniques. Two independent detectors measured scattered light from a vertical UV laser beam. One detector, located at the laser site, measured light via the inelastic Raman backscattering process. This is a common method used in atmospheric science for measuring aerosol optical depth profiles. The other detector, located approximately 40 km distant, viewed the laser beam from the side. This detector featured a 3.5 m2 mirror and measured elastically scattered light in a bistatic LIDAR configuration following the method used at the Pierre Auger cosmic ray observatory. The goal of this experiment was to assess and improve methods to measure atmospheric clarity, specifically aerosol optical depth profiles, for cosmic ray UV fluorescence detectors that use the atmosphere as a giant calorimeter. The experiment collected data from September 2010 to July 2011 under varying conditions of aerosol loading. We describe the instruments and techniques and compare the aerosol optical depth profiles measured by the Raman and bistatic LIDAR detectors.

  2. Influence of semi-volatile aerosol on physical and optical properties of aerosol in Kathmandu valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Praveen, Ps; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Shrestha, Kundan; Panday, Arnico

    2016-04-01

    A field study was conducted in the urban atmosphere of Kathmandu valley to study the influence of the semi-volatile aerosol fraction on physical and optical properties of aerosols. The study was carried out during the 2015 pre-monsoon period. Experimental setup consisted of air from an ambient air inlet being split to two sets of identical sampling instruments. The first instrument received the ambient sample directly, while the second instrument received the air sample through a thermodenuder (TDD). Four sets of experiments were conducted to understand aerosol number, size distribution, scattering and absorption properties using Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Aethalometer (AE33) and Nephelometer. The influence of semi-volatile aerosols was calculated from the fraction of particles evaporated in the TDD at set temparetures: room temperature, 50°C, 100°C, 150°C, 200°C, 250°C and 300°C. Results show that, with increasing temperature, the evaporated fraction of semi-volatile aerosol also increased. At room temperature the fraction of semi-volatile aerosols was 12% while at 300°C it was as high as to 49%. Aerosol size distribution analysis shows that with an increase in TDD temperature from 50°C to 300°C, peak mobility diameter of particles shifted from around 60nm to 40nm. However we found little change in effective diameter of aerosol size distribution with increase in set TDD temperature. The change in size of aerosols due to loss of semi-volatile component has a stronger influence (~70%) in higher size bins when compared to at lower size bins (~20%). Studies using the AE33 showed that absorption by black carbon (BC) is amplified due to influence of semi-volatile aerosols by upto 37% at 880nm wavelength. Similarly nephelometer measurements showed that upto 71% of total scattering was found to be contributed by semi-volatile aerosol fraction. The scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) of semi-volatile aerosol

  3. Sources of optically active aerosol particles over the Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Pascal; Graham, Bim; Roberts, Gregory C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Maenhaut, Willy; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    taken into account when modeling the physical and optical properties of aerosols in forested regions such the Amazon Basin.

  4. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  5. Seasonal differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over rural Oklahoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andrews

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A small airplane made 597 aerosol optical property (light absorption and light scattering vertical profile measurements over a rural Oklahoma site between March 2000 and December 2007. The aerosol profiles obtained during these 8 yr of measurements suggest significant seasonal differences in aerosol loading (scattering and absorption. The highest amounts of scattering and absorbing aerosol are observed during the summer and the lowest loading occurs during the winter. The relative contribution of aerosol absorption is highest in the winter (i.e., single scattering albedo is lowest in winter, particularly aloft. Aerosol absorption generally decreased with altitude below ~1.5 km and then was relatively constant or decreased more gradually above that. Aerosol scattering decreased sharply with altitude below ~1.5 km but, unlike absorption, also decreased at higher altitudes, albeit less sharply. Scattering Ångström exponents suggest that the aerosol was dominated by sub-micron aerosol during the summer at all altitudes, but that larger particles were present, especially in the spring and winter above 1 km. The seasonal variability observed for aerosol loading is consistent with AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD although the AOD values calculated from in situ adjusted to ambient conditions and matching wavelengths are up to a factor of two lower than AERONET AOD values depending on season. The column averaged single scattering albedo derived from in situ airplane measurements are similar in value to the AERONET single scattering albedo inversion product but the seasonal patterns are different – possibly a consequence of the strict constraints on obtaining single scattering albedo from AERONET data. A comparison of extinction Ångström exponent and asymmetry parameter from the airplane and AERONET platforms suggests similar seasonal variability with smaller particles observed in the summer and fall and larger particles observed in spring and

  6. Evaluation and application of passive and active optical remote sensing methods for the measurement of atmospheric aerosol properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielonen, T.

    2010-07-01

    assumptions and more realistic assumptions improve the retrieved parameters. However, other derived parameters, i.e. aerosol optical depth may deteriorate. In additio, the possibility to improve aerosol typing based on active spaceborne measurements by adding an additional parameter into the retrieval was studied. Unfortunately, the available parameter (color ratio) did not bring additional information into the retrieval. For the application part, remote sensed data was used in the estimation of particulate matter at the surface and in the analysis of seasonal profiles of vertical properties. The studies in this thesis show that optical remote sensing can give invaluable information on the properties of atmospheric aerosols. However, the retrieval of aerosol properties with undetermined information content is an extremely difficult task. Thus, the user should be aware of the uncertainties and the error sources in the retrieved parameters. (orig.)

  7. Retrieval of cloud optical depth from the cloud modification factor (CMF) for overcast skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, David; José Marín, María; Esteve, Anna R.; Estellés, Victor; Núñez, Manuel; Utrillas, M. Pilar; Martínez-Lozano, José A.

    2014-05-01

    Clouds generally produce an attenuating effect over solar radiation (up to 80%) that depends, among other characteristics, on the type of the cloud, its optical depth and its distribution in the sky. To analyse the dependence of the atmospheric transmissivity of solar radiation with the cloud optical depth for overcast skies (τ), both in the range of ultraviolet erythemal radiation (UVER) and in the broadband, we have used the cloud optical depths obtained by a minimization process from the irradiation surface measurements. Measurements in the UVER range were obtained by means of a UVB-1 broadband radiometer by Yankee Environmental Systems, with a spectral range of 280 - 400 nm, and in the broadband with a CM-6 pyranometer by Kipp & Zonen, with a spectral range of 310 - 2800 nm. The cloud cover was obtained from cloud sky images, which were acquired at 5 minute intervals using a sky camera by SONA Sieltec Canarias S.L. A CE318 sunphotometer by CIMEL was used in this study for monitoring aerosol optical properties in a vertical column of the atmosphere. Modelled cloud optical depths obtained by the minimization process are iterated until modelled irradiances are equal to or less than 2 percent of the measured value. This study presents the relationship between the cloud optical depths, obtained by the previous minimization method, and an important atmospheric transmissivity factor, the cloud modification factor (CMF). CMF, defined as the ratio between the measured radiation in overcast sky conditions and the calculated radiation for a cloudless sky, provides a first distinction of cloud radiative effects. CMF can be evaluated for different spectral intervals, ultraviolet as well as broadband. For the estimation of CMF, we have calculated cloudless sky irradiance in two different ways: first in a simple way using the empirical expression given by Madronich's equation for UVER range and secondly using the SBDART model for both the UVER and the broadband. Data from

  8. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range.

  9. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  10. Retrieval of aerosol aspect ratio from optical measurements in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, M.; Horvath, H.; Gangl, M.

    The phase function and extinction coefficient measured simultaneously are interpreted in terms of surface distribution function and mean effective aspect ratio of aerosol particles. All optical data were collected in the atmosphere of Vienna during field campaign in June 2005. It is shown that behavior of aspect ratio of Viennese aerosols has relation to relative humidity in such a way, that nearly spherical particles (with aspect ratio ɛ≈1) might became aspherical with ɛ≈1.3-1.6 under low relative humidity conditions. Typically, >80% of all Viennese aerosols have the aspect ratio Vienna.

  11. Aerosol optical properties determined from sky-radiometer over Loess Plateau of Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical properties and their associated radiative forcing are retrieved from sky-radiometer and surface solar radiation data collected over the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL for the period of March to May (MAM 2009. The result shows that the seasonal mean aerosol optical depth (AOD at 500 nm in MAM is 0.4. The single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm in MAM at SACOL fluctuates significantly ranging from 0.82 to 0.97. The averaged value of SSA there for background aerosol is 0.92 in MAM, while it is smaller (0.89 during the dust event outbreak period. The smaller SSA can be interpreted as the result of larger particles during dust events. The averaged asymmetry factor (ASY at 500 nm during dust event period is 0.81, which is much larger than 0.68 of background aerosols. The averaged shortwave radiative effect of the aerosols during dust event period in MAM is −6.25, −86.33 and 80.08 wm−2, respectively, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA, surface and in the atmosphere. The aerosols heat the atmosphere during dust event period by up to 2 K day−1 (daily averaged, which is 67 % larger than the heating (1.2 K day−1 of background aerosols. The significant heating effect in the atmosphere of the aerosols during dust event is determined by larger AOD and smaller SSA.

  12. Effects of data assimilation on the global aerosol key optical properties simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaomei; Dai, Tie; Schutgens, Nick A. J.; Goto, Daisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Shi, Guangyu

    2016-09-01

    We present the one month results of global aerosol optical properties for April 2006, using the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) coupled with the Non-hydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), by assimilating Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) with Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF). The simulated AOD, Ångström Exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA) are validated by independent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations over the global sites. The data assimilation has the strongest positive effect on the AOD simulation and slight positive influences on the AE and SSA simulations. For the time-averaged globally spatial distribution, the data assimilation increases the model skill score (S) of AOD, AE, and SSA from 0.55, 0.92, and 0.75 to 0.79, 0.94, and 0.80, respectively. Over the North Africa (NAF) and Middle East region where the aerosol composition is simple (mainly dust), the simulated AODs are best improved by the data assimilation, indicating the assimilation correctly modifies the wrong dust burdens caused by the uncertainties of the dust emission parameterization. Assimilation also improves the simulation of the temporal variations of the aerosol optical properties over the AERONET sites, with improved S at 60 (62%), 45 (55%) and 11 (50%) of 97, 82 and 22 sites for AOD, AE and SSA. By analyzing AOD and AE at five selected sites with best S improvement, this study further indicates that the assimilation can reproduce short duration events and ratios between fine and coarse aerosols more accurately.

  13. Physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban location in Spain: seasonal and diurnal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lyamani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol optical properties and aerosol number size distribution obtained during the period from December 2005 to November 2007 at Granada, an urban site in south-eastern Spain, are analyzed. Large variations of the measured variables have been found, and related to variations in emissions sources and meteorological conditions. High values of aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients are obtained during winter and low values are measured during summer. This seasonal pattern in the surface aerosol optical properties is opposite to the seasonal cycle showed by columnar aerosol optical depth. The differences in the seasonal features of the surface and column-integrated data are related to seasonal variations in the aerosol vertical distribution, aerosol sources and boundary layer height. In winter the number density of "fine" particles (0.5s, presents an evident seasonal cycle with values of 1.8±0.2, 1.6±0.3, 1.3±0.3 and 1.4±0.3 in winter, spring, summer and autumn, respectively. This suggests the presence of a large fraction of submicron particles at the site, especially during winter. The aerosols measured in this study contain a large fraction of absorbing material as indicated by the average single-scattering albedo that has values of 0.65±0.07, 0.66±0.06, 0.70±0.06 and 0.73±0.06 in autumn, winter, spring and summer, respectively. The aerosol scattering albedo obtained in the surface boundary layer of Granada is below the critical value of 0.86 that determines the shift from cooling to warming. These results put in evidence the need of efforts to reduce absorbing particles (black carbon emissions to avoid the possible warming that would result from the

  14. Physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban location in Spain: seasonal and diurnal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lyamani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol optical properties and aerosol number size distribution obtained during the period from December 2005 to November 2007 at Granada, an urban site in south-eastern Spain, are analyzed. Large variations of the measured variables have been found, and related to variations in emissions sources and meteorological conditions. High values of aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients are obtained during winter and low values are measured during summer. This seasonal pattern in the surface aerosol optical properties is opposite to the seasonal cycle showed by columnar aerosol optical depth. The differences in the seasonal features of the surface and column-integrated data are related to seasonal variations in the aerosol vertical distribution, aerosol sources and boundary layer height. In winter the number density of fine particles (0.5s, presents an evident seasonal cycle with values of 1.8±0.2, 1.6±0.3, 1.3±0.3 and 1.4±0.3 in winter, spring, summer and autumn, respectively. This suggests the presence of a large fraction of submicron particles at the site, especially during winter. Urban aerosols in Granada contain a large fraction of absorbing material as indicated by the average single-scattering albedo that has values of 0.65±0.07, 0.66±0.06, 0.70±0.06 and 0.73±0.06 in autumn, winter, spring and summer, respectively. The aerosol scattering albedo obtained in the surface boundary layer of Granada is below the critical value of 0.86 that determines the shift from cooling to warming. These results put in evidence the need of efforts to reduce absorbing particles (black carbon emissions to avoid the possible warming that would result from the reductions of

  15. Aerosol Characteristics at a High Altitude Location in Central Himalayas: Optical Properties and Radiative Forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, P; Dumka, U C; Sagar, R; Satheesh, S K; Moorthy, K K; Sagar, Ram

    2006-01-01

    Collocated measurements of the mass concentrations of aerosol black carbon (BC) and composite aerosols near the surface were carried out along with spectral aerosol optical depths (AODs) from a high altitude station, Manora Peak in Central Himalayas, during a comprehensive aerosol field campaign in December 2004. Despite being a pristine location in the Shivalik Ranges of Central Himalayas, and having a monthly mean AOD (at 500 nm) of 0.059 $\\pm$ 0.033 (typical to this site), total suspended particulate (TSP) concentration was in the range 15 - 40 micro g m^(-3) (mean value 27.1 $\\pm$ 8.3 micro g m^(-3)). Interestingly, aerosol BC had a mean concentration of 1.36 $\\pm$ 0.99 micro g m^(-3), contributed to ~5.0 $\\pm$ 1.3 % to the composite aerosol mass. This large abundance of BC is found to have linkages to the human activities in the adjoining valley and to the boundary layer dynamics. Consequently, the inferred single scattering albedo lies in the range of 0.87 to 0.94 (mean value 0.90 $\\pm$ 0.03), indicatin...

  16. An operational retrieval algorithm for determining aerosol optical properties in the ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas E.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Slusser, James R.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Goering, Christian D.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a number of practical considerations concerning the optimization and operational implementation of an algorithm used to characterize the optical properties of aerosols across part of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. The algorithm estimates values of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at seven wavelengths in the UV, as well as total column ozone (TOC) and wavelength-independent asymmetry factor (g) using direct and diffuse irradiances measured with a UV multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV-MFRSR). A novel method for cloud screening the irradiance data set is introduced, as well as several improvements and optimizations to the retrieval scheme which yield a more realistic physical model for the inversion and increase the efficiency of the algorithm. Introduction of a wavelength-dependent retrieval error budget generated from rigorous forward model analysis as well as broadened covariances on the a priori values of AOD, SSA and g and tightened covariances of TOC allows sufficient retrieval sensitivity and resolution to obtain unique solutions of aerosol optical properties as demonstrated by synthetic retrievals. Analysis of a cloud screened data set (May 2003) from Panther Junction, Texas, demonstrates that the algorithm produces realistic values of the optical properties that compare favorably with pseudo-independent methods for AOD, TOC and calculated Ångstrom exponents. Retrieval errors of all parameters (except TOC) are shown to be negatively correlated to AOD, while the Shannon information content is positively correlated, indicating that retrieval skill improves with increasing atmospheric turbidity. When implemented operationally on more than thirty instruments in the Ultraviolet Monitoring and Research Program's (UVMRP) network, this retrieval algorithm will provide a comprehensive and internally consistent climatology of ground-based aerosol properties in the UV spectral range that can be used

  17. Long-term observations of aerosol optical properties at Wuhan, an urban site in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lunche; Gong, Wei; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Li, Jun; Zhu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distribution and refractive index at urban Wuhan in Central China are investigated based on the measurements from a CIMEL sun-photometer during 2007-2013. AOD500 nm is found to be relatively high all year round and the highest value 1.52 occurs in June 2012 and the lowest (0.57) in November 2012. α shows a significant monthly variation, with the highest value in June 2010 (1.71) and the lowest value (0.78) in April 2012. Analysis of AOD and α frequencies indicate that this region is populated with fine-mode particles. Monthly variations of SSA for total, fine and coarse-mode particles are closely related to the aerosol hygroscopic growth, fossil fuel and biomass burning. The aerosol volume size distributions (bi-modal pattern) show distinct differences in particle radius for different seasons, the radius for fine-mode particles generally increase from spring to summer month, for example, the highest peak is around radius 0.15 μm in March, while the peak radius is around 0.25 μm in June. Finally, monthly statistics of real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index are analyzed, the highest averages of real (1.50) and imaginary parts (0.0395) are found in spring and autumn, respectively at wavelength 440-1020 nm.

  18. Development of 2-D-MAX-DOAS and retrievals of trace gases and aerosols optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ivan

    Air pollution is a major problem worldwide that adversely a_ects human health, impacts ecosystems and climate. In the atmosphere, there are hundreds of important compounds participating in complex atmospheric reactions linked to air quality and climate. Aerosols are relevant because they modify the radiation balance, a_ect clouds, and thus Earth albedo. The amount of aerosol is often characterized by the vertical integral through the entire height of the atmosphere of the logarithm fraction of incident light that is extinguished called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is 0.19 (multi annual global mean), and that over oceans is 0.13. About 43 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions, sample spatial scales that resemble satellite ground-pixels and atmospheric models, and help integrate remote sensing and in-situ observations to obtain optical closure on the effects of aerosols and trace gases in our changing environment. In this work, I present the recent development of the University of Colorado two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure the azimuth and altitude distribution of trace gases and aerosol optical properties simultaneously with a single instrument. The instrument measures solar scattered light from any direction in the sky, including direct sun light in the hyperspectral domain. In Chapter 2, I describe the capabilities of 2-D measurements in the context of retrievals of azimuth distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and glyoxal (CHOCHO), which are precursors for tropospheric O3 and aerosols. The measurements were carried out during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) campaign in Mainz, Germany and show the ability to bridge spatial scales to

  19. On the microlensing optical depth of the galactic bar

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, S

    1996-01-01

    The microlensing probability (optical depth \\tau) toward the Galactic center carries information about the mass distribution of the Galactic bulge/bar, so can be used to constrain the very uncertain shape parameters of the bar. We find tau depends on the bar mass, radial profile, angle, axis scale lengths and boxyness by a few simple analytical formulae, which shows: (1) \\tau is proportional to the mass of the bar, M. (2) \\tau falls along the minor axis with a strong gradient. (3) An oblate bulge can have more optical depth than a triaxial bar if the bar angle \\alpha>45 degress. (4) \\tau is the largest if the angle \\alpha and the axis ratio y_0/x_0 conspires so that y_0/x_0=\\tan \\alpha. (5) At a fixed field on the minor axis but away from the center, boxy bars with a flat density profile tend to give a larger optical depth than ellipsoidal bars with a steep profile. (6) Main sequence sources should have a significantly lower (20-50\\% lower) optical depth than red clump giants if main sequence stars are not ob...

