WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerosol generation potentials

  1. Generation of aerosolized drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, R K; Niven, R W

    1994-01-01

    The expanding use of inhalation therapy has placed demands on current aerosol generation systems that are difficult to meet with current inhalers. The desire to deliver novel drug entities such as proteins and peptides, as well as complex formulations including liposomes and microspheres, requires delivery systems of improved efficiency that will target the lung in a reproducible manner. These efforts have also been spurred by the phase out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and this has included a directed search for alternative propellants. Consequently, a variety of new aerosol devices and methods of generating aerosols are being studied. This includes the use of freon replacement propellants, dry powder generation systems, aqueous unit spray systems and microprocessor controlled technologies. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages depending upon each principle of action and set of design variables. In addition, specific drugs may be better suited for one type of inhaler device vs. another. The extent to which aerosol generation systems achieve their goals is discussed together with a summary of selected papers presented at the recent International Congress of Aerosols in Medicine.

  2. Micro-physics of aircraft-generated aerosols and their potential impact on heterogeneous plume chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Luo, B.P. [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung

    1997-12-31

    Answers are attempted to give to open questions concerning physico-chemical processes in near-field aircraft plumes, with emphasis on their potential impact on subsequent heterogeneous chemistry. Research issues concerning the nucleation of aerosols and their interactions among themselves and with exhaust gases are summarized. Microphysical properties of contrail ice particles, formation of liquid ternary mixtures, and nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in contrails are examined and possible implications for heterogeneous plume chemistry are discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  3. Trace Metals Derived from Electronic Cigarette (ECIG) Generated Aerosol: Potential Problem of ECIG Devices That Contain Nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Dominic L; Crow, Andrew P; Nelson, John M; Johnson, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: ECIGs are currently under scrutiny concerning their safety, particularly in reference to the impact ECIG liquids (E-liquids) have on human health. One concern is that aerosolized E-liquids contain trace metals that could become trapped in respiratory tissues and induce pathology. Methods: To mimic this trapping, peristaltic pumps were used to generate and transport aerosol onto mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membranes where aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were subsequently captured and quantified. The presence of trace metals on unexposed MCE membranes and on MCE membranes exposed to mainstream smoke served as control and comparison, respectively. The presence of these metals was also determined from the E-liquid before aerosolization and untouched by the ECIG device. All metals were quantified using ICP-MS. The ECIG core assembly was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with elemental analysis capability. Results: The contents (μg) of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn on control MCE membranes were 1.2 ± 0.2, 0.050 ± 0.002, 0.047 ± 0.003, 0.05 ± 0.01, 0.001 ± 0.001, 0.16 ± 0.04, 0.005 ± 0.003, 0.014 ± 0.006, and 0.09 ± 0.02, respectively. The contents of all trace metals on MCE membranes exposed to aerosol were similar to controls, except Ni which was significantly (p metals in E-liquid before aerosolization were negligible compared to amounts of aerosolized E-liquid, except for Fe (0.002 μg before and 0.001 μg after). Elemental analysis of the core assembly reveals the presence of several of these trace metals, especially Al, Fe, Ni, and Zn. Conclusions: In general, from the single ECIG-device/E-liquid combination used, the amount of trace metals from ECIG-generated aerosol are lower than in traditional mainstream smoke, Only Ni in the ECIG-generated aerosol was higher than control. The most probable source of Ni in this aerosol is the core

  4. Devices and methods for generating an aerosol

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-03-03

    Aerosol generators and methods of generating aerosols are provided. The aerosol can be generated at a stagnation interface between a hot, wet stream and a cold, dry stream. The aerosol has the benefit that the properties of the aerosol can be precisely controlled. The stagnation interface can be generated, for example, by the opposed flow of the hot stream and the cold stream. The aerosol generator and the aerosol generation methods are capable of producing aerosols with precise particle sizes and a narrow size distribution. The properties of the aerosol can be controlled by controlling one or more of the stream temperatures, the saturation level of the hot stream, and the flow times of the streams.

  5. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  6. Aerosol generation by raindrop impact on soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Young Soo; Buie, Cullen R

    2015-01-14

    Aerosols are investigated because of their significant impact on the environment and human health. To date, windblown dust and sea salt from sea spray through bursting bubbles have been considered the chief mechanisms of environmental aerosol dispersion. Here we investigate aerosol generation from droplets hitting wettable porous surfaces including various classifications of soil. We demonstrate that droplets can release aerosols when they influence porous surfaces, and these aerosols can deliver elements of the porous medium to the environment. Experiments on various porous media including soil and engineering materials reveal that knowledge of the surface properties and impact conditions can be used to predict when frenzied aerosol generation will occur. This study highlights new phenomena associated with droplets on porous media that could have implications for the investigation of aerosol generation in the environment.

  7. Contribution of water-soluble and insoluble components and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the reactive oxygen species-generating potential of fine ambient aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vishal; Rico-Martinez, Roberto; Kotra, Neel; King, Laura; Liu, Jiumeng; Snell, Terry W; Weber, Rodney J

    2012-10-16

    Relative contributions of water- and methanol-soluble compounds and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the ROS (reactive oxygen species)-generating potential of ambient fine aerosols (D(p) Hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were then subsequently segregated via a C-18 solid phase extraction column. The DTT assay response was significantly higher for the methanol extract, and for both extracts a substantial fraction of PM oxidative potential was associated with the hydrophobic compounds as evident from a substantial attenuation in DTT response after passing PM extracts through the C-18 column (64% for water and 83% for methanol extract; both median values). The DTT activities of water and methanol extracts were correlated with the water-soluble (R = 0.86) and water-insoluble organic carbon (R = 0.94) contents of the PM, respectively. Brown carbon (BrC), which predominantly represents the hydrophobic organic fraction (referred to as humic-like substances, HULIS), was also correlated with DTT activity in both the water (R = 0.78) and methanol extracts (R = 0.83). Oxidative potential was not correlated with any metals measured in the extracts. These findings suggest that the hydrophobic components of both water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols substantially contribute to the oxidative properties of ambient PM. Further investigation of these hydrophobic organic compounds could help identify sources of a significant fraction of ambient aerosol toxicity.

  8. High Concentration Standard Aerosol Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-31

    materials. In addition to material problems, many liquids are extremely flammable or explosive when aerosolized. This can be checked by putting a small...Hochriner. D. (1975) Stub 3A 440-445. St6ber, W. Flachsbart, H. and Hochramn, D. (1970) Staub 3^, 277. Yoshida. H. Fujii, K. Yomimoto, Y. Masuda. H. and

  9. Secondary organic aerosols: Formation potential and ambient data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, R.J.; Pryor, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Organic aerosols comprise a significant fraction of the total atmospheric particle loading and are associated with radiative forcing and health impacts. Ambient organic aerosol concentrations contain both a primary and secondary component. Herein, fractional aerosol coefficients (FAC) are used...... in conjunction with measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to predict the formation potential of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the Lower Fraser Valley (LEV) of British Columbia. The predicted concentrations of SOA show reasonable accord with ambient aerosol measurements and indicate considerable...

  10. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  11. Aerosol generation and measurement of multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myojo, Toshihiko; Oyabu, Takako; Nishi, Kenichiro; Kadoya, Chikara; Tanaka, Isamu; Ono-Ogasawara, Mariko; Sakae, Hirokazu; Shirai, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Mass production of some kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is now imminent, but little is known about the risk associated with their exposure. It is important to assess the propensity of the CNT to release particles into air for its risk assessment. In this study, we conducted aerosolization of a multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) to assess several aerosol measuring instruments. A Palas RBG-1000 aerosol generator applied mechanical stress to the MWCNT by a rotating brush at feed rates ranging from 2 to 20 mm/h, which the MWCNT was fed to a two-component fluidized bed. The fluidized bed aerosol generator was used to disperse the MWCNT aerosol once more. We monitored the generated MWCNT aerosol concentrations based on number, area, and mass using a condensation particle counter and nanoparticle surface area monitor. Also we quantified carbon mass in MWCNT aerosol samples by a carbon monitor. The shape of aerosolized MWCNT fibers was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The MWCNT was well dispersed by our system. We found isolated MWCNT fibers in the aerosols by SEM and the count median lengths of MWCNT fibers were 4-6 μm. The MWCNT was quantified by the carbon monitor with a modified condition based on the NIOSH analytical manual. The MWCNT aerosol concentration (EC mass base) was 4 mg/m3 at 2 mm/h in this study.

  12. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  13. Generation and Characterization of Indoor Fungal Aerosols for Inhalation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Larsen, Søren T; Koponen, Ismo K; Kling, Kirsten I; Barooni, Afnan; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Tendal, Kira; Wolkoff, Peder

    2016-04-01

    In the indoor environment, people are exposed to several fungal species. Evident dampness is associated with increased respiratory symptoms. To examine the immune responses associated with fungal exposure, mice are often exposed to a single species grown on an agar medium. The aim of this study was to develop an inhalation exposure system to be able to examine responses in mice exposed to mixed fungal species aerosolized from fungus-infested building materials. Indoor airborne fungi were sampled and cultivated on gypsum boards. Aerosols were characterized and compared with aerosols in homes. Aerosols containing 10(7)CFU of fungi/m(3)air were generated repeatedly from fungus-infested gypsum boards in a mouse exposure chamber. Aerosols contained Aspergillus nidulans,Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus ustus, Aspergillus versicolor,Chaetomium globosum,Cladosporium herbarum,Penicillium brevicompactum,Penicillium camemberti,Penicillium chrysogenum,Penicillium commune,Penicillium glabrum,Penicillium olsonii,Penicillium rugulosum,Stachybotrys chartarum, and Wallemia sebi They were all among the most abundant airborne species identified in 28 homes. Nine species from gypsum boards and 11 species in the homes are associated with water damage. Most fungi were present as single spores, but chains and clusters of different species and fragments were also present. The variation in exposure level during the 60 min of aerosol generation was similar to the variation measured in homes. Through aerosolization of fungi from the indoor environment, cultured on gypsum boards, it was possible to generate realistic aerosols in terms of species composition, concentration, and particle sizes. The inhalation-exposure system can be used to study responses to indoor fungi associated with water damage and the importance of fungal species composition.

  14. Development and characterization of a resistance spot welding aerosol generator and inhalation exposure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Aliakbar; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T; Jackson, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Friend, Sherri; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Leonard, H Donny; Meighan, Terence G; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2014-10-01

    Limited information exists regarding the health risks associated with inhaling aerosols that are generated during resistance spot welding of metals treated with adhesives. Toxicology studies evaluating spot welding aerosols are non-existent. A resistance spot welding aerosol generator and inhalation exposure system was developed. The system was designed by directing strips of sheet metal that were treated with an adhesive to two electrodes of a spot welder. Spot welds were made at a specified distance from each other by a computer-controlled welding gun in a fume collection chamber. Different target aerosol concentrations were maintained within the exposure chamber during a 4-h exposure period. In addition, the exposure system was run in two modes, spark and no spark, which resulted in different chemical profiles and particle size distributions. Complex aerosols were produced that contained both metal particulates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Size distribution of the particles was multi-modal. The majority of particles were chain-like agglomerates of ultrafine primary particles. The submicron mode of agglomerated particles accounted for the largest portion of particles in terms of particle number. Metal expulsion during spot welding caused the formation of larger, more spherical particles (spatter). These spatter particles appeared in the micron size mode and accounted for the greatest amount of particles in terms of mass. With this system, it is possible to examine potential mechanisms by which spot welding aerosols can affect health, as well as assess which component of the aerosol may be responsible for adverse health outcomes.

  15. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    OpenAIRE

    Kunkel, D.; Tost, H.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Major population centers (MPCs) or mega-cities represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 46 ...

  16. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kunkel; Tost, H; Lawrence, M G

    2013-01-01

    Major population centers (MPCs), or megacities, represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality, they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas-phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 4...

  17. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Chhabra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition and fragmentation (carbon loss as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  18. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  19. Sea-spray aerosol particles generated in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Kusmierczyk‐Michulec, J.T.; Francius, M.J.; Tedeschi, G.; Piazzola,J.; Merritt, D.L.; Fontana, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the properties of aerosol particles generated over the surf zone, two experiments were held at the pier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), La Jolla CA, and at the pier of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck NC. On both sites concentrations of s

  20. Aerosol generation by blower motors as a bias in assessing aerosol penetration into cabin filtration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitbrink, William A; Collingwood, Scott

    2005-01-01

    In cabin filtration systems, blower motors pressurize a vehicle cabin with clean filtered air and recirculate air through an air-conditioning evaporator coil and a heater core. The exposure reduction offered by these cabins is evaluated by optical particle counters that measure size-dependent aerosol concentration inside and outside the cabin. The ratio of the inside-to-outside concentration is termed penetration. Blower motors use stationary carbon brushes to transmit an electrical current through a rotating armature that abrades the carbon brushes. This creates airborne dust that may affect experimental evaluations of aerosol penetration. To evaluate the magnitude of these dust emissions, blower motors were placed in a test chamber and operated at 12 and 13.5 volts DC. A vacuum cleaner drew 76 m3/hour (45 cfm) of air through HEPA filters, the test chamber, and through a 5 cm diameter pipe. An optical particle counter drew air through an isokinetic sampling probe and measured the size-dependent particle concentrations from 0.3 to 15 microm. The concentration of blower motor aerosol was between 2 x 10(5) and 1.8 x 10(6) particles/m3. Aerosol penetration into three stationary vehicles, two pesticide application vehicles and one tractor were measured at two conditions: low concentration (outside in the winter) and high concentration (inside repair shops and burning incense sticks used as a supplemental aerosol source). For particles smaller than 1 microm, the in-cabin concentrations can be explained by the blower motor emissions. For particles larger than 1 microm, other aerosol sources, such as resuspended dirt, are present. Aerosol generated by the operation of the blower motor and by other sources can bias the exposure reduction measured by optical particle counters.

  1. Second-generation aerosol shock tube: an improved design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylett, D. R.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    An improved, second-generation aerosol shock tube (AST II) has been developed for the study of the chemical kinetics of low-vapor-pressure fuels. These improvements enable a wider range of fuel concentrations and enhanced spatial uniformity relative to our initial aerosol shock tube (AST I). In addition, the design of AST II limits the aerosol loading zone in the shock tube to a fixed region (1.2 m in length adjacent to the shock tube endwall). AST II achieves these improvements using a separate holding tank to prepare the aerosol mixture and a slightly under-pressure dump tank to carefully pull the aerosol mixture into the tube in a plug-flow. This filling method is capable of producing room temperature test gas mixtures of n-dodecane with equivalence ratios of up to 3.0 in 21 % O2, three times the loading achievable in the earlier AST I that used a flow-through strategy. Improvements in aerosol uniformity were quantified by measuring the liquid volume concentration at multiple locations in the shock tube. The measurements made over a length of 1.1 m of shock tube indicate that the AST II method of filling produces non-uniformities in liquid volume concentration of less than 2 %, whereas in the AST I method of filling the non-uniformities reached 16 %. The improved uniformity can also be seen in measurement of gas-phase fuel concentration behind the incident shock wave after the liquid droplets have evaporated. Significant reduction in the scatter of ignition delay times measured using AST II have also been achieved, confirming the importance of uniform loading of the aerosol in making high-quality combustion measurements.

  2. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kunkel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Major population centers (MPCs, or megacities, represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality, they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas-phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 46 MPC locations are used to study the balance between local pollution build-up and pollution export, either vertically into the upper troposphere or horizontally in the lower troposphere. The insoluble gas-phase tracers with fixed lifetimes are transported with the atmospheric circulation, while the aerosol tracers also undergo gravitational sedimentation as well as dry and wet deposition processes. The strength of low-level tracer export depends on the location of the emission source and prevailing meteorology, in particular on atmospheric stability and the height of the boundary layer and the mixing out of this layer. In contrast, vertical transport of tracer mass depends on the tracer's solubility: the more soluble a tracer is, the less mass reaches altitudes above five kilometers. Hence, the mass of insoluble gas-phase tracer above five kilometers can be up to ten times higher than the hydrophilic aerosol mass from the same source. In the case of aerosol tracers, pollution build-up around the source is determined by meteorological factors which have only indirect effects on tracer lifetime, like surface wind, boundary layer height, and turbulent mixing, as well as those which affect the lifetime of the tracers such as precipitation. The longer a tracer stays in the atmosphere, the lower is the relative importance of the location of the source to the atmospheric mass, and thus the lower is the relative local pollution build-up. We further use aerosol

  3. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kunkel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Major population centers (MPCs or mega-cities represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 46 MPC locations are used to study the balance between local pollution build up and pollution export, either vertically into the upper troposphere or horizontally, but remaining in the lower atmosphere. The insoluble gas phase tracers with fixed lifetimes are transported with the atmospheric circulation, while the aerosol tracers also undergo gravitational sedimentation as well as dry and wet deposition processes. The strength of low-level tracer export depends on the location of the emission source and prevailing meteorology, in particular on atmospheric stability and the height of the boundary layer and the mixing out of this layer. In contrast, vertical transport of tracer mass depends on the tracer's solubility: the more soluble a tracer is the less mass reaches altitudes above five kilometers. Hence, the mass of insoluble gas phase tracer above five kilometers can be up to ten times higher than the hydrophilic aerosol mass from the same source. In the case of aerosol tracers, pollution build up around the source is determined by meteorological factors which have only indirect effects on tracer lifetime, like surface wind, boundary layer height, and turbulent mixing as well as those which affect the lifetime of the tracers such as precipitation. The longer a tracer stays in the atmosphere, the lower is the relative importance of the location of the source to the atmospheric mass and thus the lower is the relative local pollution build up. We further use

  4. Photolytically generated aerosols in the mesosphere and thermosphere of Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Shemansky, Donald E

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) stellar and solar occultations at Titan to date include 12 species: N$_{2}$ (nitrogen), CH$_{4}$ (methane), C$_{2}$H$_{2}$ (acetylene), C$_{2}$H$_{4}$ (ethylene), C$_{2}$H$_{6}$ (ethane), C$_{4}$H$_{2}$ (diacetylene), C$_{6}$H$_{6}$ (benzene), C$_{6}$N$_{2}$ (dicyanodiacetylene), C$_{2}$N$_{2}$ (cyanogen), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), HC$_{3}$N (cyanoacetylene), and aerosols distinguished by a structureless continuum extinction (absorption plus scattering) of photons in the EUV. The introduction of aerosol particles, retaining the same refractive index properties as tholin with radius $\\sim$125 \\AA and using Mie theory, provides a satisfactory fit to the spectra. The derived vertical profile of aerosol density shows distinct structure, implying a reactive generation process reaching altitudes more than 1000 km above the surface. A photochemical model presented here provides a reference basis for examining the chemical and physical processes leading to...

  5. Characterization of aerosols containing Legionella generated upon nebulization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Séverine; Leclerc, Lara; Massard, Pierre André; Girardot, Françoise; Riffard, Serge; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2016-09-27

    Legionella pneumophila is, by far, the species most frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease (LD). Human infection occurs almost exclusively by aerosol inhalation which places the bacteria in juxtaposition with alveolar macrophages. LD risk management is based on controlling water quality by applying standardized procedures. However, to gain a better understanding of the real risk of exposure, there is a need (i) to investigate under which conditions Legionella may be aerosolized and (ii) to quantify bacterial deposition into the respiratory tract upon nebulization. In this study, we used an original experimental set-up that enables the generation of aerosol particles containing L. pneumophila under various conditions. Using flow cytometry in combination with qPCR and culture, we determined (i) the size of the aerosols and (ii) the concentration of viable Legionella forms that may reach the thoracic region. We determined that the 0.26-2.5 μm aerosol size range represents 7% of initial bacterial suspension. Among the viable forms, 0.7% of initial viable bacterial suspension may reach the pulmonary alveoli. In conclusion, these deposition profiles can be used to standardize the size of inoculum injected in any type of respiratory tract model to obtain new insights into the dose response for LD.

