WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerosol material comparison

  1. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  2. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used in order to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. It is also used in order to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory (κ-KT) and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-KT is the suitable framework to describe clay mineral nucleation activity. Apparent differences in κ with respect to size arise from an artifact introduced by improper size-selection methodology. For dust particles with mobility sizes larger than ~300 nm, i.e., ones that are within an atmospherically relevant size range, both κ-KT and FHH theory yield similar critical supersaturations. However, the former requires a single hygroscopicity parameter instead of the two adjustable parameters required by the latter. For dry-generated particles, the size dependence of κ is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much

  3. Aerosols: A sustainable route to functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael John; Carmalt, Claire

    2017-09-04

    Sustainability is an increasingly important topic in the design and manufacture of materials, with the need to reduce the environmental impact of producing materials being of paramount significance. A competing interest to this is the ability to produce functional materials in large volumes from a fast, on-line process, which can be integrated easily into existing industrial setups. Herein, we present aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) routes to advanced functional materials. We will show that by careful design of precursors and manipulation of deposition conditions, it is possible to achieve high sustainability whilst maintaining fast growth rates and large scale production of thin film functional materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Aerosol processing of materials: Aerosol dynamics and microstructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Abhijit Shankar

    Spray pyrolysis is an aerosol process commonly used to synthesize a wide variety of materials in powder or film forms including metals, metal oxides and non-oxide ceramics. It is capable of producing high purity, unagglomerated, and micrometer to submicron-size powders, and scale-up has been demonstrated. This dissertation deals with the study of aerosol dynamics during spray pyrolysis of multicomponent systems involving volatile phases/components, and aspects involved with using fuel additives during spray processes to break apart droplets and particles in order to produce powders with smaller sizes. The gas-phase aerosol dynamics and composition size distributions were measured during spray pyrolysis of (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Sr-Ru-O and Bi-Ru-O at different temperatures. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA) was used in conjunction with a condensation particle counter (CPC) to monitor the gas-phase particle size distributions, and a Berner-type low-pressure impactor was used to obtain mass size distributions and size-classified samples for chemical analysis. (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O powders made at temperatures up to 700sp°C maintained their initial stoichiometry over the whole range of particle sizes monitored, however, those made at 800sp°C and above were heavily depleted in lead in the size range 0.5-5.0 mum. When the reactor temperature was raised from 700 and 800sp°C to 900sp°C, a large number ({˜}10sp7\\ #/cmsp3) of new ultrafine particles were formed from PbO vapor released from the particles and the reactor walls at the beginning of high temperature runs (at 900sp°C). The metal ruthenate systems showed generation of ultrafine particles (measurements were also used to monitor the gas-phase particle size distributions during the generation of fullerene (Csb{60}) nano-particles (30 to 50 nm size) via vapor condensation at 400-650sp°C using Nsb2 carrier gas. In general, during laboratory-scale aerosol processing of materials containing a volatile

  5. Comparison of aerosol size distribution in coastal and oceanic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.T.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The results of applying the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) method to decomposition and approximation of aerosol size distributions are presented. A comparison was made for two aerosol data sets, representing coastal and oceanic environments. The first data set includes measurements collected a

  6. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  7. First comparison of a global microphysical aerosol model with size-resolved observational aerosol statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Manktelow, P.; Heintzenberg, J.

    2006-09-01

    A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP). We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10-30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the MBL. Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol, with typically 60-90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the observed and modelled particle persistence at Cape Grim in the Southern Ocean, does not

  8. A world-wide comparison of aerosol data

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Piazzola, Jacques; van Zuijlen, Suzanne; Cohen, Leo; Moerman, Marcel; Missamou, Tathy; Tedeschi, Gilles; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    A comparison of aerosol data acquired at five different sites around the globe is presented. All data has been acquired with the same instrumentation and representative size distributions for marine air masses at 10 m/s wind speed have been selected for comparison. Differences in the concentrations of larger and smaller aerosols at the various sites are explained in terms of fetch, trade winds, shielding, pollution, seawater temperature and phytoplankton bloom. The differences in size distribution induce significant differences in the extinction coefficients from the VIS to the LWIR at the various sites. Consequently, the transmission over a specific range also varies significantly. This suggests that a detailed analysis of the conditions at each site is necessary in order to understand the exact aerosol behavior and to correctly predict electro-optical propagation effects due to aerosols.

  9. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sareen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The kinetics were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The results suggest that the bimolecular reaction of methylglyoxal with an ammonium or hydronium ion is the rate-limiting step for the formation of light-absorbing species, with kNH4+II=5×10−6 M−1 min−1 and kH3O+II≤10−3 M−1 min−1. Evidence of aldol condensation products and oligomeric species up to 759 amu was found using chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS. Tentative identifications of carbon-nitrogen species and a sulfur-containing compound were also made using Aerosol-CIMS. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit significant surface tension depression. These observations add to the growing body of evidence that dicarbonyl compounds may form secondary organic material in the aerosol aqueous phase, and that secondary organic aerosol formation via heterogeneous processes may affect seed aerosol properties.

  10. Fire aerosol experiment and comparisons with computer code predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, W.S.; Nichols, B.D.; White, B.W.; Smith, P.R.; Leslie, I.H.; Corkran, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, in cooperation with New Mexico State University, has carried on a series of tests to provide experimental data on fire-generated aerosol transport. These data will be used to verify the aerosol transport capabilities of the FIRAC computer code. FIRAC was developed by Los Alamos for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is intended to be used by safety analysts to evaluate the effects of hypothetical fires on nuclear plants. One of the most significant aspects of this analysis deals with smoke and radioactive material movement throughout the plant. The tests have been carried out using an industrial furnace that can generate gas temperatures to 300/degree/C. To date, we have used quartz aerosol with a median diameter of about 10 ..mu..m as the fire aerosol simulant. We also plan to use fire-generated aerosols of polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The test variables include two nominal gas flow rates (150 and 300 ft/sup 3//min) and three nominal gas temperatures (ambient, 150/degree/C, and 300/degree/C). The test results are presented in the form of plots of aerosol deposition vs length of duct. In addition, the mass of aerosol caught in a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter during the tests is reported. The tests are simulated with the FIRAC code, and the results are compared with the experimental data. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Global two-channel AVHRR aerosol climatology: effects of stratospheric aerosols and preliminary comparisons with MODIS and MISR retrievals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor V. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Mishchenko, Michael I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States)]. E-mail: crmim@giss.nasa.gov; Liu Li [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Remer, Lorraine [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 913, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2004-10-15

    We present an update on the status of the global climatology of the aerosol column optical thickness and Angstrom exponent derived from channel-1 and -2 radiances of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) in the framework of the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). The latest version of the climatology covers the period from July 1983 to September 2001 and is based on an adjusted value of the diffuse component of the ocean reflectance as derived from extensive comparisons with ship sun-photometer data. We use the updated GACP climatology and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) data to analyze how stratospheric aerosols from major volcanic eruptions can affect the GACP aerosol product. One possible retrieval strategy based on the AVHRR channel-1 and -2 data alone is to infer both the stratospheric and the tropospheric aerosol optical thickness while assuming fixed microphysical models for both aerosol components. The second approach is to use the SAGE stratospheric aerosol data in order to constrain the AVHRR retrieval algorithm. We demonstrate that the second approach yields a consistent long-term record of the tropospheric aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent. Preliminary comparisons of the GACP aerosol product with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer aerosol retrievals show reasonable agreement, the GACP global monthly optical thickness being lower than the MODIS one by approximately 0.03. Larger differences are observed on a regional scale. Comparisons of the GACP and MODIS Angstrom exponent records are less conclusive and require further analysis.

  12. Nanocrystalline functional materials and nanocomposites synthesis through aerosol routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Olivera B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of the design of functional nanocrystalline powders and nanocomposites using chemical reactions in aerosols. The process involves ultrasonic aerosol formation (mist generators with the resonant frequencies of 800 kHz, 1.7 and 2.5 MHz from precursor salt solutions and control over the aerosol decomposition in a high-temperature tubular flow reactor. During decomposition, the aerosol droplets undergo evaporation/drying, precipitation and thermolysis in a single-step process. Consequently, spherical, solid, agglomerate-free submicronic particles are obtained. The particle morphology, revealed as a composite structure consisting of primary crystallites smaller than 20 nm was analysed by several methods (XRD, DSC/DTA, SEM, TEM and discussed in terms of precursor chemistry and process parameters. Following the initial attempts, a more detailed aspect of nanocrystalline particle synthesis was demonstrated for the case of nanocomposites based on ZnO-MeO (MeO=Bi Cr+, suitable for electronic applications, as well as an yttrium-aluminum base complex system, suitable for phosphorus applications. The results imply that parts of the material structure responsible for different functional behaviour appear through in situ aerosol synthesis by processes of intraparticle agglomeration, reaction and sintering in the last synthesis stage.

  13. Tribological comparison of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing

    Approximately 600,000 total joint replacement surgeries are performed each year in the United States. Current artificial joint implants are mainly metal-on-plastic. The synthetic biomaterials undergo degradation through fatigue and corrosive wear from load-bearing and the aqueous ionic environment of the human body. Deposits of inorganic salts can scratch weight-bearing surfaces, making artificial joints stiff and awkward. The excessive wear debris from polyethylene leads to osteolysis and potential loosening of the prosthesis. The lifetime for well-designed artificial joints is at most 10 to 15 years. A patient can usually have two total joint replacements during her/his lifetime. Durability is limited by the body's reaction to wear debris of the artificial joints. Wear of the artificial joints should be reduced. A focus of this thesis is the tribological performance of bearing materials for Total Replacement Artificial Joints (TRAJ). An additional focus is the scaffolds for cell growth from both a tissue engineering and tribological perspective. The tribological properties of materials including Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coated materials were tested for TRAJ implants. The DLC coatings are chemically inert, impervious to acid and saline media, and are mechanically hard. Carbon-based materials are highly biocompatible. A new alternative to total joints implantation is tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is the replacement of living tissue with tissue that is designed and constructed to meet the needs of the individual patient. Cells were cultured onto the artificial materials, including metals, ceramics, and polymers, and the frictional properties of these materials were investigated to develop a synthetic alternative to orthopedic transplants. Results showed that DLC coated materials had low friction and wear, which are desirable tribological properties for artificial joint material. Cells grew on some of the artificial matrix materials, depending on the

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasmas for aerosols processes in materials and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J. P.; Jidenko, N.; Bourgeois, E.

    2009-08-01

    The paper highlights applications of some atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc-corona, streamer and spark and ac-Dielectric Barrier Discharges) to aerosol processes for Materials and Environment (filtration, diagnostics). The production of vapor i.e. condensable gaseous species, leads to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation in these AP plasmas: (i) when dc streamer and spark filamentary discharges as well as ac filamentary dielectric barrier discharges interact with metal or dielectric surfaces, and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. It is shown how composition, size and structure of primary nano-particles are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients). Then the growth by coagulation controls the final size of agglomerates versus plasma parameters and transit time in and after the plasma. Charging and electro-thermal collection are depicted to account for the related potential applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol.

  15. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  16. Sensitivity test of GOCI dust aerosol index with aerosol absorptivity by using radiative transfer simulation and comparison with AERONET aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Park, Y. J.

    2016-12-01

    For the monitoring of aerosol properties in East Asia using the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), the GOCI Yonsei aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm was developed and has been improved continuously since 2011. GOCI YAER algorithm contains several aerosol models consisted of various optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA) for assuming every possible aerosol status. Then, AOD at 550 nm is retrieved from selected aerosol models which show least difference between observed top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance and simulated TOA reflectance in terms of spectral AODs. Current inversion method is optimized for spectral AODs, especially AOD at 550 nm. Therefore, GOCI YAER AOD, FMF, and Angstrom exponent show reliable accuracy with ground-based AERONET and satellite-based MODIS and VIIRS products. However, SSA shows least accuracy (R = 0.2) with AERONET SSA, which is different from AOD, FMF, and AE. To improve accuracy of SSA retrieval, the inversion method should reflect a characteristic of aerosol absorptivity well, not only in the aerosol model construction as forward modeling. UV aerosol index from TOMS and OMI measurements, calculated by using 354 and 388 nm, provides the extent of aerosol absorptivity, which can be used for the improvement of aerosol model quality between absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol model. Instead of UV index, a dust aerosol index (DAI) can be calculated using two visible channels such as 412 and 443 (or 490) nm. Heavy dust plume, which is coarse and absorbing aerosol, in 47 April 2012 show DAI of 5, but heavy haze plume, which is fine and non-absorbing aerosol, in 6 May 2012 shows DAI close to 0. To find relationship between DAI and aerosol absorptivity properties, sensitivity is tested by using radiative transfer model (RTM), and retrieved GOCI DAI from observed TOA reflectance is compared with ground-based AERONET SSA and other optical properties. Both of

  17. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics – Part 2: Product identification using Aerosol-CIMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. McNeill

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS to characterize secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate in aqueous aerosol mimics. Bulk reaction mixtures were diluted and atomized to form submicron aerosol particles. Organics were detected using Aerosol-CIMS in positive and negative ion mode using I− and H3O+·(H2On as reagent ions. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These results support previous observations by us and others that ammonium sulfate plays a critical role in the SOA formation chemistry of dicarbonyl compounds.

  18. Comparison of near surface and column-integrated atmospheric aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rudra Prasad

    Optical and chemical properties of size-resolved aerosols in near-surface air at Tudor Hill, Bermuda were measured between July 2006 and June 2009. Vertical distributions of aerosol backscattering and column-averaged aerosol optical properties were characterized with a Micro-pulse lidar (MPL) and a CIMEL automated sun-sky radiometer. The chemical species in size-segregated aerosols in marine air were compared with the surface level aerosol optical properties. The aerosol concentration, along with chemical components, was compared with the surface level wind speed and showed a significant correlation with the sea salt components. The non-sea salt components such as non-sea salt sulfate and ammonium did not show a correlation with the surface level wind speed. A comparison between scattering data at surface level with the extinction coefficient at the lowest altitude bin (75m) from the lidar inversion shows a consistent correlation but is quantitatively different. This quantitative discrepancy was explained based on the hygroscopic growth due to differences in relative humidity in measurement conditions. Aerosol optical properties measured near the surface were often significantly correlated with those averaged over the column. These include scattering by near-surface bulk aerosol at 530 nm versus column aerosol optical depth (AOD), near-surface sub-microm scattering fraction versus column averaged sub-microm scattering fraction, and the average angstrom exponent over column and lidar ratio derived using column integrated size distribution and complex refractive index. We also found that the single scattering albedo (ω o) measured at the surface by combining daily averages of the aerosol absorption and aerosol light scattering were in the same range as the instantaneous ω o retrieved for the column. The relative contribution of submicron aerosol light scattering to total aerosol light scattering is slightly higher in the column relative to the surface. Surface

  19. Maritime Aerosol Network as a Component of AERONET - First Results and Comparison with Global Aerosol Models and Satellite Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Giles, D. M.; Slutsker, I.; O'Neill, N. T.; Eck, T. F.; Macke, A.; Croot, P.; Courcoux, Y.; Sakerin, S. M.; Smyth, T. J.; Zielinski, T.; Zibordi, G.; Goes, J. I.; Harvey, M. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Nelson, N. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Duarte, C. M.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kleidman, R. G.; Gaitley, B. J.; Tan, Q.; Diehl, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been collecting data over the oceans since November 2006. Over 80 cruises were completed through early 2010 with deployments continuing. Measurement areas included various parts of the Atlantic Ocean, the Northern and Southern Pacific Ocean, the South Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean, the Arctic Ocean and inland seas. MAN deploys Microtops handheld sunphotometers and utilizes a calibration procedure and data processing traceable to AERONET. Data collection included areas that previously had no aerosol optical depth (AOD) coverage at all, particularly vast areas of the Southern Ocean. The MAN data archive provides a valuable resource for aerosol studies in maritime environments. In the current paper we present results of AOD measurements over the oceans, and make a comparison with satellite AOD retrievals and model simulations.

  20. Aerosol classification from airborne HSRL and comparisons with the CALIPSO vertical feature mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol classification products from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1 on the NASA B200 aircraft are compared with coincident V3.01 aerosol classification products from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the CALIPSO satellite. For CALIOP, aerosol classification is a key input to the aerosol retrieval, and must be inferred using aerosol loading-dependent observations and location information. In contrast, HSRL-1 makes direct measurements of aerosol intensive properties, including the lidar ratio, that provide information on aerosol type. In this study, comparisons are made for 109 underflights of the CALIOP orbit track. We find that 62% of the CALIOP marine layers and 54% of the polluted continental layers agree with HSRL-1 classification results. In addition, 80% of the CALIOP desert dust layers are classified as either dust or dusty mix byHSRL-1. However, agreement is less for CALIOP smoke (13% and polluted dust (35% layers. Specific case studies are examined, giving insight into the performance of the CALIOP aerosol type algorithm. In particular, we find that the CALIOP polluted dust type is overused due to an attenuation-related depolarization bias. Furthermore, the polluted dust type frequently includes mixtures of dust plus marine aerosol. Finally, we find that CALIOP's identification of internal boundaries between different aerosol types in contact with each other frequently do not reflect the actual transitions between aerosol types accurately. Based on these findings, we give recommendations which may help to improve the CALIOP aerosol type algorithms.

  1. Source strength of fungal spore aerosolization from moldy building material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, Rafa L.; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Willeke, Klaus [Cincinnati Univ., Dept. of Environmental Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The release of Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides, and Penicillium melinii spores from agar and ceiling tile surfaces was tested under different controlled environmental conditions using a newly designed and constructed aerosolization chamber. This study revealed that all the investigated parameters, such as fungal species, air velocity above the surface, texture of the surface, and vibration of contaminated material, affected the fungal spore release. It was found that typical indoor air currents can release up to 200 spores cm {sup -2} from surface with fungal spores during 30-min experiments. The release of fungal spores from smooth agar surfaces was found to be inadequate for accurately predicting the emission from rough ceiling tile surfaces because the air turbulence increases the spore release from a rough surface. A vibration of a frequency of 1Hz at a power level of 14W resulted in a significant increase in the spore release rate. The release appears to depend on the morphology of the fungal colonies grown on ceiling tile surfaces including the thickness of conidiophores, the length of spore chains, and the shape of spores. The spores were found to be released continuously during each 30-min experiment. However, the release rate was usually highest during the first few minutes of exposure to air currents and mechanical vibration. About 71-88% of the spores released during a 30-min interval became airborne during the first 10min. (Author)

  2. Aerosol classification from airborne HSRL and comparisons with the CALIPSO vertical feature mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol classification products from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1 on the NASA B200 aircraft are compared with coincident V3.01 aerosol classification products from the CALIOP instrument on the CALIPSO satellite. For CALIOP, aerosol classification is a key input to the aerosol retrieval, and must be inferred using aerosol loading-dependent observations and location information. In contrast, HSRL-1 makes direct measurements of aerosol intensive properties, including the lidar ratio, that provide information on aerosol type. In this study, comparisons are made for 109 underflights of the CALIOP orbit track. We find that 62% of the CALIOP marine layers and 54% of the polluted continental layers agree with HSRL-1 classification results. In addition, 80% of the CALIOP desert dust layers are classified as either dust or dusty mix by HSRL-1. However, agreement is less for CALIOP smoke (13% and polluted dust (35% layers. Specific case studies are examined, giving insight into the performance of the CALIOP aerosol type algorithm. In particular, we find that the CALIOP polluted dust type is overused due to an attenuation-related depolarization bias. Furthermore, the polluted dust type frequently includes mixtures of dust plus marine aerosol. Finally, we find that CALIOP's identification of internal boundaries between different aerosol types in contact with each other frequently do not reflect the actual transitions between aerosol types accurately. Based on these findings, we give recommendations which may help to improve the CALIOP aerosol type algorithms.

  3. Comparison of aerosol and bioaerosol collection on air filters

    OpenAIRE

    Miaskiewicz-Peska, Ewa; Lebkowska, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Air filters efficiency is usually determined by non-biological test aerosols, such as potassium chloride particles, Arizona dust or di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate (DEHS) oily liquid. This research was undertaken to asses, if application of non-biological aerosols reflects air filters capacity to collect particles of biological origin. The collection efficiency for non-biological aerosol was tested with the PALAS set and ISO Fine Test Dust. Flow rate during the filtration process was 720 l/h, and par...

  4. Ceilometer for aerosol profiling: comparison with the multiwavelength in the frame of INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, Fabio; Vande Hey, Joshua; Rosoldi, Marco; Amato, Francesco; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    project. This work is the first time that three different commercial ceilometers with an advanced Raman lidar are compared over a period of six months. The comparison of the attenuated backscatter profiles from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar and three ceilometers (CHM15k, CS135s, CT25K) reveals differences due to the expected discrepancy in the SNR but also due to effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the short and mid-term stability of ceilometer calibration. A large instability of ceilometers in the incomplete overlap region has also been observed, making the use of a single overlap correction function for the whole duration of the campaign critical. Therefore, technological improvements of ceilometers towards their operational use in the monitoring of the atmospheric aerosol in the low and free troposphere are needed.

  5. Comparison between CARIBIC aerosol samples analysed by accelerator-based methods and optical particle counter measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Martinsson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9–12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS, the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT and the tropical mid troposphere (MT were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with accelerator-based methods particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA. Data from 48 flights during one year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  6. Nano-sized aerosol classification, collection and analysis--method development using dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Axel; Buckett, Mary I; Japuntich, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a methodical approach for generating, collecting, and analyzing nano-size (1-100 nm) aerosol from abraded dental composite materials. Existing aerosol sampling instruments were combined with a custom-made sampling chamber to create and sample a fresh, steady-state aerosol size distribution before significant Brownian coagulation. Morphological, size, and compositional information was obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). To create samples sizes suitable for TEM analysis, aerosol concentrations in the test chamber had to be much higher than one would typically expect in a dental office, and therefore, these results do not represent patient or dental personnel exposures. Results show that nano-size aerosol was produced by the dental drill alone, with and without cooling water drip, prior to abrasion of dental composite. During abrasion, aerosol generation seemed independent of the percent filler load of the restorative material and the operator who generated the test aerosol. TEM investigation showed that "chunks" of filler and resin were generated in the nano-size range; however, free nano-size filler particles were not observed. The majority of observed particles consisted of oil droplets, ash, and graphitic structures.

  7. SPATIAL INTERPOLATION OF AEROSOL OPTICAL DEPTH POLLUTION: COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AEROSOL DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Safarpour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a growing problem arising from domestic heating, high density of vehicle traffic, electricity production, and expanding commercial and industrial activities, all increasing in parallel with urban population. Monitoring and forecasting of air quality parameters are important due to health impact. One widely available metric of aerosol abundance is the aerosol optical depth (AOD. The AOD is the integrated light extinction coefficient over a vertical atmospheric column of unit cross section, which represents the extent to which the aerosols in that vertical profile prevent the transmission of light by absorption or scattering. Seasonal aerosol optical depth (AOD values at 550 nm derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor onboard NASA’s Terra satellites, for the 10 years period of 2000 - 2010 were used to test 7 different spatial interpolation methods in the present study. The accuracy of estimations was assessed through visual analysis as well as independent validation based on basic statistics, such as root mean square error (RMSE and correlation coefficient. Based on the RMSE and R values of predictions made using measured values from 2000 to 2010, Radial Basis Functions (RBFs yielded the best results for spring, summer and winter and ordinary kriging yielded the best results for fall.

  8. Comparison of five bacteriophages as models for viral aerosol studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2014-07-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  9. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val. PMID:28198389

  10. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  11. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O'Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-15

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  12. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated {sup 131}I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to

  13. Inactivation of Aerosolized Biological Agents using Filled Nanocomposite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ekte N NIF == 0 (3.6) Thus, for two tests, in which identical aerosolized virions were exposed to dry heat during time intervals of te1 and te2...anthracis surrogate embedded in building decontamination residue bundles. Environ. Sci. Technol. 42: 5712-5717. www.omega.com/temperature/Z/ pdf ...z088-089. pdf , Table of Total Emissivity, pp. Z-88 – Z89, accessed on August 17, 2009. Zamenhof, S. (1960). Effects of heating dry bacteria and spores

  14. Comparison of aerosol and bioaerosol collection on air filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaskiewicz-Peska, Ewa; Lebkowska, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Air filters efficiency is usually determined by non-biological test aerosols, such as potassium chloride particles, Arizona dust or di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate (DEHS) oily liquid. This research was undertaken to asses, if application of non-biological aerosols reflects air filters capacity to collect particles of biological origin. The collection efficiency for non-biological aerosol was tested with the PALAS set and ISO Fine Test Dust. Flow rate during the filtration process was 720 l/h, and particles size ranged 0.246-17.165 μm. The upstream and downstream concentration of the aerosol was measured with a laser particle counter PCS-2010. Tested bioaerosol contained 4 bacterial strains of different shape and size: Micrococcus luteus,Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. Number of the biological particles was estimated with a culture-based method. Results obtained with bioaerosol did not confirmed 100% filters efficiency noted for the mineral test dust of the same aerodynamic diameter. Maximum efficiency tested with bacterial cells was 99.8%. Additionally, cells reemission from filters into air was also studied. Bioaerosol contained 3 bacterial strains: Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. It was proved that the highest intensity of the reemission process was during the first 5 min. and reached maximum 0.63% of total number of bacteria retained in filters. Spherical cells adhered stronger to the filter fibres than cylindrical ones. It was concluded that non-biological aerosol containing particles of the same shape and surface characteristics (like DEHS spherical particles) can not give representative results for all particles present in the filtered air.

  15. Comparison of Observed and Modeled Regional Scale Aerosol Characteristics for ACE-ASIA and TRACE-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Carmichael, G.; Tang, Y.; McNaughton, C.

    2002-12-01

    During spring of 2001 we measured aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties for Asian aerosol with our similar instrument sets [University of Hawaii] from two aircraft - the NASA P3-B (TRACE-P) and NSF C-130 (ACE-ASIA). Observed aerosol characteristics included aerosol number concentration, measured with Ultrafine Condensation Nuclei counter (UCN) and CN counters; size distributions, obtained from a radial differential mobility analyzer (RDMA), a laser optical particle counter (OPC), aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and wing mounted probes; aerosol light scattering and absorption obtained from nephelometers and a Particle Soot Absorption Photometers (PSAP). On the C-130 a dry and humidified nephelometer was operated to measure humidity dependence of aerosol light scattering, f(RH). Size distributions and number concentrations were measured with thermal aerosol volatilization to infer particles volatility and refractory properties linked to dust and soot aerosol components. Here we compare these observations to results from the University of Iowa CFORS/STEM model of related aerosol characteristics during these measurement periods. This model includes a wide variety of aerosol chemical and optical properties - black and organic carbon (BC and OC), dust, sulfate concentrations and calculated aerosol optical depth. This comparison is based not only on case studies bur also on regional scale air mass characterization. To facilitate this comparison a set of scatter "signature" plots of measured aerosol parameters like f(RH) vs. fractional submicron aerosol surface area or submicron refractory volume vs. total aerosol absorption is used. This approach generates clusters of data characteristics for different air masses. The model shows a high degree of consistency in identifying the main features of biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, and dust events. This combination of measured and modeled aerosol parameters is shown to be valuable in quantifying the

  16. MISR Global Aerosol Product Assessment by Comparison with AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Garay, Michael J.; Diner, David J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical approach is used to assess the quality of the MISR Version 22 (V22) aerosol products. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval results are improved relative to the early post- launch values reported by Kahn et al. [2005a], varying with particle type category. Overall, about 70% to 75% of MISR AOD retrievals fall within 0.05 or 20% AOD of the paired validation data, and about 50% to 55% are within 0.03 or 10% AOD, except at sites where dust, or mixed dust and smoke, are commonly found. Retrieved particle microphysical properties amount to categorical values, such as three groupings in size: "small," "medium," and "large." For particle size, ground-based AERONET sun photometer Angstrom Exponents are used to assess statistically the corresponding MISR values, which are interpreted in terms of retrieved size categories. Coincident Single-Scattering Albedo (SSA) and fraction AOD spherical data are too limited for statistical validation. V22 distinguishes two or three size bins, depending on aerosol type, and about two bins in SSA (absorbing vs. non-absorbing), as well as spherical vs. non-spherical particles, under good retrieval conditions. Particle type sensitivity varies considerably with conditions, and is diminished for mid-visible AOD below about 0.15 or 0.2. Based on these results, specific algorithm upgrades are proposed, and are being investigated by the MISR team for possible implementation in future versions of the product.

  17. CALIOP and AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth Comparisons: One Size Fits None

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, A. H.; Winker, D. M.; Tackett, J. L.; Giles, D. M.; Kar, J.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M. A.; Powell, K. A.; Trepte, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the aerosol optical depths (AOD) retrieved from backscatter measurements of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite with coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. Overpass coincidence criteria of +/- 2 h and within a 40 km radius are satisfied at least once at 149 globally distributed AERONET sites from 2006 to 2010. Most data pairs (>80%) use AERONET measurements acquired +/- 30 min of the overpass. We examine the differences in AOD estimates between CALIOP and AERONET for various aerosol, environmental, and geographic conditions. Results show CALIOP AOD are lower than AERONET AOD especially at low optical depths as measured by AERONET (500 nm AOD0.1. Differences in AOD between CALIOP and AERONET are possibly due to cloud contamination, scene inhomogeneity, instrument view angle differences, CALIOP retrieval errors, and detection limits. Comparison of daytime to nighttime number of 5 km 60m (60m in the vertical) features detected by CALIOP show that there are 20% more aerosol features at night. We find that CALIPSO and AERONET do not agree on the cloudiness of scenes. Of the scenes that meet the above coincidence criteria, CALIPSO finds clouds in more than 45% of the coincident atmospheric columns AERONET classifies as clear.

  18. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Sheridan

    2012-12-01

    lidar. In this study, aerosol layers with light extinction (532 nm values > 50 Mm−1 were detected by CALIPSO ~ 95% of the time, while aerosol layers with extinction values lower than 10 Mm−1 had a detection efficiency of < 2%. For all collocated comparison cases, a 50% probability of detection falls at an in situ extinction level of 20–25 Mm−1. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  19. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffi, Brigitte [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Schulz, Michael [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Bréon, François-Marie [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Dentener, Frank [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Steensen, Birthe Marie [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Griesfeller, Jan [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Winker, David [NASA Langley Research Center, MS/475, Hampton Virginia USA; Balkanski, Yves [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Bauer, Susanne E. [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Bellouin, Nicolas [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Berntsen, Terje [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Bian, Huisheng [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore Country Maryland USA; Chin, Mian [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Diehl, Thomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Easter, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hauglustaine, Didier A. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Iversen, Trond [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Kirkevåg, Alf [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at University of Wyoming, Laramie Wyoming USA; Lohmann, Ulrike [ETH-Zentrum, Zürich Switzerland; Myhre, Gunnar [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Rasch, Phil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Seland, Øyvind [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Skeie, Ragnhild B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Steenrod, Stephen D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Stier, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford UK; Tackett, Jason [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Takemura, Toshihiko [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Tsigaridis, Kostas [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Now at National Institute for Agronomic Research, Thiverval-Grignon France; Yoon, Jinho [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju Korea; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  20. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  1. Measurement of fine particulate matter nonvolatile and semi-volatile organic material with the Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Brett D; Kleinman, Michael; Eatough, Norman L; Eatough, Delbert J; Cary, Robert A; Hopke, Philip K; Wilson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic material (SVOM) in fine particles is not reliably measured with conventional semicontinuous carbon monitors because SVOM is lost from the collection media during sample collection. We have modified a Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor to allow for the determination of SVOM. In a conventional Sunset monitor, gas-phase organic compounds are removed in the sampled airstream by a diffusion denuder employing charcoal-impregnated cellulose filter (CIF) surfaces. Subsequently, particles are collected on a quartz filter and the instrument then determines both the organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions of the aerosol using a thermal/optical method. However, some of the SVOM is lost from the filter during collection, and therefore is not determined. Because the interfering gas-phase organic compounds are removed before aerosol collection, the SVOM can be determined by filtering the particles at the instrument inlet and then replacing the quartz filter in the monitor with a charcoal-impregnated glass fiber filter (CIG), which retains the SVOM lost from particles collected on the inlet filter. The resulting collected SVOM is then determined in the analysis step by measurement of the carbonaceous material thermally evolved from the CIG filter. This concept was tested during field studies in February 2003 in Lindon, UT, and in July 2003 in Rubidoux, CA. The results obtained were validated by comparison with Particle Concentrator-Brigham Young University Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS) results. The sum of nonvolatile organic material determined with a conventional Sunset monitor and SVOM determined with the modified Sunset monitor agree with the PC-BOSS results. Linear regression analysis of total carbon concentrations determined by the PC-BOSS and the Sunset resulted in a zero-intercept slope of 0.99 +/- 0.02 (R2 = 0.92) and a precision of sigma = +/- 1.5 microg C/m3 (8%).

  2. Future aerosol emissions: a multi-model comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rao, Shilpa; Riahi, Keywan; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, Page

    2016-08-02

    This paper compares projections over the 21st century of SO2, BC, and OC emissions from three technologically detailed, long-term integrated assessment models. The character of the projections and the response of emissions due to a comprehensive climate policy are discussed. In a continuation of historical experience, aerosol and precursor emissions are increasingly decoupled from carbon dioxide emissions over the 21st century. Implementation of a comprehensive climate policy further reduces emissions, although there is significant variation in this response by sector and by model. Differences in model responses can be traced to specific characteristics of reference case end-use and supply-side technology deployment and emissions control assumptions, which are detailed by sector.

  3. Southeast Atlantic Ocean aerosol direct radiative effects over clouds: Comparison of observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, M.; Haywood, J.; Bellouin, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2017-02-01

    Absorbing aerosols exert a warming or a cooling effect on the Earth's system, depending on the circumstances. The direct radiative effect (DRE) of absorbing aerosols is negative (cooling) at the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) over a dark surface like the ocean, as the aerosols increase the planetary albedo, but it is positive (warming) over bright backgrounds like clouds. Furthermore, radiation absorption by aerosols heat the atmosphere locally, and, through rapid adjustments of the atmospheric column and cloud dynamics, the net effect can be amplified considerably. We developed a technique to study the absorption of radiation of smoke over low lying clouds using satellite spectrometry. The TOA DRE of smoke over clouds is large and positive over the southeast Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Africa, which can be explained by the large decrease of reflected radiation by a polluted cloud, especially in the UV. However, general circulation models (GCMs) fail to reproduce these strong positive DRE, and in general GCMs disagree on the magnitude and even sign of the aerosol DRE in the southeast Atlantic region. Our satellite-derived DRE measurements show clear seasonal and inter-annual variations, consistent with other satellite measurements, which are not reproduced by GCMs. A comparison with model results showed discrepancies with the Ångström exponent of the smoke aerosols, which is larger than assumed in simulations, and a sensitivity to emission scenarios. However, this was not enough to explain the discrepancies, and we suspect that the modeling of cloud distributions and microphysics will have the necessary larger impact on DRE that will explain the differences between observations and modeling.

  4. Tropospheric aerosol microphysics simulation with assimilated meteorology: model description and intermodel comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Trivitayanurak

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We implement the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS microphysics module into GEOS-CHEM, a CTM driven by assimilated meteorology. TOMAS has 30 size sections covering 0.01–10 μm diameter with conservation equations for both aerosol mass and number. The implementation enables GEOS-CHEM to simulate aerosol microphysics, size distributions, mass and number concentrations. The model system is developed for sulfate and sea-salt aerosols, a year-long simulation has been performed, and results are compared to observations. Additionally model intercomparison was carried out involving global models with sectional microphysics: GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP. Comparison with marine boundary layer observations of CN and CCN(0.2% shows that all models perform well with average errors of 30–50%. However, all models underpredict CN by up to 42% between 15° S and 45° S while overpredicting CN up to 52% between 45° N and 60° N, which could be due to the sea-salt emission parameterization and the assumed size distribution of primary sulfate emission, in each case respectively. Model intercomparison at the surface shows that GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP, each compared against GEOS-CHEM, both predict 40% higher CN and predict 20% and 30% higher CCN(0.2% on average, respectively. Major discrepancies are due to different emission inventories and transport. Budget comparison shows GEOS-CHEM predicts the lowest global CCN(0.2% due to microphysical growth being a factor of 2 lower than other models because of lower SO2 availability. These findings stress the need for accurate meteorological inputs and updated emission inventories when evaluating global aerosol microphysics models.

  5. Comparison of activity coefficient models for atmospheric aerosols containing mixtures of electrolytes, organics, and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chinghang; Clegg, Simon L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Atmospheric aerosols generally comprise a mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Determining the gas-particle distribution of volatile compounds, including water, requires equilibrium or mass transfer calculations, at the heart of which are models for the activity coefficients of the particle-phase components. We evaluate here the performance of four recent activity coefficient models developed for electrolyte/organic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols. Two of the models, the CSB model [Clegg, S.L., Seinfeld, J.H., Brimblecombe, P., 2001. Thermodynamic modelling of aqueous aerosols containing electrolytes and dissolved organic compounds. Journal of Aerosol Science 32, 713-738] and the aerosol diameter dependent equilibrium model (ADDEM) [Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G.B., Coe, H., 2005. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: part 2—including organic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 1223-1242] treat ion-water and organic-water interactions but do not include ion-organic interactions; these can be referred to as "decoupled" models. The other two models, reparameterized Ming and Russell model 2005 [Raatikainen, T., Laaksonen, A., 2005. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2475-2495] and X-UNIFAC.3 [Erdakos, G.B., Change, E.I., Pandow, J.F., Seinfeld, J.H., 2006. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 3: Organic compounds, water, and ionic constituents by consideration of short-, mid-, and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.3. Atmospheric Environment 40, 6437-6452], include ion-organic interactions; these are referred to as "coupled" models. We address the question—Does the inclusion of a treatment of ion-organic interactions substantially improve the performance of the coupled models over

  6. Online Simulations of Global Aerosol Distributions in the NASA GEOS-4 Model and Comparisons to Satellite and Ground-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a module for tropospheric aerosols (GO CART) online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 model and simulated global aerosol distributions for the period 2000-2006. The new online system offers several advantages over the previous offline version, providing a platform for aerosol data assimilation, aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction studies, and short-range chemical weather forecasting and climate prediction. We introduce as well a methodology for sampling model output consistently with satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals to facilitate model-satellite comparison. Our results are similar to the offline GOCART model and to the models participating in the AeroCom intercomparison. The simulated AOT has similar seasonal and regional variability and magnitude to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations. The model AOT and Angstrom parameter are consistently low relative to AERONET in biomass-burning-dominated regions, where emissions appear to be underestimated, consistent with the results of the offline GOCART model. In contrast, the model AOT is biased high in sulfate-dominated regions of North America and Europe. Our model-satellite comparison methodology shows that diurnal variability in aerosol loading is unimportant compared to sampling the model where the satellite has cloud-free observations, particularly in sulfate-dominated regions. Simulated sea salt burden and optical thickness are high by a factor of 2-3 relative to other models, and agreement between model and satellite over-ocean AOT is improved by reducing the model sea salt burden by a factor of 2. The best agreement in both AOT magnitude and variability occurs immediately downwind of the Saharan dust plume.

  7. Some implications of sampling choices on comparisons between satellite and model aerosol optical depth fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The comparison of satellite and model aerosol optical depth (AOD fields provides useful information on the strengths and weaknesses of both. However, the sampling of satellite and models is very different and some subjective decisions about data selection and aggregation must be made in order to perform such comparisons. This work examines some implications of these decisions, using GlobAerosol AOD retrievals at 550 nm from Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR measurements, and aerosol fields from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model. It is recommended to sample the model only where the satellite flies over on a particular day; neglecting this can cause regional differences in model AOD of up to 0.1 on monthly and annual timescales. The comparison is observed to depend strongly upon thresholds for sparsity of satellite retrievals in the model grid cells. Requiring at least 25% coverage of the model grid cell by satellite data decreases the observed difference between the two by approximately half over land. The impact over ocean is smaller. In both model and satellite datasets, there is an anticorrelation between the proportion p of a model grid cell covered by satellite retrievals and the AOD. This is attributed to small p typically occuring due to high cloud cover and lower AODs being found in large clear-sky regions. Daily median AATSR AODs were found to be closer to GEOS-Chem AODs than daily means (with the root mean squared difference being approximately 0.05 smaller. This is due to the decreased sensitivity of medians to outliers such as cloud-contaminated retrievals, or aerosol point sources not included in the model.

  8. Characterization of ambient aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry – Part I: quantification, shape-related collection efficiency, and comparison with collocated instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Salcedo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS was deployed at the CENICA Supersite, while another was deployed in the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003 from 31 March–4 May 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. This is the first of a series of papers reporting the AMS results from this campaign. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 µm (NR-PM1 with high time and size-resolution. For the first time, we report field results from a beam width probe, which was used to study the shape and mixing state of the particles and to quantify potential losses of irregular particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS. Data from this probe show that no significant amount of irregular particles was lost due to excessive beam broadening. A comparison of the CENICA and AML AMSs measurements is presented, being the first published intercomparison between two quadrupole AMSs. The speciation, and mass concentrations reported by the two AMSs compared relatively well. The differences found are likely due to the different inlets used in both instruments. In order to account for the refractory material in the aerosol, we also present measurements of Black Carbon (BC using an aethalometer and an estimate of the aerosol soil component obtained from Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectrometry (PIXE analysis of impactor substrates. Comparisons of AMS + BC + soil mass concentration with other collocated particle instruments (a LASAIR Optical Particle Counter, a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM and a DustTrak Aerosol Monitor are also presented. The comparisons show that the AMS + BC + soil mass concentration during MCMA-2003 is a good approximation to the total PM2.5 mass concentration.

  9. Comparison of virulence of different Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes using an aerosol infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Mariann Juul; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Nielsen, Ragnhild

    1996-01-01

    An aerosol infection model for inoculation of pigs with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is described, With this model the virulence of three A. pleuropneumoniae biotype 1 strains representing serotypes 2, 5b and 6, and one Danish biotype 2 were compared using 13-week-old pigs for inoculation...... lesions was 10(9) CFU/ml. Repeated experiments confirmed these results showing similar virulence of serotypes 2, 5b and 6 whereas the biotype 2 strain proved less virulent, The aerosol infection model allowed a comparison of the number of A. pleuropneumoniae CFU/liter air which were necessary to induce...... lung lesions in susceptible pigs, This indicates that the model will be well suited for virulence studies of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes in pigs....

  10. Comparison of the DiSCmini aerosol monitor to a handheld condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jessica B; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride [NaCl] and spark-generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, 10(4) particles/cm(3)). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared with those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 16% of those measured by the CPC for polydispersed aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (±35% for most tests and +101% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm, but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resources: manufacturer-reported capabilities of instruments used, and information from the SMPS measurements for polydispersed test particles.].

  11. MODIS 3 km and 10 km aerosol optical depth for China: Evaluation and comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingqing; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Bo; Tong, Xuelian

    2017-03-01

    The recently released Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Collection 6 introduced a fine scale aerosol optical depth (AOD) distribution, the 3 km product, which is expected to perform well in analyzing aerosols and identifying local air pollution, especially in the severely polluted atmosphere of China. However, few detailed evaluations of regional variations have been conducted. In this paper, we evaluate MODIS 3 km and 10 km AOD products for China against ground-based measurements and compare their performance with respect to spatial and temporal variations. The ground validations indicate that the two products are generally correlated well to ground-based observations. Spatially, the 3 km product slightly outperform the 10 km product in well-developed areas of southern China. Temporally, both products perform worse during spring and summer. Atmospheric clouds and underlying surface are two key factors that influence the accuracy and number of retrievals for both products. The comparison analysis reveals the newly introduced AOD product clearly shows good relationships with the coarse resolution retrievals in spatial and temporal variation but significant differences regarding details. The 3 km AOD product provides better aerosol gradients, more retrievals in bare areas of western China and some spikes of diurnal variation in cloudy days. Seasonal comparisons show the 3 km AOD product is higher than the 10 km product in all seasons, especially during spring and summer. Although the 3 km product for China generally performs slightly worse than the 10 km product, the added information of the MODIS 3 km AOD product shows potential for studying local aerosol characterization, and may facilitate studies of air pollution.

  12. Analysis of marine aerosol optical depth retrieved from IRS-P4 OCM sensor and comparison with the aerosol derived from SeaWiFS and MODIS sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mishra; V K Dadhwal; C B S Dutt

    2008-07-01

    Aerosol optical depth is regularly derived from SeaWiFS and MODIS sensor and used by the scientific community in various climatic studies. In the present study an attempt has been made to retrieve the aerosol optical depth using the IRS-P4 OCM sensor data and a comparison has been carried out using few representative datasets. The results show that the IRS-P4 OCM retrieved aerosol optical depth is in good agreement with the aerosols retrieved from SeaWiFS as well as MODIS. The RMSE are found to be ± 0.0522 between OCM and SeaWIFS and ± 0.0638 between OCM and MODIS respectively. However, IRS-P4 OCM sensor retrieved aerosol optical depth is closer to SeaWiFS (correlation = 0.88, slope = 0.96 and intercept = −0.013) compared to MODIS (correlation = 0.75, slope = 0.91 and intercept = 0.0198). The mean percentage difference indicates that OCM retrieved AOD is +12% higher compared to SeaWiFS and +8% higher compared to MODIS. The mean absolute percentage between OCM derived AOD and SeaWiFS is found to be less (16%) compared to OCM and MODIS (20%).

  13. SAGE III aerosol extinction validation in the Arctic winter: comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10–20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020 nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of ~30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  14. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  15. Size distribution of aerosol particles: comparison between agricultural and industrial areas in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, M.T.Y.; Madkour, M. [Mansoura Univ., Physics Dept., Mansoura (Egypt); Elmetwally, M. [Egyptian Meteorological Authority, Abbasyia-Cairo (Egypt)

    1999-07-01

    Mie theory has been used in this work to obtain a theoretical calculation of the size distribution of aerosol particles by using tabulated mean of the Angstrom wavelength exponent {alpha}{sub o}. Comparison was done between an industrial polluted area (Helwan, which is a neighbor to Cairo city), and an agricultural relatively unpolluted area (Mansoura, about 140 km from Cairo). The results show that the size distribution obeys the Junge power law. The size of particles in the polluted area is larger than that in the unpolluted area. (Author)

  16. Ground-based aerosol optical depth inter-comparison campaigns at European EUSAAR super-sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyeki, S.; Gröbner, J.; Wehrli, C.

    2013-05-01

    This work summarizes eight aerosol optical depth (AOD) inter-comparison campaigns conducted during the 2008-2011 period. A PFR (precision filter radiometer) travelling standard from the GAW-PFR network (based at PMOD/WRC, Switzerland) was run alongside existing CIMEL sun-photometers from the PHOTONS/AERONET network located at European stations. Basic statistical analysis of coincident measurements at λ = 500 and 862 nm illustrated good agreement. However, when WMO criteria for traceability were applied only one wavelength at three stations was traceable. Other stations were close to being traceable but had slight issues with window cleanliness and calibration.

  17. Atmospheric aerosol compositions in China: spatial/temporal variability, chemical signature, regional haze distribution and comparisons with global aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From 2006 to 2007, the daily concentrations of major inorganic water-soluble constituents, mineral aerosol, organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in ambient PM10 samples were investigated from 16 urban, rural and remote sites in various regions of China, and were compared with global aerosol measurements. A large difference between urban and rural chemical species was found, normally with 1.5 to 2.5 factors higher in urban than in rural sites. Optically-scattering aerosols, such as sulfate (~16%, OC (~15%, nitrate (~7%, ammonium (~5% and mineral aerosol (~35% in most circumstance, are majorities of the total aerosols, indicating a dominant scattering feature of aerosols in China. Of the total OC, ~55%–60% can be attributed to the formation of the secondary organic carbon (SOC. The absorbing aerosol EC only accounts for ~3.5% of the total PM10. Seasonally, maximum concentrations of most aerosol species were found in winter while mineral aerosol peaks in spring. In addition to the regular seasonal maximum, secondary peaks were found for sulfate and ammonium in summer and for OC and EC in May and June. This can be considered as a typical seasonal pattern in various aerosol components in China. Aerosol acidity was normally neutral in most of urban areas, but becomes some acidic in rural areas. Based on the surface visibility observations from 681 meteorological stations in China between 1957 and 2005, four major haze areas are identified with similar visibility changes, namely, (1 Hua Bei Plain in N. China, and the Guanzhong Plain; (2 E. China with the main body in the Yangtze River Delta area; (3 S. China with most areas of Guangdong and the Pearl River Delta area; (4 The Si Chuan Basin in S.W. China. The degradation of visibility in these areas is linked with the emission changes and high PM concentrations. Such quantitative chemical characterization of aerosols is essential in assessing their role in atmospheric

  18. Simulating aerosol microphysics with the ECHAM/MADE GCM – Part I: Model description and comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lauer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol dynamics module MADE has been coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM4 to simulate the chemical composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present publication describes the new model system ECHAM4/MADE and presents model results in comparison with observations. The new model is able to simulate the full life cycle of particulate matter and various gaseous particle precursors including emissions of primary particles and trace gases, advection, convection, diffusion, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and size-dependent dry and wet deposition. Aerosol components considered are sulfate (SO4, ammonium (NH4, nitrate (NO3, black carbon (BC, particulate organic matter (POM, sea salt, mineral dust, and aerosol liquid water. The model is numerically efficient enough to allow long term simulations, which is an essential requirement for application in general circulation models. Since the current study is focusing on the submicrometer aerosol, a coarse mode is not being simulated. The model is run in a passive mode, i.e. no feedbacks between the MADE aerosols and clouds or radiation are considered yet. This allows the investigation of the effect of aerosol dynamics, not interfered by feedbacks of the altered aerosols on clouds, radiation, and on the model dynamics. In order to evaluate the results obtained with this new model system, calculated mass concentrations, particle number concentrations, and size distributions are compared to observations. The intercomparison shows, that ECHAM4/MADE is able to reproduce the major features of the geographical patterns, seasonal cycle, and vertical distributions of the basic aerosol parameters. In particular, the model performs well under polluted continental conditions in the northern hemispheric lower and middle troposphere. However, in comparatively clean remote areas, e

  19. Simulating aerosol microphysics with the ECHAM/MADE GCM - Part I: Model description and comparison with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, A.; Hendricks, J.; Ackermann, I.; Schell, B.; Hass, H.; Metzger, S.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol dynamics module MADE has been coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM4 to simulate the chemical composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present publication describes the new model system ECHAM4/MADE and presents model results in comparison with observations. The new model is able to simulate the full life cycle of particulate matter and various gaseous particle precursors including emissions of primary particles and trace gases, advection, convection, diffusion, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and size-dependent dry and wet deposition. Aerosol components considered are sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), black carbon (BC), particulate organic matter (POM), sea salt, mineral dust, and aerosol liquid water. The model is numerically efficient enough to allow long term simulations, which is an essential requirement for application in general circulation models. Since the current study is focusing on the submicrometer aerosol, a coarse mode is not being simulated. The model is run in a passive mode, i.e. no feedbacks between the MADE aerosols and clouds or radiation are considered yet. This allows the investigation of the effect of aerosol dynamics, not interfered by feedbacks of the altered aerosols on clouds, radiation, and on the model dynamics. In order to evaluate the results obtained with this new model system, calculated mass concentrations, particle number concentrations, and size distributions are compared to observations. The intercomparison shows, that ECHAM4/MADE is able to reproduce the major features of the geographical patterns, seasonal cycle, and vertical distributions of the basic aerosol parameters. In particular, the model performs well under polluted continental conditions in the northern hemispheric lower and middle troposphere. However, in comparatively clean remote areas, e.g. in the upper

  20. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  1. Social comparison, personal relative deprivation, and materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunji; Callan, Mitchell J; Gheorghiu, Ana I; Matthews, William J

    2017-06-01

    Across five studies, we found consistent evidence for the idea that personal relative deprivation (PRD), which refers to resentment stemming from the belief that one is deprived of deserved outcomes compared to others, uniquely contributes to materialism. In Study 1, self-reports of PRD positively predicted materialistic values over and above socioeconomic status, personal power, self-esteem, and emotional uncertainty. The experience of PRD starts with social comparison, and Studies 2 and 3 found that PRD mediated the positive relation between a tendency to make social comparisons of abilities and materialism. In Study 4, participants who learned that they had less (vs. similar) discretionary income than people like them reported a stronger desire for more money relative to donating more to charity. In Study 5, during a windfall-spending task, participants higher in PRD spent more on things they wanted relative to other spending categories (e.g., paying off debts). © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  2. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  3. Comparison of Aerosol Properties Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program's SGP Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Monache, L

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine under what conditions, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth's surface are representative of aerosol properties within the column of air above the surface. This thesis will use data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) which is the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are made on a routine basis. All flight legs in the one-year period from March 2000-March 2001 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer using an objective mixing height determination technique. The correlations between the aerosol properties measured at the surface and the measured within and above the ABL were then computed. The conclusion of this comparison is that the aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface are representative of values within the ABL, but not within the free atmosphere.