  20. Multi-wavelength optical measurement to enhance thermal/optical analysis for carbonaceous aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-W. A. Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A thermal/optical carbon analyzer equipped with seven-wavelength light source/detector (405–980 nm for monitoring spectral reflectance (R and transmittance (T of filter samples allows "thermal spectral analysis (TSA" and wavelength (λ-dependent organic carbon (OC-elemental carbon (EC measurements. Optical sensing is calibrated with transfer standards traceable to absolute R and T measurements and adjusted for loading effects to determine spectral light absorption (as absorption optical depth [τa, λ] using diesel exhaust samples as a reference. Tests on ambient and source samples show OC and EC concentrations equivalent to those from conventional carbon analysis when based on the same wavelength (~635 nm for pyrolysis adjustment. TSA provides additional information that evaluates black carbon (BC and brown carbon (BrC contributions and their optical properties in the near-IR to the near-UV parts of the solar spectrum. The enhanced carbon analyzer can add value to current aerosol monitoring programs and provide insight into more accurate OC and EC measurements for climate, visibility, or health studies.

  1. Use of Lidar Derived Optical Extinction and Backscattering Coefficients Near Cloud Base to Explore Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonhgua; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Combination of microwave radiometer (MWR) and mutlifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurement data together with SBDART radiative transfer model to compute cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud droplet effective radius (Reff). Quantify the first aerosol indirect effect using calculated Reff and aerosol extinction from Raman lidar measurement in urban coastal region. Illustrate comparison between ground-based and satellite retrievals. Demonstrate relationship between surface aerosol (PM2.5) loading and Reff. We also explain the sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-index (ACI) depend on the aerosol layer from cloud base height. Potential used of less noisy elastic backscattering to calculate the ACI instead of using Raman extinction. We also present comparison of elastic backscattering and Raman extinction correlation to Reff.

  2. Aerosol optical properties under the condition of heavy haze over an urban site of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Huizheng; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Sun, Junying; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    In January 2013, several serious haze pollution events happened in North China. Cimel sunphotometer measurements at an urban site of Beijing (Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences-CAMS) from 1 to 30 January 2013 were used to investigate the detailed variation of aerosol optical properties. It was found that Angstrom exponents were mostly larger than 0.80 when aerosol optical depth values are higher than 0.60 at the urban region of Beijing during January 2013. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) at the urban region of Beijing can remain steady at approximately 0.40 before haze happening and then increased sharply to more than 1.50 at 500 nm with the onset of haze, which suggests that the fine-mode AOD is a factor of 20 of the coarse-mode AOD during a serious haze pollution event. The single scattering albedo was approximately 0.90 ± 0.03 at 440, 675, 870 and 1,020 nm during the haze pollution period. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm as a function of the fine-mode fraction was relatively consistent, but it was highly variable at 675, 870 and 1,020 nm. Except on January 12 and 18, all the fine-mode particle volumes were larger than those of coarse particles, which suggests that fine particles from anthropogenic activities made up most of the haze. Aerosol type classification analysis showed that the dominant aerosol types can be classified as both "mixed" and "urban/industrial (U/I) and biomass burning (BB)" categories during the heavy haze period of Beijing in January of 2013. The mixed category occurrence was about 31 %, while the U/I and BB was about 69 %.

  3. Optical Properties of Polymers Relevant to Secondary Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Ortiz, W.; Gomez-Hernandez, M. E.; Xu, W.; Guo, S.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a critical role in climate directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by modifying the cloud formation. Currently, the direct and indirect effects of aerosols represent the largest uncertainty in climate predictions models. Some aerosols are directly emitted, but the majority are formed in the atmosphere by the oxidation of gaseous precursors. However, the formation of aerosols at the molecular level is not fully characterized. Certain category of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which represent a significant fraction of the total aerosol burden, can be light-absorbing, also known as brown carbon. However, the overall contribution of SOA to the brown carbon and the related climate forcing is poorly understood. Such incomplete understanding is due in part to the chemical complexity of SOA and the lack of knowledge regarding SOA formation, transformation, and optical properties. Based on previous laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modeling studies, it has been suggested that the polymers and oligomers play an important role in the SOA formation. Atmospheric polymers could be produced by the hydration or heterogeneous reactions of epoxides and small α-dicarbonyls. Their aqueous chemistry products have been shown to give light-absorbing and high molecular weight oligomeric species, which increase the SOA mass production and alter the direct and indirect effect of aerosols. In this paper, the aerosol chemistry of small α-dicarbonyl compounds with amines is investigated and the associated optical properties are measured using spectroscopic techniques. The differences between primary, secondary and tertiary amines with glyoxal and methylglyoxal are evaluated in terms of SOA browning efficiency. Atmospheric implications of our present work for understanding the formation of light-absorbing SOA will be presented, particularly in terms of the product distribution of light-absorbing SOA formed by aqueous phase

  4. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bondo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases – abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays – by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. For the shorter wavelength pair we observe a change in Angstrom exponent, following the Forbush Decrease, of −6 to +3% in the cases with atmospherically realistic output parameters. For some parameters we also observe a delay in the change of Angstrom exponent, compared to the maximum of the Forbush decrease, which is caused by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates. Furthermore we compare the model output with observations of 5 of the largest Forbush decreases after year 2000. For the 350, 450 nm pair we use AERONET data and find a comparable change in signal while the Angstrom Exponent is lower in the model than in the data, due to AERONET being mainly sampled over land. For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter wavelengths seem more favorable for observing these effects and great care should be taken when analyzing observations, in order to avoid the signal being drowned out by noise.

  5. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bondo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases – abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays – by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation and condensation model, according to changes in ionization by the Forbush decrease. From the resulting size distribution we then calculate the aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent, for the wavelength pairs 350, 450 nm and 550, 900 nm. In the cases where the output parameters from the model seem to compare best with atmospheric observations we observe, for the shorter wavelength pair, a change in Angstrom exponent, following the Forbush Decrease, of −6 to +3%. In some cases we also observe a delay in the change of Angstrom exponent, compared to the maximum of the Forbush decrease, which is caused by different sensitivities of the probing wavelengths to changes in aerosol number concentration and size. For the long wavelengths these changes are generally smaller. The types and magnitude of change is investigated for a suite of nucleation rates, condensable gas production rates, and aerosol loss rates. Furthermore we compare the model output with observations of 5 of the largest Forbush decreases after year 2000. For the 350, 450 nm pair we use AERONET data and find a comparable change in signal while the Angstrom Exponent is lower in the model than in the data, due to AERONET being mainly sampled over land. For 550, 900 nm we compare with both AERONET and MODIS and find little to no response in both model and observations. In summary our study shows that the optical properties of aerosols show a distinct response to Forbush Decreases, assuming that the nucleation of fresh aerosols is driven by ions. Shorter wavelengths seem more favorable for observing these effects and great care should be taken when analyzing observations, in order to avoid

  6. Aerosol physical and optical properties in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin, Crete, from Aerosol Robotic Network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fotiadi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the aerosol optical properties, namely aerosol extinction optical thickness (AOT, Angström parameter and size distribution over the Eastern Mediterranean Basin, using spectral measurements from the recently established FORTH (Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas AERONET station in Crete, for the two-year period 2003–2004. The location of the FORTH-AERONET station offers a unique opportunity to monitor aerosols from different sources. Maximum values of AOT are found primarily in spring, which together with small values of the Angström parameter indicate dust transported from African deserts, whereas the minimum values of AOT occur in winter. In autumn, large AOT values observed at near-infrared wavelengths arise also from dust transport. In summer, large AOT values at ultraviolet (340 nm and visible wavelengths (500 nm, together with large values of the Angström parameter, are associated with transport of fine aerosols of urban/industrial and biomass burning origin. The Angström parameter values vary on a daily basis within the range 0.05–2.20, and on a monthly basis within the range 0.68–1.9. This behaviour, together with broad frequency distributions and back-trajectory analyses, indicates a great variety of aerosol types over the study region including dust, urban-industrial and biomass-burning pollution, and maritime, as well as mixed aerosol types. Large temporal variability is observed in AOT, Angström parameter, aerosol content and size. The fine and coarse aerosol modes persist throughout the year, with the coarse mode dominant except in summer. The highest values of AOT are related primarily to southeasterly winds, associated with coarse aerosols, and to a less extent to northwesterly winds associated with fine aerosols. The results of this study show that the FORTH AERONET station in Crete is well suited for studying the transport and mixing of different types of aerosols from a variety

  7. Aerosol optical properties over the Svalbard region of Arctic: ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    In view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence of aerosols in the northern polar regions, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol optical parameters have been investigated over the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m ASL). This study has shown a consistent enhancement in the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients during spring. The relative dominance of absorbing aerosols is more near the surface (lower single scattering albedo), compared to that at the higher altitude. This is indicative of the presence of local anthropogenic activities. In addition, long-range transported biomass burning aerosols (inferred from the spectral variation of absorption coefficient) also contribute significantly to the higher aerosol absorption in the Arctic spring. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates from ground based Microtop sun-photometer measurements reveals that the columnar abundance of aerosols reaches the peak during spring season. Comparison of AODs between ground based and satellite remote sensing indicates that deep blue algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals over Arctic snow surfaces overestimate the columnar AOD.

  8. Fog-induced variations in aerosol optical and physical properties over the Indo-Gangetic Basin and impact to aerosol radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S. K.; Jayaraman, A.; Misra, A.

    2008-06-01

    A detailed study on the changes in aerosol physical and optical properties during fog events were made in December 2004 at Hissar (29.13° N, 75.70° E), a city located in the Indo-Gangetic basin. The visible aerosol optical depth was relatively low (0.3) during the initial days, which, however, increased (0.86) as the month progressed. The increasing aerosol amount, the decreasing surface temperature and a higher relative humidity condition were found favoring the formation of fog. The fog event is also found to alter the aerosol size distribution. An increase in the number concentration of the nucleation mode (radiuscompute the aerosol radiative forcing. The top of the atmosphere forcing is found to increase during foggy days due to large backscattering of radiation back to space. It is also shown that during foggy days, as the day progresses the RH value decreases, which reduces the forcing value while the increasing solar elevation increases the forcing value. Thus the fog event which prolongs longer into the daytime has a stronger effect on the diurnally averaged aerosol radiative forcing than those events which are confined only to the early morning hours.

  9. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian Desert dust aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Keywood

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the northern hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol. Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – both ion beam analysis and ion chromatography.

    The aerosol optical depth data showed a weak seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06±0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. Size distribution inversions showed a bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of biomass burning and marine biogenic material. Ion Beam Analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated, with the Fe/Si ratio higher than the crustal average, as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. Ion Chromatography was used to quantify water soluble ions for 2 of our sample sets, showing the importance of marine influences on both fine (biogenic and

  10. Optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush Decreases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    A tempting approach to investigate the link between cosmic rays and climate is to explore Forbush decreases - sudden drops in the amount of galactic cosmic rays reaching Earth, caused by large Coronal Mass Ejections from the sun. Due to the sudden nature of these events effects from other solar...... parameters, such as total irradiance or UV can be ruled out. There has previously been several papers using observations to gauge the impact of Forbush decreases on cloud cover, but with no definitive conclusion. In this study we model the response of the optical parameters of marine aerosols – precursors...... for cloud drops. We are specifically looking at the Angstrom exponent and the optical thickness. The goal is to elucidate the sensitivity of the type and magnitude of response in these parameters during a Forbush decrease, to changes in aerosol production, condensable gases, and primary aerosols....

  11. Evaluation of aerosol optical properties of GEOS-Chem over East Asia during the DRAGON-Asia 2012 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, D. S.; Park, R.; Kim, J.

    2015-12-01

    A nested version of 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem v9-01-02) is evaluated over East Asia during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia 2012 campaign period, focusing on fine-mode aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). Both are important to assess the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. We compare the daily mean simulated optical properties of aerosols with the observations from DRAGON-Asia campaign for March-May, 2012 (provided in level 2.0: cloud screened and quality assured). We find that the model reproduces the observed daily variability of fAOD (R=0.67), but overestimates the magnitude by 30%, which is in general consistent with other global model comparisons from ACCMIP. However, a significant high bias in the model is found compared to the observed SSA at 440 nm, which is important for determining the sign of aerosol radiative forcing. In order to understand causes for this gap we conduct several sensitivity tests by changing source magnitudes and input parameters of aerosols, affecting the aerosol optical properties under various atmospheric conditions, which allows us to reduce the gap and to find the optimal values in the model.

  12. Optical and microphysical properties of column-integrated aerosols at a SKYNET site downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Park, J. S.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    A skyradiometer (POM-02, Prede Co. Ltd.) has been operated to investigate aerosol properties at a SKYNET (SKYradiometer NETwork) site, YGN (Yongin) for six years starting from November 2008. The site is at the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul (37.34 °N, 127.27 °E and 167 m above sea level). POM-02 measures the diffuse radiation at six minute intervals at 11 wavelengths. Using version 5 of the skyrad.pack, aerosol optical (aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo) and microphysical (volume size distribution) properties were retrieved from the measurements at five wavelengths such as 400, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. In comparison with CIMEL sun photometers used in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork), another worldwide ground-based network, skyradiometers have an advantage that they can provide larger number of aerosol property data at shorter time intervals. However, standard procedures for instrument operation and data retrieval have not been established. In this study, we first showed how we calibrated the instrument and how we obtained cloud screened and quality assured data. Next, we presented variations in aerosol optical and microphysical properties, depending on air masses and/or meteorological conditions, and examined the characteristic of high aerosol loading episodes including Asian dust storm and smog.

  13. A new operational EUMETSAT product for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land (PMAp v2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy; Lang, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task to provide data for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolution for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) has been delivered as an operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The product is now extended to pixels over land using a new release of the operational PMAp processor (PMAp v2). The pre-operational data dissemination of the new PMAp v2 data to our users is scheduled for March 2016. This presentation gives an overview on the new operational product PMAp v2 with a focus on the validation of the PMAp aerosol optical depth over land. The impact of different error sources on the results (e.g. surface contribution to the TOA reflectance) is discussed. We also show first results of upcoming extensions of our PMAp processor, in particular the improvement of the cloud/aerosol discrimination of thick aerosol events (e.g. volcanic ash plumes, desert dust outbreaks).

  14. Depth Compensated Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography via Digital Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Boroomand, Ameneh; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a well-known imaging modality which allows for \\textit{in-vivo} visualization of the morphology of different biological tissues at cellular level resolutions. The overall SD-OCT imaging quality in terms of axial resolution and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) degrades with imaging depth, while the lateral resolution degrades with distance from the focal plane. This image quality degradation is due both to the design of the SD-OCT imaging system and the optical properties of the imaged object. Here, we present a novel Depth Compensated SD-OCT (DC-OCT) system that integrates a Depth Compensating Digital Signal Processing (DC-DSP) module to improve the overall imaging quality via digital compensation. The designed DC-DSP module can be integrated to any SD-OCT system and is able to simultaneously compensate for the depth-dependent loss of axial and lateral resolutions, depth-varying SNR, as well as sidelobe artifact for improved imaging quality. The integrated D...

  15. Electro-Optical Aerosol Phase Function Database PFNDAT2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Pollack, J.B.; Khare, B.N. Optical Constants of Several Atmospheric Aerosol Species, Ammonium Sulphate , Aluminum Oxide and Sodium Chloride. J. of...16 Table 12. Precipitation rates, number...rain at three precipitation rates (drizzle, moderate, and heavy); and two classes of snow, “dry” and “wet”. Dusts are treated under four categories

  16. Sensitivity of aerosol optical thickness and aerosol direct radiative effect to relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study on the effects of spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric relative humidity (RH on calculated aerosol optical thickness (AOT and the aerosol direct radiative effects (DRE in a global model. Using the same aerosol fields simulated in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI model, we find that, on a global average, the calculated AOT from RH in 1° latitude by 1.25° longitude spatial resolution is 11% higher than that in 2° by 2.5° resolution, and the corresponding DRE at the top of the atmosphere is 8–9% higher for total aerosols and 15% higher for only anthropogenic aerosols in the finer spatial resolution case. The difference is largest over surface escarpment regions (e.g. >200% over the Andes Mountains where RH varies substantially with surface terrain. The largest zonal mean AOT difference occurs at 50–60°N (16–21%, where AOT is also relatively larger. A similar increase is also found when the time resolution of RH is increased. This increase of AOT and DRE with the increase of model resolution is due to the highly non-linear relationship between RH and the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE at high RH (>80%. Our study suggests that caution should be taken in a multi-model comparison (e.g. AeroCom since the comparison usually deals with results coming from different spatial/temporal resolutions.