  6. Characterization of aerosols containing Legionella generated upon nebulization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Séverine; Leclerc, Lara; Massard, Pierre André; Girardot, Françoise; Riffard, Serge; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2016-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila is, by far, the species most frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease (LD). Human infection occurs almost exclusively by aerosol inhalation which places the bacteria in juxtaposition with alveolar macrophages. LD risk management is based on controlling water quality by applying standardized procedures. However, to gain a better understanding of the real risk of exposure, there is a need (i) to investigate under which conditions Legionella may be aerosolized and (ii) to quantify bacterial deposition into the respiratory tract upon nebulization. In this study, we used an original experimental set-up that enables the generation of aerosol particles containing L. pneumophila under various conditions. Using flow cytometry in combination with qPCR and culture, we determined (i) the size of the aerosols and (ii) the concentration of viable Legionella forms that may reach the thoracic region. We determined that the 0.26–2.5 μm aerosol size range represents 7% of initial bacterial suspension. Among the viable forms, 0.7% of initial viable bacterial suspension may reach the pulmonary alveoli. In conclusion, these deposition profiles can be used to standardize the size of inoculum injected in any type of respiratory tract model to obtain new insights into the dose response for LD.

  7. Development of a portable sodium fluorescence aerosol generator model

    CERN Document Server

    LiuQun; Gao Xiao Mei; Jia Ming; Guo Chuang Cheng; Wu Tao; Liu Zhao Feng; Qiu Dan Gui

    2002-01-01

    A portable sodium fluorescence aerosol generator has been developed. It is a key equipment for in-situ testing of HEPA filters using sodium fluorescence method. The structure and technical specifications of the model generator are presented, along with its performance testing methods. The performance comparison result of the model with two French-made generators is also presented. The self-made generator has performances as follows: the average mass generating rate is 32.9 mg/h, mass median diameter of the particles 0.22 mu m and geometric standard deviation 1.58. The filtration efficiency up to 99.99% can be achieved flow-rate of ventilation system is less than 150000 m sup 3 /h. The portable model weight 25 kg, which is convenient for in situ testing

  8. Lake spray aerosol generation: a method for producing representative particles from freshwater wave breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Nathaniel W.; Axson, Jessica L.; Watson, Alexa; Pratt, Kerri A.; Ault, Andrew P.

    2016-09-01

    Wave-breaking action in bodies of freshwater produces atmospheric aerosols via a similar mechanism to sea spray aerosol (SSA) from seawater. The term lake spray aerosol (LSA) is proposed to describe particles formed by this mechanism, which have been observed over the Laurentian Great Lakes. Though LSA has been identified from size distribution measurements during a single measurement campaign, no measurements of LSA composition or relationship to bubble-bursting dynamics have been conducted. An LSA generator utilizing a plunging jet, similar to many SSA generators, was constructed for the generation of aerosol from freshwater samples and model salt solutions. To evaluate this new generator, bubble and aerosol number size distributions were measured for salt solutions representative of freshwater (CaCO3) and seawater (NaCl) at concentrations ranging from that of freshwater to seawater (0.05-35 g kg-1), synthetic seawater (inorganic), synthetic freshwater (inorganic), and a freshwater sample from Lake Michigan. Following validation of the bubble and aerosol size distributions using synthetic seawater, a range of salt concentrations were investigated. The systematic studies of the model salts, synthetic freshwater, and Lake Michigan sample indicate that LSA is characterized by a larger number size distribution mode diameter of 300 nm (lognormal), compared to seawater at 110 nm. Decreasing salt concentrations from seawater to freshwater led to greater bubble coalescence and formation of larger bubbles, which generated larger particles and lower aerosol number concentrations. This resulted in a bimodal number size distribution with a primary mode (180 ± 20 nm) larger than that of SSA, as well as a secondary mode (46 ± 6 nm) smaller than that of SSA. This new method for studying LSA under isolated conditions is needed as models, at present, utilize SSA parameterizations for freshwater systems, which do not accurately predict the different size distributions observed

  9. Development, Validation, and Potential Enhancements to the Second-Generation Operational Aerosol Product at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Larry L.; Ignatov, Alexander M.; Singh, Ramdas R.

    1997-01-01

    A revised (phase 2) single-channel algorithm for aerosol optical thickness, tau(sup A)(sub SAT), retrieval over oceans from radiances in channel 1 (0.63 microns) of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) has been implemented at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service for the NOAA 14 satellite launched December 30, 1994. It is based on careful validation of its operational predecessor (phase 1 algorithm), implemented for NOAA 14 in 1989. Both algorithms scale the upward satellite radiances in cloud-free conditions to aerosol optical thickness using an updated radiative transfer model of the ocean and atmosphere. Application of the phase 2 algorithm to three matchup Sun-photometer and satellite data sets, one with NOAA 9 in 1988 and two with NOAA 11 in 1989 and 1991, respectively, show systematic error is less than 10%, with a random error of sigma(sub tau) approx. equal 0.04. First results of tau(sup A)(sub SAT) retrievals from NOAA 14 using the phase 2 algorithm, and from checking its internal consistency, are presented. The potential two-channel (phase 3) algorithm for the retrieval of an aerosol size parameter, such as the Junge size distribution exponent, by adding either channel 2 (0.83 microns) from the current AVHRR instrument, or a 1.6-microns channel to be available on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission and the NOAA-KLM satellites by 1997 is under investigation. The possibility of using this additional information in the retrieval of a more accurate estimate of aerosol optical thickness is being explored.

  10. Assessing the oxidative potential of isoprene-derived epoxides and secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Amanda J.; Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is known to contribute to adverse health effects, such as asthma, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major component of PM2.5 and can be enhanced by atmospheric oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide. However, whether biogenic SOA contributes to adverse health effects remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of isoprene-derived epoxides and SOA for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in light of the recent recognition that atmospheric oxidation of isoprene in the presence of acidic sulfate aerosol is a major contributor to the global SOA burden. The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay was used to characterize the ROS generation by the isoprene-derived epoxides, trans-β-isoprene epoxydiol (trans-β-IEPOX) and methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE), and their hydrolysis products, the 2-methyltetrol diastereomers (2-MT), 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG), their organosulfate derivatives, as well as an isoprene-derived hydroxyhydroperoxide (ISOPOOH). In addition, ROS generation potential was evaluated for total SOA produced from photooxidation of isoprene and methacrolein (MACR) as well as from the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX and MAE onto acidified sulfate aerosol. The high-NOx regime, which yields 2-MG-, MAE- and MACR-derived SOA has a higher ROS generation potential than the low-NOx regime, which yields 2-MT, IEPOX- and isoprene-derived SOA. ISOPOOH has an ROS generation potential similar to 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ), suggesting a significant contribution of aerosol-phase organic peroxides to PM oxidative potential. MAE- and MACR-derived SOA show equal or greater ROS generation potential than reported in studies on diesel exhaust PM, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of isoprene-derived SOA.

  11. Laboratory-generated primary marine aerosol via bubble-bursting and atomization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fuentes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A range of bubble and sea spray aerosol generators has been tested in the laboratory and compared with ocean measurements. We have shown that the method of generation has a significant influence on the properties of the aerosol particles produced. Hence, the validity of a generation system to mimic atmospheric aerosol is dependent on its capacity of generating bubbles and particulate in a realistic manner. A bubble-bursting aerosol generator consisting in the production of bubbles by the impingement of water jets on seawater was shown to best reproduce the real oceanic bubble and aerosol distributions signatures.

    Two aeration methods and a plunging-water jet system were tested as bubble-bursting aerosol generators for comparison with a standard nebulizer. The methods for aerosol production were evaluated by analysing the bubble spectrum generated by the bubble-bursting systems and the submicron size distribution, hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleus activity of the aerosols generated by the different techniques. Significant differences in the bubble spectrum and aerosol properties were observed when using different aerosol generators.

    The hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleus activity of aerosols generated by the different methods were similar when a sample of purely inorganic salts was used as a parent seawater solution; however, significant differences in the aerosol properties were found when biogenic organics were incorporated in the seawater samples. The presence of organics in the aerosol caused suppression of the growth factor at humidities above 75% RH and an increase in the critical supersaturation when compared with the case without organics. Unequal extent of these effects was observed for aerosols generated by the different methods of particle production. While the highest reductions of the growth factor were observed for the plunging-water jet aerosol, the largest effect on the critical

  12. Low-cost screening for microbial contaminants in aerosols generated in a dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubar, J Sean; Pelon, William

    2005-01-01

    It has been reported that aerosols and droplets generated by high-speed dental drills and cavitrons are contaminated with blood and bacteria and represent a potential route for transmitting disease. Bacterial cells possess a negative electrical charge, while the cathode ray tubes (CRT) that are used in computer monitors generate positively charged static electric fields. Consequently, bacteria dispersed within these aerosols could be attracted to the screens on CRT monitors. In this study, pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus were found on CRT screens in different locations within the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry facility. The results suggest that surveying CRT screens is a simple method for evaluating the airborne microbial contaminants present within a dental office.

  13. Potential Climate Effects of Dust Aerosols' over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    JI, Z.; Wang, G.; Pal, J. S.; Yu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate in West Africa is under the influence of the West African monsoon circulation and mineral dust emitted from the Sahara desert (which is the world's largest source of mineral dust emission). Dust aerosols alter the atmospheric radiative fluxes and act as cloud condensation nuclei in the process of emission, transportation and deposition. However, our understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence the present-day and future climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4-CLM4.5 is used to investigate the potential climatic effects of dust aerosols both in present (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100) periods over WA. First, the model performance and dust climatic effects are evaluated. The contribution of dust climatic effects under RCP8.5 scenario and their confounding effects with land use change are assessed. Our results indicate that the model can reproduce with reasonable accuracy the spatial and temporal distribution of climatology, aerosol optical depth and surface concentration over WA. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative in the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in JJA and MAM compared to those in SON and DJF. Over most of West Africa, cooling is the dominant effect on temperature. Their impact on precipitation features a dipole pattern, with decrease in the north and increase in the south of West Africa. Despite the dust-induced decrease of precipitation amount, dusts cause extreme precipitation to increase. To evaluate the uncertainties surrounding our modeling results, sensitivity experiments driven by ICBC from MIROC-ESM and CESM and their dynamic downscaling results are used for comparisons. Results from these sensitivity experiments indicate that the impact of dust aerosols on present and future climate is robust.

  14. Transition metal associations with primary biological particles in sea spray aerosol generated in a wave channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasco, Timothy L; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Pedler, Byron E; Ault, Andrew P; Collins, Douglas B; Zhao, Defeng; Kim, Michelle J; Ruppel, Matthew J; Wilson, Scott C; Pomeroy, Robert S; Grassian, Vicki H; Azam, Farooq; Bertram, Timothy H; Prather, Kimberly A

    2014-01-21

    In the ocean, breaking waves generate air bubbles which burst at the surface and eject sea spray aerosol (SSA), consisting of sea salt, biogenic organic species, and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). Our overall understanding of atmospheric biological particles of marine origin remains poor. Here, we perform a control experiment, using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer to measure the mass spectral signatures of individual particles generated by bubbling a salt solution before and after addition of heterotrophic marine bacteria. Upon addition of bacteria, an immediate increase occurs in the fraction of individual particle mass spectra containing magnesium, organic nitrogen, and phosphate marker ions. These biological signatures are consistent with 21% of the supermicrometer SSA particles generated in a previous study using breaking waves in an ocean-atmosphere wave channel. Interestingly, the wave flume mass spectral signatures also contain metal ions including silver, iron, and chromium. The nascent SSA bioparticles produced in the wave channel are hypothesized to be as follows: (1) whole or fragmented bacterial cells which bioaccumulated metals and/or (2) bacteria-derived colloids or biofilms which adhered to the metals. This study highlights the potential for transition metals, in combination with specific biomarkers, to serve as unique indicators for the presence of marine PBAP, especially in metal-impacted coastal regions.

  15. Characterization of heparin aerosols generated in jet and ultrasonic nebulizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendstrup, K.E.; Newhouse, M.T.; Pedersen, Ole Finn;

    1999-01-01

    Inhaled heparin has been used for asthma treatment, but results have been inconsistent, probably due to highly varying lung doses. We determined the output per unit time and the particle size distributions of sodium heparin, calcium heparin, and low molecular weight (LMW) heparin formulations...... depended upon the viscosity and temperature of the solution. MMD was independent of formulation, temperature, or concentration and ranged from 5.61 to 7.03 /urn. Sodium heparin/calcium heparin in a concentration of 20,000 IU/mL in the jet nebulizer driven at 10 L/min produced the highest dose of heparin...... capable of reaching the lower respiratory tract. Mass balance was determined for these combinations with the jet nebulizer run until visible aerosol generation ceased. Of a loading dose of 80,000 IU of heparin, 45,000 IU remained in the dead space of the nebulizer, 20,000 IU was deposited...

  16. Beschrijving van een spinning top generator voor de produktie van hypermicron aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkus; R.*; Meulen; A.van der

    1986-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft pogingen tot het verbeteren van de May spinning top aerosol generator. Met deze generator is het theoretisch mogelijk monodispers aerosol met afmetingen tussen 1 en 10 um te produceren met grote concentraties (ongeveer 500 deeltjes per cc). Diverse factoren die de werking

  17. Modeling organic aerosol from the oxidation of α-pinene in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A model has been developed to simulate the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA and was tested against data produced in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM flow reactor and a large environmental chamber. The model framework is based on the two-dimensional volatility basis set approach (2D-VBS, in which SOA oxidation products in the model are distributed on the 2-D space of effective saturation concentration (Ci* and oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C. The modeled organic aerosol mass concentrations (COA and O : C agree with laboratory measurements within estimated uncertainties. However, while both measured and modeled O : C increase with increasing OH exposure as expected, the increase of modeled O : C is rapid at low OH exposure and then slows as OH exposure increases while the increase of measured O : C is initially slow and then accelerates as OH exposure increases. A global sensitivity analysis indicates that modeled COA values are most sensitive to the assumed values for the number of Ci* bins, the heterogeneous OH reaction rate coefficient, and the yield of first-generation products. Modeled SOA O : C values are most sensitive to the assumed O : C of first-generation oxidation products, the number of Ci* bins, the heterogeneous OH reaction rate coefficient, and the number of O : C bins. All these sensitivities vary as a function of OH exposure. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the 2D-VBS model framework may require modifications to resolve discrepancies between modeled and measured O : C as a function of OH exposure.

  18. Nanominerals, fullerene aggregates, and hazardous elements in coal and coal combustion-generated aerosols: An environmental and toxicological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Jyotilima; Narzary, Bardwi; Roy, Sonali; Bordoloi, Manobjyoti; Saikia, Prasenjit; Saikia, Binoy K

    2016-12-01

    Studies on coal-derived nanoparticles as well as nano-minerals are important in the context of the human health and the environment. The coal combustion-generated aerosols also affect human health and environmental quality aspects in any coal-fired station. In this study, the feed coals and their combustion-generated aerosols from coal-fired boilers of two tea industry facilities were investigated for the presence of nanoparticles/nano minerals, fullerene aggregates, and potentially hazardous elements (PHEs). The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS), High resolution-transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (HR-TEM/EDS) and Ultra Violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) to know their extent of environmental risks to the human health when present in coals and aerosols. The feed coals contain mainly clay minerals, whilst glass fragments, spinel, quartz, and other minerals occur in lesser quantities. The PM samples contain potentially hazardous elements (PHEs) like As, Pb, Cd and Hg. Enrichment factor of the trace elements in particulate matters (PMs) was calculated to determine their sources. The aerosol samples were also found to contain nanomaterials and ultrafine particles. The fullerene aggregates along with potentially hazardous elements were also detected in the aerosol samples. The cytotoxicity studies on the coal combustion-generated PM samples show their potential risk to the human health. This detailed investigation on the inter-relationship between the feed coals and their aerosol chemistry will be useful for understanding the extent of environmental hazards and related human health risk.

  19. Evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols at elevated relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacqueline; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semisolid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on α-pinene SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30-70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 h, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses; with aging at elevated RH leading to a more significant effect. In all cases, the observed SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent.

  20. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN and ice nucleating particle (INP number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of number concentrations of aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (APC50, reservoir of favorable CCN and with radius > 250 nm (APC250, reservoir of favorable INP, as well as profiles of the aerosol particle surface area concentration (ASC, used in INP parameterization can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC with relative uncertainties of a factor of around 2 (APC50, and of about 25–50 % (APC250, ASC. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to identify mineral dust particles and to distinguish and separate the aerosol properties of basic aerosol types such as mineral dust and continental pollution (haze, smoke. We investigate the relationship between AEC and APC50, APC250, and ASC for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm and main aerosol types (dust, pollution, marine. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures of continental pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple relationship between APC50 and the CCN-reservoir particles (APCCCN and published INP parameterization schemes (with APC250 and ASC as input we finally compute APCCCN and INP concentration profiles. We apply the full methodology to a lidar observation of a heavy dust outbreak crossing Cyprus with dust up to 8 km height and to a case during which anthropogenic pollution dominated.

  1. Direct radiative effect due to brownness in organic carbon aerosols generated from biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, T. D.; Sahu, S. K.; Tiwari, M.; Pandit, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    We report the enhancement in the direct radiative effect due the presence of Brown carbon (BrC) as a part of organic carbon aerosols. The optical properties of organic carbon aerosols generated from pyrolytic combustion of mango tree wood (Magnifera Indica) and dung cake at different temperatures were considered. Mie codes were used to calculate absorption and scattering coefficients coupled with experimentally derived imaginary complex refractive index. The direct radiative effect (DRE) for sampled organic carbon aerosols was estimated using a wavelength dependent radiative transfer equation. The BrC DRE was estimated taking virtually non absorbing organic aerosols as reference. The BrC DRE from wood and dung cake was compared at different combustion temperatures and conditions. The BrC contributed positively to the direct top of the atmosphere radiative effect. Dung cake generated BrC aerosols were found to be strongly light absorbing as compared to BrC from wood combustion. It was noted that radiative effects of BrC from wood depended on its generation temperature and conditions. For BrC aerosols from dung cake such strong dependence was not observed. The average BrC aerosol DRE values were 1.53±0.76 W g-1 and 17.84±6.45 W g-1 for wood and dung cake respectively. The DRE contribution of BrC aerosols came mainly (67-90%) from visible light absorption though they exhibited strong absorption in shorter wavelengths of the UV-visible spectrum.

  2. Validation of MODIS aerosol retrievals and evaluation of potential cloud contamination in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Xiang-ao; CHEN Hong-bin; WANG Pu-cai

    2004-01-01

    MODIS aerosol retrievals onboard Terra/Aqua and ground truth data obtained from AERONET(Aerosol Robtic Network) solar direct radiance measurements are collocated to evaluate the quality of the former in East Asia. AERONET stations in East Asia are separated into two groups according to their locations and the preliminary validation results for each station. The validation results showed that the accuracy of MODIS aerosol retrievals in East Asia is a little worse than that obtained in other regions such as Eastern U.S., Western Europe, Brazil and so on. The primary reason is due to the improper aerosol model used in MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm, so it is of significance to characterize aerosol properties properly according to long term ground-based remote sensing or other relevant in situ observations in order to improve MODIS retrievals in East Asia. Cloud contamination is proved to be one of large errors, which is demonstrated by the significant relation between MODIS aerosol retrievals versus cloud fraction, as well as notable improvement of linear relation between satellite and ground aerosol data after potential cloud contamination screened. Hence, it is suggested that more stringent clear sky condition be set in use of MODIS aerosol data. It should be pointed out that the improvement might be offset by other error sources in some cases because of complex relation between different errors. Large seasonal variation of surface reflection and uncertainties associated with it result in large intercepts and random error in MODIS aerosol retrievals in northern inland of East Asia. It remains to be a big problem to retrieve aerosols accurately in inland characterized by relatively larger surface reflection than the requirement in MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm.