  4. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  5. Characterization of Particle Size Distributions of Powdery Building Material Aerosol Generated by Fluidization and Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Prasauskas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify particle size distributions (PSD of aerosol of powdery building materials commonly used in construction work (cement, chalk, clay, wood sawdust, wood grinding dust, gypsum, hydrated lime, masonry grout, quartz sand, sand and structural lime by two aerosolization methods: fluidization and gravitation. Fluidization and gravitation methods represent industrial activities such as pneumotransportation and unloading. Both particle resuspension mechanisms have been modelled in laboratory conditions. The particle size distributions of resuspended particulate matter from powdery building materials were rather similar identified by both fluidization and gravitation methods, with an exception of wood sawdust and sand. The PM10 fraction ranged between 30% and 87%, PM2.5 from 7% to 28% and PM1.0 from 3% to 7% of the total mass of particulate matter. The highest PM10/PMtotal ratio was calculated for masonry grout - 0.87, and the lowest ratio for quartz sand - 0.30. The highest ratio of PM2.5/PMtotal was calculated for sand - 0.23, the lowest for quartz sand - 0.07. Substantial quantities of PM2.5 were found to be emitted implying a potential threat to human health.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.61.3.1519

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo Derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument with Aerosol Robotic Network Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qi; HONG Yu-Lan

    2012-01-01

    The single-scattering albedo (SSA), which quantifies radiative absorption capability, is an important optical property of aerosols. Ground-based methods have been extensively exploited to determine aerosol SSA but there were no satellite-based SSA measurements available until the advent of advanced remote sensing techniques, such as the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Although the overall accuracy of OMI SSA is estimated to approach 0.1, its regional availability is unclear. Four-year SSA daily measurements from three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites in China (Xianghe, Taihu, and Hong Kong) are chosen to determine the accuracy of OMI SSA in specific locations. The results show that on a global scale, the OMI SSA is systematically higher (with a mean relative bias of 3.5% and a RMS difference of ~0.06) and has poor correlation with the AERONET observations. In the Xianghe, Taihu, and Hong Kong sites, the correlation coefficients are 0.16, 0.47, and 0.44, respectively, suggesting that the distinct qualities of OMI SSA depend on geographic locations and/or dominant aerosol environments. The two types of SSA data yield the best agreement in Taihu and the worst in Hong Kong; the differing behavior is likely caused by varying levels of cloud contamination. The good consistency of the aerosol variation between the two SSA datasets on a seasonal scale is promising. These findings suggest that the current-version OMI SSA product can be applied to qualitatively characterize climatological variations of aerosol properties despite its limited accuracy as an instantaneous measurement.

  7. A-Train Aerosol Observations Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-Sky Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals and calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on the aerosol retrievals to values derived from four models that participated in the latest AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. We find significant inter-model differences, in particular for the aerosol single scattering albedo, which can be evaluated using the multi-sensor A-Train retrievals. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  8. Formation of hydroxyl radicals from photolysis of secondary organic aerosol material

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    K. M. Badali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that OH radicals are formed by photolysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA material formed by terpene ozonolysis. The SOA aerosol is collected on filters, dissolved in water containing a radical trap (benzoic acid, and then exposed to ultraviolet light in a photochemical reactor. The OH formation rates, which are similar for both α-pinene and limonene SOA, are measured from the formation rate of p-hydroxybenzoic acid as measured using offline HPLC analysis. To evaluate whether the OH is formed by photolysis of H2O2 or organic hydroperoxides (ROOH, the peroxide content of the SOA was measured using the horseradish peroxidase-dichlorofluorescein (HRP-DCF assay, which was calibrated using H2O2. The OH formation rates from SOA are five times faster than from the photolysis of H2O2 solutions whose concentrations correspond to the peroxide content of the SOA solutions assuming that the HRP-DCF signal arises from H2O2 alone. The higher rates of OH formation from SOA are likely due to ROOH photolysis. This result is substantiated by photolysis experiments conducted with t-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide which produce over three times more OH than photolysis of equivalent concentrations of H2O2. Relative to the peroxide level in the SOA, the quantum yield for OH generation from α-pinene SOA is 0.8 ± 0.4. This is the first demonstration of an efficient photolytic source of OH in SOA, one that may affect both cloudwater and aerosol chemistry.

  9. Simulating aerosol microphysics with the ECHAM/MADE GCM Part I: Model description and comparison with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, A.; Hendricks, J.; Ackermann, I.; Schell, B.; Hass, H.; Metzger, S.

    2005-09-01

    The aerosol dynamics module MADE has been coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM4 to simulate the chemical composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present publication describes the new model system ECHAM4/MADE and presents model results in comparison with observations. The new model is able to simulate the full life cycle of particulate matter and various gaseous precursors including emissions of primary particles and trace gases, advection, convection, diffusion, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and size-dependent dry and wet deposition. Aerosol components considered are sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), black carbon (BC), particulate organic matter (POM), sea salt, mineral dust, and aerosol liquid water. The model is numerically efficient enough to allow long term simulations, which is an essential requirement for application in general circulation models. In order to evaluate the results obtained with this new model system, calculated mass concentrations, particle number concentrations, and size distributions are compared to observations. The intercomparison shows, that ECHAM4/MADE is able to reproduce the major features of the geographical patterns, seasonal cycle, and vertical distributions of the basic aerosol parameters. In particular, the model performs well under polluted continental conditions in the northern hemispheric lower and middle troposphere. However, in comparatively clean remote areas, e.g. in the upper troposphere or in the southern hemispheric marine boundary layer, the current model version tends to underestimate particle number concentrations.

  10. Comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) determined from UVMRP and AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Manyi; Liu, Chaoshun; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is critically important for a better understanding of how Earth's climate is radiatively forced. To compensate for the conventional satellite observations, several types of ground-based radiometers are operated by AOD measurement programs. This study compares the Bratts Lake climate station's long-term AOD measurements from 1999 to 2012 which are derived from two ground-based programs with high accuracy: the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program. The comparison shows that, in the 14-year period, the AOD values have an excellent agreement at six wavelengths (368, 415, 500, 610, 665, and 860 nm) with varying slopes (ranging from 0.95763 to 1.04089), intercepts (ranging from 0.0219 to 0.03945), correlation coefficients (R) (ranging from 0.82005 to 0.96155), and root mean square errors (RMSE) (ranging from 0.02639 to 0.03663). The correlations of both monthly and hourly averaged AOD measurements are highly consistent for each band. Specifically, the shorter (with larger AOD values) the wavelength is, the better the correlation is. Also, the results show that the peaks of relative errors generally occur in summer each year, and at noon each day. Our analyses suggest that AOD products derived from UVMRP are accurate and can serve as an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD measurements.

  11. Climate Response to Warm Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Comparisons With Direct Aerosol and Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ming, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We employ the NOAA/ GFDL global atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean to investigate the mechanisms and quantitative aspects underlying the radiative perturbations and climate response arising due to cloud-aerosol interactions in low-lying clouds. The aerosol species considered include sulfate, sea-salt and carbonaceous species, whose space-time distributions are determined offline by the MOZART 2 chemistry- transport model based on emissions data. The model's prognostic cloud scheme of liquid water and amount is expanded to include cloud droplet concentration in a way that importantly allows them to be computed using the same large-scale and convective updraft velocity field. The equilibrium response of the model's global climate system to the change in aerosols from pre- industrial to present-day is evaluated, in terms of the forcing applied and the role of the large- and cloud-scale feedback mechanisms. The cloud characteristics simulated are compared against observations, while the model's response is compared with that obtained from using a diagnostic aerosol-cloud relationship to highlight the significance of specific cloud microphysical processes. The spatial distributions of the thermal and hydrologic responses are also compared with those resulting from simulations performed for the pre-industrial to present-day direct aerosol effect. The temperature responses in the low and high latitudes, including changes in the large-scale precipitation pattern, are contrasted with those due to the well-mixed greenhouse gases. The forcing-response relationship is examined for the radiative perturbations investigated, with surface radiative forcing included in these considerations. We finally investigate the concept of linear additivity of the responses in various climate variables for the set of radiative perturbations considered above, extending from the global- and zonal-mean to continental scales.

  12. A global comparison of GEOS-Chem predicted and remotely-sensed mineral dust aerosol optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Johnson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dust aerosol optical depth (AOD and vertical distribution of aerosol extinction predicted by a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem are compared to space-borne data from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO for March 2009 to February 2010. Model-predicted and remotely-sensed AOD/aerosol extinction profiles are compared over six regions where aerosol abundances are dominated by mineral dust. Calculations indicate that over the regions examined in this study (with the exception of Middle Eastern dust sources GEOS-Chem predicts higher AOD values compared to MODIS and MISR. The positive bias is particularly pronounced over the Saharan dust source regions, where model-predicted AOD values are a factor of 2 to 3 higher. The comparison with CALIPSO-derived dust aerosol extinction profiles revealed that the model overestimations of dust abundances over the study regions primarily occur below ~4 km, suggesting excessive emissions of mineral dust and/or uncertainties in dust optical properties. The implementation of a new dust size distribution scheme into GEOS-Chem reduced the yearly-mean positive bias in model-predicted AOD values over the study regions. The results were most noticeable over the Saharan dust source regions where the differences between model-predicted and MODIS/MISR retrieved AOD values were reduced from 0.22 and 0.17 to 0.02 and -0.04, respectively. Our results suggest that positive/negative biases between satellite and model-predicted aerosol extinction values at different altitudes can sometimes even out, giving a false impression for the agreement between remotely-sensed and model-predicted column-integrated AOD data.

  13. Compact Layers of Hybrid Halide Perovskites Fabricated via the Aerosol Deposition Process—Uncoupling Material Synthesis and Layer Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Panzer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the successful fabrication of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layers by the aerosol deposition method (ADM. The layers show high structural purity and compactness, thus making them suitable for application in perovskite-based optoelectronic devices. By using the aerosol deposition method we are able to decouple material synthesis from layer processing. Our results therefore allow for enhanced and easy control over the fabrication of perovskite-based devices, further paving the way for their commercialization.

  14. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 1; Methods and Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Leifer, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured at night by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site in April 1994. These lidar data are used to derive aerosol profiles for altitudes between 0.0 1 5 and 5 km. Since this lidar detects Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen molecules as well as the elastic scattering from molecules and aerosols, it measures both aerosol backscattering and extinction simultaneously. The aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio varied between approximately 30 sr and 75 sr at 351 nm. Aerosol optical thicknesses derived by integrating the lidar profiles of aerosol extinction measured at night between 0. I and 5 km are found to be about 10-40% lower than those measured by a Sun photometer during the day. This difference is attributed to the contribution by stratospheric aerosols not included in the lidar estimates as well as to diurnal differences in aerosol properties and concentrations. Aerosol profiles close to the surface were acquired by pointing the lidar nearly horizontally. Measurements of aerosol scattering from a tower-mounted nephelometer are found to be 40% lower than lidar measurements of aerosol extinction over a wide range of relative humidities even after accounting for the difference in wavelengths. The reasons for this difference are not clear but may be due to the inability of the nephelometer to accurately measure scattering by large particles.

  15. Inter-comparison of lidar and ceilometer retrievals for aerosol and Planetary Boundary Layer profiling over Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tsaknakis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an inter-comparison of two active remote sensors (lidar and ceilometer to determine the mixing layer height and structure of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL and to retrieve tropospheric aerosol vertical profiles over Athens, Greece. This inter-comparison was performed under various strongly different aerosol loads/types (urban air pollution, biomass burning and Saharan dust event, implementing two different lidar systems (one portable Raymetrics S.A. lidar system running at 355 nm and one multi-wavelength Raman lidar system running at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm and one CL31 Vaisala S.A. ceilometer (running at 910 nm. Spectral conversions of the ceilometer's data were performed using the Ångström exponent estimated by ultraviolet multi-filter radiometer (UV-MFR measurements. The inter-comparison was based on two parameters: the mixing layer height determined by the presence of the suspended aerosols and the attenuated backscatter coefficient. Additionally, radiosonde data were used to derive the PBL height. In general, a good agreement was found between the ceilometer and the lidar techniques in both inter-compared parameters in the height range from 500 m to 5000 m, while the limitations of each instrument are also examined.

  16. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and MODIS to AERONET AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 Mass at Bondville, Illinois Stratified by Chemical Composition, RH, Particle Size, and Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. C.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.

    2008-05-01

    The USEPA is interested in using satellite remote sensing data to estimate levels of PM2.5. Here we report on comparisons of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to IMPROVE network PM2.5 mass and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based AOD. Before we compare GASP and MODIS AOD to PM2.5, we first evaluate satellite AOD using the ground-based AERONET measurements and how it varies by aerosol chemical composition and size distribution. We focus attention on the Bondville, Illinois site because there is collocated IMPROVE sampling and an AERONET site. GASP provides aerosol optical depth at 0.55 um using top of atmosphere visible channel radiance measured from GOES east and GOES west. Time resolution is typically every 30 minutes during daylight hours. MODIS provides typically once per day AOD for any given location. The IMPROVE sampler provides a 24-hour integrated sample of PM10 mass, and PM2.5 mass and elemental composition on a one day in three schedule. AERONET provides aerosol optical depth at multiple wavelengths and aerosol size distribution as well as other derived parameters such as Angstrom exponent from ground based daytime measurements. We stratified cases by RH group, major chemical component, size distribution, and season. GOES AOD correlated best with PM2.5 mass during periods with mainly small particles, moderate RH, and sulfate dominated aerosol. It correlated poorly when RH is very high or low, aerosol is primarily organic, and when coarse to fine mass ratio is high. GASP AOD also correlated best with AERONET AOD when particles are mainly fine, suggesting the aerosol model assumptions (e.g. size distribution) may need to be varied geographically for GASP to achieve better AOD results.

  17. Comparison of aerosol optical properties above clouds between POLDER and AeroCom models over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, F.; Bellouin, N.; Waquet, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Mollard, J.; Myhre, G.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tanré, D.; Thieuleux, F.; Zhang, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol properties above clouds have been retrieved over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season 2006 using satellite observations from POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances). From June to October, POLDER has observed a mean Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Thickness (ACAOT) of 0.28 and a mean Above-Clouds Single Scattering Albedo (ACSSA) of 0.87 at 550 nm. These results have been used to evaluate the simulation of aerosols above clouds in five Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART), Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 3 (HadGEM3), European Centre Hamburg Model 5-Hamburg Aerosol Module 2 (ECHAM5-HAM2), Oslo-Chemical Transport Model 2 (OsloCTM2), and Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS)). Most models do not reproduce the observed large aerosol load episodes. The comparison highlights the importance of the injection height and the vertical transport parameterizations to simulate the large ACAOT observed by POLDER. Furthermore, POLDER ACSSA is best reproduced by models with a high imaginary part of black carbon refractive index, in accordance with recent recommendations.

  18. High-performance energy harvester fabricated with aerosol deposited PMN-PT material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. T.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. K.; Wu, W. J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a high-performance piezoelectric energy harvester (EH) fabricated with xPb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)-(l-x)PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) by aerosol deposition method. The result indicates that PMN-PT based EH owns 1.8 times output power which is higher than traditional PbZrxTi1- xO3 (PZT) based EH. In order to compare the output performance of EH fabricated with PMN- PT compared with PZT, the similar thickness of PMN-PT and PZT thin film is deposited on stainless steel subtracted. The experimental results show that PZT-based EH had a maximum output power of 4.65 μW with 1.11 Vp-p output voltage excited at 94.4 Hz under 0.5g base excitation, while the PMN-PT based device has a maximum output power of 8.42 μW with 1.49 Vp-p output voltage at a vibration frequency of 94.8 Hz and the same base excitation level. The volumetric power density was 82.95 μW/mm3 and 48.05 μW/mm3 for the device based on PMN- PT and PZT materials, respectively. All the results demonstrate that PMN-PT has better output performance than PZT.

  19. An In Vitro Aerosolization Efficiency Comparison of Generic and Branded Salbutamol Metered Dose Inhalers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rahimkhani, Saeed Ghanbarzadeh, Ali Nokhodchi, Hamed Hamishehkar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the high rate of pulmonary diseases, respiratory drug delivery systems have been attracted excessive attention for the past decades. Because of limitations and growing drug bill, physicians are encouraged to prescribe generically whenever possible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there was any significant difference in aerosolization performance between a reference brand Salbutamol (A Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs and two generic products (B and C. Methods: The aerosolization performance of MDIs was evaluated by calculating aerosolization indexes including fine particle fraction (FPF, fine particle dose (FPD, geometric standard deviation (GSD and mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD by using the next generation impactor. Results: Although aerosolization indexes of MDI A were superior than the Iranian brands, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: These results verified that generic MDIs deliver similar quantities of Salbutamol to the reference brand and aerosolization performance parameters of generic Salbutamol MDIs did not differ significantly from the reference brand.

  20. A sensitivity analysis of Ring effect to aerosol properties and comparison to satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the sensitivity of satellite observations of the Ring effect (at various wavelengths to atmospheric aerosol properties. Compared to clouds, aerosols have a rather weak influence on the Ring effect, thus the requirements on the accuracy of the measurements and the radiative transfer simulations are high. In this study, we show that for moderate and high aerosol optical depth (AOD, Ring effect observations are sensitive enough to yield information not only on the AOD, but also on the absorbing properties of aerosols and the aerosol layer height. The latter two quantities are especially important for the determination of the radiative effects of aerosols.

    Our investigations are based on observations by the satellite instrument SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT (2004–2008 and on model simulations using the Monte-Carlo radiative transfer model McArtim. In addition to the Ring effect we investigate the impact of aerosols on the absorptions of the oxygen molecule (O2 and dimer (O4 as well as the radiance. In general good consistency between measured and simulated quantities is found. In some cases also systematic differences occurred, which are probably mainly related to the strong polarisation sensitivity of the SCIAMACHY instrument.

    Our study indicates that Ring effect observations have important advantages for aerosol retrievals: they can be analysed with high accuracy in various wavelength ranges; and depending on the wavelength range, they show different sensitivities on aerosol properties like single scattering albedo, optical depth or layer height. The results of this study are of particular interest for future aerosol inversion algorithms for satellite instruments with reduced polarisation sensitivity and smaller ground pixels, capable of measuring the Ring effect with higher accuracy.

  1. Comparison of aerosol properties from the Indian Himalayas and the Indo-Gangetic plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Raatikainen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gual Pahari is a polluted semi-urban background measurement site at the Indo-Gangetic plains close to New Delhi and Mukteshwar is a relatively clean background measurement site at the foothills of the Himalayas about 270 km NE from Gual Pahari and about 2 km above the nearby plains. Two years long data sets including aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as modeled backward trajectories and boundary layer heights were compared. The purpose was to see how aerosol concentrations vary between clean and polluted sites not very far from each other. Specifically, we were exploring the effect of boundary layer evolution on aerosol concentrations. The measurements showed that especially during the coldest winter months, aerosol concentrations are significantly lower in Mukteshwar. On the other hand, the difference is smaller and also the concentration trends are quite similar from April to October. With the exception of the monsoon season, when rains are affecting on aerosol concentrations, clear but practically opposite diurnal cycles are observed. When the lowest daily aerosol concentrations are seen during afternoon hours in Gual Pahari, there is a peak in Mukteshwar aerosol concentrations. In addition to local sources and long-range transport of dust, boundary layer dynamics can explain the observed differences and similarities. When mixing of air masses is limited during the relatively cool winter months, aerosol pollutions are accumulated to the plains, but Mukteshwar is above the pollution layer. When mixing increases in the spring, aerosol concentrations are increased in Mukteshwar and decreased in Gual Pahari. The effect of mixing is also clear in the diurnal concentration cycles. When daytime mixing decreases aerosol concentrations in Gual Pahari, those are increased in Mukteshwar.

  2. A comparison of lidar and balloon-borne particle counter measurements of the stratospheric aerosol 1974-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swissler, T. J.; Hamill, P.; Osborn, M.; Russell, P. B.; McCormick, M. P.

    1982-04-01

    The optical radar measurements considered in the present investigation are those which have been obtained routinely at Hampton, VA (37.1 deg N, 76.3 deg W) since 1974. The dustsonde measurements are those made monthly at Laramie, WY (41.2 deg N, 105 deg W). The extensive data sets acquired with these two instruments during the time period 1974-80 permit a long-term comparison of the two different measurement techniques. The balloon-borne dustsonde pumps ambient air in a well-defined stream through an illuminated chamber where individual aerosol particles scatter light into photodetectors. The optical radar system used in the studies has a ruby laser with a 48-inch Cassegrainian configured telescope mounted on a mobile platform to collect the backscattered laser light. The investigation shows that optical radar measurements, dustsonde measurements, and realistic optical models together give a very consistent picture of stratospheric aerosol behavior.

  3. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity: a comparison between measurements made at three different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.

    The water uptake by fine aerosol particles in the atmosphere has been investigated at three rural National Parks in the United States (Great Smoky Mountains, Grand Canyon and Big Bend National Parks). The relative humidity (RH) of sample aerosols was varied from less than 20% to greater than 90% using Perma Pure drying tubes as the scattering coefficient of the aerosol was measured with a Radiance Research M903 nephelometer. Data from these studies show that growth curves at all the three sites are similar in shape but the magnitude of growth can vary considerably from day to day. The growth curves from Great Smoky Mountains show smooth continuous growth over the entire range of RH, while the growth curves from the Grand Canyon and Big Bend show smooth and continuous growth on some days and deliquescence on other days. Comparing 12-h filter samples of chemical composition data with the aerosol growth curves, we find that higher fractions of soluble inorganic compounds (sulfate and nitrate) produce growth curves of greater magnitude than do higher concentrations of either organic carbon or soil material.

  4. Comparison of solid highlighter materials for thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genest, M.; Forsyth, D.S. [National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: marc.genest@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca; Maldague, X. [Univ. Laval, Electrical and Computing Engienering Dept., Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Bare metal surfaces are difficult to inspect with flash thermography due to the high reflectivity and low emissivity of metal surfaces. Often black paint is used to prepare these surfaces for inspection. The additional time required to apply, dry, and then remove paint after inspection can be a significant barrier to using thermographic inspection techniques in these applications. This paper examines the use of solid 'highlighter' materials instead of paint to provide desirable surface characteristics and ease of use. Both positive pressure and vacuum methods were used to apply a variety of materials to metal test specimens, which were then inspected with a commercial pulsed flash thermography system. A vacuum-applied black latex material provided surface performance close to that of black paint without the extra burden of paint application and removal. (author)

  5. Organic aerosol concentration and composition over Europe: insights from comparison of regional model predictions with aerosol mass spectrometer factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx was applied over Europe focusing on the formation and chemical transformation of organic matter. Three periods representative of different seasons were simulated, corresponding to intensive field campaigns. An extensive set of AMS measurements was used to evaluate the model and, using factor analysis results, gain more insight into the sources and transformations of organic aerosol (OA. Overall, the agreement between predictions and measurements for OA concentration is encouraging with the model reproducing two thirds of the data (daily average mass concentrations within a factor of two. Oxygenated OA (OOA is predicted to contribute 93% to total OA during May, 87% during winter and 96% during autumn with the rest consisting of fresh primary OA (POA. Predicted OOA concentrations compare well with the observed OOA values for all periods with an average fractional error of 0.53 and a bias equal to −0.07 (mean error = 0.9 μg m−3, mean bias = −0.2 μg m−3. The model systematically underpredicts fresh POA in most sites during late spring and autumn (mean bias up to −0.8 μg m−3. Based on results from a source apportionment algorithm running in parallel with PMCAMx, most of the POA originates from biomass burning (fires and residential wood combustion and therefore biomass burning OA is most likely underestimated in the emission inventory. The model performs well at all sites when the PMF-estimated low volatility OOA is compared against the OA with C* ≤ 0.1 μg m−3 and semivolatile OOA against the OA with C* > 0.1 μg m−3 respectively.

  6. Inhibition by sodium cromoglycate of bronchoconstriction stimulated by respiratory heat loss: comparison of pressurised aerosol and powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, K M; Roberts, R; Morris, M M; Hargreave, F E

    1984-01-01

    The protective effect was examined of three doses (2, 10, and 20 mg) of sodium cromoglycate inhaled from a pressurised metered dose inhaler on the response to isocapnic hyperventilation of cold dry air in 10 asthmatic subjects. This was compared with the effect of cromoglycate powder (20 mg) inhaled from a Spincap and with placebo given on two occasions. The medications were inhaled on separate days, in random order and with the use of a double blind double dummy technique, 20 minutes before isocapnic hyperventilation of two fold increasing volumes of air (-15 degrees C, 0% humidity) to produce a 20% fall in the post-treatment FEV1. The response was expressed as the provocative dose of respiratory heat loss required to cause a fall in FEV1 of 15% (PD15, kcal/min). The mean baseline spirometric indices exceeded 85% of predicted normal values on each test day; both placebo treatments reduced the baseline FEV1 by comparison with all active treatments (p less than 0.0001). Comparison of the PD15 on the two placebo days confirmed excellent reproducibility. All doses of cromoglycate shifted the respiratory heat loss dose-response curve to the right of the placebo curve; PD15 after all active treatments exceeded PD15 after placebo (p less than 0.0001). There was no cromoglycate dose-response relationship between the three doses of aerosol (p greater than 0.05), or between any dose of aerosol and powder (p greater than 0.05). It is concluded that cromoglycate aerosol inhaled from a pressurised inhaler in a dose of 2 mg gives the same magnitude of protection against bronchoconstriction stimulated by airway cooling as 20 mg of pressurised aerosol or powder from a Spincap. PMID:6426073

  7. Comparison of methods for the quantification of carbonate carbon in atmospheric PM10 aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Nicole; Schmidl, Christoph; Marr, Iain L.; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    Carbonate carbon (CC) represents an important fraction of atmospheric PM10 along with organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), if specific sources (e.g. street abrasion, construction sites, desert dust) contribute to its composition. However, analytical methods for an easy and unambiguous determination of CC in atmospheric aerosols collected on filter matrices are scarce. We propose here a method for the determination of CC based on a heating pretreatment of the sample to remove OC and EC, followed by a total carbon determination to measure CC. This procedure is used for the correction of EC also determined by a heating pretreatment (Cachier, H., Bremond, M.P., Buat-Ménard, P., 1989. Determination of atmospheric soot carbon with a simple thermal method. Tellus 41B, 379-390) but without previous HCl fumigation, as proposed. Comparison of the carbon remaining after the proposed thermal treatment at 460 °C for 60 min in an oxygen stream showed good correlation for the carbonate carbon derived by calculation from the ionic balance for ambient air and street dust samples. Using the "three step" combustion technique it is now possible to determine OC, EC and CC by the use of a TC analyser in the concentration range of 2-200 μg carbon per sample aliquot, with good precision (3-5% RSD for TC and 5-10% for CC) and accuracy. In ambient air samples from a sampling site in Vienna with elevated PM10 levels ("Liesing") CC values as high as 25% of TC and 27% CO 32-; for street dust samples 32% of TC and 25% CO 32- of total PM10 mass were observed.

  8. A Review on the Study of the Generation of (Nanoparticles Aerosols during the Mechanical Solicitation of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on presenting the forefront of the interdisciplinary studies conceived towards the generation of the wear particles aerosol when materials are subjected to mechanical stresses. Various wear mechanisms and instrumentation involved during stress application and aerosolization of wear particles, as well as particles characterization, measurement, and modeling techniques are presented through the investigation of a series of contextual works which are emphasized on the identification of these aspects. The review is motivated from the fact that understanding mechanisms involved in wear-induced particle generation, both at nano- and at microscale, is important for many applications that involve surfaces sliding over each other due to various potential health aspects. An attempt has been made to explain how the information based on this broad spectrum of subjects discovered in this contribution can be used and improved in order to produce a more resilient, rational, and versatile knowledge base which has been found lacking in the present literature during its survey. The area of study is highly multidisciplinary since it involves aerosol, particle, and material sciences.

  9. Efficiency of five chemical protective clothing materials against nano and submicron aerosols when submitted to mechanical deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Mehdi; Hallé, Stéphane; Tuduri, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Due to their potential toxicity, the use of nanoparticles in the workplace is a growing concern. Some studies indicate that nanoparticles can penetrate the skin and lead to adverse health effects. Since chemical protective clothing is the last barrier to protect the skin, this study aims to better understand nanoparticle penetration behaviour in dermal protective clothing under mechanical deformation. For this purpose, five of the most common types of fabrics used in protective clothing, one woven and four nonwoven, were chosen and submitted to different simulated exposure conditions. They were tested against polydispersed NaCl aerosols having an electrical-mobility diameter between 14 and 400 nm. A bench-scale exposure setup and a sampling protocol was developed to measure the level of penetration of the aerosols through the material samples of disposable coveralls and lab coat, while subjecting them to mechanical deformations to simulate the conditions of usage in the workplace. Particle size distribution of the aerosol was determined upstream and downstream using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The measured efficiencies demonstrated that the performances of nonwoven materials were similar. Three nonwovens had efficiencies above 99%, while the woven fabric was by far, the least effective. Moreover, the results established that mechanical deformations, as simulated for this study, did not have a significant effect on the fabrics' efficiencies.

  10. Aerosol properties measured by MAX-DOAS in Gwangju during the DRAGON NE-Asia Campaign and comparison with AERONET and MODIS data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Irie, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Shin, D.; Kim, K.; Lee, K.; Kim, J.; Song, C.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol interacts both directly and indirectly with the Earth's radiation budget and cause climate change. Aerosols also can act as sites for chemical reactions to take place (heterogeneous chemistry). In Asia, the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) campaign for validation of satellite aerosol products and comparison/validation of ground-based aerosol retrievals had been conducted in Korea (DRAGON-Korea) from March to May 2012 for three months with 21 CIMEL sunphotometers, 2 Pandoras, a MAX-DOAS and a multichannel Raman Lidar system. Level 2.0 sunphotometer data (cloud screened and quality assured) at the Gwangju AERONET 321 site (35.2°N, 126.8°E, 52 m above sea level) were used for comparing aerosol optical depths (AODs) derived from the GIST MAX-DOAS observations. Information on O4 slant column densities at several different elevation angles is used to determine the atmospheric aerosol optical depth within the lower troposphere using the MAX-DOAS measurement data. Also, in order to evaluate satellite aerosol products, MODIS Terra satellite aerosol products were compared with the ground-based AERONET aerosol data at the 550 nm spectral wavelength. Significant linear relationship was resulted with a correlation coefficient larger than 0.66 between the sunphotometer measured AODs and GIST MAX-DOAS retrieved AODs values at 476 nm. There is significant linear relationship with a correlation coefficient larger than 0.79 between the sunphotometer measured AODs and MODIS Terra AODs at 550 nm. Aerosol extinction coefficient values from MAX-DOAS and Lidar system were compared. Results from sunphotometer and MAX-DOAS measurements can be used for validation of geostationary satellite measurement in the near future.

  11. A prospective Comparison of Porta-Sonic and Fisoneb Ultrasonic Nebulizers for Administering Aerosol Pentamidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew McIvor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report patient acceptability and overall therapeutic effectiveness of two different ultrasonic nebulizers, Fisoneb and Porta-sonic, for the administration of aerosol pentamidine for Pneumocysitis carinii prophylaxis in human immunodeficiency virus (hiv-infected individuals.

  12. Comparison of aerosol properties retrieved using GARRLiC, LIRIC, and Raman algorithms applied to multi-wavelength lidar and sun/sky-photometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovchaliuk, Valentyn; Goloub, Philippe; Podvin, Thierry; Veselovskii, Igor; Tanre, Didier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Mortier, Augustin; Lopatin, Anton; Korenskiy, Mikhail; Victori, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol particles are important and highly variable components of the terrestrial atmosphere, and they affect both air quality and climate. In order to evaluate their multiple impacts, the most important requirement is to precisely measure their characteristics. Remote sensing technologies such as lidar (light detection and ranging) and sun/sky photometers are powerful tools for determining aerosol optical and microphysical properties. In our work, we applied several methods to joint or separate lidar and sun/sky-photometer data to retrieve aerosol properties. The Raman technique and inversion with regularization use only lidar data. The LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) and recently developed GARRLiC (Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data) inversion methods use joint lidar and sun/sky-photometer data. This paper presents a comparison and discussion of aerosol optical properties (extinction coefficient profiles and lidar ratios) and microphysical properties (volume concentrations, complex refractive index values, and effective radius values) retrieved using the aforementioned methods. The comparison showed inconsistencies in the retrieved lidar ratios. However, other aerosol properties were found to be generally in close agreement with the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) products. In future studies, more cases should be analysed in order to clearly define the peculiarities in our results.

  13. Aircraft measurements of aerosol properties during GoAmazon - G1 and HALO inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, F.; Cecchini, M. A.; Wang, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Longo, K.; Martin, S. T.; Schmid, B.; Weinzierl, B.; Krüger, M. L.; Zöger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2013). This large uncertainty is partially a result of our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturations. One objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Green Ocean Amazon Project (GoAmazon2014/5) is to understand the influence of the emission from Manaus, a tropical megacity, on aerosol size, concentration, and chemical composition, and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum. The GoAmazon2014/5 study was an international campaign with the collaboration efforts from US, Brazil and Germany. During the intensive operation period, in the dry season (Sep. 1st - Oct. 10th, 2014), aerosol concentration, size distributions, and CCN spectra, both under pristine conditions and inside the Manaus plume, were characterized in-situ from the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) research aircraft and German HALO aircraft during 4 coordinated flights on Sep. 9th, Sep. 16th, Sep 21st and Oct. 1st, 2014. During those four flights, aerosol number concentrations and CCN concentrations at two supersaturations (0.25% and 0.5%) were measured by condensation particle counters (CPCs) and a DMT dual column CCN counter onboard both G-1 and HALO. Aerosol size distribution was also measured by a Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS) aboard the G-1 and is compared with the size distribution from Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), which were deployed both on the G-1 and the HALO. Good agreement between the aerosol properties measured from the two aircraft has been achieved. The vertical profiles of aerosol size distribution and CCN spectrum will be discussed.

  14. Comparison of lithium and sodium intercalation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujković Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low abundance of lithium in Earth’s crust and its high participation in overall cost of lithium-ion batteries incited intensive investigation of sodium-ion batteries, in hope that they may become similar in basic characteristics: specific energy and specific power. Furthermore, over the last years the research has been focused on the replacement of organic electrolytes of Li- and Na-ion batteries, by aqueous electrolytes, in order to simplify the production and improve safety of use. In this lecture, some recent results on the selected intercalation materials are presented: layered structure vanadium oxides, olivine and nasicon phosphates, potentially usable in both Li and Na aqueous rechargeable batteries. After their characterization by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, the electrochemical behavior was studied by both cyclic voltammetry and hronopotenciometry. By comparing intercalation kinetics and coulombic capacity of these materials in LiNO3 and NaNO3 solutions, it was shown that the following ones: Na1.2V3O8, Na2V6O16/C , NaFePO4/C and NaTi2(PO43/C may be used as electrode materials in aqueous alkali-ion batteries.

  15. Simulation of aerosol optical properties over a tropical urban site in India using a global model and its comparison with ground measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Takemura

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have great impacts on atmospheric environment, human health, and earth's climate. Therefore, information on their spatial and temporal distribution is of paramount importance. Despite numerous studies have examined the variation and trends of BC and AOD over India, only very few have focused on their spatial distribution or even correlating the observations with model simulations. In the present study, a three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model coupled with a general circulation model. SPRINTARS, simulated atmospheric aerosol distributions including BC and aerosol optical properties, i.e., aerosol optical thickness (AOT, Ångström Exponent (AE, and single scattering albedo (SSA. The simulated results are compared with both BC measurements by aethalometer and aerosol optical properties measured by ground-based skyradiometer and by satellite sensor, MODIS/Terra over Hyderabad, which is a tropical urban area of India, for the year 2008. The simulated AOT and AE in Hyderabad are found to be comparable to ground-based measured ones. The simulated SSA tends to be higher than the ground-based measurements. Both these comparisons of aerosol optical properties between the simulations with different emission inventories and the measurements indicate that, firstly the model uncertainties derived from aerosol emission inventory cannot explain the gaps between the simulations and the measurements and secondly the vertical transport of BC and the treatment of BC-containing particles can be the main issue in the global model to solve the gap.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  17. Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines in Electronic Cigarettes: Comparison between Liquid and Aerosol Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although electronic cigarette (EC liquids contain low levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs, studies evaluating the levels emitted to the aerosol are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of TSNAs between liquids and generated aerosol. Methods: Three EC liquids were obtained from the market. An additional (spiked sample was prepared by adding known amounts of standard TSNAs solutions to one of the obtained liquids. N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN, N-nitrosoanatabine (NAT, N-nitrosoanabasine (NAB and 4-(methylnitrosamino1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK were measured. Three 100-puff sets from each liquid were trapped in filter pads and were subsequently analyzed for the presence of TSNAs. The expected levels of TSNAs (calculated based on the liquid consumption were compared with the measured levels in the aerosol. Results: Only NAB was found at trace levels in two commercial liquids (1.2 and 2.3 ng/g, while the third contained 1.5 ng/g NAB and 7.7 ng/g NNN. The 100-puff sets resulted in 336–515 mg liquid consumption, with no TSNAs being detected in the aerosol. The spiked sample contained 42.0–53.9 ng/g of each of the TSNAs. All TSNAs were detected in the aerosol with the measured levels being statistically similar to the expected amounts. A significant correlation between expected and measured levels of TSNAs in the aerosol was found (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that exposure of EC users to TSNAs can be accurately assessed based on the levels present in the liquid, without the need to analyze the aerosol.

  18. Optical properties of urban aerosols in the region Bratislava-Vienna—II: Comparisons and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, M.; Horvath, H.; Hrvoľ, J.

    The optical and microphysical properties of aerosols in highly urbanized region Bratislava-Vienna were determined by means of ground-based optical methods during campaign in August and September 2004. Although both cities are close to each other forming a common metropolitan region, the features of their aerosol systems are distinct. While urban and suburban zones around Vienna have mostly a clean air without major influences of emissions from industry, Bratislava itself need to be classified as polluted area—the optical data collected in the measuring site are influenced mainly by Technické Sklo factory (NW positioned), Matador (SSE), Istrochem (ENE) and Slovnaft (ESE). In contrary to an observed smooth evolution of the aerosol system in Vienna, the aerosol environment is quite unstable in Bratislava and usually follows the day changes of the wind directions (as they correspond to the position of individual sources of pollution). The particle sizes in Bratislava are predominately larger compared to Vienna. A subsidiary mode within surface size distribution frequently occurs at radius about 0.7 μm in Bratislava but not in Vienna. The size distribution of airborne particles in Vienna is more dependent on relative humidity than in Bratislava. It suggests the particles in Bratislava are larger whenever, or non-deliquescent to a great extent. The spectral attenuation of solar radiation by aerosol particles shows a typical mode at λ≈0.4μm in Bratislava, which is not observed in the spectral aerosol extinction coefficient in Vienna. In Bratislava, the average aerosol optical thickness grows from morning hours to the evening, while an opposite effect can be observed in Vienna in the same time.

  19. Retrieval, Inter-Comparison, and Validation of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth from A-train Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen E.; Livingston, John; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal-Rosenbeimer, Michal; hide

    2014-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols produced from biomass burning and dust outbreaks are often found to overlay lower level cloud decks and pose greater potentials of exerting positive radiative effects (warming) whose magnitude directly depends on the aerosol loading above cloud, optical properties of clouds and aerosols, and cloud fraction. Recent development of a 'color ratio' (CR) algorithm applied to observations made by the Aura/OMI and Aqua/MODIS constitutes a major breakthrough and has provided unprecedented maps of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD). The CR technique employs reflectance measurements at TOA in two channels (354 and 388 nm for OMI; 470 and 860 nm for MODIS) to retrieve ACAOD in near-UV and visible regions and aerosol-corrected cloud optical depth, simultaneously. An inter-satellite comparison of ACAOD retrieved from NASA's A-train sensors reveals a good level of agreement between the passive sensors over the homogeneous cloud fields. Direct measurements of ACA such as carried out by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) can be of immense help in validating ACA retrievals. We validate the ACA optical depth retrieved using the CR method applied to the MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance against the airborne AATS and 4STAR measurements. A thorough search of the historic AATS-4STAR database collected during different field campaigns revealed five events where biomass burning, dust, and wildfire-emitted aerosols were found to overlay lower level cloud decks observed during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS- 2013, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne measurements revealed a good agreement (RMSE less than 0.1 for AOD at 500 nm) with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties in the MODIS retrievals. An extensive validation of satellite-based ACA retrievals requires equivalent field measurements particularly over the regions where ACA are often

  20. Comparison of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) remote-sensing retrievals of aerosol fine mode fraction over ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidman, R. G.; O'Neill, N. T.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Eck, T. F.; Tanré, Didier; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, B. N.

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol particle size is one of the fundamental quantities needed to determine the role of aerosols in forcing climate, modifying the hydrological cycle, and affecting human health and to separate natural from man-made aerosol components. Aerosol size information can be retrieved from remote-sensing instruments including satellite sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and ground-based radiometers such as Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Both satellite and ground-based instruments measure the total column ambient aerosol characteristics. Aerosol size can be characterized by a variety of parameters. Here we compare remote-sensing retrievals of aerosol fine mode fraction over ocean. AERONET retrieves fine mode fraction using two methods: the Dubovik inversion of sky radiances and the O'Neill inversion of spectral Sun measurements. Relative to the Dubovik inversion of AERONET sky measurements, MODIS slightly overestimates fine fraction for dust-dominated aerosols and underestimates in smoke- and pollution-dominated aerosol conditions. Both MODIS and the Dubovik inversion overestimate fine fraction for dust aerosols by 0.1-0.2 relative to the O'Neill method of inverting AERONET aerosol optical depth spectra. Differences between the two AERONET methods are principally the result of the different definitions of fine and coarse mode employed in their computational methodologies. These two methods should come into better agreement as a dynamic radius cutoff for fine and coarse mode is implemented for the Dubovik inversion. MODIS overestimation in dust-dominated aerosol conditions should decrease significantly with the inclusion of a nonspherical model.

  1. Optical properties of Titan's aerosols: comparison between DISR/Huygens observations and VIMS/Cassini solar occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmuse, Florian; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, the only satellite with a dense atmosphere, presents a hydrocarbon cycle that includes the formation and sedimentation of organic aerosols. The optical properties of Titan's haze inferred from measurement of the Huygens probe were recently revisited by Doose et al. (Icarus, 2016). The present study uses the solar occultation observations in equatorial regions of Titan that have been acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft to infer similar information in a broader wavelength range. Preliminary studies have proven the interest of those solar occultation data in the seven atmospheric windows to constrain the aerosol number density, but could not directly compare with the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR) data because models predict that the density profile vary with latitude. The present study compares the DISR measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and the solar occultation data acquired by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. These sets of data differ in their acquisition method and time, spectral range, and altitude: the DISR measurements have been taken in 2005, along a vertical line of sight, in the visible spectral range (490-950nm) and under 140km of altitude. The relevant solar occultation data at equator have been acquired in 2009, along a horizontal line of sight, in the IR range (0.9-5.1µm), with sun light scanning all altitudes for a long enough wavelength, namely in the five-micron atmospheric window. These sets of data have been analyzed previously, separately and using different models. Here, we present a cross analysis of these sets of data, that allows us to test the different models describing the density profile of aerosols. In addition to providing wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient, the comparison allows us to assess the impact of refraction in Titan's atmosphere. It also provides optical depth and scattering properties that are crucial information

  2. Titan Aerosol Analogs from Aromatic Precursors: Comparisons to Cassini CIRS Observations in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Anderson, Carrie M.; Loeffler, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, ppm levels of benzene (C6H6) as well as large positive ions, which may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). have been detected in the atmosphere. Aromatic molecules. photolytically active in the ultraviolet, may be important in the formation of the organic aerosol comprising the Titan haze layer even when present at low mixing ratios. Yet there have not been laboratory simulations exploring the impact of these molecules as precursors to Titan's organic aerosol. Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) in the far-infrared (far-IR) between 560 and 20/cm (approx. 18 to 500 microns) and in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) between 1500 and 600/cm (approx. 7 to 17 microns) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km in the far-IR and between 150 and 350 km in the mid-IR. Titan's aerosol has several observed emission features which cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs, including a broad far-IR feature centered approximately at 140/cm (71 microns).

  3. Comparison of aerosol volume size distributions between column and surface measurements downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. S.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol volume size distribution is one of the most important parameters in retrieving aerosol optical properties and studying radiative forcing. The column-integrated aerosol volume size distribution for AERONET was obtained from inversion product level 1.5 (22 bins between 0.1 and 30 μm in diameter) from the measurements of CIMEL sunphotometer (CE-318); that for SKYNET was obtained using skyrad.pack V5 (20 bins, 0.02-33 μm) from the measurements of PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02). The aerosol volume size distribution at the surface was measured using a wide range aerosol spectrometer system consisting of a scanning mobility particle scanner (Grimm, Model 5.419; 89 bins, 0.005-0.35 μm) and an optical particle counter (Grimm, Model 1.109; 31 bins, 0.27-34 μm). The measurement was conducted in Yongin, downwind of Seoul, Korea, from April 30 to June 27, 2015. The measurement site is located on the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) in the global campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. To investigate the discrepancy in effective diameter and fine mode volume fraction, we compared the volume size distributions when the measurement time coincided within 5 minutes because the measurement intervals were different between instruments.

  4. Comparison of PMCAMx aerosol optical depth predictions over Europe with AERONET and MODIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Antigoni; Charalampidis, Panagiotis; Fountoukis, Christos; Pilinis, Christodoulos; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-11-01

    The ability of chemical transport model (CTM) PMCAMx to reproduce aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over Europe during the photochemically active period of May 2008 (EUCAARI campaign) is evaluated. Periods with high dust or sea-salt levels are excluded, so the analysis focuses on the ability of the model to simulate the mostly secondary aerosol and its interactions with water. PMCAMx reproduces the monthly mean MODIS and AERONET AOD values over the Iberian Peninsula, the British Isles, central Europe, and Russia with a fractional bias of less than 15 % and a fractional error of less than 30 %. However, the model overestimates the AOD over northern Europe, most probably due to an overestimation of organic aerosol and sulfates. At the other end, PMCAMx underestimates the monthly mean MODIS AOD over the Balkans, the Mediterranean, and the South Atlantic. These errors appear to be related to an underestimation of sulfates. Sensitivity tests indicate that the evaluation results of the monthly mean AODs are quite sensitive to the relative humidity (RH) fields used by PMCAMx, but are not sensitive to the simulated size distribution and the black carbon mixing state. The screening of the satellite retrievals for periods with high dust (or coarse particles in general) concentrations as well as the combination of the MODIS and AERONET datasets lead to more robust conclusions about the ability of the model to simulate the secondary aerosol components that dominate the AOD during this period.

  5. Adsorption and revaporisation studies of thin iodine oxide and CsI aerosol deposits from containment surface materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    During a severe nuclear accident released fission and radiolysis products can react with each other to form new species which might contribute to the volatile source term. Iodine will be released from UO2 fuel mainly in form as CsI aerosol particles and elemental iodine. Elemental iodine can react in gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (IOx). Within the AIAS-2 (Adsorption of Iodine Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of IOx and CsI aerosols with common containment surface materials was investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled aerosols were produced from a KI solution and ozone with a new facility designed and built at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. CsI aerosols were produced from a CsI solution with the same facility. A monolayer of the aerosols was deposited on the surfaces. The deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the chemical form of the deposits on the surfaces to identify if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials had occured. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 with a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The decomposition effect of the radiolysis product carbon monoxide was tested on IOx aerosols deposited on a glass fibre filter. Iodine oxide particles were produced at 50 deg. C, 100 deg. C and 120 deg. C and deposited on filter samples in order to study the chemical

  6. Aerosol Property Comparison Within and Above the ABL at the ARM Program SGP Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Monache, L

    2002-05-01

    This thesis determines what, if any, measurements of aerosol properties made at the Earth surface are representative of those within the entire air column. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site at the Southern Great Plains, the only location in the world where ground-based and in situ airborne measurements are routinely made. Flight legs during the one-year period from March 2000 were categorized as either within or above the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by use of an objective mixing height determination technique. Correlations between aerosol properties measured at the surface and those within and above the ABL were computed. Aerosol extensive and intensive properties measured at the surface were found representative of values within the ABL, but not of within the free atmosphere.

  7. Comparison of aerosol optical thickness retrieval from spectroradiometer measurements and from two radiative transfer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrillas, M.P.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Tena, F. [Universitat de Valencia, Dept. de Termodinamica, Valencia (Spain); Cachorro, V.E. [Universidad de Valladolid, Dept. de Fisica Aplicada 1, Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, S. [Universidad de Valladolid, Dept. de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Valladolid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The spectral values of the aerosol optical thickness {tau}{sub a{lambda}} in the 400-670 nm band have been determined from 500 solar direct irradiance spectra at normal incidence registered at Valencia (Spain) in the period from July 1993 to March 1997. The {tau}{sub a{lambda}} values obtained from experimental measurements have been compared with the boundary layer aerosol models implemented in the radiative transfer codes ZD-LOA and LOWTRAN 7. For the ZD-LOA code, the continental and maritime models have been considered and for the LOWTRAN 7 code the rural, maritime, urban and tropospheric models have been used. The obtained results show that the aerosol model that best represents the average turbidity of the boundary layer for the urban area of Valencia (Spain) is the continental model when the ZD-LOA code is used and the urban model when the LOWTRAN 7 code is used. (Author)

  8. Comparison of the DiSCmini aerosol monitor to a handheld condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Jessica B.; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, 104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface ...