  17. Study of aerosol optical properties at Kunming in southwest China and long-range transport of biomass burning aerosols from North Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Che, H.; Wang, J.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal variation of aerosol optical properties and dominant aerosol types at Kunming (KM), an urban site in southwest China, is characterized. Substantial influences of the hygroscopic growth and long-range transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosols on aerosol optical properties at KM are revealed. These results are derived from a detailed analysis of (a) aerosol optical properties (e.g. aerosol optical depth (AOD), columnar water vapor (CWV), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size distribution) retrieved from sunphotometer measurements during March 2012-August 2013, (b) satellite AOD and active fire products, (c) the attenuated backscatter profiles from the space-born lidar, and (d) the back-trajectories. The mean AOD440nm and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE440 - 870) at KM are 0.42 ± 0.32 and 1.25 ± 0.35, respectively. Seasonally, high AOD440nm (0.51 ± 0.34), low EAE440 - 870 (1.06 ± 0.34) and high CWV (4.25 ± 0.97 cm) during the wet season (May - October) contrast with their counterparts 0.17 ± 0.11, 1.40 ± 0.31 and 1.91 ± 0.37 cm during the major dry season (November-February) and 0.53 ± 0.29, 1.39 ± 0.19, and 2.66 ± 0.44 cm in the late dry season (March-April). These contrasts between wet and major dry season, together with the finding that the fine mode radius increases significantly with AOD during the wet season, suggest the importance of the aerosol hygroscopic growth in regulating the seasonal variation of aerosol properties. BB and Urban/Industrial (UI) aerosols are two major aerosol types. Back trajectory analysis shows that airflows on clean days during the major dry season are often from west of KM where the AOD is low. In contrast, air masses on polluted days are from west (in late dry season) and east (in wet season) of KM where the AOD is often large. BB air mass is found mostly originated from North Burma where BB aerosols are lifted upward to 5 km and then subsequently transported to southwest China via prevailing westerly winds.

  18. Aerosol optical and physical properties during winter monsoon pollution transport in an urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S; Bhanja, S N; Pani, S K; Misra, A

    2014-04-01

    We analysed aerosol optical and physical properties in an urban environment (Kolkata) during winter monsoon pollution transport from nearby and far-off regions. Prevailing meteorological conditions, viz. low temperature and wind speed, and a strong downdraft of air mass, indicated weak dispersion and inhibition of vertical mixing of aerosols. Spectral features of WinMon aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed larger variability (0.68-1.13) in monthly mean AOD at short-wavelength (SW) channels (0.34-0.5 μm) compared to that (0.28-0.37) at long-wavelength (LW) channels (0.87-1.02 μm), thereby indicating sensitivity of WinMon AOD to fine aerosol constituents and the predominant contribution from fine aerosol constituents to WinMon AOD. WinMon AOD at 0.5 μm (AOD 0. 5) and Angstrom parameter ( α) were 0.68-0.82 and 1.14-1.32, respectively, with their highest value in December. Consistent with inference from spectral features of AOD, surface aerosol loading was primarily constituted of fine aerosols (size 0.23-3 μm) which was 60-70 % of aerosol 10- μm (size 0.23-10 μm) concentration. Three distinct modes of aerosol distribution were obtained, with the highest WinMon concentration at a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.3 μm during December, thereby indicating characteristics of primary contribution related to anthropogenic pollutants that were inferred to be mostly due to contribution from air mass originating in nearby region having predominant emissions from biofuel and fossil fuel combustion. A relatively higher contribution from aerosols in the upper atmospheric layers than at the surface to WinMon AOD was inferred during February compared to other months and was attributed to predominant contribution from open burning emissions arising from nearby and far-off regions. A comparison of ground-based measurements with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data showed an underestimation of MODIS AOD and α values for most of the days. Discrepancy in

  19. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.6±23.2 Mm-1 and 4.3±2.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm) was 2.8±2.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Ångström exponent (å) (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.90±0.05 and 1.3±0.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated Ångström exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.8±0.5 m2 g-1 and 11.8±2.2 m2 g-1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC) was 10.4±2.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the Ångström exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere (å = 1.5±0.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles (å = 1.0±0.4). The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas

  20. Eight-year Climatology of Dust Optical Depth on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Montabone, L; Millour, E; Wilson, R J; Lewis, S R; Cantor, B A; Kass, D; Kleinboehl, A; Lemmon, M; Smith, M D; Wolff, M J

    2014-01-01

    We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from Martian year 24 to 31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the Martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced, but possibly incomplete, spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure weighted in space, time, and retrieval uncertainty. In order to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we validat...

  1. Estimation of Visible Surface Reflectance for Retrieving Aerosol Optical Depth Using Landsat-8 OLI Data%利用 Landsat-8 OLI 反演大气气溶胶的可见光谱段地表反射率估算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕春光; 田庆久; 王磊; 黄彦; 耿君

    2015-01-01

    准确估算地表反射率的贡献一直是遥感反演大气气溶胶光学厚度过程中的重点和难点。为了促进Landsat-8 OLI 传感器在地表参数定量化特别是大气遥感领域的应用,本文提出一种利用 OLI 1.6μm、2.2μm 短波红外谱段数据估算遥感影像可见光地表反射率的方法。该方法依托于 MOD04产品地表反射率估算模式,通过光谱归一化和构建新的短波红外植被指数等过程,建立 OLI 地表反射率估算模式,通过误差分析发现该模式能够有效地降低由于传感器光谱响应不同对估算结果的影响,对应用在 OLI 遥感影像的计算结果与同时间同区域MOD04产品地表反射率进行比较,表明其结果有较高的相关性和可靠性。%Accurate estimation to the contribution of the surface reflectance has been the focus and the difficult point in aerosol optical depth (AOD)retrieval from remote sensing data.In order to promote the applications of Landsat-8 OLI data in quantification of surface physical parameters particularly in the field of atmospheric remote sensing,a method to estimate the optical surface reflectance from OLI images was put forward using OLI 1.6μm and OLI 2.2μm short infrared bands.The method was proposed based on the surface reflectance estimation mode of MOD04 product,by means of processes such as spectral normalization,building a new short infrared vegetation index and so on.The error analysis shows the OLI estimation mode can effectively reduce the error effect caused by spectral response differences.The comparison of the surface reflectance estimation results between the OLI and MOD04 product in the same time and same area represents that the estimation results obtained by OLI estimation mode have high correlation and reliability.

  2. Combining data from lidar and in situ instruments to characterize the vertical structure of aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, the quantification of tropospheric aerosol abundance, composition and radiative impacts has become an important research endeavor. For the most part, the interest in tropospheric aerosols is derived from questions related to the global and local (instantaneous) radiative forcing of climate due to these aerosols. One approach is to study local forcing under well-defined conditions, and to extrapolate such results to global scales. To estimate local aerosol forcing, appropriate radiative transfer models can be employed (e.g., the Fu-Liou radiative transfer code, [Fu and Liou, 1993]). In general, such models require information on derived aerosol properties [Toon, 1994]; namely the aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor (phase function), all of which appear in the equations of radiative transfer. In this paper, we report on a method that utilizes lidar data and in situ aerosol size distribution measurements to deduce the vertical structure of the aerosol complex index of refraction in the near IR, thus identifying the aerosol type. Together with aerosol size distributions obtained in situ, the aerosol refractive index can be used to calculate the necessary derived aerosol properties. The data analyzed here were collected during NASA's PEM West-B (Pacific Exploratory Mission) experiment, which took place in February/March 1994. The platform for the measurements was the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The primary goal of the PEM West missions [Browell et al., 1996] was the assessment of potential anthropogenic perturbations of the chemistry in the Pacific Basin troposphere. For this purpose the timing of PEM West-B corresponded to the seasonal peak in transport from the Asian continent into the Pacific basin [Merrill et al., in press]. This period normally occurs during Northern Hemisphere spring, when the Japan jet is well developed.

  3. Comparison of aerosol optical properties at the sub-arctic stations ALOMAR-Andenes, Abisko and Sodankylä in late spring and summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V.; de Leeuw, G.; De Frutos, A.; Gausa, M.; Holben, B.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosol concentration and aerosol type, retrieved from observations with CIMEL sun-photometers at three sub-arctic locations at the Scandinavian Peninsula are presented. The observations were made at ALOMAR-Andenes in Norway, Abisko in Sweden and Sodankylä in Finland. This field campaign took place in late spring and summer 2007 as part of the activities of the International Polar Year (IPY) within the POLARCAT project at ALOMAR and Abisko. Aerosol properties were characterized using the relationship between the aerosol optical depth and the Ångström Exponent. The characteristics of the predominant aerosol type and microphysics are largely determined by the location of the site (continental or coastal). During summer the fine mode particles dominate, as indicated by the fine mode volume fraction and the Ångström Exponent. The aerosol concentration was on average very low, except during an event in which long-range transported aerosols (dust and pollution) were detected.

  4. Diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties in the North China Plain and their influences on the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ye; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties and their influences on the estimation of daily average direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) in the North China Plain (NCP) are investigated based on in situ measurements from Haze in China campaign. For ambient aerosol, the diurnal patterns of single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g) in the NCP are both highest at dawn and lowest in the late afternoon, and quite different from those of dry-state aerosol. The relative humidity is the dominant factor which determines the diurnal patterns of SSA and g for ambient aerosol. Basing on the calculated SSA and g, several cases are designed to investigate the impacts of the diurnal changes of aerosol optical properties on DARE. The results demonstrate that the diurnal changes of SSA and g in the NCP have significant influences on the estimation of DARE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). If the full temporal coverage of aerosol optical depth (AOD), SSA and g are available, an accurate estimation of daily average DARE can be achieved by using the daily averages of AOD, SSA and g. However, due to the lack of full temporal coverage datasets of SSA and g, their daily averages are usually not available. Basing on the results of designed cases, if the RH plays a dominant role in the diurnal variations of SSA and g, we suggest that using both SSA and g averaged over early morning and late afternoon as inputs for radiative transfer model to improve the accurate estimation of DARE. If the temporal samplings of SSA or g are too few to adopt this method, either averaged over early morning or late afternoon of both SSA and g can be used to improve the estimation of DARF at TOA.

  5. Sensitivity of aerosol optical thickness and aerosol direct radiative effect to relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the effects of spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric relative humidity (RH on calculated aerosol optical thickness (AOT and the aerosol direct radiative effects (DRE in a global model. We carry out different modeling experiments using the same aerosol fields simulated in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI model at a resolution of 2° latitude by 2.5° longitude, using time-averaged fields archived every three hours by the Goddard Earth Observation System Version 4 (GEOS-4, but we change the horizontal and temporal resolution of the relative humidity fields. We find that, on a global average, the AOT calculated using RH at a 1°×1.25° horizontal resolution is 11% higher than that using RH at a 2°×2.5° resolution, and the corresponding DRE at the top of the atmosphere is 8–9% and 15% more negative (i.e., more cooling for total aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol alone, respectively, in the finer spatial resolution case. The difference is largest over surface escarpment regions (e.g. >200% over the Andes Mountains where RH varies substantially with surface terrain. The largest zonal mean AOT difference occurs at 50–60° N (16–21%, where AOT is also relatively larger. A similar impact is also found when the time resolution of RH is increased. This increase of AOT and aerosol cooling with the increase of model resolution is due to the highly non-linear relationship between RH and the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE at high RH (>80%. Our study is a specific example of the uncertainty in model results highlighted by multi-model comparisons such as AeroCom, and points out one of the many inter-model differences that can contribute to the overall spread among models.

  6. Direct effect of aerosol optical properties on global dimming and brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, R.; Uchiyama, A.

    2011-12-01

    Surface solar radiation observed at numerous locations has decreased from the 1960s to the 1980s (Global dimming), thereafter increased (Global brightening). The dimming and brightening is considered to be due to the changes in both clouds and aerosols. Aerosols have a direct impact on the surface solar radiation by scattering and absorption. The impact is determined by three parameters: optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry factor, but the effect of asymmetry factor is rather smaller than the others. Therefore, the long-term changes in AOD and SSA are necessary to evaluate the aerosol impact on the global dimming and brightening. We have developed the method to estimate AOD and SSA from the hourly accumulated direct and diffuse irradiances measured by the ground-based broadband radiometers. In the estimation, the real part of the refractive index is fixed, and the size distribution is defined by the Junge distribution with a fixed shaping constant. Using the developed method, the measurements from 1975 to 2008 at 14 sites in Japan were analyzed. Consequently, a decrease of AOD by 0.02 and an increase of SSA by 0.2 during the period were seen. The surface solar radiation under the clear sky conditions, which was calculated from the estimated aerosol optical properties, was increased by 5% due to the changes in AOD and SSA; the influence of SSA was dominant. We also investigate the cloud impact on the surface solar radiation which was simply defined as the difference between the surface solar radiation under the cloudy sky conditions and under the clear sky conditions; the cloud impact had no statistically significant trends. The brightening in Japan may be due to the changes in aerosol optical properties, especially SSA. Our developed method can be applied to measurements at other sites around the world and would be helpful to understand the causes of the global dimming and brightening.

  7. Optical and radiative properties of aerosols over Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegum, S. Naseema; Romdhane, Haifa Ben; Ali, Mohammed Tauha; Armstrong, Peter; Ghedira, Hosni

    2016-12-01

    The present study is on the aerosol optical and radiative properties in the short-wave radiation and its climate implications at the arid city of Abu Dhabi (24.42 ∘N, 54.61 ∘E, 4.5 m MSL), in the United Arab Emirates. The direct aerosol radiative forcings (ARF) in the short-wave region at the top (TOA) and bottom of the atmosphere (BOA) are estimated using a hybrid approach, making use of discrete ordinate radiative transfer method in conjunction with the short-wave flux and spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements, over a period of 3 years (June 2012-July 2015), at Abu Dhabi located at the south-west coast of the Arabian Gulf. The inferred microphysical properties of aerosols at the measurement site indicate strong seasonal variations from the dominance of coarse mode mineral dust aerosols during spring (March-May) and summer (June-September), to the abundance of fine/accumulation mode aerosols mainly from combustion of fossil-fuel and bio-fuel during autumn (October-November) and winter (December-February) seasons. The monthly mean diurnally averaged ARF at the BOA (TOA) varies from -13.2 Wm-2 (˜-0.96 Wm-2) in November to -39.4 Wm-2 (-11.4 Wm-2) in August with higher magnitudes of the forcing values during spring/summer seasons and lower values during autumn/winter seasons. The atmospheric aerosol forcing varies from + 12.2 Wm-2 (November) to 28.2 Wm-2 (June) with higher values throughout the spring and summer seasons, suggesting the importance of mineral dust aerosols towards the solar dimming. Seasonally, highest values of the forcing efficiency at the surface are observed in spring (-85.0 ± 4.1 W m-2 τ -1) followed closely by winter (-79.2 ± 7.1 W m-2 τ -1) and the lowest values during autumn season (-54 ± 4.3 W m-2 τ -1). The study concludes with the variations of the atmospheric heating rates induced by the forcing. Highest heating rate is observed in June (0.39 K day -1) and the lowest in November (0.17 K day -1) and the temporal

  8. Observations of Aerosol Optical Properties over 15 AERONET Sites in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J. D.; Lagrosas, N.; Uy, S. N.; Holben, B. N.; Dorado, S.; Tobias, V., Jr.; Anh, N. X.; Po-Hsiung, L.; Janjai, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Liew, S. C.; Lim, H. S.; Lestari, P.

    2014-12-01

    Mean column-integrated optical properties from ground sun photometers of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are studied to provide an overview of the characteristics of aerosols over the region as part of the 7 Southeast Asian Studies (7-SEAS) mission. The 15 AERONET sites with the most available level 2 data products are selected from Thailand (Chiang Mai, Mukdahan, Songkhla and Silpakorn University), Malaysia (University Sains Malaysia), Laos (Vientiane), Vietnam (Bac Giang, Bac Lieu and Nha Trang), Taiwan (National Cheng Kung University and Central Weather Bureau Taipei), Singapore, Indonesia (Bandung) and the Philippines (Manila Observatory and Notre Dame of Marbel University). For all 15 sites, high angstrom exponent values (α>1) have been observed. Chiang Mai and USM have the highest mean Angstrom exponent indicating the dominance of fine particles that can be ascribed to biomass burning and urbanization. Sites with the lowest Angstrom exponent values include Bac Lieu (α=1.047) and Manila Observatory (α=1.021). From the average lognormal size distribution curves, Songkhla and NDMU show the smallest annual variation in the fine mode region, indicating the observed fine aerosols are local to the sites. The rest of the sites show high variation which could be due to large scale forcings (e.g., monsoons and biomass burnings) that affect aerosol properties in these sites. Both high and low single scattering albedo at 440 nm (ω0440) values are found in sites located in major urban areas. Silpakorn University, Manila Observatory and Vientiane have all mean ω0440 0.94. The discrepancy in ω0 suggests different types of major emission sources present in urban areas. The absorptivity of urban aerosols can vary depending on the strength of traffic emissions, types of fuel combusted and automobile engines used, and the effect of biomass burning aerosols during the dry season. High aerosol optical depth values (τa550 > 0.4) are mainly found over inland sites

  9. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Properties Derived from PREDE Skyradiometer and CIMEL Sunphotometer Measurements for the DRAGON-Korea Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-12-01

    The Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) campaign for validation of satellite aerosol products and comparison/validation of ground-based aerosol retrievals has been launched in Asia. It was conducted in Korea (DRAGON-Korea) between March and May 2012, with CIMEL sunphotometers being operated at around 20 sites throughout the country. The Hankuk University of Foreign Studies site (Hankuk_UFS, 37.02oN, 127.16oE, 167 m above sea level) is located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. A PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02) is operated along with CIMEL sunphotometer (CE 318-1) to compare the aerosol optical properties derived from the two instruments. The operation for intercomparison study started with the DRAGON-Korea campaign and will continue for a year. POM-02 and CE 318-1 measure diffuse radiation at 6-minute intervals and 11 wavelengths and at 1-hour intervals and 4 wavelengths, respectively. Aerosol optical depths from these two instruments are compared at 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm when the measurement time coincides within 3 minutes. Other aerosol optical properties such as Angstrom exponent and single scattering albedo (SSA) from the two instruments are also compared in a similar way. It is reported that SSA from the skyradiometer tends to be larger than that from sunphotometer. Factors causing the difference are closely examined.