  3. Characterization of potential impurities and degradation products in electronic cigarette formulations and aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Jason W; Meruva, Naren; Huang, Chorng B; Wilkinson, Celeste T; Ballentine, Regina; Smith, Donna C; Werley, Michael S; McKinney, Willie J

    2016-02-01

    E-cigarettes are gaining popularity in the U.S. as well as in other global markets. Currently, limited published analytical data characterizing e-cigarette formulations (e-liquids) and aerosols exist. While FDA has not published a harmful and potentially harmful constituent (HPHC) list for e-cigarettes, the HPHC list for currently regulated tobacco products may be useful to analytically characterize e-cigarette aerosols. For example, most e-cigarette formulations contain propylene glycol and glycerin, which may produce aldehydes when heated. In addition, nicotine-related chemicals have been previously reported as potential e-cigarette formulation impurities. This study determined e-liquid formulation impurities and potentially harmful chemicals in aerosols of select commercial MarkTen(®) e-cigarettes manufactured by NuMark LLC. The potential hazard of the identified formulation impurities and aerosol chemicals was also estimated. E-cigarettes were machine puffed (4-s duration, 55-mL volume, 30-s intervals) to battery exhaustion to maximize aerosol collection. Aerosols analyzed for carbonyls were collected in 20-puff increments to account for analyte instability. Tobacco specific nitrosamines were measured at levels observed in pharmaceutical grade nicotine. Nicotine-related impurities in the e-cigarette formulations were below the identification and qualification thresholds proposed in ICH Guideline Q3B(R2). Levels of potentially harmful chemicals detected in the aerosols were determined to be below published occupational exposure limits.

  4. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Barbaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols, particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m−3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m−3 and the coarse particles were found to be enriched with amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition had also changed suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V talica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material in the sample.

  5. New liquid aerosol generation devices: systems that force pressurized liquids through nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, David E

    2002-12-01

    Over the past few decades, aerosol delivery devices have been relatively inefficient, wasteful, and difficult for patients to use. These drawbacks have been tolerated because the drugs available for inhalation have wide therapeutic margins and steep dose-response curves at low doses. Recently several forces have converged to drive innovation in the aerosol device industry: the ban on chlorofluorocarbon propellants in metered-dose inhalers, the need for more user-friendly devices, and the invention of expensive inhalable therapies for topical and systemic lung delivery. Numerous devices are in development to improve the efficiency, ease of use, and reproducibility of aerosol delivery to the lung, including systems that force liquid through a nozzle to form the aerosol cloud. The Respimat is a novel, compact, propellant-free, multi-dose inhaler that employs a spring to push drug solution through a nozzle, which generates a slow-moving aerosol. Deposition studies show that the Respimat can deliver 39-44% of a dose to the lungs. Clinical asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease trials with bronchodilators show that the Respimat is 2-8 times as effective as a metered-dose inhaler. Respimat has been tested with bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids. The AERx device uses sophisticated electronics to deliver aerosol from a single-dose blister, using an integral, disposable nozzle array. The electronics control dose expression and titration, timing of aerosol generation with the breath, and provide feedback for proper inhalation technique. Lung deposition ranges from 50 to 80% of the loaded dose, with remarkable reproducibility. AERx has been tested with a variety of drugs, for both topical and systemic delivery, including rhDNase (dornase alfa), insulin, and opioids. These novel devices face competition from other technologies as well as financial and regulatory hurdles, but they both offer a marked improvement in the efficiency of pulmonary drug delivery.

  6. Potential emission flux to aerosol pollutants over Bengal Gangetic plain through combined trajectory clustering and aerosol source fields analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. Bharath; Verma, S.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid source-receptor analysis was carried out to evaluate the potential emission flux to winter monsoon (WinMon) aerosols over Bengal Gangetic plain urban (Kolkata, Kol) and semi-urban atmospheres (Kharagpur, Kgp). This was done through application of fuzzy c-mean clustering to back-trajectory data combined with emission flux and residence time weighted aerosols analysis. WinMon mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom exponent (AE) at Kol (AOD: 0.77; AE: 1.17) were respectively slightly higher than and nearly equal to that at Kgp (AOD: 0.71; AE: 1.18). Out of six source region clusters over Indian subcontinent and two over Indian oceanic region, the cluster mean AOD was the highest when associated with the mean path of air mass originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian sea clusters at Kol and that from the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) cluster at Kgp. Spatial distribution of weighted AOD fields showed the highest potential source of aerosols over the IGP, primarily over upper IGP (e.g. Punjab, Haryana), lower IGP (e.g. Uttarpradesh) and eastern region (e.g. west Bengal, Bihar, northeast India) clusters. The emission flux contribution potential (EFCP) of fossil fuel (FF) emissions at surface (SL) of Kol/Kgp, elevated layer (EL) of Kol, and of biomass burning (BB) emissions at SL of Kol were primarily from upper, lower, upper/lower IGP clusters respectively. The EFCP of FF/BB emissions at Kgp-EL/SL, and that of BB at EL of Kol/Kgp were mainly from eastern region and Africa (AFR) clusters respectively. Though the AFR cluster was constituted of significantly high emission flux source potential of dust emissions, the EFCP of dust from northwest India (NWI) was comparable to that from AFR at Kol SL/EL.

  7. Key Findings from the Artist Project on Aerosol Retention in a Dry Steam Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahab Dehbi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A steam generator tube rupture (SGTR event with a stuck-open safety relief valve constitutes one of the most serious accident sequences in pressurized water reactors (PWRs because it may create an open path for radioactive aerosol release into the environment. The release may be mitigated by the deposition of fission product particles on a steam generator's (SG's dry tubes and structures or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. However, the absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry, and the controlling processes have, until recently, made any quantification of retention difficult to justify. As a result, past risk assessment studies typically took little or no credit for aerosol retention in SGTR sequences. To provide these missing data, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI initiated the Aerosol Trapping In Steam GeneraTor (ARTIST Project, which aimed to thoroughly investigate various aspects of aerosol removal in the secondary side of a breached steam generator. Between 2003 and 2011, the PSI has led the ARTIST Project, which involved intense collaboration between nearly 20 international partners. This summary paper presents key findings of experimental and analytical work conducted at the PSI within the ARTIST program.

  8. Potential Impact of South Asian Anthropogenic Aerosols on Northern Hemisphere Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollasina, M. A.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2014-12-01

    South Asia has one of the world's highest aerosol loading due to the dramatic increase of anthropogenic emissions from the 1950s associated with rapid urbanization and population growth. The possible large-scale impact of the late 20th century increase of South Asian aerosol emissions on climate away from the source regions was studied by means of historical ensemble experiments with a state-of-the-art coupled climate model with fully interactive aerosols and a representation of both direct and indirect aerosol effects. The key characteristics of the northern hemisphere responses are examined separately for winter and summer, and show that regional aerosols induce significant planetary-scale teleconnection patterns. In both seasons, the large-scale aerosol imprint originates from substantial changes in the regional precipitation distribution. During the winter, in response to anomalous surface cooling in the northern Indian Ocean, aerosols cause a westward shift of convection over the eastern Indian Ocean and compensating subsidence to the west and over the Maritime continent. During the summer, aerosols are collocated with rainfall, and cause a widespread drying over South Asia mostly by indirect effects. In both cases, the impact of the regional diabatic heating anomaly propagates remotely by exciting a northern hemisphere wave-train which, enhanced by regional feedbacks, leads to remarkable changes in near-surface climate, including circulation and temperature, over Eurasia, the northern Pacific and North America. Depending on the region, the induced anomalies may have opposite signs between the two seasons, and may thus contribute to reinforcing or dampening those due greenhouse gases. These results underscore the potential influence of Asian aerosols on global climate, which is a compelling problem as regional aerosol loading will continue to be large in the coming decades.

  9. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols), n100, dry (particles with dry radius > 100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN), and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius > 250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5-2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25-50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine) and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input) and available INP parameterization schemes (with n250, dry and sdry as input) we finally compute

  10. A Review on the Study of the Generation of (Nanoparticles Aerosols during the Mechanical Solicitation of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on presenting the forefront of the interdisciplinary studies conceived towards the generation of the wear particles aerosol when materials are subjected to mechanical stresses. Various wear mechanisms and instrumentation involved during stress application and aerosolization of wear particles, as well as particles characterization, measurement, and modeling techniques are presented through the investigation of a series of contextual works which are emphasized on the identification of these aspects. The review is motivated from the fact that understanding mechanisms involved in wear-induced particle generation, both at nano- and at microscale, is important for many applications that involve surfaces sliding over each other due to various potential health aspects. An attempt has been made to explain how the information based on this broad spectrum of subjects discovered in this contribution can be used and improved in order to produce a more resilient, rational, and versatile knowledge base which has been found lacking in the present literature during its survey. The area of study is highly multidisciplinary since it involves aerosol, particle, and material sciences.

  11. Epidemiology of infection by nontuberculous Mycobacteria. III. Isolation of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria from aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, S L; George, K L; Parker, B C; Gruft, H; Falkinham, J O

    1980-08-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (21 isolates), biochemically similar to those that are recovered from humans, were recovered from rainwater and from natural river waters and their aerosols in the area of Richmond, Virginia. Field experiments have confirmed the existence of a natural mechanism for the transfer of significant numbers of mycobacteria from water to air. These findings support the hypothesis that aerosolization of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria from waters of the southeastern United States may be a major pathway for human infection.

  12. The Potential of Modern Russian Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Grigor’evna Dobrokhleb

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the necessity of socio-demographic approach to assessing the potential of modern generations. The demographic potential of generations is determined by their number, their share in total population, and their life expectancy. Their economic potential is determined by the proportion of representatives of different generations in total employment. Their social potential is determined by the system of values of generations. The rapid growth of differences in these characteristics leads to the break up of intergenerational relations and is connected with the aggravation of social contradictions. The potential of modern generations can be considered in different aspects: number of generations, life expectancy at birth, the share of representatives of different generations that share or do not share the basic social values of the society, including values related to reproductive and other types of demographic behavior. In order to identify existing differences between generations in the framework of the socio-demographic approach, the paper analyzes the dynamics of the number of young people in 1926, 1936, 2014 in the Russian Federation; the authors also carry out a comparative analysis of the secondary and authors’ sociological data of values-related and reproductive attitudes of conditionally parental and child generations. Russian researchers studied the life potential of the population and proved that in 1990–2010, the life potential of Russia’s population decreased. Reduction in the life potential in the population in general is associated with a decrease in this indicator for the younger generation (children’s ages due to the reduction in the number and proportion of this generation in the population structure. The reduction in the life potential has not stopped because the number of the younger generation continues to decrease. However, life expectancy in this period increased. Nevertheless, in general, mortality in

  13. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  14. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  15. Aerosol trapping in steam generator (artist): an investigation of aerosol and iodine behaviour in the secondary side of a steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guentay, S.; Birchley, J.; Suckow, D.; Dehbi, A

    2000-07-01

    Incidents such as a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) with stuck-open relief valve are important accident sequences for analysis by virtue of the open path for release of radioactivity which ensues. The release may be mitigated by deposition of fission products on the steam generator (SG) tubes and other structures, or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. The absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry and controllingprocesses, however, make the retention difficult to quantify and its full import is typically not taken into account in risk assessment studies. The ARTIST experimental programme at PSI will simulate the flow and retention of aerosol-borne fission products in the SG secondary, and thus provide a unique database to support safety assessments and analytical models. Scaling of the break flow represents a particular challenge since the aerosol retention processes operate at contrasting length scales. Preliminary calculations have identified a baseline set of conditions, and confirmed the feasibility of the rig design and scaling principles. Flexibility of the rig layout enables simulations to be performed for a range of SG designs, accident situations and accident management philosophies. (authors)

  16. An image-based automatic mesh generation and numerical simulation for a population-based analysis of aerosol delivery in the human lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-11-01

    The authors propose a method to automatically generate three-dimensional subject-specific airway geometries and meshes for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of aerosol delivery in the human lungs. The proposed method automatically expands computed tomography (CT)-based airway skeleton to generate the centerline (CL)-based model, and then fits it to the CT-segmented geometry to generate the hybrid CL-CT-based model. To produce a turbulent laryngeal jet known to affect aerosol transport, we developed a physiologically-consistent laryngeal model that can be attached to the trachea of the above models. We used Gmsh to automatically generate the mesh for the above models. To assess the quality of the models, we compared the regional aerosol distributions in a human lung predicted by the hybrid model and the manually generated CT-based model. The aerosol distribution predicted by the hybrid model was consistent with the prediction by the CT-based model. We applied the hybrid model to 8 healthy and 16 severe asthmatic subjects, and average geometric error was 3.8% of the branch radius. The proposed method can be potentially applied to the branch-by-branch analyses of a large population of healthy and diseased lungs. NIH Grants R01-HL-094315 and S10-RR-022421, CT data provided by SARP, and computer time provided by XSEDE.

  17. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini v. Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas-liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D3,2) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D3,2), within a span of 0.07-0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined.

  18. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  19. Vector Potential Generation for Numerical Relativity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Zachary; Faber, Joshua; Adams, Thomas; Etienne, Zachariah; Ruchlin, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Many different numerical codes are employed in studies of highly relativistic magnetized accretion flows around black holes. Based on the formalisms each uses, some codes evolve the magnetic field vector B, while others evolve the magnetic vector potential A, the two being related by the curl: B=curl(A). Here, we discuss how to generate vector potentials corresponding to specified magnetic fields on staggered grids, a surprisingly difficult task on finite cubic domains. The code we have developed solves this problem in two ways: a brute-force method, whose scaling is nearly linear in the number of grid cells, and a direct linear algebra approach. We discuss the success both algorithms have in generating smooth vector potential configurations and how both may be extended to more complicated cases involving multiple mesh-refinement levels. NSF ACI-1550436

  20. Potential pathogenic bacteria in metalworking fluids and aerosols from a machining facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Sarah D; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-12-01

    The metalworking and machining industry utilizes recirculating metalworking fluids for integral aspects of the fabrication process. Despite the use of biocides, these fluids sustain substantial biological growth. Subsequently, the high-shear forces incurred during metalworking processing aerosolize bacterial cells and may cause dermatologic and respiratory effects in exposed workers. We quantified and identified the bacterial load for metalworking fluid and aerosol samples of a machining facility in the US Midwest during two seasons. To investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in fluid and air, we performed 16S rRNA gene surveys. The concentration of total bacterial cells (including culturable and nonculturable cells) was relatively constant throughout the study, averaging 5.1 × 10⁸ cells mL⁻¹ in the fluids and 4.8 × 10⁵ cells m⁻³ in the aerosols. We observed bacteria of potential epidemiologic significance from several different bacterial phyla in both fluids and aerosols. Most notably, Alcaligenes faecalis was identified through both direct sequencing and culturing in every sample collected. Elucidating the bacterial community with gene surveys showed that metalworking fluids were the source of the aerosolized bacteria in this facility.

  1. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini von Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D{sub 3,2}), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol

  2. Maritime Evaluation of Aerosol Fire Knock Down Tools. Part 2: Toxicity and Corrosion Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    i 2014 Fire Research Group Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering University of Waterloo Waterloo ON Canada N2L 3G1 E. Weckman, A...Topic, T. Sheehan and G.Hitchman MARITIME EVALUATION OF AEROSOL FIRE KNOCK DOWN TOOLS PART 2: TOX CITY AND CORROSION POTENTIAL February, 2014 A report...Exposure .............................. 64 Exposure of Wiped and Unwiped Computer Discs ............................................................ 66

  3. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  4. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gyawali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols and relatively clean (aged aerosols conditions. Particulate matter (PM concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm and 10 μm, respectively and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2. The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA, Ångström exponent of absorption (AEA, and Ångström exponent of scattering (AES for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy

  5. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  6. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachlewska Iwona S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  7. Improving Aerosol and Visibility Forecasting Capabilities Using Current and Future Generations of Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    retrievals . 15. SUBJECT TERMS ’ Aerosol, data assimilation, satellite remote sensing, visibility forecast, electro-optical propagation 16. SECURITY...innovative methods for retrieving aerosol optical depth at nighttime using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data (Johnson et al...Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol and cloud layer products, as well as collocated Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Aerosol Index (Al) data and

  8. Relationship Between Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient in an Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Matthew; Matthews, James; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Small ions are created in the atmosphere by ground based radioactive decay and solar and cosmic radiation ionising the air. The ionosphere is maintained at a high potential relative to the Earth due to global thunderstorm activity, a current from the ionosphere transfers charge back to the ground through the weakly ionised atmosphere. A potential gradient (PG) exists between the ionosphere and the ground that can be measured in fair weather using devices such as an electric field mill. PG is inversely-proportional to the conductivity of the air and therefore to the number of ions of a given electrical mobility; a reduction of air ions will cause an increase of PG. Aerosols in the atmosphere act as a sink of air ions with an attachment rate dependent on aerosol size distribution and ion mobility. These relationships have been used to infer high particulate, and hence pollution, levels in historic datasets of atmospheric PG. A measurement campaign was undertaken in Manchester, UK for three weeks in July and August where atmospheric PG was measured with an electric field mill (JCI131, JCI Chilworth) on a second floor balcony, aerosol size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI3936), aerosol concentration measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC, Grimm 5.403) and local meteorological measurements taken on a rooftop measurement site ~200 m away. Field mill and CPC data were taken at 1 s intervals and SMPS data in 2.5 minute cycles. Data were excluded for one hour either side of rainfall as rainclouds and droplets can carry significant charge which would affect PG. A quantity relating to the attachment of ions to aerosol (Ion Sink) was derived from the effective attachment coefficient of the aerosols. Further measurements with the field mill and CPC were taken at the same location in November 2015 when bonfire events would be expected to increase aerosol concentrations. During the summer measurements, particle number count (PNC

  9. Understanding the toxicological potential of aerosol organic compounds using informatics based screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David; Decesari, Stefano; Bassan, Arianna; Pavan, Manuela; Ciacci, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to atmospheric particulate matter is responsible for both short-term and long-term adverse health effects. So far, all efforts spent in achieving a systematic epidemiological evidence of specific aerosol compounds determining the overall aerosol toxicity were unsuccessful. The results of the epidemiological studies apparently conflict with the laboratory toxicological analyses which have highlighted very different chemical and toxicological potentials for speciated aerosol compounds. Speciation remains a problem, especially for organic compounds: it is impossible to conduct screening on all possible molecular species. At the same time, research on toxic compounds risks to be biased towards the already known compounds, such as PAHs and dioxins. In this study we present results from an initial assessment of the use of in silico methods (i.e. (Q)SAR, read-across) to predict toxicity of atmospheric organic compounds including evaluation of applicability of a variety of popular tools (e.g. OECD QSAR Toolbox) for selected endpoints (e.g. genotoxicity). Compounds are categorised based on the need of new experimental data for the development of in silico approaches for toxicity prediction covering this specific chemical space, namely the atmospheric aerosols. Whilst only an initial investigation, we present recommendations for continuation of this work.