  9. [Comparison of the aerosol produced by electronic cigarettes with conventional cigarettes and the shisha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholon, J-F; Becquemin, M H; Roy, M; Roy, F; Ledur, D; Annesi Maesano, I; Dautzenberg, B

    2013-11-01

    In previous studies of the smoke from regular cigarettes and water pipes, we measured aerosol particle sizes in three streams; S1, inhaled by the smoker, S2, released by the device itself and S3, exhaled by the smoker. We used an electrostatic low-pressure impactor (ELPI), giving particle size distributions in real time and calculated median diameters, D50, and dispersion (σg). This allowed us to predict airway deposition. In addition, the aerosol particle half-life in the air was used as a measure of the risk to others from passive smoking. With the same equipment, we measured the particle sizes and persistence in air of the liquid aerosol generated by e-cigarettes (Cigarettec®) containing water, propylene glycol and flavorings with or without nicotine. Aerosol generation was triggered by a syringe or by the inspiration of volunteer smokers. The D50 data obtained in S1, were 0.65 μm with nicotine and 0.60 μm without nicotine. Deposition in the airways could then be calculated: 26% of the total would deposit, of which 14% would reach the alveoli. These data are close to those found with regular cigarettes. For S3, D50 data were 0.34 μm and 0.29 μm with or without nicotine. The half-life in air of the S3 stream was 11 seconds due to a rapid evaporation. The-e-cigarette aerosol, as measured here, is made of particles bigger than those of cigarette and water pipe aerosols. Their deposition in the lung depends on their fate in the airways, which is unknown. Contrary to tobacco smoke, which has a half-life in air of 19 to 20 minutes, the risk of passive "smoking" exposure from e-cigarettes is modest. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: model comparison with 84 AMS factor-analysis data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel, and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) with a computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA) composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE). The tropospheric burden of open biomass and anthropogenic (fossil and biofuel) combustion particles is estimated to be 0.59 and 0.63 Tg, respectively, accounting for about 30 and 32 % of the total tropospheric OA load. About 30 % of the open biomass burning and 10 % of the anthropogenic combustion aerosols originate from direct particle emissions, whereas the rest is formed in the atmosphere. A comprehensive data set of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements along with factor-analysis results from 84 field campaigns across the Northern Hemisphere are used to evaluate the model results. Both the AMS observations and the model results suggest that over urban areas both POA (25-40 %) and SOA (60-75 %) contribute substantially to the overall OA mass, whereas further downwind and in rural areas the POA concentrations decrease substantially and SOA dominates (80-85 %). EMAC does a reasonable job in reproducing POA and SOA levels during most of the year. However, it tends to underpredict POA and SOA concentrations during winter indicating that the model misses wintertime sources of OA (e.g., residential biofuel use) and SOA formation pathways (e.g., multiphase oxidation).

  11. Contribution of carbonaceous material to cloud condensation nuclei concentrations in European background (Mt. Sonnblick) and urban (Vienna) aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Berner, A.; Giebl, H.; Kromp, R.; Larson, S. M.; Rouc, A.; Koch, A.; Marischka, S.; Puxbaum, H.

    During four intensive measurement campaigns (two on Mt. Sonnblick, European background aerosol, and two in Vienna, urban aerosol), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were measured at supersaturations of 0.5%. Impactor measurements of the mass size distribution in the size range 0.1-10 μm were performed and later analyzed for Cl -, NO -3, SO 2-4, Na +, NH +4, K +, Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ by ion chromatography, for total carbon (TC) using a combustion method, and for black carbon (BC) by an optical method (integrating sphere). Organic carbon (OC) was defined as the difference between TC (minus carbonate carbon) and BC. At all sites, the mass fraction of BC in the submicron aerosol was comparable (4-5%). CCN concentrations on Mt. Sonnblick were found to be 10-30% of those measured in Vienna, although high Mt. Sonnblick concentrations were comparable to low Vienna concentrations (around 800 cm -3). The contribution of organic material was estimated from the mass concentrations of the chemical species sampled on the impactor stage with the lowest cut point (0.1-0.215 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter). On Mt. Sonnblick, TC material contributed 11% to the total mass in fall 1995, and 67% in summer 1996, while the OC fraction was 6 and 61%. The combined electrolytes and mineral material contributed 18 and 16% in fall and summer. During the Vienna spring campaign, the contributions of OC and electrolytes to the total mass concentration in this size range were 48 and 36%, respectively.

  12. Respirator Testing Using Virus Aerosol: Comparison between Viability Penetration and Physical Penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zhili; Kuehn, Thomas H; Pui, David Y H

    2015-07-01

    Viability, fluorescence (particle volume), photometric, viral RNA, and particle number penetration of MS2 bacteriophage through filter media used in three different models of respirators were compared to better understand the correlation between viability and physical penetration. Although viability and viral RNA penetration were better represented by particle volume penetration than particle number penetration, they were several-fold lower than photometric penetration, which was partially due to the difference in virus survival between upstream and downstream aerosol samples. Results suggest that the current NIOSH photometer-based test method can be used as a quick means to roughly differentiate respirators with different performance against virus aerosols.

  13. Combining real-time PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing to provide quantitative comparisons of fungal aerosol populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Lang-Yona, Naama; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Rudich, Yinon; Peccia, Jordan

    2014-02-01

    We examined fungal communities associated with the PM10 mass of Rehovot, Israel outdoor air samples collected in the spring and fall seasons. Fungal communities were described by 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal ribosomal RNA encoding gene. To allow for a more quantitative comparison of fungal exposure in humans, the relative abundance values of specific taxa were transformed to absolute concentrations through multiplying these values by the sample's total fungal spore concentration (derived from universal fungal qPCR). Next, the sequencing-based absolute concentrations for Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. were compared to taxon-specific qPCR concentrations for A. alternata, C. cladosporioides, E. nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. derived from the same spring and fall aerosol samples. Results of these comparisons showed that the absolute concentration values generated from pyrosequencing were strongly associated with the concentration values derived from taxon-specific qPCR (for all four species, p 0.70). The correlation coefficients were greater for species present in higher concentrations. Our microbial aerosol population analyses demonstrated that fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was higher in the spring compared to the fall (p = 0.02), and principal coordinate analysis showed distinct seasonal differences in taxa distribution (ANOSIM p = 0.004). Among genera containing allergenic and/or pathogenic species, the absolute concentrations of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Cladosporium were greater in the fall, while Cryptococcus, Penicillium, and Ulocladium concentrations were greater in the spring. The transformation of pyrosequencing fungal population relative abundance data to absolute concentrations can improve next-generation DNA sequencing-based quantitative aerosol exposure assessment.

  14. Comparison of laser ablation and dried solution aerosol as sampling systems in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coedo, A G; Padilla, I; Dorado, M T

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a study designed to determine the possibility of using a dried aerosol solution for calibration in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The relative sensitivities of tested materials mobilized by laser ablation and by aqueous nebulization were established, and the experimentally determined relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) were used in conjunction with aqueous calibration for the analysis of solid steel samples. To such a purpose a set of CRM carbon steel samples (SS-451/1 to SS-460/1) were sampled into an ICP-MS instrument by solution nebulization using a microconcentric nebulizer with membrane desolvating (D-MCN) and by laser ablation (LA). Both systems were applied with the same ICP-MS operating parameters and the analyte signals were compared. The RSF (desolvated aerosol response/ablated solid response) values were close to 1 for the analytes Cr, Ni, Co, V, and W, about 1.3 for Mo, and 1.7 for As, P, and Mn. Complementary tests were carried out using CRM SS-455/1 as a solid standard for one-point calibration, applying LAMTRACE software for data reduction and quantification. The analytical results are in good agreement with the certified values in all cases, showing that the applicability of dried aerosol solutions is a good alternative calibration system for laser ablation sampling.

  15. Adsorption and revaporisation studies of thin iodine oxide and CsI aerosol deposits from containment surface materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    During a severe nuclear accident released fission and radiolysis products can react with each other to form new species which might contribute to the volatile source term. Iodine will be released from UO2 fuel mainly in form as CsI aerosol particles and elemental iodine. Elemental iodine can react in gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (IOx). Within the AIAS-2 (Adsorption of Iodine Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of IOx and CsI aerosols with common containment surface materials was investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled aerosols were produced from a KI solution and ozone with a new facility designed and built at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. CsI aerosols were produced from a CsI solution with the same facility. A monolayer of the aerosols was deposited on the surfaces. The deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the chemical form of the deposits on the surfaces to identify if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials had occured. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 with a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The decomposition effect of the radiolysis product carbon monoxide was tested on IOx aerosols deposited on a glass fibre filter. Iodine oxide particles were produced at 50 deg. C, 100 deg. C and 120 deg. C and deposited on filter samples in order to study the chemical

  16. Comparison between summertime and wintertime Arctic Ocean primary marine aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosols (PMAs are an important source of cloud condensation nuclei, and one of the key elements of the remote marine radiative budget. Changes occurring in the rapidly warming Arctic, most importantly the decreasing sea ice extent, will alter PMA production and hence the Arctic climate through a set of feedback processes. In light of this, laboratory experiments with Arctic Ocean water during both Arctic winter and summer were conducted and focused on PMA emissions as a function of season and water properties. Total particle number concentrations and particle number size distributions were used to characterize the PMA population. A comprehensive data set from the Arctic summer and winter showed a decrease in PMA concentrations for the covered water temperature (Tw range between −1°C and 15°C. A sharp decrease in PMA emissions for a Tw increase from −1°C to 4°C was followed by a lower rate of change in PMA emissions for Tw up to about 6°C. Near constant number concentrations for water temperatures between 6°C to 10°C and higher were recorded. Even though the total particle number concentration changes for overlapping Tw ranges were consistent between the summer and winter measurements, the distribution of particle number concentrations among the different sizes varied between the seasons. Median particle number concentrations for a dry diameter (DpDp > 0.125μm, the particle number concentrations during winter were mostly higher than in summer (up to 50%. The normalized particle number size distribution as a function of water temperature was examined for both winter and summer measurements. An increase in Tw from −1°C to 10°C during winter measurements showed a decrease in the peak of relative particle number concentration at about a Dp of 0.180μm, while an increase was observed for particles with Dp > 1μm. Summer measurements exhibited a relative shift to smaller particle sizes for an increase of Tw in the range

  17. A Comparison of Pre-monsoonal and Monsoonal Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols over South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Cohen, J. B.; Wang, C.

    2012-12-01

    Radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols after monsoon onset is often considered unimportant compared to forcing during the pre-monsoonal period, due to precipitation scavenging. We tested this assumption for the South Asian monsoon using three model runs with forcing prescribed during the pre-monsoonal period (March-May), monsoon period (June-September) and both periods. The forcing represents the direct radiative effects of sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon. It was derived from a set of Kalman filter-optimised black carbon emissions from a modelling system based on the CAM3 GCM, a two-moment multi-scheme aerosol and radiation model, and a coupled urban scale processing package; we expect it to be reliable within its given error bounds. The monthly climatological forcing values were prescribed over South Asia every year for 100 years to CESM 1.0.4, a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. We shall compare the three resultant climatologies with climatologies from a no aerosol model and a full aerosol model.

  18. Comparisons of LASE, aircraft, and satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties and water vapor during TARFOX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Kooi, S.; Clayton, M.; Hobbs, P.V.; Hartley, S.; Veefkind, J.P.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Tanré, D.; Hignett, P.

    2000-01-01

    We examine aerosol extinction and optical thickness from the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE), the in situ nephelometer and absorption photometer on the University of Washington C-131A aircraft, and the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6) on the C-131A measured during the

  19. Comparison of high order algorithms in Aerosol and Aghora for compressible flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbengoue D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the work done within the Colargol project during CEMRACS 2012. The aim of this project is to compare the implementations of high order finite element methods for compressible flows that have been developed at ONERA and at INRIA for about one year, within the Aghora and Aerosol libraries.

  20. Comparisons of LASE, aircraft, and satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties and water vapor during TARFOX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Kooi, S.; Clayton, M.; Hobbs, P.V.; Hartley, S.; Veefkind, J.P.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Tanré, D.; Hignett, P.

    2000-01-01

    We examine aerosol extinction and optical thickness from the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE), the in situ nephelometer and absorption photometer on the University of Washington C-131A aircraft, and the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6) on the C-131A measured during the

  1. Aerosol microphysical retrievals from precision filter radiometer direct solar radiation measurements and comparison with AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadzis, S.; Veselovskii, I.; Amiridis, V.; Gröbner, J.; Suvorina, A.; Nyeki, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Kouremeti, N.; Taylor, M.; Tsekeri, A.; Wehrli, C.

    2014-07-01

    Synchronized sun-photometric measurements from the AERONET-CIMEL (AErosol RObotic NETwork) and GAW-PFR (Global Atmospheric Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer) aerosol networks are used to compare retrievals of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), effective radius, and volume concentration during a high-temporal-resolution measurement campaign at the Athens site in the Mediterranean Basin from 14 to 22 July 2009. During this period, direct-sun AOD retrievals from both instruments exhibited small differences in the range 0.01-0.02. The AODs measured with CIMEL and PFR instruments were inverted to retrieve particle microphysical properties using the linear estimation (LE) technique. For low aerosol loads (AOD CIMEL values for both direct-sun data and inversion data. At higher loads (AOD > 0.4), measurements of the effective radius by the PFR are consistently 20 % lower than CIMEL for both direct-sun and inversion data. Volume concentrations at low aerosol loads from the PFR are up to 80% higher than the CIMEL for direct-sun data but are up to 20% lower when derived from inversion data under these same conditions. At higher loads, the percentage difference in volume concentrations from the PFR and CIMEL is systematically negative, with inversion data predicting differences 30% lower than those obtained from direct-sun data. An assessment of the effect of errors in the AOD retrieval on the estimation of PFR bulk parameters was performed and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the particle volume concentration and effective radius with an uncertainty < 65% when AOD < 0.2 and when input errors are as high as 10%.

  2. Atmospheric aerosol in an urban area: Comparison of measurement instruments and methodologies and pulmonary deposition assessment; Aerosol atmosferico in area urbanae di misura e valutazione di deposizione polmonare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Luciani, A.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-07-01

    In March 1995 a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol in the Bologna urban area (Italy) was carried out. A transportable laboratory, set up by ENEA (Italian national Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) Environmental Department (Bologna), was utilized with instruments for measurement of atmospheric aerosol and meteorological parameters. The aim of this campaign was of dual purpose: to characterize aerosol in urban area and to compare different instruments and methodologies of measurements. Mass concentrations measurements, evaluated on a 23-hour period with total filter, PM10 dichotomous sampler and low pressure impactor (LPI Berner), have provided information respectively about total suspended particles, respirable fraction and granulometric parameters of aerosol. Eight meteorologic parameters, number concentration of submicromic fraction of aerosol and mass concentration of micromic fraction have been continually measured. Then, in a daytime period, several number granulometries of atmospheric aerosol have also been estimated by means of diffusion battery system. Results related to different measurement methodologies and granulometric characteristics of aerosol are presented here. Pulmonary deposition of atmospheric aerosol is finally calculated, using granulometries provided by LPI Brener and ICRP 66 human respiratory tract model.

  3. Assessment of the MODIS-Terra Collection 006 aerosol optical depth data over the greater Mediterranean basin and inter-comparison against MODIS C005 and AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsikas, Marios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew; Hsu, Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the key factors determining the Earth's solar radiation budget. The aerosol radiative effects are strongly dependent on aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a good measure of atmospheric aerosol loading. Therefore, understanding better the spatial and temporal patterns of AOD at both global and regional scales is important for more accurate estimations of aerosol radiative effects. Nowadays, improved globally distributed AOD products are available largely based on satellite observations. Currently, one of the most acknowledged accurate AOD dataset is the one derived from measurements of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the twin Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellite platforms. The MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm, which is used to produce AOD data, is continuously improved and updated, leading to releases of successive series, named as Collections. Recently, MODIS Collection 6 (C006) dataset has been made available. Despite their advantages, satellite AOD products have to be assessed through comparisons against ground based AOD products, such as those from AERosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The aim of the present study is to assess the newest MODIS C006 AOD product over the greater Mediterranean basin. The assessment is performed through comparisons of the MODIS-Terra C006 Level-3 AOD data against corresponding data from the previous C005 MODIS dataset, as well as versus AOD data from AERONET stations within the study region. The study period extends from 2001 to 2012 and our comparisons are performed on a monthly basis. Emphasis is given on differences between the MODIS C006 AOD data and corresponding previous C005 data, as to their spatial and temporal, seasonal and inter-annual, patterns. The results show a better agreement of MODIS C006 than C005 AOD data with AERONET, while the C006 data offer a complete spatial coverage of the study region, specifically over the northern African

  4. Light-absorbing secondary organic material formed by glyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Shapiro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Light-absorbing and high-molecular-weight secondary organic products were observed to result from the reaction of glyoxal in mildly acidic (pH=4 aqueous inorganic salt solutions mimicking aqueous tropospheric aerosol particles. High-molecular-weight (500–600 amu products were observed when ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 or sodium chloride (NaCl was present in the aqueous phase. The products formed in (NH42SO4 or ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3 solutions absorb light at UV and visible wavelengths. Substantial absorption at 300–400 nm develops within two hours, and absorption between 400–600 nm develops within days. Pendant drop tensiometry measurements show that the products are not surface-active. The experimental results along with ab initio predictions of the UV/Vis absorption of potential products suggest a mechanism involving the participation of the ammonium ion. If similar products are formed in atmospheric aerosol particles, they could change the optical properties of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  5. Comparison of shrinkage related properties of various patch repair materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Fitrianto, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    A patch repair material has been developed in the form of unsaturated polyester resin (UPR)-mortar. The performance and durability of this material are governed by its compatibility with the concrete being repaired. One of the compatibility issue that should be tackled is the dimensional compatibility as a result of differential shrinkage between the repair material and the concrete substrate. This research aims to evaluate such shrinkage related properties of UPR-mortar and to compare with those of other patch repair materials. The investigation includes the following aspects: free shrinkage, resistance to delamination and cracking. The results indicate that UPR-mortar poses a lower free shrinkage, lower risk of both delamination and cracking tendency in comparison to other repair materials.

  6. The comparison of MODIS-Aqua (C5 and CALIOP (V2 & V3 aerosol optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Redemann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We assess the consistency between instantaneously collocated level-2 aerosol optical depth (AOD retrievals from MODIS-Aqua (C5 and CALIOP (Version 2 & 3, comparing the standard MODIS AOD (MYD04_L2 data to the AOD calculated from CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for both the previous release (V2 and the latest release (V3 of CALIOP data. Based on data collected in January 2007, we investigate the most useful criteria for screening the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals to achieve the best agreement between the two data sets. Applying these criteria to eight months of data (Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct 2007 and 2009, we find an order of magnitude increase for the CALIOP V3 data density (by comparison to V2, that is generally accompanied by equal or better agreement with MODIS AOD. Differences in global, monthly mean, over-ocean AOD (532 nm between CALIOP and MODIS range between 0.03 and 0.04 for CALIOP V3, with CALIOP generally biased low, when all available data from both sensors are considered. Root-mean-squares (RMS differences in instantaneously collocated AOD retrievals by the two instruments are reduced from values ranging between 0.14 and 0.19 using the unscreened V3 data to values ranging from 0.09 to 0.1 for the screened data. A restriction to scenes with cloud fractions less than 1% (as defined in the MODIS aerosol retrievals generally results in improved correlation (R2>0.5, except for the month of July when correlations remain relatively lower. Regional assessments show hot spots in disagreement between the two sensors in Asian outflow during April and off the coast of South Africa in July.

  7. A new method of satellite-based haze aerosol monitoring over the North China Plain and a comparison with MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Luo, Nana; Zhao, Wenji

    2016-05-01

    With worldwide urbanization, hazy weather has been increasingly frequent, especially in the North China Plain. However, haze aerosol monitoring remains a challenge. In this paper, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements were used to develop an enhanced haze aerosol retrieval algorithm (EHARA). This method can work not only on hazy days but also on normal weather days. Based on 12-year (2002-2014) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol property data, empirical single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (AF) values were chosen to assist haze aerosol retrieval. For validation, EHARA aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, along with MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark-pixel and deep blue aerosol products, were compared with AERONET data. The results show that the EHARA can achieve greater AOT spatial coverage under hazy conditions with a high accuracy (73% within error range) and work a higher resolution (1-km). Additionally, this paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the differences between and limitations of the EHARA and the MODIS C6 DT land algorithms.

  8. Comparison of different methods used in integral codes to model coagulation of aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketov, A. I.; Sorokin, A. A.; Alipchenkov, V. M.; Mosunova, N. A.

    2013-09-01

    The methods for calculating coagulation of particles in the carrying phase that are used in the integral codes SOCRAT, ASTEC, and MELCOR, as well as the Hounslow and Jacobson methods used to model aerosol processes in the chemical industry and in atmospheric investigations are compared on test problems and against experimental results in terms of their effectiveness and accuracy. It is shown that all methods are characterized by a significant error in modeling the distribution function for micrometer particles if calculations are performed using rather "coarse" spectra of particle sizes, namely, when the ratio of the volumes of particles from neighboring fractions is equal to or greater than two. With reference to the problems considered, the Hounslow method and the method applied in the aerosol module used in the ASTEC code are the most efficient ones for carrying out calculations.

  9. Carbonaceous aerosols in megacity Xi'an, China: Implications of thermal/optical protocols comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y. M.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Huang, R.-J.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Ni, H. Y.; Liu, S. X.; Fung, K. K.; Shen, Z. X.; Wei, C.; Wang, Q. Y.; Tian, J.; Zhao, Z. Z.; Prévôt, André S. H.; Cao, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is an important component that influences the environment, climate, and human health. Organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) are the two main constituents of carbonaceous aerosols that have opposite, i.e., cooling versus warming, effects on the Earth's radiation balance. Knowledge on the variability of OC/EC splits measured by different thermal/optical protocols is useful for understanding the uncertainty in the climate models. This study shows good correlations within OC or EC (r2 > 0.83, P burning samples. However, EC concentrations differ by more than two folds, and OC/EC ratios differ up to a factor of 2.7. The discrepancies were attributed to the selection between the reflectance and transmittance corrections and the different peak inert-atmosphere temperature. The IMPROVE and IMPROVE_A protocols also quantified different char and soot concentrations, two subtypes of EC with distinct chemical and optical properties. Char, but not soot, was found to correlate with the humic-like substances (HULIS) content in the samples, suggesting that both char and HULIS originate mainly from biomass burning. A one-year (2012-2013) ambient aerosol monitoring in Xi'an, China, shows that OC, EC, and char displayed winter highs and summer lows, while soot had no seasonal trend. The char/soot ratios showed a "single peak" in winter, while OC/EC ratios exhibited "dual peak" feature due to the influence of secondary organic aerosol formation. In addition to commonly measured OC and EC, we recommend both char and soot from a common reference method to be considered in the chemical transport and climate models.

  10. An in vitro aerosolization efficiency comparison of generic and branded salbutamol metered dose inhalers

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimkhani, Sara; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Nokhodchi, Ali; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Background: Due to the high rate of pulmonary diseases, respiratory drug delivery systems have been attracted excessive attention for the past decades. Because of limitations and growing drug bill, physicians are encouraged to prescribe generically whenever possible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there was any significant difference in aerosolization performance between a reference brand Salbutamol (A) Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs) and two generic products (B and C).\\ud \\ud...

  11. Model simulations of aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation in comparison with ARM data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, Joyce E. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zhou, Cheng [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-01-12

    Observation-based studies have shown that the aerosol cloud lifetime effect or the increase of cloud liquid water path (LWP) with increased aerosol loading may have been overestimated in climate models. Here, we simulate shallow warm clouds on 05/27/2011 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) measurement site established by Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program using a single column version of a global climate model (Community Atmosphere Model or CAM) and a cloud resolving model (CRM). The LWP simulated by CAM increases substantially with aerosol loading while that in the CRM does not. The increase of LWP in CAM is caused by a large decrease of the autoconversion rate when cloud droplet number increases. In the CRM, the autoconversion rate is also reduced, but this is offset or even outweighed by the increased evaporation of cloud droplets near cloud top, resulting in an overall decrease in LWP. Our results suggest that climate models need to include the dependence of cloud top growth and the evaporation/condensation process on cloud droplet number concentrations.

  12. Progress in Airborne Polarimeter Inter Comparison for the NASA Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Redemann, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) mission, recommended by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, calls for a multi-angle, multi-spectral polarimeter devoted to observations of atmospheric aerosols and clouds. In preparation for ACE, NASA funds the deployment of airborne polarimeters, including the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimeter Imager (AirMSPI), the Passive Aerosol and Cloud Suite (PACS) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). These instruments have been operated together on NASA's ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of field campaigns such as the POlarimeter DEfinition EXperiment (PODEX) (California, early 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, California and Texas, summer 2013). Our role in these efforts has been to serve as an assessment team performing level 1 (calibrated radiance, polarization) and level 2 (retrieved geophysical parameter) instrument intercomparisons, and to promote unified and generalized calibration, uncertainty assessment and retrieval techniques. We will present our progress in this endeavor thus far and describe upcoming research in 2015.

  13. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  14. Comparison of UV-RSS spectral measurements and TUV model runs for clear skies for the May 2003 ARM aerosol intensive observation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Michalsky

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The first successful deployment of the fully-operational ultraviolet rotating shadow-band spectroradiometer occurred during the May 2003 U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Aerosol Intensive Observation Period. The aerosol properties in the visible range were characterized using redundant measurements with several instruments to determine the column aerosol optical depth, the single scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter needed as input for radiative transfer calculations of the downwelling direct normal and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance in clear-sky conditions. The Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV radiative transfer model developed by Madronich and his colleagues at the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research was used for the calculations of the spectral irradiance between 300–360 nm. Since there are few ultraviolet measurements of aerosol properties, most of the input aerosol data for the radiative transfer model are based on the assumption that UV input parameters can be extrapolated from the visible portion of the spectrum. Disagreements between available extraterrestrial spectra, which are discussed briefly, suggested that instead of comparing irradiances that measured and modeled spectral transmittances between 300–360 nm should be compared for the seven cases studied. These cases included low to moderate aerosol loads and low to high solar-zenith angles. A procedure for retrieving single scattering albedo in the ultraviolet based on the comparisons of direct and diffuse transmittance is outlined.

  15. Comparison of two aerosol-based detectors for the analysis of gabapentin in pharmaceutical formulations by hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shaodong; Park, Jeong Hill; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won

    2011-10-15

    Comparison of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) columns coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) or charged aerosol detector (CAD) was done for the detection of gabapentin in pharmaceutical formulations. The chromatographic separations were achieved on four HILIC columns: ZIC HILIC, ZIC pHILIC, Luna HILIC, and Atlantis HILIC. Experimental factors such as mobile phase composition, acetonitrile content, and mobile phase pH were evaluated. Validation of method was done in terms of linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. The performance of ELSD detection method is comparable to that of CAD. The intra-day and inter-day variations were below 1.7% and 3.2% for CAD and 2.8%, and 3.4% for ELSD, respectively. In addition, detection sensitivities of ELSD, CAD, and UV detectors were also compared for HILIC and reversed phase (RP) modes and the highest sensitivities were obtained in the HILIC mode when connected with CAD and ELSD. The developed HILIC aerosol based detection methods were successfully applied to the analysis of gabapentin in commercial tablets and capsules.

  16. A comparison of dry and wet season aerosol number fluxes over the Amazon rain forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertical number fluxes of aerosol particles and vertical fluxes of CO2 were measured with the eddy covariance method at the top of a 53 m high tower in the Amazon rain forest as part of the LBA (The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia experiment. The observed aerosol number fluxes included particles with sizes down to 10 nm in diameter. The measurements were carried out during the wet and dry season in 2008. In this study focus is on the dry season aerosol fluxes, with significant influence from biomass burning, and these are compared with aerosol fluxes measured during the wet season.

    Net particle deposition fluxes dominated in daytime in both seasons and the deposition flux was considerably larger in the dry season due to the much higher dry season particle concentration. The particle transfer velocity increased linearly with increasing friction velocity in both seasons. The difference in transfer velocity between the two seasons was small, indicating that the seasonal change in aerosol number size distribution is not enough for causing any significant change in deposition velocity. In general, particle transfer velocities in this study are low compared to studies over boreal forests. The reasons are probably the high percentage of accumulation mode particles and the low percentage of nucleation mode particles in the Amazon boundary layer, both in the dry and wet season, and low wind speeds in the tropics compared to the midlatitudes.

    In the dry season, nocturnal particle fluxes behaved very similar to the nocturnal CO2 fluxes. Throughout the night, the measured particle flux at the top of the tower was close to zero, but early in the morning there was an upward particle flux peak that is not likely a result of entrainment or local pollution. It is possible that these morning upward particle fluxes are associated with emission of primary biogenic particles from the rain forest

  17. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City: Comparison with Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, W. P.; Miranda, G. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Four photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) for aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The four sites included: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP); a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac; a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch; and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. A similar campaign was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA in January-February, 2003. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering at the T0 site will be presented. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of

  18. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    uncertainties by "the I-beams". Only an uncertainty range rather than a best estimate is presented for direct aerosol forcing by mineral dust and for indirect aerosol forcing. An assessment of the present level of scientific understanding is indicated at the bottom of the figure (reproduced by permission of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The importance of atmospheric aerosols to issues of societal concern has motivated much research intended to describe their loading, distribution, and properties and to develop understanding of the controlling processes to address such issues as air pollution, acid deposition, and climate influences of aerosols. However, description based wholly on measurements will inevitably be limited in its spatial and temporal coverage and in the limited characterization of aerosol properties. These limitations are even more serious for predictions of future emissions and provide motivation for concurrent theoretical studies and development of model-based description of atmospheric aerosols.An important long-range goal, which has already been partly realized, is to develop quantitative understanding of the processes that control aerosol loading, composition, and microphysical properties as well as the resultant optical and cloud-nucleating properties. An objective is to incorporate these results into chemical transport models that can be used for predictions. Such models are required, for example, to design approaches to achieve air quality standards and to assess and predict aerosol influences on climate change. Much current research is directed toward enhancing this understanding and to evaluating it by comparison of model results and observations. However, compared to gases, models involving particles are far more complex because of the need to specify additional parameters such as particle sizes and size distributions, compositions as a function of size, particle shapes, and temporal and spatial variations, including reactions that occur

  19. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    OpenAIRE

    D. B. Atkinson; P. Massoli; N. T. O'Neill; P. K. Quinn; S. D. Brooks; Lefer, B.

    2009-01-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006), the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep) were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD) instruments, one located on board the NO...

  20. Aerosol assisted synthesis of hierarchical tin–carbon composites and their application as lithium battery anode materials

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Juchen

    2013-01-01

    We report a method for synthesizing hierarchically structured tin-carbon (Sn-C) composites via aerosol spray pyrolysis. In this method, an aqueous precursor solution containing tin(ii) chloride and sucrose is atomized, and the resultant aerosol droplets carried by an inert gas are pyrolyzed in a high-temperature tubular furnace. Owing to the unique combination of high reaction temperature and short reaction time, this method is able to achieve a hetero-structure in which small Sn particles (15 nm) are uniformly embedded in a secondary carbon particle. This procedure allows the size and size distribution of the primary Sn particles to be tuned, as well as control over the size of the secondary carbon particles by addition of polymeric surfactant in the precursor solution. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the resultant Sn-C composites demonstrate attractive electrochemical performance in terms of overall capacity, electrochemical stability, and coulombic efficiency. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Comparison of black carbon (BC) aerosols in two urban areas - concentrations and size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Tohno, S.

    In this study, the BC aerosol measured at two very different urban sites is compared in terms of concentration, seasonal variation, and size distribution. During a 14 month study, one impactor sample was performed each month on a day with typical meteorological conditions. One (Vienna) or three (Uji) filter samples were obtained during the sampling time of the impactors. BC concentration in both the filter and impactor samples was analyzed with an optical technique (integrating sphere technique), where a calibration curve obtained from commercial carbon black is used to convert the optical signal to BC mass. Gravimetric mass concentration was measured at both sites. The gravimetric mass size distribution was measured only in Vienna. At both sites, the yearly average of the BC concentration on the sampling days was around 5 μg m -3. In Vienna, some seasonal trend with high concentrations during the cold season was observed, while in Uji, no pronounced seasonal trend was found. The BC size distribution in Uji was distinctly bimodal in the submicron size range. Log-normal distributions were fitted through the impactor data. The average BC mass median diameters (MMD) of the two submicron modes were 0.15 and 0.39 μm. Each mode contained about the same amount of BC mass. In Vienna only one submicron BC mode (average MMD 0.3 μm) was found because of the low size resolution of the impactor. An analysis of humidity effects on the MMDs of BC (both sites) and gravimetric mass (Vienna only) indicates that the Vienna aerosol is partly mixed internally with respect to BC, while the Uji aerosol seems to be externally mixed.

  2. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  3. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic reactivity of surface

  4. Validation of SAGE II aerosol measurements by comparison with correlative sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swissler, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The SAGE II limb-scanning radiometer carried on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite functions at wavelengths of 0.385, 0.45, 0.525, and 1.02 microns to identify vertical profiles of aerosol density by atmospheric extinction measurements from cloud tops upward. The data are being validated by correlating the satellite data with data gathered with, e.g., lidar, sunphotometer, and dustsonde instruments. Work thus far has shown that the 1 micron measurements from the ground and satellite are highly correlated and are therefore accurate to within measurement uncertainty.

  5. Comparison of aerosol optical properties above clouds between POLDER and AeroCom models over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season: POLDER/AeroCom Comparison Above Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peers, F. [Laboratoire d' Optique Atmosphérique, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq France; Now at College of Engineering, Mathematics, and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter UK; Bellouin, N. [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Waquet, F. [Laboratoire d' Optique Atmosphérique, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq France; Ducos, F. [Laboratoire d' Optique Atmosphérique, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq France; Goloub, P. [Laboratoire d' Optique Atmosphérique, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq France; Mollard, J. [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Myhre, G. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo, Oslo Norway; Skeie, R. B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo, Oslo Norway; Takemura, T. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Tanré, D. [Laboratoire d' Optique Atmosphérique, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq France; Thieuleux, F. [Laboratoire d' Optique Atmosphérique, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq France; Zhang, K. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-04-21

    Aerosol properties above clouds have been retrieved over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season 2006 using satellite observations from POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances). From June to October, POLDER has observed a mean Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Thickness (ACAOT) of 0.28 and a mean Above-Clouds Single Scattering Albedo (ACSSA) of 0.87 at 550nm. These results have been used to evaluate the simulation of aerosols above clouds in 5 AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) models (GOCART, HadGEM3, ECHAM5-HAM2, OsloCTM2 and SPRINTARS). Most models do not reproduce the observed large aerosol load episodes. The comparison highlights the importance of the injection height and the vertical transport parameterizations to simulate the large ACAOT observed by POLDER. Furthermore, some models overestimate the ACSSA. In accordance with recent recommendations of the black carbon refractive index, a higher prescription of the imaginary part allows a better comparison with POLDER’s ACSSA.

  6. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    classification. The harmonization of the aerosol typing procedures is a fundamental need in aerosol studies for long-term perspectives, satellite validation, and accuracy. However, the possibilities and limits in defining a common set of aerosol types for satellite missions and ground-based measurements depends on different information content among measurement techniques and for different retrieval conditions (e.g. for low aerosol content there is smaller satellite aerosol type retrieval sensitivity), as well as different historical choices. The concept of aReference database for aerosol typing (REDAT) is developed with the specific purpose of providing a dataset suitable for the comparison of typing procedures (from ground-based, and satellite measurements) and to be used as reference dataset for the modelling community. It will also allow the definition of translating rules between the different aerosol typing nomenclature, information strongly needed for the more and more increased audience of scientific data with no scientific background, as well as policy and decision makers. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results is partially funded by ACTRIS2 Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the grant agreement n. 654169.

  7. Synthesis and Aerosol-phase Treatments of Environmental and Materials Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Brandon James

    The synthesis of silicon nanoparticles using a non-thermal RF plasma system is explored followed by in-air oxidation of these particles. The oxidation process is monitored over a period of 1 month using FTIR, XPS and EELS. The results show a complex relationship between the rate of oxidation and the degree to which the surface bound hydrogen has been desorbed. Additionally, the synthesis of natural gas soot followed by aerosol-phase heating under various system pressures with different oxygen partial pressures is explored. The pressure of the synthesis system in tandem with the furnace temperature are shown to affect the growth of the graphene crystallites contained within the synthesized particles. FTIR, Raman, and TEM are used in this analysis.

  8. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  9. Comparison of ambient aerosol extinction coefficients obtained from in-situ, MAX-DOAS and LIDAR measurements at Cabauw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zieger, P.; Weingartner, E.; Henzing, J.; Moerman, M.; Leeuw, G. de; Mikkilä, J.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Clémer, K.; Roozendael, M. van; Yilmaz, S.; Frieß, U.; Irie, H.; Wagner, T.; Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Apituley, A.; Wilson, K.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-01-01

    In the field, aerosol in-situ measurements are often performed under dry conditions (relative humidity RH<30-40%). Since ambient aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced RH, their microphysical and optical properties especially the aerosol light scattering are also strongly

  10. Vertical profiles of fine and coarse aerosol particles over Cyprus: Comparison between in-situ drone measurements and remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamali, Dimitra; Marinou, Eleni; Pikridas, Michael; Kottas, Michael; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Tsekeri, Aleksandra; Amiridis, Vasilis; Sciare, Jean; Keleshis, Christos; Engelmann, Ronny; Ansmann, Albert; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.; Biskos, George

    2017-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) measurements were compared to airborne dried optical particle counter (OPC MetOne; Model 212) measurements during the INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS campaign. The campaign took place in April 2016 and its main focus was the study of aerosol dust particles. During the campaign the NOA Polly-XT Raman lidar located at Nicosia (35.08° N, 33.22° E) was providing round-the-clock vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) carrying an OPC flew on 7 days during the first morning hours. The flights were performed at Orounda (35.1018° N, 33.0944° E) reaching altitudes of 2.5 km a.s.l, which allows comparison with a good fraction of the recorded lidar data. The polarization lidar photometer networking method (POLIPHON) was used for the estimation of the fine (non-dust) and coarse (dust) mode aerosol mass concentration profiles. This method uses as input the particle backscatter coefficient and the particle depolarization profiles of the lidar at 532 nm wavelength and derives the aerosol mass concentration. The first step in this approach makes use of the lidar observations to separate the backscatter and extinction contributions of the weakly depolarizing non-dust aerosol components from the contributions of the strongly depolarizing dust particles, under the assumption of an externally mixed two-component aerosol. In the second step, sun photometer retrievals of the fine and the coarse modes aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and volume concentration are used to calculate the associated concentrations from the extinction coefficients retrieved from the lidar. The estimated aerosol volume concentrations were converted into mass concentration with an assumption for the bulk aerosol density, and compared with the OPC measurements. The first results show agreement within the experimental uncertainty. This project received funding from the

  11. MIPAS detection of cloud and aerosol particle occurrence in the UTLS with comparison to HIRDLS and CALIOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sembhi

    2012-10-01

    detection of particle distributions in the UTLS, with extinction detection limits above 13 km often better than 10−4 km−1, with values approaching 10−5 km−1 in some cases.

    Comparisons of the new MIPAS results with cloud data from HIRDLS and CALIOP, outside of the poles, establish a good agreement in distributions (cloud and aerosol top heights and occurrence frequencies with an offset between MIPAS and the other instruments of 0.5 km to 1 km between 12 km and 20 km, consistent with vertical oversampling of extended cloud layers within the MIPAS field of view. We conclude that infrared limb sounders provide a very consistent picture of particles in the UTLS, allowing detection limits which are consistent with the lidar observations. Investigations of MIPAS data for the Mount Kasatochi volcanic eruption on the Aleutian Islands and the Black Saturday fires in Australia are used to exemplify how useful MIPAS limb sounding data were for monitoring aerosol injections into the UTLS. It is shown that the new thresholds allowed such events to be much more effectively derived from MIPAS with detection limits for these case studies of 1 × 10−5 km−1 at a wavelength of 12 μm.

  12. The global middle-atmosphere aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2: comparison with satellite and in-situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hommel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate results from a three-dimensional middle-atmosphere aerosol-climate model which has been developed to study the evolution of stratospheric aerosols. Here we focus on the stratospheric background period and evaluate several key quantities of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols and their precursors with observations and other model studies. It is shown that the model fairly well reproduces in situ observations of the aerosol size and number concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Compared to measurements from the limb-sounding SAGE II satellite instrument, modelled integrated aerosol quantities are more biased the lower the moment of the aerosol population is. Both findings are consistent with earlier work analysing the quality of SAGE II retrieved e.g. aerosol surface area densities in the volcanically unperturbed stratosphere (SPARC/ASAP, 2006; Thomason et al., 2008; Wurl et al., 2010.

    The model suggests that new particles are formed over large areas of the LS, albeit nucleation rates in the upper troposphere are at least one order of magnitude larger than those in the stratosphere. Hence, we suggest that both, tropospheric sulphate aerosols and particles formed in situ in the LS are maintaining the stability of the stratospheric aerosol layer in the absence of direct stratospheric emissions from volcanoes. Particle size distributions are clearly bimodal, except in the upper branches of the stratospheric aerosol layer where aerosols evaporate. Modelled concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN are smaller than measured in regions of the aerosol layer where aerosol mixing ratios are largest. This points to an overestimated particle growth by coagulation.

    Transport regimes of tropical stratospheric aerosol have been identified from modelled aerosol mixing ratios and correspond to those deduced from satellite extinction measurements. We found that convective

  13. Observation and Model Comparison on Precipitation response to Volcanic Aerosols in the Asian Monsoon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Z.; Gao, C.

    2014-12-01

    Disagreement between observation and models were shown on the volcanic sulfate aerosols' effect on precipitation in Asia monsoon region. Here, we investigate it by classifying two groups of historical volcanism between AD 1300 and AD 1850 to 2, 1, and 0.5 times Pinatubo sulfate injection into the northern hemisphere (NH) stratosphere based on IVI2 and Crowley2013 volcanic reconstructions, then comparing precipitation response of BCC-CSM1 and CCSM4 model outputs under past1000 scenario to IVI2 volcanic group, and that of MIROC-ESM and MPI-ESM-P to Crowley2013 group with tree-ring reconstruction data MADA. In both groups, Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) of MADA and four model outputs show a drying trend over Asia monsoon regions after the NH injections and drier with larger sulfate magnitude, with a 1 or 2 year time lag in MADA comparing to the model outputs, this may result from the biological response of tree ring data that lag behind the meteorological forcing of model outputs. On the other hand, different responses to Southern Hemisphere (SH) only injections were found between the two groups as well as MADA and model outputs. Most of the results were found significant at 90% or even 95% significance level with a 10,000 Monte Carlo resampling procedure. Spatial variation of MADA show a significant drying effect in central Asia in year 1, and then move westward in year 2 and 3 after 2, 1×Pinatubo eruptions of IVI2, while a significant wetting effect in northwest Asia but drying effect in south Asia were shown in Crowley2013 group. However, model outputs did not show spatial variation, with a pattern drier in northwest than in southeast Asia along the years after the eruptions in both volcanic groups. Thus, observation and model outputs are well consistent on precipitation response to NH aerosol injections, but models may need large improvement on the response to SH aerosol injection as well as the spatial variation. Besides, opposite precipitation response to SH

  14. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. II. Comparison of extinction, reflectance, polarization, and counting measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Pirre, Michel; Brogniez, Colette; Herman, Maurice; Verwaerde, Christian; Balois, Jean-Yves; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Ovarlez, Henri; Crespin, Jacques; Deshler, Terry

    2002-12-20

    The physical properties of stratospheric aerosols can be retrieved from optical measurements involving extinction, radiance, polarization, and counting. We present here the results of measurements from the balloonborne instruments AMON, SALOMON, and RADIBAL, and from the French Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique and the University of Wyoming balloonborne particle counters. A cross comparison of the measurements was made for observations of background aerosols conducted during the polar winters of February 1997 and January-February 2000 for various altitudes from 13 to 19 km. On the one band, the effective radius and the total amount of background aerosols derived from the various sets of data are similar and are in agreement with pre-Pinatubo values. On the other hand, strong discrepancies occur in the shapes of the bimodal size distributions obtained from analysis of the raw measurement of the various instruments. It seems then that the log-normal assumption cannot fully reproduce the size distribution of background aerosols. The effect ofthe presence of particular aerosols on the measurements is discussed, and a new strategy for observations is proposed.

  15. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics – Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. McNeill

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  16. Comparison of nonwoven fiberglass and stainless steel microfiber media in aerosol coalescence filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Gabriel

    Coalescing filters are used to remove small liquid droplets from air streams. They have numerous industrial applications including dehumidification, cabin air filtration, compressed air filtration, metal working, CCV, and agriculture. In compressed air systems, oils used for lubrication of compressor parts can aerosolize into the main air stream causing potential contamination concerns for downstream applications. In many systems, humid air can present problems to sensitive equipment and sensors. As the humid air cools, small water drops condense and can disrupt components that need to be kept dry. Fibrous nonwoven filter media are commonly used to coalesce small drops into larger drops for easier removal. The coalescing performance of a medium is dependent upon several parameters including permeability, porosity, and wettability. In many coalescing filters, glass fibers are used. In this work, the properties of steel fiber media are measured to see how these properties compare to glass fiber media. Steel fiber media has different permeability, porosity and wettability to oil and water than fiber glass media. These differences can impact coalescence performance. The impact of these differences in properties on coalescence filtration performance was evaluated in a coalescence test apparatus. The overall coalescence performance of the steel and glass nonwoven fiber media are compared using a filtration efficiency and filtration index. In many cases, the stainless steel media performed comparably to fiber glass media with efficiencies near 90%. Since stainless steel media had lower pressure drops than fiber glass media, its filtration index values were significantly higher. Broader impact of this work is the use of stainless steel fiber media as an alternative to fiber glass media in applications where aerosol filtration is needed to protect the environment or sensitive equipment and sensors.

  17. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison and fine-mode fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations and fine-mode fraction. Arctic haze observed in <2 km and 2–4 km over Alaska in April 2008 originated mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively, according to aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements. The Ångström exponent for these air masses is 1.4 ± 0.3 and 1.7 ± 0.1, respectively, when derived at 499 nm from a second-order polynomial fit to the AOD spectra measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 over 354–2139 nm. We examine 55 vertical profiles selected from all phases of the experiment. For two thirds of them, the AOD spectra are within 3% + 0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes from local biomass burning observed in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Ångström exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD > 0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference (in both directions from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within ±0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements between 340–1640 nm for five overpass events.

  18. A Novel Method of Safely Measuring Influenza Virus Aerosol Using Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Performance Evaluation of Protective Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Okaue, Akira; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Hamamoto, Itsuki; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Currently, threats caused by pathogens are serious public health problems worldwide. Protective clothing is essential when one is treating infected patients or dealing with unknown pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing against pathogens. In Japan, some methods for evaluating the performance of protective clothing have been established in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). However, a test method against virus aerosols has not been established. Because there is a risk of infection from a live virus during the test, it is necessary to devise a safe method for the virus-aerosol-based test. Here, we propose a new method of safely measuring virus aerosols for the performance evaluation of protective clothing materials. To ensure safety, an inactivated virus was used. As a model virus, the influenza virus was selected owing to the proper small diameter of the virus particles. To quantitatively measure the particle-amount of the inactivated influenza virus, we developed an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting the M1 protein. Furthermore, we evaluated two materials using our method. Significant differences in the protection performance against the virus aerosol were observed between different sample materials, thereby confirming the applicability of our new method for performance evaluation.

  19. Comparison of Subcuticular Suture Materials in Cesarean Skin Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Solmaz Hasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Comparison of the rate of wound complications, pain, and patient satisfaction based on used subcuticular suture material. Methods. A total of 250 consecutive women undergoing primary and repeat cesarean section with low transverse incision were prospectively included. The primary outcome was wound complication rate including infection, dehiscence, hematoma, and hypertrophic scar formation within a 6-week period after operation. Secondary outcomes were skin closure time, the need for use of additional analgesic agent, pain score on numeric rating scale, cosmetic score, and patient scar satisfaction scale. Results. Absorbable polyglactin was used in 108 patients and nonabsorbable polypropylene was used in 142 patients. Wound complication rates were similar in primary and repeat cesarean groups based on the type of suture material. Skin closure time is longer in nonabsorbable suture material group in both primary and repeat cesarean groups. There was no difference between groups in terms of postoperative pain, need for additional analgesic use, late phase pain, and itching at the scar. Although the cosmetic results tended to be better in the nonabsorbable group in primary surgery patients, there was no significant difference in the visual satisfaction of the patients. Conclusions. Absorbable and nonabsorbable suture materials are comparable in cesarean section operation skin closure.

  20. Reference materials and interlaboratory comparison for actinide analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssens, Alain; Viallesoubranne, Carole; Roche, Claude; Liozon, Gerard [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Marcoule: BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    Measurement quality is crucial for the safety of nuclear facilities and is a primary requirement for fissile material monitoring and accountancy. CETAMA (Cea Committee for the establishment of analysis methods), in collaboration with Cea and AREVA laboratories, fabricates certified reference materials and organizes interlaboratory comparison programs for plutonium and uranium assay in solution. A new plutonium metal measurement standard (MP3) is currently being prepared by Cea and is a subject of cooperative work in view of its certification and use by analysis laboratories. U and Pu interlaboratory comparisons are carried out at regular intervals on benchmark samples in coordination with working groups from French nuclear laboratories. These programs are supported by international cooperation. 'Chemical' methods (potentiometry, gravimetric analysis, etc.) generally provide the best accuracy. Coulometry is the benchmark technique for plutonium assay: its metrological qualities should be an incentive for wider use by laboratories performing precise control assays of plutonium as well as uranium. Gravimetric analysis provides excellent results for analysis of pure uranyl nitrate solutions. In view of its many advantages we encourage laboratories to employ this technique to assay pure U or Pu solutions. 'Physical' or 'physicochemical' methods are increasingly used, and their performance has improved. K-edge absorption spectrometry and isotope dilution mass spectrometry are capable of reaching measurement quality levels comparable to those of the best 'chemical' methods. (authors)

  1. Aerosols Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovski, Igor

    2011-01-01

    This self-contained handbook and ready reference examines aerosol science and technology in depth, providing a detailed insight into this progressive field. As such, it covers fundamental concepts, experimental methods, and a wide variety of applications, ranging from aerosol filtration to biological aerosols, and from the synthesis of carbon nanotubes to aerosol reactors.Written by a host of internationally renowned experts in the field, this is an essential resource for chemists and engineers in the chemical and materials disciplines across multiple industries, as well as ideal supplementary

  2. Comparison of UV-RSS spectral measurements and TUV model runs for clear skies for the May 2003 ARM aerosol intensive observation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Kiedron

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The first successful deployment of the fully-operational ultraviolet rotating shadow-band spectroradiometer occurred during the May 2003 US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Aerosol Intensive Observation Period. The aerosol properties in the visible range were characterized using redundant measurements with several instruments to determine the column aerosol optical depth, the single scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter needed as input for radiative transfer calculations of the downwelling direct normal and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance in clear-sky conditions. The Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV radiative transfer model developed by Madronich and his colleagues at the US National Center for Atmospheric Research was used for the calculations of the spectral irradiance between 300–360 nm. Since there are few ultraviolet measurements of aerosol properties, most of the input aerosol data for the radiative transfer model are based on the assumption that UV input parameters can be extrapolated from the visible portion of the spectrum. Disagreements among available extraterrestrial spectra, which are discussed briefly, suggested that instead of comparing irradiances, measured and modeled spectral transmittances between 300–360 nm should be compared for the seven cases studied. Transmittance was calculated by taking the ratios of the measured irradiances to the Langley-derived, top-of-the-atmosphere irradiances. The cases studied included low to moderate aerosol loads and low to high solar-zenith angles. A procedure for retrieving single scattering albedo in the ultraviolet based on the comparisons of direct and diffuse transmittance is outlined.