  10. Synergistic analyses of optical and microphysical properties of agricultural crop residue burning aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Shibata, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). The present study deals with the spatial variability including the vertical structure of optical and microphysical properties of aerosols, during the crop residue burning season (October and November) of 2009 over the IGB. Increased number of fire counts observed by MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) that is associated with high aerosol optical depth (MODIS-AOD > 0.7) and enhanced tropospheric columnar NO2 concentrations observed by OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), suggests agriculture crop residue burning as a main source of aerosol loading over the IGB during October and November. PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar) observations show an increase in fine mode AOD (at 865 nm) from October (0.1-0.2) to November (0.2-0.3) over the IGB, which is well corroborated with MODIS observations. CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) data shows the elevated aerosol plume (4.0-4.5 km) over the north-west IGB (associated with burning activities) that could have been caused by positive buoyancy through pyro-convection. However, large concentrations of aerosol were found below 1.0 km altitude. The averaged vertical structure of crop residue burning aerosols shows an exponential decrease with altitude (mean scale height ˜1.44 ± 0.20 km). Aerosol optical and microphysical properties coupled with backward air trajectories analyses at Kanpur indicated regional transport of biomass burning aerosols in a downwind direction from north-west IGB to south-east IGB. Aerosol classification, using AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork)-derived absorption properties coupled with size parameter (2006-2010) showed clear seasonal dependency of aerosol types which revealed the presence of biomass burning aerosols only during the crop

  11. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement

  12. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  13. In situ observations of aerosol physical and optical properties in northern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihavainen, H.; Hyvarinen, A.; Hooda, R. K.; Raatikainen, T. E.; Sharma, V.; Komppula, M.

    2012-12-01

    The southern Asia, including India, is exposed to substantial quantities of particulate air pollution originating mainly from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Besides serious adverse health effects, these aerosols cause a large reduction of solar radiation at the surface accompanied by a substantial atmospheric heating, which is expected to have significant influences on the air temperature, crop yields, livestock and water resources over the southern Asia. The various influences by aerosols in this region depend crucially on the development of aerosol emissions from household, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sectors. The main purpose of this study is to investigate several measured aerosol optical and physical properties. We take advantage of observations from two measurement stations which have been established by the Finnish Meteorological Institute and The Energy and Resources Institute. Another station is on the foothills of Himalayas, in Mukteshwar, about 350 km east of New Delhi at elevation about 2 km ASL. This site is considered as a rural background site. Measurements of aerosol size distribution (7-500 nm), PM10, PM2.5, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients and weather parameters have been conducted since 2006. Another station is located at the outskirts of New Delhi, in Gual Pahari, about 35 km south of city centre. It is considered as an urban background site. Measurements of aerosol size distribution (7 nm- 10 μm), PM10, PM2.5, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, aerosol optical depth, aerosol vertical distribution (LIDAR), aerosol filter sampling for chemical characterization and weather parameters were conducted between 2008 and 2010. On the overall average PM10 and PM2.5 values were about 3-4 times higher in Gual Pahari than in Mukteshwar as expected, 216 and 126 μg m^-3, respectively. However, difference depended much on the season, so that during winter time PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were about

  14. Constraints on the Optical Depth of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flender, Samuel; Nagai, Daisuke; McDonald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth (τ) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on τ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intracluster medium, which takes into account star formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. We calibrate the free parameters in the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters, and gas masses of groups and clusters. Our observationally calibrated model predicts the average {τ }500 (i.e., the integrated τ within a disk of size R 500) to better than 6% modeling uncertainty (at 95% confidence level). If the remaining uncertainties associated with other astrophysical uncertainties and X-ray selection effects can be better understood, our model for the optical depth should break the degeneracy between optical depth and cluster velocity in the analysis of future pairwise kSZ measurements and improve cosmological constraints with the combination of upcoming galaxy and CMB surveys, including the nature of dark energy, modified gravity, and neutrino mass.

  15. The Impacts of Optical Properties on Radiative Forcing Due to Dust Aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong; SHI Guangyu; LI Shuyan; LI Wei; WANG Biao; HUANG Yanbin

    2006-01-01

    There are large uncertainties in the quantitative assessment of radiative effects due to atmospheric dust aerosol. The optical properties contribute much to those uncertainties. The authors perform several sensitivity experiments to estimate the impacts of optical characteristics on regional radiative forcing in this paper. The experiments involve in refractive indices, single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and optical depth. An updated dataset of refractive indices representing East Asian dust and the one recommended by the World Meteorology Organization (WMO) are contrastively analyzed and used. A radiative transfer code for solar and thermal infrared radiation with detailed aerosol parameterization is employed. The strongest emphasis is on the refractive indices since other optical parameters strongly depend on it, and the authors found a strong sensitivity of radiative forcing on refractive indices. Studies show stronger scattering, weaker absorption and forward scattering of the East Asian dust particles at solar wavelengths, which leads to higher negative forcing, lower positive forcing and bigger net forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) than that of the WMO dust model. It is also found that the TOA forcings resulting from these two dust models have opposite signs in certain regions, which implies the importance of accurate measurements of optical properties in the quantitative estimation of radiative forcing.

  16. Cloud and aerosol optics by polarized micro pulse Lidar and ground based measurements of zenith radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Clouds impact Earth's climate through cloud transmission and reflection properties. Clouds reflect approximately 15 percent of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A key cloud radiative variable is cloud optical depth, which gives information about how much light is transmitted through a cloud. Historically, remote measurements of cloud optical depth have been limited to uniform overcast conditions and had low temporal and spatial resolution. We present a novel method to measure cloud optical depth for coastal regions from spectral zenith radiance measurements for optically thin clouds, which removes some of these limitations. Our measurement site is part of South Florida's Cloud-Aerosol-Rain Observatory (CAROb), located on Virginia Key, FL (6 km from Miami). This work is based on Marshak et al.'s method for finding cloud optical depth from vegetative sites that provide a strong spectral contrast between red and near infrared surface albedo. However, given the unique nature of our site, which contains water, vegetation, beach, and urban surface types, we found no such spectral contrast at those wavelength pairs. We measured albedo, with hyperspectral resolution, for different surface types around our measurement site to estimate the effective spectral albedo for the area centered on the site with a 5km radius. From this analysis, we found the best possible albedo contrast (573.9 and 673.1 nm) for our site. We tested the derived cloud optical depth from zenith radiance at these two wavelengths against a concurrently running polarized micro pulse LIDAR (MPL) and found good agreement.

  17. Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties during "El Arenosillo 2004 Summer Campaign"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prats, N.; Cachorro, V. E.; Sorribas, M.; Mogo, S.; Berjon, A.; Toledano, C.; de Frutos, A. M.; de la Rosa, J.; Laulainen, Nels S.; de la Morena, B. A.

    2008-04-14

    A detailed analysis of the microphysical and radiative columnar aerosol parameters has been carried out for data collected during the “El Arenosillo 2004” summer campaign. These data are derived from a Cimel sun-photometer, as part of the PHOTONS-AERONET network at the El Arenosillo site in south-western Spain, over the period 1 June to 31 October 2004. The aim of this campaign was to obtain a more complete set of data on aerosol microphysical, optical/radiative, and chemical properties for use in closure studies. Previous papers addressed the climatology of the AOD-alpha parameters at this site. In this paper, we focus on the characterization of the particle size distribution and associated microphysical parameters, such as volume concentration, effective radius, etc., in order to define the features and ranges of these physical parameters associated with both fine and coarse particle modes. The requirement of high AOD values for using the optical inversion technique puts significant constraints on the estimation of these parameters and, thus, necessitates great care in the analysis. As a result, only the characterizations for desert dust events are considered reliable. Moreover, summer 2004 had the most frequent desert dust intrusions, including the most intense event, ever recorded at the El Arensillo site. We summarize the results for the intensive summer campaign in terms of the range of values of the physical and optical parameters of the mixed aerosol types present in this area of Spain.

  18. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  19. Optical and radiative properties of aerosols over Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Naseema Beegum; Haifa Ben Romdhane; Mohammed Tauha Ali; Peter Armstrong; Hosni Ghedira

    2016-12-01

    The present study is on the aerosol optical and radiative properties in the short-wave radiation and its climate implications at the arid city of Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61°E, 4.5 m MSL), in the United Arab Emirates. The direct aerosol radiative forcings (ARF) in the short-wave region at the top (TOA) and bottom of the atmosphere (BOA) are estimated using a hybrid approach, making use of discrete ordinate radiative transfer method in conjunction with the short-wave flux and spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements, over a period of 3 years (June 2012–July 2015), at Abu Dhabi located at the southwest coast of the Arabian Gulf. The inferred microphysical properties of aerosols at the measurementsite indicate strong seasonal variations from the dominance of coarse mode mineral dust aerosols during spring (March–May) and summer (June–September), to the abundance of fine/accumulation modeaerosols mainly from combustion of fossil-fuel and bio-fuel during autumn (October–November) and winter(December–February) seasons. The monthly mean diurnally averaged ARF at the BOA (TOA) varies from −13.2Wm⁻² (∼ −0.96 Wm⁻²) in November to −39.4 Wm⁻² (−11.4 Wm⁻²) in August with higher magnitudes of the forcing values during spring/summer seasons and lower values during autumn/winter seasons. The atmospheric aerosol forcing varies from +12.2 Wm⁻² (November) to 28.2 Wm⁻² (June) with higher values throughout the spring and summer seasons, suggesting the importance of mineral dust aerosols towards the solar dimming. Seasonally, highest values of the forcing efficiency at the surfaceare observed in spring (−85.0± 4.1Wm⁻²τ⁻¹) followed closely by winter (−79.2±7.1 W m⁻²τ⁻¹) and the lowest values during autumn season (−54±4.3W m⁻²τ⁻¹). The study concludes with the variations of the atmospheric heating rates induced by the forcing. Highest heating rate is observed in June (0.39 K day⁻¹) and the lowest in November

  20. Airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties related to early spring transport of mid-latitude sources into the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. de Villiers

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne lidar and in-situ measurements of the aerosol properties were conducted between Svalbard Island and Scandinavia in April 2008. Evidence of aerosol transport from Europe and Asia is given. The analysis of the aerosol optical properties based on a multiwavelength lidar (355, 532, 1064 nm including volume depolarization at 355 nm aims at distinguishing the role of the different aerosol sources (Siberian wild fires, Eastern Asia and European anthropogenic emissions. Combining, first aircraft measurements, second FLEXPART simulations with a calculation of the PBL air fraction originating from the three different mid-latitude source regions, and third level-2 CALIPSO data products (i.e. backscatter coefficient 532 nm,volume depolarization and color ratio between 1064 and 532 nm in aerosol layers along the transport pathways, appears a valuable approach to identify the role of the different aerosol sources even after a transport time larger than 4 days. Optical depth of the aerosol layers are always rather small (<4% while transported over the Arctic and ratio of the total attenuated backscatter (i.e. including molecular contribution provide more stable result than conventional aerosol backscatter ratio. Above Asia, CALIPSO data indicate more depolarization (up to 15% and largest color ratio (>0.5 for the northeastern Asia emissions (i.e. an expected mixture of Asian pollution and dust, while low depolarization together with smaller and quasi constant color ratio (≈0.3 are observed for the Siberian biomass burning emissions. A similar difference is visible between two layers observed by the aircraft above Scandinavia. The analysis of the time evolution of the aerosol optical properties revealed by CALIPSO between Asia and Scandinavia shows a gradual decrease of the aerosol backscatter, depolarization ratio and color ratio which suggests the removal of the largest particles in the accumulation mode. A similar study conducted for a European

  1. Aerosol optical properties in ultraviolet ranges and respiratory diseases in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumharn, Wilawan; Hanprasert, Kasarin

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the values of Angstrom parameters (α,β) in ultraviolet (UV) ranges by using AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data. A second-order polynomial was applied to the AERONET data in order to extrapolate to 320 nm from 2003 to 2013 at seven sites in Thailand. The α,β were derived by applying the Volz Method (VM) and Linear Method (LM) at 320-380 nm at seven monitoring sites in Thailand. Aerosol particles were categorized in both coarse and fine modes, depending on regions. Aerosol loadings were related to dry weather, forest fires, sea salt and most importantly, biomass burning in the North, and South of Thailand. Aerosol particles in the Central region contain coarse and fine modes, mainly emitted from vehicles. The β values obtained were associated with turbid and very turbid skies in Northern and Central regions except Bangkok, while β results are associated with clean skies in South. Higher values of the β at all sites were found in the winter and summer compared with the rainy season, in contrast to South where the highest AOD was observed in June. The β values were likely to increase during 2003-2013. These values correlate with worsening health situations as evident from increasing respiratory diseases reported.

  2. Impact of wild forest fires in Eastern Europe on aerosol composition and particle optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tymon Zielinski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors discuss the changes of aerosol optical depth (AOD in the region of eastern Europe and the Baltic Sea due to wild fire episodes which occurred in the area of Belarus and Ukraine in 2002. The authors discuss how the biomass burning aerosols were advected over the Baltic area and changed the composition of aerosol ensemble for a period of several summer weeks. The air pressure situation and slow wind speeds also facilitated the development of such conditions. As a consequence very high AOD levels were recorded, by an order of 3–4 higher versus normal conditions and they significantly increased the annual averages. On particular days of August 2002 the AOD values reached a level of over 0.7. On these days fine particles fully dominated the entire ensemble of aerosol particles. They were either sulfates or smoke particles. Such situation was unique over a period of many years and it had its serious consequences for the region and especially for the Baltic Sea.

  3. Optical and Hygroscopic Studies of Aerosols In Simulated Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkopf, Christa A.

    2011-08-01

    Basic characteristics of the early Earth climate, the only known environment in the Universe in which life has been known to emerge and thrive, remain a mystery. In particular, little is understood about the Earth's atmosphere 2.8 billion years ago. From climate models and laboratory studies, it is postulated that an organic haze, much like that found on Saturn's largest moon Titan, covered the early Earth. This haze, generated from photolysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), may have had profound climatic consequences. Climate models of the early Earth that include this haze have had to rely upon optical properties of a Titan laboratory analog. Titan haze, though thought to be similar, is formed from a different combination of precursor gases and by different energy sources than early Earth haze. This thesis examines the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosol on early Earth climate by studying the optical and hygroscopic properties of a laboratory analog. A Titan analog is studied for comparison and to better understand spacecraft-retrieved haze chemical and optical properties from Titan. The properties of the laboratory analogs, generated in a flowing reactor cell with a continuum ultraviolet (UV) light source, were primarily measured using cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectroscopy and UV-visible (UV-Vis) transmission spectroscopy. We find that the optical properties of our early Earth analog are significantly different than those of the Titan analog from Khare et al. (1984). In both the UV and visible, when modeled as fractals, particles with the optical properties of the early Earth analog have approximately 30% larger extinction efficiencies than particles with Khare et al. (1984) values. This result implies our early Earth haze analog would provide a more efficient UV shield and have a stronger antigreenhouse effect than the Khare et al. (1984) Titan analog. Our Titan analog has significantly smaller imaginary refractive index values

  4. Studies of seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties with use of remote techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2014-05-01

    According to the IPCC report, atmospheric aerosols due to their properties -extinction of Sun and Earth radiation and participation in processes of creation of clouds, are among basic "unknowns" in climate studies. Aerosols have large effect on the radiation balance of the Earth which has a significant impact on climate changes. They are also a key issue in the case of remote sensing measurements. The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols depend not only on their type but also on physical parameters such as pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction. The wide range of properties in which atmospheric aerosols affect Earth's climate is the reason of high unrelenting interest of scientists from different disciplines such as physics, chemistry and biology. Numerous studies have dealt with aerosol optical properties, e.g. Dubovik et al. (2002), but only in a few have regarded the influence of meteorological parameters on the optical properties of aerosols in the Baltic Sea area. Studies of aerosol properties over the Baltic were conducted already in the last forty years, e.g. Zielinski T. et. al. (1999) or Zielinski T. & A. Zielinski (2002). The experiments carried out at that time involved only one measuring instrument -e.g. LIDAR (range of 1 km) measurements and they were conducted only in selected areas of the Polish coastal zone. Moreover in those publications authors did not use measurements performed on board of research vessel (R/V Oceania), which belongs to Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Science (IO PAN) or data received from satellite measurements. In 2011 Zdun and Rozwadowska performed an analysis of all data derived from the AERONET station on the Gotland Island. The data were divided into seasons and supplemented by meteorological factors. However, so far no comprehensive study has been carried out for the entire Baltic Sea area. This was the reason to conduct further research of SEasonal Variations of Aerosol optical depth over the Baltic

  5. Variability of aerosol optical thickness and atmospheric turbidity in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmoudi, M.; Chaabane, M.; Medhioub, K.; Elleuch, F.

    The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) τa computed from the spectral sun photometer in Thala (Tunisia) exhibited variability ranging from approximately 0.03 to greater than 2.0 at 870 nm for March-October 2001. These measurements are compared to the aerosol optical thickness computed in Ouagadougou (Burkina-Faso), Banizoumbou (Niger), IMC Oristano (Sardinia) and Rome Tor Vergata (Italy). Analysis of τa data from this observation network suggests that there is a high temporal and spatial variability of τa in the different sites. The Angström wavelength exponent α was found to vary with the magnitude of the aerosol optical thickness, with values as high as 1.5 for very low τa, and values of -0.1 for high τa situations. The relationship between the two parameters τa and α is investigated. Values of the turbidity coefficient β have been determined in Thala (Tunisia) for 8 months in 2001 based on a direct fitting method of the Angström power law expression using sun photometer data. The monthly averaged values of the turbidity coefficient β vary between 0.15 and 0.33. The months of July and October experienced the highest turbidity, while April experienced the lowest aerosol loading on average. The turbidity shows a maximum and minimum values for the Southwest and the Northwest wind directions, respectively. The single scattering albedo ωo for the 870 nm wavelength obtained from solar aureole data in Thala is analysed according to the particles' origin.

  6. Microlensing optical depth as a function of source apparent magnitude

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the microlensing optical depth, tau, towards the Galactic bulge appear to depend on the method used to obtain them. Those values based on the lensing of red clump giants (RCGs) appear to be significantly lower than those based on the lensing of all stars along the line of sight. This discrepancy is still not understood. Through Monte Carlo simulations, it is found that the discrepancy cannot be explained by a dependance on the flux limits of the two methods. The optical depth is expected to be generally constant as a function of source apparent magnitude for I_0 >~ 13.0, except in the range 13.5 <~ I_0 <~ 15.5. Here many RCGs are detected, causing a significant oscillation in tau. The amplitude of this oscillation is a function of the inclination angle of the Galactic bar, theta_bar, which may thus be constrained. A further constraint comes from a similar dependance of tau with theta_bar: combining the predicted trends with the measured values provides 1-sigma upper limits, which exclude...