  10. Potential sea salt aerosol sources from frost flowers in the pan-Arctic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Now at Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA; Russell, Lynn M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-09-23

    In order to better represent observed wintertime aerosol concentrations at Barrow, Alaska, we implemented an observationally-based parameterization for estimating sea salt production from frost flowers in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In this work, we evaluate the potential influence of this sea salt source on the pan-Arctic (60ºN-90ºN) climate. Results show that frost flower salt emissions substantially increase the modeled surface sea salt aerosol concentration in the winter months when new sea ice and frost flowers are present. The parameterization reproduces both the magnitude and seasonal variation of the observed submicron sea salt aerosol concentration at surface in Barrow during winter much better than the standard CESM simulation without a frost-flower salt particle source. Adding these frost flower salt particle emissions increases aerosol optical depth by 10% and results in a small cooling at surface. The increase in salt particle mass concentrations of a factor of 8 provides nearly two times the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, as well as 10% increases in cloud droplet number and 40% increases in liquid water content near coastal regions adjacent to continents. These cloud changes reduce longwave cloud forcing by 3% and cause a small surface warming, increasing the downward longwave flux at the surface by 2 W m-2 in the pan-Arctic under the present-day climate.

  11. Exploring potential Pluto-generated neutral tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Hill, Matthew; KollMann, Peter; McHutt, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto is providing unprecedented insight into this mysterious outer solar system body. Escaping molecular nitrogen is of particular interest and possibly analogous to similar features observed at moons of Saturn and Jupiter. Such escaping N2 has the potential of creating molecular nitrogen and N (as a result of molecular dissociation) tori or partial toroidal extended particle distributions. The presence of these features would present the first confirmation of an extended toroidal neutral feature on a planetary scale in our solar system. While escape velocities are anticipated to be lower than those at Enceladus, Io or even Europa, particle lifetimes are much longer in Pluto’s orbit because as a result of much weaker solar interaction processes along Pluto’s orbit (on the order of tens of years). Thus, with a ~248 year orbit, Pluto may in fact be generating an extended toroidal feature along it orbit.For this work, we modify and apply our 3-D Monte Carlo neutral torus model (previously used at Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury) to study/analyze the theoretical possibility and scope of potential Pluto-generated neutral tori. Our model injects weighted particles and tracks their trajectories under the influence of all gravitational fields with interactions with other particles, solar photons and Pluto collisions. We present anticipated N2 and N tori based on current estimates of source characterization and environmental conditions. We also present an analysis of sensitivity to assumed initial conditions. Such results can provide insight into the Pluto system as well as valuable interpretation of New Horizon’s observational data.

  12. Review of models applicable to accident aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

  13. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to CBD. In comparison to high-CBD risk exposures where the chemical nature of aerosol

  14. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gyawali

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet (UV wavelength (i.e. 355 nm and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory-generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Exact T-matrix method calculations were used to model the absorption and scattering characteristics of fractal-like agglomerates of different compactness and varying number of monomers. With these calculations, we attempted to estimate the number of monomers and fractal dimension of laboratory generated kerosene soot. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009, and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols and relatively clean (aged aerosols conditions. Particulate matter (PM concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm and 10 μm, respectively and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2. The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from

  15. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  16. Global aerosol retrieval by synergistic use of ESA ENVISAT instruments and potential for long-term aerosol records from Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, P. R.; Bevan, S. L.; Brockmann, C.; Fischer, J.; Gomez-Chova, L.; Grey, W.; Heckel, A.; Moreno, J. F.; Munoz Mari, J.; Preusker, R.; Regner, P.

    2009-12-01

    We present research on for improved global aerosol retrieval by synergistic use of optical sensors on the European Space Agency ENVISAT satellite, MERIS and AATSR. Previously aerosol retrievals have been developed in isolation for these instruments, using spectral and mult-angular approaches respectively. These sensors will be succeeded with improved specification on the Sentinel-3 mission (2012-2030) with the aim to offer data suitable for long-term climate records. The research aims to use combined multi-angular and spectral approaches to constrain the inverse problem. The MERIS and AATSR instruments onboard ENVISAT provide similar resolution and swath but complementary information, encompassing different spectral domains and viewing geometries. Substantial success has been obtained previously by a number of researchers in using the instruments independently; for example MERIS aerosol retrieval using spectral methods over known targets, and AATSR approaches using the dual-view capability. The research explores the gain by using information from both instruments simultaneously to constrain atmospheric profile, characterise cloud, and provide improved atmospheric correction to surface reflectance. Results suggest improved estimation of aerosol properties compared to single-instrument retrievals, when compared with AERONET. A sensitivity study is performed to evaluate potential of Sentinel-3 for aerosol retreval, to be launched in 2012, which will give continuity with enhanced instrument specifications for the successor instruments OLCI and SLSTR.

  17. Cloud Formation Potential of Biomass Burning Aerosol Surrogate-Particles Chemically Aged by OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R. M.; Wang, J.; Li, Z. Q.; Knopf, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous or multiphase reactions between trace gases such as OH and atmospheric aerosol can influence physicochemical properties of the particles including composition, morphology and lifetime. In this work, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) exposed to OH radicals is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type and OH exposure ([OH]×time) using a CCN counter coupled to a custom-built aerosol flow reactor (AFR). The composition of particles collected by a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) first subjected to different OH exposures is analyzed by Raman and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative compounds found in BBA that have different hygroscopicity, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals. BBA surrogate-particles are generated following atomization of aqueous solutions with mass ratios LEV:MNC:KS of 1:0:0, 0:1:0, 0:0:1, 1:1:0, 0:1:1, 1:0:1, 1:1:1, and 1:0.03:0.3. OH radicals are generated in the AFR following photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O using a variable intensity ultra-violet (UV) lamp, which allows equivalent atmospheric OH exposures from days to weeks. In addition, we investigate how κ changes i) in response to varying [O3] with and without OH, and ii) at a fixed OH exposure while varying RH. The impact of OH exposure on the CCN activity of BBA will be presented and its atmospheric implications will be discussed.

  18. Enhanced UV Absorption in Carbonaceous Aerosols during MILAGRO and Identification of Potential Organic Contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangu, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kilaparty, S.; Gunawan, G.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-12-01

    ), and nitrated PAH compounds for comparison. Potential organic aerosol components are identified which contribute to the enhanced absorption observed in the field. The wavelength dependence of the mass specific absorption is obtained from these spectra and total carbon measurements. The wavelength dependence of the aerosol complex refractive index (m = n +ik) in the UV-visible spectral region is determined by application of the Kramers Kronig function. The importance of the aerosol absorption in the infrared spectral region to radiative forcing will be discussed. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). 2. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and K.A. Orlandini, Chapter 7 in Humic/Fulvic Acids and Organic Colloidal Materials in the Environment, ACS Symposium Series 651, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., pp. 96-107, 1996. This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  19. The impact of recirculation, ventilation and filters on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadeyi, M.O.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of recirculation rates (7 and 14 h(-1)), ventilation rates (1 and 2 h(-1)), and filtration on secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated by ozone of outdoor origin reacting with limonene of indoor origin. Experiments were conducted within a recirculating air handling...... system that serviced an unoccupied, 236 m(3) environmental chamber configured to simulate an office; either no filter, a new filter or a used filter was located downstream of where outdoor air mixed with return air. For otherwise comparable conditions, the SOA number and mass concentrations......, but this was more than offset by the increased dilution of SOA derived from ozone-initiated chemistry. The presence of a particle filter (new or used) strikingly lowered SOA number and mass concentrations compared with conditions when no filter was present. Even though the particle filter in this study had only 35...

  20. Characterization of Particle Size Distributions of Powdery Building Material Aerosol Generated by Fluidization and Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Prasauskas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify particle size distributions (PSD of aerosol of powdery building materials commonly used in construction work (cement, chalk, clay, wood sawdust, wood grinding dust, gypsum, hydrated lime, masonry grout, quartz sand, sand and structural lime by two aerosolization methods: fluidization and gravitation. Fluidization and gravitation methods represent industrial activities such as pneumotransportation and unloading. Both particle resuspension mechanisms have been modelled in laboratory conditions. The particle size distributions of resuspended particulate matter from powdery building materials were rather similar identified by both fluidization and gravitation methods, with an exception of wood sawdust and sand. The PM10 fraction ranged between 30% and 87%, PM2.5 from 7% to 28% and PM1.0 from 3% to 7% of the total mass of particulate matter. The highest PM10/PMtotal ratio was calculated for masonry grout - 0.87, and the lowest ratio for quartz sand - 0.30. The highest ratio of PM2.5/PMtotal was calculated for sand - 0.23, the lowest for quartz sand - 0.07. Substantial quantities of PM2.5 were found to be emitted implying a potential threat to human health.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.61.3.1519

  1. MADE-IN: a new aerosol microphysics submodel for global simulation of potential atmospheric ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Aquila

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC and mineral dust are among the dominant atmospheric ice nuclei, i.e. aerosol particles that can initiate heterogeneous nucleation of ice crystals. When released, most BC and dust particles are externally mixed with other aerosol compounds. Through coagulation with particles containing soluble material and condensation of gases, externally mixed particles may obtain a coating and be transferred into an internal mixture. The mixing state of BC and dust aerosol particles influences their radiative and hygroscopic properties, as well as their ability of building ice crystals.

    We introduce the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE-IN, implemented within the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global model (EMAC. MADE-IN is able to track separately mass and number concentrations of BC and dust particles in their different mixing states, as well as particles free of BC and dust. MADE-IN describes these three classes of particles through a superposition of seven log-normally distributed modes, and predicts the evolution of their size distribution and chemical composition. Six out of the seven modes are mutually interacting, allowing for the transfer of mass and number among them. Separate modes for the different mixing states of BC and dust particles in EMAC/MADE-IN allow for explicit simulations of the relevant aging processes, i.e. condensation, coagulation and cloud processing. EMAC/MADE-IN has been evaluated with surface and airborne measurements and performs well both in the planetary boundary layer and in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere. Such a model represents a highly appropriate tool for the study of the concentration and composition of potential atmospheric ice nuclei.

  2. Adequacy of the SPARC9O code for the simulation of the capture of aerosols by break in steam generator; Adecuacion del codigo sparc90 para la simulacion de la captura de aerosoles por rotura en el generador de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escriva, A.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Berna, C.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-07-01

    The SPARC9O (Suppression Pool Aerosol Removal Code)is intended to perform the calculation in terms of discharge of aerosols in swimming pools, is for this reason that it is working to achieve an analytical model that suits the conditions of discharge in a steam generator the code.

  3. Distribution of Fatty Acids and Triethanolamine in Synthetic Metalworking Fluid Aerosols Generated in the Laboratory and Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgner, R.H., Palausky, A., Jenkins, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States) Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.], Ball, A.M., Lucke, W.E. [Cincinnati Milacron, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Metalworking fluid mists were generated in the laboratory with selected synthetic fluids by nebulization and with an air sparging apparatus. Short chain fatty acid species were determined in the vapor and particulate phase of the resulting aerosols using in-situ trimethyl silyl derivatization. Certain fatty acid species in sparger generated mists were found in the vapor phase in greater quantities relative to the particle phase, compared with the corresponding amounts determined in nebulized mists. With one metalworking fluid, the nonanoic acid vapor phase to particulate phase concentration ratio was over 14 fold higher with air sparged mists (1.0) than with the corresponding nebulized mists (0.07). The nonanoic acid vapor phase concentrations were 0.026 mg/m{sup 3} and 0.002 mg/m{sup 3} for sparged (bubbled) and nebulized mists respectively. This phenomenon was observed with mists generated from several selected synthetic metalworking fluids. This could suggest that in the work place environment, with a variety of mist generation mechanisms occurring simultaneously, significant vapor phase concentrations of certain species could exist in an environment where particulate levels are low. Vapor phase fatty acid levels could remain relatively high in an occupational setting even when mist levels are reduced with efficient air cleaning devices. Results from mist generation experiments performed in the laboratory, were compared with actual field data from a relatively clean metal machining operation. Anecdotal evidence of potential irritation by short chain fatty acids prompted a study of this industrial site. Numerous air scrubbing devices were utilized at this industrial site to reduce airborne particulates, which typically ranged from 0.05 to 0.4 mg/m{sup 3}. Comparisons were made of triethanolamine and short chain fatty acid concentrations in vapor and particulate phases measured in the laboratory and work place environment.

  4. Evaluating the potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, D. L.; Liu, J.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we compare the potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on the air quality of continental regions. We use a global chemical transport model, Model of Ozone and Related Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), to quantify the source-receptor relationships of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols among ten regions in 2000. In order to compare the importance of foreign emissions relative to domestic emissions and estimate the effect of future changes in emissions on human exposure, we define an "influence potential" (IP). The IP quantifies the human exposure that occurs in a receptor region as a result of a unit of SO2 emissions from a source region. We find that due to the non-linear nature of sulfate production, regions with low SO2 emissions usually have large domestic IP, and vice versa. An exception is East Asia (EA), which has both high SO2 emissions and relatively large domestic IP, mostly caused by the spatial coincidence of emissions and population. We find that intercontinental IPs are usually less than domestic IPs by 1-3 orders of magnitude. SO2 emissions from the Middle East (ME) and Europe (EU) have the largest potential to influence populations in surrounding regions. By comparing the IP ratios (IPR) between foreign and domestic SO2 emissions, we find that the IPR values range from 0.00001 to 0.16 and change with season. Therefore, if reducing human exposure to sulfate aerosols is the objective, all regions should first focus on reducing domestic SO2 emissions. In addition, we find that relatively high IPR values exist among the EU, ME, the former Soviet Union (FSU) and African (AF) regions. Therefore, based on the IP and IPR values, we conclude that a regional agreement among EA countries, and an inter-regional agreement among EU, ME, FSU and north AF regions to control sulfur emissions would benefit public health in these regions.

  5. Potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we compare the potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on the air quality of (different) continental regions. We use a global chemical transport model, Model of Ozone and Related Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), to quantify the source receptor relationships of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols among ten regions in 2000. In order to compare the importance of foreign with domestic emissions and to estimate the effect of future changes in emissions on human exposure, we define an 'influence potential' (IP). The IP quantifies the human exposure that occurs in a receptor region as a result of a unit of SO2 emissions from a source region. We find that due to the non-linear nature of sulfate production, regions with low SO2 emissions usually have large domestic IP, and vice versa. An exception is East Asia (EA), which has both high SO2 emissions and relatively large domestic IP, mostly caused by the spatial coincidence of emissions and population. We find that inter-continental IPs are usually less than domestic IPs by 1 3 orders of magnitude. SO2 emissions from the Middle East (ME) and Europe (EU) have the largest potential to influence populations in surrounding regions. By comparing the IP ratios (IPR) between foreign and domestic SO2 emissions, we find that the IPR values range from 0.000 01 to 0.16 and change with season. Therefore, if reducing human exposure to sulfate aerosols is the objective, all regions should first focus on reducing domestic SO2 emissions. In addition, we find that relatively high IPR values exist among the EU, ME, the former Soviet Union (FSU) and African (AF) regions. Therefore, on the basis of the IP and IPR values, we conclude that a regional agreement among EA countries, and an inter-regional agreement among EU, ME, FSU and (north) AF regions to control sulfur emissions could benefit public health in these regions.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a U-shaped steam generator tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Pamela

    scenario evaluated but ranged from 1.61 to 3.2. At the outlet, the computed AMMD (1.9 mum) had GSD between 1.12 and 2.76. Decontamination factors (DF), computed based on deposition from trajectory calculations, were just over 3.5 for the bend and 4.4 at the outlet. Computed DFs were consistent with expert elicitation cited in NUREG-1150 for aerosol retention in steam generators.

  7. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  8. Potential modulations of pre-monsoon aerosols during El Niño: impact on Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadnavis, S.; Roy, Chaitri; Sabin, T. P.; Ayantika, D. C.; Ashok, K.

    2016-11-01

    The potential role of aerosol loading on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall during the El Niño years are examined using satellite-derived observations and a state of the art fully interactive aerosol-chemistry-climate model. The Aerosol Index (AI) from TOMS (1978-2005) and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from MISR spectroradiometer (2000-2010) indicate a higher-than-normal aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) during the pre-monsoon season with a concurrent El Niño. Sensitivity experiments using ECHAM5-HAMMOZ climate model suggests that this enhanced loading of pre-monsoon absorbing aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic plain can reduce the drought during El Niño years by invoking the `Elevated-Heat-Pump' mechanism through an anomalous aerosol-induced warm core in the atmospheric column. This anomalous heating upshot the relative strengthening of the cross-equatorial moisture inflow associated with the monsoon and eventually reduces the severity of drought during El Niño years. The findings are subject to the usual limitations such as the uncertainties in observations, and limited number of El Niño years (during the study period).

  9. Disk generator, its status and its potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The MHD disk generator has been used as an experimental tool to study plasma properties and to explore new diagnostic techniques, since it provides a near-ideal geometry for plasma studies due to its electrodeless configuration combined with near-perfect insulating walls. Both experimental and theoretical studies have also determined the conditions for favorable performance of the disk, often with inlet swirl, as a configuration for electrical power generation in both open- and closed-cycle applications. This paper describes the state-of-the-art of the disk geometry for power generation, and it also reviews recent system studies which have integrated the disk generator in electrical power plants using coal as a fuel. These studies indicate that the disk system can achieve overall efficiencies comparable to linear generator systems, but they also show that the disk configuration might provide significant reliability and require lower capital investments. These cost advantages are derived from the simplicity of the superconducting magnet and power management systems.

  10. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to estimate the potential contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic precursors (S/IVOC in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA, their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007 ("ROB" and Grieshop et al. (2009 ("GRI" are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (2–4 times with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009, both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40–60% of the total measured SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from commonly measured aromatic VOCs, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively

  11. Developing Aerosol Algorithm over Ocean and a Littoral Zone Using the Next Generation Geo-Stationary Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, M. M.; Holz, R.; Levy, R. C.; Miller, S. D.; Walther, A.; Heidinger, A.

    2016-12-01

    The advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) and the upcoming GOES-R are the next generation geo-stationary sensors with the capability of multi-spectral, high spatial and geo-stationary observation over southeast Asia (AHI) and United States (GOES-R). The long-term goal of this project is to develop an aerosol algorithm for the AHI and GOES-R that can be applied to the littoral regions where the surface reflectance can vary significantly and cannot be assumed dark. This new algorithm will be integrated into the NOAA's Clouds from AVHRR Extended (CLAVR-x) framework providing near real time processing capability. The foundation for the algorithm is the dark target approach, developed for NASA's Earth Observing System Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to retrieve aerosol properties. In this paper we will present our preliminary AOD retrievals from geo-stationary (AH) data over ocean and inter-compare with collocated MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) (Dark Target) retrievals and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) AHI beta AOD retrieval. We will then present the design of the littoral aerosol algorithm with a focus on methods to separate the surface reflectance from the aerosol signal using the combined multispectral capability of AHI with the ability to characterize the temporal variability of a given FOV. Finally, we will demonstrate a case study of aerosol retrieval using this approach.

  12. Sensitivity of aerosol radiative forcing calculations to spectral resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, K.E.

    1996-10-01

    Potential impacts of aerosol radiative forcing on climate have generated considerable recent interest. An important consideration in estimating the forcing from various aerosol components is the spectral resolution used for the solar radiative transfer calculations. This paper examines the spectral resolution required from the viewpoint of overlapping spectrally varying aerosol properties with other cross sections. A diagnostic is developed for comparing different band choices, and the impact of these choices on the radiative forcing calculated for typical sulfate and biomass aerosols was investigated.