  3. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  4. Comparison of ground based indices (API and AQI) with satellite based aerosol products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sheng; Cao, Chun-Xiang; Singh, Ramesh P

    2014-08-01

    Air quality in mega cities is one of the major concerns due to serious health issues and its indirect impact to the climate. Among mega cities, Beijing city is considered as one of the densely populated cities with extremely poor air quality. The meteorological parameters (wind, surface temperature, air temperature and relative humidity) control the dynamics and dispersion of air pollution. China National Environmental Monitoring Centre (CNEMC) started air pollution index (API) as of 2000 to evaluate air quality, but over the years, it was felt that the air quality is not well represented by API. Recently, the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of the People's Republic of China (PRC) started using a new index "air quality index (AQI)" from January 2013. We have compared API and AQI with three different MODIS (MODIS - Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer, onboard the Terra/Aqua satellites) AOD (aerosol optical depth) products for ten months, January-October, 2013. The correlation between AQI and Aqua Deep Blue AOD was found to be reasonably good as compared with API, mainly due to inclusion of PM2.5 in the calculation of AQI. In addition, for every month, the correlation coefficient between AQI and Aqua Deep Blue AOD was found to be relatively higher in the month of February to May. According to the monthly average distribution of precipitation, temperature, and PM10, the air quality in the months of June-September was better as compared to those in the months of February-May. AQI and Aqua Deep Blue AOD show highly polluted days associated with dust event, representing true air quality of Beijing.

  5. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Caries is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. For (direct restaurations of carious lesions, tooth-coloured composite materials are increasingly used. The compulsory health insurance pays for composite fillings in front teeth; in posterior teeth, patients have to bear the extra cost. Scientific background: Amalgam is an alloy of mercury and other metals and has been used in dentistry for more than one hundred and fifty years. Composites consist of a resin matrix and chemically bonded fillers. They have been used for about fifty years in front teeth. Amalgam has a long longevity; the further development of composites has also shown improvements regarding their longevity. Research questions: This HTA-report aims to evaluate the longevity (failure rate, median survival time (MST, median age of direct amalgam fillings in comparison to direct composite fillings in permanent teeth from a medical and economical perspective and discusses the ethical, legal and social aspects of using these filling materials. Methods: The systematic literature search yielded a total of 1,149 abstracts. After a two-step selection process based on defined criteria 25 publications remained to be assessed. Results: The medical studies report a longer longevity for amalgam fillings than for composite fillings. However, the results of these studies show a large heterogeneity. No publication on the costs or the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings exists for Germany. The economic analyses (NL, SWE, GB report higher costs for composite fillings when longevity is assumed equal (for an observation period of five years or longer for amalgam compared to composite fillings. These higher costs are due to the higher complexity of placing composite fillings. Discussion: Due to different study designs and insufficient documentation of study details, a comparison of different studies on longevity of direct amalgam and composite

  6. Comparison of self repair in various composite matrix materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    In a comparison of self repair in graphite composites (for airplane applications) versus epoxy and vinyl ester composites (for building structures or walls) 1 the type of damage that the fiber/matrix is prone to experience is a prime factor in determining which materials self repair well and 2 the flow of energy during damage determines what kinds of damage that can be self repaired well. 1) In brittle composites, repair was successful throughout the composite due to matrix cracking which allowed for optimum chemical flow, whereas in toughened composites that did not crack, the repair chemical flows into a few layers of the composite. 2) If the damage energy is stopped by the composite and goes laterally, it causes delamination which will be repaired; however if the damage energy goes through the composite as with a puncture, then there will be limited delamination, less chemical release and less self repair.

  7. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Atkinson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006, the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT. An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD. The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep, a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η and the fine mode effective radius (Reff,f. These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution, respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff,f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff,f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation = 28 nm.

  8. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Atkinson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006, the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT. An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD. The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep, a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η and the fine mode effective radius (Reff f. These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation

  9. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, conducted in North America in April and June–July 2008, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability. The AOD spectra spanning 354–2139 nm measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 are generally less wavelength-dependent below 2 km (499-nm Angstrom exponent 1.4 ± 0.3 than in 2–4 km (1.6–1.8 for Alaska in April 2008. Together with concurrent aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements, this corroborates the hypothesis that Arctic haze in these layers originates mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively. The spectra are within 3%+0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption for two thirds of the 55 vertical profiles examined. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Angstrom exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD>0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within 0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements for five overpass events. Evidently, the fresh local emission in Canada in June and July makes the horizontal distribution of AOD highly heterogeneous (standard deviation ~19% of the mean over 20 km and random (autocorrelation r=0.37 across 20 km, in contrast to long-range transport to Alaska in April (std~2%, r=0.95. The

  10. Inter-comparison of model-simulated and satellite-retrieved componential aerosol optical depths in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenshen; Yu, Chao; Chen, Liangfu; Tao, Jinhua; Letu, Husi; Ge, Wei; Si, Yidan; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    China's large aerosol emissions have major impacts on global climate change as well as regional air pollution and its associated disease burdens. A detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of aerosol components is necessary for the calculation of aerosol radiative forcing and the development of effective emission control policy. Model-simulated and satellite-retrieved aerosol components can support climate change research, PM2.5 source appointment and epidemiological studies. This study evaluated the total and componential aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the GEOS-Chem model (GC) and the Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART), and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) from 2006 to 2009 in China. Linear regression analysis between the GC and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) in China yielded similar correlation coefficients (0.6 daily, 0.71 monthly) but lower slopes (0.41 daily, 0.58 monthly) compared with those in the U.S. This difference was attributed to GC's underestimation of water-soluble AOD (WAOD) west of the Heihe-Tengchong Line, the dust AOD (DAOD) in the fall and winter, and the soot AOD (SAOD) throughout the year and throughout the country. GOCART exhibits the strongest dust estimation capability among all datasets. However, the GOCART soot distribution in the Northeast and Southeast has significant errors, and its WAOD in the polluted North China Plain (NCP) and the South is underestimated. MISR significantly overestimates the water-soluble aerosol levels in the West, and does not capture the high dust loadings in all seasons and regions, and the SAOD in the NCP. These discrepancies can mainly be attributed to the uncertainties in the emission inventories of both models, the poor performance of GC under China's high aerosol loading conditions, the omission of certain aerosol tracers in GOCART, and the tendency of MISR to misidentify dust and non-dust mixtures.

  11. Comparison of fatigue characteristics of some selected materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Marta; Lagoda, Tadeusz; Katzy, Damian [Technical University of Opole (Poland). Dept. of Mechanics and Machine Design

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents a comparison of fatigue characteristics of twenty selected materials (divided in three groups of steels: 1. unalloyed steels (St42, St37, St52, Ck45, Ck15, Ck35); 2. low-alloy steels (14Mov63, 11NiMnCrMo55, StE460, StE690, 41CrM4B, 42CrMo4, 100Cr6); 3. high-alloy steels (X11NiCrMo4820, X10CrNiTi189, X6NiCr3220, X10CrNiMo1642, X10CrNi919, X4NiCrTi73153, X5CrNi189)). The compared models were proposed by Woehler, Basquin, Stromeyer, Corson, and Bastenaire. The determination coefficient was calculated for each material in order to define the best fitting to the empirical data. After analysis authors evaluated which characteristics best describes the course of the destruction of the specimens during fatigue tests. (orig./MM)

  12. Highlights from 4STAR Sky-Scanning Retrievals of Aerosol Intensive Optical Properties from Multiple Field Campaigns with Detailed Comparisons of SSA Reported During SEAC4RS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument combines airborne sun tracking capabilities of the Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-14) with AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network)-like sky-scanning capability and adds state-of-the-art fiber-coupled grating spectrometry to yield hyperspectral measurements of direct solar irradiance and angularly resolved sky radiance. The combination of sun-tracking and sky-scanning capability enables retrievals of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), mode-resolved aerosol size distribution (SD), asphericity, and complex refractive index, and thus also the scattering phase function, asymmetry parameter, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and absorption aerosol optical thickness (AAOT). From 2012 to 2014 4STAR participated in four major field campaigns: the U.S. Dept. of Energy's TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) I & II campaigns, and NASA's SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea & Ice Experiment) campaigns. Establishing a strong performance record, 4STAR operated successfully on all flights conducted during each of these campaigns. Sky radiance spectra from scans in either constant azimuth (principal plane) or constant zenith angle (almucantar) were interspersed with direct beam measurements during level legs. During SEAC4RS and ARISE, 4STAR airborne measurements were augmented with flight-level albedo from the collocated Shortwave Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) providing improved specification of below-aircraft radiative conditions for the retrieval. Calibrated radiances and retrieved products will be presented with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of ambient SSA retrievals and measurements during SEAC4RS from 4STAR, AERONET, HSRL2 (High Spectral Resolution Lidar), and from in situ measurements.

  13. Cloud and aerosol classification for 2 1/2 years of MAX-DOAS observations in Wuxi (China and comparison to independent data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Axis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS observations of trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds and aerosols. Thus it is important to identify clouds and characterise their properties. In a recent study Wagner et al. (2014 developed a cloud classification scheme based on the MAX-DOAS measurements themselves with which different "sky conditions" (e.g. clear sky, continuous clouds, broken clouds can be distinguished. Here we apply this scheme to long term MAX-DOAS measurements from 2011 to 2013 in Wuxi, China (31.57° N, 120.31° E. The original algorithm has been modified, in particular in order to account for smaller solar zenith angles (SZA. Instrumental degradation is accounted for to avoid artificial trends of the cloud classification. We compared the results of the MAX-DOAS cloud classification scheme to several independent measurements: aerosol optical depth from a nearby AERONET station and from MODIS, visibility derived from a visibility meter; and various cloud parameters from different satellite instruments (MODIS, OMI, and GOME-2. The most important findings from these comparisons are: (1 most cases characterized as clear sky with low or high aerosol load were associated with the respective AOD ranges obtained by AERONET and MODIS, (2 the observed dependences of MAX-DOAS results on cloud optical thickness and effective cloud fraction from satellite indicate that the cloud classification scheme is sensitive to cloud (optical properties, (3 separation of cloudy scenes by cloud pressure shows that the MAX-DOAS cloud classification scheme is also capable of detecting high clouds, (4 some clear sky conditions, especially with high aerosol load, classified from MAX-DOAS observations corresponding to the optically thin and low clouds derived by satellite observations probably indicate that the satellite cloud products contain valuable information on aerosols.

  14. Experimental Study on the Comparison of the Material Properties of Glass Wool Used as Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Woo KIM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Artificial mineral fibers such as glass wool or stone wool are commonly used in building walls, ceilings and floors as a major insulation material for buildings. Among the material properties of building materials, thermal conductivity, the sound absorption coefficient, compressibility, and dynamic stiffness are regarded as important performance requirements since they directly affect the thermal and acoustic properties of the building. This study measured the changes of the thermal and acoustical performances of glass wool that was actually installed for a long time to the outer wall of a building as an insulation material through a comparison with recently produced glass wool. The results showed that the measured thermal conductivities of the old and the new specimens both rise with an increase of temperature, showing quite similar results in both specimens over temperature ranges of (0 – 20 ºC. The noise reduction coefficient decreased by 0.1 in the old specimen and the difference of the compressibilities in both specimens was shown to be 7.32 mm. The dynamic stiffness of the old specimen was found to be 1.28 MN/m3 higher than that of the new specimen.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3714

  15. New Global Deep Blue Aerosol Product over Land and Ocean from VIIRS, and Its comparisons with MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. Y. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.; Tsay, S. C.; Carletta, N.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of natural and anthropogenic sources of air pollution on climate and human health have continued to gain attention from the scientific community. In order to facilitate these effects, high quality consistent long-term global aerosol data records from satellites are essential. Several EOS-era instruments (e.g., SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MISR) are able to provide such information with a high degree of fidelity. However, with the aging MODIS sensors and the launch of the VIIRS instrument on Suomi NPP in late 2011, the continuation of long-term aerosol data records suitable for climate studies from MODIS to VIIRS is needed urgently. VIIRS was designed to have similar capabilities to MODIS, with similar visible/infrared spectral channels, and spatial/ temporal resolution. However, small but significant differences in several key channels used in aerosol retrievals between MODIS and VIIRS mean that significant effort is required to revise aerosol models and surface reflectance determination modules previously developed using MODIS data. In this study, we will show the global (land and ocean) distribution of aerosols from Version 1 of the VIIRS Deep Blue data set. The preliminary validation results of these new VIIRS Deep Blue aerosol products using data from AERONET sunphotometers over land and ocean will be discussed. We will also compare the monthly averaged Deep Blue aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from VIIRS with the MODIS C6 products to investigate if any systematic biases may exist between MODIS C6 and VIIRS AOT.

  16. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements

  17. Climate-relevant physical properties of molecular constituents relevant for isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Upshur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles, formed from gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs, contribute large uncertainties to the radiative forcing that is associated with aerosols in the climate system. Reactive uptake of surface-active organic oxidation products of BVOCs at the gas–aerosol interface can potentially decrease the overall aerosol surface tension and therefore influence their propensity to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Here, we synthesize and measure some climate-relevant physical properties of SOA particle constituents consisting of the isoprene oxidation products α-, δ-, and cis- and {trans-β-IEPOX (isoprene epoxide, as well as syn- and anti-2-methyltetraol. Following viscosity measurements, we use octanol-water partition coefficients to quantify the relative hydrophobicity of the oxidation products while dynamic surface tension measurements indicate that aqueous solutions of α- and trans-β-IEPOX exhibit significant surface tension depression. We hypothesize that the surface activity of these compounds may enhance aerosol CCN activity, and that trans-β-IEPOX may be highly relevant for surface chemistry of aerosol particles relative to other IEPOX isomers.

  18. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  19. Characterization of aerosol and cloud water at a mountain site during WACS 2010: secondary organic aerosol formation through oxidative cloud processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Y. Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The water-soluble fractions of aerosol filter samples and cloud water collected during the Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS 2010 were analyzed using an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. This is the first study to report AMS organic spectra of re-aerosolized cloud water, and to make direct comparison between the AMS spectra of cloud water and aerosol samples collected at the same location. In general, the mass spectra of aerosol were very similar to those of less volatile cloud organics. By using a photochemical reactor to oxidize both aerosol filter extracts and cloud water, we find evidence that fragmentation of water-soluble organics in aerosol increases their volatility during photochemical oxidation. By contrast, enhancement of AMS-measurable organic mass by up to 30% was observed during the initial stage of oxidation of cloud water organics, which was followed by a decline at the later stages of oxidation. These observations are in support of the general hypothesis that cloud water oxidation is a viable route for SOA formation. In particular, we propose that additional SOA material was produced by functionalizing dissolved organics via OH oxidation, where these dissolved organics are sufficiently volatile that they are not usually part of the aerosol. This work demonstrates that water-soluble organic compounds of intermediate volatility (IVOC, such as cis-pinonic acid, produced via gas-phase oxidation of monoterpenes, can be important aqueous-phase SOA precursors in a biogenic-rich environment.

  20. Effect of viscosity on photodegradation rates in complex secondary organic aerosol materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinks, Mallory L.; Brady, Monica V.; Lignell, Hanna; Song, Mijung; Grayson, James W.; Bertram, Allan K.; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the effect of environmental conditions on the photodegradation rates of atmospherically relevant, photolabilie, organic molecules embedded in a film of secondary organic material (SOM). Three types of SOM were studied: a-pinene/O3 SOM (PSOM), limonene/O3 SOM (LSOM), and aged limonene/O3 obtained by exposure of LSOM to ammonia (brown LSOM). PSOM and LSOM were impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), an atmospherically relevant molecule that photodegrades faster than either PSOM or LSOM alone, to serve as a probe of SOM matrix effects on photochemistry. Brown LSOM contains an unidentified chromophore that absorbs strongly at 510 nm and photobleaches upon irradiation. This chromophore served as a probe molecule for the brown LSOM experiments. In all experiments, the temperature and relative humidity (RH) surrounding the SOM films were varied. The extent of photochemical reaction in the samples was monitored using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. For all three model systems examined, the observed photodegradation rates were slower at lower temperatures and lower RH, under conditions that make SOM more viscous. Additionally, the activation energies for photodegradation of each system were positively correlated with the viscosity of the SOM matrix as measured in poke-flow experiments. These activation energies were calculated to be 50, 24, and 17 kJ/mol for 2,4-DNP in PSOM, 2,4-DNP in LSOM, and brown LSOM, respectively and PSOM was found to be the most viscous of the three. These results suggest that the increased viscosity is hindering the motion of the molecules in SOM and is slowing down photochemical reactions in which they participate.

  1. The inter-comparison of major satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms using simulated intensity and polarization characteristics of reflected light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kokhanovsky

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of aerosol from space is a challenging and typically underdetermined retrieval task, requiring many assumptions to be made with respect to the aerosol and surface models. Therefore, the quality of a priori information plays a central role in any retrieval process (apart from the cloud screening procedure and the forward radiative transfer model, which to be most accurate should include the treatment of light polarization and molecular-aerosol coupling. In this paper the performance of various algorithms with respect to the of spectral aerosol optical thickness determination from optical spaceborne measurements is studied. The algorithms are based on various types of measurements (spectral, angular, polarization, or some combination of these. It is confirmed that multiangular spectropolarimetric measurements provide more powerful constraints compared to spectral intensity measurements alone, particularly those acquired at a single view angle and which rely on a priori assumptions regarding the particle phase function in the retrieval process.

  2. Ceramic materials of low-temperature synthesis for dielectric coating applied by 3D aerosol printing used in nano- and microelectronics, lighting engineering, and spacecraft control devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Tuev, V. I.; Nisan, A. V.; Potapov, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    A synthesis technique of low-temperature ceramic material based on aluminosilicates of dendrimer morphology capable to contain up to 80 wt % of nitrides and oxides of high-melting compounds as filler has been developed. The synthesis is based on a sol-gel method followed by mechanochemical treatment and ultrasonic dispersing. Dielectric ceramic layers with the layer thickness in the nanometer range and high thermal conductivity have been obtained for the first time by 3D aerosol printing of the synthesized material. The study of the obtained ceramic coating on the metal surface (Al) has proved its use prospects in microelectronics, light engineering, and devices for special purposes.

  3. The effect of hygroscopicity on sea-spray aerosol fluxes: a comparison of high-rate and bulk correction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. J. Sproson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The eddy covariance technique is the most direct of the methods that have been used to measure the flux of sea-spray aerosol between the ocean and atmosphere, but has been applied in only a handful of studies. However, unless the aerosol is dried before the eddy covariance measurements are made, the hygroscopic nature of sea-spray may combine with a relative humidity flux to result in a bias in the calculated aerosol flux. "Bulk" methods have been presented to account for this bias, however they rely on assumptions of the shape of the aerosol spectra which may not be valid for near-surface measurements of sea-spray.

    Here we describe a method of correcting aerosol spectra for relative humidity induced size variations at the high frequency (10 Hz measurement timescale, where counting statistics are poor and the spectral shape cannot be well represented by a simple power law. Such a correction allows the effects of hygroscopicity and relative humidity flux on the aerosol flux to be explicitly evaluated and compared to the bulk corrections, both in their original form and once reformulated to better represent the measured mean aerosol spectra. In general, the bulk corrections – particularly when reformulated for the measured mean aerosol spectra – perform relatively well, producing flux corrections of the right sign and approximate magnitude. However, there are times when the bulk methods either significantly over- or underestimate the required flux correction. We thus conclude that, where possible, relative humidity corrections should be made at the measurement frequency.

  4. Statistical Comparison of Cloud and Aerosol Vertical Properties between Two Eastern China Regions Based on CloudSat/CALIPSO Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between cloud and aerosol properties was investigated over two 4° × 4° adjacent regions in the south (R1 and in the north (R2 in eastern China. The CloudSat/CALIPSO data were used to extract the cloud and aerosol profiles properties. The mean value of cloud occurrence probability (COP was the highest in the mixed cloud layer (−40°C~0°C and the lowest in the warm cloud layer (>0°C. The atmospheric humidity was more statistically relevant to COP in the warm cloud layer than aerosol condition. The differences in COP between the two regions in the mixed cloud layer and ice cloud layer (<−40°C had good correlations with those in the aerosol extinction coefficient. A radar reflectivity factor greater than −10 dBZ occurred mainly in warm cloud layers and mixed cloud layers. A high-COP zone appeared in the above-0°C layer with cloud thicknesses of 2-3 km in both regions and in all the four seasons, but the distribution of the zonal layer in R2 was more continuous than that in R1, which was consistent with the higher aerosol optical thickness in R2 than in R1 in the above-0°C layer, indicating a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud probability.

  5. Comparison of GOES and MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) to aerosol robotic network (AERONET) AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 mass at Bondville, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Mark; Kondragunta, Shobha; Ciren, Pubu; Xu, Chuanyu

    2009-09-01

    Collocated Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) chemically speciated data, mass of PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and size distribution at Bondville, IL, were compared with satellite-derived AOD. This was done to evaluate the quality of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data and their potential to predict surface PM2.5 concentrations. MODIS AOD correlated better to AERONET AOD (r = 0.835) than did GOES AOD (r = 0.523). MODIS and GOES AOD compared better to AERONET AOD when the particle size distribution was dominated by fine mode. For all three AOD methods, correlation between AOD and PM2.5 concentration was highest in autumn and lowest in winter. The AERONET AOD-PM2.5 relationship was strongest with moderate relative humidity (RH). At low RH, AOD attributable to coarse mass degrades the relationship; at high RH, added AOD from water growth appears to mask the relationship. For locations such as many in the central and western United States with substantial coarse mass, coarse mass contributions to AOD may make predictions of PM2.5 from AOD data problematic. Seasonal and diurnal variations in particle size distributions, RH, and seasonal changes in boundary layer height need to be accounted for to use satellite AOD to predict surface PM2.5.

  6. Comparison of aerosol optical depth of UV-B monitoring and research program (UVMRP), AERONET and MODIS over continental united states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongzhao; Chen, Maosi; Davis, John; Gao, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The concern about the role of aerosols as to their effect in the Earth-Atmosphere system requires observation at multiple temporal and spatial scales. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS) is the main aerosol optical depth (AOD) monitoring satellite instrument, and its accuracy and uncertainty need to be validated against ground based measurements routinely. The comparison between two ground AOD measurement programs, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Ultraviolet-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program, confirms the consistency between them. The intercomparison between the MODIS AOD, the AERONET AOD, and the UVMRP AOD suggests that the UVMRP AOD measurements are suited to be an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD products. The experiments show that the spatial-temporal dependency between the MODIS AOD and the UVMRP AOD is positive in the sense that the MODIS AOD compare more favorably with the UVMRP AOD as the spatial and temporal intervals are increased. However, the analysis shows that the optimal spatial interval for all time windows is defined by an angular subtense of around 1° to 1.25°, while the optimal time window is around 423 to 483 minutes at most spatial intervals. The spatial-temporal approach around 1.25° & 423 minutes shows better agreement than the prevalent strategy of 0.25° & 60 minutes found in other similar investigations.

  7. Aerosol extinction profiles at 525 nm and 1020 nm derived from ACE imager data: comparisons with GOMOS, SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, and OSIRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vanhellemont

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment mission is dedicated to the retrieval of a large number of atmospheric trace gas species using the solar occultation technique in the infrared and UV/visible spectral domain. However, two additional solar disk imagers (at 525 nm and 1020 nm were added for a number of reasons, including the retrieval of aerosol and cloud products. In this paper, we present first comparison results for these imager aerosol/cloud optical extinction coefficient profiles, with the ones derived from measurements performed by 3 solar occultation instruments (SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, one stellar occultation instrument (GOMOS and one limb sounder (OSIRIS. The results indicate that the ACE imager profiles are of good quality in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere, although the aerosol extinction for the visible channel at 525 nm contains a significant negative bias at higher altitudes, while the relative differences indicate that ACE profiles are almost always too high at 1020 nm. Both problems are probably related to ACE imager instrumental issues.

  8. Inversion of tropospheric profiles of aerosol extinction and HCHO and NO2 mixing ratios from MAX-DOAS observations in Milano during the summer of 2003 and comparison with independent data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present aerosol and trace gas profiles derived from MAX-DOAS observations. Our inversion scheme is based on simple profile parameterisations used as input for an atmospheric radiative transfer model (forward model. From a least squares fit of the forward model to the MAX-DOAS measurements, two profile parameters are retrieved including integrated quantities (aerosol optical depth or trace gas vertical column density, and parameters describing the height and shape of the respective profiles. From these results, the aerosol extinction and trace gas mixing ratios can also be calculated. We apply the profile inversion to MAX-DOAS observations during a measurement campaign in Milano, Italy, September 2003, which allowed simultaneous observations from three telescopes (directed to north, west, south. Profile inversions for aerosols and trace gases were possible on 23 days. Especially in the middle of the campaign (17–20 September 2003, enhanced values of aerosol optical depth and NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios were found. The retrieved layer heights were typically similar for HCHO and aerosols. For NO2, lower layer heights were found, which increased during the day. The MAX-DOAS inversion results are compared to independent measurements: (1 aerosol optical depth measured at an AERONET station at Ispra; (2 near-surface NO2 and HCHO (formaldehyde mixing ratios measured by long path DOAS and Hantzsch instruments at Bresso; (3 vertical profiles of HCHO and aerosols measured by an ultra light aircraft. Depending on the viewing direction, the aerosol optical depths from MAX-DOAS are either smaller or larger than those from AERONET observations. Similar comparison results are found for the MAX-DOAS NO2 mixing ratios versus long path DOAS measurements. In contrast, the MAX-DOAS HCHO mixing ratios are generally higher than those from long path DOAS or Hantzsch instruments. The comparison of the HCHO and aerosol profiles from the aircraft showed reasonable

  9. Inversion of tropospheric profiles of aerosol extinction and HCHO and NO2 mixing ratios from MAX-DOAS observations in Milano during the summer of 2003 and comparison with independent data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present aerosol and trace gas profiles derived from MAX-DOAS observations. Our inversion scheme is based on simple profile parameterisations used as input for an atmospheric radiative transfer model (forward model. From a least squares fit of the forward model to the MAX-DOAS measurements, two profile parameters are retrieved including integrated quantities (aerosol optical depth or trace gas vertical column density, and parameters describing the height and shape of the respective profiles. From these results, the aerosol extinction and trace gas mixing ratios can also be calculated. We apply the profile inversion to MAX-DOAS observations during a measurement campaign in Milano, Italy, September 2003, which allowed simultaneous observations from three telescopes (directed to north, west, south. Profile inversions for aerosols and trace gases were possible on 23 days. Especially in the middle of the campaign (17–20 September 2003, enhanced values of aerosol optical depth and NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios were found. The retrieved layer heights were typically similar for HCHO and aerosols. For NO2, lower layer heights were found, which increased during the day. The MAX-DOAS inversion results are compared to independent measurements: (1 aerosol optical depth measured at an AERONET station at Ispra; (2 near-surface NO2 and HCHO (formaldehyde mixing ratios measured by long path DOAS and Hantzsch instruments at Bresso; (3 vertical profiles of HCHO and aerosols measured by an ultra light aircraft. Depending on the viewing direction, the aerosol optical depths from MAX-DOAS are either smaller or larger than those from AERONET observations. Similar comparison results are found for the MAX-DOAS NO2 mixing ratios versus long path DOAS measurements. In contrast, the MAX-DOAS HCHO mixing ratios are generally higher than those from long path DOAS or Hantzsch instruments. The comparison of the HCHO and aerosol profiles from the aircraft showed reasonable

  10. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, K.E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  11. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: comparison of simple and complex representations of the volatility basis set approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shrivastava

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem is modified to include a volatility basis set (VBS treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation. The VBS approach, coupled with SAPRC-99 gas-phase chemistry mechanism, is used to model gas-particle partitioning and multiple generations of gas-phase oxidation of organic vapors. In addition to the detailed 9-species VBS, a simplified mechanism using 2 volatility species (2-species VBS is developed and tested for similarity to the 9-species VBS in terms of both mass and oxygen-to-carbon ratios of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. WRF-Chem results are evaluated against field measurements of organic aerosols collected during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign in the vicinity of Mexico City. The simplified 2-species mechanism reduces the computational cost by a factor of 2 as compared to 9-species VBS. Both ground site and aircraft measurements suggest that the 9-species and 2-species VBS predictions of total organic aerosol mass as well as individual organic aerosol components including primary, secondary, and biomass burning are comparable in magnitude. In addition, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions from both approaches agree within 25 %, providing evidence that the 2-species VBS is well suited to represent the complex evolution of organic aerosols. Model sensitivity to amount of anthropogenic semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (S/IVOC precursor emissions is also examined by doubling the default emissions. Both the emission cases significantly under-predict primary organic aerosols in the city center and along aircraft flight transects. Secondary organic aerosols are predicted reasonably well along flight tracks surrounding the city, but are consistently over-predicted downwind of the city. Also, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions are significantly improved compared to prior studies by adding 15 % oxygen mass per generation of oxidation; however, all modeling cases

  12. Comparison of aerosol optical depth of UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP), AERONET and MODIS over continental United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongzhao TANG; Maosi CHEN; John DAVIS; Wei GAO

    2013-01-01

    The concern about the role of aerosols as to their effect in the Earth-Atmosphere system requires observation at multiple temporal and spatial scales.The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS) is the main aerosol optical depth (AOD)monitoring satellite instrument,and its accuracy and uncertainty need to be validated against ground based measurements routinely.The comparison between two ground AOD measurement programs,the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Ultraviolet-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program,confirms the consistency between them.The intercomparison between the MODIS AOD,the AERONET AOD,and the UVMRP AOD suggests that the UVMRP AOD measurements are suited to be an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD products.The experiments show that the spatial-temporal dependency between the MODIS AOD and the UVMRP AOD is positive in the sense that the MODIS AOD compare more favorably with the UVMRP AOD as the spatial and temporal intervals are increased.However,the analysis shows that the optimal spatial interval for all time windows is defined by an angular subtense of around 1° to 1.25°,while the optimal time window is around 423 to 483 minutes at most spatial intervals.The spatial-temporal approach around 1.25° & 423 minutes shows better agreement than the prevalent strategy of 0.25° & 60 minutes found in other similar investigations.Research Program (UVMRP),Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET),Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS),validation,spatial-temporal approach

  13. Comparison of aerosol optical depths from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on Aura with results from airborne sunphotometry, other space and ground measurements during MILAGRO/INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Livingston

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Airborne sunphotometer measurements are used to evaluate retrievals of extinction aerosol optical depth (AOD from spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the Aura satellite during the March 2006 Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (MILAGRO/INTEX-B. The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS flew on nine missions over the Gulf of Mexico and four in or near the Mexico City area. Retrievals of AOD from near-coincident AATS and OMI measurements are compared for three flights over the Gulf of Mexico for flight segments when the aircraft flew at altitudes 60–70 m a.s.l., and for one flight over Mexico City when the aircraft flew ~420–590 m a.g.l. OMI-measured top of atmosphere (TOA reflectances are routinely inverted to yield aerosol products such as AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD using two different retrieval algorithms: a near-UV (OMAERUV and a multiwavelength (OMAERO technique. This study uses the archived Collection 3 data products from both algorithms. In particular, AATS and OMI AOD comparisons are presented for AATS data acquired in 20 OMAERUV retrieval pixels (15 over water and 19 OMAERO pixels (also 15 over water. At least four pixels for one of the over-water coincidences and all pixels for the over-land case were cloud-free. Coincident AOD retrievals from 17 pixels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aboard Aqua are available for two of the over-water flights and are shown to agree with AATS AODs to within root mean square (RMS differences of 0.00–0.06, depending on wavelength. Near-coincident ground-based AOD measurements from ground-based sun/sky radiometers operated as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET at three sites in and near Mexico City are also shown and are generally consistent with the AATS AODs

  14. Comparison of aerosol optical depths from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on Aura with results from airborne sunphotometry, other space and ground measurements during MILAGRO/INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Livingston

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne sunphotometer measurements are used to evaluate retrievals of extinction aerosol optical depth (AOD from spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the Aura satellite during the March 2006 Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (MILAGRO/INTEX-B. The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS flew on nine missions over the Gulf of Mexico and four in or near the Mexico City area. Retrievals of AOD from near-coincident AATS and OMI measurements are compared for three flights over the Gulf of Mexico for flight segments when the aircraft flew at altitudes 60–70 m above sea level, and for one flight over the Mexico City area where the aircraft was restricted to altitudes ~320–800 m above ground level over the rural area and ~550–750 m over the city. OMI-measured top of atmosphere (TOA reflectances are routinely inverted to yield aerosol products such as AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD using two different retrieval algorithms: a near-UV (OMAERUV and a multiwavelength (OMAERO technique. This study uses the archived Collection 3 data products from both algorithms. In particular, AATS and OMI AOD comparisons are presented for AATS data acquired in 20 OMAERUV retrieval pixels (15 over water and 19 OMAERO pixels (also 15 over water. At least four pixels for one of the over-water coincidences and all pixels for the over-land case were cloud-free. Coincident AOD retrievals from 17 pixels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aboard Aqua are available for two of the over-water flights and are shown to agree with AATS AODs to within root mean square (RMS differences of 0.00–0.06, depending on wavelength. Near-coincident ground-based AOD measurements from ground-based sun/sky radiometers operated as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET

  15. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  16. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Healy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4 with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.. The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  17. Aerosol Optical Depth measurements at 340 nm with a Brewer spectrophotometer and comparison with Cimel sunphotometer observations at Uccle, Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Bock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Langley Plot Method (LPM is adapted for the retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values at 340 nm from Brewer#178 sun scan measurements between 335 and 345 nm (convoluted with the band pass function of the Cimel sunphotometer filter at 340 nm performed in Uccle, Belgium. The use of sun scans instead of direct sun measurements simplifies the comparison of the AOD values with quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer values. Also, the irradiance at 340 nm is larger than the one at 320.1 nm due to lower ozone absorption, thus improving the signal to noise ratio. For the selection of the cloudless days (from now on referred to as calibration quality clear days, a new set of criteria is proposed. With the adapted method, individual clear sky AOD values, for which the selection criteria are also presented in this article, are calculated for a period from September 2006 until the end of August 2010. These values are then compared to quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer measurements, showing a very good agreement (the correlation coefficient, the slope and the intercept of the regression line are respectively 0.974, 0.968 and 0.011, which proves that good quality observations can be obtained from Brewer sun scan measurements at 340 nm. The analysis of the monthly and seasonal Brewer AODs at Uccle is consistent with studies at other sites reporting on the seasonal variation of AODs in Europe. The highest values can be observed in summer and spring, whereas more than 50% of the winter AODs are lower than 0.3. On a monthly scale, the lowest AOD are observed in December and the highest values occur in June and April. No clear weekly cycle is observed for Uccle. The current cloud-screening algorithm is still an issue, which means that some AOD values can still be influenced by scattered clouds. This effect can be seen when comparing the calculated monthly mean values of the Brewer with the AERONET measurements.

  18. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  19. Modeling of solar radiation management: a comparison of simulations using reduced solar constant and stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidindi, Sirisha; Bala, Govindasamy; Modak, Angshuman; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-05-01

    The climatic effects of Solar Radiation Management (SRM) geoengineering have been often modeled by simply reducing the solar constant. This is most likely valid only for space sunshades and not for atmosphere and surface based SRM methods. In this study, a global climate model is used to evaluate the differences in the climate response to SRM by uniform solar constant reduction and stratospheric aerosols. Our analysis shows that when global mean warming from a doubling of CO2 is nearly cancelled by both these methods, they are similar when important surface and tropospheric climate variables are considered. However, a difference of 1 K in the global mean stratospheric (61-9.8 hPa) temperature is simulated between the two SRM methods. Further, while the global mean surface diffuse radiation increases by ~23 % and direct radiation decreases by about 9 % in the case of sulphate aerosol SRM method, both direct and diffuse radiation decrease by similar fractional amounts (~1.0 %) when solar constant is reduced. When CO2 fertilization effects from elevated CO2 concentration levels are removed, the contribution from shaded leaves to gross primary productivity (GPP) increases by 1.8 % in aerosol SRM because of increased diffuse light. However, this increase is almost offset by a 15.2 % decline in sunlit contribution due to reduced direct light. Overall both the SRM simulations show similar decrease in GPP (~8 %) and net primary productivity (~3 %). Based on our results we conclude that the climate states produced by a reduction in solar constant and addition of aerosols into the stratosphere can be considered almost similar except for two important aspects: stratospheric temperature change and the consequent implications for the dynamics and the chemistry of the stratosphere and the partitioning of direct versus diffuse radiation reaching the surface. Further, the likely dependence of global hydrological cycle response on aerosol particle size and the latitudinal and

  20. Comparison of aerosol hygroscopicity and mixing state between winter and summer seasons in Pearl River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongxin; Tan, Haobo; Tang, Lili; Cai, Mingfu; Yin, Yan; Li, Fei; Liu, Li; Xu, Hanbing; Chan, P. W.; Deng, Xuejiao; Wu, Dui

    2016-03-01

    Hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles are important for determining aerosol size distributions, and thus determining scattering and absorption coefficients at ambient atmospheric conditions. In this study, hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at an urban site in Guangzhou, China, were measured using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) system during the winter and the summer. The results show that the urban aerosols were composed of more-hygroscopic, less-hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic particles. For less-hygroscopic particles of 40-200 nm in diameter, the hygroscopic parameter κLH was around 0.15. For more-hygroscopic particles, the κMH was from 0.290 to 0.339 with a particle size from 40 to 200 nm. For non-hygroscopic particles, the κNH was about 0.015. It was found that the number fraction of less-hygroscopic particles (NFLH) was correlated with the atmospheric oxidation which can be presented by OC/EC. This paper attributed the larger NFLH in winter to the higher value of OC/EC (3.0). Such conditions may lead to more formation of less-hygroscopic particles. Backward trajectories cluster analysis shows that there is a certain link between air mass origin and aerosol hygroscopicity, but it seems to be independent of the level of pollution. The difference of NFNH indicates that the mixing state of aerosol particles can also be affected by air mass origin. Diurnal variations in aerosol hygroscopic parameters in both seasons show that during daytime, aerosol particles tend to have a low degree of external mixing or quasi-internal mixing, resulting in a higher NFMH and a larger κmean; during nighttime and early mornings, they tend to be mixed externally, resulting in a lower NFMH and a smaller κmean. This can be attributed to atmospheric aging effect and evolution of mixing layer height and implies that soot (non-hygroscopic) particles present to a large extent as internal mixtures by the time they leave the urban

  1. Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black CarbonReference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous AtmosphericAerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2007-04-25

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratios and graphitic nature of a rangeof black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecularmass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric particles are examinedusing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with nearedge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. UsingSTXM/NEXAFS, individual particles with diameter>100 nm are studied,thus the diversity of atmospheric particles collected during a variety offield missions is assessed. Applying a semi-quantitative peak fittingmethod to the NEXAFS spectra enables a comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS toparticles originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burns,thus allowing determination of the suitability of these materials forrepresenting atmospheric particles. Anthropogenic combustion and biomassburn particles can be distinguished from one another using both chemicalbonding and structural ordering information. While anthropogeniccombustion particles are characterized by a high proportion ofaromatic-C, the presence of benzoquinone and are highly structurallyordered, biomass burn particles exhibit lower structural ordering, asmaller proportion of aromatic-C and contain a much higher proportion ofoxygenated functional groups.

  2. Comparison between calculations of shortwave radiation with different aerosol datasets and measured data at the MSU MO (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliukhov, Aleksei; Chubarova, Natalia; Kinne, Stephan; Rivin, Gdaliy; Shatunova, Marina; Tarasova, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    The radiation block of the COSMO non-hydrostatic mesoscale model of the atmosphere and soil active layer was tested against a relatively new effective CLIRAD(FC05)-SW radiation model and radiative measurements at the Moscow State University Meteorological Observatory (MSU MO, 55.7N, 37.5E) using different aerosol datasets in cloudless conditions. We used the data of shortwave radiation components from the Kipp&Zonen net radiometer CNR4. The model simulations were performed with the application of various aerosol climatologies including the new MACv2 climatology and the aerosol and water vapor dataset from CIMEL (AERONET) sun photometer measurements. The application of the new MACv2 climatology in the CLIRAD(FC05)-SW radiation model provides the annual average relative error of the total global radiation of -3% varying from 0.5% in May to -7.7% in December. The uncertainty of radiative calculations in the COSMO model according to preliminary estimates changes from 1.4% to 8.4%. against CLIRAD(FC05)-SW radiation model with the same parameters. We showed that in clear sky conditions the sensitivity of air temperature at 2 meters to shortwave net radiation changes is about 0.7-0.9°C per100 W/m2 due to the application of aerosol climatologies over Moscow.

  3. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Ship, Aircraft and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, J. M.; Kapustin, V. N.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Covert, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We present analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements taken with a shipboard six-channel tracking sunphotometer during ACE-2. For 10 July 1997, results are also shown for measurements acquired 70 km from the ship with a fourteen-channel airborne tracking sunphotometer.

  4. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering in Mexico City: Comparison With Las Vegas, NV, and Los Angeles, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The primary site in Mexico City was an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). Similar campaigns were held in Las Vegas, NV in January-February, 2003; and Los Angeles, CA at numerous sites during all seasons from 2003 through 2007. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The photoacoustic instrument (PAS) used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In Mexico City the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of Mexico City resulted in more direct solar radiation. Further insight on the meteorological connections and population dynamics will be discussed.

  5. New materials Mr. Constructor - A comparison of: Glass,FRP and Mycelium with concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debets, N.; Gkioka, M.; Postel, M.

    2016-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual aims to inform about common and new materials, used for structural purposes. Th ree building materials are discussed. Th rough a comparison with the popular building material, concrete, their pr

  6. New materials Mr. Constructor - A comparison of: Glass,FRP and Mycelium with concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debets, N.; Gkioka, M.; Postel, M.

    2016-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual aims to inform about common and new materials, used for structural purposes. Th ree building materials are discussed. Th rough a comparison with the popular building material, concrete, their

  7. Quantitative assessment of surf-produced sea spray aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.; De Leeuw, G.; Jansen, M.; Stive, M.J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The first results are presented from a quantitative model describing the aerosol production in the surf zone. A comparison is made with aerosol produced in the surf zone as measured during EOPACE experiments in La Jolla and Monterey. The surf aerosol production was derived from aerosol concentration

  8. Quantitative assessment of surf-produced sea spray aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.; De Leeuw, G.; Jansen, M.; Stive, M.J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The first results are presented from a quantitative model describing the aerosol production in the surf zone. A comparison is made with aerosol produced in the surf zone as measured during EOPACE experiments in La Jolla and Monterey. The surf aerosol production was derived from aerosol concentration

  9. Speciation of the major inorganic salts in atmospheric aerosols of Beijing, China: Measurements and comparison with model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Ci, Zhijia; Guo, Jia; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-05-01

    In the winter and summer of 2013-2014, we used a sampling system, which consists of annular denuder, back-up filter and thermal desorption set-up, to measure the speciation of major inorganic salts in aerosols and the associated trace gases in Beijing. This sampling system can separate volatile ammonium salts (NH4NO3 and NH4Cl) from non-volatile ammonium salts ((NH4)2SO4), as well as the non-volatile nitrate and chloride. The measurement data was used as input of a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II) to investigate the gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics. Results show that (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and NH4Cl were the major inorganic salts in aerosols and mainly existed in the fine particles. The sulfate, nitrate and chloride associated with crustal ions were also important in Beijing where mineral dust concentrations were high. About 19% of sulfate in winter and 11% of sulfate in summer were associated with crustal ions and originated from heterogeneous reactions or direct emissions. The non-volatile nitrate contributed about 33% and 15% of nitrate in winter and summer, respectively. Theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for NH4NO3 and NH4Cl suggest that the gaseous precursors were sufficient to form stable volatile ammonium salts in winter, whereas the internal mixing with sulfate and crustal species were important for the formation of volatile ammonium salts in summer. The results of the thermodynamic equilibrium model reasonably agreed with the measurements of aerosols and gases, but large discrepancy existed in predicting the speciation of inorganic ammonium salts. This indicates that the assumption on crustal species in the model was important for obtaining better understanding on gas-aerosol partitioning and improving the model prediction.

  10. A miniature particle counter LOAC under meteorological balloon for the survey of stratospheric aerosols - comparison with other datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignelles, Damien; Berthet, Bwenael; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Rieger, Landon; Bourassa, Adam; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Taha, Ghassan; Khaykin, Sergey; Lurton, Thibaut; Jegou, Fabrice; Couté, Benoît; Duverger, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols contribute to the terrestrial radiative budget during large eruptive events but also during volcanic quiescent periods (Kremser et al. 2016). The survey of background stratospheric aerosols, especially in the middle stratosphere, is challenging due to extreme experimental conditions and low particle concentration. Furthermore, during periods of low volcanic activity, origins and optical properties of aerosols in the middle and high stratosphere are not well defined yet (Neely et al. 2011). We propose to study the capabilities of a new miniature particle counter called LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter), light enough to be carried under meteorological balloons, whichensure a very good frequency of flights and designed to be able to measure and discriminate between several main aerosol types. The LOAC miniature particle counter has been initially designed for balloon-borne tropospheric studies (Renard et al. 2016).Metrological performances of the LOAC instrument have been determined in the laboratory and during balloon flights. Principal limitations of the use of LOAC in the stratosphere areinduced by the temperature variations and the influence of cosmic rays. A detection threshold has been determined in the laboratory to be of 0.8 particule.cm-3 in terms of concentration which also limits the use of LOAC in the stratosphere where aerosol concentrations during volcanic quiescent periods may be lower than this limit. Since June 2013, more than 100 hundred LOAC instruments have been launched under meteorological balloons during the ChArMEx and Voltaire-LOAC field campaigns. This dataset has been studied and compared to satellite records such as OSIRIS, OMPS, and CALIOPbut also to ground-based lidar data (NDACC lidar OHP) and outputs from the WACCM/CARMA model. Results show that large variations in stratospheric aerosols are well defined by satellite but less visible in LOAC records. Instrumental LOAC limitations in the stratosphere can explain

  11. 4STAR Sky-Scanning Retrievals of Aerosol Intensive Optical Properties from Multiple Field Campaigns with Detailed Comparisons of SSA Reported During SEAC4RS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Connor; Dahlgren, R. P.; Dunagan, S.; Johnson, R.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Livingston, J.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Segal Rozenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Schmidt, S.; Holben, B.; Sinyuk, A.; Hair, J.; Anderson, B.; Ziemba, L.

    2015-01-01

    The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument combines airborne sun tracking capabilities of the Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-14) with AERONET-like sky-scanning capability and adds state-of-the-art fiber-coupled grating spectrometry to yield hyper spectral measurements of direct solar irradiance and angularly resolved sky radiance. The combination of sun-tracking and sky-scanning capability enables retrievals of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), mode-resolved aerosol size distribution (SD), asphericity, and complex refractive index, and thus also the scattering phase function, asymmetry parameter, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and absorption aerosol optical thickness (AAOT).From 2012 to 2014 4STAR participated in four major field campaigns: the U.S. Dept. of Energy TCAP I II campaigns, and NASAs SEAC4RS and ARISE campaigns. Establishing a strong performance record, 4STAR operated successfully on all flights conducted during each of these campaigns. Sky radiance spectra from scans in either constant azimuth (principal plane) or constant zenith angle (almucantar) were interspersed with direct beam measurements during level legs. During SEAC4RS and ARISE, 4STAR airborne measurements were augmented with flight-level albedo from the collocated Shortwave Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) providing improved specification of below-aircraft radiative conditions for the retrieval. Calibrated radiances and retrieved products will be presented with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of ambient SSA retrievals and measurements during SEAC4RS from 4STAR, AERONET, HSRL2, and from in situ measurements.

  12. Comparison of inhaled nitric oxide with aerosolized iloprost for treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukanov, Tsvetomir; Bucsenez, Dietrich; Springer, Wolfgang; Sebening, Christian; Rauch, Helmut; Roesch, Eva; Karck, Matthias; Gorenflo, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    Pilot study to compare the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) and aerosolized iloprost in preventing perioperative pulmonary hypertensive crises (PHTCs). Guidelines recommend the use of iNO to treat PHTCs, but treatment with iNO is not an ideal vasodilator. Aerosolized iloprost may be a possible alternative to iNO in this setting. Investigator-initiated, open-label, randomized clinical trial in 15 infants (age range 77-257 days) with left-to-right shunt (11 out of 15 with additional trisomy 21), and pulmonary hypertension (i.e. mean pulmonary artery pressure [PAP] >25 mmHg) after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomized to treatment with iNO at 10 ppm or aerosolized iloprost at 0.5 µg/kg (every 2 h). The observation period was 72 h after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of PHTCs; the secondary endpoints were mean PAP, duration of mechanical ventilation, safety of administration, and in-hospital mortality. Seven patients received iNO and eight patients received iloprost. During the observation period, 13 of the 15 patients had at least one major or minor PHTC. There was no difference between the groups with regard to the frequency of PHTCs, mean PAP and duration of mechanical ventilation (p > 0.05). In this pilot study, aerosolized iloprost had a favorable safety profile. Larger trials are needed to compare its efficacy to iNO for the treatment of perioperative pulmonary hypertension. However, neither treatment alone abolished the occurrence of PHTCs.

  13. Deposition rates of fungal spores in indoor environments, factors effecting them and comparison with non-biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaani, Hussein; Hargreaves, Megan; Ristovski, Zoran; Morawska, Lidia

    Particle deposition indoors is one of the most important factors that determine the effect of particle exposure on human health. While many studies have investigated the particle deposition of non-biological aerosols, few have investigated biological aerosols and even fewer have studied fungal spore deposition indoors. The purpose of this study was, for the first time, to investigate the deposition rates of fungal particles in a chamber of 20.4 m 3 simulating indoor environments by: (1) releasing fungal particles into the chamber, in sufficient concentrations so the particle deposition rates can be statistically analysed; (2) comparing the obtained deposition rates with non-bioaerosol particles of similar sizes, investigated under the same conditions; and (3) investigating the effects of ventilation on the particle deposition rates. The study was conducted for a wide size range of particle sizes (0.54-6.24 μm), at three different air exchange rates (0.009, 1.75 and 2.5 h -1). An Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer Spectrometer (UVAPS) was used to monitor the particle concentration decay rate. The study showed that the deposition rates of fungal spores ( Aspergillus niger and Penicillium species) and the other aerosols (canola oil and talcum powder) were similar, especially at very low air exchange rates (in the order of 0.009). Both the aerosol and the bioaerosol deposition rates were found to be a function of particle size. The results also showed increasing deposition rates with increasing ventilation rates, for all particles under investigation. These conclusions are important in understanding the dynamics of fungal spores in the air.

  14. Aerosol dynamics in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazaryan, Lilya

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, a computational model was developed for the simulation of aerosol formation through nucleation, followed by condensation and evaporation and filtration by porous material. Understanding aerosol dynamics in porous media can help improving engineering models that are used in various in

  15. Determination of PAH in airborne particulate: comparison between off-line sampling techniques and an automatic analyser based on a photoelectric aerosol sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesod, G; De Maria, R; Fontana, M; Zublena, M

    1996-10-28

    The automatic analyser is based on a photoelectric aerosol sensor, with continuous sampling and an on-line detection system. Traditional sampling monitoring systems consist of collecting airborne particulate on filters; the sample is then extracted, purified and analysed. It is possible to identify each compound and to determine its relative abundance in the total particulate matter, on the other hand, this method requires great complexity of analysis. Continuous monitoring systems allow getting quicker results to compare with threshold levels. It is also possible to obtain an easier correlation with factors such as traffic flows or meteorological conditions. However, such systems cannot quantify single compounds, and data are expressed as total PAH. The comparison between the results shows a satisfactory linearity between the data obtained with the two methods. The difference of about one order of magnitude between the data obtained with photoelectric aerosol sensor (PAS) system and the sum of the concentrations of selected PAHs determined with off-line methods can be explained with the different selectivity of the two methods employed. This work has been developed in Aosta, the administrative centre of the Aosta Valley district.