  7. Profiling aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties in ambient conditions by combining in situ and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Nenes, Athanasios; Marinou, Eleni; Solomos, Stavros; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Nott, Graeme J.; Allan, James; Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Coe, Hugh; Percival, Carl; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    We present the In situ/Remote sensing aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (IRRA) that combines airborne in situ and lidar remote sensing data to retrieve vertical profiles of ambient aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties, employing the ISORROPIA II model for acquiring the particle hygroscopic growth. Here we apply the algorithm on data collected from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during the ACEMED campaign in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vertical profiles of aerosol microphysical properties have been derived successfully for an aged smoke plume near the city of Thessaloniki with aerosol optical depth of ˜ 0.4 at 532 nm, single scattering albedos of ˜ 0.9-0.95 at 550 nm and typical lidar ratios for smoke of ˜ 60-80 sr at 532 nm. IRRA retrieves highly hydrated particles above land, with 55 and 80 % water volume content for ambient relative humidity of 80 and 90 %, respectively. The proposed methodology is highly advantageous for aerosol characterization in humid conditions and can find valuable applications in aerosol-cloud interaction schemes. Moreover, it can be used for the validation of active space-borne sensors, as is demonstrated here for the case of CALIPSO.

  8. Assessment of aerosol optics, microphysics, and transport process of biomass-burning haze over northern SE Asia: 7-SEAS AERONET observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Lin, N.; Tsay, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 2007, the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) is aimed to facilitate an interdisciplinary research on the aerosol environment in SE Asia (SEA) as a whole, promote international collaboration, and further enhance scientific understanding of the impact of biomass burning on clouds, atmospheric radiation, hydrological cycle, and region climates. One of the key measurements proposed in the 7-SEAS is the NASA/AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) observation, which provides helpful information on columnar aerosol optical properties and allows us consistently to examine biomass-burning aerosols across northern SEA from ground-based remote-sensing point of view. In this presentation, we will focus on the two 7-SEAS field deployments, i.e. the 2012 Son La Experiment and the 2013 BASELInE (Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles and Interactions Experiment). We analyze the daytime variation of aerosol by using consistent measurements from 15 of AERONET sites over Indochina, the South China Sea, and Taiwan. Spatiotemporal characteristics of aerosol optical properties (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine/coarse mode AOD, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor) will be discussed. Strong diurnal variation of aerosol optical properties was observed to be attributed to planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. A comparison between aerosol loading (i.e. AOD) and surface PM2.5 concentration will be presented. Our results demonstrate that smoke aerosols emitted from agriculture burning that under certain meteorological conditions can degrade regional air quality 3000 km from the source region, with additional implications for aerosol radiative forcing and regional climate change over northern SE Asia.

  9. Climatology of aerosol optical properties in Northern Norway and Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present comparisons between estimates of the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström exponent in Northern Norway and Svalbard based on data from AERONET stations at Andenes (69° N, 16° E, 379 m altitude and Hornsund (77° N, 15° E, 10 m altitude for the period 2008–2010. The three-year annual mean values for the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm τ(500 at Andenes and Hornsund were 0.11 and 0.10, respectively. At Hornsund, there was less variation of the monthly mean value of τ(500 than at Andenes. The annual mean values of the Ångström exponent α at Andenes and Hornsund were 1.18 and 1.37, respectively. At Andenes and Hornsund α was found to be larger than 1.0 in 68% and 93% of the observations, respectively, indicating that fine-mode particles were dominating at both sites. Both sites had a similar seasonal variation of the aerosol size distribution although one site is in an Arctic area while the other site is in a sub-arctic area.

  10. Major optical depth perturbations to the stratosphere from volcanic eruptions: Steller extinction period, 1961-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    2001-02-01

    A revised chronology of stratospheric aerosol extinction due to volcanic eruptions has been assembled for the period 1961-1978, which immediately precedes the era of dedicated satellite measurements. On the whole, the most accurate data consist of published observations of stellar extinction, supplemented in part by other kinds of observational data. The period covered encompasses the important eruptions of Agung (1963) and Fuego (1974), whose dust veils are discussed with respect to their transport, decay, and total mass. The effective (area-weighted mean) radii of the aerosols for both eruptions are found to be 0.3-0.4 μm. It is confirmed that, among known tropical eruptions, Agung's dust was unique for a low-latitude eruption in remaining almost entirely confined to the hemisphere of its production. A new table of homogeneous visual optical depth perturbations, listed by year and by hemisphere, is provided for the whole period 1881-1978, including the pyrheliometric period before 1961 that was investigated previously.

  11. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandolfi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR. Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm were 26.6±23.2 Mm−1 and 4.3±2.7 Mm−1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm was 2.8±2.2 Mm−1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA and Ångström exponent (å (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm at MSY were 0.90±0.05 and 1.3±0.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated Ångström exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.8±0.5 m2 g−1 and 11.8±2.2 m2 g−1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC was 10.4±2.0 m2 g−1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the Ångström exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere (å = 1.5±0.1 while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly

  12. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Findlay, Scott D.; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. Here, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided a cold field emission source is used. These results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.

  13. Parameterization of cirrus optical depth and cloud fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soden, B. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This research illustrates the utility of combining satellite observations and operational analysis for the evaluation of parameterizations. A parameterization based on ice water path (IWP) captures the observed spatial patterns of tropical cirrus optical depth. The strong temperature dependence of cirrus ice water path in both the observations and the parameterization is probably responsible for the good correlation where it exists. Poorer agreement is found in Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes where the temperature dependence breaks down. Uncertainties in effective radius limit quantitative validation of the parameterization (and its inclusion into GCMs). Also, it is found that monthly mean cloud cover can be predicted within an RMS error of 10% using ECMWF relative humidity corrected by TOVS Upper Troposphere Humidity. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  14. Constraints on the optical depth of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Flender, Samuel; McDonald, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth ($\\tau$) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on $\\tau$ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intra-cluster medium, which takes into account star-formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. By calibrating the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters and $M_{\\mathrm{gas}}-M$ relations of groups ...

  15. Eight-year climatology of dust optical depth on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montabone, L.; Forget, F.; Millour, E.; Wilson, R. J.; Lewis, S. R.; Cantor, B.; Kass, D.; Kleinböhl, A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from martian year 24-31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure that is weighted in space, time, and retrieval quality. The lack of observations at certain times and locations introduces missing grid points in the maps, which therefore may result in irregularly gridded (i.e. incomplete) fields. In order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we compare with independent observations of CDOD by PanCam cameras and Mini-TES spectrometers aboard the Mars Exploration Rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity", by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard the Phoenix lander, and by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars aboard MRO. We have statistically analyzed the irregularly gridded maps to provide an overview of the dust climatology on Mars over eight years, specifically in relation to its interseasonal and interannual variability, in addition to provide a basis for instrument intercomparison. Finally, we have produced regularly gridded maps of CDOD by spatially interpolating the irregularly gridded maps using a kriging method. These complete maps are used as dust scenarios in the Mars Climate Database (MCD) version 5, and are useful in many modeling

  16. Peripheral processing facilitates optic flow-based depth perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Flying insects, such as flies or bees, rely on consistent information regarding the depth structure of the environment when performing their flight maneuvers in cluttered natural environments. These behaviors include avoiding collisions, approaching targets or spatial navigation. Insects are thought to obtain depth information visually from the retinal image displacements (`optic flow' during translational ego-motion. Optic flow in the insect visual system is processed by a mechanism that can be modeled by correlation-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs. However, it is still an open question how spatial information can be extracted reliably from the responses of the highly contrast- and pattern-dependent EMD responses, especially if the vast range of light intensities encountered in natural environments is taken into account. This question will be addressed here by systematically modeling the peripheral visual system of flies, including various adaptive mechanisms. Different model variants of the peripheral visual system were stimulated with image sequences that mimic the panoramic visual input during translational ego-motion in various natural environments, and the resulting peripheral signals were fed into an array of EMDs. We characterized the influence of each peripheral computational unit on the representation of spatial information in the EMD responses. Our model simulations reveal that information about the overall light level needs to be eliminated from the EMD input as is accomplished under light-adapted conditions in the insect peripheral visual system. The response characteristics of large monopolar cells resemble that of a band-pass filter, which reduces the contrast dependency of EMDs strongly, effectively enhancing the representation of the nearness of objects and, especially, of their contours. We furthermore show that local brightness adaptation of photoreceptors allows for spatial vision under a wide range of dynamic light

  17. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effect determined from sky-radiometer over Loess Plateau of Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical properties and their associated radiative effects are derived from sky-radiometer and surface solar radiation data collected over the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL for the period of March to May (MAM 2009. The result shows that the seasonal mean aerosol optical depth (AOD at 500 nm in MAM is 0.40. The single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm in MAM at SACOL fluctuates significantly ranging from 0.82 to 0.98. The averaged value of SSA there for background aerosol is 0.90 in MAM, while it is smaller (0.87 during the dust event outbreak period. The smaller SSA can be interpreted as the result of larger particles during dust events. The averaged asymmetry factor (ASY at 500 nm during dust event period is 0.73, which is larger than 0.70 of background aerosols. The averaged shortwave radiative effects of the aerosols during dust event period in MAM are 0.68, −70.02 and 70.70 W m−2, respectively, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA, surface and in the atmosphere. The aerosols heat the atmosphere during dust event period by up to about 2 K day−1 (daily averaged, which is 60 % larger than the heating (1.25 K day−1 of background aerosols. The significant heating effect in the atmosphere of the aerosols during dust event is determined by larger AOD and smaller SSA.

  18. Optical properties of aerosol mixtures derived from sun-sky radiometry during SAMUM-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, C. (Meteorological Institute, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Group of Atmospheric Optics, Valladolid Univ., Valladolid (Spain)), e-mail: toledano@goa.uva.es; Wiegner, M.; Gross, S. (Meteorological Institute, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany)) (and others)

    2011-09-15

    The SAMUM-2 experiment took place in the Cape Verde islands in January-February 2008. The colocated ground-based and airborne instruments allow the study of desert dust optical and microphysical properties in a closure experiment. The Meteorological Institute of the Univ. of Munich deployed one sun-sky photometer and two tropospheric lidar systems. A travelling AERONET-Cimel sun-sky radiometer was also deployed. During the measurement period the aerosol scenario over Cape Verde mostly consisted of a dust layer below 2 km and a smoke-dust layer above 2-4 km a.s.l. The Saharan dust arrived at the site from the NE, whereas the smoke originated in the African equatorial region. This paper describes the main results of the Sun photometer observations, supported by lidar information. An analysis of the variations in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the range 340-1550 nm, the Aangstroem exponent, volume size distributions and single scattering albedo is presented. The aerosol mixtures are analysed by means of the fine mode fraction of the AOD provided by the sun-sky inversion data and the Spectral Deconvolution Algorithm. The mean AOD (500 nm) was 0.31, with associated low Aangstroem exponent of 0.46. Several types of events were detected within the data set, with prevalence of dust or mixtures as characterized by the Aangstroem exponents of extinction and absorption and the fine mode fraction. Aerosol properties derived from sunphotometry were compared to in situ measurements of size distribution, effective radius and single scattering albedo

  19. Depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the f

  20. MISR Level 2 FIRSTLOOK Aerosol parameters V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the Level 2 FIRSTLOOK Aerosol Product. It contains Aerosol optical depth and particle type, with associated atmospheric data, produced using ancillary inputs...

  1. Estimation of PM2.5 over Eastern China from MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Using the Back Propagation Neural Network%BP网络框架下MODIS气溶胶光学厚度产品估算中国东部PM2.5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建平; 吴业荣; 张小曳; 李小文

    2013-01-01

    近年来随着中国经济的快速发展,中国区域的大气污染情况日趋严重,大气污染监测与治理已刻不容缓.由于卫星遥感具有较广的空间覆盖、成本低等优点,卫星遥感反演气溶胶光学厚度(AOD)产品被普遍认为是地面PM2.5浓度的重要指标,且已被广泛地应用于地面PM2.5遥感监测.利用2007~ 2008年的MODIS/Terra气溶胶光学厚度产品,考虑中国东部地区5个大气成分站点风速、风向、温度、湿度和边界层高度等气象数据,构建后向(BP)神经网络,提出了基于MODIS AOD产品估算PM2.5的模型.利用5个大气成分站点PM2.5观测数据对模型进行散点拟合和时间序列拟合验证,结果表明:①从PM2.5观测值与估算值的散点回归分析来看,PM2.5估算值与观测值相关系数最好的为庐山站(R=0.6),其它4个站次之,但其相关系数均在0.4(中强相关)以上;②从PM2.5观测值与估算值的时间序列比对分析来看,PM2.5估算值和观测值差值随时间变化而变化,且存在明显的日际振荡现象,但经相邻5d滑动平均处理,5个站点的PM2.5估算值与观测值相关系数得到普遍提升,滑动后的相关系数RMA均在0.7以上(除郑州外),庐山RMA达到0.83.结果表明在BP网络框架下,基于MODIS AOD产品估算PM2.5的模型能较好地应用于PM2.5监测.%With the fast economic development in China in recent years, air pollutions are becoming increasingly serious. It is, therefore, imperative to develop new technology to solve this issue. Due to the wide spatial coverage of satellite remote sensing, along with the relatively lower cost compared to ground-based in situ aerosol measurements, satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth ( AOD) is widely recognized as a good surrogate of surface PM2.5 concentrations. In this study, two years (2007-2008) of AOD data from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Terra at five observational sites of China (Benxi

  2. Aerosol absorption measurement with a sinusoidal phase modulating fiber optic photo thermal interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuwang; Shao, Shiyong; Mei, Haiping; Rao, Ruizhong

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol light absorption plays an important role in the earth's atmosphere direct and semi-direct radiate forcing, simultaneously, it also has a huge influence on the visibility impairment and laser engineering application. Although various methods have been developed for measuring aerosol light absorption, huge challenge still remains in precision, accuracy and temporal resolution. The main reason is that, as a part of aerosol light extinction, aerosol light absorption always generates synchronously with aerosol light scattering, and unfortunately aerosol light scattering is much stronger in most cases. Here, a novel photo-thermal interferometry is proposed only for aerosol absorption measurement without disturbance from aerosol scattering. The photo-thermal interferometry consists of a sinusoidal phase-modulating single mode fiber-optic interferometer. The thermal dissipation, caused by aerosol energy from photo-thermal conversion when irritated by pump laser through interferometer, is detected. This approach is completely insensitive to aerosol scattering, and the single mode fiber-optic interferometer is compact, low-cost and insensitive to the polarization shading. The theory of this technique is illustrated, followed by the basic structure of the sinusoidal phase-modulating fiber-optic interferometer and demodulation algorithms. Qualitative and quantitative analysis results show that the new photo-thermal interference is a potential approach for aerosol absorption detection and environmental pollution detection.

  3. Field Studies of Broadband Aerosol Optical Extinction in the Ultraviolet Spectral Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. In the case of brown carbon, its wavelength-dependent absorption in the ultraviolet spectral region has been suggested as an important component of aerosol radiative forcing. We describe a new field instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We deployed this instrument during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment during Fall 2012 to measure biomass burning aerosol, and again during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study in summer 2013 to measure organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. In both field experiments, we determined aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength and can interpret this together with size distribution and composition measurements to characterize the aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing.

  4. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  5. Improving Aerosol and Visibility Forecasting Capabilities Using Current and Future Generations of Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    retrievals . 15. SUBJECT TERMS ’ Aerosol, data assimilation, satellite remote sensing, visibility forecast, electro-optical propagation 16. SECURITY...innovative methods for retrieving aerosol optical depth at nighttime using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data (Johnson et al...Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol and cloud layer products, as well as collocated Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Aerosol Index (Al) data and

  6. Secchi depth analysis using bio-optical parameters measured in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Naik, P.; Bandishte, M.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    Secchi depth provides the oceanographer with the first hand information about transparency and penetration of light in the water. Results of the Secchi depth and the optical properties measured in the Arabian Sea is presented. Our analyses show...

  7. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbin Chen; Xiangao Xia; Pucai Wang; Wenxing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain an insight into the aerosol properties and their climatic effect over the continental source regions of China, it is of significance to carry out long-term ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. A couple of temporary and permanent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and three comprehensive radiative sites were established in China as a result of international cooperation in recent years. Heavy aerosol loading and significant temporal and spatial variation over North China are revealed by the AERONET data.Aerosol-induced reductions in surface radiation budget are examined on the basis of collocated observations by sun photometers and pyranometers.

  8. Parameterization of the Optical Properties of Sulfate Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Wong, J. G. D.; Dobbie, J. S.; Chýlek, P.

    2001-01-01

    Parameterizations of the shortwave optical properties of ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], ammonium bisulfate (NH4HSO4), and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) are provided as functions of relative humidity for high and low spectral resolution band models. The optical property parameterization is simple in form and in its dependence on relative humidity. The growth of the aerosol particles is based on equilibrium saturation theory, and the optical properties are computed from Mie theory. The optical properties necessary for the most commonly used radiative transfer methods are provided.Results show that when relative humidity effects are included in the backscatter fraction the radiative forcing is found to be a more sensitive function of near infrared wavelengths compared to visible wavelengths. For increasing relative humidity, sulfuric acid is found to have a larger effect on radiative forcing compared to the forcing by ammonium sulfate or ammonium bisulfate. Also, as relative humidity increases, forcing increases to higher values for smaller mode size distributions compared to forcing by larger mode distributions. These parameterizations will enable climate forcing studies to be performed with radiative transfer schemes that more accurately represent sulfate influences on the radiation balance.