  13. Chemical and isotopic composition of secondary organic aerosol generated by α-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusinger, Carl; Dusek, Ulrike; King, Stephanie M.; Holzinger, Rupert; Rosenørn, Thomas; Sperlich, Peter; Julien, Maxime; Remaud, Gerald S.; Bilde, Merete; Röckmann, Thomas; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays a central role in air pollution and climate. However, the description of the sources and mechanisms leading to SOA is elusive despite decades of research. While stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to constrain sources of ambient aerosol, in many cases it is difficult to apply because neither the isotopic composition of aerosol precursors nor the fractionation of aerosol forming processes is well characterised. In this paper, SOA formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene - an important precursor and perhaps the best-known model system used in laboratory studies - was investigated using position-dependent and average determinations of 13C in α-pinene and advanced analysis of reaction products using thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The total carbon (TC) isotopic composition δ13C of the initial α-pinene was measured, and the δ13C of the specific carbon atom sites was determined using position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA). The PSIA analysis showed variations at individual positions from -6.9 to +10. 5 ‰ relative to the bulk composition. SOA was formed from α-pinene and ozone in a constant-flow chamber under dark, dry, and low-NOx conditions, with OH scavengers and in the absence of seed particles. The excess of ozone and long residence time in the flow chamber ensured that virtually all α-pinene had reacted. Product SOA was collected on two sequential quartz filters. The filters were analysed offline by heating them stepwise from 100 to 400 °C to desorb organic compounds that were (i) detected using PTR-MS for chemical analysis and to determine the O : C ratio, and (ii) converted to CO2 for 13C analysis. More than 400 ions in the mass range 39-800 Da were detected from the desorbed material and quantified using a PTR-MS. The largest amount desorbed at 150 °C. The O : C ratio of material from the front filter increased from 0.18 to 0.25 as the desorption temperature was

  14. Indoor terpene emissions from cooking with herbs and pepper and their secondary organic aerosol production potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Felix; Farren, Naomi J.; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K.; Pieber, Simone M.; Slowik, Jay G.; Tuthill, Rosemary N.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-11-01

    Cooking is widely recognized as an important source of indoor and outdoor particle and volatile organic compound emissions with potential deleterious effects on human health. Nevertheless, cooking emissions remain poorly characterized. Here the effect of herbs and pepper on cooking emissions was investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge using state of the art mass spectrometric analysis of particle and gas-phase composition. Further, the secondary organic aerosol production potential of the gas-phase emissions was determined by smog chamber aging experiments. The emissions of frying meat with herbs and pepper include large amounts of mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes as well as various terpenoids and p-cymene. The average total terpene emission rate from the use of herbs and pepper during cooking is estimated to be 46 ± 5 gg-1Herbs min-1. These compounds are highly reactive in the atmosphere and lead to significant amounts of secondary organic aerosol upon aging. In summary we demonstrate that cooking with condiments can constitute an important yet overlooked source of terpenes in indoor air.

  15. CCN Activation Properties of Multiple-Component, Smog Chamber Generated, and Ambient Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, T. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2002-12-01

    Ambient aerosols are a complex mixture of inorganic and hundreds of organic compounds varying in structure and physical properties. Despite the considerable fraction of organic matter in atmospheric aerosol, relatively little is known about the ability of complex, mixed particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Previous work has focused on pure-component and dual-component aerosols and theoretical modeling of their activation. This work expands the investigation by studying the CCN-forming ability of multiple-component organic-inorganic mixed aerosol compounds produced in a smog chamber, and ambient aerosols. The CCN properties of aerosols produced in an indoor five cubic meter Teflon smog chamber and ambient aerosol are investigated experimentally combining a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a static diffusion CCN counter (M1 Model, DH Associates). Data was obtained for ozone oxidation products of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Multiple-component aerosols were produced from atomizing a mixed solution of chemical components and studying the particles with the TDMA-CCNC system. Mixtures included ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, pinonic acid, pinic acid, norpinic acid, glutamic acid, and leucine. Studies were performed at supersaturations of 0.3% and 1.0% with dry particle diameters ranging from 0.02 to 0.2 micrometers. The results were analyzed to gain insights into CCN properties of atmospheric aerosols composed of known mixtures of inorganic and organic species, mixed oxidation products of primary organic species, and actual ambient aerosols. The results are compared to the behavior of pure organic aerosols and theory.

  16. Simulation test of aerosol generation from vessels in the pre-treatment system of fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujine, Sachio; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kihara, Takehiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Aerosol concentration and droplet size are measured in off-gas of vessel under various conditions by changing off-gas flow rate, stirring air flow rate, salts concentration and temperature of nitrate solution. Aerosols are also measured under evaporation and air-lift operation. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Aerosol generating procedures and risk of transmission of acute respiratory infections to healthcare workers: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khai Tran

    Full Text Available Aerosol generating procedures (AGPs may expose health care workers (HCWs to pathogens causing acute respiratory infections (ARIs, but the risk of transmission of ARIs from AGPs is not fully known. We sought to determine the clinical evidence for the risk of transmission of ARIs to HCWs caring for patients undergoing AGPs compared with the risk of transmission to HCWs caring for patients not undergoing AGPs. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, University of York CRD databases, EuroScan, LILACS, Indian Medlars, Index Medicus for SE Asia, international health technology agencies and the Internet in all languages for articles from 01/01/1990 to 22/10/2010. Independent reviewers screened abstracts using pre-defined criteria, obtained full-text articles, selected relevant studies, and abstracted data. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. The outcome of interest was risk of ARI transmission. The quality of evidence was rated using the GRADE system. We identified 5 case-control and 5 retrospective cohort studies which evaluated transmission of SARS to HCWs. Procedures reported to present an increased risk of transmission included [n; pooled OR(95%CI] tracheal intubation [n = 4 cohort; 6.6 (2.3, 18.9, and n = 4 case-control; 6.6 (4.1, 10.6], non-invasive ventilation [n = 2 cohort; OR 3.1(1.4, 6.8], tracheotomy [n = 1 case-control; 4.2 (1.5, 11.5] and manual ventilation before intubation [n = 1 cohort; OR 2.8 (1.3, 6.4]. Other intubation associated procedures, endotracheal aspiration, suction of body fluids, bronchoscopy, nebulizer treatment, administration of O2, high flow O2, manipulation of O2 mask or BiPAP mask, defibrillation, chest compressions, insertion of nasogastric tube, and collection of sputum were not significant. Our findings suggest that some procedures potentially capable of generating aerosols have been associated with increased risk of SARS transmission to HCWs or were a risk

  18. Attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Koichi; Tanaka, Toru; Nitta, Shinnosuke; Itosu, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Shun; Oki, Yuichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Various characteristics such as size distribution, chemical component and radioactivity have been analyzed for radioactive aerosols released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Measured results for radioactive aerosols suggest that the potential transport medium for radioactive cesium was non-sea-salt sulfate. This result indicates that cesium isotopes would preferentially attach with sulfate compounds. In the present work the attachment behavior of fission products to aqueous solution aerosols of sodium salts has been studied using a generation system of solution aerosols and spontaneous fission source of {sup 248}Cm. Attachment ratios of fission products to the solution aerosols were compared among the aerosols generated by different solutions of sodium salt. A significant difference according as a solute of solution aerosols was found in the attachment behavior. The present results suggest the existence of chemical effects in the attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosols.

  19. High-Resolution Mass Spectroscopic Analysis of Secondary Organic Aerosol Generated by Ozonolysis of Isoprene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran B; Bateman, Adam P; Bones, David L; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of isoprene (C5H8) in the presence of an OH scavenger was examined using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The chemical composition of SOA is complex, with more than 1000 assigned peaks observed in the positive and negative ion mode spectra. Only a small fraction of peaks corresponds to known products of isoprene oxidation, such as pyruvic acid, glycolic acid, methylglyoxal, etc. The absolute majority of the detected peaks correspond to highly oxidized oligomeric constituents of SOA, with an average O:C molar ratio of ~0.6. The corresponding organic mass (OM) to organic oxygen (OO) ratio is OM/OO ~2.4. Approximately 8% of oxygen atoms in SOA are in the form of peroxides as quantified with an iodide test. Double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, representing the sum of all double bonds and rings, increase by 1 for every 2-3 additional carbon atoms in the molecule. The prevalent oligomer building blocks are therefore carbonyls or carboxylic acids with a C2-C3 skeleton. Kendrick analysis suggests that simple aldehydes, specifically formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and methylglyoxal can serve as monomeric building blocks in the observed oligomers. The large number of reactive functional groups, especially organic peroxides and carbonyls, suggests that isoprene/O3 SOA should be prone to chemical and photochemical aging.

  20. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Curt; Ghan, Steven J.; Walton, John J.; Weissman, Paul R.

    1989-01-01

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to the three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans, not included in the one-dimensional model, substantially mitigates land surface cooling. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stages of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. GCM-simulated climatic changes in the scenario of asteroid/comet winter are more severe than in nuclear winter because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects could also lead to dramatic, though of course less severe, climatic changes, according to the GCM. An asteroid or comet impact would not lead to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts would dramatically alter the climate in at least a patchy sense.

  1. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Curt; Ghan, Steven J.; Walton, John J.; Weissman, Paul R.

    1989-01-01

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of nuclear winter; GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of asteroid/comet winter, however, are more severe than in nuclear winter because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a patchy sense.

  2. An estimation of impact of anthropogenic aerosols in atmosphere of Tirana on solar insolation. Part II: Modification of solar energy potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzra, Urim, E-mail: rimibuzra@yahoo.com; Berberi, Pellumb; Mitrushi, Driada; Muda, Valbona [Department of Engineering Physics, FIMIF, PUT, Tirana (Albania); Halili, Daniela [Department of physics, FNS, AXHU, Elbasan (Albania); Berdufi, Irma [Institute of Nuclear Physics, INP, TU, Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    Change of irradiative properties of the atmosphere during clear days is an indicator, among others, of existence of atmospheric aerosols and can be used as an indicator for assessment both air pollution and local modifications of solar energy potentials. The main objective of this study is estimation of influence of anthropogenic aerosols on solar energy falling in a horizontal surface during a cloudless day. We have analyzed and quantified the effect of aerosols on reducing the amount of solar energy that falls on the horizontal ground surface in cloudless sky conditions, estimating temporal evolution, both in daily and hour scale, considering also, side effects caused by relative humidity of the air wind speed and geometric factor. As an indicator of concentration of aerosols in atmosphere, we agreed to use the attenuation of solar radiation after the last rainy day. All data were corrected by factors such as, variations of relative humidity, wind speed and daily change of incident angle of solar radiation. We studied the change of solar insolation in three sites with different traffic intensity, one in city of Shkodra and two in city of Tirana. Fifteen days after last rainy day, approximate time needed to achieve saturation, the insolation drops only 3.1% in the city of Shkodra, while in two sites in city of Tirana are 8.5 % and 18.4%. These data show that reduction of solar insolation is closely related with anthropogenic activity, mainly traffic around the site of the meteorological station. The day to day difference tends to decrease with increasing of number of days passed from the last rainy day, which is an evidence of a trend toward a dynamic equilibrium between decantation process of aerosols during the night and their generation during the day.

  3. Global potential for wind-generated electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; McElroy, Michael B.; Kiviluoma, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The potential of wind power as a global source of electricity is assessed by using winds derived through assimilation of data from a variety of meteorological sources. The analysis indicates that a network of land-based 2.5-megawatt (MW) turbines restricted to nonforested, ice-free, nonurban areas operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity, >5 times total global use of energy in all forms. Resources in the contiguous United States, specifically in the central plain states, could accommodate as much as 16 times total current demand for electricity in the United States. Estimates are given also for quantities of electricity that could be obtained by using a network of 3.6-MW turbines deployed in ocean waters with depths <200 m within 50 nautical miles (92.6 km) of closest coastlines. PMID:19549865

  4. Aerosol data assimilation using data from Himawari‐8, a next‐generation geostationary meteorological satellite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yumimoto, K; Nagao, T.M; Kikuchi, M; Sekiyama, T.T; Murakami, H; Tanaka, T.Y; Ogi, A; Irie, H; Khatri, P; Okumura, H; Arai, K; Morino, I; Uchino, O; Maki, T

    2016-01-01

    ...‐8 data to aerosol data assimilation. Validation of the assimilation experiment by comparison with independent observations demonstrated successful modeling of continental pollution that was not predicted by simulation without...

  5. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Gobrogge, Eric; Fu, Li; Link, Katie; Elliott, Scott M.; Wang, Hongfei; Walker, Rob

    2016-08-01

    Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions between soluble monosaccharides and an insoluble lipid surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the alkane:hydroxyl mass ratio in modeled sea spray organic matter is reduced from a median of 2.73 to a range of 0.41-0.69, reducing the discrepancy with previous Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations of clean marine aerosol (ratio: 0.24-0.38). The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5-0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. Sum frequency generation experiments support the modeling approach by demonstrating that soluble monosaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer likely via Coulomb interactions under appropriate conditions. These laboratory findings motivate further research to determine the relevance of coadsorption mechanisms for real-world, sea spray aerosol production.

  6. Improving Aerosol and Visibility Forecasting Capabilities Using Current and Future Generations of Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    indicate that the assimilation of satellite observations significantly improves NAAPS aerosol forecasting capability and reliability. To fully utilize...method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime x using artificial light sources. Nighttime x retrievals from the newly-developed method are...Kemper, T. Craig, I. Ginis , Evaluation of Maine aerosol production simulated using the WaveWatchlll prognostic Wave Model coupled to the Community

  7. Generating nanoscale aggregates from colloidal nanoparticles by various aerosol spray techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in the environmental and health effects of engineered nanostructured materials requires accurate control of cluster morphology and size in order to make valid interpretations of nanomaterial toxicity. We report the comparison of three methods for the generation of aggregated uniform polystyrene latex (PSL) nanospheres from a colloidal suspension. Atomization, ultrasonic generation and electrospray, which utilize distinct mechanisms for the formation of liquid droplets from a PSL colloidal suspension, are explored as potential methods for nanostructured material synthesis. Electrospray produced isolated PSL particles most suited for use in experiments involving exposure to non-aggregated nanoparticles. Though producing the largest cluster size, ultrasonic generation proved to be a relatively straightforward process for reproducibly generating nanoparticle aggregates. Further advantages and disadvantages of each method are presented in relation to future toxicology experiments.

  8. Primary Emission and the Potential of Secondary Aerosol Formation from Chinese Gasoline Engine Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Peng, Jianfei; Qin, Yanhong; Du, Zhuofei; Li, Mengjin; Zheng, Rong; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Lu, Sihua; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Limin; Guo, Song; Shao, Min; Wang, Yinhui; Shuai, Shijin

    2017-04-01

    Along with the urbanization and economic growth, vehicle population in China reached 269 million, ranked the second in the world in 2015. Gasoline vehicle is identified to be the main source for urban PM2.5 in China, accounting for 15%-31%. In this study the impact of fuel components on PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from a gasoline port fuel injection (PFI) engine and a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine are discussed. Results show that, higher proportion of aromatics, alkenes or sulfur in gasoline fuel will lead to higher PM emissions. The PM from the PFI engine mainly consists of OC and a small amount of EC and inorganic ions, while the PM discharge from the GDI engine mainly consists of EC, OM and a small amount of inorganic ions. Since the GDI engines can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, and it would become more and more popular in the near future. The characteristics of POM component, emission factors and source profile were investigated from GDI engine, particularly focused on the effect of engine speed, load and the catalyst, which will be very much helpful for source identification as source indicators. Chamber experiments were conducted to quantify the potential of secondary aerosol formation from exhaust of a PFI gasoline engine and China V gasoline fuel. During 4-5 h simulation, equivalent to10 days of atmospheric photo-oxidation in Beijing, the extreme SOA production was 426 ± 85 mg/kg fuel, with high precursors and OH exposure. 14% of SOA measured in the chamber experiments could be explained through the oxidation of speciated single-ring aromatics. Unspeciated precursors, such as intermediate-volatility organic compounds and semi-volatility organic compounds, might be significant for SOA formation from gasoline VOCs. We concluded that reduction of emissions of aerosol precursor gases from vehicles is essential to mediate pollution in China.

  9. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Astitha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, indicating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols shows that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud, and by entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  10. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. C. Denier van der Gon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, designating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols indicates that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud and entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  11. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean - potential impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.

    2010-02-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates), natural (desert dust, sea salt) and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust) aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode) are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, designating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols indicates that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud and entrainment). The sodium (sea salt related) aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  12. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean - potential impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.

    2010-07-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates), natural (desert dust, sea salt) and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust) aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode) are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, indicating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols shows that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud, and by entrainment). The sodium (sea salt related) aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  13. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  14. Occurrence of Legionella in technological water and studies of the total number of bacteria and fungi in indoor air at workplaces where water aerosol is generated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Krogulska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to confirm the fact that technological water is a significant carrier of Legionella, a potential serious threat to the health of operators of mechanical devices generating contaminated water aerosol. Material and Methods: Microbiological analyses of water and indoor air were conducted in 8 different production facilities involved in mechanical processing of glass. The study covered 81 samples of water collected from technical water systems. Isolation of Legionella and the determination of total number of microorganisms were processed according to PN-EN ISO 11731-2:2008E and PN-EN ISO 6222:2004P, respectively. Air samples were collected using air samplers and total numbers of bacteria and fungi were determined. Results: The studies of process water, indicated the presence of Legionella in 27.2% of collected samples. These bacteria were present in both closed and open process water reservoirs at 10 cfu/100 ml to 2.9×104 cfu/100 ml. The count of other associated bacteria exceeded 103 cfu/ml. All strains isolated from Legionella-positive samples were identified as L. pneumophila SG 2-14. In 5 of 8 studied production facilities an increased total number of aerial bacteria and fungi was observed in samples collected in close vicinity of aerosol source. Conclusions: To reduce the number of microorganisms in water it is required to introduce technological water quality monitoring and procedures for the cleaning and disinfecting of mechanical devices generating water aerosol. Med Pr 2014;65(3:325–334

  15. An aerosol chamber investigation of the heterogeneous ice nucleating potential of refractory nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. C. Plane

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of iron oxide (crystalline and amorphous, silicon oxide and magnesium oxide were investigated for their propensity to nucleate ice over the temperature range 180–250 K, using the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany.

    All samples were observed to initiate ice formation via the deposition mode at threshold ice super-saturations (RHi thresh ranging from 105% to 140% for temperatures below 220 K. Approximately 10% of amorphous Fe2O3 particles (modal diameter = 30 nm generated in situ from a photochemical aerosol reactor, led to ice nucleation at RHi thresh = 140% at an initial chamber temperature of 182 K. Quantitative analysis using a singular hypothesis treatment provided a fitted function [ns (190 K = 10(3.33×sice+8.16] for the variation in ice-active surface site density (ns: m−2 with ice saturation (sice for Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was implemented in an aerosol-cloud model to determine a predicted deposition (mass accommodation coefficient for water vapour on ice of 0.1 at temperatures appropriate for the upper atmosphere. Classical nucleation theory was used to determine representative contact angles (θ for the different particle compositions. For the in situ generated Fe2O3 particles, a slight inverse temperature dependence was observed with θ = 10.5° at 182 K, decreasing to 9.0° at 200 K (compared with 10.2° and 11.4°, respectively for the SiO2 and MgO particle samples at the higher temperature.

    These observations indicate that such refractory nanoparticles are relatively efficient materials for the nucleation of ice under the conditions studied in the chamber which correspond to cirrus cloud formation in the upper troposphere. The results also show that Fe2O3 particles do not act as ice nuclei

  16. An aerosol chamber investigation of the heterogeneous ice nucleating potential of refractory nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Saunders

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of iron oxide (crystalline and amorphous, silicon oxide and magnesium oxide were investigated for their propensity to nucleate ice over the temperature range 180–250 K, using the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany.