  16. Particle size measurements in the submicron range by the differential electromobility technique: comparison of aerosols from thermospray, ultrasonic, pneumatic and frit-type nebulizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Robert H.; Tan, Hsiaoming; Liu, Huiying; Montaser, Akbar; Zarrin, Fahimeh; Keady, Patricia B.

    1993-08-01

    The differential electromobility technique was used for the comparison of droplet- and particle-size distributions in the 0.02-0.8 μm range for six nebulization systems often used in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry: a thermospray nebulizer coupled to a membrane separator (TNMS); two ultrasonic nebulizers (USNs) used with desolvation; one pneumatic nebulizer (PN) used with and without desolvation; and a frit-type nebulizer. In general, volume concentration (volume of droplets or particles per cubic centimeter of injector gas) increased with NaCl concentration, and it was greater for TNMS followed by USNs compared to other nebulizers. For the desolvated aerosol produced by PN and USN, volume concentration was found to be independent of the temperature (140-180°C) of the heating tube for the desolvation device. As the nebulizer tip temperature in thermospray nebulization was varied from 160 to 240°C, a larger volume concentration of desolvated aerosol was produced. Size distributions shifted towards larger particles with increasing NaCl concentration. The implications of these observations in plasma spectrochemical measurements are discussed.

  17. MAX-DOAS observations of aerosols, formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide in the Beijing area: comparison of two profile retrieval approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vlemmix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year data set of MAX-DOAS observations in the Beijing area (2008–2012 is analysed with a focus on NO2, HCHO and aerosols. Two very different retrieval methods are applied. Method A describes the tropospheric profile with 13 layers and makes use of the optimal estimation method. Method B uses 2–4 parameters to describe the tropospheric profile and an inversion based on a least-squares fit. For each constituent (NO2, HCHO and aerosols the retrieval outcomes are compared in terms of tropospheric column densities, surface concentrations and "characteristic profile heights" (i.e. the height below which 75% of the vertically integrated tropospheric column density resides. We find best agreement between the two methods for tropospheric NO2 column densities, with a standard deviation of relative differences below 10%, a correlation of 0.99 and a linear regression with a slope of 1.03. For tropospheric HCHO column densities we find a similar slope, but also a systematic bias of almost 10% which is likely related to differences in profile height. Aerosol optical depths (AODs retrieved with method B are 20% high compared to method A. They are more in agreement with AERONET measurements, which are on average only 5% lower, however with considerable relative differences (standard deviation ~ 25%. With respect to near-surface volume mixing ratios and aerosol extinction we find considerably larger relative differences: 10 ± 30, −23 ± 28 and −8 ± 33% for aerosols, HCHO and NO2 respectively. The frequency distributions of these near-surface concentrations show however a quite good agreement, and this indicates that near-surface concentrations derived from MAX-DOAS are certainly useful in a climatological sense. A major difference between the two methods is the dynamic range of retrieved characteristic profile heights which is larger for method B than for method A. This effect is most pronounced for HCHO, where retrieved profile shapes with method

  18. The validation and comparison of the GOCI aerosol optical thickness products: a case study of Tianjin 8.12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hui; Jiang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    COMSGOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) is the first geostationary ocean color satellite in the world launched by South Korea in June 2010, which includes eight bands from the visible to the infrared band. GOCI aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 555nm was retrieved by atmospheric radiative transfer model based on two-stream approximation algorithm. Due to GOCI without near infrared band and has a high solar elevation angle, solar zenith angle must be recalibrated to solve the earth system albedo, and the surface reflectance solved by quack atmospheric correction and recalculated backward scatter coefficient. Evaluation of GOCIAOT with AERONET measurements showed that the average error becomes 0.107 from the original 0.393, that means GOCI aerosol optical thickness can be more accurately with the advanced two-stream approximation. Taking the eastern China in 3 and 4 December 2013 for example, comparing the GOCIAOT at 555nm, MODISAOT retrievals at 550nm, NPPAOT at 550nm and AERONET data products indicated that: take the AERONET data as reference, the error of three kinds of satellite data can be ordered as following: MODISAOT< GOCIAOT< NPPAOT and the GOCI-MODIS shows a bias of 0.02917 with the GOCI-NPP. GOCIAOT is 0.05714 generally bigger than that of MODISAOT. NPP-GOCI deviation is 0.10253. The deficiency of MODIS is its low spatial resolution and the high concentration of AOT will be mistaken for a cloud area. However, GOCI can well reflect the concentration and distribution of aerosols. Therefore, GOGI can provide real-time dynamic monitoring on China Eastern atmospheric environment and the accurate time event information of haze for each process can be obtained. Finally, applied GOCI to the "8.12 Tianjin bombings" and to monitor the migration and dispersion of pollutant.

  19. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  20. Comparative antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solutions evaluated using a novel standardized assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, R M S; Robinson, G M; Reynolds, D M

    2013-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces.

  1. Comparison of Electrical Properties between Fluoroapatite and Hydroxyapatite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghzizil, A.; El Herch, N.; Bouhaouss, A.; Lorente, G.; Macquete, J.

    2001-01-01

    By appropriate modifications of existing precipitation methods, apatite samples of formula M10(PO4)6X2 (M=Ca, Pb, Ba and X=F, OH) were prepared at 80°C. Samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, infrared, 31P NMR, SEM, and chemical analysis. By comparing the effect of fluoride and hydroxide ions on ionic conductivity measurements, it was concluded that the fluorinated materials (MFAp) were better conductors than other hydroxyapatites (MHAp). The F- and H+ ions are the main charge carriers, respectively, in fluoroapatite and in hydroxyapatite compounds. The most pronounced effect on the conduction properties was observed in the lead apatite material. These results should provide important physico-chemical information for ionic diffusion of the roles played by fluoride in inhibiting dental caries.

  2. Comparison of Different Wood Species as Raw Materials for Bioenergy

    OpenAIRE

    Bojana Klašnja; Saša Orlović; Zoran Galić

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Most projections of the global energy use predict that biomass will be an important component of primary energy sources in the coming decades. Short rotation plantations have the potential to become an important source of renewable energy in Europe because of the high biomass yields, a good combustion quality as solid fuel, ecological advantages and comparatively low biomass production costs. Materials and Methods: In this study, the wood of black locust Robinia pse...

  3. Comparison of phosphate materials for immobilizing cadmium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chang Oh; Chung, Doug Young; Lee, Do Kyoung; Kim, Pil Joo

    2010-02-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effects of phosphate (P) materials in reducing cadmium extractability. Seven P materials (commercial P fertilizers--fused phosphate (FP), 'fused and superphosphate' [FSP], and rock phosphate [RP]; P chemicals--Ca[H(2)PO(4)](2).H(2)O, [NH(4)](2)HPO(4), KH(2)PO(4), and K(2)HPO(4)) were selected for the test. The selected P source was mixed with Cd-contaminated soil at the rate of 0, 200, 400, 800, and 1,600 mg P kg(-1) under controlled moisture conditions at 70% of water holding capacity, then incubated for 8 weeks. FP, Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2) H(2)O, KH(2)PO(4), and K(2)HPO(4) significantly decreased NH(4)OAc-extractable Cd (plant-available form) concentrations with increasing application rates. Compared to other phosphate materials used, K(2)HPO(4) was found to be the most effective in reducing the plant-available Cd concentration in soil, mainly due to the negative charge increase caused by soil pH and phosphate adsorption. Contrary to the general information, FSP and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) increased Cd extractability at low levels of P application (MINTEQ program were significantly increased by K(2)HPO(4) addition, but the effect of Cd-P compound formation on reducing Cd extractability was negligible. Conclusively, the P-induced alleviation of Cd extractability can be attributed primarily to Cd immobilization due to the increase in soil pH and negative charge rather than Cd-P precipitation, and therefore, alkaline P materials such as K(2)HPO(4) are effective for immobilizing soil Cd.

  4. Comparison of aerosol optical properties above clouds between POLDER and AeroCom models over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season

    OpenAIRE

    F. Peers; Bellouin, Nicolas; F. Waquet; F. Ducos; P. Goloub; Mollard, J.; Myhre, G; R. B. Skeie; T. Takemura; Tanré, D.; F. Thieuleux; Zhang, K

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol properties above clouds have been retrieved over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season 2006 using satellite observations from POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances). From June to October, POLDER has observed a mean Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Thickness (ACAOT) of 0.28 and a mean Above-Clouds Single Scattering Albedo (ACSSA) of 0.87 at 550nm. These results have been used to evaluate the simulation of aerosols above clouds in five Aerosol Compariso...

  5. Iodine Standard Materials: Preparation and Inter-Laboratory Comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D D Jenson; M L Adamic; J E Olson; M G Watrous; C Vockenhuber

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is preparing to enter the community of AMS practioners who analyze for 129Iodine. We expect to take delivery of a 0.5 MV compact accelerator mass spectrometry system, built by NEC, in the early summer of 2014. The primary mission for this instrument is iodine; it is designed to analyze iodine in the +3 charge state. As part of the acceptance testing for this instrument, both at NEC and on-site in our laboratory, some sort of standard or reference material is needed to verify performance. Appropriate standard materials are not readily available in the commercial marketplace. Small quantities can sometimes be acquired from other laboratories already engaged in iodine analyses. In the longer-term, meaningful quantities of standard materials are needed for routine use in analyses, and for quality control functions1. We have prepared some standard materials, starting with elemental Woodward iodine and NIST SRM 3231 [Iodine-129 Isotopic Standard (high level)] 10-6 solution. The goal was to make mixtures at the 5x10-10, 5x10-11, 5x10-12 ratio levels, along with some unmodified Woodward, in the chemical form of silver iodide. Approximately twenty grams of each of these mixtures were prepared. The elemental Woodward iodine was dissolved in chloroform, then reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite in water. At this point the NIST spike material was added, in the form of sodium iodide. The mixed iodides were oxidized back to iodine in chloroform using hydrogen peroxide. This oxidation step was essential for isotopic equilibration of the 127 and 129 atoms. The iodine was reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite as before. Excess sulfites and sulfates were precipitated with barium nitrate. After decanting, silver nitrate was used to precipitate the desired silver iodide. Once the silver iodide was produced, the material was kept in darkness as much as possible to minimize photo-oxidation. The various mixtures were synthesized independently of each

  6. Aerosol jet printed p- and n-type electrolyte-gated transistors with a variety of electrode materials: exploring practical routes to printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kihyon; Kim, Se Hyun; Mahajan, Ankit; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2014-11-12

    Printing electrically functional liquid inks is a promising approach for achieving low-cost, large-area, additive manufacturing of flexible electronic circuits. To print thin-film transistors, a basic building block of thin-film electronics, it is important to have several options for printable electrode materials that exhibit high conductivity, high stability, and low-cost. Here we report completely aerosol jet printed (AJP) p- and n-type electrolyte-gated transistors (EGTs) using a variety of different electrode materials including highly conductive metal nanoparticles (Ag), conducting polymers (polystyrenesulfonate doped poly(3,4-ethylendedioxythiophene, PEDOT:PSS), transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide), and carbon-based materials (reduced graphene oxide). Using these source-drain electrode materials and a PEDOT:PSS/ion gel gate stack, we demonstrated all-printed p- and n-type EGTs in combination with poly(3-hexythiophene) and ZnO semiconductors. All transistor components (including electrodes, semiconductors, and gate insulators) were printed by AJP. Both kinds of devices showed typical p- and n-type transistor characteristics, and exhibited both low-threshold voltages (<2 V) and high hole and electron mobilities. Our assessment suggests Ag electrodes may be the best option in terms of overall performance for both types of EGTs.

  7. Deposition of combustion aerosols in the human respiratory tract: comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data considering nonspherical shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, W; Morawska, L; Winkler-Heil, R; Moustafa, M

    2009-12-01

    Total deposition of petrol and diesel combustion aerosols and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particles in the human respiratory tract for nasal breathing conditions was computed for 14 nonsmoking volunteers, considering the specific pulmonary function parameters of each volunteer and the specific size distribution for each inhalation experiment. Theoretical predictions were 34.6% for petrol smoke, 24.0% for diesel smoke, and 18.5% for ETS particles. Compared to the experimental results, predicted deposition values were consistently smaller than the measured data (41.4% for petrol smoke, 29.6% for diesel smoke, and 36.2% for ETS particles). The apparent discrepancy between experimental data on total deposition and modeling results may be reconciled by considering the nonspherical shape of the test aerosols by diameter-dependent dynamic shape factors to account for differences between mobility-equivalent and volume-equivalent or thermodynamic diameters. While the application of dynamic shape factors is able to explain the observed differences for petrol and diesel combustion particles, additional mechanisms may be required for ETS particle deposition, such as the size reduction upon inspiration by evaporation of volatile compounds and/or condensation-induced restructuring, and, possibly, electrical charge effects.

  8. Comparison of different Aethalometer correction schemes and a reference multi-wavelength absorption technique for ambient aerosol data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Jorge; Pöhlker, Christopher; Massabò, Dario; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Cheng, Yafang; Chi, Xuguang; Ditas, Florian; Hrabě de Angelis, Isabella; Morán-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Walter, David; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Artaxo, Paulo; Prati, Paolo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-08-01

    Deriving absorption coefficients from Aethalometer attenuation data requires different corrections to compensate for artifacts related to filter-loading effects, scattering by filter fibers, and scattering by aerosol particles. In this study, two different correction schemes were applied to seven-wavelength Aethalometer data, using multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) data as a reference absorption measurement at 637 nm. The compensation algorithms were compared to five-wavelength offline absorption measurements obtained with a multi-wavelength absorbance analyzer (MWAA), which serves as a multiple-wavelength reference measurement. The online measurements took place in the Amazon rainforest, from the wet-to-dry transition season to the dry season (June-September 2014). The mean absorption coefficient (at 637 nm) during this period was 1.8 ± 2.1 Mm-1, with a maximum of 15.9 Mm-1. Under these conditions, the filter-loading compensation was negligible. One of the correction schemes was found to artificially increase the short-wavelength absorption coefficients. It was found that accounting for the aerosol optical properties in the scattering compensation significantly affects the absorption Ångström exponent (åABS) retrievals. Proper Aethalometer data compensation schemes are crucial to retrieve the correct åABS, which is commonly implemented in brown carbon contribution calculations. Additionally, we found that the wavelength dependence of uncompensated Aethalometer attenuation data significantly correlates with the åABS retrieved from offline MWAA measurements.

  9. [Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal wall hernias: prosthesis material comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, A; Tropea, A; Monaco, N; Musmeci, G; Basile, G; Basile, F

    2011-12-01

    Hernia is due to abdominal wall weakening. This allows the contents of the abdomen to protrude from normal boundaries. Hernias are repaired by implanting a sterile surgical mesh to strengthen the weakened abdominal wall. Aim of this study is to compare the results obtained by bard Composix® L/P mesh or Dualmesh Plus Gore® implanting. The mesh has various beneficial characteristics. It is a reinforcing material for the abdominal wall, even when in the direct contact with the intestinal tract does not cause adhsion problems. The use of biocompatible materials is necessary in laparoscopic hernia repair. e-PTFE prosthesis and Dual Mesh® were the first to be used for laparoscopic treatment of the abdominal wall defects. These prosthesis are the result of many improvements, actually they are 1-mm thick and the two surfaces have different characteristics. Compound meshes are composed by e-PTFE and polypropylene with different percentage of the two materials and methods of interactions. The incidence of early complications were poor in relation to both types of implants, only seroma cases e-PTFE treated showed a prevalence of complication, in agreement with literature. About relapses in our experience we found that e-PTFE cases were predominantly. Dual Mesh® has better adaptability than Bard Composix®, which allows easier placement of the prosthesis as well as a better adaptation to the wall surface. The Bard Composix®, thanks to rigidity due to the polypropylene component has better handling than the Dual Mesh®, as it promotes a rapid and easy deployment of the prosthesis inside the abdominal cavity, favoring its positioning. The use of both prosthesis depends also on the experience specific to each operator, moreover, a rigorous surgical technique remains fundamental for the application of the mesh used.

  10. Comparison of Different Wood Species as Raw Materials for Bioenergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Klašnja

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Most projections of the global energy use predict that biomass will be an important component of primary energy sources in the coming decades. Short rotation plantations have the potential to become an important source of renewable energy in Europe because of the high biomass yields, a good combustion quality as solid fuel, ecological advantages and comparatively low biomass production costs. Materials and Methods: In this study, the wood of black locust Robinia pseudoacacia, white willow Salix alba L., poplars Populus deltoides and Populus x euramericana cl.I-214, aged eight years were examined. Immediately after the felling, sample discs were taken to assess moisture content, ash content, the width of growth rings, wood densities and calorific values, according to the standard methodology. Results:The mean values of willow, poplar and black locust wood density were 341 kg/m3, 336 kg/m3 and 602 kg/m3,respectively. The average heating values of willow poplar and black locust wood were 18.599 MJ/kg, 18.564 MJ/kg and 21.196 MJ/kg, respectively. The FVI index (average values was higher for black locust (17.186 than for poplar and willow clones, which were similar: 11.312 and 11.422 respectively. Conclusions: Black locust wood with a higher density, calorific value and ash content compared to poplar and willow wood proved to be a more suitable raw material as RES. However, it is very important, from the aspect of the application of wood of these tree species as RES, to also consider the influence of the biomass yield per unit area of the plantations established as “energy plantations”.

  11. Comparison of measurements of peroxyacyl nitrates and primary carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in Mexico City determined in 1997 and 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Ramos-Villegas, R.; Cárdenas González, B.

    2007-05-01

    The concentrations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in ambient air can be a good indicator of air quality and the effectiveness of control strategies for reducing ozone levels in urban areas. As PAN is formed by the oxidation of reactive hydrocarbons in the presence of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), it is a direct measure of the peroxyacyl radical levels produced from reactive organic emissions in the urban air shed. Carbon soot, known as black carbon (BC) or elemental carbon (EC), is a primary atmospheric aerosol species and is a good indicator of the levels of combustion emissions, particularly from diesel engines, in major cities. Mexico City is the second largest megacity in the world and has long suffered from poor air quality. Reported here are atmospheric measurements of PAN and BC obtained in Mexico City during the Mexico Megacity 2003 field study. These results are compared with measurements obtained earlier during the Investigación sobre Materia Particulada y Deterioro Atmosférico - Aerosol and Visibility Research (IMADA-AVER) campaign in 1997 to obtain an estimate of the changes in emissions in Mexico City and the effectiveness of control strategies adopted during that time. Concentrations of PAN in 1997 reached a maximum of 34 ppb with an average daily maximum of 15 ppb. The PAN levels recorded in 2003 were quite different, with an average daily maximum of 3 ppb. This dramatic reduction in PAN levels observed in 2003 indicate that reactive hydrocarbon emissions have been reduced in the city due to controls on olefins in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and also due to the significant number of newer vehicles with catalytic converters that have replaced older higher emission vehicles. In contrast, black/elemental carbon levels were similar in 1997 and 2003 indicating little improvement likely due to the lack of controls on diesel vehicles in the city. Thus, while air quality and ozone production have improved, Mexico City and other megacities continue to be a major

  12. Inter-comparison of laboratory smog chamber and flow reactor systems on organic aerosol yield and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Bruns

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of tools are used to simulate atmospheric aging, including smog chambers and flow reactors. Traditional, large-scale smog chambers age emissions over the course of hours to days, whereas flow reactors rapidly age emissions using high oxidant concentrations to reach higher degrees of oxygenation than typically attained in smog chamber experiments. The atmospheric relevance of the products generated under such rapid oxidation warrants further study. However, no previously published studies have compared the yields and chemical composition of products generated in flow reactors and smog chambers from the same starting mixture. The yields and composition of the organic aerosol formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene and of wood combustion emissions were determined using aerosol mass spectrometry in a smog chamber (SC and two flow reactors: a potential aerosol mass reactor (PAM and a micro-smog chamber (MSC. Reactants were sampled from the SC and aged in the MSC and PAM using a range of hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations and then photo-chemically aged in the SC. The maximum yields/emission factors and the chemical composition of the products in both the α-pinene and wood combustion systems determined with the PAM and SC agreed reasonably well. High OH exposures have been shown previously to lower yields by breaking carbon-carbon bonds and forming higher volatility species, which reside largely in the gas phase, however, fragmentation in the PAM was not observed. The yields determined using the PAM for the α-pinene system were slightly lower than in the SC, possibly from increased wall losses of gas-phase species due to the higher surface area to volume ratios in the PAM, even when offset with better isolation of the sampled flow from the walls. The α-pinene SOA results for the MSC were not directly comparable, as particles were smaller than the optimal AMS transmission range. For the wood combustion system, emission factors

  13. Comparison of measurements of peroxyacyl nitrates and primary carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in Mexico City determined in 1997 and 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Marley

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN concentrations in ambient air can be a good indicator of air quality and the effectiveness of control strategies for reducing ozone levels in urban areas. As PAN is formed by the oxidation of reactive hydrocarbons in the presence of nitrogen dioxide (NO2, it is a direct measure of the peroxyacyl radical levels produced from reactive organic emissions in the urban air shed. Carbon soot, known as black carbon or elemental carbon, is a primary atmospheric aerosol species and is a good indicator of the levels of combustion emissions, particularly from diesel engines, in major cities. Mexico City is the second largest megacity in the world and has long suffered from poor air quality. Reported here are atmospheric measurements of PAN and black carbon obtained in Mexico City during the Mexico Megacity 2003 field study. These results are compared with measurements obtained earlier during the Investigación sobre Materia Particulada y Deterioro Atmosférico – Aerosol and Visibility Research (IMADA-AVER campaign in 1997 to obtain an estimate of the changes in emissions in Mexico City and the effectiveness of control strategies adopted during that time. Concentrations of PAN in 1997 reached a maximum of 34 ppb with an average daily maximum of 15 ppb. The PAN levels recorded in 2003 were quite different, with an average daily maximum of 3 ppb. This dramatic reduction in PAN levels observed in 2003 indicate that reactive hydrocarbon emissions have been reduced in the city due to controls on olefins in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG and also due to the significant number of newer vehicles with catalytic converters that have replaced older higher emission vehicles. In contrast, black/elemental carbon levels were similar in 1997 and 2003 indicating little improvement likely due to the lack of controls on diesel vehicles in the city. Thus, while air quality and ozone production has improved, Mexico City and other

  14. Comparison of aerosol optical properties at the sub-arctic stations ALOMAR-Andenes, Abisko and Sodankylä in late spring and summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V.; de Leeuw, G.; De Frutos, A.; Gausa, M.; Holben, B.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosol concentration and aerosol type, retrieved from observations with CIMEL sun-photometers at three sub-arctic locations at the Scandinavian Peninsula are presented. The observations were made at ALOMAR-Andenes in Norway, Abisko in Sweden and Sodankylä in Finland. This field campaign took place in late spring and summer 2007 as part of the activities of the International Polar Year (IPY) within the POLARCAT project at ALOMAR and Abisko. Aerosol properties were characterized using the relationship between the aerosol optical depth and the Ångström Exponent. The characteristics of the predominant aerosol type and microphysics are largely determined by the location of the site (continental or coastal). During summer the fine mode particles dominate, as indicated by the fine mode volume fraction and the Ångström Exponent. The aerosol concentration was on average very low, except during an event in which long-range transported aerosols (dust and pollution) were detected.

  15. 4-D comparison method to study the NOy partitioning in summer polar stratosphere – Influence of aerosol burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dufour

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available On 21–22 August 2001, NO, NO2 and HNO3 mixing ratio profiles were measured at high latitudes during sunset and sunrise using the Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere (LPMA and the DOAS experiments under stratospheric balloon. Photochemical simulations using the chemistry module of the Reprobus Chemistry Transport Model (CTM that are constrained by ozone and total NOy balloon observations reproduce well the partitioning of NOx and NOy when model results are calculated at the exact time and location of the measurement for each tangent altitude. Taking the recently recommended reaction rate coefficients for the NOy partitioning (JPL-2003 and using realistic aerosol surface area in order to initialise the model leads to an agreement between calculations and measurements better than 10% all over the covered altitude range.

  16. A Comparison Analysis of Chemical Composition of Aerosols in the Dust and Non-Dust Periods in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仁健; 徐永福; 韩志伟

    2004-01-01

    Dust events occurred frequently in Beijing in recent years. In this work, 120 aerosol samples were collected in two typical dust events (21-22 March and 15 May) and a non-dust period in Beijing from March to May 2001. Samples were analyzed for major elemental components by the Proton Induced Xray Emission (PIXE) method. Results show that the enrichment factors of crustal elements such as Mg,Al, and Ti had little differences between the dust period and the non-dust period in Beijing, while the enrichment factors of other elements that have a relation to anthropogenic emissions were very low during the dust period. The results derived by using multivariate factor analysis from the observation data show that the sources such as soil dust, industry, and fuel combustion were among the major contributors to the particles in Beijing.

  17. Magnetic and Electrical Characteristics of Cobalt-Based Amorphous Materials and Comparison to a Permalloy Type Polycrystalline Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieserman, William R.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic component designers are always looking for improved soft magnetic core materials to increase the efficiency, temperature rating and power density of transformers, motors, generators and alternators, and energy density of inductors. In this paper, we report on the experimental investigation of commercially available cobalt-based amorphous alloys which, in their processing, were subjected to two different types of magnetic field anneals: A longitudinal magnetic field anneal or a transverse magnetic field anneal. The longitudinal field annealed material investigated was Metglas 2714A. The electrical and magnetic characteristics of this material were investigated over the frequency range of 1 to 200 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 150 C for both sine and square wave voltage excitation. The specific core loss was lower for the square than the sine wave voltage excitation for the same maximum flux density, frequency and temperature. The transverse magnetic field annealed core materials include Metglas 2714AF and Vacuumschmelze 6025F. These two materials were experimentally characterized over the frequency range of 10 to 200 kHz for sine wave voltage excitation and 23 C only. A comparison of the 2174A to 2714AF found that 2714AF always had lower specific core loss than 2714A for any given magnetic flux density and frequency and the ratio of specific core loss of 2714A to 2714AF was dependent on both magnetic flux density and frequency. A comparison was also made of the 2714A, 2714AF, and 6025F materials to two different tape thicknesses of the polycrystalline Supermalloy material and the results show that 2714AF and 6025F have the lowest specific core loss at 100 kHz over the magnetic flux density range of 0.1 to 0.4 Tesla.

  18. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-J. Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and ion chromatography (IC, for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3–99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8–3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1–2% (v/v of acetone (or 2–4% (v/v of acetonitrile was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1–15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1–103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  19. Comparison of different Aethalometer correction schemes and a reference multi-wavelength absorption technique for ambient aerosol data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saturno

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deriving absorption coefficients from Aethalometer attenuation data requires different corrections to compensate for artifacts related to filter-loading effects, scattering by filter fibers, and scattering by aerosol particles. In this study, two different correction schemes were applied to seven-wavelength Aethalometer data, using multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP data as a reference absorption measurement at 637 nm. The compensation algorithms were compared to five-wavelength offline absorption measurements obtained with a multi-wavelength absorbance analyzer (MWAA, which serves as a multiple-wavelength reference measurement. The online measurements took place in the Amazon rainforest, from the wet-to-dry transition season to the dry season (June–September 2014. The mean absorption coefficient (at 637 nm during this period was 1.8 ± 2.1 Mm−1, with a maximum of 15.9 Mm−1. Under these conditions, the filter-loading compensation was negligible. One of the correction schemes was found to artificially increase the short-wavelength absorption coefficients. It was found that accounting for the aerosol optical properties in the scattering compensation significantly affects the absorption Ångström exponent (åABS retrievals. Proper Aethalometer data compensation schemes are crucial to retrieve the correct åABS, which is commonly implemented in brown carbon contribution calculations. Additionally, we found that the wavelength dependence of uncompensated Aethalometer attenuation data significantly correlates with the åABS retrieved from offline MWAA measurements.

  20. A Comparison of Similar Aerosol Measurements made on the NASA P-3B, DC-8 and NSF C-130 Aircraft during TRACE-P and ACE-ASIA, An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Kapustin, V.

    2002-12-01

    Two major aircraft experiments occurred off the Pacific coast of Asia during spring, 2001: the NASA sponsored Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) and the NSF sponsored Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-ASIA). Both experiments studied emissions from the Asian continent (biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, and dust). TRACE-P focussed on trace gases and aerosol during March/April and was based primarily in Hong Kong and Yokota AFB, Japan and involved two aircraft: the NASA DC-8 and the NASA P3-B. ACE-ASIA focussed on aerosol and radiation during April/May and was based in Iwakuni MCAS, Japan and involved n the NSF C-130. This paper will compare aerosol measurments from these aircraft including aerosol concentrations, size distributions (and integral properties), chemistry, and optical properties. Interagency cooperation helped coordinate five flights (three between the P3-B and DC-8, two between the P3-B and the C-130) where time was devoted to flying "wingtip-to-wingtip" (within 500 m, typically less) for inter-comparison of measurements. These inter-comparisons included 12 horizontal legs and 13 vertical profiles allowing for comparison of data at numerous altitudes and conditions. Time series of various parameters for the inter-comparison portion of each flight showed that even when there was disagreement between the absolute value of a particular measurement, trends in the data were usually duplicated. Best overall agreement was for the CN concentrations, scattering and absorptions coefficients (especially for the C-130 and P3-B), DMA and OPC size distributions, and NH4 concentrations. Largest differences were often for parameters related to the super-micron aerosols, where aircraft sampling has difficulties (inlet losses-each plane had different inlets, losses in plumbing, etc.). Means and variances of comparable measurements for horizontal legs were calculated for each platform and allow for an assessment of

  1. Is macroporosity absolutely required for preliminary in vitro bone biomaterial study? A comparison between porous materials and flat materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juliana T Y; Chow, King L; Wang, Kefeng; Tsang, Wai-Hung

    2011-11-08

    Porous materials are highly preferred for bone tissue engineering due to space for blood vessel ingrowth, but this may introduce extra experimental variations because of the difficulty in precise control of porosity. In order to decide whether it is absolutely necessary to use porous materials in in vitro comparative osteogenesis study of materials with different chemistries, we carried out osteoinductivity study using C3H/10T1/2 cells, pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), on seven material types: hydroxyapatite (HA), α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and b-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in both porous and dense forms and tissue culture plastic. For all materials under test, dense materials give higher alkaline phosphatase gene (Alp) expression compared with porous materials. In addition, the cell density effects on the 10T1/2 cells were assessed through alkaline phosphatase protein (ALP) enzymatic assay. The ALP expression was higher for higher initial cell plating density and this explains the greater osteoinductivity of dense materials compared with porous materials for in vitro study as porous materials would have higher surface area. On the other hand, the same trend of Alp mRNA level (HA > β-TCP > α-TCP) was observed for both porous and dense materials, validating the use of dense flat materials for comparative study of materials with different chemistries for more reliable comparison when well-defined porous materials are not available. The avoidance of porosity variation would probably facilitate more reproducible results. This study does not suggest porosity is not required for experiments related to bone regeneration application, but emphasizes that there is often a tradeoff between higher clinical relevance, and less variation in a less complex set up, which facilitates a statistically significant conclusion. Technically, we also show that the base of normalization for ALP activity may influence the conclusion and there may be ALP activity from

  2. Material Property Correlations: Comparisons between FRAPCON-3.4, FRAPTRAN 1.4, and MATPRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.

    2010-08-01

    Sections 3 and 4, respectively. In addition to describing the material property correlations used in the subroutines of FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN, this report also provides a variety of comparisons between material property correlations and data. Although they are frequently identical, comparisons are made between the material property correlations used in the FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN codes. Comparisons are also made between the material property correlations used in MATPRO, a compilation of fuel and cladding material property correlations with an extensive history of used with various fuel performance and severe accident codes. For a number of reasons, consistency between the material property correlations in FRAPCON-3, FRAPTRAN, and MATPRO has never been complete. However, the current versions of FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN use a relatively consistent set of correlations for the properties that are used by both codes. The material property correlations in the most recent version of MATPRO are documented in Volume 4 of NUREG/CR-6150. In addition to comparison of the various correlations, correlation-to-data comparisons are also made with FRAPCON-3, FRAPTRAN, and MATPRO. All comparisons made in this report are based on the material property correlations used in the most recent version of the FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN codes, FRAPCON-3.4 and FRAPTRAN 1.4. The source code for each material property correlation discussed will be provided for FRAPCON-3.4 and FRAPTRAN 1.4 (see appendix) as well as a range of applicability and an estimate of uncertainty where possible.

  3. Effects of substrate materials on piezoelectric properties of BaTiO3 thick films deposited by aerosol deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Masato; Arai, Ken-Ichi; Sugimoto, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Piezoelectric properties were evaluated for annealed BaTiO3 (BT) films formed by aerosol deposition on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Fe-Cr-Al-based heat-resistant stainless steel (SS). The piezoelectric constants d 31 of BT films annealed at 1200 °C formed on YSZ and SS were -71 and -41 pm/V, respectively. The effects of different substrates on piezoelectric properties were investigated. The grain sizes of the films formed on YSZ and SS were 1.5 and 1.0 µm, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis using a two-dimensional stress method revealed that the respective residual stresses of the films formed on YSZ and SS were -55 ± 8 and -32 ± 7 MPa, respectively, as compressive stresses. The c-domain structure was formed preferentially in the films on SS because of its larger compressive stress. These results suggest that differences in piezoelectric properties attributable to substrates result from differences in compressive stress magnitude and the volume fraction between the c- and a-domains.

  4. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  5. Leaching behaviour of rock materials and a comparison with slag used in road construction

    OpenAIRE

    Tossavainen, Mia

    2000-01-01

    Leaching characteristics are used for the evaluation of secondary materials used in road construction. In order to form a basis for comparison of the leachability, Swedish rock material have been investigated using the availability test NT ENVIR 003. Microscopic studies of the mineral composition, Acid-Base-Accounting and pH-measurements have been used to explain the leaching results. Overall, the content of identified opaque minerals is low and the leachable amounts of the heavy metal elemen...

  6. Wintertime organic and inorganic aerosols in Lanzhou, China: sources, processes, and comparison with the results during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Shi, Jinsen; Zhang, Qi; Ge, Xinlei; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Vonwiller, Matthias; Szidat, Sönke; Ge, Jinming; Ma, Jianmin; An, Yanqing; Kang, Shichang; Qin, Dahe

    2016-12-01

    Lanzhou, which is located in a steep alpine valley in western China, is one of the most polluted cities in China during the wintertime. In this study, an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a seven-wavelength aethalometer, and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) were deployed during 10 January to 4 February 2014 to study the mass concentrations, chemical processes, and sources of submicrometer particulate matter (PM1). The average PM1 concentration during this study was 57.3 µg m-3 (ranging from 2.1 to 229.7 µg m-3 for hourly averages), with organic aerosol (OA) accounting for 51.2 %, followed by nitrate (16.5 %), sulfate (12.5 %), ammonium (10.3 %), black carbon (BC, 6.4 %), and chloride (3.0 %). The mass concentration of PM1 during winter was more than twice the average value observed at the same site in summer 2012 (24.5 µg m-3), but the mass fraction of OA was similar in the two seasons. Nitrate contributed a significantly higher fraction to the PM1 mass in winter than summer (16.5 % vs. 10 %), largely due to more favored partitioning to the particle phase at low air temperature. The mass fractions of both OA and nitrate increased by ˜ 5 % (47 to 52 for OA and 13 to 18 % for nitrate) with the increase of the total PM1 mass loading, while the average sulfate fraction decreased by 6 % (17 to 11 %), indicating the importance of OA and nitrate for the heavy air pollution events in Lanzhou. The size distributions of OA, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, and chloride all peaked at ˜ 500 nm, with OA being slightly broader, suggesting that aerosol particles were internally mixed during winter, likely due to frequently calm and stagnant air conditions during wintertime in Lanzhou (average wind speed: 0.82 m s-1).The average mass spectrum of OA showed a medium oxidation degree (average O / C ratio of 0.28), which was lower than that during summer 2012 (O / C = 0.33). This is consistent with weaker photochemical processing

  7. Inter-comparison of laboratory smog chamber and flow reactor systems on organic aerosol yield and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, E. A.; El Haddad, I.; Keller, A.; Klein, F.; Kumar, N. K.; Pieber, S. M.; Corbin, J. C.; Slowik, J. G.; Brune, W. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-06-01

    A variety of tools are used to simulate atmospheric aging, including smog chambers and flow reactors. Traditional, large-scale smog chambers age emissions over the course of hours to days, whereas flow reactors rapidly age emissions using high oxidant concentrations to reach higher degrees of oxygenation than typically attained in smog chamber experiments. The atmospheric relevance of the products generated under such rapid oxidation warrants further study. However, no previously published studies have compared the yields and chemical composition of products generated in flow reactors and smog chambers from the same starting mixture. The yields and composition of the organic aerosol formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene and of wood-combustion emissions in a smog chamber (SC) and two flow reactors: a potential aerosol mass reactor (PAM) and a micro-smog chamber (MSC), were determined using aerosol mass spectrometry. Reactants were sampled from the SC and aged in the MSC and the PAM using a range of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and then photo-chemically aged in the SC. The chemical composition, as well as the maximum yields and emission factors, of the products in both the α-pinene and wood-combustion systems determined with the PAM and the SC agreed reasonably well. High OH exposures have been shown previously to lower yields by breaking carbon-carbon bonds and forming higher volatility species, which reside largely in the gas phase; however, fragmentation in the PAM was not observed. The yields determined using the PAM for the α-pinene system were slightly lower than in the SC, possibly from increased wall losses of gas phase species due to the higher surface area to volume ratios in the PAM, even when offset with better isolation of the sampled flow from the walls. The α-pinene SOA results for the MSC were not directly comparable, as particles were smaller than the optimal AMS transmission range. The higher supersaturation in the flow reactors

  8. Comparison of Two Xenograft Materials Used in Sinus Lift Procedures: Material Characterization and In Vivo Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Piedad Ramírez Fernández

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information about graft material characteristic is crucial to evaluate their clinical outcomes. The present study evaluates the physico-chemical characteristics of two xenografts manufactured on an industrial scale deproteinized at different temperatures (non-sintered and sintered in accordance with a protocol previously used in sinus lift procedures. It compares how the physico-chemical properties influence the material’s performance in vivo by a histomorphometric study in retrieved bone biopsies following maxillary sinus augmentation in 10 clinical cases. An X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the typical structure of hydroxyapatite (HA for both materials. Both xenografts were porous and exhibited intraparticle pores. Strong differences were observed in terms of porosity, crystallinity, and calcium/phosphate. Histomorphometric measurements on the bone biopsies showed statistically significant differences. The physic-chemical assessment of both xenografts, made in accordance with the protocol developed on an industrial scale, confirmed that these products present excellent biocompatibilitity, with similar characteristics to natural bone. The sintered HA xenografts exhibited greater osteoconductivity, but were not completely resorbable (30.80 ± 0.88% residual material. The non-sintered HA xenografts induced about 25.92 ± 1.61% of new bone and a high level of degradation after six months of implantation. Differences in the physico-chemical characteristics found between the two HA xenografts determined a different behavior for this material.

  9. Comparison of Candida Albicans Adherence to Conventional Acrylic Denture Base Materials and Injection Molding Acrylic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Aslanimehr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Candida species are believed to play an important role in initiation and progression of denture stomatitis. The type of the denture material also influences the adhesion of candida and development of stomatitis. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the adherence of candida albicans to the conventional and injection molding acrylic denture base materials. Materials and Method: Twenty injection molding and 20 conventional pressure pack acrylic discs (10×10×2 mm were prepared according to their manufacturer’s instructions. Immediately before the study, samples were placed in sterile water for 3 days to remove residual monomers. The samples were then sterilized using an ultraviolet light unit for 10 minutes. 1×108 Cfu/ml suspension of candida albicans ATCC-10231 was prepared from 48 h cultured organism on sabouraud dextrose agar plates incubated at 37oC. 100 μL of this suspension was placed on the surface of each disk. After being incubated at 37oC for 1 hour, the samples were washed with normal saline to remove non-adherent cells. Attached cells were counted using the colony count method after shaking at 3000 rmp for 20 seconds. Finally, each group was tested for 108 times and the data were statistically analyzed by t-test. Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that differences in colony count average of candida albicans adherence to conventional acrylic materials (8.3×103 comparing to injection molding acrylic resins (6×103 were statistically significant (p<0.001. Conclusion: Significant reduction of candida albicans adherence to the injection acrylic resin materials makes them valuable for patients with high risk of denture stomatitis.

  10. Comparison of Candida Albicans Adherence to Conventional Acrylic Denture Base Materials and Injection Molding Acrylic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanimehr, Masoomeh; Rezvani, Shirin; Mahmoudi, Ali; Moosavi, Najmeh

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Candida species are believed to play an important role in initiation and progression of denture stomatitis. The type of the denture material also influences the adhesion of candida and development of stomatitis. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the adherence of candida albicans to the conventional and injection molding acrylic denture base materials. Materials and Method: Twenty injection molding and 20 conventional pressure pack acrylic discs (10×10×2 mm) were prepared according to their manufacturer’s instructions. Immediately before the study, samples were placed in sterile water for 3 days to remove residual monomers. The samples were then sterilized using an ultraviolet light unit for 10 minutes. 1×108 Cfu/ml suspension of candida albicans ATCC-10231 was prepared from 48 h cultured organism on sabouraud dextrose agar plates incubated at 37oC. 100 μL of this suspension was placed on the surface of each disk. After being incubated at 37oC for 1 hour, the samples were washed with normal saline to remove non-adherent cells. Attached cells were counted using the colony count method after shaking at 3000 rmp for 20 seconds. Finally, each group was tested for 108 times and the data were statistically analyzed by t-test. Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that differences in colony count average of candida albicans adherence to conventional acrylic materials (8.3×103) comparing to injection molding acrylic resins (6×103) were statistically significant (pcandida albicans adherence to the injection acrylic resin materials makes them valuable for patients with high risk of denture stomatitis. PMID:28280761

  11. Effects of relative humidity on aerosol light scattering and its importance for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, Paul; Clemer, Katrijn; Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Irie, Hitoshi; Henzing, Bas; Fierz-Schmidhauser, Rahel; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Baltensperger, Urs; Weingartner, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    In the field, in-situ measurements of aerosol light scattering are often performed under dry conditions (relative humidity RH MAAP). This combination of measurements allows the determination of the aerosol extinction coefficient at ambient RH. Three MAX-DOAS (multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy) instruments retrieved vertical profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficient during CINDI. The retrieved aerosol extinction corresponding to the lowest profile layer can now be directly compared to the in-situ value, which is now re-calculated to ambient RH.

  12. Characterization of ambient aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Part II: overview of the results at the CENICA supersite and comparison to previous studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, D.; Dzepina, K.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Johnson, K. S.; Zuberi, B.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Y.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2005-06-01

    An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the CENICA Supersite during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study from 31 March-4 May 2003. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 µm (NR-PM1) with high time and size-resolution. Measurements of Black Carbon (BC) using an aethalometer, and estimated soil concentrations from Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis of impactor substrates are also presented and combined with the AMS in order to include refractory material and estimate the total PM2.5 mass concentration at CENICA during this campaign. In Mexico City, the organic fraction of the estimated PM2.5 at CENICA represents 54.6% of the mass, with the rest consisting of inorganic compounds (mainly ammonium nitrate and sulfate/ammonium salts), BC, and soil. Inorganic compounds represent 27.5% of PM2.5; BC mass concentration is about 11%; while soil represents about 6.9%. The NR species and BC have diurnal cycles that can be qualitatively interpreted as the interplay of direct emissions, photochemical production in the atmosphere followed by condensation and gas-to-particle partitioning, boundary layer dynamics, and/or advection. Bi- and trimodal size distributions are observed for the AMS species, with a small combustion (likely traffic) organic particle mode and an accumulation mode that contains mainly organic and secondary inorganic compounds. The AMS and BC mass concentrations, size distributions, and diurnal cycles are found to be qualitatively similar to those from most previous field measurements in Mexico City.

  13. The European aerosol budget in 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aan de Brugh, J.M.J.; Schaap, M.; Vignati, E.; Dentener, F.J.; Kahnert, M.; Sofiev, M.A.; Huijnen, V.; Krol, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the aerosol budget over Europe in 2006 calculated with the global transport model TM5 coupled to the size-resolved aerosol module M7. Comparison with ground observations indicates that the model reproduces the observed concentrations quite well with an expected slight underestima

  14. Aerosol generation by raindrop impact on soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Young Soo; Buie, Cullen R

    2015-01-14

    Aerosols are investigated because of their significant impact on the environment and human health. To date, windblown dust and sea salt from sea spray through bursting bubbles have been considered the chief mechanisms of environmental aerosol dispersion. Here we investigate aerosol generation from droplets hitting wettable porous surfaces including various classifications of soil. We demonstrate that droplets can release aerosols when they influence porous surfaces, and these aerosols can deliver elements of the porous medium to the environment. Experiments on various porous media including soil and engineering materials reveal that knowledge of the surface properties and impact conditions can be used to predict when frenzied aerosol generation will occur. This study highlights new phenomena associated with droplets on porous media that could have implications for the investigation of aerosol generation in the environment.

  15. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles and its relation to nucleation scavenging in clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenningsson, B.

    1997-11-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are important in several aspects. Some major aerosol constituents that are deposited in ecosystems are acidic or fertilizers and some minor or trace constituents are toxic. Aerosol particles are also involved in the earth`s radiation balance, both directly by scattering the sunlight and indirectly by influencing the clouds. All these effects are influenced by the interaction between the aerosol particles and water vapour. A tandem differential mobility analyser (TDMA) has been designed to measure hygroscopic growth, i.e. the particle diameter change due to uptake of water at well defined relative humidities below 100%. Tests of the instrument performance have been made using aerosol particles of pure inorganic salts. Three field experiments have been performed as parts of large fog and cloud experiments. Bimodal hygroscopic growth spectra were found: less-hygroscopic particles containing a few percent and more-hygroscopic particles around 50% by volume of hygroscopically active material. In general the fraction of less-hygroscopic particles decreases with particle size and it is larger in polluted continental aerosols than in remote background aerosols. This external mixing cannot be fully understood using present views on the formation of aerosols. Evidence or the importance of the external mixing on the cloud nucleating properties of the particles are found in comparisons between hygroscopic growth spectra for the total aerosol, the interstitial aerosol in clouds, and cloud drop residuals. Cloud condensation nuclei spectra, calculated using aerosol particle size distributions and hygroscopic growth spectra, in combination with information on the major inorganic ions are presented. These CCN spectra reveal for instance that the influence of less-hygroscopic particles on the cloud droplets increases with increasing peak supersaturation. The fraction of the particles that were scavenged to cloud drops, as a function of particle

  16. A seasonal time history of the size resolved composition of fine aerosol in Manchester UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choularton, Thomas; Martin, Claire; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh; Bower, Keith; Gallagher, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in urban centres now using sophisticated instruments that measure aerosol properties needed to determine their effects on human health, air quality and climate change) showing that a significant fraction of urban aerosols (mainly from automotive sources) are composed of organic compounds with implications for human health. In this project we have produced the first seasonal aerosol composition and emission database for the City of Manchester in the UK Several recent projects have been conducted by SEAES looking at fundamental properties of urban atmospheric aerosol to understand their influence on climate. This work is now expanding through collaboration with the School of Geography & Centre for Occupational & Environmental Health to investigate urban aerosol emission impacts on human health In this paper we present a compendium of data from field campaigns in Manchester city centre over the past decade. The data are from six different campaigns, between 2001 - 2007, each campaign was between 2 weeks and 2 months long predominantly from January and June periods . The data analysis includes air parcel trajectory examination and comparisons with external data, including PM10, CO and NOx data from AURN fixed monitoring sites Six Manchester fine aerosol datasets from the past decade have been quality controlled and analysed regarding averages of the size distributions of Organic, NO3, NH4 and SO4 mass loadings. It was found that: Organic material is the largest single component of the aerosol with primary aliphatic material dominating the smallest sizes, but with oxygenated secondary organic material being important in the accumulation mode. In the accumulation mode the organic material seems to be internally mixed with sulphate and nitrate. The accumulation mode particles were effective as cloud condensation nuclei. Seasonal effects surrounding atmospheric stability and photochemistry were found to play an important role in the

  17. A global aerosol classification algorithm incorporating multiple satellite data sets of aerosol and trace gas abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. M. Penning de Vries

    2015-09-01

    comparison with GACA. Whereas the presented study is of exploratory nature, we show that the developed algorithm is well suited to evaluate climate and atmospheric composition models by including aerosol type and source obtained from measurements into the comparison, instead of focusing on a single parameter, e.g., AOD. The approach could be adapted to constrain the mix of aerosol types during the process of a combined data assimilation of aerosol and trace gas observations.

  18. A global aerosol classification algorithm incorporating multiple satellite data sets of aerosol and trace gas abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. M. Penning de Vries

    2015-05-01

    in comparison with GACA. Whereas the presented study is of exploratory nature, we show that the developed algorithm is well suited to evaluate climate and atmospheric composition models by including aerosol type and source obtained from measurements into the comparison, instead of focusing on a single parameter, e.g. AOD. The approach could be adapted to constrain the mix of aerosol types during the process of a combined data assimilation of aerosol and trace gas observations.

  19. Evaluation of Air Pollution Applications of AERONET and MODIS Aerosol Column Optical Depth by Comparison with In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Reno, NV, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria Salazar, S.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Colucci, D.

    2012-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is subject to typical urban aerosol, wind-blown dust, and occasional biomass burning smoke from anthropogenic and natural fires. Reno has complex air flow at levels relevant for aerosol transport. At times recirculating mountain and urban flow arrives from the Sierra Nevada, San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA. The urban plumes are further modified by biogenic forest emissions and secondary aerosol formation during transport over the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Reno. This complicates the use of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) for air quality measurements in Reno. Our laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno has collocated multispectral photoacoustic instruments and reciprocal nephelometers to measure light absorption and light scattering coefficients as well as an AERONET operated CIMEL CE-318 ground-based sunphotometer. Preliminary measurements from August 2011 indicate substantially larger Cimel AOD than could be accounted for by use of the in situ aerosol extinction measurements combined with mixing height estimate. This poster presents new results comparing AERONET AOD and single scattering albedo and MODIS AOD with in situ measurements for summer and fall 2012, along with extensive back trajectory analysis, to evaluate conditions when satellite measurement may be useful for air pollution applications in Reno.

  20. Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO field campaign: a comparison of results from the T0 and T1 sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Marley

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In March 2006, a multiagency field campaign was undertaken in Mexico City called the Megacities Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO. Two of the five field components of the MILAGRO study focused a major part of their efforts on atmospheric particulate emissions from the Mexico City basin and their effects on radiative balance as a function of time, location and processing conditions. As part of these two MILAGRO components, measurements of aerosol optical properties were obtained at a site located in the northern part of Mexico City (T0 and also at a site located 29 km northwest (T1 to estimate the regional effects of aerosol emissions from the basin.

    Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering for fine mode aerosols were obtained at both sites. Aerosol absorption at 550 nm was similar at both sites, ranging from 7–107 Mm−1 at T0 and from 3–147 Mm−1 at T1. Aerosol scattering measured at 550 nm at T0 ranged from 16–344 Mm−1 while the aerosol scattering values at T1 were much lower than at T0 ranging from 2–136 Mm−1. Aerosol single scattering albedos (SSAs were calculated at 550 nm for the fine mode aerosols at both sites using these data. The SSAs at T0 ranged from 0.47–0.92 while SSAs at T1 ranged from 0.35–0.86. The presence of these highly absorbing fine aerosols in the lower atmosphere of the Mexico City area will result in a positive climate forcing and a local warming of the boundary layer in the region.