  9. Similarities and differences of aerosol optical properties between southern and northern slopes of the Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Himalayas is located at the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, and it acts as a natural barrier for the transport of atmospheric aerosols, e.g. from the polluted regions of South Asia to the main body of the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we investigate the seasonal and diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties measured at the three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sites over the southern (Pokhara station and EVK2-CNR station in Nepal and northern (Qomolangma (Mt. Everest station for Atmospheric and Environmental Observation and Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (QOMS_CAS in Tibet, China slopes of the Himalayas. While observations at QOMS_CAS and EVK2-CNR can generally be representative of a remote background atmosphere, Pokhara is an urban site with much higher aerosol load due to the influence of local anthropogenic activities. The annual mean of aerosol optical depth (AOD during the investigated period was 0.06 at QOMS_CAS, 0.04 at EVK2-CNR and 0.51 at Pokhara, respectively. Seasonal variations of aerosols are profoundly affected by large scale atmospheric circulation. Vegetation fires, peaking during April in the Himalayan region and northern India, contribute to a growing fine mode AOD at 500 nm at the three stations. Dust transported to these sites results in an increase of coarse mode AOD during the monsoon season at the three sites. Meanwhile, coarse mode AOD at EVK2-CNR is higher than QOMS_CAS from July to September, indicating the Himalayas blocks the coarse particles carried by the southwest winds. The precipitation scavenging effect is obvious at Pokhara, which can significantly reduce the aerosol load during the monsoon season. Unlike the seasonal variations, diurnal variations are mainly influenced by meso-scale systems and local topography. In general, precipitation can lead to a decrease of the aerosol load and the average particle size at each station. AOD changes in a short time with the emission rate near

  10. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work

  11. Aerosol retrieval from OMI: Applications to the amazon bassin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curier, R.L.; Veefkind, J.P.; Veilhmann, B.; Braak, R.; Torres, O.; Leeuw, G.de

    2007-01-01

    We present the aerosol optical depth retrieved from OMI measurements using the multi-wavelengthm algorithm for two different environments: over Western Europe where the aerosols are weakly absorbing and over the Amazon basin where aerosol optical properties are governed by biomass burning. The resul

  12. Improvements in AOD retrieval from geostationary measurements over Asia with aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-Asia campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An aerosol model optimized for East Asia is improved by applying inversion data from both long-term monitoring of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun photometer and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON-Asia campaign from 2012. This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate aerosol optical depth (AOD from satellite-based measurements. In particular, the performance of a single visible channel algorithm, limited to a specific aerosol type, from real-time measurements is strongly affected by the assumed aerosol optical properties (AOPs for the measured scene. In sensitivity tests, a 4% difference in single scattering albedo (SSA between modeled and measured values can cause a retrieval error in AOD of over 20%, and the overestimation of SSA leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AERONET inversion datasets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed AOPs can be summarized by SSAs (measured at 675 nm of 0.92, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.91 for spring (March, April, and May, summer (June, July, and August, autumn (September, October, and November, and winter (December, January, and February, respectively. After DRAGON-Asia 2012, the SSA during spring shows a slight increase to 0.93. The large volume of data and spatially concentrated measurements from this campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the AOD datasets retrieved from a single channel algorithm, which uses a pre-calculated look-up table (LUT with the new aerosol model, show an improved correlation with the measured AOD during the DRAGON-Asia campaign (March to May 2012. Compared with the correlation of the AOD retrieved using the original aerosol model, the regression slope between the new AOD and the AERONET values is reduced from 1.08 to 1.00, while the change of the y-offset of −0.08 is significant. The correlation coefficients for the comparisons are 0.87 and 0

  13. Improvements in AOD retrieval from geostationary measurements over Asia with aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-Asia campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.; Lee, S.

    2015-04-01

    An aerosol model optimized for East Asia is improved by applying inversion data from both long-term monitoring of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia campaign from 2012. This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate aerosol optical depth (AOD) from satellite-based measurements. In particular, the performance of a single visible channel algorithm, limited to a specific aerosol type, from real-time measurements is strongly affected by the assumed aerosol optical properties (AOPs) for the measured scene. In sensitivity tests, a 4% difference in single scattering albedo (SSA) between modeled and measured values can cause a retrieval error in AOD of over 20%, and the overestimation of SSA leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AERONET inversion datasets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed AOPs can be summarized by SSAs (measured at 675 nm) of 0.92, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.91 for spring (March, April, and May), summer (June, July, and August), autumn (September, October, and November), and winter (December, January, and February), respectively. After DRAGON-Asia 2012, the SSA during spring shows a slight increase to 0.93. The large volume of data and spatially concentrated measurements from this campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the AOD datasets retrieved from a single channel algorithm, which uses a pre-calculated look-up table (LUT) with the new aerosol model, show an improved correlation with the measured AOD during the DRAGON-Asia campaign (March to May 2012). Compared with the correlation of the AOD retrieved using the original aerosol model, the regression slope between the new AOD and the AERONET values is reduced from 1.08 to 1.00, while the change of the y-offset of -0.08 is significant. The correlation coefficients for the comparisons are 0.87 and 0.85, respectively. The

  14. Design of Optical Systems with Extended Depth of Field: An Educational Approach to Wavefront Coding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, C.; Bosch, S.; Carnicer, A.

    2012-01-01

    A practical activity designed to introduce wavefront coding techniques as a method to extend the depth of field in optical systems is presented. The activity is suitable for advanced undergraduate students since it combines different topics in optical engineering such as optical system design, aberration theory, Fourier optics, and digital image…

  15. Classification of Aerosol over Central Europe by Cluster Analysis of Aerosol Columnar Optical Properties and Backward Trajectory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkop, Artur; Pietruczuk, Aleksander; Posyniak, Michał

    2016-12-01

    A cluster analysis is applied to the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data obtained at Belsk, Poland, as well as three nearby Central European stations (Leipzig, Minsk and Moldova) for estimation of atmospheric aerosol types. Absorption Ångstrom exponent (AAE), aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and extinction Ångstrom exponent (EAE) parameters are used. Clustering in both 2D (AOT, EAE) and 3D (AOT, EAE, AAE) is investigated. A method of air mass backward trajectory analysis is then proposed, with the receptor site at Belsk, to determine possible source regions for each cluster. Four dominant aerosol source regions are identified. The biomass burning aerosol source is localized in the vicinity of Belarusian-Ukrainian border. Slovakia and northern Hungary are found to be the source of urban/industrial pollutants. Western Poland and eastern Germany are the main sources of polluted continental aerosols. The most differentiated source region of Scandinavia, Baltic Sea and Northern Atlantic, associated with lowest values of AOT, corresponds to clean continental and possibly maritime type aerosols.

  16. Optical Properties and Aging of Light Absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wise, Matthew E.; Caylor, Ryan; Imholt, Felisha; Selimovic, Vanessa; Shilling, John E.

    2016-10-14

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA), commonly referred to as “brown carbon (BrC)”, has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various VOC precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficients (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organonitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible and UV light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed-SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.

  17. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can exist not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase (1,2). Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols (1,2,3), secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments (4), and field measurements (5) suggest that liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ inorganic particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core-shell and partially engulfed. A core-shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles in particular for organic phases containing absorbing molecules, e.g. brown carbon. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. Our ternary model system consist of ammonium sulfate (AS)/ Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)/ and water (H2O). Carminic acid (CA) was added as a proxy for an absorbing organic compound to the system. The behavior of single droplets of above ternary mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same ternary mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. In addition, Mie-code modeling is used to predict the absorption efficiency of the same ternary system and the result will be compared with the data obtained from EDB experiment. We also intend to determine the occurrence of

  18. Validation of ASH Optical Depth and Layer Height from IASI using Earlinet Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, D.; Siomos, N.; Koukouli, M.; Clarisse, L.; Carboni, E.; Ventress, L.; Grainger, R.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2016-06-01

    The 2010 eruptions of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull attracted the attention of the public and the scientific community to the vulnerability of the European airspace to volcanic eruptions. The European Space Agency project "Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards", called for the creation of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on improved and dedicated satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide level assessments, as well as an extensive validation, using among others ground-based measurements (Koukouli et al., 2014). The validation of volcanic ash levels and height extracted from IASI/MetopA is presented in this work with emphasis on the ash plume height and ash optical depth levels. European Aerosol Research Lidar Network [EARLINET] lidar measurements are compared to different satellite estimates for two eruptive episodes. The validation results are extremely promising within the estimated uncertainties of each of the comparative datasets.

  19. Organic component vapor pressures and hygroscopicities of aqueous aerosol measured by optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Chen; Stewart, David J.; Reid, Jonathan P; Zhang, Yun Hong; Ohm, Peter; Dutcher, Cari S.; Clegg, Simon L.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopic response of aerosol and the particle-to-gas partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds are crucial for providing more accurate descriptions of the compositional and size distributions of atmospheric aerosol. Concurrent measurements of particle size and composition (inferred from refractive index) are reported here using optical tweezers to isolate and probe individual aerosol droplets over extended timeframes. The measurements are shown to allow accurate re...

  20. The matter power spectrum from the Ly alpha forest : an optical depth estimate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaroubi, S; Nusser, A; Haehnelt, M; Kim, TS; Viel, M.

    2006-01-01

    We measure the matter power spectrum from 31 Ly alpha spectra spanning the redshift range of 1.6-3.6. The optical depth, tau, for Ly alpha absorption of the intergalactic medium is obtained from the flux using the inversion method of Nusser & Haehnelt. The optical depth is converted to density by us

  1. Optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds over oceans from CALIPSO infrared radiometer and lidar measurements, and an evaluation of the lidar multiple scattering factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed evaluation of cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm and comparisons to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP flying on-board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations satellite. The blackbody radiance taken in the IIR Version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are then compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent 2-way transmittance through the cloud. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40% as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. This behavior is explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT to be applied to correct the measured transmittance, which is taken equal to 0.6 in the CALIOP Version 3 algorithm, and which is found here to vary with temperature (and hence cloud particle size from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  2. Physical and optical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols during ICARB at Manora Peak, Nainital: A sparsely inhabited, high-altitude location in the Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Dumka; K Krishna Moorthy; P Pant; P Hegde; Ram Sagar; K Pandey

    2008-07-01

    Collocated measurements of the optical and physical properties of columnar and near-surface aerosols were carried out from Manora Peak, Nainital (a sparsely inhabited, high altitude location, ∼2km above mean sea level, in the Himalayas), during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) under the Geosphere Biosphere Programme of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO-GBP). Under this, observational data of spectral aerosol optical depths (AOD), mass concentration of aerosol black carbon (B), mass concentration () and number concentration () of composite (total) aerosols near the surface and meteorological parameters were collected during the period February 15 to April 30, 2006. Though very low (> 0.1 at 500 nm) AODs were observed during clear days, as much as a fourfold increase was seen on hazy days. The Ångström exponent (), deduced from the spectral AODs, revealed high values during clear days, while on hazy days was low; with an overall mean value of 0.69 ± 0.06 for the campaign period. BC mass concentration varied between 0.36 and 2.87 g m−3 and contributed in the range 0.7 to 1.8% to the total aerosol mass. Total aerosol number concentration and BC mass concentration showed diurnal variation with a midnight and early morning minimum and a late afternoon maximum; a pattern quite opposite to that seen in low altitude stations. These are attributed to the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  3. Aerosol Composition, Size Distribution and Optical Properties during SEAC4RS Simulated by a Sectional Aerosol Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P.; Toon, O. B.; Bardeen, C.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Ziemba, L. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Perring, A. E.; Wagner, N.; Neely, R. R., III

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field mission in August and September 2013 provided large aerosol/gas datasets over the Southeastern U.S. We use a sectional microphysics model (CARMA) coupled with CAM-Chem to study the aerosol composition, size distribution, vertical distribution and optical properties during the SEAC4RS campaign. Our simulations are within the observational error bars for the mass of organics, sulfate and black carbon from the boundary layer to upper-troposphere. CARMA, as a sectional model, provides detailed aerosol size distributions from nano-meters to tens of microns, which is important to determine optical properties. We investigate how the aerosol size distribution varies with altitude. Modeled spatial gradients of [O]:[C] and [OC]:[SO4-2] ratios are compared with the AMS and PALMS data collected over forests, fires and cities. These ratios are important to constrain the budget of secondary organic aerosols. We will discuss the values of these ratios over the U.S. and the rest of the world.

  4. Analysis of aerosol optical properties from continuous sun-sky radiometer measurements at Halley and Rothera, Antarctica over seven years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Monica; Estellés, Victor; Colwell, Steve; Shanklin, Jonathan; Ningombam, Shantikumar S.

    2015-04-01

    The Antarctic continent is located far from most anthropogenic emission sources on the planet, it has limited areas of exposed rock and human activities are less developed. Air circulation over Antarctica also seems to prevent the direct transport of air originating from anthropogenic sources of pollution at lower latitudes. Therefore Antarctica is considered an attractive site for studying aerosol properties as unaltered as possible by human activity. Long term monitoring of the optical and physical properties is necessary for observing possible changes in the atmosphere over time and understanding if such changes are due to human activity or natural variation. Columnar aerosol optical and physical properties can be obtained from sun-sky radiometers, very compact instruments measuring spectral direct and diffuse solar irradiance at the visible wavelengths and using fast and efficient inversion algorithms. The British Antarctic Survey has continuously operated two Prede Pom-01 sun-sky radiometers in Antarctica as part of the ESR-European Skynet Radiometers network (www.euroskyrad.net, Campanelli et al, 2012). They are located at Halley and Rothera, and have operated since 2009 and 2008 respectively. In the present study the aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, volume size distribution and refractive index were retrieved from cloud-screened measurements of direct and diffuse solar irradiance using the Skyrad 4.2 pack code (Nakajima et al., 1986). The analysis of the daily and yearly averages showed an important increase of the absorbing properties of particles at Halley from 2013 to the beginning of 2014 related to the increasing presence of smaller particles (from 2012) but with a non-significant variation of aerosol optical depth. The same increase of absorption was visible at Rothera only in 2013. Air pressure measurements, wind directions and intensity, and vertical profiles from radio-soundings, together with HYSPLIT model

  5. Quantitative retrieval of aerosol optical properties by means of ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegner, Matthias; Gasteiger, Josef; Geiß, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years extended networks of ceilometers have been established by several national weather services. Based on improvements of the hardware performance of these single-wavelength backscatter lidars and their 24/7 availability they are increasingly used to monitor mixing layer heights and to derive profiles of the particle backscatter profile. As a consequence they are used for a wide range of applications including the dispersion of volcanic ash plumes, validation of chemistry transport models and air quality studies. In this context the development of automated schemes to detect aerosol layers and to identify the mixing layer are essential, in particular as the latter is often used as a proxy for air quality. Of equal importance is the calibration of ceilometer signals as a pre-requisite to derive quantitative optical properties. Recently, it has been emphasized that the majority of ceilometers are influenced by water vapor absorption as they operate in the spectral range of 905 - 910 nm. If this effect is ignored, errors of the aerosol backscatter coefficient can be as large as 50%, depending on the atmospheric water vapor content and the emitted wavelength spectrum. As a consequence, any other derived quantity, e.g. the extinction coefficient or mass concentration, would suffer from a significant uncertainty in addition to the inherent errors of the inversion of the lidar equation itself. This can be crucial when ceilometer derived profiles shall be used to validate transport models. In this presentation, the methodology proposed by Wiegner and Gasteiger (2015) to correct for water vapor absorption is introduced and discussed.

  6. Analysis of intensive aerosol optical properties measured at the Jungfraujoch station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.; Nyeki, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Lugauer, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Characterisation of atmospheric aerosol optical properties at the Jungfraujoch has been conducted to deliver basic data for comparison with those from NOAA baseline atmospheric monitoring stations. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  7. The tropospheric aerosol at mid-latitudes - microphysics, optics, and climate forcing illustrated by the LACE 98 field study; Das troposphaerische Aerosol in mittleren Breiten - Mikrophysik, Optik und Klimaantrieb am Beispiel der Feldstudie LACE 98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebig, M.

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the column closure of optical aerosol parameters as part of the Lindenberg Aerosol Characterisation Experiment (LACE 98). The optical aerosol parameters were calculated from microphysical aerosol parameters which were measured height resolved from tropopause to boundary layer and compared with the direct measurement of the respective property (closure). The closure allows the validation of the measured aerosol properties and the inversion of aerosol properties which are not measurable directly. The radiative forcings of the measured aerosol columns are estimated. The measured, quality assured microphysical aerosol properties are parameterized and tabulated as input data for models. The successful closure of the aerosol column's optical depth validates the measured particle size distributions, whereas the successful closure of the backscatter coefficient validates the assumptions made on the aerosol chemical composition and serves to deduce its state of mixture, the latter point exemplified using a 7 day old forest fire aerosol. The local, instantaneous radiative forcing of the measured continental particle columns are estimated to lie between -33 W/m{sup 2} for continental and -6 W/m{sup 2} for marine air masses for a solar zenith angle of 56 . (orig.) [German] Als Teil des Lindenberger Aerosol Charakterisierungsexperimentes (LACE 98) behandelt diese Arbeit die Saeulenschliessung optischer Aerosolparameter. Diese wurden aus den von Tropopause bis Grenzschicht hoehenaufgeloest gemessenen mikrophysikalischen Aerosoleigenschaften berechnet, um sie mit den am gleichen Ort direkt gemessenen optischen Aerosolparametern zu vergleichen (Schliessung). Es wird gezeigt, dass die Schliessung die Qualitaetssicherung der gemessenen Aerosoleigenschaften und die Invertierung direkt nicht messbarer Aerosoleigenschaften ermoeglicht. Die Strahlungsantriebe der vermessenen Aerosolsaeulen werden abgeschaetzt. Die qualitaetsgesicherten gemessenen

  8. A simple parameterization of the short-wave aerosol optical properties for surface direct and diffuse irradiances assessment in a numerical weather model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Ruiz-Arias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadband short-wave (SW surface direct and diffuse irradiances are not typically within the set of output variables produced by numerical weather prediction (NWP models. However, they are being more and more demanded in solar energy applications. A detailed representation of the aerosol optical properties is important to achieve an accurate assessment of these direct and diffuse irradiances. Nonetheless, NWP models typically oversimplify its representation or even neglect its effect. In this work, a flexible method to account for the SW aerosol optical properties in the computation of broadband SW surface direct and diffuse irradiances is presented. It only requires aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm and the type of predominant aerosol. The rest of parameters needed to consider spectral aerosol extinction, namely, Angström exponent, aerosol single-scattering albedo and aerosol asymmetry factor, are parameterized. The parameterization has been tested in the RRTMG SW scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF NWP model. However, it can be adapted to any other SW radiative transfer band model. It has been verified against a control experiment along five radiometric stations in the contiguous US. The control experiment consisted of a clear-sky evaluation of the RRTMG solar radiation estimates obtained in WRF when RRTMG is driven with ground-observed aerosol optical properties. Overall, the verification has shown very satisfactory results for both broadband SW surface direct and diffuse irradiances. It has proven effective to significantly reduce the prediction error and constraint the seasonal bias in clear-sky conditions to within the typical observational error in well-maintained radiometers.