    All samples were observed to initiate ice formation via the deposition mode at threshold ice super-saturations (RHithresh ranging from 105% to 140% for temperatures below 220 K. Approximately 10% of amorphous Fe2O3 particles (modal diameter = 30 nm generated in situ from a photochemical aerosol reactor, led to ice nucleation at RHithresh = 140% at an initial chamber temperature of 182 K. Quantitative analysis using a singular hypothesis treatment provided a fitted function [ns(190 K=10(3.33×sice+8.16] for the variation in ice-active surface site density (ns:m−2 with ice saturation (sice for Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was implemented in an aerosol-cloud model to determine a predicted deposition (mass accommodation coefficient for water vapour on ice of 0.1 at temperatures appropriate for the upper atmosphere. Classical nucleation theory was used to determine representative contact angles (θ for the different particle compositions. For the in situ generated Fe2O3 particles, a slight inverse temperature dependence was observed with θ = 10.5° at 182 K, decreasing to 9.0° at 200 K (compared with 10.2° and 11.4° respectively for the SiO2 and MgO particle samples at the higher temperature.

    These observations indicate that such refractory nanoparticles are relatively efficient materials for the nucleation of ice under the conditions studied in the chamber which correspond to cirrus cloud formation in the upper troposphere. The results also show that Fe2O3 particles do not act as ice

  17. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean-potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size dis

  18. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean - Potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size dis

  19. A study of photochemical againg of ambient air using Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber under the different sources and types of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.; Son, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.; Sung, K.; Park, G.; Link, M.; Park, T.; Kim, K.; Kang, S.; Ban, J.; Kim, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research proposed that Secondary Aerosol (SA) is important class of predicting future climate change scenarios, health effect, and a general air quality. However, there has been lack of studies to investigate SA formation all over the world. This study tried to focus on understanding potential secondary aerosol formation and its local impact by the photochemical aging of inorganic and organic aerosols in the ambient air using the Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber under the different sources and types of emissions. PAM chamber manufactured by Aerodyne make an oxidizing environment that simulates oxidation processes on timescales of 12-15 hrs in the atmosphere. Chemical compositions of ambient aerosol and aerosol that was aged in the PAM chamber were alternately measured every 2-minutes using the High Resolution-Time of Flight-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). HR-ToF-AMS provides non-refractory aerosol mass concentrations including nitrate, sulfate, hydrocarbon-like and oxygenated organic aerosol in real time. This study includes a residence area of mixture of sources, a forest site of dominant source of biogenic VOCs, an underground parking lot of dominant vehicle emission, and laboratory experiment of vehicle emissions under different fuels and speeds using the chassis dynamometer. As a result, it was revealed that gasoline and LPG vehicle relatively made more potential SA than diesel vehicle.

  20. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strada, Susanna; Unger, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (anthropogenic, biomass burning, and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. The model framework includes all known light and meteorological responses of photosynthesis, but uses fixed canopy structures and phenology. On a global scale, our results show that global land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ˜ 9 %. At a regional scale, GPP and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols in regions where forested canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Eurasia, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +5-8 % on an annual average. In the northwestern Amazon Basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the northwestern Amazon Basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). The prevailing mechanism varies across regions: light scattering dominates in eastern North America, while a reduction in direct radiation dominates in Europe and China. Aerosol-induced GPP productivity increases in the Amazon and central Africa include an additional positive feedback from reduced canopy temperatures in response to increases in canopy conductance. In Eurasia and northeastern China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on an annual average. Future research needs to incorporate the indirect effects of aerosols and possible feedbacks from dynamic carbon allocation and phenology.

  1. Potential impacts from biological aerosols on ensembles of continental clouds simulated numerically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. J. Phillips

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An aerosol-cloud modeling framework is described to simulate the activation of ice particles and droplets by biological aerosol particles, such as airborne ice-nucleation active (INA bacteria. It includes the empirical parameterisation of heterogeneous ice nucleation and a semi-prognostic aerosol component, which have been incorporated into a cloud-system resolving model (CSRM with double-moment bulk microphysics. The formation of cloud liquid by soluble material coated on these partially insoluble organic aerosols is represented. It determines their partial removal from deep convective clouds by accretion onto precipitation in the cloud model. This "aerosol-cloud model" is validated for diverse cases of deep convection with contrasting aerosol conditions, against satellite, ground-based and aircraft observations.

    Simulations are performed with the aerosol-cloud model for a month-long period of summertime convective activity over Oklahoma. It includes three cases of continental deep convection simulated previously by Phillips and Donner (2006. Elevated concentrations of insoluble organic aerosol, boosted by a factor of 100 beyond their usual values for this continental region, are found to influence significantly the following quantities: (1 the average numbers and sizes of ice crystals and droplets in the clouds; (2 the horizontal cloud coverage in the free troposphere; (3 precipitation at the ground; and (4 incident solar insolation at the surface. This factor of 100 is plausible for natural fluctuations of the concentration of insoluble organic aerosol, in view of variability of cell concentrations for airborne bacteria seen by Lindemann et al. (1982.

    In nature, such boosting of the insoluble organic aerosol loading could arise from enhanced emissions of biological aerosol particles from a land surface. Surface wetness and solar insolation at the ground are meteorological quantities known to influence rates of growth of

  2. Aerossol bacteriano gerado por respiradores mecânicos: estudo comparativo Bacterial aerosol generated by mechanical ventilators: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Agostino Dias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiradores mecânicos emitem aerossóis que podem estar colonizados com bactérias. OBJETIVO. Estudar a contaminação ambiental gerada por respiradores, comparando-se dois siste-mas de umidificação. MÉTODOS. Realizaram-se 51 estudos, comparando-se a colonização dos aerossóis emitidos pela válvula expiratória dos aparelhos de ventilação mecânica, sendo em 31 com nebulizadores convencionais e em 20 com condensadores higroscópicos, em quinze minutos de observação. RESULTADOS. Houve emissão de bactérias para o ambiente, pela válvula expiratória, de 32,2% de respiradores equipados com sistema de nebulização convencional e de 5% com condensador (p = 0,0340. CONCLUSÃO. A umidificação da mistura gasosa com o uso de condensadores pode ser um meio eficiente de reduzir a contaminação bacteriana ambiental.Mechanical ventilators generate aerosol which may be bacterially colonized. PURPOSE - To determine the environmental contamination generated by ventilators with two different humidification techniques. METHODS - The study was done comparing the generation of bacterial colonized aerosol by the expiratory valve of mechanical respirators with conventional water nebulization or with hygroscopic condensator as the humidifier source during 15 minutes of observation. RESULTS - The aerosol got positive cultures in 32.2% of the conventional system and in 5% of the condensator system (p = 0.0340. CONCLUSION - We concluded that the humidification by the hygroscopic condensator may be an efficient way to reduce environmental bacterial contamination.

  3. Generating Functionals for Quantum Field Theories with Random Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    We consider generating functionals for computing correlators in quantum field theories with random potentials. Examples of such theories include condensed matter systems with quenched disorder (e.g. spin glass) or cosmological systems in context of the string theory landscape (e.g. cosmic inflation). We use the so-called replica trick to define two different generating functionals for calculating correlators of the quantum fields averaged over a given distribution of random potentials. The first generating functional is appropriate for calculating averaged (in-out) amplitudes and involves a single replica of fields, but the replica limit is taken to an (unphysical) negative one number of fields outside of the path integral. When the number of replicas is doubled the generating functional can also be used for calculating averaged probabilities (squared amplitudes) using the in-in construction. The second generating functional involves an infinite number of replicas, but can be used for calculating both in-out ...

  4. Time-resolved analysis of primary volatile emissions and secondary aerosol formation potential from a small-scale pellet boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Hendryk; Pieber, Simone M.; Tiitta, Petri; Sippula, Olli; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Grigonyte, Julija; Streibel, Thorsten; Prévôt, André S. H.; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Small-scale pellet boilers and stoves became popular as a wood combustion appliance for domestic heating in Europe, North America and Asia due to economic and environmental aspects. Therefore, an increasing contribution of pellet boilers to air pollution is expected despite their general high combustion efficiency. As emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and permanent gases of pellet boilers are well investigated, the scope of this study was to investigate the volatile organic emissions and the formation potential of secondary aerosols for this type of appliance. Fresh and aged emissions were analysed by a soot-particle aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SP-AMS) and the molecular composition of the volatile precursors with single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) at different pellet boiler operation conditions. Organic emissions in the gas phase were dominated by unsaturated hydrocarbons while wood-specific VOCs, e.g. phenolic species or substituted furans, were only detected during the starting phase. Furthermore, organic emissions in the gas phase were found to correlate with fuel grade and combustion technology in terms of secondary air supply. Secondary organic aerosols of optimised pellet boiler conditions (OPT, state-of-the-art combustion appliance) and reduced secondary air supply (RSA, used as a proxy for pellet boilers of older type) were studied by simulating atmospheric ageing in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor. Different increases in OA mass (55% for OPT, 102% for RSA), associated with higher average carbon oxidation state and O:C, could be observed in a PAM chamber experiment. Finally, it was found that derived SOA yields and emission factors were distinctly lower than reported for log wood stoves.

  5. Characterizing source fingerprints and ageing processes in laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols using proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR analysis and HPLC HULIS determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zanca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in laboratory settings has greatly increased our knowledge of the diverse chemical processes and environmental conditions responsible for the formation of particulate matter starting from biogenic and anthropogenic volatile compounds. However, characteristics of the different experimental setups and the way they impact the composition and the timescale of formation of SOA are still subject to debate. In this study, SOA samples were generated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM oxidation flow reactor using α-pinene, naphthalene and isoprene as precursors. The PAM reactor facilitated exploration of SOA composition over atmospherically relevant photochemical ageing timescales that are unattainable in environmental chambers. The SOA samples were analyzed using two state-of-the-art analytical techniques for SOA characterization – proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy and HPLC determination of humic-like substances (HULIS. Results were compared with previous Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS measurements. The combined 1H-NMR, HPLC, and AMS datasets show that the composition of the studied SOA systems tend to converge to highly oxidized organic compounds upon prolonged OH exposures. Further, our 1H-NMR findings show that only α-pinene SOA acquires spectroscopic features comparable to those of ambient OA when exposed to at least 1  ×  1012 molec OH cm−3  ×  s OH exposure, or multiple days of equivalent atmospheric OH oxidation. Over multiple days of equivalent OH exposure, the formation of HULIS is observed in both α-pinene SOA and in naphthalene SOA (maximum yields: 16 and 30 %, respectively, of total analyzed water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC, providing evidence of the formation of humic-like polycarboxylic acids in unseeded SOA.

  6. Characterizing source fingerprints and ageing processes in laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols using proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) analysis and HPLC HULIS determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Nicola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Croasdale, David R.; Parmar, Yatish; Tagliavini, Emilio; Gilardoni, Stefania; Decesari, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    The study of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in laboratory settings has greatly increased our knowledge of the diverse chemical processes and environmental conditions responsible for the formation of particulate matter starting from biogenic and anthropogenic volatile compounds. However, characteristics of the different experimental setups and the way they impact the composition and the timescale of formation of SOA are still subject to debate. In this study, SOA samples were generated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor using α-pinene, naphthalene and isoprene as precursors. The PAM reactor facilitated exploration of SOA composition over atmospherically relevant photochemical ageing timescales that are unattainable in environmental chambers. The SOA samples were analyzed using two state-of-the-art analytical techniques for SOA characterization - proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy and HPLC determination of humic-like substances (HULIS). Results were compared with previous Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The combined 1H-NMR, HPLC, and AMS datasets show that the composition of the studied SOA systems tend to converge to highly oxidized organic compounds upon prolonged OH exposures. Further, our 1H-NMR findings show that only α-pinene SOA acquires spectroscopic features comparable to those of ambient OA when exposed to at least 1 × 1012 molec OH cm-3 × s OH exposure, or multiple days of equivalent atmospheric OH oxidation. Over multiple days of equivalent OH exposure, the formation of HULIS is observed in both α-pinene SOA and in naphthalene SOA (maximum yields: 16 and 30 %, respectively, of total analyzed water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC), providing evidence of the formation of humic-like polycarboxylic acids in unseeded SOA.

  7. Kinetic analysis of competition between aerosol particle removal and generation by ionization air purifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawa, Ahmad; Russell, Ashley R; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2007-04-01

    Ionization air purifiers are increasingly used to remove aerosol particles from indoor air. However, certain ionization air purifiers also emit ozone. Reactions between the emitted ozone and unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOC) commonly found in indoor air produce additional respirable aerosol particles in the ultrafine (air purifiers under conditions of a typical residential building. This model predicts that certain widely used ionization air purifiers may actually increase the mass concentration of fine and ultrafine particulates in the presence of common unsaturated VOC, such as limonene contained in many household cleaning products. This prediction is supported by an explicit observation of ultrafine particle nucleation events caused by the addition of D-limonene to a ventilated office room equipped with a common ionization air purifier.

  8. Ice Formation Potential of Laboratory Generated Biogenic and Anthropogenic-Biogenic SOA Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Lambe, A. T.; Massoli, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is ubiquitous in the atmosphere and may play an important role in cloud glaciation processes. We investigated several laboratory generated SOA particles systems for their initial water uptake and ice formation propensity as a function of temperature, T, relative humidity with respect to water, RH, relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice, and for different humidification rates, cRHice. This includes pure SOA particles formed from α-pinene, isoprene, and longifolene volatile organic compound precursors with and without the presence of sulfate seed particles as well as oxidized soot and soot-coated α-pinene and naphthalene SOA with varying O/C ratios and coating thicknesses. Micro-spectroscopic chemical imaging using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) is used to characterize SOA, SOA-sulfate, SOA-soot particles generated in the Boston College potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor in relation to their ice nucleation behavior. Water uptake is consistently observed on SOA particles at RH=75% and 95% for 262 and 228 K, respectively, followed by homogeneous ice nucleation applying atmospherically relevant cRHice=1 % min-1. When cRHice=25 % min-1, ice nucleation is delayed by about 30-40% RHice and cannot be explained by homogeneous ice nucleation. This implies diffusion limitation of water into these potentially glassy or semi-solid organic particles resulting in non-equilibrium between ambient RH and particle water activity. These data will aid in our understanding of the role of organic particle phase states in response to changes in T and RH which is crucial information for prediction of atmospheric ice nucleation.

  9. Combining real-time PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing to provide quantitative comparisons of fungal aerosol populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Lang-Yona, Naama; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Rudich, Yinon; Peccia, Jordan

    2014-02-01

    We examined fungal communities associated with the PM10 mass of Rehovot, Israel outdoor air samples collected in the spring and fall seasons. Fungal communities were described by 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal ribosomal RNA encoding gene. To allow for a more quantitative comparison of fungal exposure in humans, the relative abundance values of specific taxa were transformed to absolute concentrations through multiplying these values by the sample's total fungal spore concentration (derived from universal fungal qPCR). Next, the sequencing-based absolute concentrations for Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. were compared to taxon-specific qPCR concentrations for A. alternata, C. cladosporioides, E. nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. derived from the same spring and fall aerosol samples. Results of these comparisons showed that the absolute concentration values generated from pyrosequencing were strongly associated with the concentration values derived from taxon-specific qPCR (for all four species, p 0.70). The correlation coefficients were greater for species present in higher concentrations. Our microbial aerosol population analyses demonstrated that fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was higher in the spring compared to the fall (p = 0.02), and principal coordinate analysis showed distinct seasonal differences in taxa distribution (ANOSIM p = 0.004). Among genera containing allergenic and/or pathogenic species, the absolute concentrations of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Cladosporium were greater in the fall, while Cryptococcus, Penicillium, and Ulocladium concentrations were greater in the spring. The transformation of pyrosequencing fungal population relative abundance data to absolute concentrations can improve next-generation DNA sequencing-based quantitative aerosol exposure assessment.

  10. Parameters contributing to efficient ion generation in aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJimpsey, Erica L; Jackson, William M; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Tobias, Herbert; Bogan, Michael J; Gard, Eric E; Frank, Matthias; Steele, Paul T

    2008-03-01

    The Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system was developed for the real-time detection and identification of biological aerosols using laser desorption ionization. Greater differentiation of particle types is desired; consequently MALDI techniques are being investigated. The small sample size ( approximately 1 microm3), lack of substrate, and ability to simultaneously monitor both positive and negative ions provide a unique opportunity to gain new insight into the MALDI process. Several parameters known to influence MALDI molecular ion yield and formation are investigated here in the single particle phase. A comparative study of five matrices (2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, ferulic acid, and sinapinic acid) with a single analyte (angiotensin I) is presented and reveals effects of matrix selection, matrix-to-analyte molar ratio, and aerosol particle diameter. The strongest analyte ion signal is found at a matrix-to-analyte molar ratio of 100:1. At this ratio, the matrices yielding the least and greatest analyte molecular ion formation are ferulic acid and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, respectively. Additionally, a significant positive correlation is found between aerodynamic particle diameter and analyte molecular ion yield for all matrices. SEM imaging of select aerosol particle types reveals interesting surface morphology and structure.

  11. POTENTIAL OF SERBIA TO GENERATE TOURISTIC FLOWS IN TRANSITION PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk GARACA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Generative regions are the areas that generate touristic demand. It is important to aknowledge the potential of certain countries to generate touristic flows. This is essential asset for the development of destination countries in its souroundings, as well as faraway tourism destinations. The contribution of every country to the world tourism should not be ignored, as it plays its role in the global tourism phenomenon. Serbia is a small country with many demographical and economical problems. Despite the relativelly low standard of living of its population, the significant number of Serbs travel abroad every year.. This research examine the potential of Serbia to generate tourism flows, nowdays and in the future, the main destinations of Serbian tourists, the amount of money spent by Serbians on tourism and the role that tourism have in their culture of living.

  12. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Gobrogge, Eric [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Fu, Li [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Link, Katie [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Elliott, Scott M. [Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modelling Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico USA; Wang, Hongfei [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Walker, Rob [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA

    2016-08-10

    Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions of soluble polysaccharides with a surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the fraction of hydroxyl functional groups in modeled sea spray organic matter is increased, improving agreement with FTIR observations of marine aerosol composition. The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5 – 0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. We show results from Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) experiments that support the modeling approach, by demonstrating that soluble polysaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer via columbic interactions under appropriate conditions.

  13. Managing 'Generation Y' occupational therapists: optimising their potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Warren-Forward, Helen; Smith, Derek R

    2013-08-01

    'Generation Y' is a descriptor of those therapists born between 1982 and 2000. According to generational theory, each generation have unique characteristics due to the social and historical factors they have experienced during their formative years. Occupational therapy educators have reported on 'Generation Y' characteristics observed in occupational therapy students. This study aimed to investigate if managers considered there was a 'Generation Y' therapist and their observed characteristics in practice, as well as successful management strategies used to maximise their potential in the workplace. A hard copy survey based on the 'Generation Y' literature was sent to all managers listed on an Australian University database. Almost all respondents considered there was a 'Generation Y' therapist. Overall, managers reported characteristics of this staff group as being hard working, confident with technology, needing positive feedback and demanding professional development opportunities. Managers also reported that this group may be a challenge to retain in work positions. Managers also viewed 'Generation Y' staff as a positive energy and considered that in the future they will be of benefit to the profession. While there may be generational differences between therapists in the workplace, inclusive management styles may be the most appropriate management approach. Career guidance, facilitating creativity, increasing work responsibility and integrating new technologies like social networking into practice may be appropriate strategies for this staff group, to facilitate both their professional development and to retain them in the profession. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  14. Potential of Biomass Based Electricity Generation in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KP Ariyadasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass has attracted much attention as a primary energy source for electricity generation due to its potential to supply low cost fuel source with considerable environmental and socio-economic benefits. Despite having favorable climatic conditions to grow and use biomass for electricity generation, biomass based electricity generation in Sri Lanka is lagging behind due to many reasons. Many countries rely on the agricultural or forestry by-products or residuals as the main source of biomass for electricity generation mainly due to the comparatively low cost and sustainable supply of these by-products. Sri Lanka does not have this advantage and has to rely mainly on purposely grown biomass for electricity generation. Development of short rotation energy plantations seems to be the best option available for Sri Lanka to produce biomass for commercial scale electricity generation. The highly favorable growing conditions, availability of promising tree species and a variety of plantation management options and significant environmental and socio-economic benefits associated with energy plantation development greatly favor this option. This paper examines the potential of using plantation grown biomass as a fuel source for electricity generation in Sri Lanka.