    Broadband UVB intensity was found to be higher at site T0, with an average of 64 μW/cm2 at solar noon, than at site T1, which had an average of 54 μW/cm2 at solar noon. Comparisons of clear-sky modeled UVB intensities with the simultaneous UVB measurements obtained at sites T0 and T1 for cloudless days indicate a larger diffuse radiation field at site T0 than at site T1. The determination of aerosol

  1. Comparison of aerosol optical properties at the sub-arctic stations ALOMAR-Andenes, Abisko and Sodankylä in late spring and summer 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, E.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V.; Leeuw, G. de; Frutos, A.de; Gausa, M.; Holben, B.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol concentration and aerosol type, retrieved from observations with CIMEL sun-photometers at three sub-arctic locations at the Scandinavian Peninsula are presented. The observations were made at ALOMAR-Andenes in Norway, Abisko in Sweden and Sodankylä in Finland. This field campaign took place

  2. Comparison of Select Analytes in Exhaled Aerosol from E-Cigarettes with Exhaled Smoke from a Conventional Cigarette and Exhaled Breaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A. Long

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled aerosols were collected following the use of two leading U.S. commercial electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes and a conventional cigarette by human subjects and analyzed for phenolics, carbonyls, water, glycerin and nicotine using a vacuum-assisted filter pad capture system. Exhaled breath blanks were determined for each subject prior to each product use and aerosol collection session. Distribution and mass balance of exhaled e-cigarette aerosol composition was greater than 99.9% water and glycerin, and a small amount (<0.06% of nicotine. Total phenolic content in exhaled e-cigarette aerosol was not distinguishable from exhaled breath blanks, while total phenolics in exhaled cigarette smoke were significantly greater than in exhaled e-cigarette aerosol and exhaled breaths, averaging 66 µg/session (range 36 to 117 µg/session. The total carbonyls in exhaled e-cigarette aerosols were also not distinguishable from exhaled breaths or room air blanks. Total carbonyls in exhaled cigarette smoke was significantly greater than in exhaled e-cigarette aerosols, exhaled breath and room air blanks, averaging 242 µg/session (range 136 to 352 µg/session. These results indicate that exhaled e-cigarette aerosol does not increase bystander exposure for phenolics and carbonyls above the levels observed in exhaled breaths of air.

  3. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  4. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  5. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  6. High Concentration Standard Aerosol Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-31

    materials. In addition to material problems, many liquids are extremely flammable or explosive when aerosolized. This can be checked by putting a small...Hochriner. D. (1975) Stub 3A 440-445. St6ber, W. Flachsbart, H. and Hochramn, D. (1970) Staub 3^, 277. Yoshida. H. Fujii, K. Yomimoto, Y. Masuda. H. and

  7. Federal funding in materials research. [Performance comparison of 20 materials research labs. with 15 other university non-MRLs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, J.G.; Hand, M.A.

    1980-09-12

    The performance of the 20 materials research laboratories (MRL's) at universities funded with institutional grants by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration is evaluated in comparison with 15 other universities (non-MRL's) receiving individually funded projects for materials research. Performance is measured by peer review and citation frequency analysis of publications, subjective evaluation of research achievements and researcher reputaton by a panel of experts, review of equipment purchases and utilization, and analysis of administrative costs. The study concludes that there are no significant differences between the MRL's and non-MRL's with respect to innovation, interdisciplinarity, utilization of specialized equipment, concentration of funding, rate of turnover, duration of research areas, and level of effort per research paper. The MRL's have a greater number of major achievements and attract researchers with higher reputations. The MRL's tend to emphasize experimental work, and in about 70% of the materials research areas sponsored by the National Science Foundation there is no overlap between the two groups. Institutional grants involve much less total (Federal plus university) administrative cost per grant dollar than project grants.

  8. The European aerosol budget in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J. Aan de Brugh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the aerosol budget over Europe in 2006 calculated with the global transport model TM5 coupled to the size-resolved aerosol module M7. Comparison with ground observations indicates that the model reproduces the observed concentrations quite well with an expected slight underestimation of PM10 due to missing emissions (e.g. resuspension. We model that a little less than half of the anthropogenic aerosols emitted in Europe are exported and the rest is removed by deposition. The anthropogenic aerosols are removed mostly by rain (95% and only 5% is removed by dry deposition. For the larger natural aerosols, especially sea salt, a larger fraction is removed by dry processes (sea salt: 70%, mineral dust: 35%. We model transport of aerosols in the jet stream in the higher atmosphere and an import of Sahara dust from the south at high altitudes. Comparison with optical measurements shows that the model reproduces the Ångström parameter very well, which indicates a correct simulation of the aerosol size distribution. However, we underestimate the aerosol optical depth. Because the surface concentrations are close to the observations, the shortage of aerosol in the model is probably at higher altitudes. We show that the discrepancies are mainly caused by an overestimation of wet-removal rates. To match the observations, the wet-removal rates have to be scaled down by a factor of about 5. In that case the modelled ground-level concentrations of sulphate and sea salt increase by 50% (which deteriorates the match, while other components stay roughly the same. Finally, it is shown that in particular events, improved fire emission estimates may significantly improve the ability of the model to simulate the aerosol optical depth. We stress that discrepancies in aerosol models can be adequately analysed if all models would provide (regional aerosol budgets, as presented in the current study.

  9. CCN activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical. The particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA and butylamine (BA reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ ≤ 0.25. Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3, contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA aerosol. TMA + N2O5 form semi-volatile organics in low RH conditions that have κ ~ 0.20, indicative of slightly soluble organic material. As RH increases, several inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR ideal mixing rules. Higher CCN activity (κ > 0.3 was also observed for humid BA+N2O5 aerosols compared with dry aerosol (κ ~ 0.2, as a result of the formation of inorganic salts such as NH4NO3 and butylamine nitrate (C4H11N · HNO3. Compared with TMA, BA+N2O5 reactions produce more volatile aerosols. The BA+N2O5 aerosol products under humid experiments were found to be very sensitive to the temperature within the stream-wise continuous flow thermal gradient CCN counter. The CCN counter, when set above a 21 °C temperature difference, evaporates BA+N2O5 aerosol formed at RH ≥ 30%; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 and is dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss settings. The aerosol behaves non-ideally, hence simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems κ ranges from 0.2 < κ < 0.7. This work indicates that

  10. Comparison of two different sea-salt aerosol schemes as implemented in air quality models applied to the Mediterranean Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jiménez-Guerrero

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of attempts have been made to incorporate sea-salt aerosol (SSA source functions in chemistry transport models with varying results according to the complexity of the scheme considered. This contribution compares the inclusion of two different SSA algorithms in two chemistry transport models: CMAQ and CHIMERE. The main goal is to examine the differences in average SSA mass and composition and to study the seasonality of the prediction of SSA when applied to the Mediterranean area with high resolution for a reference year. Dry and wet deposition schemes are also analyzed to better understand the differences observed between both models in the target area. The applied emission algorithm in CHIMERE uses a semi-empirical formulation which obtains the surface emission rate of SSA as a function of the particle size and the surface wind speed raised to the power 3.41. The emission parameterization included within CMAQ is somehow more sophisticated, since fluxes of SSA are corrected with relative humidity. In order to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, the participating algorithms as implemented in the chemistry transport models were evaluated against AOD measurements from Aeronet and available surface measurements in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, showing biases around −0.002 and −1.2 μg m−3, respectively. The results indicate that both models represent accurately the patterns and dynamics of SSA and its non-uniform behavior in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality. The levels of SSA strongly vary across the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean, reproducing CHIMERE higher annual levels in the Aegean Sea (12 μg m−3 and CMAQ in the Gulf of Lion (9 μg m−3. The large difference found for the ratio PM2.5/total SSA in CMAQ and CHIMERE is also investigated. The dry and wet removal rates are very similar for both models despite the different schemes

  11. A comparison of similar aerosol measurements made on the NASA P3-B, DC-8, and NSF C-130 aircraft during TRACE-P and ACE-Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Kapustin, V. N.; McNaughton, C.; Anderson, B. E.; Winstead, E. L.; Weber, R.; Ma, Y.; Lee, Y. N.; Talbot, R.; Dibb, J.; Anderson, T.; Doherty, S.; Covert, D.; Rogers, D.

    2004-08-01

    Two major aircraft experiments occurred off the Pacific coast of Asia during spring 2001: the NASA sponsored Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia). Both experiments studied emissions from the Asian continent (biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, and dust). TRACE-P focused on trace gases and aerosol during March/April and was based primarily in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Force Base, Japan, and involved two aircraft: the NASA DC-8 and the NASA P3-B. ACE-Asia focused on aerosol and radiation during April/May and was based in Iwakuni Marine Corps Air Station, Japan, and involved the NSF C-130. This paper compares aerosol measurements from these aircraft including aerosol concentrations, size distributions (and integral properties), chemistry, and optical properties. Best overall agreement (generally within RMS instrumental uncertainty) was for physical properties of the submircron aerosol, including condensation nuclei concentrations, scattering coefficients, and differential mobility analyzer and optical particle counter (OPC) accumulation mode size distributions. Larger differences (typically outside of the RMS uncertainty) were often observed for parameters related to the supermicron aerosols (total scattering and absorption coefficients, coarse mode Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and OPC size distributions/integral properties, and soluble chemical species usually associated with the largest particles, e.g., Na+, Cl-, Ca2+, and Mg2+), where aircraft sampling is more demanding. Some of the observed differences reflect different inlets (e.g., low-turbulence inlet enhancement of coarse mode aerosol), differences in sampling lines, and instrument configuration and design. Means and variances of comparable measurements for horizontal legs were calculated, and regression analyses were performed for each platform and allow for an

  12. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  13. Comparison of PM10 concentrations and metal content in three different sites of the Venice Lagoon: An analysis of possible aerosol sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniele Contini; Franco Belosi; Andrea Gambaro; Daniela Cesari; Angela Maria Stortini; Maria Chiara Bove

    2012-01-01

    The Venice Lagoon is exposed to atmospheric pollutants from industrial activities,thermoelectric power plants,petrochemical plants,incinerator,domestic heating,ship traffic,glass factories and vehicular emissions on the mainland.In 2005,construction began on the mobile dams (MOSE),one dam for each channel connecting the lagoon to the Adriatic Sea as a barrier against high tide.These construction works could represent an additional source of pollutants.PM10 samples were taken on random days between 2007 and 2010 at three different sites:Punta Sabbioni,Chioggia and Malamocco,located near the respective dam construction worksites.Chemical analyses of V,Cr,Fe,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn,As,Mo,Cd,Sb,T1 and Pb in PM10 samples were performed by Inductively coupled plasmaquadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and results were used to identify the main aerosol sources.The correlation of measured data with meteorology,and source apportionment,failed to highlight a contribution specifically associated to the emissions of the MOSE construction works.The comparison of the measurements at the three sites showed a substantial homogeneity of metal concentrations in the area.Source apportionment with principal component analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) showed that a four principal factors model could describe the sources of metals in PM10.Three of them were assigned to specific sources in the area and one was characterised as a source of mixed origin (anthropogenic and crustal).A specific anthropogenic source of PM10 rich in Ni and Cr,active at the Chioggia site,was also identified.

  14. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    OpenAIRE

    S. Garimella; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; D. J. Cziczo

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the cla...

  15. Comparison between X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectra of an environmental aerosol sample measured by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, J.; Yamamoto, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Tohno, S. [Department of Socio-Environmental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kitajima, Y. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-01-04

    Sulfur X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of an aerosol sample collected by an Andersen sampler were measured using a synchrotron beam line. While the XPS was more surface sensitive than XAS, the detection limit of XAS was better than that of XPS. It was concluded that the XAS was more suitable for the chemical state analysis of sulfur in aerosol samples than XPS. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. A Comparison of the OSHA Modified NIOSH Physical and Chemical Analytical Method (P and CAM) 304 and the Dust Trak Photometric Aerosol Sampler for 0-Chlorobenzylidine Malonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    form of smokes, dusts, fumes and mists. Naturally occurring aerosols include airborne dusts, clouds, mists, clay particles and sandstorms. Aerosol...case of accidental CS ingestion happened when a male took an 820 mg CS pellet because he thought it was a vitamin. The man was treated with viscous...CS contaminated juice where investigators discovered several small pellets of CS partially dissolved at the bottom of a communal juice container

  17. Comparison and statistics of aerosol properties measured in situ in the tropopause region during the aircraft campaigns of POLSTAR, LACE 98, UFA, EXPORT, INCA and SCAVEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Fiebig, M.; Hendricks, J.; Schröder, F.; Schlager, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the past few years the DLR Falcon 20, a German twin-jet research aircraft with a maximum ceiling of 13~km, has participated in a number of experiments devoted to the characterization of aerosol properties in the troposphere and the tropopause region. Total aerosol number concentrations for Aitken mode and ultrafine particles have been measured with condensation particle counters with different lower cut-off diameters in the range from 3 to 15~nm. For a subset of data, the fractionation between volatile, semi-volatile and refractory particles was determined. Total concentration of accumulation mode particles as well as aerosol size distributions were determined from measurements of a combination of optical aerosol spectrometer probes (PMS PCASP-100X and FSSP-300). In this contribution we report on mean tropospheric vertical profiles of aerosol properties and the statistics of aerosol abundance and size distributions in the upper troposphere for different campaigns mainly conducted in Europe but with differing continental character. Results of the projects LACE~98, UFA, EXPORT and SCAVEX refer to measurements over Germany and neighboring countries in spring, summer and autumn. Contrasting geographical regions are addressed by the results of the POLSTAR and INCA campaigns (high latitudes of the northern hemisphere and mid-latitudes of the southern and northern hemisphere, respectively, the latter with only small continental influence). We compare the results of the different campaigns in order to assess the representativity and natural variability of aerosol properties measured in situ in the upper troposphere and in the transition to the lower stratosphere. Experimental results are compared to simulations of the ECHAM global climate model. Simulated aerosol mass concentrations are in good agreement with observations of the mean vertical distribution of accumulation mode particles and the contrasting concentration level in the northern and southern hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  18. Comparison of the Levels of Infectious Virus in Respirable Aerosols Exhaled by Ferrets Infected with Influenza Viruses Exhibiting Diverse Transmissibility Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a major public health burden to communities around the world by causing respiratory infections that can be highly contagious and spread rapidly through the population. Despite extensive research on influenza viruses, the modes of transmission occurring most often among humans are not entirely clear. Contributing to this knowledge gap is the lack of an understanding of the levels of infectious virus present in respirable aerosols exhaled from infected hosts. Here, we used the ferret model to evaluate aerosol shedding patterns and measure the amount of infectious virus present in exhaled respirable aerosols. By comparing these parameters among a panel of human and avian influenza viruses exhibiting diverse respiratory droplet transmission efficiencies, we are able to report that ferrets infected by highly transmissible influenza viruses exhale a greater number of aerosol particles and more infectious virus within respirable aerosols than ferrets infected by influenza viruses that do not readily transmit. Our findings improve our understanding of the ferret transmission model and provide support for the potential for influenza virus aerosol transmission. PMID:23658443

  19. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  20. Temporal and spatial variations of the Vienna aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, H; Habenreich, T A; Kreiner, I; Norek, C

    1989-07-01

    For several intensive sampling periods the mass concentration, light extinction, light scattering and light absorption coefficients, and the mass size distribution of the aerosol have been determined at up to eleven location in the non-industrial town of Vienna. Obviously, large variations of the measured values have been found. The following factors influenced the aerosol markedly: wind speed, wind direction, increased aerosol production such as by space heating or traffic and resuspension. Most of the variations in aerosol were found to be caused by these factors. A comparison of the mass concentration and light absorption of the aerosol upwind and downwind of Vienna permitted the estimation of locally produced aerosols: about 50% of the mass of the aerosol and 75% of the light-absorbing aerosol appears to be produced locally.

  1. Estimating marine aerosol particle volume and number from Maritime Aerosol Network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD, aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The "average solution" MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the "best solution" dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data. However, without accurate AOD data and prior knowledge of

  2. An AERONET-based aerosol classification using the Mahalanobis distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Patrick; Giordano, Marco; Ward, Carolyne; Giles, David; Holben, Brent

    2016-09-01

    We present an aerosol classification based on AERONET aerosol data from 1993 to 2012. We used the AERONET Level 2.0 almucantar aerosol retrieval products to define several reference aerosol clusters which are characteristic of the following general aerosol types: Urban-Industrial, Biomass Burning, Mixed Aerosol, Dust, and Maritime. The classification of a particular aerosol observation as one of these aerosol types is determined by its five-dimensional Mahalanobis distance to each reference cluster. We have calculated the fractional aerosol type distribution at 190 AERONET sites, as well as the monthly variation in aerosol type at those locations. The results are presented on a global map and individually in the supplementary material. Our aerosol typing is based on recognizing that different geographic regions exhibit characteristic aerosol types. To generate reference clusters we only keep data points that lie within a Mahalanobis distance of 2 from the centroid. Our aerosol characterization is based on the AERONET retrieved quantities, therefore it does not include low optical depth values. The analysis is based on "point sources" (the AERONET sites) rather than globally distributed values. The classifications obtained will be useful in interpreting aerosol retrievals from satellite borne instruments.

  3. An AERONET-Based Aerosol Classification Using the Mahalanobis Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Patrick; Giordano, Marco; Ward, Carolyne; Giles, David; Holben, Brent

    2016-01-01

    We present an aerosol classification based on AERONET aerosol data from 1993 to 2012. We used the AERONET Level 2.0 almucantar aerosol retrieval products to define several reference aerosol clusters which are characteristic of the following general aerosol types: Urban-Industrial, Biomass Burning, Mixed Aerosol, Dust, and Maritime. The classification of a particular aerosol observation as one of these aerosol types is determined by its five-dimensional Mahalanobis distance to each reference cluster. We have calculated the fractional aerosol type distribution at 190 AERONET sites, as well as the monthly variation in aerosol type at those locations. The results are presented on a global map and individually in the supplementary material. Our aerosol typing is based on recognizing that different geographic regions exhibit characteristic aerosol types. To generate reference clusters we only keep data points that lie within a Mahalanobis distance of 2 from the centroid. Our aerosol characterization is based on the AERONET retrieved quantities, therefore it does not include low optical depth values. The analysis is based on point sources (the AERONET sites) rather than globally distributed values. The classifications obtained will be useful in interpreting aerosol retrievals from satellite borne instruments.

  4. Materials Comparison of Cutting Tools Functional Parts for Cutting of Electrical Engineering Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan ZLÁMALÍK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper concerns the comparison of functional materials parts of cutting tools used for the production of stator and rotor sheets in the electrical industry from point of view of their life. Alternatives and the properties of metal used for the production of stator and rotor components in electrical rotating machines are analysed. The main factors affecting the life of cutting tools of functional parts are analysed, one of the most important is the cutting tool functional parts material itself. Comparison of three variants of the cuttong tool funkcional parts material – 19 436 tool steel (chrome steel according to the Czech State Standard 41 9436, 19 830 high speed steel according to the Czech State Standard 41 9830 and a special powder metallurgy product – ledeburite tool steel Vanadis 10. Useful lifes of the functional components of individual cutting tools performances can be calculated from the theoretical lifes by their multiplying the coefficients of the tool design and the cutting edges shape complexity.

  5. Aerosol Observation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The aerosol observation system (AOS) is the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) platform for in situ aerosol measurements at the surface. The principal...

  6. Air quality modelling over the Eastern Mediterranean using the WRF/Chem model: Comparison of gas-phase chemistry and aerosol mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Christoudias, Theodoros; Proestos, Yiannis; Kushta, Jonilda; Hadjinicolaou, Panos; Lelieveld, Jos

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the performance of three coupled gas-phase chemistry and aerosol mechanisms included in the WRF/Chem model has been performed over the Eastern Mediterranean focusing on Cyprus during the CYPHEX campaign in 2014, using high temporal and spatial resolution. The model performance was evaluated by comparing calculations to measurements of gas phase species (O3, CO, NOx, SO2) and aerosols (PM10, PM2.5) from 13 ground stations. Initial results indicate that the calculated day-to-day and diurnal variations of the aforementioned species show good agreement with observations. The model was set up with three nested grids, downscaling to 4km over Cyprus. The meteorological boundary conditions were updated every 3 hours throughout the simulation using the Global Forecast System (GFS), while chemical boundary conditions were updated every 6 hours using the MOZART global chemical transport model. Biogenic emissions were calculated online by the the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1). Anthropogenic emissions were based on the EDGAR HTAP v2 global emission inventory, provided on a horizontal grid resolution of 0.1o × 0.1o. Three simulations were performed employing different chemistry and aerosol mechanisms; i) RADM2 chemical mechanism and MADE/SORGAM aerosols, ii) CBMZ chemical mechanism and MOSAIC aerosols, iii) MOZART chemical mechanism and MOSAIC aerosols. Results show that the WRF/Chem model satisfactorily estimates the trace gases relative concentrations at the background sites but not at the urban and traffic sites, while some differences appear between the simulated concentrations by the three mechanisms. The resulting discrepancies between the model outcome and measurements, especially at the urban and traffic sites, suggest that a higher resolution anthropogenic emission inventory might help improve fine resolution, regional air quality modelling. Differences in the simulated concentrations by the

  7. Observations of meteoric material and implications for aerosol nucleation in the winter Arctic lower stratosphere derived from in situ particle measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Curtius

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Number concentrations of total and non-volatile aerosol particles with size diameters >0.01 μm as well as particle size distributions (0.4–23 μm diameter were measured in situ in the Arctic lower stratosphere (10–20.5 km altitude. The measurements were obtained during the campaigns European Polar Stratospheric Cloud and Lee Wave Experiment (EUPLEX and Envisat-Arctic-Validation (EAV. The campaigns were based in Kiruna, Sweden, and took place from January to March 2003. Measurements were conducted onboard the Russian high-altitude research aircraft Geophysica using the low-pressure Condensation Nucleus Counter COPAS (COndensation PArticle Counter System and a modified FSSP 300 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. Around 18–20 km altitude typical total particle number concentrations nt range at 10–20 cm−3 (ambient conditions. Correlations with the trace gases nitrous oxide (N2O and trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11 are discussed. Inside the polar vortex the total number of particles >0.01 μm increases with potential temperature while N2O is decreasing which indicates a source of particles in the above polar stratosphere or mesosphere. A separate channel of the COPAS instrument measures the fraction of aerosol particles non-volatile at 250°C. Inside the polar vortex a much higher fraction of particles contained non-volatile residues than outside the vortex (~67% inside vortex, ~24% outside vortex. This is most likely due to a strongly increased fraction of meteoric material in the particles which is transported downward from the mesosphere inside the polar vortex. The high fraction of non-volatile residual particles gives therefore experimental evidence for downward transport of mesospheric air inside the polar vortex. It is also shown that the fraction of non-volatile residual particles serves directly as a suitable experimental vortex tracer. Nanometer-sized meteoric smoke particles may also serve as nuclei for the condensation of

  8. A Mesoscale Analysis of Column-Integrated Aerosol Properties in Northern India During the TIGERZ 2008 Pre-Monsoon Period and a Comparison to MODIS Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Eck, T. F.; Newcomb, W. W.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Wang, S.-H.; Singh, R. P.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of the northern Indian subcontinent produces anthropogenic pollution from urban, industrial and rural combustion sources nearly continuously and is affected by convection-induced winds driving desert and alluvial dust into the atmosphere during the premonsoon period. Within the IGP, the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project initiated the TIGERZ measurement campaign in May 2008 with an intensive operational period from May 1 to June 23, 2008. Mesoscale spatial variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD, tau) measurements at 500mn was assessed at sites around Kanpur, India, with averages ranging from 0.31 to 0.89 for spatial variability study (SVS) deployments. Sites located downwind from the city of Kanpur indicated slightly higher average aerosol optical depth (delta Tau(sub 500)=0.03-0.09). In addition, SVS AOD area-averages were compared to the long-tenn Kanpur AERONET site data: Four SVS area-averages were within +/- 1 cr of the climatological mean of the Kanpur site, while one SVS was within 2sigma below climatology. For a SVS case using AERONET inversions, the 440-870mn Angstrom exponent of approximately 0.38, the 440-870mn absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) of 1.15-1.53, and the sphericity parameter near zero suggested the occurrence of large, strongly absorbing, non-spherical aerosols over Kanpur (e.g., mixed black carbon and dust) as well as stronger absorption downwind of Kanpur. Furthermore, the 3km and lOkm Terra and Aqua MODIS C005 aerosol retrieval algorithms at tau(sub 550) were compared to the TIGERZ data set. Although MODIS retrievals at higher quality levels were comparable to the MODIS retrieval uncertainty, the total number of MODIS matchups (N) were reduced with subsequent quality levels (N=25, QA>=0; N=9,QA>=l; N=6, QA>=2; N=1, QA=3) over Kanpur during the premonsoon primarily due to the semi-bright surface, complex aerosol mixture and cloud-contaminated pixels. The TIGERZ 2008 data set provided a unique

  9. Comparison of intrapulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) and colistin after aerosol delivery and intravenous administration of CMS in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Couet, William; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients.

  10. Comparison of concentrations of selected aerosol components estimated using the AERONET data set with those from continuous/semi-continuous measurements on the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A CIEMEL sunphotometer was operated in 2012 starting from March as a part of the DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks) campaign. The site is Hankuk_UFS (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies; 37.02 °N, 127.16 °E, 167 m above sea level) located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. We also measured inorganic ions using PILS (Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler, ADI 2081, Applikon) at intervals of 25 minutes in spring and winter and BC (black carbon) using MAAP (Multiangle Absorption Photometer, Model 5012, Thermo) at intervals of 10 minutes throughout the study period. Concentrations of major chemical components were estimated from effective real and imaginary refractory indices for a mixture assuming the Maxwell-Garnett mixing of four components such as mineral dust, organic and black carbons, and ammonium sulfate (as a surrogate of secondary ions) embedded in water host. We compare ammonium sulfate of column aerosols estimated from the refractive indices with secondary ions of surface aerosols from PILS and BC of column aerosols estimated from the refractive indices with that of surface aerosols from MAAP. Since the measurement intervals are different between sunphotometer and surface instruments, we compare the concentrations when the measurement time coincides within 5 minutes.

  11. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Austin Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Runnels, Joel T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  12. Comparison of acute hemodynamic effects of aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide in adult congenital heart disease with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caojin, Zhang; Yigao, Huang; Tao, Huang; Wenhui, Huang; Chunli, Xia; Xinsheng, Huang

    2012-01-01

    To compare the acute hemodynamic effects of aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in adult congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). One hundred and eighty five adult CHDs with severe PAH were nonrandomized into two groups (iloprost, n=127; NO, n=58). Various hemodynamic parameters were measured before and after iloprost or NO inhalation. Iloprost and NO inhalation resulted in significant reductions in pulmonary arterial pressure (from 110.6±21.8 mmHg to 105.5±22.3 mmHg, piloprost and NO were compared, similar reductions in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were observed. Aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) were generally well tolerated and no patient experienced any side effects during inhalation. Aerosolized iloprost can be effectively and safely used and might be an alternative to NO for testing pulmonary vascular reactivity and treating severe PAH in adult CHD patients.

  13. Impact of Southeast Asian smoke on aerosol properties in Southwest China: First comparison of model simulations with satellite and ground observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Xia, Xiangao; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinqiang; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Fisher, Jenny A.; Keller, Christoph A.

    2017-04-01

    Smoke aerosols have been observed in Southwest China as a result of long-range transport from surrounding areas in March and April. The processes driving this transport and the resultant impact on regional aerosol optical properties are studied here through a combined use of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-Chem chemistry transport model in conjunction with satellite and the first-ever ground-based observations in the Southwest China. The potential biomass burning source regions as well as their respective contributions to aerosol loading in Southwest China are quantified. Compared to Sun photometer observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm at eight stations in the study region (10-28°N, 90-115°E, comprising Northeast India, Indo-China Peninsula, and Southwest and South China), the AOD simulated by GEOS-Chem (nested grid with 0.5° × 0.667° resolution) by using the Fire Inventory from National Center for Atmospheric Research shows an average bias of -0.17 during January 2012 to May 2013. However, during the biomass burning months (March-April), the simulated AOD is much improved with a bias of -0.04. Model sensitivity experiments show that biomass burning in Burma and Northeast India is the largest contributor to smoke AOD ( 88%) and total AOD ( 57%) over Kunming, an urban site in Southwest China. Case studies on 21-23 March 2013 show that the smoke layer in Northeast India and North Burma can extend from the surface to 4 km and then be transported to Southwest China by prevailing westerly airflow. Model-simulated AOD and vertical distribution of aerosols are respectively in good agreement with satellite measurements from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization.

  14. Inter-comparison of source apportionment models for the estimation of wood burning aerosols during wintertime in an Alpine city (Grenoble, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Favez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission of organic aerosols (OA in the ambient air by residential wood burning is nowadays a subject of great scientific concern and a growing number of studies aim at apportioning the influence of such emissions on urban air quality. In the present study, results obtained using two commonly-used source apportionment models, i.e., Chemical Mass Balance (CMB, performed with off-line filter measurements and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF, applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements, as well as using the recently-proposed aethalometer model (based on the measurement of the aerosol light absorption at different wavelengths are inter-compared. This work is performed using field data obtained during the winter season (14 to 30 January 2009 at an urban background site of a French Alpine city (Grenoble. Converging results from the different models indicate a major contribution of wood burning organic aerosols (OMwb to the organic fraction, with mean OMwb contributions to total OA of about 67%, 60% and 38% for the CMB, the aethalometer and the AMS-PMF models, respectively. Quantitative discrepancies might notably be due to the overestimation of OMwb calculated by the CMB due to the loss of semi-volatile compounds from sources to receptor site, as well as to the accounting of oxidized primary wood burning organic (OPOAwb aerosols within the Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (OOA PMF-factor. This OOA factor accounts on average for about 50% of total OM, while non-combustion sources contribute to about 25% and 28% of total OM according to the CMB and aethalometer models, respectively. Each model suggests a mean contribution of fossil fuel emissions to total OM of about 10%. A good agreement is also obtained for the source apportionment of elemental carbon (EC by both the CMB and aethalometer models, with fossil fuel emissions representing on average more than 80% of total EC.

  15. Comparison of the color stability of provisional restorative materials after storing in different drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Bankoğlu Güngör

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to compare the color stability of provisional restorative materials after stroring in different drinks. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Thirty specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were prepared from three different materials (Temdent, TRIAD ve TelioCAD. Specimens were divided into six groups according to drinks (distilled water, coffee, tea, cola, red wine and fruit juice; n=5. Specimens were stored in these drinks at 37 °C for 48 hours. The L*, a*, b* values of the specimens were measured with a spectrophometer and recorded before and after storing in drinks. Then ΔE* values were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests (α=0.05. RESULTS: Difference between the ΔE* values of specimens stored in different drinks was statistically significant (p<0.05. Color change of TelioCAD specimens was smallest in cola drink and greatest in red wine. Color change of Temdent specimens was smallest in fruit juice and greatest in coffee. For TRIAD specimens, greater color change was observed in coffee, red wine, and tea, in descending order. When the results of storing in the same drink were compared, TRIAD showed the greatest values of color change in coffee and red wine in comparison to the other provisional materials (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Color stability changed according to the type of the provisional material and the drink. When the drinks were evaluated, greater color changes were observed in coffee, and when the materials were evaluated greater color changes were observed in TRIAD.

  16. Orientation-dependent low field magnetic anomalies and room-temperature spintronic material – Mn doped ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High quality un-doped and Mn-doped ZnO films deposited by a simple aerosol spray pyrolysis technique for 20 and 30 min were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques...

  17. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  18. Model study on the dependence of primary marine aerosol emission on the sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barthel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosol composed of sea salt and organic material is an important contributor to the global aerosol load. By comparing measurements from two EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air-pollutants in Europe intensive campaigns in June 2006 and January 2007 with results from an atmospheric transport model this work shows that accounting for the influence of the sea surface temperature on the emission of primary marine aerosol improves the model results towards the measurements in both months. Different sea surface temperature dependencies were evaluated. Using correction functions based on Sofiev et al. (2011 and Jaeglé et al. (2011 improves the model results for coarse mode particles. In contrast, for the fine mode aerosols no best correction function could be found. The model captures the low sodium concentrations at the marine station Virolahti II (Finland, which is influenced by air masses from the low salinity Baltic Sea, as well as the higher concentrations at Cabauw (Netherlands and Auchencorth Moss (Scotland. These results indicate a shift towards smaller sizes with lower salinity for the emission of dry sea salt aerosols. Organic material was simulated as part of primary marine aerosol assuming an internal mixture with sea salt. A comparison of the model results for primary organic carbon with measurements by a Berner-impactor at Sao Vincente (Cape Verde indicated that the model underpredicted the observed organic carbon concentration. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of secondary organic material needs to be included in the model to improve the agreement with the measurements.

  19. Comparison of properties of silver-metal oxide electrical contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosović V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in physical properties such as density, porosity, hardness and electrical conductivity of the Ag-SnO2 and Ag-SnO2In2O3 electrical contact materials induced by introduction of metal oxide nanoparticles were investigated. Properties of the obtained silver-metal oxide nanoparticle composites are discussed and presented in comparison to their counterparts with the micro metal oxide particles as well as comparable Ag-SnO2WO3 and Ag-ZnO contact materials. Studied silvermetal oxide composites were produced by powder metallurgy method from very fine pure silver and micro- and nanoparticle metal oxide powders. Very uniform microstructures were obtained for all investigated composites and they exhibited physical properties that are comparable with relevant properties of equivalent commercial silver based electrical contact materials. Both Ag-SnO2 and Ag- SnO2In2O3 composites with metal oxide nanoparticles were found to have lower porosity, higher density and hardness than their respective counterparts which can be attributed to better dispersion hardening i.e. higher degree of dispersion of metal oxide in silver matrix.

  20. Comparison of the Radiopacities of Different Root-End Filling and Repair Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Karapınar-Kazandağ, Meriç; Kayahan, Mehmet Baybora

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of 3 repair materials, Biodentine, MM-MTA, and MTA Angelus. Standardized cylindrical rings were prepared. Samples of Biodentine MM-MTA and MTA Angelus were prepared (n = 10 in each group), filled into the rings, and preserved at 37°C until setting. A 1 mm thick dentin slice was used as control. All set specimens were removed and radiographed along with the dentine slice and a graduated aluminium step wedge. Digital images were transferred to the computer using a software. The radiographic densities of the specimens were determined, and the values were converted into millimetres of aluminium (mm Al). One-way ANOVA was used for intergroup comparison, whereas Tukey HSD test was used for detecting the group with the difference. The mean radiopacities of Biodentine, MTA Angelus, and MM-MTA were 2.8 ± 0.48, 4.72 ± 0.45, and 5.18 ± 0.51 mm Al, respectively. The radiopacity of Biodentine was significantly lower compared to other materials (P = 0.001), whereas no significant difference was noted between MTA Angelus and MM-MTA (P = 0.109). All materials had significantly higher radiopacities compared to dentine. The relatively lower radiopacity of Biodentine can be improved to achieve more reliable results in procedures such as retrograde fillings. PMID:24260018

  1. Comparison of the Radiopacities of Different Root-End Filling and Repair Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jale Tanalp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the radiopacity of 3 repair materials, Biodentine, MM-MTA, and MTA Angelus. Standardized cylindrical rings were prepared. Samples of Biodentine MM-MTA and MTA Angelus were prepared ( in each group, filled into the rings, and preserved at 37°C until setting. A 1 mm thick dentin slice was used as control. All set specimens were removed and radiographed along with the dentine slice and a graduated aluminium step wedge. Digital images were transferred to the computer using a software. The radiographic densities of the specimens were determined, and the values were converted into millimetres of aluminium (mm Al. One-way ANOVA was used for intergroup comparison, whereas Tukey HSD test was used for detecting the group with the difference. The mean radiopacities of Biodentine, MTA Angelus, and MM-MTA were 2.8 ± 0.48, 4.72 ± 0.45, and 5.18 ± 0.51 mm Al, respectively. The radiopacity of Biodentine was significantly lower compared to other materials (, whereas no significant difference was noted between MTA Angelus and MM-MTA (. All materials had significantly higher radiopacities compared to dentine. The relatively lower radiopacity of Biodentine can be improved to achieve more reliable results in procedures such as retrograde fillings.

  2. Determination of phthalates in polymer materials - comparison of GC/MS and GC/ECD methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jaworek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents two methods for determination of phthalates in polymer materials. The methods compared were gas chromatography combined with the mass spectrometry (GC/MS and gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC/ECD. The GC/ECD technique was chosen for this comparison, because the ECD detector was one of few capable of detecting phthalates. In both cases the same procedure of sample preparation with ultrasonic extraction was applied. Overall recoveries were 76-100 % with relative of standard deviation (R.S.D. values in the range 0.6-19 %. The values of limit of detection (LOD for GC/MS method ranged from 3.46 µg mL- 1 to 10.10 µg mL- 1, depending on the determined phthalate, while in case of the GC/ECD method they were in the range from 2.97 µg mL- 1 to 4.29 µg mL- 1. The methods were applied for determination of: dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, diisoocyl phthalate in polymer material. The seventeen kinds of samples were analyzed. Most of the materials selected for the analyses were made from polyethylene (PE, polyvinyl chloride (PVC and polystyrene (PS.

  3. Aerosol Properties Over the Eastern US in July 2002: Comparison of Long-Term Measurements With Results From a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, U.; Husain, L.; Khan, A. J.; Ahmed, T.; Adelman, Z.; Xiu, A.; Arunachalam, S.

    2007-12-01

    Elemental or black carbon aerosols absorb solar radiation and have direct and indirect effect on radiative forcing. Unfortunately, global EC data are rather sparse. Therefore, for planetary radiative forcing calculations atmospheric EC burdens are obtained from model estimates based on energy consumptions. In this work we have attempted to evaluate a multiscale integrated model for aerosol physics, chemistry and radiative effects using measurements of EC and sulfate at two sites in New York State. The EC and sulfate concentrations were measured for January, February, July and August 2002 at Mayville, and Whiteface Mountain. Our Mayville site is located near Lake Chautauqua, ~ 100 km southwest of Buffalo and ~ 530 km upwind of Whiteface Mountain. Our observatory at Whiteface Mountain is located at an altitude of 1.5 km above mean sea level. Whereas at Mayville samples were collected daily, the duration of sampling at Whiteface Mountain varied from 6 to 48 h. The samples were analyzed for EC using the thermal optical method and sulfate by ion chromatography. The observations of elemental carbon and sulfate from Whiteface and Mayville for the summer of 2002 have been used along with other network measurements from the IMPROVE and CASTNet networks to evaluate METCHEM, a tightly coupled meteorology-chemistry model in nested simulations over the U.S. to examine the radiative impacts of absorbing and scattering aerosols. The model is being driven by a high-quality bottom-up inventory of emissions compiled by the Regional Planning Organizations for their 2002 visibility assessments, and the National Emissions Inventories compiled previously by the U.S. EPA in the years 2002 and 1999. The model was used to compare both the effects of evolving emissions, and the successive improvements in characterizing wildfire emissions in each of these inventories. Results of aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depths are compared for a 3-week test period of simulation using the

  4. Indoor aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morawska, L.; Afshari, Alireza; N. Bae, G.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by growing considerations of the scale, severity, and risks associated with human exposure to indoor particulate matter, this work reviewed existing literature to: (i) identify state-of-the-art experimental techniques used for personal exposure assessment; (ii) compare exposure levels...... reported for domestic/school settings in different countries (excluding exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and particulate matter from biomass cooking in developing countries); (iii) assess the contribution of outdoor background vs indoor sources to personal exposure; and (iv) examine scientific...... understanding of the risks posed by personal exposure to indoor aerosols. Limited studies assessing integrated daily residential exposure to just one particle size fraction, ultrafine particles, show that the contribution of indoor sources ranged from 19% to 76%. This indicates a strong dependence on resident...

  5. Artifact free denuder method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuška, P.; Vecera, Z.; Broškovicová, A.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past decade, a growing attention has been focused on the carbonaceous aerosols. Although they may account for 30--60% of the total fine aerosol mass, their concentration and formation mechanisms are not well understood, particularly in comparison with major fine particle inorganic species. The deficiency in knowledge of carbonaceous aerosols results from their complexity and because of problems associated with their collection. Conventional sampling techniques of the carbonaceous aerosols, which utilize filters/backup adsorbents suffer from sampling artefacts. Positive artifacts are mainly due to adsorption of gas-phase organic compounds by the filter material or by the already collected particles, whereas negative artifacts arise from the volatilisation of already collected organic compounds from the filter. Furthermore, in the course of the sampling, the composition of the collected organic compounds may be modified by oxidants (O_3, NO_2, PAN, peroxides) that are present in the air passing through the sampler. It is clear that new, artifact free, method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols is needed. A combination of a diffusion denuder and a filter in series is very promising in this respect. The denuder is expected to collect gaseous oxidants and gas-phase organic compounds from sample air stream prior to collection of aerosol particles on filters, and eliminate thus both positive and negative sampling artifacts for carbonaceous aerosols. This combination is subject of the presentation. Several designs of diffusion denuders (cylindrical, annular, parallel plate, multi-channel) in combination with various types of wall coatings (dry, liquid) were examined. Special attention was given to preservation of the long-term collection efficiency. Different adsorbents (activated charcoal, molecular sieve, porous polymers) and sorbents coated with various chemical reagents (KI, Na_2SO_3, MnO_2, ascorbic acid) or chromatographic stationary phases (silicon oils

  6. Characterization of Cooking-Related Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Blanc, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    The temperatures at which food is cooked are usually high enough to drive oils and other organic compounds out of materials which are being prepared for consumption. As these compounds move away from the hot cooking surface and into the atmosphere, they can participate in chemical reactions or condense to form particles. Given the high concentration of cooking in urban areas, cooking-related aerosols likely contribute to the overall amount of particulate matter on a local scale. Reported here are results for the mid-infrared optical characterization of aerosols formed during the cooking of several meat and vegetable samples in an inert atmosphere. The samples were heated in a novel aerosol generator that is designed to collect particles formed immediately above the cooking surface and inject them into a laminar aerosol flow cell. Preliminary results for the chemical processing of cooking-related aerosols in synthetic air will also be presented.

  7. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  8. Interlanguage comparison of sport discourse (on the material of sport analytic article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavryushina Ekaterina Alexandrovna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cultural and mental specificity of language units in the sport communication. The study was conducted on the material of English, Russian and German analytical articles, thematically related to tennis. Using the technique of cross-language comparison it is revealed significant characteristic parameters of sports discourse. The proposed comparative procedure consists in three stages of analysis: linguistic, cognitive-communicative and linguistic-cultural. During the analysis at each step there were identified certain criteria specific to the sport discourse in three linguasocieties. Sport communication reflects not only the specificity and originality of the language, but also the traditions, history, mentality, culture, and behavior patterns of modern professional sport community. Comparative study of sport discourse reveals the cultural, linguistic and cognitive features of sublanguage sports and allows to get a common view of the structure of sport analytical articles.

  9. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  10. Comparison of in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of MMA-based polymeric materials and various metallic materials

    OpenAIRE

    İZ, Sultan GÜLÇE; GÜRHAN, Saime İsmet DELİLOĞLU; ŞEN, Bilge Hakan

    2010-01-01

    To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of some polymeric and metallic implant materials used as base materials in dentistry, based on ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and OECD (Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development) test protocols. Materials and methods: Three different acrylate-based polymeric materials were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (polymethylmethacrylate microspheres [PMMA], a solid cement prepared by mi...

  11. CCN activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X.; Price, D.; Praske, E.; Vu, D.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Silva, P. J.; Cocker, D. R., III; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA) and butylamine (BA) reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH) is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ ≤ 0.25). Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA) with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3), contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA) aerosol. TMA + N2O5 form semi-volatile organics in low RH conditions that have κ ~ 0.20, indicative of slightly soluble organic material. As RH increases, several inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR) ideal mixing rules. Higher CCN activity (κ > 0.3) was also observed for humid BA+N2O5 aerosols compared with dry aerosol (κ ~ 0.2), as a result of the formation of inorganic salts such as NH4NO3 and butylamine nitrate (C4H11N · HNO3). Compared with TMA, BA+N2O5 reactions produce more volatile aerosols. The BA+N2O5 aerosol products under humid experiments were found to be very sensitive to the temperature within the stream-wise continuous flow thermal gradient CCN counter. The CCN counter, when set above a 21 °C temperature difference, evaporates BA+N2O5 aerosol formed at RH ≥ 30%; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 and is dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss) settings. The aerosol behaves non-ideally, hence simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems κ ranges from 0.2 systems.

  12. Aerosol radioactivity record in Bratislava/Slovakia following the Fukushima accident--a comparison with global fallout and the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, P P; Sýkora, I; Holý, K; Gera, M; Kováčik, A; Brest'áková, L

    2012-12-01

    Results of radioactivity measurements in Bratislava aerosols following the Fukushima accident showed that at least three radioactive plumes arrived to Bratislava as indicated by (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratios. When compared with the Chernobyl results available for the Bratislava station, the Fukushima radionuclide levels were almost five orders of magnitude lower, with the maximum values for (131)I and (137)Cs of 0.5 and 0.07 mBq/m(3), respectively. The (131)I and (137)Cs vs. (7)Be aerosol activity records showed that the increases in (131)I and (137)Cs activity concentrations were accompanied by (7)Be increases, indicating that both the horizontal and vertical transports of radionuclides were responsible for observed radionuclide concentrations. The (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio was close to 1, as has also been reported by other investigators.

  13. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to CBD. In comparison to high-CBD risk exposures where the chemical nature of aerosol

  14. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  15. Use of historical documents in a digital world: comparisons with original materials and microfiche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Duff

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on a user study of a digital library collection of Early Canadiana material, with comparisons to the use of the material in original paper and microfiche formats. The study included a survey of individuals who had used Early Canadiana in original paper, microfiche or WWW format, focus group sessions, and server log analysis. The purpose of the study was to compare use and user satisfaction across the three formats to identify ways to improve the WWW format. Although, as expected, many people liked the paper format the best, over half of those who had experience with all three formats thought that the WWW format would be most useful in their work.  However, some users expressed concerns about the authenticity of the WWW format.  This raises questions for digital libraries to make explicit the relationship between the original paper and digital formats. The research led to 26 recommendations. To date, over half have been implemented or are in the process of being implemented.  The paper concludes with suggestions for future research.

  16. Synthesis and comparison of the activities of a catalyst supported on two silicate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Eduardo G., E-mail: eduardogv5007@gmail.com [Departamento de Física e Química, Unesp-Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. Brasil, 56-Centro, Caixa Postal 31, CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, Rafael O.; Carmo, Devaney R. do [Departamento de Física e Química, Unesp-Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. Brasil, 56-Centro, Caixa Postal 31, CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, São Paulo (Brazil); Junior, Enes F. [Departamento de Fitotecnia, Tecnologia de Alimentos e Sócio Economia, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Ilha Solteira, São Paulo (Brazil); Dias Filho, Newton L., E-mail: nldias@unesc.net [Departamento de Física e Química, Unesp-Univ Estadual Paulista, Av. Brasil, 56-Centro, Caixa Postal 31, CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Av. Universitaria, 1105, CP 3167, CEP 88806-000, Criciúma, SC (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    The focus of this work is inspecting the synthesis and comparison of the activities of a catalyst supported on two silicate materials in the epoxidation of 1-octene. The two new catalyst materials were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, solid-state {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and analysis of nitrogen. Lastly, the two new catalysts, Silsesq-TCA-[(W(CO){sub 3}I{sub 2}){sub 3}] and Silica-TCA-[W(CO){sub 3}I{sub 2}] were tested as catalysts in reactions of epoxidation of 1-octene and compared with their analogue not supported [W(CO){sub 3}I{sub 2}(thiocarbamide)]. After an extensive literature search, we verified that our work is the first that has reported the immobilization process of [W(CO){sub 3}I{sub 2}(NCCH{sub 3}){sub 2}] on silsesquioxane and silica gel functionalized with propyl-thiocarbamide groups and their applications as catalysts of reactions of catalytic epoxidation of 1-octene. - Highlights: • Immobilization of [W(CO){sub 3}I{sub 2}(NCCH{sub 3}){sub 2}] complex onto mesoporous supports. • Synthesis and characterization of new mesoporous catalysts. • The new catalysts exhibit great catalytic activity in the epoxidation of 1-octene. • Recyclable catalysts with excellent reusability and stability.

  17. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias; Covert, Dave S.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and colurnmn water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's 6-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V Professor Vodyanitskiy during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA-14/AVHRR satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering mearured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from radiosonde measurements during 8 soundings on 7 days and also with values calculated from measurements taken on 10 July with

  18. Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing Based on Combined A-Train Observations: Towards All-sky Estimates and Attribution to Aerosol Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; Burton, S.; Livingston, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We describe a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) measurements for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Initial calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals compare well with over-ocean and top of the atmosphere IPCC-2007 model-based results, and with more recent assessments in the "Climate Change Science Program Report: Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts" (2009). We discuss some of the challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed. We also discuss a methodology for using the multi-sensor aerosol retrievals for aerosol type classification based on advanced clustering techniques. The combination of research results permits conclusions regarding the attribution of aerosol radiative forcing to aerosol type.

  19. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm−3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm−3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94 and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58 of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm−3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed

  20. Aerosol Chemistry of Furfural and Sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithawirat, T.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2008-12-01

    Furfural and sugars (as levoglucosan equivalent) are derived from biomass burning and contribute to aerosol composition. This study examined the potential of furfural and levoglucosan to be tracers of biomass burning. Furfural is likely to be oxidized quickly so comparison with levoglucosan may give a sense of the age of the aerosols in forest fire smoke. However, few furfural emissions are available for biomass combustion. Furfural and sugars were determined in coarse aerosols (>2.4μm aerodynamic diameter) and fine aerosols (Furfural and sugars dominated in fine fractions, especially in the UK autumn. Sugars were found at 5.96-18.37 nmol m-3 in fine mode and 1.36-5.75 nmol m-3 in coarse mode aerosols in the UK. Furfural was found at 0.18-0.91 nmol m-3 and 0.05-0.51 nmol m-3 respectively in the same aerosols. Sugars were a dominant contributor to aerosol derived from biomass burning. Sugars and furfural were about 10 and 20 times higher during haze episodes in Malaysia. Laboratory experimental simulation suggested furfural is more rapid destroyed by UV and sunlight than levoglucosan.

  1. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  2. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  3. WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

  4. The impact of biogenic carbon sources on aerosol absorption in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Tackett, M.; Sturchio, N. C.; Heraty, L.; Martinez, N.; Hardy, K. D.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Guilderson, T.; MacMillan, A.; Steelman, K.

    2009-03-01

    In order to determine the wavelength dependence of fine (C-4 plants) in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

  5. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  6. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) as a Core Material and a Comparison with Gold Standard Core Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Schmid, Philipp; Roos, Malgorzata; Eichberger, Marlis; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2016-06-20

    This study investigated the colorimetric properties of different veneering materials on core materials. Standardized specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 1.5 mm) reflecting four core (polyetheretherketone (PEEK), zirconia (ZrO₂), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo), and titanium oxide (TiO₂); thickness: 1.5 mm) and veneering materials (VITA Mark II, IPS e.max CAD, LAVA Ultimate and VITA Enamic, all in shade A3; thickness: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mm, respectively) were fabricated. Specimens were superimposed to assemblies, and the color was determined with a spectrophotometer (CieLab-System) or a chair-side color measurement device (VITA EasyShade), respectively. Data were analyzed using three-, two-, and one-way ANOVA, a Chi²-test, and a Wilson approach (p materials (p material (p material (p material showed comparable outcomes as compared to ZrO₂ and CoCrMo, with respect to CieLab-System parameters for each veneering material. The relative frequency of the measured VITA EasyShade parameters regarding PEEK cores also showed comparable results as compared to the gold standard CoCrMo, regardless of the veneering material used.