  9. Intercomparison and closure calculations using measurements of aerosol species and optical properties during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.; Carrico, Christian; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Carrillo, Jacqueline; Schichtel, Bret

    2005-07-01

    Physical and optical properties of inorganic aerosols have been extensively studied, but less is known about carbonaceous aerosols, especially as they relate to the non-urban settings such as our nation's national parks and wilderness areas. Therefore an aerosol characterization study was conceived and implemented at one national park that is highly impacted by carbonaceous aerosols, Yosemite. The primary objective of the study was to characterize the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a carbon-dominated aerosol, including the ratio of total organic matter weight to organic carbon, organic mass scattering efficiencies, and the hygroscopic characteristics of a carbon-laden ambient aerosol, while a secondary objective was to evaluate a variety of semi-continuous monitoring systems. Inorganic ions were characterized using 24-hour samples that were collected using the URG and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) monitoring systems, the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) cascade impactor, as well as the semi-continuous particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) technology. Likewise, carbonaceous material was collected over 24-hour periods using IMPROVE technology along with the thermal optical reflectance (TOR) analysis, while semi-continuous total carbon concentrations were measured using the Rupprecht and Patashnick (R&P) instrument. Dry aerosol number size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and optical particle counter, scattering coefficients at near-ambient conditions were measured with nephelometers fitted with PM10 and PM2.5 inlets, and "dry" PM2.5 scattering was measured after passing ambient air through Perma Pure Nafion® dryers. In general, the 24-hour "bulk" measurements of various aerosol species compared more favorably with each other than with the semi-continuous data. Semi-continuous sulfate measurements correlated well with the 24-hour measurements, but were biased low by

  10. Case study of modeled aerosol optical properties during the SAFARI 2000 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, Michael A; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B; Redemann, Jens

    2007-08-01

    We present modeled aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and lidar ratio) in two layers with different aerosol loadings and particle sizes, observed during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2,000 (SAFARI 2,000) campaign. The optical properties were calculated from aerosol size distributions retrieved from aerosol layer optical thickness spectra, measured using the NASA Ames airborne tracking 14-channel sunphotometer (AATS-14) and the refractive index based on the available information on aerosol chemical composition. The study focuses on sensitivity of modeled optical properties in the 0.3-1.5 microm wavelength range to assumptions regarding the mixing scenario. We considered two models for the mixture of absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol components commonly used to model optical properties of biomass burning aerosol: a layered sphere with absorbing core and nonabsorbing shell and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium model. In addition, comparisons of modeled optical properties with the measurements are discussed. We also estimated the radiative effect of the difference in aerosol absorption implied by the large difference between the single scattering albedo values (approximately 0.1 at midvisible wavelengths) obtained from different measurement methods for the case with a high amount of biomass burning particles. For that purpose, the volume fraction of black carbon was varied to obtain a range of single scattering albedo values (0.81-0.91 at lambda=0.50 microm). The difference in absorption resulted in a significant difference in the instantaneous radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and can result in a change of the sign of the aerosol forcing at TOA from negative to positive.

  11. The "RED Versa NIR" Plane to Retrieve Broken-Cloud Optical Depth from Ground-Based Measurements"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Evans, K.; Wiscombe, W.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for retrieving cloud optical depth from ground-based measurements of zenith radiance in the RED and near infrared (MR) spectral regions is introduced. Because zenith radiance does not have a one-to-one relationship with optical depth, it is absolutely impossible to use a monochromatic retrieval. On the other side, algebraic combinations of spectral radiances such as NDCI while largely removing nouniquiness and the radiative effects of cloud inhomogeneity, can result in poor retrievals due to its insensitivity to cloud fraction. Instead, both RED and NIR radiances as points on the 'RED vs. NIR' plane are proposed to be used for retrieval. The proposed retrieval method is applied to Cimel measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site in Oklahoma. Cimel, a multi-channel sunphotometer, is a part of AERONET - a ground-based network for monitoring aerosol optical properties. The results of retrieval are compared with the ones from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) located next to Cimel at the ARM site. In addition, the performance of the retrieval method is assessed using a fractal model of cloud inhomogeneity and broken cloudiness. The preliminary results look very promising both theoretically and from measurements.

  12. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian continental aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the Northern Hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol.

    Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. The aerosol optical depth data showed a clear though moderate seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06 ± 0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. AERONET size distributions showed a generally bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of fine dust, biomass burning and marine biogenic material.

    In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – ion beam analysis and ion chromatography. Ion beam analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated with Si, with the Fe/Al ratio somewhat higher than values reported from Northern Hemisphere sites (as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. These data may be used to attempt to build a signature of soil in this

  13. Estimating the relationship between aerosol optical thickness and PM10using lidar and meteorological data in Limassol, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyro, Nisantzi; Diofantos, Hadjimitsis G.; Dimitrios, Alexakis

    2011-11-01

    Daily Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values from MODIS satellite instrument may be useful to predict Particulate Matter (PM) values in local scale in accordance with vertical profile of the atmosphere and meteorological data. In the frame of 'AIRSPACE' project, correlations between the AOD retrieved from MODIS to sun photometer data from both hand-held MICROTOPS II and ground-based CIMEL from the AERONET network were applied with good correlation coefficients. This permits to use MODIS retrievals as a reliable tool for assessing PM whereas the relationship between these two quantities is not lucid. The main study area is the centre of Limassol in Cyprus. Results concerning the relation between AOD and PM are presented. In cases where high AOD values corresponded to low PM surface values, the vertical distribution of aerosols from Lidar allows the AOD to be quantified within the boundary layer as this fraction best represents the PM measurements in a well-mixed layer.

  14. Analysis of aerosol optical and microphysical properties observed during the DC3 field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Schuster, G. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) consisted of 18 research flights from Salina, KS. During cloud inflow and outflow surveys, various aged aerosol layers and plumes, including biomass burning, were sampled by the NASA DC-8 aircraft which was equipped with a broad suite of instruments for aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties. As a result, the DC3 dataset includes detailed aerosol number size distribution, bulk aerosol mass concentration, black carbon mass concentration, and mass size distribution for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organics, together with scattering and absorption coefficients. We use this comprehensive dataset to perform a detailed closure analysis to examine the consistency between the observed aerosol properties and the literature reported aerosol refractive index values. In this context, we report aerosol observations, and comparisons between the aerosol mass and number size distribution for various aerosol layers. Closure tests will also be presented in terms of the impact of the aerosol composition and size distribution on the scattering and absorption.

  15. Aerosol direct radiative effects over the northwest Atlantic, northwest Pacific, and North Indian Oceans: estimates based on in-situ chemical and optical measurements and chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bates

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial era is that due to aerosols, a substantial fraction of which is the uncertainty associated with scattering and absorption of shortwave (solar radiation by anthropogenic aerosols in cloud-free conditions (IPCC, 2001. Quantifying and reducing the uncertainty in aerosol influences on climate is critical to understanding climate change over the industrial period and to improving predictions of future climate change for assumed emission scenarios. Measurements of aerosol properties during major field campaigns in several regions of the globe during the past decade are contributing to an enhanced understanding of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on light scattering and climate. The present study, which focuses on three regions downwind of major urban/population centers (North Indian Ocean (NIO during INDOEX, the Northwest Pacific Ocean (NWP during ACE-Asia, and the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA during ICARTT, incorporates understanding gained from field observations of aerosol distributions and properties into calculations of perturbations in radiative fluxes due to these aerosols. This study evaluates the current state of observations and of two chemical transport models (STEM and MOZART. Measurements of burdens, extinction optical depth (AOD, and direct radiative effect of aerosols (DRE – change in radiative flux due to total aerosols are used as measurement-model check points to assess uncertainties. In-situ measured and remotely sensed aerosol properties for each region (mixing state, mass scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and angular scattering properties and their dependences on relative humidity are used as input parameters to two radiative transfer models (GFDL and University of Michigan to constrain estimates of aerosol radiative effects, with uncertainties in each step propagated through the analysis. Constraining the radiative

  16. Aerosol direct radiative effects over the northwest Atlantic, northwest Pacific, and North Indian Oceans: estimates based on in-situ chemical and optical measurements and chemical transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, T. S.; Anderson, T. L.; Baynard, T.; Bond, T.; Boucher, O.; Carmichael, G.; Clarke, A.; Erlick, C.; Guo, H.; Horowitz, L.; Howell, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Maring, H.; McComiskey, A.; Middlebrook, A.; Noone, K.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ogren, J.; Penner, J.; Quinn, P. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Savoie, D. L.; Schwartz, S. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Tang, Y.; Weber, R. J.; Wu, Y.

    2006-05-01

    The largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial era is that due to aerosols, a substantial fraction of which is the uncertainty associated with scattering and absorption of shortwave (solar) radiation by anthropogenic aerosols in cloud-free conditions (IPCC, 2001). Quantifying and reducing the uncertainty in aerosol influences on climate is critical to understanding climate change over the industrial period and to improving predictions of future climate change for assumed emission scenarios. Measurements of aerosol properties during major field campaigns in several regions of the globe during the past decade are contributing to an enhanced understanding of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on light scattering and climate. The present study, which focuses on three regions downwind of major urban/population centers (North Indian Ocean (NIO) during INDOEX, the Northwest Pacific Ocean (NWP) during ACE-Asia, and the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA) during ICARTT), incorporates understanding gained from field observations of aerosol distributions and properties into calculations of perturbations in radiative fluxes due to these aerosols. This study evaluates the current state of observations and of two chemical transport models (STEM and MOZART). Measurements of burdens, extinction optical depth (AOD), and direct radiative effect of aerosols (DRE - change in radiative flux due to total aerosols) are used as measurement-model check points to assess uncertainties. In-situ measured and remotely sensed aerosol properties for each region (mixing state, mass scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and angular scattering properties and their dependences on relative humidity) are used as input parameters to two radiative transfer models (GFDL and University of Michigan) to constrain estimates of aerosol radiative effects, with uncertainties in each step propagated through the analysis. Constraining the radiative transfer

  17. Egocentric Depth Judgements in Optical, See-Through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    order design that repeated modulo eight subjects. Within each environment protocol block, our control program generated a list of 3 ðdistanceÞ 4...pp. 15-19, 2006. [18] M.S. Landy, L.T. Maloney, E.B. Johnston, and M. Young , “Measurement and Modeling of Depth Cue Combination: In Defense of Weak

  18. Sunphotometry of the 2006-2007 aerosol optical/radiative properties at the Himalayan Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (5079 m a.s.l.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, G. P.; Angelini, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Verza, G. P.; Marinoni, A.; Barnaba, F.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of being located at the heart of the highest mountain range in the world, the Himalayan Nepal Climate Observatory (5079 m a.s.l.) at the Ev-K2-CNR Pyramid is shown to be affected by the advection of pollution aerosols from the populated regions of southern Nepal and the Indo-Gangetic plains. Such an impact is observed along most of the period April 2006-March 2007 addressed here, with a minimum in the monsoon season. Backtrajectory-analysis indicates long-range transport episodes occurring in this period to originate mainly in the West Asian deserts. At this high altitude site, the measured aerosol optical depth is observed to be: 1) about one order of magnitude lower than the one measured at Gandhi College (60 m a.s.l.), in the Indo-Gangetic basin, and 2) maximum during the monsoon period, due to the presence of elevated (cirrus-like) particle layers. Assessment of the aerosol radiative forcing results to be hampered by the persistent presence of these high altitude particle layers, which impede a continuous measurement of both the aerosol optical depth and its radiative properties from sky radiance inversions. Even though the retrieved absorption coefficients of pollution aerosols was rather large (single scattering albedo of the order of 0.6-0.9 were observed in the month of April 2006), the corresponding low optical depths (~0.03 at 500 nm) are expected to limit the relevant radiative forcings. Still, the high specific forcing of this aerosol and its capability of altering snow surface albedo provide good reason for continuous monitoring.

  19. Climatological analysis of aerosol optical properties over East Africa observed from space-borne sensors during 2001-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiyo, Richard; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Zhao, Tianliang; Bao, Yansong

    2017-03-01

    The present study is aimed at analyzing spatial and temporal characteristics of aerosols retrieved from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) sensors over East Africa (EA). Data spanning for a period of 15 years during 2001-2015 was used to investigate aerosol optical depth (AOD550), Ångstrom exponent (AE470-660) and absorption aerosol Index (AAI) over EA and selected locations within EA. Validation results of MODIS-Terra versus the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) AOD550 revealed that the former underestimated aerosol loading over the studied regions due to uncertainties in surface reflectance. The annual mean AOD550, AAI, and AE470-660 were found to be 0.20 ± 0.01, 0.81 ± 0.03, and 1.39 ± 0.01, respectively with peak values observed during the local dry seasons. The spatial seasonal distributions of mean AOD550 suggested high (low) values during the local dry (wet) periods. The high AOD values found along the borders of southwest of Uganda were attributed to smoke particles; while higher (lower) values of AE470-660 (AAI) dominated most parts of the study domain. Low AOD (0.1-0.2) centers were located in high-altitude regions with relatively high vegetation cover over western and central parts of Kenya, and central and northern parts of Tanzania. Furthermore, latitudinal and longitudinal gradients in AOD550 showed a "southern low and northern high" and a "western low and eastern high" profile, respectively during JJA, as other seasons showed heterogeneous variations. Trend analysis revealed a general increase in AOD and AAI and a decrease in AE; while impact factors significantly affected AOD distribution over EA. HYSPLIT back trajectory analyses revealed diverse transport pathways originated from the Arabian Deserts, central Africa, and southwest of Indian Ocean along with locally produced aerosols during different seasons.

  20. Retrieval of aerosol optical and physical properties from ground-based measurements for Zanjan, a city in Northwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, A.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Bayat, A.; Moradhaseli, R.

    2013-02-01

    A ground-based sun and sky scanning radiometer, CIMEL CE 318-2 sunphotometer, has been used to study the atmosphere of Zanjan, a city in Northwest Iran (36.70°N, 48.51°E, and 1800 m above the mean sea level) in the periods of October 2006-October 2008, and January-September 2010. Direct sun and solar principal plane sky radiance measurements by the sunphotometer have been used to retrieve the optical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index, and volume size distributions. About 50 dusty days (daily averaged AOD (870) > 0.35, α < 0.5) have been recorded during the mentioned periods. Considering the different values obtained for SSA, real part of refractive index, and volume size distributions, it has been found that just dust and anthropogenic aerosols are making the atmospheric aerosols in this region. In these recordings it has been observed that AODs (Ångström exponents) were increasing (decreasing) during spring and early summer. This was accompanied by increase of SSA, real part of refractive index, and coarse mode part of volume size distributions of aerosols. This behavior could be due to transport of dust, mostly from Tigris-Euphrates basin or sometimes with lower probability from the region between Caspian and Aral seas and rarely from sources inside the Iran plateau like the Qom dry lake, especially in dry seasons. In this work NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, HYSPLIT model back trajectories, and MODIS Deep Blue AODs have been used to track the air masses and dust plumes during the recorded dust events.

  1. Effect of the summer monsoon on aerosols at two measurement stations in Northern India – Part 2: Physical and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol physical and optical properties were measured at two locations in Northern India during 2006–2010. The first measurement station was a background site in Mukteshwar, about 350 km northeast of New Delhi, in the foothills of the Indian Himalayas. The second measurement site was located in Gual Pahari, about 25 km south of New Delhi. At both stations, the average aerosol concentrations during the monsoon were decreased by 40–75% compared to the pre-monsoon average concentrations. The decrease varied with the total local rainfall. Also the mean aerosol size decreased during the monsoon season. The size distribution at Mukteshwar was unimodal, with a mode diameter at about 80 nm. In Gual Pahari, the ratio of Aitken and accumulation particle concentration was >1, due to wet deposition and new particle formation during the monsoon season. Aerosol concentrations during the early monsoon were found to be affected by mineral dust which in Gual Pahari was observed as an increased particle volume at around 3–4 μm. The single scattering albedo varied from 0.73 to 0.93 during the monsoon season, being slightly lower in Gual Pahari than in Mukteshwar. The aerosol columnar properties, which were measured in Gual Pahari, showed a somewhat different seasonal behavior compared to the surface measurements, with the aerosol optical depth increasing to an annual maximum in the early monsoon season.

  2. Aerosol Optical Properties over Beijing during the World Athletics Championships and Victory Day Military Parade in August and September 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A special period in Beijing from 6 August to 17 September 2015, during which the World Athletics Championships and Victory Day military parade took place, and which involved measures to restrict traffic and reduce factory emissions, was selected to analyze the aerosol optical properties and the impact of meteorological conditions on pollution levels. The study was based on AERONET observational and retrieval data, particulate matter measurements (TEOM 1405, meteorological data, and then the HYSPLIT model was used to analyze the pollution sources. The study period was divided into three sub-periods according to the different stages of implementation of the control measures, and the main conclusions can be summarized as follows. During the period in which the restrictive measures were applied, the air quality improved significantly, with the average value of the AOD being 0.34 ± 0.20, about 69% less than before. Meanwhile, the average Ångström exponent was about 9.5% higher than before, with an average value of 1.38 ± 0.25, indicating that the main pollutants were fine particles. Single scattering albedo decreased as wavelength increased, being higher than in the other two stages (mean value of 0.944 ± 0.045. This showed that the strong scattering capacity and absorption aerosol optical depth was at its lowest, at about 0.008 ± 0.009. The peaks of aerosol volume concentration in the fine and coarse mode were significantly reduced. Meteorological conditions also had a certain effect on the aerosol optical properties, with the blowing of clean and dry wind and the occurrence of precipitation contributing to the overall improvement in air quality.