  15. Reducing multisensor monthly mean aerosol optical depth uncertainty: 2. Optimal locations for potential ground observation deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Xichen; Carlson, Barbara E.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Dubovik, Oleg; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2017-04-01

    Surface remote sensing of aerosol properties provides "ground truth" for satellite and model validation and is an important component of aerosol observation system. Due to the different characteristics of background aerosol variability, information obtained at different locations usually has different spatial representativeness, implying that the location should be carefully chosen so that its measurement could be extended to a greater area. In this study, we present an objective observation array design technique that automatically determines the optimal locations with the highest spatial representativeness based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) theory. The ensemble is constructed using aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from five satellite sensors. The optimal locations are solved sequentially by minimizing the total analysis error variance, which means that observations at these locations will reduce the background error variance to the largest extent. The location determined by the algorithm is further verified to have larger spatial representativeness than some other arbitrary location. In addition to the existing active Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, the 40 selected optimal locations are mostly concentrated on regions with both high AOD inhomogeneity and its spatial representativeness, namely, the Sahel, South Africa, East Asia, and North Pacific Islands. These places should be the focuses of establishing future AERONET sites in order to further reduce the uncertainty in the monthly mean AOD. Observations at these locations contribute to approximately 50% of the total background uncertainty reduction.

  16. On the potential contribution of open lead particle emissions to the central Arctic aerosol concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Held

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During the ice-breaker borne ASCOS expedition (Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study direct eddy covariance measurements of aerosol number fluxes were carried out in August 2008 on the edge of an ice floe drifting in the central Arctic Ocean between 2°–10° W longitude and 87°–87.5° N latitude. The median aerosol transfer velocities over different surface types (open water leads, ice ridges, snow and ice surfaces ranged from 0.27 to 0.68 mm s−1 during deposition-dominated episodes. Emission periods were observed more frequently over the open lead, while the snow behaved primarily as a deposition surface. Directly measured aerosol fluxes were compared with particle deposition parameterizations in order to estimate the emission flux from the observed net aerosol flux. Finally, the contribution of the open lead particle source to atmospheric variations in particle number concentration was evaluated and compared with the observed temporal evolution of particle number. The direct emission of aerosol particles from the open lead can only explain 5–10% of the observed particle number variation in the mixing layer close to the surface.

  17. Nature, Origin, Potential Composition, and Climate Impact of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Thomason, L. W.; Natarajan, M.; Bedka, K.; Wienhold, F.; Bian J.; Martinsson, B.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations from SAGE II and CALIPSO indicate that summertime aerosol extinction has more than doubled in the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) since the late 1990s. Here we show remote and in-situ observations, together with results from a chemical transport model (CTM), to explore the likely composition, origin, and radiative forcing of the ATAL. We show in-situ balloon measurements of aerosol backscatter, which support the high levels observed by CALIPSO since 2006. We also show in situ measurements from aircraft, which indicate a predominant carbonaceous contribution to the ATAL (Carbon/Sulfur ratios of 2- 10), which is supported by the CTM results. We show that the peak in ATAL aerosol lags by 1 month the peak in CO from MLS, associated with deep convection over Asia during the summer monsoon. This suggests that secondary formation and growth of aerosols in the upper troposphere on monthly timescales make a significant contribution to ATAL. Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations provide evidence that deep convection over India is a significant source for ATAL through the vertical transport of pollution to the upper troposphere.

  18. Green and ultraviolet pulse generation with a compact, fiber laser, chirped-pulse amplification system for aerosol fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Janet W.; Currie, Marc; Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Eversole, Jay D.

    2010-10-01

    We use a compact chirped-pulse amplified system to harmonically generate ultrashort pulses for aerosol fluorescence measurements. The seed laser is a compact, all-normal dispersion, mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser with a 1050 nm center wavelength operating at 41 MHz. Average powers of more than 1.2 W at 525 nm and 350 mW at 262 nm are generated with biofluorescence measurements as it allows faster sampling rates as well as the higher peak powers as compared to previously demonstrated Q-switched systems while maintaining a pulse period that is longer than the typical fluorescence lifetimes. Thus, the fluorescence excitation can be considered to be quasicontinuous and requires no external synchronization and triggering.

  19. Dry powder aerosols generated by standardized entrainment tubes from drug blends with lactose monohydrate: 1. Albuterol sulfate and disodium cromoglycate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Mansour, Heidi M; Mulder, Tako; McLean, Richard; Langridge, John; Hickey, Anthony J

    2010-08-01

    The major objective of this study was: discriminatory assessment of dry powder aerosol performance using standardized entrainment tubes (SETs) and lactose-based formulations with two model drugs. Drug/lactose interactive physical mixtures (2%w/w) were prepared. Their properties were measured: solid-state characterization of phase behavior and molecular interactions by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction; particle morphology and size by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction; aerosol generation by SETs and characterization by twin-stage liquid impinger and Andersen cascade impactor operated at 60 L/min. The fine particle fraction (FPF) was correlated with SET shear stress (tau(s)), using a novel powder aerosol deaggregation equation (PADE). Drug particles were <5 microm in volume diameter with narrow unimodal distribution (Span <1). The lowest shear SET (tau(s) = 0.624 N/m(2)) gave a higher emitted dose (ED approximately 84-93%) and lower FPF (FPF(6.4) approximately 7-25%). In contrast, the highest shear SET (tau(s) = 13.143 N/m(2)) gave a lower ED (ED approximately 75-89%) and higher FPF (FPF(6.4) approximately 15-46%). The performance of disodium cromoglycate was superior to albuterol sulfate at given tau(s), as was milled with respect to sieved lactose monohydrate. Excellent correlation was observed (R(2) approximately 0.9804-0.9998) when pulmonary drug particle release from the surface of lactose carriers was interpreted by PADE linear regression for dry powder formulation evaluation and performance prediction.

  20. Potential for Usage of Thermoelectric Generators on Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nils; Nielsen, H.K.

    2010-01-01

    The useful waste heat potential for a bulk carrier has been evaluated as a preliminary step towards developing a thermoelectric generator (TEG) waste heat recovery system for ships. A medium-sized bulk carrier produces 6.2 MW of waste heat, and the most promising usable sources for the TEG...

  1. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  2. Insight into Generation and Evolution of Sea-Salt Aerosols from Field Measurements in Diversified Marine and Coastal Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Limin; Shen, Hengqing; Zhu, Yujiao; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    This report focuses on studying generation and/or evolution of sea-salt aerosols (SSA) on basis of measurements in the Northwest Pacific Ocean (NWPO), the marginal seas of China, at sea-beach sites and a semi-urban coastal site in 2012–2015. From measurements in the NWPO, we obtained the smallest generation function of the super-micron SSA mass ([MSSA]) by the local wind comparing to those previously reported. Vessel-caused wave-breaking was found to greatly enhance generation of SSA and increase [MSSA], which was subject to non-natural generation of SSA. However, naturally enhanced generation of SSA was indeed observed in the marginal seas and at the sea-beach site. The two enhancement mechanisms may explain the difference among this and previous studies. Size distributions of super-micron SSA exhibited two modes, i.e., 1–2 μm mode and ~5 μm mode. The 1–2 μm mode of SSA was enhanced more and comparable to the ~5 μm mode under the wind speed >7 m/s. However, the smaller mode SSA was largely reduced from open oceans to sea-beach sites with reducing wind speed. The two super-micron modes were comparable again at a semi-urban coastal site, suggesting that the smaller super-micron mode SSA may play more important roles in atmospheres.

  3. Potential generated by a massive inhomogeneous straight segment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nour-Eddine Najid; El Haj Elourabi; Mohamed Zegoumou

    2011-01-01

    The discoveries of binary asteroids have opened an important new field of research concerning the calculation of potential generated by irregular bodies. Some of them have an elongated shape. A simple model to describe the motion of a test parficle in that kind of potential requires consideration of a finite homogeneous straight segment. We construct this model by adding an inhomogeneous distribution of mass.To be consistent with the geometrical shape of the asteroid, we explore a parabolic profile of the density. We establish the closed analytical form of the potential generated by this inhomogeneous massive segment. The study of the dynamical behavior is fulfilled by the use of Lagrangian formulation, which allows us to calculate some two and three dimensional orbits.

  4. The Impact of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Volcanoes Upon the Earth's Radiative Energy Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for detecting aerosols from biomass burning and dust is developed. The radiative forcing of aerosols is estimated over four major ecosystems in South America. A new smoke and fire detection scheme is developed for biomass burning aerosols over South America. Surface shortware irradiance calculations are developed in the presence of biomass burning aerosols during the SCAR-B experiment. This new approach utilizes ground based, aircraft, and satellite measurements.

  5. Simulated nutrient dissolution of Asian aerosols in various atmospheric waters: Potential links to marine primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Bi, Yanfeng; Zhang, Guosen; Liu, Sumei; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Zhaomeng; Ren, Jingling; Zhang, Guiling

    2017-09-01

    To probe the bioavailability and environmental mobility of aerosol nutrient elements (N, P, Si) in atmospheric water (rainwater, cloud and fog droplets), ten total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected at Fulong Mountain, Qingdao from prevailing air mass trajectory sources during four seasons. Then, a high time-resolution leaching experiment with simulated non-acidic atmospheric water (non-AAW, Milli-Q water, pH 5.5) and subsequently acidic atmospheric water (AAW, hydrochloric acid solution, pH 2) was performed. We found that regardless of the season or source, a monotonous decreasing pattern was observed in the dissolution of N, P and Si compounds in aerosols reacted with non-AAW, and the accumulated dissolved curves of P and Si fit a first-order kinetic model. No additional NO3- + NO2- dissolved out, while a small amount of NH4+ in Asian dust (AD) samples was released in AAW. The similar dissolution behaviour of P and Si from non-AAW to AAW can be explained by the Transition State Theory. The sources of aerosols related to various minerals were the natural reasons that affected the amounts of bioavailable phosphorus and silicon in aerosols (i.e., solubility), which can be explained by the dissolution rate constant of P and Si in non-AAW with lower values in mineral aerosols. The acid/particle ratio and particle/liquid ratio also have a large effect on the solubility of P and Si, which was implied by Pearson correlation analysis. Acid processing of aerosols may have great significance for marine areas with limited P and Si and post-acidification release increases of 1.1-10-fold for phosphorus and 1.2-29-fold for silicon. The decreasing mole ratio of P and Si in AAW indicates the possibility of shifting from a Si-limit to a P-limit in aerosols in the ocean, which promotes the growth of diatoms prior to other algal species.

  6. Aerosol Plume during a Polluted Event Occuring Over Paris Area and its Potential Photochemical Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamiarisoa, H.; Chazette, P.; Sanak, J.; Hauglustaine, D.

    2002-12-01

    As in many big cities, there are several pollution events in Paris area. A thorough understanding of the processes leading on the formation of pollutants and their transport during pollution episodes is necessary. One of the pertinent factors, which contributions on atmospheric chemistry and radiative effect are not yet well known, is the aerosol. ESQUIF (Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l?air en Ile de France) is the first program dedicated to study such issues over the Paris area. It was carried out from summer 1998 to winter 2000 (Menut et al., 2000). To characterize all the properties of the urban aerosol, many campaigns were coordinated using both ground and airborne measurements (Chazette et al., 2000). We are focusing on the 31st of July 2000 where a well-defined polluted plume has been observed. Aerosol number concentrations in different size classes were measured and show that urban aerosol in Paris area is mainly submicronic. The absorbent part of the aerosol, mainly associated to the black carbon component, has been observed to be associated to particles with diameter less than 0.1 æm. The single scattering albedo has been assessed to be close to 0.85 leading to a significant influence on the photochemical chemistry. Indeed, a significant decrease of the daily maximum ozone concentration has been calculated using the INCA model and will be presented. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Programme National de Chimie Atmosphérique, INSU supported this work. REFERENCES Chazette P., H. Randriamiarisoa, J. Sanak, C. Flamant, J. Pelon, M. Sicard, H. Cachier, F. Aulagnier, R. Sarda-Esteve, L. Gomes, S. Alfaro and A. Gaudichet (2001). ESQUIF 2000 : Aerosol survey over the Ile-de-France area, J. Aerosol Sci ., 32/suppl. 1, S439-S440. Menut, L., R. Vautard, C. Flamant, A. Abonnel, M. Beekmann, P. Chazette, P.H. Flamant, D. Gombert, D. Guédalia, D. Kley, M.P. Lefebvre, B. Lossec, D. Martin, G. Mégie, P. Perros, M. Sicard and G. Toupance (2000). Measurements and modelling

  7. Potential climate effect of mineral aerosols over West Africa. Part I: model validation and contemporary climate evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhenming; Wang, Guiling; Pal, Jeremy S.; Yu, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Mineral dusts present in the atmosphere can play an important role in climate over West Africa and surrounding regions. However, current understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model is used to investigate the potential climatic impacts of dust aerosols. Two sets of simulations driven by reanalysis and Earth System Model boundary conditions are performed with and without the representation of dust processes. The model, regardless of the boundary forcing, captures the spatial and temporal variability of the aerosol optical depth and surface concentration. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative at the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in the spring and summer. The presence of mineral dusts causes surface cooling and lower troposphere heating, resulting in a stabilization effect and reduction in precipitation in the northern portion of the monsoon close to the dust emissions region. This results in an enhancement of precipitation to the south. While dusts cause the lower troposphere to stabilize, upper tropospheric cooling makes the region more prone to intense deep convection as is evident by a simulated increase in extreme precipitation. In a companion paper, the impacts of dust emissions on future West African climate are investigated.

  8. Phase, size and shape controlled formation of aerosol generated nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, D., E-mail: d.ponce@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH London (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, M.V. [N.P. Ogarev Mordovian State University, Saransk, Republic of Mordovia 430005 (Russian Federation); Morozov, Yu.G.; Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P. [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Structural and magnetic characterization of aerosol Ni nanoparticles. •Experimental parameters affecting size, shape and composition are discussed. •Larger spherical particles with the highest Ni content are produced by using an Ar flow. •Coalescence rate of primary particles is accelerated by increasing Ni feeding rate. •Ni nanoparticles show bulk-like saturation magnetization values. -- Abstract: Ferromagnetic Ni nanoparticles were formed by a levitation-jet aerosol synthesis under different gas environments and metal precursor feed rates. At a constant background gas inlet temperature, it was found that a higher Ni loading resulted in enhanced particle growth through coalescence. He partial atmosphere favors surface condensation of evaporated Ni atoms over coalescence as the surface area reduction mechanism in the nanoparticles. A flow of 2.5% air in the background gas mixture was enough to oxidize 75% of the initial Ni load, inducing a drastic destabilization of particle size and shape distribution. Regardless of the background inert gas composition, necked nanoparticles were observed in samples prepared with a 1 g/h Ni feed rate, whereas discrete nanoparticles resulted from a higher feed rate of ca. 4 g/h, confirming the key role of Ni loading on the rate of coalescence. The highest saturation magnetization (51.75 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1} measured at 300 K) and the lowest coercivity (0.008 T) were obtained under an Ar flow. Zero-field cooled and field-cooled magnetization curves measured under an applied field of 10{sup −2} T revealed that the blocking processes of nanoparticles are dominated by their particle size distributions, with some features attributable to interparticle interactions.

  9. Multi-generation gas-phase oxidation, equilibrium partitioning, and the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is developed that explicitly takes into account multi-generational oxidation as well as fragmentation of gas-phase compounds, and assumes equilibrium gas-particle partitioning. The model framework requires specification of a limited number of tunable parameters to describe the kinetic evolution of SOA mass, the average oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratio and the mean particle volatility as oxidation proceeds. These parameters describe (1 the relationship between oxygen content and volatility, (2 the probability of fragmentation and (3 the amount of oxygen added per reaction. The time-evolution and absolute value of the simulated SOA mass depends sensitively on all tunable parameters. Of the tunable parameters, the mean O : C is most sensitive to the oxygen/volatility relationship, exhibiting only a weak dependence on the other relationships. The model mean particle O : C produced from a given compound is primarily controlled by the number of carbon atoms comprising the SOA precursor, with some sensitivity to the specified oxygen/volatility relationship. The model is tested against laboratory measurements of time-dependent SOA formation from the photooxidation of α-pinene and n-pentadecane and performs well (after tuning. The model can also accurately simulate the carbon-number dependence of aerosol yields previously observed for oxidation of straight-chain alkanes. This model may provide a generalized framework for the interpretation of laboratory SOA formation experiments in which explicit consideration of multiple-generations of products is required, which is true for all photo-oxidation experiments.

  10. Novel method of generation of Ca(HCO32 and CaCO3 aerosols and first determination of hygroscopic and cloud condensation nuclei activation properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trimborn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral aerosols contain CaCO3 as a reactive component. A novel method to produce CaCO3 aerosol was developed by spraying Ca(HCO32 solution, which was generated from a CaCO3 suspension and CO2. By aerosol mass spectrometry the freshly sprayed and dried aerosol was characterized to consist of pure Ca(HCO32 which under annealing in a tube furnace transformed into CaCO3. Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrated that the particles produced were spherical. The method was able to generate aerosol of sufficient concentration and proper size for the study of physiochemical properties and investigations of heterogeneous reactions of mineral aerosol. The dried Ca(HCO32 particles were somewhat more hygroscopic than CaCO3 particles. However, during humidification a restructuring took place and ∼2/3 of the Ca(HCO32 was transformed to CaCO3. The mixed Ca(HCO32/CaCO3(s particles were insoluble with a growth factor of 1.03 at 95% (hygroscopicity parameter κ=0.011±0.007 relative humidity. This compares to a corresponding growth factor of 1.01 for CaCO3(s (κ=0.0016±0.0004. Mass spectrometric composition analysis, restructuring, and insolubility of the mixed particles suggested that solid Ca(HCO32(s was observed. This would be in contrast to the current belief that Ca(HCO32(s is thermodynamically instable. The CCN activity of Ca(HCO32(s aerosol (κ≈0.15 is remarkably higher than that of CaCO3 aerosol (κ=0.0019±0.0007 and less than that of Ca(NO32. The noticeable but limited solubility of Ca(HCO32 of ≈0.01 mol/l explains limited hygroscopic growth and good CCN activity. Experiments in the Large Jülich Aerosol Chamber indicated that Ca(HCO32(s could exist for several hours under dry atmospheric conditions. However, it was likely buried in a protective layer of CaCO3(s. We conclude that Ca(HCO32 may be formed in the atmosphere in cloud droplets of activated mineral dust by reaction of CaCO3 with CO2 and H2O. The presence of Ca(HCO32 and

  11. Some peculiarities in the magnetic behavior of aerosol generated NiO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Yu.G., E-mail: yurimor@dio.ru [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation); Ortega, D., E-mail: d.ponce@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Davy-Faraday Research Laboratory, The Royal Institution of Great Britain, W1S 4BS London (United Kingdom); Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P., E-mail: i.p.parkin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ London (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, M.V., E-mail: maxim1968@mail.ru [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ London (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-25

    Highlights: •Structural and magnetic characterization of cubic-shaped aerosol NiO nanoparticles. •Procedure for subtracting an underlying diamagnetic contribution. •Correlation between specific surface area of NPs and their diamagnetic susceptibility. •Critical transition temperature associated to a hypothetical superconductive state. -- Abstract: Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NPs) 6–24 nm size have been prepared by a levitation-jet method based on metal vapor condensation in a mixture of gaseous streams of helium and air (or oxygen). Particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) N{sub 2} adsorption and SQUID magnetometry. It is revealed that at room-temperature (RT) the nanoparticles show a small magnetic moment and the magnetic field dependence of their susceptibility a minimum lying below the high-field values. After the appropriate subtraction of both ferromagnetic and paramagnetic components from the initial magnetization curves, the appearance of a diamagnetic contribution is observed. The possible link between the latter contribution and the occurrence of some features related to RT superconductivity in NiO NPs is discussed.