  7. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  8. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ariya, Parisa A. (ed.) [McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2014-09-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  9. Iterated linear comparison bounds for viscoplastic porous materials with “ellipsoidal” microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoras, M.; Ponte Castañeda, P.

    2013-03-01

    Analytical estimates are obtained for the effective constitutive response of porous viscoplastic materials consisting of aligned ellipsoidal voids that are distributed randomly with "ellipsoidal" symmetry in the matrix material. These estimates are obtained by means of a novel iterative homogenization strategy recently proposed by Ponte Castañeda (2012), and can be shown to be bounds for certain classes of multi-scale microstructures. By design, the resulting constitutive model agrees exactly with the earlier "variational linear comparison" model at the first iteration (N=1), and provides estimates that get progressively more accurate as the number of iterations increases (N→∞), especially for high-triaxiality loading conditions, and low porosity and strain-rate sensitivity. However, in practice, a small number of iterations (N≈10) is sufficient to get very accurate results. It is important to emphasize that, unlike other models that have been proposed in the literature, the new model requires no fitting parameters, solely depending on the properties of the matrix phase and microstructural information, such as the porosity, the average void shape and orientation, as well as the generally different shape and orientation of their distribution. Results are given for the yield and gauge surfaces of ideally plastic and power-law viscoplastic porous materials for the special cases of aligned spheroidal and ellipsoidal voids, and the results are compared with available numerical results and with the results of other models. Compared to available numerical results, the new estimates are found to be quite accurate, while they also provide more flexibility than competing models in terms of the characterization of the microstructure. In particular, it was found that the effect of different shapes for the average pore shape and distribution on the yield surfaces of the porous materials can be significant at high triaxialities, even for very small porosities. In addition

  10. Comparison of abundances, compositions and sources of elements, inorganic ions and organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from Xi'an and New Delhi, two megacities in China and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Huang, Yao; Ren, Yanqin; Zhou, Bianhong; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Rong

    2014-04-01

    Wintertime TSP samples collected in the two megacities of Xi'an, China and New Delhi, India were analyzed for elements, inorganic ions, carbonaceous species and organic compounds to investigate the differences in chemical compositions and sources of organic aerosols. The current work is the first time comparing the composition of urban organic aerosols from China and India and discussing their sources in a single study. Our results showed that the concentrations of Ca, Fe, Ti, inorganic ions, EC, PAHs and hopanes in Xi'an are 1.3-2.9 times of those in New Delhi, which is ascribed to the higher emissions of dust and coal burning in Xi'an. In contrast, Cl(-), levoglucosan, n-alkanes, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, phthalates and bisphenol A are 0.4-3.0 times higher in New Delhi than in Xi'an, which is attributed to strong emissions from biomass burning and solid waste incineration. PAHs are carcinogenic while phthalates and bisphenol A are endocrine disrupting. Thus, the significant difference in chemical compositions of the above TSP samples may suggest that residents in Xi'an and New Delhi are exposed to environmental hazards that pose different health risks. Lower mass ratios of octadecenoic acid/octadecanoic acid (C18:1/C18:0) and benzo(a)pyrene/benzo(e)pyrene (BaP/BeP) demonstrate that aerosol particles in New Delhi are photochemically more aged. Mass closure reconstructions of the wintertime TSP indicate that crustal material is the most abundant component of ambient particles in Xi'an and New Delhi, accounting for 52% and 48% of the particle masses, respectively, followed by organic matter (24% and 23% in Xi'an and New Delhi, respectively) and secondary inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate plus ammonium, 16% and 12% in Xi'an and New Delhi, respectively). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  12. Dependence of aerosol scattering coefficients on relative humidity observed at two coastal sites on the East China Sea: Comparison to remote observations and influence of chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.; Taketani, F.; Irie, H.; Komazaki, Y.; Takashima, H.; Xiaole, P.; Takami, A.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    We employed an integrating nephelometer equipped with a humidifier (where the relative humidity (RH) was scanned between 40 and 90%) to measure the aerosol scattering coefficients and their dependence on RH at Fukue Island (32.75N, 128.68E), west of Japan, in May 2009 and at Rudong, Jiangsu, China (32.26N, 121.37E) in May/June 2010, aiming at better characterization of optical properties of the regional-scale aerosol pollution over East Asia. The two coastal sites are located east and west of the East China Sea and are separated by about 700 km. The observed scattering coefficients are normalized by the concurrently measured PM2.5 mass concentrations and thereby behaviors of the mass scattering coefficients are discussed. At Fukue, the mass scattering coefficients under the ambient RH conditions were >1.5 times higher than those observed under the dry condition (RH = 40%), suggesting that the RH effect was crucial in determining optical properties under ambient conditions. The coefficients under the ambient RH conditions, rather than the dry values, agreed better with the extinction coefficients determined by MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique based on remote measurements of O4 optical depths. The single-scattering albedo (SSA), estimated in combination to the absorption coefficients determined by a MAAP (Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer) instrument, had similar average values (~0.95) at the two sites. The SSA values at the two sites were commonly lowered (to below 0.90) when the air traveled from the North China Plain region. At Fukue, the RH dependence was found to be weakened when the organics/sulfate ratio increased (as observed by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer), while such influence of chemical composition was less clear at Rudong, possibly masked by large temporal variations in the particle size distributions.

  13. Fast atmospheric correction algorithm based on the darkest pixel approach for retrieving the aerosol optical thickness: comparison with in-situ AOT measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Alexakis, Dimitrios

    2011-11-01

    Darkest pixel atmospheric correction is the simplest and fully image-based correction method. This paper presents an overview of a proposed 'fast atmospheric correction algorithm' developed at MATLAB based on the RT equation basics and the darkest pixel approach. The task is to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the application of this atmospheric correction. The effectiveness of this algorithm is performed by comparing the AOT values from the algorithm with those measured in-situ both from MICROTOPS II hand-held sunphotometer and the CIMEL sunphotometer (AERONET).

  14. Status of the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied. Recent activities in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project include studies of (1) the thermal hydraulic conditions existing during Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) aerosol tests in steam-air environments, (2) the thermal output and aerosol mass generation rates for plasma torch aerosol generators, and (3) the influence of humidity on the shape of agglomerated aerosols of various materials. A new Aerosol-Moisture Interaction Test (AMIT) facility was prepared at the NSPP site to accommodate the aerosol shape studies; several tests with Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol have been conducted. In addition to the above activities a special study was conducted to determine the suitability of the technique of aerosol production by plasma torch under the operating conditions of future tests of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of Polyetheretherketone (PEEK as a Core Material and a Comparison with Gold Standard Core Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Stawarczyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the colorimetric properties of different veneering materials on core materials. Standardized specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 1.5 mm reflecting four core (polyetheretherketone (PEEK, zirconia (ZrO2, cobalt–chromium–molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo, and titanium oxide (TiO2; thickness: 1.5 mm and veneering materials (VITA Mark II, IPS e.max CAD, LAVA Ultimate and VITA Enamic, all in shade A3; thickness: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mm, respectively were fabricated. Specimens were superimposed to assemblies, and the color was determined with a spectrophotometer (CieLab-System or a chair-side color measurement device (VITA EasyShade, respectively. Data were analyzed using three-, two-, and one-way ANOVA, a Chi2-test, and a Wilson approach (p < 0.05. The measurements with EasyShade showed A2 for VITA Mark II, A3.5 for VITA Enamic, B2 for LAVA Ultimate, and B3 for IPS e.max CAD. LabE-values showed significant differences between the tested veneering materials (p < 0.001. CieLab-System and VITA EasyShade parameters of the different assemblies showed a significant impact of core (p < 0.001, veneering material (p < 0.001, and thickness of the veneering material (p < 0.001. PEEK as core material showed comparable outcomes as compared to ZrO2 and CoCrMo, with respect to CieLab-System parameters for each veneering material. The relative frequency of the measured VITA EasyShade parameters regarding PEEK cores also showed comparable results as compared to the gold standard CoCrMo, regardless of the veneering material used.

  16. Modeling aerosol processes at the local scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, M.; Isukapalli, S.S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., NJ (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This work presents an approach for modeling photochemical gaseous and aerosol phase processes in subgrid plumes from major localized (e.g. point) sources (plume-in-grid modeling), thus improving the ability to quantify the relationship between emission source activity and ambient air quality. This approach employs the Reactive Plume Model (RPM-AERO) which extends the regulatory model RPM-IV by incorporating aerosol processes and heterogeneous chemistry. The physics and chemistry of elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, sodium, chloride and crustal material of aerosols are treated and attributed to the PM size distribution. A modified version of the Carbon Bond IV chemical mechanism is included to model the formation of organic aerosol, and the inorganic multicomponent atmospheric aerosol equilibrium model, SEQUILIB is used for calculating the amounts of inorganic species in particulate matter. Aerosol dynamics modeled include mechanisms of nucleation, condensation and gas/particle partitioning of organic matter. An integrated trajectory-in-grid modeling system, UAM/RPM-AERO, is under continuing development for extracting boundary and initial conditions from the mesoscale photochemical/aerosol model UAM-AERO. The RPM-AERO is applied here to case studies involving emissions from point sources to study sulfate particle formation in plumes. Model calculations show that homogeneous nucleation is an efficient process for new particle formation in plumes, in agreement with previous field studies and theoretical predictions.

  17. Organically Modified Aero-Sol Gel Silica for Elastomer Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratsinis, S. E.; Kohls, D. J.; Beaucage, G.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed facilities to produce organically functionalized silicas using a novel, room-temperature, aerosol, chemical reactor (ASG reactor). This reactor can produce exceedingly high surface area nano-structured materials (up to 800 m2/g) with tuned interfacial chemistries. This poster will present our results on dynamic mechanical properties of elastomer compounds with ASG-organically modified silicas and comparison with conventional carbon black, conventional precipated and fumed silica as well as blends of the conventional materials. The mass-fractal structure as determined by SAXS and SALS, as well as conventional gas and DBP absorption measurements and microscopy will be presented. Hyeon-Lee, J.; Beaucage, G.; Pratsinis, S. E. (1997) Chem. of Mat. 9, 2400. Hyeon-Lee, J.; Beaucage, G.; Pratsinis, S. E.; Vemury, S. (1998) Langmuir 5751.

  18. Global modeling of nitrate and ammonium aerosols using EQSAM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, particles suspending in air, are important as they affect human health, air quality, and visibility as well as climate. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium are among the most important inorganic aerosol species in the atmosphere. These compounds are hygroscopic and absorb water under almost all ambient environmental conditions. The uptake of water alters the aerosol size, and causes water to become the constituent with the largest atmospheric aerosol mass, especially when the aerosols grow into fog, haze or clouds. Furthermore, several global model studies have demonstrated that rapid increases in nitrogen emissions could produce enough nitrate in aerosols to offset the expected decline in sulfate forcing by 2100 for the extreme IPCC A2 scenario (Bauer et al., 2007). Although nitrate and ammonium were identified as significant anthropogenic sources of aerosols by a number of modeling studies, most global aerosol models still exclude ammonium-nitrate when the direct aerosol forcing is studied. In this study, the computationally efficient equilibrium model, EQSAM3, is incorporated into the UMICH-IMPACT-nitrate model using the hybrid dynamical solution method (Feng and Penner, 2007). The partitioning of nitrate and ammonium along with the corresponding water uptake is evaluated by comparing the model to the EQUISOLVE II method used in Feng and Penner (2007). The model is also evaluated by comparison with the AERONET data base and satellite-based aerosol optical depths.

  19. The Studies on Aerosol Transport, Its Deposition, and Its Impact on Climate - the Study on the Surface Material Circulation can Connect from the Past to the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei

    2012-01-01

    Recently the issue on glacier retreats comes up and many factors should be relevant to the issue. The absorbing aerosols such as dust and black carbon (BC) are considered to be one of the factors. After they deposited onto the snow surface, it will reduce snow albedo (called snow darkening effect) and probably contribute to further melting of glacier. The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) has developed at NASAlGSFC. However, the original snowpack model used in the land surface model in the GEOS-5 did not consider the snow darkening effect. Here we developed the new snow albedo scheme which can consider the snow darkening effect. In addition, another scheme on calculating mass concentrations on the absorbing aerosols in snowpack was also developed, in which the direct aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model in the GEOS-5 were used. The scheme has been validated with the observed data obtained at backyard of the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, by Dr. Teruo Aoki (Meteorological Research Institute) et al. including me. The observed data was obtained when I was Ph.D. candidate. The original GEOS-5 during 2007-2009 over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau region showed more reductions of snow than that of the new GEOS-5 because the original one used lower albedo settings. On snow cover fraction, the new GEOS-5 simulated more realistic snow-covered area comparing to the MODIS snow cover fraction. The reductions on snow albedo, snow cover fraction, and snow water equivalent were seen with statistically significance if we consider the snow darkening effect comparing to the results without the snow darkening effect. In the real world, debris-cover, inside refreezing process, surface flow of lacier, etc. affect glacier mass balance and the simu.latedresults immediately do not affect whole glacier retreating. However, our results indicate that some surface melting over non debris-covered parts of the glacier would be

  20. Comparison of quartz and Teflon filters for simultaneous collection of size-separated ultrafine aerosol particles and gas-phase zero samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Ruiz-Jimenez, Jose; Petäjä, Tuukka; Hartonen, Kari; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2011-07-01

    In this research, the two most common filter media, quartz and Teflon, were tested to obtain information about the possible adsorption of gas-phase compounds onto filters during long sample collection of atmospheric aerosols. Particles of nanometer-size for off-line chemical characterization were collected using a recently introduced differential mobility analyzer for size separation. Samples were collected at an urban site (Helsinki, SMEARIII station) during spring 2010. Sampling time was 4 to 10 days for particles 50, 40, or 30 nm in diameter. Sample air flow was 4 L/min. The sampling setup was arranged so that two samples were obtained for each sampling period almost simultaneously: one containing particles and adsorbed gas-phase compounds and one containing adsorbed gas-phase compounds only. Filters were extracted and analyzed for the presence of selected carboxylic acids, polyols, nitrogen-containing compounds, and aldehydes. The results showed that, in quartz filter samples, gas-phase adsorption may be responsible for as much as 100% of some compound masses. Whether quartz or Teflon, simultaneous collection of gas-phase zero samples is essential during the whole sampling period. The dependence of the adsorption of gas-phase compounds on vapor pressure and the effect of adsorption on the deposited aerosol layer are discussed.

  1. Characterization of Ambient Aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 Campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Results from the CENICA Supersite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, D; Onasch, Timothy B; Dzepina, K; Canagaratna, M R; Zhang, Q; Huffman, A J; DeCarlo, Peter; Jayne, J T; Mortimer, P; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kolb, C E; Johnson, Kirsten S; Zuberi, Bilal M; Marr, L; Volkamer, Rainer M; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J; Cardenas, B; Bernabe, R; Marquez, C; Gaffney, Jeffrey S; Marley, Nancy A; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V; Xie, YuLong; Brune, W H; Lesher, R; Shirley, T; Jiminez, J L

    2006-03-24

    An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the CENICA Supersite, while another was deployed in the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) from March 29-May 4, 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. This is the first of a series of papers reporting the AMS results from this campaign. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 μm (NR PM1) with high time and size resolution. For the first time, we report field results from a beam width probe, which was used to study the shape and mixing state of the particles and to quantify potential losses of irregular particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS. Data from this probe show that no significant amount of irregular particles was lost due to excessive beam broadening. A comparison of the CENICA and AML AMSs measurements is presented, being the first published intercomparison between two quadrupole AMSs. The speciation, and mass concentrations reported by the two AMSs compared well. In order to account for the refractory material in the aerosol, we also present measurements of Black Carbon (BC) using an aethalometer and an estimate of the aerosol soil component obtained from PIXE analysis of filters. Comparisons of (AMS + BC + soil) mass concentration with other collocated particle instruments (a LASAIR Optical Particle Counter, a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) and a DustTrack Aerosol Monitor) are also presented. The comparisons show that the (AMS + BC + soil) mass concentration during MCMC-2003 is a good approximation to the total PM₂.₅ mass concentration.

  2. The contribution of aerosol hygroscopic growth to the modeled aerosol radiative effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Kirkevåg, Alf; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant effect on the direct radiative effect of atmospheric aerosol. However, there are significant uncertainties concerning how much of the radiative forcing is due to different chemical compounds, especially water. For example, modeled optical depth of water in global aerosol-climate models varies by more than a factor of two. These differences can be attributed to differences in modeled 1) hygroscopicity, 2) ambient relative humidity, and/or 3) aerosol size distribution. In this study, we investigate which of these above-mentioned factors cause the largest variability in the modeled optical depth of water. In order to do this, we have developed a tool that calculates aerosol extinction using interchangeable global 3D data of aerosol composition, relative humidity, and aerosol size distribution fields. This data is obtained from models that have taken part in the open international initiative AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). In addition, we use global 3D data for relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying on board NASA's Aqua satellite and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. These observations are used to evaluate the modeled relative humidity fields. In the first stage of the study, we made a detailed investigation using the aerosol-chemistry-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ in which most of the aerosol optical depth is caused by water. Our results show that the model significantly overestimates the relative humidity over the oceans while over land, the overestimation is lower or it is underestimated. Since this overestimation occurs over the oceans, the water optical depth is amplified as the hygroscopic growth is very sensitive to changes in high relative humidities. Over land, error in modeled relative humidity is unlikely to cause significant errors in water optical depth as relative humidities are generally

  3. The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, M.; Remer, L.; Kahn, R.; Starr, D.; Hildebrand, P.; Colarco, P.; Diner, D.; Vane, D.; Im, E.; Behrenfeld, M.; Stephens, G.; Maring, H.; Bontempi, P.; Martins, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission is a second tier Decadal Survey mission designed to characterize the role of aerosols in climate forcing, especially their impact on precipitation and cloud formation. ACE also includes ocean biosphere measurements (chlorophyll and dissolved organic materials) which will be greatly improved by simultaneous measurements of aerosols. The nominal ACE payload includes lidar and multiangle spectropolarimetric polarimetric measurements of aerosols, radar measurements of clouds and multi-band spectrometer for the measurement of ocean ecosystems. An enhancement to ACE payload under consideration includes µ-wave radiometer measurements of cloud ice and water outside the nadir path of the radar/lidar beams. This talk will cover ACE instrument and science options, updates on the science team definition activity and science potential.

  4. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state: an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS climate model (ModelE are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM, represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations.

    A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment

  5. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer,S.E.; Wright, D.L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E.R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S.E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-10-21

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 {micro}m, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due

  6. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    to carbonyl- and nitro- functional groups on conjugated and aromatic organic structures (e.g. PAH, and terpene derived products). Using 12-hour fine (0.1-1.0 micron) aerosol samples collected in the field on quartz filters, uv/vis and infrared spectra were obtained in the laboratory using integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. An inter-comparison of the "real-time" measurements made by the photo-acoustic, aethalometer and MAAP techniques have been described. In addition, the in situ aethalometer (seven-channel) results are compared with continuous integrating sphere uv-visible spectra to examine the angstrom absorption coefficient variance. These results will be briefly overviewed and the specific posters detailing these results will be highlighted highlighted. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329.

  7. Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Weather Forecasts in the ECMWF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, A.; Benedetti, A.; Rodwell, M. J.; Bechtold, P.; Remy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the energy balance of the Earth system via direct scattering and absorpiton of short-wave and long-wave radiation and indirect interaction with clouds. Diabatic heating or cooling by aerosols can also modify the vertical stability of the atmosphere and influence weather pattern with potential impact on the skill of global weather prediction models. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) provides operational daily analysis and forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for five aerosol species using a prognostic model which is part of the Integrated Forecasting System of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF-IFS). The aerosol component was developed during the research project Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC). Aerosols can have a large impact on the weather forecasts in case of large aerosol concentrations as found during dust storms or strong pollution events. However, due to its computational burden, prognostic aerosols are not yet feasible in the ECMWF operational weather forecasts, and monthly-mean climatological fields are used instead. We revised the aerosol climatology used in the operational ECMWF IFS with one derived from the MACC reanalysis. We analyse the impact of changes in the aerosol radiative effect on the mean model climate and in medium-range weather forecasts, also in comparison with prognostic aerosol fields. The new climatology differs from the previous one by Tegen et al 1997, both in the spatial distribution of the total AOD and the optical properties of each aerosol species. The radiative impact of these changes affects the model mean bias at various spatial and temporal scales. On one hand we report small impacts on measures of large-scale forecast skill but on the other hand details of the regional distribution of aerosol concentration have a large local impact. This is the case for the northern Indian Ocean where the radiative impact of the mineral

  8. Final report on CCQM-K80: Comparison of value-assigned CRMs and PT materials: Creatinine in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Johanna E.; Duewer, David L.; Gasca Aragon, Hugo; Lippa, Katrice A.; Toman, Blaza

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 CCQM-K80 'Comparison of value-assigned CRMs and PT materials: creatinine in human serum' is the first in a series of key comparisons directly testing the chemical measurement services provided to customers by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes. CCQM-K80 compared the assigned serum creatinine values of certified reference materials (CRMs) using measurements made on these materials under repeatability conditions. Six NMIs submitted 17 CRM materials for evaluation, all intended for sale to customers. These materials represent nearly all of the higher-order CRMs then available for this clinically important measurand. The certified creatinine mass fraction in the materials ranged from 3 mg/kg to 57 mg/kg. All materials were stored and prepared according the specifications provided by each NMI. Samples were processed and analyzed under repeatability conditions by one analyst using isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The instrumental repeatability imprecision, expressed as a percent relative standard deviation, was 1.2%. Given the number of materials and the time required for each analysis, the measurements were made in two measurement campaigns ('runs'). In both campaigns, replicate analyses (two injections of one preparation separated in time) were made on each of two or three independently prepared aliquots from one randomly selected unit of each of the 17 materials. The mean value, between-campaign, between-aliquot and between-replicate variance components, standard uncertainty of the mean value, and the number of degrees of freedom associated with the standard uncertainty were estimated using a linear mixed model. Since several of the uncertainties estimated using this traditional frequentist approach were associated with a single degree of freedom, Markov Chain Monte Carlo Bayesian analysis was used to estimate 95% level-of-confidence coverage intervals, U95. Uncertainty-weighted generalized distance

  9. Methodology comparison for gamma-heating calculations in material-testing reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache F-13108 Saint Paul les Durance (France); Reynard-Carette, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Universite de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397, Marseille (France)

    2015-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a Material-Testing Reactor (MTR) under construction in the south of France at CEA Cadarache (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission). It will typically host about 20 simultaneous irradiation experiments in the core and in the beryllium reflector. These experiments will help us better understand the complex phenomena occurring during the accelerated ageing of materials and the irradiation of nuclear fuels. Gamma heating, i.e. photon energy deposition, is mainly responsible for temperature rise in non-fuelled zones of nuclear reactors, including JHR internal structures and irradiation devices. As temperature is a key parameter for physical models describing the behavior of material, accurate control of temperature, and hence gamma heating, is required in irradiation devices and samples in order to perform an advanced suitable analysis of future experimental results. From a broader point of view, JHR global attractiveness as a MTR depends on its ability to monitor experimental parameters with high accuracy, including gamma heating. Strict control of temperature levels is also necessary in terms of safety. As JHR structures are warmed up by gamma heating, they must be appropriately cooled down to prevent creep deformation or melting. Cooling-power sizing is based on calculated levels of gamma heating in the JHR. Due to these safety concerns, accurate calculation of gamma heating with well-controlled bias and associated uncertainty as low as possible is all the more important. There are two main kinds of calculation bias: bias coming from nuclear data on the one hand and bias coming from physical approximations assumed by computer codes and by general calculation route on the other hand. The former must be determined by comparison between calculation and experimental data; the latter by calculation comparisons between codes and between methodologies. In this presentation, we focus on this latter kind of bias. Nuclear

  10. A comparison between PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of metals in aerosol particulate collected in urban and marine sites in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S. [Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, I-50019 Sesto F.no, Florence (Italy); Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and I.N.F.N., Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto F.no, Florence (Italy); Lucarelli, F., E-mail: lucarelli@fi.infn.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and I.N.F.N., Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto F.no, Florence (Italy); Nava, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and I.N.F.N., Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto F.no, Florence (Italy); Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R. [Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, I-50019 Sesto F.no, Florence (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    PIXE and ICP-AES techniques are largely used in atmospheric aerosol studies. Since PIXE is able to provide the total elemental concentrations, while ICP-AES results depend on the extraction conditions, parallel PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of Fe, Al, Cu, Pb, Mn, Cr, Ni, V, As on PM10 and PM2.5 samples were compared. Two extraction procedures were applied to samples from 5 sites at different anthropization level in Italy: a “weak” extraction (HNO{sub 3} at pH = 1.5) and a “strong” extraction (micro-wave oven in HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} – following EU rules). The amount of the metal extracted in the different conditions resulted to be strongly dependent on the sampling site, on the main sources of the particle (crustal or anthropic) containing the metal and on the sampled size class.

  11. A comparison between tracer gas and aerosol particles distribution indoors: The impact of ventilation rate, interaction of airflows, and presence of objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Ondráček, Jakub; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2017-01-01

    room with mixing ventilation. Three layouts were arranged: an empty room, an office room with an occupant sitting in front of a table, and a single-bed hospital room. The room occupant was simulated by a thermal manikin. Monodisperse particles of three sizes (0.07, 0.7, and 3.5 μm) and nitrous oxide......The study investigated the separate and combined effects of ventilation rate, free convection flow produced by a thermal manikin, and the presence of objects on the distribution of tracer gas and particles in indoor air. The concentration of aerosol particles and tracer gas was measured in a test...... tracer gas were generated simultaneously at the same location in the room. The particles and gas concentrations were measured in the bulk room air, in the breathing zone of the manikin, and in the exhaust air. Within the breathing zone of the sitting occupant, the tracer gas emerged as reliable predictor...

  12. A COMPARISON OF THE TOUGHNESS CHARACTERISTICS OF D6 AIR AND VACUUM MELT MATERIAL,

    Science.gov (United States)

    tests were performed on both materials over a range of thickness and temperatures. The smooth tensile test indicated very little difference between...the D6 air and D6AC vacuum melt material. The notched tensile test , however, indicated that the D6AC vacuum melt material possesses much better toughness properties than does the D6 air melt material. (Author)

  13. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size‐resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1‐CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial‐temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground‐based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data. PMID:27668039

  14. Sensitivity of aerosol optical thickness and aerosol direct radiative effect to relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study on the effects of spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric relative humidity (RH on calculated aerosol optical thickness (AOT and the aerosol direct radiative effects (DRE in a global model. Using the same aerosol fields simulated in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI model, we find that, on a global average, the calculated AOT from RH in 1° latitude by 1.25° longitude spatial resolution is 11% higher than that in 2° by 2.5° resolution, and the corresponding DRE at the top of the atmosphere is 8–9% higher for total aerosols and 15% higher for only anthropogenic aerosols in the finer spatial resolution case. The difference is largest over surface escarpment regions (e.g. >200% over the Andes Mountains where RH varies substantially with surface terrain. The largest zonal mean AOT difference occurs at 50–60°N (16–21%, where AOT is also relatively larger. A similar increase is also found when the time resolution of RH is increased. This increase of AOT and DRE with the increase of model resolution is due to the highly non-linear relationship between RH and the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE at high RH (>80%. Our study suggests that caution should be taken in a multi-model comparison (e.g. AeroCom since the comparison usually deals with results coming from different spatial/temporal resolutions.

  15. A method for measuring total aerosol oxidative potential (OP) with the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and comparisons between an urban and roadside site of water-soluble and total OP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Fang, Ting; Verma, Vishal; Zeng, Linghan; Weber, Rodney J.

    2017-08-01

    An automated analytical system was developed for measuring the oxidative potential (OP) with the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay of filter extracts that include both water-soluble and water-insoluble (solid) aerosol species. Three approaches for measuring total oxidative potential were compared. These include using methanol as the solvent with (1) and without (2) filtering the extract, followed by removing the solvent and reconstituting with water, and (3) extraction in pure water and performing the OP analysis in the extraction vial with the filter. The water extraction method (the third approach, with filter remaining in the vial) generally yielded the highest DTT responses with better precision (coefficient of variation of 1-5 %) and was correlated with a greater number of other aerosol components. Because no organic solvents were used, which must be mostly eliminated prior to DTT analysis, it was easiest to automate by modifying an automated analytical system for measuring water-soluble OP developed by Fang et al. (2015). Therefore, the third method was applied to the field study for the determination of total OP. Daily 23 h filter samples were collected simultaneously at a roadside (RS) and a representative urban (Georgia Tech, GT) site for two 1-month study periods, and both water-soluble (OPWS-DTT) and total (OPTotal-DTT) OP were measured. Using PM2. 5 (aerodynamic diameter coefficient (r) of 0.71 (N = 35; p value < 0.01), compared to a ratio of 62 % and r = 0. 56 (N = 31; p value < 0.01) at the roadside site. The same DTT analyses were performed, and similar results were found using particle composition monitors (flow rate of 16.7 L min-1) with Teflon filters. Comparison of measurements between sites showed only slightly higher levels of both OPWS-DTT and OPTotal-DTT at the RS site, indicating both OPWS-DTT and OPTotal-DTT were largely spatially homogeneous. These results are consistent with roadway emissions as sources of DTT-quantified PM2. 5 OP and indicate

  16. Comparison of advanced cutting techniques on hardox 500 steel material and the effect of structural properties of the material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dahil

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study is to determine the most advantageous cutting method for a better competition chance. By presenting high hardness, high strength and superior toughness Hardox 500 steel. This sample was cut by plasma, laser, wire erosion and abrasive water jet (AWJ methods from advanced cutting technologies. By taking micro structure photos of surface of the sample cut by different cutting methods, effects of different cutting methods on metallurgical structure of material were compared.

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The resulting particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate ...

  18. Development of a fission product transport module predicting the behavior of radiological materials during sever accidents in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyung Seok; Rhee, Bo Wook; Kim, Dong Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is developing a fission product transport module for predicting the behavior of radioactive materials in the primary cooling system of a nuclear power plant as a separate module, which will be connected to a severe accident analysis code, Core Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software (COMPASS). This fission product transport (COMPASS-FP) module consists of a fission product release model, an aerosol generation model, and an aerosol transport model. In the fission product release model there are three submodels based on empirical correlations, and they are used to simulate the fission product gases release from the reactor core. In the aerosol generation model, the mass conservation law and Raoult's law are applied to the mixture of vapors and droplets of the fission products in a specified control volume to find the generation of the aerosol droplet. In the aerosol transport model, empirical correlations available from the open literature are used to simulate the aerosol removal processes owing to the gravitational settling, inertia impaction, diffusiophoresis, and thermophoresis. The COMPASS-FP module was validated against Aerosol Behavior Code Validation and Evaluation (ABCOVE-5) test performed by Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory for comparing the prediction and test data. The comparison results assuming a non-spherical aerosol shape for the suspended aerosol mass concentration showed a good agreement with an error range of about ±6%. It was found that the COMPASS-FP module produced the reasonable results of the fission product gases release, the aerosol generation, and the gravitational settling in the aerosol removal processes for ABCOVE-5. However, more validation for other aerosol removal models needs to be performed.

  19. Final report on CCQM-K79: Comparison of value-assigned CRMs and PT materials: Ethanol in aqueous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sebastian; Philipp, Rosemarie; Duewer, David L.; Gasca Aragon, Hugo; Lippa, Katrice A.; Toman, Blaza

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 CCQM-K79 'Comparison of value-assigned CRMs and PT materials: Ethanol in aqueous media' is the second key comparison directly testing the chemical measurement services provided to customers by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs). CCQM-K79 compared the assigned ethanol values of proficiency test (PT) and certified reference materials (CRMs) using measurements made on these materials under repeatability conditions. Nine NMIs submitted 27 CRM or value-assigned PT materials for evaluation. These materials represent many of the higher-order reference materials then available for this commercially and forensically important measurand. The assigned ethanol mass fraction in the materials ranged from 0.1 mg/kg to 334 mg/kg. All materials were stored and prepared according the specifications provided by each NMI. Samples were processed and analyzed under repeatability conditions by one analytical team using a gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) method of demonstrated trueness and precision. Given the number of materials and the time required for each analysis, the majority of the measurements were made in two measurement campaigns ('runs'). Due to a shipping delay from one NMI, an unanticipated third campaign was required. In all three campaigns, replicate analyses (three injections of one preparation separated in time) were made for one randomly selected unit of each of the 27 materials. Nine of the 27 materials were gravimetrically diluted before measurement to provide solutions with ethanol mass fraction in the established linear range of the GC-FID method. The repeatability measurement value for each analyzed solution was estimated as the mean of all replicate values. The within- and between-campaign variance components were estimated using one-way ANOVA. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Bayesian analysis was used to estimate 95% level-of-confidence coverage intervals for the mean values. Uncertainty

  20. Comparison of the MARC and CRAC2 programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Hemming, C R; Charles, D; Ostmeyer, R M

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of the MARC (Methodology for Assessing Radiological Consequences) and CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences, version 2) computer programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material. A qualitative comparison has been made of the features of the constituent sub-models of the two codes, and potentially the most important differences identified. The influence of these differences has been investigated quantitatively by comparison of the predictions of the two codes in a wide variety of circumstances. Both intermediate quantities and endpoints used as a measure of risk have been compared in order to separate the variables more clearly. The results indicate that, in general, the predictions of MARC and CRAC2 are in good agreement.

  1. Code-to-Code Comparison, and Material Response Modeling of Stardust and MSL using PATO and FIAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidy, Ali D.; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Lachaud, Jean R.; Cozmuta, Ioana; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a code-to-code comparison between PATO, a recently developed high fidelity material response code, and FIAT, NASA's legacy code for ablation response modeling. The goal is to demonstrates that FIAT and PATO generate the same results when using the same models. Test cases of increasing complexity are used, from both arc-jet testing and flight experiment. When using the exact same physical models, material properties and boundary conditions, the two codes give results that are within 2% of errors. The minor discrepancy is attributed to the inclusion of the gas phase heat capacity (cp) in the energy equation in PATO, and not in FIAT.

  2. Aerosol MTF revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-05-01

    Different views of the significance of aerosol MTF have been reported. For example, one recent paper [OE, 52(4)/2013, pp. 046201] claims that the aerosol MTF "contrast reduction is approximately independent of spatial frequency, and image blur is practically negligible". On the other hand, another recent paper [JOSA A, 11/2013, pp. 2244-2252] claims that aerosols "can have a non-negligible effect on the atmospheric point spread function". We present clear experimental evidence of common significant aerosol blur and evidence that aerosol contrast reduction can be extremely significant. In the IR, it is more appropriate to refer to such phenomena as aerosol-absorption MTF. The role of imaging system instrumentation on such MTF is addressed too.

  3. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X.; Price, D.; Praske, E.; Vu, D. N.; Purvis-Roberts, K.; Silva, P. J.; Cocker, D. R., III; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-06-01

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g., hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The particle can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The ratio of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate phase influences aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. SOA formed from trimethylamine (TMA) and butylamine (BA) reactions with hydroxyl radical (OH) is composed of organic material of low hygroscopicity (single hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ≤ 0.25). Secondary aerosol formed from the tertiary aliphatic amine (TMA) with N2O5 (source of nitrate radical, NO3) contains less volatile compounds than the primary aliphatic amine (BA) aerosol. As relative humidity (RH) increases, inorganic amine salts are formed as a result of acid-base reactions. The CCN activity of the humid TMA-N2O5 aerosol obeys Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson (ZSR) ideal mixing rules. The humid BA + N2O5 aerosol products were found to be very sensitive to the temperature at which the measurements were made within the streamwise continuous-flow thermal gradient CCN counter; κ ranges from 0.4 to 0.7 dependent on the instrument supersaturation (ss) settings. The variance of the measured aerosol κ values indicates that simple ZSR rules cannot be applied to the CCN results from the primary aliphatic amine system. Overall, aliphatic amine aerosol systems' κ ranges within 0.2 systems.

  4. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  5. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  6. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality.

  7. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  8. Viewing Atmospheric Aerosols from the MODIS Satellite Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, L.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently aboard both the Terra and Aqua satellites produces a suite of products designed to characterize global aerosol distribution, optical thickness and particle size. Never before has a space-borne instrument been able to provide such detailed information, complementing field and modeling efforts to produce a comprehensive picture of aerosol characteristics. The three years of Terra-MODIS data have been validated by comparing with co-located AERONET observations of aerosol optical thickness and derivations of aerosol size parameters. Some 8000 comparison points located at 133 AERONET sites around the globe show that the MODIS aerosol optical thickness retrievals are accurate to within the pre-launch expectations, on a global basis. The global statistics, however, can hide local biases in the product. Some of these biases will be discussed. Nevertheless, the products can be used and are currently being used to answer some pressing questions concerning aerosol radiative forcing, aerosol-cloud interaction, estimating aerosol sources and height of transport, and Air Quality forecasting. A survey of current applications of MODIS aerosol products will be presented.

  9. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, D E; Malm, W C; Kreidenweis, S M

    2000-05-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric fine aerosol was investigated at a rural site in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park during July and August 1995. Passing the sample aerosol through an inlet, which housed an array of Perma Pure diffusion dryers, controlled the sample aerosol's relative humidity (RH). After conditioning the aerosol sample in the inlet, the light scattering coefficient and the aerosol size distribution were simultaneously measured. During this study, the conditioned aerosol's humidity ranged between 5% < RH < 95%. Aerosol response curves were produced using the ratio bspw/bspd; where bspw is the scattering coefficient measured at some RH greater than 20% and bspd is the scattering coefficient of the "dry" aerosol. For this work, any sample RH values below 15% were considered dry. Results of this investigation showed that the light scattering ratio increased continuously and smoothly over the entire range of relative humidity. The magnitude of the ratio at a particular RH value, however, varied considerably in time, particularly for RH values greater than approximately 60%. Curves of the scattering coefficient ratios as a function of RH were generated for each day and compared to the average 12-hour chemical composition of the aerosol. This comparison showed that for any particular RH value the ratio was highest during time periods of high sulfate concentrations and lowest during time periods of high soil or high organic carbon concentrations.

  10. Evaluation of Aerosol Mixing State Classes in the GISS Modele-matrix Climate Model Using Single-particle Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Ault, Andrew; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are composed of multiple chemical species. The aerosol mixing state, which describes how chemical species are mixed at the single-particle level, provides critical information on microphysical characteristics that determine the interaction of aerosols with the climate system. The evaluation of mixing state has become the next challenge. This study uses aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) data and compares the results to those of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies modelE-MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state) model, a global climate model that includes a detailed aerosol microphysical scheme. We use data from field campaigns that examine a variety of air mass regimens (urban, rural, and maritime). At all locations, polluted areas in California (Riverside, La Jolla, and Long Beach), a remote location in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Sugar Pine) and observations from Jeju (South Korea), the majority of aerosol species are internally mixed. Coarse aerosol particles, those above 1 micron, are typically aged, such as coated dust or reacted sea-salt particles. Particles below 1 micron contain large fractions of organic material, internally-mixed with sulfate and black carbon, and few external mixtures. We conclude that observations taken over multiple weeks characterize typical air mass types at a given location well; however, due to the instrumentation, we could not evaluate mass budgets. These results represent the first detailed comparison of single-particle mixing states in a global climate model with real-time single-particle mass spectrometry data, an important step in improving the representation of mixing state in global climate models.

  11. Arctic Aerosols and Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ingeborg Elbæk

    2017-01-01

    winter and spring explained by expansion of the polar dome enabling long-range transport of aerosols from source regions outside the Arctic. This phenomenon is better known as the Arctic haze. Contrary, the summer and fall concentrations were lower due to the retreat of the polar dome. These seasonal...... species. The aerosol concentration decreased during spring as the Arctic haze leveled off. A source apportionment analysis showed that three factors were contributing to organic aerosols. A hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol factor was assigned to fossil fuel combustion and a second factor, less oxygenated...

  12. Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y. T. Eunice; Charlton-Perez, Andrew J.; Lott, Fraser C.; Highwood, Eleanor J.

    2016-12-01

    Sulphate aerosol injection has been widely discussed as a possible way to engineer future climate. Monitoring it would require detecting its effects amidst internal variability and in the presence of other external forcings. We investigate how the use of different detection methods and filtering techniques affects the detectability of sulphate aerosol geoengineering in annual-mean global-mean near-surface air temperature. This is done by assuming a future scenario that injects 5 Tg yr‑1 of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere and cross-comparing simulations from 5 climate models. 64% of the studied comparisons would require 25 years or more for detection when no filter and the multi-variate method that has been extensively used for attributing climate change are used, while 66% of the same comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection using a trend-based filter. This highlights the high sensitivity of sulphate aerosol geoengineering detectability to the choice of filter. With the same trend-based filter but a non-stationary method, 80% of the comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection. This does not imply sulphate aerosol geoengineering should be deployed, but suggests that both detection methods could be used for monitoring geoengineering in global, annual mean temperature should it be needed.

  13. INTEGRATED PROTECTIVE FABRIC SYSTEM (IPFS) PHASE III PROGRAM: AEROSOL PROTECTION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    one layer control. It was observed that aerosol swatch measurements showed no correlation to aerosol system test performance for the materials and...the BRHA model employed. It was observed that aerosol swatch measurements showed no correlation to aerosol system test performance for the...was used as a negative control with the purpose of providing a high-efficiency filter to demonstrate that if the suit fabric was highly efficient at

  14. Improved measurement of carbonaceous aerosol: evaluation of the sampling artifacts and inter-comparison of the thermal-optical analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cheng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The sampling artifacts (both positive and negative and the influence of thermal-optical methods (both charring correction method and the peak inert mode temperature on the split of organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC were evaluated in Beijing. The positive sampling artifact constituted 10% and 23% of OC concentration determined by the bare quartz filter during winter and summer, respectively. For summer samples, the adsorbed gaseous organics were found to continuously evolve off the filter during the whole inert mode when analyzed by the IMPROVE-A temperature protocol. This may be due to the oxidation of the adsorbed organics during sampling (reaction artifact which would increase their thermal stability. The backup quartz approach was evaluated by a denuder-based method for assessing the positive artifact. The quartz-quartz (QBQ in series method was demonstrated to be reliable, since all of the OC collected by QBQ was from originally gaseous organics. Negative artifact that could be adsorbed by quartz filter was negligible. When the activated carbon impregnated glass fiber (CIG filter was used as the denuded backup filter, the denuder efficiency for removing gaseous organics that could be adsorbed by the CIG filter was only about 30%. EC values were found to differ by a factor of about two depending on the charring correction method. Influence of the peak inert mode temperature was evaluated based on the summer samples. The EC value was found to continuously decrease with the peak inert mode temperature. Premature evolution of light absorbing carbon began when the peak inert mode temperature was increased from 580 to 650 °C; when further increased to 800 °C, the OC and EC split frequently occurred in the He mode, and the last OC peak was characterized by the overlapping of two separate peaks. The discrepancy between EC values defined by different temperature protocols was larger for Beijing carbonaceous aerosol compared with North

  15. Regional air quality in Leipzig, Germany: detailed source apportionment of size-resolved aerosol particles and comparison with the year 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pinxteren, D; Fomba, K W; Spindler, G; Müller, K; Poulain, L; Iinuma, Y; Löschau, G; Hausmann, A; Herrmann, H

    2016-07-18

    A detailed source apportionment of size-resolved aerosol particles in the area of Leipzig, Germany, was performed. Sampling took place at four sites (traffic, traffic/residential, urban background, regional background) in parallel during summer 2013 and the winters 2013/14/15. Twenty-one samples were taken per season with a 5-stage Berner impactor and analysed for particulate mass, inorganic ions, organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon, trace metals, and a wide range of organic species. The compositional data were used to estimate source contributions to particulate matter (PM) in quasi-ultrafine (up to 140 nm), accumulation mode, and coarse size ranges using Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) receptor modelling. Traffic (exhaust and general traffic emissions), coal combustion, biomass combustion, photochemistry, general secondary formation, cooking, fungal spores, urban dust, fresh sea/road salt, and aged sea salt were all found to contribute to different extents to observed PM concentrations. PMF derived estimates agreed reasonably with estimates from established macrotracer approaches. Quasi-ultrafine PM originated mainly from traffic (20-50%) and photochemistry (30-50%) in summer, while it was dominated by solid fuel (mainly biomass) combustion in winter (50-70%). Tentatively identified cooking aerosol contributed up to 36% on average at the residential site. For accumulation mode particles, two secondary sources typically contributed 40-90% to particle mass. In winter, biomass and coal combustion contributions were up to ca. 25% and 45%, respectively. Main sources of coarse particles were diverse and included nearly all PMF-resolved ones depending on season and air mass origin. For PM10, traffic (typically 20-40% at kerbside sites), secondary formation (30-60%), biomass combustion (10-15% in winter), and coal combustion (30-40% in winter with eastern air mass inflow) were the main quantified sources. At the residential site, contributions

  16. Optical closure study on light-absorbing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Andrews, Elizabeth; Hallar, Anna G.

    2014-05-01

    approach for determining aerosol absorption using the difference method, and (4) whether this comparison provides any indication that the PSAP and/or MAAP measurements of absorption have artifacts by organic condensation as suggested in the literature. The results presented here contribute to the ongoing efforts of assessing measurement methods suitable for the monitoring of aerosol optical properties.

  17. Culture through Comparison: Creating Audio-Visual Listening Materials for a CLIL Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyrun, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Authentic listening has become a part of CLIL materials, but it can be difficult to find listening materials that perfectly match the language level, length requirements, content, and cultural context of a course. The difficulty of finding appropriate materials online, financial limitations posed by copyright fees, and necessity to produce…

  18. Seasonal differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over rural Oklahoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andrews

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A small airplane made more than 450 aerosol optical property (light absorption and light scattering vertical profile measurements (up to 4 km over a rural Oklahoma site between March 2000 and July 2005. These profiles suggest significant seasonal differences in aerosol properties. The highest amounts of scattering and absorbing aerosol are observed during the summer, while the relative contribution of aerosol absorption is highest in the winter (i.e., single scattering albedo is lowest in winter. Aerosol absorption generally decreased with altitude below ∼1.5 km and then was relatively constant above that. Aerosol scattering decreased sharply with altitude below ∼1.5 km but, unlike absorption, also decreased at higher altitudes, albeit less sharply. The seasonal variability observed for aerosol loading is consistent with other aerosol measurements in the region including AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD, CALIPSO vertical profiles, and IMPROVE aerosol mass. The column averaged single scattering albedo derived from in situ airplane measurements shows a similar seasonal cycle as the AERONET single scattering albedo inversion product, but a comparison of aerosol asymmetry parameter from airplane and AERONET platforms suggests differences in seasonal variability. The observed seasonal cycle of aerosol loading corresponds with changes in air mass back trajectories: the aerosol scattering was higher when transport was from polluted areas (e.g., the Gulf Coast and lower when the air came from cleaner regions and/or the upper atmosphere.

  19. Comparison of lithium and the eutectic lead lithium alloy, two candidate liquid metal breeder materials for self-cooled blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malang, S. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Mattas, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Liquid metals are attractive candidates for both near-term and long-term fusion applications. The subjects of this comparison are the differences between the two candidate liquid metal breeder materials Li and LiPb for use in breeding blankets in the areas of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, tritium control, compatibility with structural materials, heat extraction system, safety, and required R&D program. Both candidates appear to be promising for use in self-cooled breeding blankets which have inherent simplicity with the liquid metal serving as both breeders and coolant. The remaining feasibility question for both breeder materials is the electrical insulation between liquid metal and duct walls. Different ceramic coatings are required for the two breeders, and their crucial issues, namely self-healing of insulator cracks and radiation induced electrical degradation are not yet demonstrated. Each liquid metal breeder has advantages and concerns associated with it, and further development is needed to resolve these concerns.

  20. Data on comparison between FLEC and CLIMPAQ methods used for fast sorption measurements of VOCs on building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak Rizk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A test emission chamber called CLIMPAQ has been coupled to a chromatography analyzer GC to measure volatile organic compounds (VOC concentration during a sorption experiments (Fast sorption measurements of VOCs on building materials: Part 2 – Comparison between FLEC and CLIMPAQ methods, (Rizk et al., In press [1]. The equations used to calculate the mass transfer coefficient and the thickness of the boundary layer developed on the surface of a material are presented. In addition, the experimental profiles obtained using the CLIMPAQ chamber is also presented in the presence and the absence of a building material. Finally, the impact of chamber size on the obtained concentration profile using different chambers is shown using 3 types of chambers having different volumes, 1 m3, 30 m3 and a micro chamber of 40 mL.

  1. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS approach and an integrating sphere (IS for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolved aerosol optical extinction over the spectral range of 445–480 nm. An integrating sphere nephelometer coupled to the IBBCEAS setup was used for the measurement of aerosol scattering. The scattering signal was measured with a single channel photomultiplier tube (PMT, providing an integrated value over a narrow bandwidth (FWHM ~ 9 nm in the spectral region of 465–474 nm. A scattering coefficient at a wavelength of 470 nm was deduced as an averaged scattering value and used for data analysis and instrumental performance comparison. Performance evaluation of the albedometer was carried out using laboratory-generated particles and ambient aerosol. The scattering and extinction measurements of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL spheres generated in laboratory proved excellent correlation between two channels of the albedometer. The retrieved refractive index (RI from the measured scattering and extinction efficiencies agreed well with the values reported in previously published papers. Aerosol light scattering and extinction coefficients, single scattering albedo (SSA and NO2 concentrations in an ambient sample were directly and simultaneously measured using the developed albedometer. The developed instrument was validated via an intercomparison of the measured aerosol scattering coefficient and NO2 trace concentration against a TSI 3563 integrating nephelometer and a chemiluminescence detector, respectively.

  2. Radiodensity evaluation of dental impression materials in comparison to tooth structures

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Borges Fonseca; Carolina Assaf Branco; Francisco Haiter-Neto; Luciano Souza Gonçalves; Carlos José Soares; Hugo Lemes Carlo; Mário Alexandre Coelho Sinhoreti; Lourenço Correr-Sobrinho

    2010-01-01

    In the most recent decades, several developments have been made on impression materials' composition, but there are very few radiodensity studies in the literature. It is expected that an acceptable degree of radiodensity would enable the detection of small fragments left inside gingival sulcus or root canals. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the radiodensity of different impression materials, and to compare them to human and bovine enamel and dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tw...

  3. A comparison of the dimensional accuracy of microwave and conventionally polymerized denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Zissis, A; Vowles, R W

    1993-01-01

    This study compares the dimensional changes of microwave and conventionally polymerized denture bases and also establishes the degree of monomer conversion using gas-liquid chromatography. Dimensional changes of three denture base materials were assessed using an optical comparator and the results showed no significant differences between the materials employed or the curing method used. Efficient monomer conversion was demonstrated with levels of residual monomer of less than 1% for all materials.