  3. Aerosol direct radiative effects over the northwest Atlantic, northwest Pacific, and North Indian Oceans: estimates based on in-situ chemical and optical measurements and chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bates

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial era is that due to aerosols, a substantial fraction of which is the uncertainty associated with scattering and absorption of shortwave (solar radiation by anthropogenic aerosols in cloud-free conditions (IPCC, 2001. Quantifying and reducing the uncertainty in aerosol influences on climate is critical to understanding climate change over the industrial period and to improving predictions of future climate change for assumed emission scenarios. Measurements of aerosol properties during major field campaigns in several regions of the globe during the past decade are contributing to an enhanced understanding of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on light scattering and climate. The present study, which focuses on three regions downwind of major urban/population centers (North Indian Ocean (NIO during INDOEX, the Northwest Pacific Ocean (NWP during ACE-Asia, and the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA during ICARTT, incorporates understanding gained from field observations of aerosol distributions and properties into calculations of perturbations in radiative fluxes due to these aerosols. This study evaluates the current state of observations and of two chemical transport models (STEM and MOZART. Measurements of burdens, extinction optical depth (AOD, and direct radiative effect of aerosols (DRE – change in radiative flux due to total aerosols are used as measurement-model check points to assess uncertainties. In-situ measured and remotely sensed aerosol properties for each region (mixing state, mass scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and angular scattering properties and their dependences on relative humidity are used as input parameters to two radiative transfer models (GFDL and University of Michigan to constrain estimates of aerosol radiative effects, with uncertainties in each step propagated through the analysis. Constraining the radiative

  4. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    Photopolymerization is a process that depends, among other factors, on the optical properties of polymerized materials. In turn, this process affects longitudinal light transport in these materials, thereby altering their optical absorption coefficient which is thus expected to exhibit depth dependence. Furthermore, polymerization affects the thermal properties of these materials. A robust theoretical approach to the study of the depth-dependent optical absorption coefficient, β(x ), and thermal diffusivity, α(x ), in materials exhibiting depth profiles of these parameters has been developed through the photothermal inverse problem based on the concept of the thermal-harmonic oscillator. Using this concept in the frequency-domain nonhomogeneous photothermal-wave boundary-value problem, the simultaneous reconstruction of arbitrary simultaneous optical and thermal depth profiles was achieved using a multiparameter fitting method to the experimental amplitude and phase. As a first application of the theory to partially polymerized Alert Composite (shade A3) dental resin, with curing induced by a blue light-emitting diode, the β(x ) and α(x ) depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric frequency-scanned data. A strong anticorrelation of these two depth profiles was observed and was interpreted in terms of photochemical processes occurring during the optical (photocuring) creation of long polymeric chains in the resin. The photothermally reconstructed depth profiles may have implications for the optimization of blue light curing methods using such resins in dental clinical practice.

  5. Satellite and Ship-based Lidar Measurements of Optical Depth during EOPACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, M.; Wash, C.; Durkee, P.H.; Veefkind, J.P.; Leeuw, G. de; Smith, M.H.; Hill, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the coastal MABL for the entire battlespace is critical for modern Navy operations. To support modern weapon and sensor systems, quantitative assessment of a number of MABL properties are needed. They include: optical depth, boundary layer depth, sea surface temperature, and surface lay

  6. Parameterization of the Optical Properties of Sulfate Aerosols in the Infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Min, Qilong

    2002-11-01

    Parameterizations of absorptance depth for ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], ammonium bisulfate (NH4HSO4), and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the infrared are provided for an eight-band model (covering 340-2500 cm1) and for 32 individual wavenumbers in order to generate other band schemes. The parameterization is simple in form and in its dependence on relative humidity.It is found that the aerosol surface infrared forcing can cancel about 12%-24% aerosol surface solar forcing in a clear sky condition. Also the existence of clouds could enhance the ratio of aerosol surface infrared forcing to the aerosol surface solar forcing. In contrast to the solar case, a small mode size distribution does not always produce a larger aerosol surface forcing. Also it is found that the aerosol surface forcing is dependent on the aerosol location. Very simple analysis is presented to help understand the related physics on sulfate aerosol infrared radiative forcing.

  7. Laboratory measurements of the optical properties of sea salt aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Irshad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The extinction spectra of laboratory generated sea salt aerosols have been measured from 1 μm to 20 μm using a Bruker 66v/S FTIR spectrometer. Concomitant measurements include temperature, pressure, relative humidity and the aerosol size distribution. The refractive indices of the sea salt aerosol have been determined using a simple harmonic oscillator band model (Thomas et al., 2004 for aerosol with relative humidities at eight different values between 0.4% to 86%. The resulting refractive index spectra show significant discrepancies when compared to existing sea salt refractive indices calculated using volume mixing rules (Shettle and Fenn, 1979. Specifically, an additional band is found in the refractive indices of dry sea salt aerosol and the new data shows increased values of refractive index at almost all wavelengths. This implies that the volume mixing rules, currently used to calculate the refractive indices of wet sea salt aerosols, are inadequate. Furthermore, the existing data for the real and imaginary parts of the refractive indices of dry sea salt aerosol are found not to display the Kramers-Kronig relationship. This implies that the original data used for the volume mixing calculations is also inaccurate.

  8. Application of oxygen A-band equivalent width to disambiguate downwelling radiances for cloud optical depth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niple, Edward R.; Scott, Herman E.; Conant, John A.; Jones, Stephen H.; Iannarilli, Frank J.; Pereira, Wellesley E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the three-waveband spectrally agile technique (TWST) for measuring cloud optical depth (COD). TWST is a portable field-proven sensor and retrieval method offering a unique combination of fast (1 Hz) cloud-resolving (0.5° field of view) real-time-reported COD measurements. It entails ground-based measurement of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) zenith spectral radiances much like the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) cloud-mode sensors. What is novel in our approach is that we employ absorption in the oxygen A-band as a means of resolving the COD ambiguity inherent in using up-looking spectral radiances. We describe the TWST sensor and algorithm, and assess their merits by comparison to AERONET cloud-mode measurements collected during the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Spectral radiance agreement was better than 1 %, while a linear fit of COD yielded a slope of 0.905 (TWST reporting higher COD) and offset of -2.1.

  9. Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity

  10. Observations and regional modeling of aerosol optical properties, speciation and size distribution over Northern Africa and western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, Laurent; Siour, Guillaume; Mailler, Sylvain; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The aerosol speciation and size distribution is modeled during the summer 2013 and over a large area encompassing Africa, Mediterranean and western Europe. The modeled aerosol is compared to available measurements such as the AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size distribution (ASD) and the EMEP network for surface concentrations of particulate matter PM2.5, PM10 and inorganic species (nitrate, sulfate and ammonium). The main goal of this study is to quantify the model ability to realistically model the speciation and size distribution of the aerosol. Results first showed that the long-range transport pathways are well reproduced and mainly constituted by mineral dust: spatial correlation is ≈ 0.9 for AOD and Ångström exponent, when temporal correlations show that the day-to-day variability is more difficult to reproduce. Over Europe, PM2.5 and PM10 have a mean temporal correlation of ≈ 0.4 but the lowest spatial correlation ( ≈ 0.25 and 0.62, respectively), showing that the fine particles are not well localized or transported. Being short-lived species, the uncertainties on meteorology and emissions induce these lowest scores. However, time series of PM2.5 with the speciation show a good agreement between model and measurements and are useful for discriminating the aerosol composition. Using a classification from the south (Africa) to the north (northern Europe), it is shown that mineral dust relative mass contribution decreases from 50 to 10 % when nitrate increases from 0 to 20 % and all other species, sulfate, sea salt, ammonium, elemental carbon, primary organic matter, are constant. The secondary organic aerosol contribution is between 10 and 20 % with a maximum at the latitude of the Mediterranean Sea (Spanish stations). For inorganic species, it is shown that nitrate, sulfate and ammonium have a mean temporal correlation of 0.25, 0.37 and 0.17, respectively. The spatial correlation is better (0.25, 0.5 and 0.87), showing that the mean

  11. Lidar multiple scattering factors inferred from CALIPSO lidar and IIR retrievals of semi-transparent cirrus cloud optical depths over oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubuisson, P.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm are compared to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flying on board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent two-way transmittance through the cloud. An evaluation of the CALIOP multiple scattering factor is inferred from these comparisons after assessing and correcting biases in IIR and CALIOP optical depths reported in version 3 data products. In particular, the blackbody radiance taken in the IIR version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40 % as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. It is discussed that this behavior can be explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT applied to correct the measured apparent two-way transmittance for contribution of forward-scattering. While the CALIOP version 3 retrievals hold ηT fixed at 0.6, this study shows that ηT varies with temperature (and hence cloud particle size) from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for single-layered semi-transparent cirrus clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP

  12. Airborne in situ characterization of dry urban aerosol optical properties around complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targino, Admir Créso; Noone, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study—NARSTO were used to describe the aerosol optical properties in an urban area whose aerosol distribution is modified as the aerosols are advected over the surrounding topography. The data consist of measurements made with a nephelometer and absorption photometer onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Pelican aircraft. The cases investigated in this study include vertical profiles flown over coastal sites as well as sites located along some important mountain ranges in southern California. The vertical distribution of the aerosol in the Los Angeles Basin showed a complex configuration, directly related with the local meteorological circulations and the surrounding topography. High spatial and temporal variability in air pollutant concentrations within a relatively small area was found, as indicated by the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient data. The results suggest that in areas with such complex terrain, a high spatial resolution is required in order to adequately describe the aerosol optical quantities. Principal components analysis (PCA) has been applied to aerosol chemical samples in order to identify the major aerosol types in the Los Angeles Basin. The technique yielded four components that accounted for 78% of the variance in the data set. These were indicative of marine aerosols, urban aerosols, trace elements and secondary aerosol components of traffic emissions and agricultural activities. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer model has been employed to simulate the effects that different aerosol vertical profiles have on the attenuation of solar energy. The cases examined were selected using the results of the PCA and in situ data were used to describe the atmospheric optical properties in the model. These investigations comprise a number of sensitivity tests to evaluate the effects on the results of the location of the aerosol layers as well as

  13. Biogenic Aerosols Over the Amazon Basin: Optical Properties and Relationship With Elemental and Ionic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Godoy, J. M.; Godoy, M. L.; Rizzo, L. V.; Paixao, M.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the optical properties of natural biogenic aerosol particles over the central Amazon Basin near Manaus during the wet season in February and March 2008. The measurements were conducted as part of the AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment) sampling campaign. Light absorption was determined with the use of an Aethalometer and an MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). Light scattering was measured with a 3 wavelength TSI nephelometer and an Ecotech nephelometer. The elemental composition was measured trough PIXE and IC. Single scattering albedo shows relatively low values varying from 0.86 to 0.95. Very low fine mode aerosol mass was measured, and coarse mode particles are responsible for a significant fraction of scattering and absorption. Sulfur was observed in very low concentrations, and most of the aerosol mass was organic. Long range transport of soil dust from Sahara were observed and reflected in the light scattering coefficient. Wavelength dependence of absorption indicates the strong influence of coarse mode aerosol. Aerosol optical thickness shows low values, but with significant single scattering albedo values, showing strong absorption properties of these biogenic aerosols. Size distribution measurements shows consistence with the scattering coefficients measured, if the coarse mode particles are taken into account.

  14. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol optical thickness and chlorophyll concentration from multiwavelength measurement over East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chong; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Hashimoto, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    A flexible inversion algorithm is proposed for simultaneously retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and surface chlorophyll a (Chl) concentration from multiwavelength observation over the ocean. In this algorithm, forward radiation calculation is performed by an accurate coupled atmosphere-ocean model with a comprehensive bio-optical ocean module. Then, a full-physical nonlinear optimization approximation approach is used to retrieve AOT and Chl. For AOT retrieval, a global three-dimensional spectral radiation-transport aerosol model is used as the a priori constraint to increase the retrieval accuracy of aerosol. To investigate the algorithm's availability, the retrieval experiment is conducted using simulated radiance data to demonstrate that the relative errors in simultaneously determining AOT and Chl can be mostly controlled to within 10% using multiwavelength and angle covering in and out of sunglint. Furthermore, the inversion results are assessed using the actual satellite observation data obtained from Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI)/Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite GOSAT and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua instruments through comparison to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol and ocean color (OC) products over East China Sea. Both the retrieved AOT and Chl compare favorably to the reported AERONET values, particularly when using the CASE 2 ocean module in turbid water, even when the retrieval is performed in the presence of high aerosol loading and sunglint. Finally, the CAI and MODIS images are used to jointly retrieve the spatial distribution of AOT and Chl in comparison to the MODIS AOT and OC products.

  15. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  16. Urban Aerosol Optical Properties Measurement by Elastic Counter-Look Lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Wang X.; Boselli A.; He Y; Sannino A.; Song C.; Spinelli N.

    2016-01-01

    The new developed elastic lidar system utilizes two identical elastic lidars, in counter-look configuration, to measure aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficients without any hypotheses. Compared to elastic-Raman lidar and high spectral resolution lidar, the proposed counter-look elastic lidar can use low power eyesafe laser and all available wavelengths. With this prototype lidar system, urban aerosol optical properties and their spatial distribution have been directly measured, incl...

  17. Chromatic error correction of diffractive optical elements at minimum etch depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Jochen; Gühne, Tobias

    2014-09-01

    The integration of diffractive optical elements (DOE) into an optical design opens up new possibilities for applications in sensing and illumination. If the resulting optics is used in a larger spectral range we must correct not only the chromatic error of the conventional, refractive, part of the design but also of the DOE. We present a simple but effective strategy to select substrates which allow the minimum etch depths for the DOEs. The selection depends on both the refractive index and the dispersion.

  18. Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Colarco, P.; Covert, D.; Eilers, J.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Flagan, R.; Jonsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. One of the objectives of the Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (TOP) conducted by ARM in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma was to examine and hopefully reduce these differences. The IOP involved airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We give an overview of airborne results obtained aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The Twin Otter performed 16 research flights over the SGP site. The aircraft carried instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size. This included such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods for in-situ absorption (675 nm) and extinction (675 and 1550 nm) and a new multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometer (467, 530, 660 nm). A newly developed instrument measured cloud condensation nucleus concentration (CCN) concentrations at two supersaturation levels. Aerosol optical depth and extinction (354-2139 nm) were measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore, up-and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation were measured using seven individual radiometers. Three up-looking radiometers werer mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, keeping the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of approximately 10(exp 0). This resulted in unprecedented continuous vertical profiles

  19. Weekly periodicities of aerosol optical thickness over Central Europe – evidence of an anthropogenic direct aerosol effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vogel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Statistical analyses of data from 14 ground-based sun photometer stations all over Central Europe are presented. All stations are part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET, and only data of the highest data quality level 2.0 had been applied. The averages by weekday of aerosol optical thickness (AOT at a wavelength of 440 nm of 12 of the 14 stations show a weekly periodicity with lowest values on Sunday and Monday, but greatest values from Wednesday until Saturday, that is significant at least on a 90% level. The stations in Germany and in Greater Paris show weekly cycles with ranges of about 20% on average. In Northern Italy and Switzerland this range is about 10% on average. The corresponding weekly cycle of anthropogenic gaseous and particulate emissions leads us to the conclusion of the anthropogenic origin of the weekly AOT cycle. Since these AOT patterns are derived from the reduction of the direct sun radiation by the columnar atmospheric aerosol, this result represents strong evidence for an anthropogenic direct aerosol effect on shortwave radiation. Furthermore, this study makes a first contribution to the understanding and explanation of recently observed weekly periodicities in meteorological variables as temperature in Germany.

  20. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  1. Optical properties of Titan's aerosols: comparison between DISR/Huygens observations and VIMS/Cassini solar occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmuse, Florian; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, the only satellite with a dense atmosphere, presents a hydrocarbon cycle that includes the formation and sedimentation of organic aerosols. The optical properties of Titan's haze inferred from measurement of the Huygens probe were recently revisited by Doose et al. (Icarus, 2016). The present study uses the solar occultation observations in equatorial regions of Titan that have been acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft to infer similar information in a broader wavelength range. Preliminary studies have proven the interest of those solar occultation data in the seven atmospheric windows to constrain the aerosol number density, but could not directly compare with the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR) data because models predict that the density profile vary with latitude. The present study compares the DISR measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and the solar occultation data acquired by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. These sets of data differ in their acquisition method and time, spectral range, and altitude: the DISR measurements have been taken in 2005, along a vertical line of sight, in the visible spectral range (490-950nm) and under 140km of altitude. The relevant solar occultation data at equator have been acquired in 2009, along a horizontal line of sight, in the IR range (0.9-5.1µm), with sun light scanning all altitudes for a long enough wavelength, namely in the five-micron atmospheric window. These sets of data have been analyzed previously, separately and using different models. Here, we present a cross analysis of these sets of data, that allows us to test the different models describing the density profile of aerosols. In addition to providing wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient, the comparison allows us to assess the impact of refraction in Titan's atmosphere. It also provides optical depth and scattering properties that are crucial information

  2. Investigating the aerosol optical and radiative characteristics of heavy haze episodes in Beijing during January of 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jianrong; Huang, Jianping; Hu, Zhiyuan; Holben, B. N.; Guo, Zhiqiang

    2014-08-01

    Several heavy atmospheric haze pollution episodes occurred over eastern and northern China during January of 2013. The pollution covered more than 100 km2 and caused serious impacts on environmental quality, human health, and transportation. In this study, we characterize aerosol microphysical, optical, and radiative characteristics using a combination of ground-based Sun/sky radiometer retrievals and a radiative transfer model. Our results show that during about half of the total number of days, daily PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations are larger than 100 µg/m3, with maxima of 462 and 433 µg/m3, respectively, during the haze events. Fine-mode (PM2.5) particles dominated the aerosol size during the episodes. The volume size distribution and median radius of fine-mode particles generally increase as aerosol optical depth at 440 nm (AOD440) increases. The median effective radius of fine-mode particles increases from 0.15 µm at low AOD value (AOD440 ~ 0.3) to a radius of 0.25-0.30 µm at high AOD value (AOD440 ≥ 1.0). The daily mean single-scattering albedo (SSA), imaginary part of refractive index (RI), and asymmetry factor display pronounced spectral behaviors. The overall mean SSA440 and SSA675 are 0.892 and 0.905, respectively. The corresponding RI440 and RI675 are 0.016 and 0.011, respectively. This indicates that a significant amount of absorption occurred under the haze event in Beijing during January 2013. Approximately half of the incident solar radiation energy went into heating the atmosphere as a result of strong aerosol loading and absorption. The daily averaged heating rate in the haze particle layer (0-3.2 km) varies from 0.12 to 0.81 K/day in Beijing, which might exert profound impact on the atmospheric thermodynamic and dynamical structures and cloud development, which should be further studied.

  3. USING MODIS SATELLITE DATA TO ANALYSE THE RELATIONSHIOP BETWEEN CHLOROPHYLL A AND AEROSOL OPTICAL DEPTH IN THE GREENLAND SEA%用MODIS卫星数据来分析格陵兰海叶绿素和气溶胶光学厚