  4. A comparison of haptic material perception in blind and sighted individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Elisabeth; Wiebel, Christiane B; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated material perception in blind participants to explore the influence of visual experience on material representations and the relationship between visual and haptic material perception. In a previous study with sighted participants, we had found participants' visual and haptic judgments of material properties to be very similar (Baumgartner, Wiebel, & Gegenfurtner, 2013). In a categorization task, however, visual exploration had led to higher categorization accuracy than haptic exploration. Here, we asked congenitally blind participants to explore different materials haptically and rate several material properties in order to assess the role of the visual sense for the emergence of haptic material perception. Principal components analyses combined with a procrustes superimposition showed that the material representations of blind and blindfolded sighted participants were highly similar. We also measured haptic categorization performance, which was equal for the two groups. We conclude that haptic material representations can emerge independently of visual experience, and that there are no advantages for either group of observers in haptic categorization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development, validation and comparison of two stability-indicating RP-LC methods using charged aerosol and UV detectors for analysis of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in capsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two new stability-indicating liquid chromatographic methods using two detectors, an ultraviolet (UV and a charged aerosol detector (CAD simultaneously connected in series were validated for the assessment of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX in capsule. The method was optimized and the influence of individual parameters on UV and CAD response and sensitivity was studied. Chromatography was performed on a Zorbax CN column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm in an isocratic elution mode, using acetonitrile and 20 mM ammonium formate at pH 4.0 (50:50, v/v as mobile phase and UV detection at 207 nm. The developed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and the parameters’ specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, linearity, accuracy, precision and robustness were evaluated. CAD is designated to be a non-linear detector in a wide dynamic range, however, the method was linear over the concentration range of 70–130 μg mL−1 in both detectors. The method was precise and accurate. Robustness study was performed by a Plackett–Burman design, delivering results within the acceptable range. Neither the excipients nor the degradation products showed interference in the method after studies of specificity as well as under stress conditions. The results of the LC-UV and LC-CAD methods were statistically compared through ANOVA and showed no significant difference (p > 0.05. Both proposed methods could be considered interchangeable and stability-indicating, and can be applied as an appropriate quality control tool for routine analysis of LDX in capsule.

  6. Supplementary Material for: BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACONâ s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  7. Comprehensive Measurement of Atmospheric Aerosols with a Wide Range Aerosol Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, L; Pesch, M; Grimm, H, E-mail: lk@grimm-aerosol.com [GRIMM Aerosol Technik GmbH and Co. KG, Dorfstrasse 9, D-83404 Ainring, Bayern (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    A wide range aerosol spectrometer (WRAS) was used for comprehensive long term measurements of aerosol size distributions. The system combines the results of an optical aerosol spectrometer with the results of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to record essentially the full size range (5 nm - 32 {mu}m) of atmospheric particles in 72 channels. Measurements were carried out over one year (2009) at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW)-Station Hohenpeissenberg, Bavaria. Total particle number concentrations obtained from the aerosol size distributions were compared to the total number concentrations measured by a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC). The comparison showed an excellent agreement of the data. The high time resolution of 5 minutes allows the combination of the measured size distributions with meteorological data and correlations to gaseous pollutants (CO, NOx and SO2). A good correlation of particle number and CO concentrations was found for long distance transported small particles, which were probably mainly soot particles. Correlations to NOx were observed for aerosols from local sources such as traffic emissions. The formation of secondary aerosols from gaseous precursors was also observed. Episodes of relatively high concentration of particles in the range of 2-3 {mu}m were probably caused by pollen.

  8. Comparison of United States and British Methods for Testing Plastic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    materials including cost, hot- molded and sheet materials. Two procedures, refractometric and microscopical, are proposed in order to cover satisfactorily...duplicability. The refractometric method, which is preferred, is based on the standard Abbe refractometer, almost universally used for liquids. For solids

  9. The role of semi-volatile organic compounds in the mesoscale evolution of biomass burning aerosol: a modeling case study of the 2010 mega-fire event in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Konovalov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry transport models (CTMs are an indispensable tool for studying and predicting atmospheric and climate effects associated with carbonaceous aerosol from open biomass burning (BB; this type of aerosol is known to contribute significantly to both global radiative forcing and to episodes of air pollution in regions affected by wildfires. Improving model performance requires systematic comparison of simulation results with measurements of BB aerosol and elucidation of possible reasons for discrepancies between them, which, by default, are frequently attributed in the literature to uncertainties in emission data. Based on published laboratory data on the atmospheric evolution of BB aerosol and using the volatility basis set (VBS framework for organic aerosol modeling, we examined the importance of taking gas-particle partitioning and oxidation of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs into account in simulations of the mesoscale evolution of smoke plumes from intense wildfires that occurred in western Russia in 2010. Biomass burning emissions of primary aerosol components were constrained with PM10 and CO data from the air pollution monitoring network in the Moscow region. The results of the simulations performed with the CHIMERE CTM were evaluated by considering, in particular, the ratio of smoke-related enhancements in PM10 and CO concentrations (ΔPM10 and ΔCO measured in Finland (in the city of Kuopio, nearly 1000 km downstream of the fire emission sources. It is found that while the simulations based on a "conventional" approach to BB aerosol modeling (disregarding oxidation of SVOCs and assuming organic aerosol material to be non-volatile strongly underestimated values of ΔPM10/ΔCO observed in Kuopio (by a factor of 2, employing the "advanced" representation of atmospheric processing of organic aerosol material resulted in bringing the simulations to a much closer agreement with the ground measurements. Furthermore, taking gas

  10. Comparison of carbon materials as electrodes for enzyme electrocatalysis: hydrogenase as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinson, Jonathan; Hidalgo, Ricardo; Ash, Philip A; Dillon, Frank; Grobert, Nicole; Vincent, Kylie A

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of electrocatalysis by an enzyme adsorbed on a range of carbon materials, with different size, surface area, morphology and graphitic structure, which are either commercially available or prepared via simple, established protocols. We choose as our model enzyme the hydrogenase I from E. coli (Hyd-1), which is an active catalyst for H2 oxidation, is relatively robust and has been demonstrated in H2 fuel cells and H2-driven chemical synthesis. The carbon materials were characterised according to their surface area, surface morphology and graphitic character, and we use the electrocatalytic H2 oxidation current for Hyd-1 adsorbed on these materials to evaluate their effectiveness as enzyme electrodes. Here, we show that a variety of carbon materials are suitable for adsorbing hydrogenases in an electroactive configuration. This unified study provides insight into selection and design of carbon materials for study of redox enzymes and different applications of enzyme electrocatalysis.

  11. Analysis of plant gums and saccharide materials in paint samples: comparison of GC-MS analytical procedures and databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluveras-Tenorio Anna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharide materials have been used for centuries as binding media, to paint, write and illuminate manuscripts and to apply metallic leaf decorations. Although the technical literature often reports on the use of plant gums as binders, actually several other saccharide materials can be encountered in paint samples, not only as major binders, but also as additives. In the literature, there are a variety of analytical procedures that utilize GC-MS to characterize saccharide materials in paint samples, however the chromatographic profiles are often extremely different and it is impossible to compare them and reliably identify the paint binder. Results This paper presents a comparison between two different analytical procedures based on GC-MS for the analysis of saccharide materials in works-of-art. The research presented here evaluates the influence of the analytical procedure used, and how it impacts the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of paint samples that contain saccharide materials. The procedures have been developed, optimised and systematically used to characterise plant gums at the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI. The main steps of the analytical procedures and their optimisation are discussed. Conclusions The results presented highlight that the two methods give comparable sugar profiles, whether the samples analysed are simple raw materials, pigmented and unpigmented paint replicas, or paint samples collected from hundreds of centuries old polychrome art objects. A common database of sugar profiles of reference materials commonly found in paint samples was thus compiled. The database presents data also from those materials that only contain a minor saccharide fraction. This database highlights how many sources of saccharides can be found in a paint sample, representing an important step

  12. Radiodensity evaluation of dental impression materials in comparison to tooth structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Borges Fonseca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the most recent decades, several developments have been made on impression materials' composition, but there are very few radiodensity studies in the literature. It is expected that an acceptable degree of radiodensity would enable the detection of small fragments left inside gingival sulcus or root canals. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the radiodensity of different impression materials, and to compare them to human and bovine enamel and dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-five impression materials, from 5 classes, were studied: addition and condensation silicones, polyether, polysulfides and alginates. Five 1-mm-thick samples of each material and tooth structure were produced. Each sample was evaluated 3 times (N=15, being exposed to x-ray over a phosphor plate of Digora digital system, and radiodensity was obtained by the software Digora for Windows 2.5 Rev 0. An aluminum stepwedge served as a control. Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's method (α=0.05. RESULTS: Different materials and respective classes had a different behavior with respect to radiodensity. Polysulfides showed high values of radiodensity, comparable to human enamel (p>0.05, but not to bovine enamel (p<0.05. Human dentin was similar only to a heavy-body addition silicon material, but bovine dentin was similar to several materials. Generally, heavy-body materials showed higher radiodensity than light-body ones (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Impression materials' radiodensity are influenced by composition, and almost all of them would present a difficult detection against enamel or dentin background in radiographic examinations.

  13. Inter-laboratory comparison study for pyrrolizidine alkaloids in animal feed using spiked and incurred material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, de W.C.M.; Elbers, I.J.W.; Mulder, P.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are hepatotoxic metabolites produced by plants. PAs in animal feed can cause acute or chronic intoxications in animals and can be transferred to milk. An inter-laboratory comparison study among 12 laboratories, using their own methods of analysis, was conducted for the

  14. Comparison between hobbed and precision forged helical gears for automobile manual transaxle - on the prospect of form, precision, material specification and production cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooka, M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Hoguchi, T.; Tsujimoto, H.; Yamazaki, S.; Yoshinaga, M. [O-oka Co., Toyota (Japan); Moriwaki, I. [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Kagaya, C. [Chubu Univ., Kasugai (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the comparison between hobbed and forged helical gears in terms of precision, deformation of heat-treatment, material specification and production cost. With the results the forged ones are superior to hobbed ones. (orig.)

  15. Secondary organic aerosols from ozone-initiated reactions with emissions from wood-based materials and a ‘‘green’’ paint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Freund, Sarah; Salthammer, Tunga

    2008-01-01

    at close to real-world conditions; the chamber was ventilated at w0.5 air changes/h; the loadings (exposed surface of building materials to chamber volume) were in the range of 1–2.5 m2m3; and the initial O3 concentrations were between 15 and 40 ppb. Throughout each experiment particles were measured...

  16. An investigation of aerosol optical properties: Atmospheric implications and influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.

    An experimental, observational, and theoretical investigation of aerosol optical properties has been made in this work to study their implications and influences on the atmosphere. In the laboratory the scientific and instrumental methodology consisted of three parts, namely, aerosol generation, optical and mass concentration measurements, and computational calculations. In particular the optical properties of ammonium sulfate and caffeine aerosol were derived from measurements made with a transmissometer cell-reciprocal- integrating nephelometer (TCRIN), equipped with a laser beam at 632.8 nm, and by applying a Mie theory computer code The aerosol generators, optical equipment and calibration procedures were reviewed. The aerosol shape and size distribution were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and the Gumprecht- Sliepcevich/Lipofsky-Green extinction-sedimentation method. In particular the spherical and cylindrical shape were considered. During this investigation, an alternative method for obtaining the optical properties of monodisperse spherical non-absorbing aerosol using a cell-transmissometer, which is based on a linearisation of the Lambert-Beer law, was found. In addition, adapting the TCRIN to electrooptical aerosol studies, the optical properties of a circular-cylindrical aerosol of caffeine were undertaken under the condition of random orientation in relation with the laser beam, and perpendicular orientation to it. A theoretical study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of aerosol to a change of shape under different polarisation modes. The aerosol optical properties, obtained previously in the laboratory, were then used to simulate the direct radiative forcing. The calculations and results were obtained by applying a one- dimensional energy-balance box model. The influence of atmospheric aerosol on the sky brightness due to a total solar eclipse was studied using the photometric and meteorological observations made during the

  17. Atmosphere aerosol satellite project Aerosol-UA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Syniavskyi, Ivan; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Degtyaryov, Oleksandr; Sosonkin, Mikhail; Mishchenko, Michael; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Ivanov, Yury; Oberemok, Yevgeny; Masley, Volodymyr; Rosenbush, Vera; Moskalev, Sergii

    2017-04-01

    The experiment Aerosol-UA is Ukrainian space mission aimed to the terrestrial atmospheric aerosol spatial distribution and microphysics investigations. The experiment concept is based on idea of Glory/APS mission of precise orbital measurements of polarization and intensity of the sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, aerosol and the surface the multichannel Scanning Polarimeter (ScanPol) with narrow field-of-view. ScanPol measurements will be accompanied by the wide-angle MultiSpectral Imager-Polarimeter (MSIP). The ScanPol is designed to measure Stokes parameters I, Q, U within the spectral range from the UV to the SWIR in a wide range of phase angles along satellite ground path. Expected ScanPol polarimetric accuracy is 0.15%. A high accuracy measurement of the degree of linear polarization is provided by on-board calibration of the ScanPol polarimeter. On-board calibration is performed for each scan of the mirror scanning system. A set of calibrators is viewed during the part of the scan range when the ScanPol polarimeter looks in the direction opposite to the Earth's surface. These reference assemblies provide calibration of the zero of the polarimetric scale (unpolarized reference assembly) and the scale factor for the polarimetric scale (polarized reference assembly). The zero of the radiometric scale is provided by the dark reference assembly.The spectral channels of the ScanPol are used to estimate the tropospheric aerosol absorption, the aerosol over the ocean and the land surface, the signals from cirrus clouds, stratospheric aerosols caused by major volcanic eruptions, and the contribution of the Earth's surface. The imager-polarimeter MSIP will collect 60°x60° field-of-view images on the state of the atmosphere and surface in the area, where the ScanPol polarimeter will measure, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and polarization properties of aerosol by registration of three Stokes parameters simultaneously in three spectral channels. The two more

  18. DARE : Dedicated Aerosols Retrieval Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smorenburg, K.; Courrèges-Lacoste, G.B.; Decae, R.; Court, A.J.; Leeuw, G. de; Visser, H.

    2004-01-01

    At present there is an increasing interest in remote sensing of aerosols from space because of the large impact of aerosols on climate, earth observation and health. TNO has performed a study aimed at improving aerosol characterisation using a space based instrument and state-of-the-art aerosol retr

  19. Comparison of electron beam and laser beam powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process for high temperature turbine component materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kirka, Michael M [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Ryan, Daniel [Solar Turbines, Inc.

    2016-04-01

    The evolving 3D printer technology is now at the point where some turbine components could be additive manufactured (AM) for both development and production purposes. However, this will require a significant evaluation program to qualify the process and components to meet current design and quality standards. The goal of the project was to begin characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nickel Alloy X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo) test bars fabricated by powder bed fusion (PBF) AM processes that use either an electron beam (EB) or laser beam (LB) power source. The AM materials produced with the EB and LB processes displayed significant differences in microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. Accordingly, during the design analysis of AM turbine components, the specific mechanical behavior of the material produced with the selected AM process should be considered. Comparison of the mechanical properties of both the EB and LB materials to those of conventionally processed Nickel Alloy X materials indicates the subject AM materials are viable alternatives for manufacture of some turbine components.

  20. Urban aerosol effects on surface insolation and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Burian, S. J.; Remer, L. A.; Shepherd, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Urban aerosol particulates may play a fundamental role in urban microclimates and city-generated mesoscale circulations via its effects on energy balance of the surface. Key questions that need to be addressed include: (1) How do these particles affect the amount of solar energy reaching the surface and resulting surface temperature? (2) Is the effect the same in all cities? and (3) How does it vary from city to city? Using NASA AERONET in-situ observations, a radiative transfer model, and a regional climate mode (MM5), we assess aerosol effects on surface insolation and surf ace temperature for dense urban-polluted regions. Two big cities, one in a developing country (Beijing, P.R. China) and another in developed country (New York City, USA), are selected for inter-comparison. The study reveals that aerosol effects on surface temperature depends largely on aerosols' optical and chemical properties as well as atmosphere and land surface conditions, such as humidity and land cover. Therefore, the actual magnitudes of aerosol effects differ from city to city. Aerosol measurements from AERONET show both average and extreme cases for aerosol impacts on surface insolation. In general, aerosols reduce surface insolation by 30Wm-2. Nevertheless, in extreme cases, such reduction can exceed 100 Wm-2. Consequently, this reduces surface skin temperature 2-10C in an urban environment.

  1. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles across the Caribbean Basin: A Comparison between Clean and Perturbed African Dust and Volcanic Ash Air Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, H.; Ogren, J. A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Mayol-Bracero, O.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol’s optical and physical properties were measured during year 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The three cases investigated were classified according to the origin of the air masses: clean (C), African dust (AD), and volcanic ash (VA). The instrumentation used included a sunphotometer to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficient (σsp), and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to measure the absorption coefficient (σap). The average volume size distributions were trimodal for the C (peaks at 0.14, 0.99 and 4.25 µm radius) and AD (peaks at 0.11, 1.30 and 2.00 µm radius) cases and bimodal for the VA (peaks at 0.19 and 2.75 µm radius) case. Fine and coarse modes maxima for AD occurred at radii smaller than for VA, confirming the different origins of those particles. The average values for the total σsp were higher for AD (82.9 Mm-1) and VA (33.7 Mm-1) compared to C (16.6 Mm-1). The same happened for the AOT maximum values at 500 nm with 0.92, 0.30, and 0.06 for AD, VA, and C, respectively. The observed increase in the values of the Angstrom exponent (å) is indicative of a decrease in the size of the particles associated to VA (å= 0.27) and AD (å =0.89) when compared to C (å =0.24). The volume size distributions and thus the mass were dominated by the coarse mode (> 1.0 µm) especially for the AD case. Results have shown that AD as well as VA has a significant impact on the physical and radiative properties across Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Additional results on the AOT wavelength dependence and on the annual variability of the properties under study will be presented.

  2. Physical properties of the sub-micrometer aerosol over the Amazon rain forest during the wet-to-dry season transition - comparison of modeled and measured CCN concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rissler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles were studied in the Amazon region, 125 km northeast of Manaus, Brazil (-1°55.2'S, 59°28.1'W. The measurements were performed during the wet-to-dry transition period, 4-28 July 2001 as part of the LBA (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia CLAIRE-2001 (Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment experiment. The number size distribution was measured with two parallel differential mobility analyzers, the hygroscopic growth at 90% RH with a Hygroscopic Tandem Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA and the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN with a cloud condensation nuclei counter. A model was developed that uses the H-TDMA data to predict the number of soluble molecules or ions in the individual particles and the corresponding minimum particle diameter for activation into a cloud droplet at a certain supersaturation. Integrating the number size distribution above this diameter, CCN concentrations were predicted with a time resolution of 10 min and compared to the measured concentrations. During the study period, three different air masses were identified and compared: clean background, air influenced by aged biomass burning, and moderately polluted air from recent local biomass burning. For the clean period 2001, similar number size distributions and hygroscopic behavior were observed as during the wet season at the same site in 1998, with mostly internally mixed particles of low diameter growth factor (~1.3 taken from dry to 90% RH. During the periods influenced by biomass burning the hygroscopic growth changed slightly, but the largest difference was seen in the number size distribution. The CCN model was found to be successful in predicting the measured CCN concentrations, typically within 25%. A sensitivity study showed relatively small dependence on the assumption of which model salt that was used to predict CCN concentrations from H-TDMA data. One strength of using H-TDMA data

  3. Multi-instrument comparison and compilation of non-methane organic gas emissions from biomass burning and implications for smoke-derived secondary organic aerosol precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Lindsay E.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Veres, Patrick R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Blake, Donald R.; Orlando, John J.; Barsanti, Kelley C.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple trace-gas instruments were deployed during the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4), including the first application of proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) for laboratory biomass burning (BB) measurements. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) was also deployed, as well as whole-air sampling (WAS) with one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. This combination of instruments provided an unprecedented level of detection and chemical speciation. The chemical composition and emission factors (EFs) determined by these four analytical techniques were compared for four representative fuels. The results demonstrate that the instruments are highly complementary, with each covering some unique and important ranges of compositional space, thus demonstrating the need for multi-instrument approaches to adequately characterize BB smoke emissions. Emission factors for overlapping compounds generally compared within experimental uncertainty, despite some outliers, including monoterpenes. Data from all measurements were synthesized into a single EF database that includes over 500 non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) to provide a comprehensive picture of speciated, gaseous BB emissions. The identified compounds were assessed as a function of volatility; 6-11 % of the total NMOG EF was associated with intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). These atmospherically relevant compounds historically have been unresolved in BB smoke measurements and thus are largely missing from emission inventories. Additionally, the identified compounds were screened for published secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields. Of the total reactive carbon (defined as EF scaled by the OH rate constant and carbon number of each compound) in the BB emissions, 55-77 % was associated with compounds for

  4. Comparison of physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosols during the 2009 haze and non-haze periods in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingsha; Tai, Xuhong; Betha, Raghu; He, Jun; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent smoke-haze episodes that occur in Southeast Asia (SEA) are of much concern because of their environmental and health impacts. These haze episodes are mainly caused by uncontrolled biomass and peat burning in Indonesia. Airborne particulate matter (PM) samples were collected in the southwest coast of Singapore from 16 August to 9 November in 2009 to assess the impact of smoke-haze episodes on the air quality due to the long-range transport of biomass and peat burning emissions. The physical and chemical characteristics of PM were investigated during pre-haze, smoke-haze, and post-haze periods. Days with PM2.5 mass concentrations of ≥35 μg m(-3) were considered as smoke-haze events. Using this criterion, out of the total 82 sampling days, nine smoke-haze events were identified. The origin of air masses during smoke-haze episodes was studied on the basis of HYSPLIT backward air trajectory analysis for 4 days. In terms of the physical properties of PM, higher particle surface area concentrations and particle gravimetric mass concentrations were observed during the smoke-haze period, but there was no consistent pattern for particle number concentrations during the haze period as compared to the non-haze period except that there was a significant increase at about 08:00, which could be attributed to the entrainment of PM from aloft after the breakdown of the nocturnal inversion layer. As for the chemical characteristics of PM, among the six key inorganic water-soluble ions (Cl(-), NO3(-), nss-SO4(2-), Na(+), NH4(+), and nss-K(+)) measured in this study, NO3(-), nss-SO4(2-), and NH4(+) showed a significant increase in their concentrations during the smoke-haze period together with nss-K(+). These observations suggest that the increased atmospheric loading of PM with higher surface area and increased concentrations of optically active secondary inorganic aerosols [(NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4 and NH4NO3] resulted in the atmospheric visibility reduction in SEA due to

  5. Comparison of Geant4 with EGSnrc for Simulation of Gamma-Radiation Detectors Based on Semi-Insulating Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Skrypnyk, A I; Khazhmuradov, M A

    2011-01-01

    We considered GEANT4 version 4.9.4 with different Electromagnetic Physics Package for calculation of response functions of detectors based on semi-insulating materials. Computer simulations with GEANT4 packages were run in order to determine the energy deposition of gamma-quanta in detectors of specified composition (Mercuric (II) Iodide and Thallium Bromide) at various energies from 0.026 to 3 MeV. The uncertainty in these predictions is estimated by comparison of their results with EGSnrc simulations. A general good agreement is found for EGSnrc and GEANT4 with Penelope 2008 model of LowEnergy Electromagnetic package.

  6. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are: (1) Development of an aerosol chemistry model; (2) Utilization of satellite measurements of trace gases along with analysis of temperatures and dynamic conditions to understand ice cloud formation, dehydration and sedimentation in the winter polar regions; (3) Comparison of the HALOE and SAGE II time dependencies of the Pinatubo aerosol decay. The publications are attached.

  7. Satellite remote sensing of Asian aerosols: a case study of clean, polluted and dust storm days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Lee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based aerosol observation is a useful tool for the estimation of microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosol during more than three decades. Until now, a lot of satellite remote sensing techniques have been developed for aerosol detection. In East Asian region, the role of satellite observation is quite important because aerosols originating from natural and man-made pollution in this region have been recognized as an important source for regional and global scale air pollution. However, it is still difficult to retrieve aerosol over land because of the complexity of the surface reflection and complex aerosol composition, in particular, aerosol absorption. In this study, aerosol retrievals using Look-up Table (LUT based method was applied to MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Level 1 (L1 calibrated reflectance data to retrieve aerosol optical thickness (AOT over East Asia. Three case studies show how the methodology works to identify those differences to obtain a better AOT retrieval. The comparison between the MODIS and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET shows better results when the suggested methodology using the cluster based LUTs is applied (linear slope=0.94, R=0.92 than when operational MODIS aerosol products are used (linear slope=0.78, R=0.87. In conclusion, the suggested methodology is shown to work well with aerosol models acquired by statistical clustering the observation data in East Asia.

  8. MSA in Beijing aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Hui; WANG Ying; ZHUANG Guoshun

    2004-01-01

    Methane sulphonate (MSA) and sulfate (SO42-), the main oxidation products of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), are the target of atmospheric chemistry study, as sulfate aerosol would have important impact on the global climate change. It is widely believed that DMS is mainly emitted from phytoplankton production in marine boundary layer (MBL), and MSA is usually used as the tracer of non-sea-salt sulfate (nss- SO42-) in marine and coastal areas (MSA/SO42- = 1/18). Many observations of MSA were in marine and coastal aerosols. To our surprise, MSA was frequently (>60%) detected in Beijing TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 aerosols, even in the samples collected during the dust storm period. The concentrations of MSA were higher than those measured in marine aerosols. Factor analysis, correlation analysis and meteorology analysis indicated that there was no obvious marine influence on Beijing aerosols. DMS from terrestrial emissions and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) from industrial wastes could be the two possible precursors of MSA. Warm and low-pressure air masses and long time radiation were beneficial to the formation of MSA. Anthropogenic pollution from regional and local sources might be the dominant contributor to MSA in Beijing aerosol. This was the first report of MSA in aerosols collected in an inland site in China. This new finding would lead to the further study on the balance of sulfur in inland cities and its global biogeochemical cycle.

  9. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical linkage between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5) which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption and giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics to understand their individual impacts on global-scale cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Compared to the existing activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of activation schemes increase the computation time by ~10% but leads to predicted CDNC in better agreement with satellite-derived/in situ values in many regions with high CDNC but in worse agreement for some regions with low CDNC. Large percentage changes in predicted CDNC occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reduced activation of sea spray aerosol after accounting for giant CCN activation kinetics. Comparison of CESM/CAM5 predictions against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes generally improve the low biases. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNC of 150% and an increase (more negative) in shortwave cloud forcing of 12%. With the improvement of model-predicted CDNCs and better agreement with most satellite-derived cloud properties in many regions, the inclusion of these aerosol activation

  10. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2010-01-01

    results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20% to 400% of the OA mass, with smaller values generally corresponding to the higher ΔHvap assumptions. The volatility of various OA components determined from factor analysis of AMS spectra has also been assessed. In general, it is found that the fraction of non-volatile material follows the pattern: biomass burning OA < hydrocarbon-like OA < semivolatile oxygenated OA < low-volatility oxygenated OA. Correspondingly, the sensitivity to dilution and the estimated amount of semivolatile gas-phase material for the OA factors follows the reverse order. Primary OA has a substantial semivolatile fraction, in agreement with previous results, while the non-volatile fraction appears to be dominated by oxygenated OA produced by atmospheric aging. The overall OA volatility is thus controlled by the relative contribution of each aerosol type to the total OA burden. Finally, the model/measurement comparison appears to require OA having an evaporation coefficient (γe substantially greater than 10−2; at this point it is not possible to place firmer constraints on γe based on the observations.

  11. Comparison of platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after third molar extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Nathani, Dipesh B.; Sequeira, Joyce; Rao, B. H. Sripathi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the efficacy of Platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after bilateral third molar extraction. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Yenepoya Dental College & Hospital. Patients requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars were taken for the study. Following extraction, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) was placed in one extraction socket and synt...

  12. Characterization of a new plastic scintillation material and comparison with liquid BC-501A scintillator

    OpenAIRE

    Poleshchuk, Oleksii

    2015-01-01

    In this work the capability of various scintillation materials to discriminate gamma rays and neutrons were studied. Also such basic properties of scintillators as light emission spectrum and light output were determined. The studied materials were BC-501A liquid scintillator and a plastic scintillator provided by CEA. An experimental setup consisting of detector shielding, analog and digital electronics and data acquisition system was built to study the neutron-gamma discrimination propertie...

  13. Comparison of platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after third molar extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathani, Dipesh B.; Sequeira, Joyce; Rao, B. H. Sripathi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the efficacy of Platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after bilateral third molar extraction. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Yenepoya Dental College & Hospital. Patients requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars were taken for the study. Following extraction, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) was placed in one extraction socket and synthetic graft material in form granules [combination of Hydroxyapatite (HA) and Bioactive glass (BG)] in another extraction socket. The patients were assessed for postoperative pain and soft tissue healing. Radiological assessment of the extraction site was done at 8, 12 and 16 weeks interval to compare the change in bone density in both the sockets. Results: Pain was less on PRP site when compared to HA site. Soft tissue evaluation done using gingival healing index given by Landry et al showed better healing on PRP site when compared to HA site. The evaluation of bone density by radiological assessment showed the grey level values calculated at 4 months at the PRP site were comparatively higher than HA site. Conclusion: The study showed that the platelet rich plasma is a better graft material than synthetic graft material in terms of soft tissue and bone healing. However a more elaborate study with a larger number of clinical cases is very much essential to be more conclusive regarding the efficacy of both the materials. PMID:26981473

  14. Material properties of Grade 91 steel at elevated temperature and their comparison with a design code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Kim, Woo Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han Sang; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the material properties of tensile strength, creep properties, and creep crack growth model for Gr.91 steel at elevated temperature were obtained from material tests at KAERI, and the test data were compared with those of the French elevated temperature design code, RCC-MRx. The conservatism of the material properties in the French design code is highlighted. Mod.9Cr-1Mo (ASME Grade 91; Gr.91) steel is widely adopted as candidate material for Generation IV nuclear systems as well as for advanced thermal plants. In a Gen IV sodium-cooled fast reactor of the PGSFR (Prototype Gen IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) being developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute), Gr.91 steel is selected as the material for the steam generator, secondary piping, and decay heat exchangers. However, as this material has a relatively shorter history of usage in an actual plant than austenitic stainless steel, there are still many issues to be addressed including the long-term creep rupture life extrapolation and ratcheting behavior with cyclic softening characteristics.

  15. The Creativity Dimension of Instructional Materials Designed by Prospective Teachers: The Comparison across Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersoy Esen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revealing the creativity dimension of the materials designed and developed by the second year students studying at the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology. A part of the participants has completed the process by designing materials in their own field, information technologies; while some of them have done so by designing materials in the field of mathematics. The data have been retrieved from an experimental study of 13 weeks. “Teaching Material Creativity Rubric” developed by the researchers, has been used as the data collection tool. The rubric has been developed in order to evaluate the creativity dimensions of products. While developing the rubric, the creative product evaluation dimensions of [14] have been a source of inspiration. The products developed by the students have been evaluated through the retrieved data, in terms of their creativity. The rubric developed includes Originality, Practicality & Sensibility, Productivity & Flexibility, Feasibility, Inclusiveness, and Insightfulness dimensions. In this research, the data of the aforementioned dimensions and sub-dimensions have been evaluated. The results present that the creativity level of the products on teaching information technologies, which have been developed by Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT students, is high. It has been argued that the creativity of domain-specifically developed materials is higher, through literature. Keywords: Material Design in Computers, Mathematics Teaching, Originality, Applicability, Creativity, Creativity and Domainswords.

  16. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  17. WRF-Chem simulations of aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, L. Ruby

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF, including direct, semi-direct and indirect forcing) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at many sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 μm or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan, which indicates the possible influence of pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. The model underestimates SO42- and organic carbon (OC) concentrations over mainland China by about a factor of 2, while overestimates NO3- concentration in autumn along the Yangtze River. The model captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter and spring and over North China in winter, spring and summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over adjacent oceans at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5-30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO42-, NO3- and NH4

  18. Development and validation of a CCD-laser aerosol detective system for measuring the ambient aerosol phase function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol phase function represents the angular scattering property of aerosols, which is crucial for understanding the climate effects of aerosols that have been identified as one of the largest uncertainties in the evaluation of radiative forcing. So far, there is a lack of instruments with which to measure the aerosol phase function directly and accurately in laboratory studies and in situ measurements. A portable instrument with high angular range and resolution has been developed for the measurement of the phase function of ambient aerosols in this study. The charge-coupled device-laser aerosol detective system (CCD-LADS measures the aerosol phase function both across a relatively wide angular range of 10–170° and at a high resolution of 0.1°. The system includes a continuous laser, two charge-coupled device cameras and the corresponding fisheye lenses. The CCD-LADS was validated by both a laboratory study and a field measurement. The comparison between the aerosol phase function retrieved from CCD-LADS and Mie-scattering model shows good agreement. Compared with the TSI polar nephelometer, CCD-LADS has the advantages of wider detection range and better stability.

  19. A Comparison of the Reproduction of Surface Detail of Three Tissues Conditioning Materials over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nili M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Although the basic use of tissue conditioners is to treat inflamed mucosa, they are also employed as functional impression materials. No information was obtained on the reproduction of surface detail of these materials over time.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the surface quality of three tissue conditioners after being immersed in water for a period of time.Materials and Method: Detail reproduction was determined by using from a ruled test block the same it was specified in ISO Specification 4823. Three tissue conditioners (GC, Acrosoft, and Visco-gel were evaluated. Samples were made by pouring freshly mixed materials into a ruled test block. The samples were then stored in distilled water for either of the followings periods of time: 0 hour, 24 hours, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days. Subsequently, the dental stone was mixed with distilled water and poured on each sample and allowed to remain for 60 minutes. Then, 25 specimens were prepared. The detail reproduction was determined based on what is specified in ISO Specification 4823. The samples were examined under a stereo-microscope with low-angle illumination. The data was analyzed through running Kruskal-Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney Test.Results: The three materials had minimum standard of detail reproduction. The detail reproduction were more significantly influenced by the time period of immersion in water ( p <0.0005 than the type of the material. The best detail reproduction was pertained to Visco-gel not immersed in water. Acrosoft was less influenced by the time period of immersion in water than the two other types.Conclusion: The detail reproduction may be attributed to chemical composition. The type of material and immersion time had a significant effect, while the effect of the type was less significant. The best time for making functional impressions was ranges from 0 to 24 hours.

  20. Photophoretic levitation of engineered aerosols for geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols could be injected into the upper atmosphere to engineer the climate by scattering incident sunlight so as to produce a cooling tendency that may mitigate the risks posed by the accumulation of greenhouse gases. Analysis of climate engineering has focused on sulfate aerosols. Here I examine the possibility that engineered nanoparticles could exploit photophoretic forces, enabling more control over particle distribution and lifetime than is possible with sulfates, perhaps allowing climate engineering to be accomplished with fewer side effects. The use of electrostatic or magnetic materials enables a class of photophoretic forces not found in nature. Photophoretic levitation could loft particles above the stratosphere, reducing their capacity to interfere with ozone chemistry; and, by increasing particle lifetimes, it would reduce the need for continual replenishment of the aerosol. Moreover, particles might be engineered to drift poleward enabling albedo modification to be tailored to counter polar warming while minimizing the impact on equatorial climates. PMID:20823254

  1. Photophoretic levitation of engineered aerosols for geoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David W

    2010-09-21

    Aerosols could be injected into the upper atmosphere to engineer the climate by scattering incident sunlight so as to produce a cooling tendency that may mitigate the risks posed by the accumulation of greenhouse gases. Analysis of climate engineering has focused on sulfate aerosols. Here I examine the possibility that engineered nanoparticles could exploit photophoretic forces, enabling more control over particle distribution and lifetime than is possible with sulfates, perhaps allowing climate engineering to be accomplished with fewer side effects. The use of electrostatic or magnetic materials enables a class of photophoretic forces not found in nature. Photophoretic levitation could loft particles above the stratosphere, reducing their capacity to interfere with ozone chemistry; and, by increasing particle lifetimes, it would reduce the need for continual replenishment of the aerosol. Moreover, particles might be engineered to drift poleward enabling albedo modification to be tailored to counter polar warming while minimizing the impact on equatorial climates.

  2. Comparison of tokamak behaviour with tungsten and low-Z plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, V.; Neu, R.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Tokar, M.; Tanabe, T.; Rubel, M.

    2000-12-01

    Graphite wall materials are used in present day fusion devices in order to optimize plasma core performance and to enable access to a large operational space. A large physics database exists for operation with these plasma facing materials, which also indicate their use in future devices with extended burn times. The radiation from carbon impurities in the edge and divertor regions strongly helps to reduce the peak power loads on the strike areas, but carbon radiation also supports the formation of MARFE instabilities which can hinder access to high densities. The main concerns with graphite are associated with its strong chemical affinity to hydrogen, which leads to chemical erosion and to the formation of hydrogen-rich carbon layers. These layers can store a significant fraction of the total tritium fuel, which might prevent the use of these materials in future tritium devices. High-Z plasma facing materials are much more advantageous in this sense, but these advantages compete with the strong poisoning of the plasma if they enter the plasma core. New promising experiences have been obtained with high-Z wall materials in several devices, about which a survey is given in this paper and which also addresses open questions for future research and development work.

  3. Comparison of effects of different screw materials in the triangle fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Kadir; Inal, Sermet; Gok, Arif; Gulbandilar, Eyyup

    2017-05-01

    In this study, biomechanical behaviors of three different screw materials (stainless steel, titanium and cobalt-chromium) have analyzed to fix with triangle fixation under axial loading in femoral neck fracture and which material is best has been investigated. Point cloud obtained after scanning the human femoral model with the three dimensional (3D) scanner and this point cloud has been converted to 3D femoral model by Geomagic Studio software. Femoral neck fracture was modeled by SolidWorks software for only triangle configuration and computer-aided numerical analyses of three different materials have been carried out by AnsysWorkbench finite element analysis (FEA) software. The loading, boundary conditions and material properties have prepared for FEA and Von-Misses stress values on upper and lower proximity of the femur and screws have been calculated. At the end of numerical analyses, the best advantageous screw material has calculated as titanium because it creates minimum stress at the upper and lower proximity of the fracture line.

  4. Modelling of aerosol processes in plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, M.; Isukapalli, S.S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Norwegian Institute of Air Research, Kjeller (Norway)

    2001-07-01

    A modelling platform for studying photochemical gaseous and aerosol phase processes from localized (e.g., point) sources has been presented. The current approach employs a reactive plume model which extends the regulatory model RPM-IV by incorporating aerosol processes and heterogeneous chemistry. The physics and chemistry of elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium material of aerosols are treated and attributed to the PM size distribution. A modified version of the carbon bond IV chemical mechanism is included to model the formation of organic aerosol. Aerosol dynamics modeled include mechanisms of nucleation, condensation, dry deposition and gas/particle partitioning of organic matter. The model is first applied to a number of case studies involving emissions from point sources and sulfate particle formation in plumes. Model calculations show that homogeneous nucleation is an efficient process for new particle formation in plumes, in agreement with previous field studies and theoretical predictions. In addition, the model is compared with field data from power plant plumes with satisfactory predictions against gaseous species and total sulphate mass measurements. Finally, the plume model is applied to study secondary organic matter formation due to various emission categories such as vehicles and the oil production sector.

  5. Comparison of one-dimensional probabilistic finite element method with direct numerical simulation of dynamically loaded heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure such as grain topology, porosity, inclusions, and defects; however, many models rely on assumptions of homogeneity. We use the probabilistic finite element method (WK Liu, IJNME, 1986) to introduce local uncertainty to account for material heterogeneity. The PFEM uses statistical information about the local material response (i.e., its expectation, coefficient of variation, and autocorrelation) drawn from knowledge of the microstructure, single crystal behavior, and direct numerical simulation (DNS) to determine the expectation and covariance of the system response (velocity, strain, stress, etc). This approach is compared to resolved grain-scale simulations of the equivalent system. The microstructures used for the DNS are produced using Monte Carlo simulations of grain growth, and a sufficient number of realizations are computed to ensure a meaningful comparison. Finally, comments are made regarding the suitability of one-dimensional PFEM for modeling material heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Comparison of seven different suture materials in the feline oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNardo, G A; Brown, N O; Trenka-Benthin, S; Marretta, S M

    1996-01-01

    Seven different suture materials were implanted into the oral tissues of 12 cats. The sutures and surrounding tissues were retrieved en bloc from each of two cats on days one, three, seven, 14, 21, and 28 postimplantation. Tissue reaction and suture duration were evaluated by gross visual observation and histological examination. Chromic gut disappeared between days three and seven; polyglactin 910 disappeared between days 14 and 21; and polyglycolic acid disappeared as early as seven to 14 days. Polydioxanone still was intact at day 28 and is recommended as an absorbable material for procedures in which longer healing time is anticipated. All the nonabsorbable suture materials (i.e., polypropylene, stainless steel, and nylon) were intact at day 28 postimplantation. Visual inspection showed polypropylene to have the least tissue reaction.

  7. Comparison of filter media materials for heavy metal removal from urban stormwater runoff using biofiltration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H S; Lim, W; Hu, J Y; Ziegler, A; Ong, S L

    2015-01-01

    The filter media in biofiltration systems play an important role in removing potentially harmful pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. This study compares the heavy metal removal potential (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) of five materials (potting soil, compost, coconut coir, sludge and a commercial mix) using laboratory columns. Total/dissolved organic carbon (TOC/DOC) was also analysed because some of the test materials had high carbon content which affects heavy metal uptake/release. Potting soil and the commercial mix offered the best metal uptake when dosed with low (Cu: 44.78 μg/L, Zn: 436.4 μg/L, Cd, 1.82 μg/L, Pb: 51.32 μg/L) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu: 241 μg/L, Zn: 1127 μg/L, Cd: 4.57 μg/L, Pb: 90.25 μg/L). Compost and sludge also had high removal efficiencies (>90%). Heavy metal leaching from these materials was negligible. A one-month dry period between dosing experiments did not affect metal removal efficiencies. TOC concentrations from all materials increased after the dry period. Heavy metal removal was not affected by filter media depth (600 mm vs. 300 mm). Heavy metals tended to accumulate at the upper 5 cm of the filter media although potting soil showed bottom-enriched concentrations. We recommend using potting soil as the principal media mixed with compost or sludge since these materials perform well and are readily available. The use of renewable materials commonly found in Singapore supports a sustainable approach to urban water management.

  8. In vitro comparison of coronal microleakage of four temporary restorative materials used in endodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahi Sh.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The use of proper temporary restorative materials between appointments is critical in successful root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to compare the coronal microleakage of four temporary restorative materials including Zonalin, Zamherir, Coltosol and IRM. "nMaterials and Methods: In this in vitro study, standard access cavities were prepared in 120 intact extracted maxillary and mandibular human first molars. Canal preparation was carried out by the step-back technique, and obturation was performed with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer using the lateral condensation technique. Teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups of 25 teeth each and two positive and negative control groups, each containing 10 teeth. In each experimental group the access cavity was restored with one of the tested materials (Zamherir, Zonalin, IRM and Coltosol. In the negative control group the access cavity was filled entirely with sticky wax and in the positive control group no restorative material was applied. Dye penetration technique was used to evaluate microleakage which was measured under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with one way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. "nResults: Dye penetration was observed in all groups. Zonalin and Coltosol had the highest and the lowest dye penetration respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.001. There was no significant difference in dye penetration between IRM, and either Coltosol or Zamherir (p>0.05. "nConclusion: The results of this study showed that using Coltosol as a temporary restorative material can provide a better coronal seal in endodontic treatments

  9. Comparison of the insulation property of an innovative material and a traditional one by infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizza, A.; Bison, P.; Boldrini, S.; Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; Colla, L.; Ferrarini, G.

    2015-05-01

    An innovative ceramic material has been developed as a possible substitute of the traditional rock-wool as thermal insulating material. It should be used in the future inside a machine working at a temperature greater than 200 °C. The effect of exposition to this temperature for several hours has been evaluated to check if a degradation of the insulating properties can be measured. Experiments did not show any evidence of degradation. Nonetheless the value of the thermal conductivity measured both at high and ambient temperature was not so good as expected. At the same time, the same measurements on rock-wool (the traditional choice for insulation in this machinery) revealed to be very difficult as it is not possible to prepare samples to be tested in a laser flash. To overcome this problem in the measurement of the performance at high temperature a new experiment was prepared by heating one side of the material by means of an electric heater and by looking and comparing (at least qualitatively) the temperature increase on the other side. On the purpose, two parallel-piped samples of the two rival materials, with the same thickness have been prepared and put in contact with the electric heater plate. The temperature evolution of the side facing the ambient has been measured by means of a thermographic camera for almost one hour. The experiment shows that the traditional material owns better insulation performance than the innovative one. Attention has been paid on the properties of the innovative material that, being highly hygroscopic, can maintain a low temperature during the drying process due to the very high value of the latent heat of water when changing from liquid to gas phase.

  10. Inter-laboratory calibration of new silver orthophosphate comparison materials for the stable oxygen isotope analysis of phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Stanislaw; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Pelc, Andrzej; Kemp, Helen F

    2011-03-15

    Stable oxygen isotope compositions (δ(18)O values) of two commercial and one synthesized silver orthophosphate reagents have been determined on the VSMOW scale. The analyses were carried out in three different laboratories: lab (1) applying off-line oxygen extraction in the form of CO(2) which was analyzed on a dual inlet and triple collector isotope ratio mass spectrometer, while labs (2) and (3) employed an isotope ratio mass spectrometer coupled to a high-temperature conversion/elemental analyzer (TC/EA) where Ag(3)PO(4) samples were analyzed as CO in continuous flow mode. The δ(18)O values for the proposed new comparison materials were linked to the generally accepted δ(18)O values for Vennemann's TU-1 and TU-2 standards as well as for Ag(3)PO(4) extracted from NBS120c. The weighted average δ(18)O(VSMOW) values for the new comparison materials UMCS-1, UMCS-2 and AGPO-SCRI were determined to be + 32.60 (± 0.12), + 19.40 (± 0.12) and + 14.58 (± 0.13)‰, respectively. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Aerosol Delivery for Amendment Distribution in Contaminated Vadose Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. J.; Murdoch, L.; Riha, B.; Looney, B.

    2011-12-01

    Remediation of contaminated vadose zones is often hindered by an inability to effectively distribute amendments. Many amendment-based approaches have been successful in saturated formations, however, have not been widely pursued when treating contaminated unsaturated materials due to amendment distribution limitations. Aerosol delivery is a promising new approach for distributing amendments in contaminated vadose zones. Amendments are aerosolized and injected through well screens. During injection the aerosol particles are transported with the gas and deposited on the surfaces of soil grains. Resulting distributions are radially and vertically broad, which could not be achieved by injecting pure liquid-phase solutions. The objectives of this work were A) to characterize transport and deposition behaviors of aerosols; and B) to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios. Aerosol transport and deposition processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments. These experiments involved injection of aerosols through a 2m radius, sand-filled wedge. A particle analyzer was used to measure aerosol particle distributions with time, and sand samples were taken for amendment content analysis. Predictive capabilities were obtained by constructing a numerical model capable of simulating aerosol transport and deposition in porous media. Results from tests involving vegetable oil aerosol injection show that liquid contents appropriate for remedial applications could be readily achieved throughout the sand-filled wedge. Lab-scale tests conducted with aqueous aerosols show that liquid accumulation only occurs near the point of injection. Tests were also conducted using 200 g/L salt water as the aerosolized liquid. Liquid accumulations observed during salt water tests were minimal and similar to aqueous aerosol results. However, particles were measured, and salt deposited distal to the point of injection. Differences between

  12. A comparison of material removal mechanism under low stress abrasive condition of steel and hardfacing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Modi, O. P.; Jha, A. K.

    1999-08-01

    The low stress abrasive wear behavior of two types of steels commonly used for making a number of commonly used engineering components has been compared with the composition of a few hardfacing alloys that can be overlayed on the steels to impart a wear-resistant surface. The mechanism of material removal as studied by the scanning electron micrographs of the worn and transverse sections is different for the steels and hardfacing alloys. An attempt has been made to explain the mechanism of material removal for the steels and hardfacing alloys.

  13. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  14. Aerosol Optical Depth over Africa retrieved from AATSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Rodriques, Edith

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols produced over the African continent have important consequences for climate. In particular, large amounts of desert dust are produced over the Sahara and transported across the North Atlantic where desert dust deposition influences the eco system by iron fertilization, and further North over Europe with outbreaks as far as Scandinavia. Biomass burning occurs in most of the African continent south of the Sahara and causes a net positive radiating forcing resulting in local warming of the atmosphere layers. These effects have been studied during large field campaigns. Satellites can systematically provide information on aerosols over a large area such as Africa and beyond. To this end, we retrieved the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at three wavelengths (555nm, 670nm, and 1600nm) over Africa from the reflectance measured at the top of the atmosphere by the AATSR (Advances Along Track Scanning Radiometer) flying on ENVISAT, for one year (1 May 2008 to 30 April 2009) to obtain information on the seasonal and spatial behaviour of the AOD, episodes of high AOD events and connect the retrieved AOD with the ground-based aerosol measurements. The AOD retrieval algorithm, which is applied to cloud-free pixels over land, is based on the comparison of the measured and modeled reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The algorithm uses look-up-tables (LUTs) to compute the modeled TOA reflectance. For AOD retrieval, an aerosol in the atmosphere is assumed to be an external mixture of fine and coarse mode particles. The two aerosol types are mixed such that the spectral behavior of the reflectance due to aerosol best fits the measurements. Comparison with AERONET (Aerosol Roboric NETwork), which is a network of ground-based sun photometers which measure atmospheric aerosol properties, shows good agreement but with some overestimation of the AATSR retrieved AOD. Different aerosol models have been used to improve the comparison. The lack of AERONET stations in Africa

  15. Source attribution of aerosol size distributions and model evaluation using Whistler Mountain measurements and GEOS-Chem-TOMAS simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Ng, J. Y.; Kodros, J. K.; Atwood, S. A.; Wheeler, M. J.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Pierce, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Remote and free-tropospheric aerosols represent a large fraction of the climatic influence of aerosols; however, aerosol in these regions is less characterized than those polluted boundary layers. We evaluate aerosol size distributions predicted by the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global chemical transport model with online aerosol microphysics using measurements from the peak of Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada (2182 m a.s.l., hereafter referred to as Whistler Peak). We evaluate the model for predictions of aerosol number, size, and composition during periods of free-tropospheric (FT) and boundary-layer (BL) influence at "coarse" 4° × 5° and "nested" 0.5° × 0.667° resolutions by developing simple FT/BL filtering techniques. We find that using temperature as a proxy for upslope flow (BL influence) improved the model-measurement comparisons. The best threshold temperature was around 2 °C for the coarse simulations and around 6 °C for the nested simulations, with temperatures warmer than the threshold indicating boundary-layer air. Additionally, the site was increasingly likely to be in cloud when the measured relative humidity (RH) was above 90 %, so we do not compare the modeled and measured size distributions during these periods. With the inclusion of these temperature and RH filtering techniques, the model-measurement comparisons improved significantly. The slope of the regression for N80 (the total number of particles with particle diameter, Dp, > 80 nm) in the nested simulations increased from 0.09 to 0.65, R2 increased from 0.04 to 0.46, and log-mean bias improved from 0.95 to 0.07. We also perform simulations at the nested resolution without Asian anthropogenic emissions and without biomass-burning emissions to quantify the contribution of these sources to aerosols at Whistler Peak (through comparison with simulations with these emissions on). The long-range transport of Asian anthropogenic aerosol was found to be significant throughout all particle

  16. Use of the CALIOP vertical feature mask for evaluating global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Nowottnick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Global aerosol distributions provided by the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero are evaluated using the <