  12. Assessment of Hydrocarbon Generation Potential of Permian Gondwana Coals, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Zakir Hossain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the geochemical characteristics of Gondwana coals from the Barapukuria coal mine, Bangladesh in order to investigate the potential for hydrocarbon generation. A total number of twenty three coal samples were analyzed Rock-Eval pyrolysis, CHNS elemental analyses, maceral analysis and vitrinite reflectance. The samples were collected from drill hole GDH-40 of the Barapukuria coal mine encountered within Gondwana succession of Permian age. The TOC contents of the coal samples range between ~50 and 76 wt.% and the organic matter consists predominantly of type III and type IV kerogen with respect to hydrocarbon generation. The GP, HI, PI and Tmax values range between 7 and 35 mg HC/g rock, 20 and 62 mg HC/g TOC, 0.02 and 0.04, and 430 and 437oC, respectively. The organic matter is mainly gas prone and thermally immature to early mature level. The potential coal bed methane (CBM generation of the Barapukuria basin is estimated to be 11 Gm3. Thus, underground coal gasification (UCG is helpful for better development of subsurface coals at the Barapukuria basin, Bangladesh.

  13. Exploration of Similarity Renormalization Group Generators in 1-Dimensional Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    The Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) is used in nuclear theory to decouple high- and low-momentum components of potentials to improve convergence and thus reduce the computational requirements of many-body calculations. The SRG is a series of unitary transformations defined by a differential equation for the Hamiltonian. The user input into the SRG evolution is a matrix called the generator, which determines to what form the Hamiltonian is transformed. As it is currently used, the SRG evolves Hamiltonian into a band diagonal form. However, due to many-body forces induced by the evolution, the SRG introduces errors when used to renormalize many-body potentials. This makes it unfit for calculations with nuclei larger than a certain size. A recent paper suggests that alternate generators may induce smaller many-body forces. Smaller many-body force induction would allow SRG use to be extended to larger nuclei. I use 1-dimensional systems of two, three, and four bosons to further study the SRG evolution and how alternate generators affect many-body forces induced.

  14. Potential of OFDM for next generation optical access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Daniel; Weis, Erik; Breuer, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the requirements for next generation optical access (NGOA) networks and analyzes the potential of OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing) for the use in such network scenarios. First, we show the motivation for NGOA systems based on the future requirements on FTTH access systems and list the advantages of OFDM in such scenarios. In the next part, the basics of OFDM and different methods to generate and detect optical OFDM signals are explained and analyzed. At the transmitter side the options include intensity modulation and the more advanced field modulation of the optical OFDM signal. At the receiver there is the choice between direct detection and coherent detection. As the result of this discussion we show our vision of the future use of OFDM in optical access networks.

  15. Aerosol generation of As and Se hydrides using a new Flow Blurring® multiple nebulizer for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Catarinie D.; Aguirre Pastor, Miguel Ángel; NÓBREGA, Joaquim A.; Hidalgo Núñez, Montserrat; Canals Hernández, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A new Flow Blurring® multiple nebulizer (FBMN) has been used for the efficient generation of As and Se hydrides directly into the aerosol formed inside the spray chamber before detection by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The FBMN allowed the hydride generation directly into the spray chamber without using any additional device either for solution and gas control or for gas phase separation. Synthetic solutions containing As and Se plus Ca, Mg and K were us...

  16. The economics and ethics of aerosol geoengineering strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Marlos; Keller, Klaus; Tuana, Nancy

    2010-05-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the Earth's climate and impose substantial risks for current and future generations. What are scientifically sound, economically viable, and ethically defendable strategies to manage these climate risks? Ratified international agreements call for a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Recent proposals, however, call for a different approach: geoengineering climate by injecting aerosol precursors into the stratosphere. Published economic studies typically neglect the risks of aerosol geoengineering due to (i) a potential failure to sustain the aerosol forcing and (ii) due to potential negative impacts associated with aerosol forcings. Here we use a simple integrated assessment model of climate change to analyze potential economic impacts of aerosol geoengineering strategies over a wide range of uncertain parameters such as climate sensitivity, the economic damages due to climate change, and the economic damages due to aerosol geoengineering forcings. The simplicity of the model provides the advantages of parsimony and transparency, but it also imposes considerable caveats. For example, the analysis is based on a globally aggregated model and is hence silent on intragenerational distribution of costs and benefits. In addition, the analysis neglects the effects of future learning and is based on a simple representation of climate change impacts. We use this integrated assessment model to show three main points. First, substituting aerosol geoengineering for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions can fail the test of economic efficiency. One key to this finding is that a failure to sustain the aerosol forcing can lead to sizeable and abrupt climatic changes. The monetary damages due to such a discontinuous aerosol geoengineering can dominate the cost-benefit analysis because the monetary damages of climate change are expected to increase with

  17. Potential benefits of second-generation human papillomavirus vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapop Kiatpongsan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current prophylactic vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV target two oncogenic types (16 and 18 that contribute to 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide. Our objective was to quantify the range of additional benefits conferred by second-generation HPV prophylactic vaccines that are expected to expand protection to five additional oncogenic types (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. METHODS: A microsimulation model of HPV and cervical cancer calibrated to epidemiological data from two countries (Kenya and Uganda was used to estimate reductions in lifetime risk of cervical cancer from the second-generation HPV vaccines. We explored the independent and joint impact of uncertain factors (i.e., distribution of HPV types, co-infection with multiple HPV types, and unidentifiable HPV types in cancer and vaccine properties (i.e., cross-protection against non-targeted HPV types, compared against currently-available vaccines. RESULTS: Assuming complete uptake of the second-generation vaccine, reductions in lifetime cancer risk were 86.3% in Kenya and 91.8% in Uganda, representing an absolute increase in cervical cancer reduction of 26.1% in Kenya and 17.9% in Uganda, compared with complete uptake of current vaccines. The range of added benefits was 19.6% to 29.1% in Kenya and 14.0% to 19.5% in Uganda, depending on assumptions of cancers attributable to multiple HPV infections and unidentifiable HPV types. These effects were blunted in both countries when assuming vaccine cross-protection with both the current and second-generation vaccines. CONCLUSION: Second-generation HPV vaccines that protect against additional oncogenic HPV types have the potential to improve cervical cancer prevention. Co-infection with multiple HPV infections and unidentifiable HPV types can influence vaccine effectiveness, but the magnitude of effect may be moderated by vaccine cross-protective effects. These benefits must be weighed against the cost of the vaccines in future

  18. Mechanism of High-Order Harmonic Generation from Periodic Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Tao-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically the Bloch electron wave-packet dynamics in periodic potentials to simulate laser-solid interactions. We introduce a quasi-classical model in the \\emph{k} space combined with the energy band structure to understand the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) process occurring in a subcycle timescale. This model interprets the multiple plateau structure in HHG spectra well and the linear dependence of cutoff energies on the amplitude of vector potential of the laser fields. It also predicts the emission time of HHG, which agrees well with the results by solving the time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation (TDSE). It provides a scheme to reconstruct the energy dispersion relations in Brillouin zone and to control the trajectories of HHG by varying the shape of laser pulses. This model is instructive for experimental measurements.

  19. Role of the Ionic Potential in High Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shafir, D; Higuet, J; Soifer, H; Dagan, M; Descamps, D; Mevel, E; Petit, S; Worner, H J; Pons, B; Dudovich, N; Mairesse, Y

    2013-01-01

    Recollision processes provide direct insight into the structure and dynamics of electronic wave functions. However, the strength of the process sets its basic limitations - the interaction couples numerous degrees of freedom. In this Letter we decouple the basic steps of the process and resolve the role of the ionic potential which is at the heart of a broad range of strong field phenomena. Specifically, we measure high harmonic generation from argon atoms. By manipulating the polarization of the laser field we resolve the vectorial properties of the interaction. Our study shows that the ionic core plays a significant role in all steps of the interaction. In particular, Coulomb focusing induces an angular deflection of the electrons before recombination. A complete spatiospectral analysis reveals the influence of the potential on the spatiotemporal properties of the emitted light.

  20. Examination of the potential impacts of dust and pollution aerosol acting as cloud nucleating aerosol on water resources in the Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Vandana

    In this study we examine the cumulative effect of dust acting as cloud nucleating aerosol (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN), and ice nuclei (IN)) along with anthropogenic aerosol pollution acting primarily as CCN, over the entire Colorado Rocky Mountains from the months of October to April in the year 2004-2005; the snow year. This ˜6.5 months analysis provides a range of snowfall totals and variability in dust and anthropogenic aerosol pollution. The specific objectives of this research is to quantify the impacts of both dust and pollution aerosols on wintertime precipitation in the Colorado Mountains using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). In general, dust enhances precipitation primarily by acting as IN, while aerosol pollution reduces water resources in the CRB via the so-called "spill-over" effect, by enhancing cloud droplet concentrations and reducing riming rates. Dust is more episodic and aerosol pollution is more pervasive throughout the winter season. Combined response to dust and aerosol pollution is a net reduction of water resources in the CRB. The question is by how much are those water resources affected? Our best estimate is that total winter-season precipitation loss for for the CRB the 2004-2005 winter season due to the combined influence of aerosol pollution and dust is 5,380,00 acre-feet of water. Sensitivity studies for different cases have also been run for the specific cases in 2004-2005 winter season to analyze the impact of changing dust and aerosol ratios on precipitation in the Colorado River Basin. The dust is varied from 3 to 10 times in the experiments and the response is found to be non monotonic and depends on various environmental factors. The sensitivity studies show that adding dust in a wet system increases precipitation when IN affects are dominant. For a relatively dry system high concentrations of dust can result in over-seeding the clouds and reductions in precipitation

  1. Perceptual learning of acoustic noise generates memory-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrillon, Thomas; Kouider, Sid; Agus, Trevor; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Experience continuously imprints on the brain at all stages of life. The traces it leaves behind can produce perceptual learning [1], which drives adaptive behavior to previously encountered stimuli. Recently, it has been shown that even random noise, a type of sound devoid of acoustic structure, can trigger fast and robust perceptual learning after repeated exposure [2]. Here, by combining psychophysics, electroencephalography (EEG), and modeling, we show that the perceptual learning of noise is associated with evoked potentials, without any salient physical discontinuity or obvious acoustic landmark in the sound. Rather, the potentials appeared whenever a memory trace was observed behaviorally. Such memory-evoked potentials were characterized by early latencies and auditory topographies, consistent with a sensory origin. Furthermore, they were generated even on conditions of diverted attention. The EEG waveforms could be modeled as standard evoked responses to auditory events (N1-P2) [3], triggered by idiosyncratic perceptual features acquired through learning. Thus, we argue that the learning of noise is accompanied by the rapid formation of sharp neural selectivity to arbitrary and complex acoustic patterns, within sensory regions. Such a mechanism bridges the gap between the short-term and longer-term plasticity observed in the learning of noise [2, 4-6]. It could also be key to the processing of natural sounds within auditory cortices [7], suggesting that the neural code for sound source identification will be shaped by experience as well as by acoustics.

  2. Worldwide impact of aerosol's time scale on the predicted long-term concentrating solar power potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A; Gueymard, Christian A; Santos-Alamillos, Francisco J; Pozo-Vázquez, David

    2016-08-10

    Concentrating solar technologies, which are fuelled by the direct normal component of solar irradiance (DNI), are among the most promising solar technologies. Currently, the state-of the-art methods for DNI evaluation use datasets of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with only coarse (typically monthly) temporal resolution. Using daily AOD data from both site-specific observations at ground stations as well as gridded model estimates, a methodology is developed to evaluate how the calculated long-term DNI resource is affected by using AOD data averaged over periods from 1 to 30 days. It is demonstrated here that the use of monthly representations of AOD leads to systematic underestimations of the predicted long-term DNI up to 10% in some areas with high solar resource, which may result in detrimental consequences for the bankability of concentrating solar power projects. Recommendations for the use of either daily or monthly AOD data are provided on a geographical basis.

  3. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell's equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Lienard-Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular delta-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is a) linear, b) accelerated unbounded, c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a delta-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a re...

  4. Prediction of the acid generating potential of coal mining spoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monterroso, C.; Macias, F. [Universidad de Santiago, Santiago (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola

    1998-07-01

    The sulfide oxidation impact on mined land reclamation makes it necessary for mine spoils to be classified according to their acidifying potential. In this paper predictions were made of the acid generating potential of sulfide-containing spoils from the Puentes lignite mine (Galicia, NW Spain), and the limits of sulfur contents allowable for their storage in aerobic conditions, were established. Using samples of fresh spoils, analyses were made of the content and speciation of sulfur, pH was measured after oxidation of the sample with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (pH of oxidation = pH{sub OX}), and titration of the oxidation extract with 0.1N NaOH to pH = 7 was carried out (Net Acid Production = NAP). The total sulfur content (S{sub T}) varied between {lt} 0.01% and {gt} 3%, with pyritic-S being the most common form ({gt} 80%). pH{sub OX} varied between 1.6 and 6.4 and NAP between 1.2 and 85.0 Kg-CaCO{sub 3}t{sup -1}. A high correlation was found between the NAP and the S{sub T}(r-0.98, p{lt} 0.001). Spoils with S{sub T} {gt} 0.15% cause high risks of mine-soil acidification, and create the need for large doses of CaCO{sub 3} to be used on final surface of the mine dump. Use of fly ash, produced from the combustion of lignite, as an alternative to commercial lime is more effective in the control of acidity generated by spoils with high S{sub T}. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Learning about the Milky Way potential with generative stream models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Streams are formed when satellites of a galaxy are pulled apart by tidal forces and the stars then drift apart because they are placed on different orbits. Therefore it is the difference between the orbits that determines the shape of the stream (rather than the stream nearly following a single orbit). This means that a good model of the structure of a stream can be defined in terms of orbital frequencies and angle coordinates.I’ll talk about a new method for creating generative models of streams based on this insight. Given that the orbital frequencies are directly related to the actions, the method of torus modelling (which finds the orbits corresponding to a given value of actions) is ideally suited to the problem. I’ll show results from a new method that interpolates between orbits (tori), to rapidly generate stream models that can be used to determine the gravitational potential that the stream is moving in. This method has now been made publicly available.

  6. The effect of actuator nozzle designs on the electrostatic charge generated in pressurised metered dose inhaler aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Young, Paul M; Fletcher, David F; Chan, Hak Kim; Long, Edward; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Traini, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the influence of different actuator nozzle designs on aerosol electrostatic charges and aerosol performances for pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Four actuator nozzle designs (flat, curved flat, cone and curved cone) were manufactured using insulating thermoplastics (PET and PTFE) and conducting metal (aluminium) materials. Aerosol electrostatic profiles of solution pMDI formulations containing propellant HFA 134a with different ethanol concentration and/or model drug beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) were studied using a modified electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) for all actuator designs and materials. The mass of the deposited drug was analysed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both curved nozzle designs for insulating PET and PTFE actuators significantly influenced aerosol electrostatics and aerosol performance compared with conducting aluminium actuator, where reversed charge polarity and higher throat deposition were observed with pMDI formulation containing BDP. Results are likely due to the changes in plume geometry caused by the curved edge nozzle designs and the bipolar charging nature of insulating materials. This study demonstrated that actuator nozzle designs could significantly influence the electrostatic charges profiles and aerosol drug deposition pattern of pMDI aerosols, especially when using insulating thermoplastic materials where bipolar charging is more dominant.

  7. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzurli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.azzurli@gmail.com [Scuola Galileiana di Studi Superiori, Università degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Lechner, Kurt, E-mail: lechner@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Liénard–Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular δ-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is (a) linear, (b) accelerated unbounded, (c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a δ-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a regular principal-part type distribution diverging on the same singularity-string. - Highlights: • First exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for massless charges in arbitrary motion. • Explicit expressions of electromagnetic fields and potentials. • Derivations are rigorous and based on distribution theory. • The form of the field depends heavily on whether the motion is bounded or unbounded. • The electromagnetic field contains unexpected Dirac-delta-function contributions.

  8. Real refractive indices of α- and β-pinene and toluene secondary organic aerosols generated from ozonolysis and photo-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajin; Barkey, Brian; Paulson, Suzanne E.

    2010-12-01

    The refractive index is the fundamental property controlling aerosol optical properties. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) real refractive indices (mr) were derived from polar nephelometer measurements using parallel and perpendicular polarized 670 nm light, using a genetic algorithm method with Mie-Lorenz scattering theory and measured particle size distributions. The absolute error associated with the mr retrieval is ±0.03, and the instrument has sufficient sensitivity to achieve reliable retrievals for particles larger than about 200 nm. SOA generated by oxidizing α-pinene, β-pinene, and toluene with ozone and NOx/sunlight are explored. Retrieved refractive indices for the SOA vary between 1.38 and 1.61, depending on several factors. For α- and β-pinene ozonolysis, SOA mr ranges from 1.4 to 1.5 and, within the resolution of our method and bounds of our experiments, is not affected by the addition of an OH scavenger, and is only slightly dependent on the aerosol mass concentration. For photochemically generated SOA, mr generally increases as experiments progress, ranging from about 1.4 to 1.53 for α-pinene, 1.38 to 1.53 for β-pinene, and 1.4 to 1.6 for toluene. The pinene SOA mr appear to decrease somewhat toward the end of the experiments. Aspects of the data suggest aerosol mass concentration, oxidation chemistry, temperature, and aerosol aging may all influence the refractive index. There is more work to be done before recommendations can be made for atmospheric applications, but our calculations of the resulting asymmetry parameter indicate that a single value for SOA refractive index will not be sufficient to accurately model radiative transfer.

  9. Multi-generation gas-phase oxidation, equilibrium partitioning, and the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new statistical model of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation is developed that explicitly takes into account multi-generational oxidation as well as fragmentation of gas-phase compounds. The model framework requires three tunable parameters to describe the kinetic evolution of SOA mass, the average oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratio and the mean particle volatility as oxidation proceeds. These parameters describe (1 the relationship between oxygen content and volatility, (2 the probability of fragmentation and (3 the amount of oxygen added per reaction. The time-evolution and absolute value of the SOA mass depends sensitively on all three tunable parameters. Of the tunable parameters, the mean O:C is most sensitive to the oxygen/volatility relationship, exhibiting only a weak dependence on the other two. The mean particle O:C produced from a given compound is primarily controlled by the number of carbon atoms comprising the SOA precursor. It is found that gas-phase compounds with larger than 11 carbon atoms are unlikely to form SOA with O:C values >0.4, which suggests that so-called "intermediate-volatility" organic compounds (IVOCs and "semi-volatile" organic compounds (SVOCs are not major contributors to the ambient SOA burden when high O:C ratios are observed, especially at short atmospheric times. The model is tested against laboratory measurements of SOA formation from the photooxidation of α-pinene and n-pentadecane and performs well (after tuning. This model may provide a generalized framework for the interpretation of laboratory SOA formation experiments in which explicit consideration of multiple-generations of products is required, which is true for all photo-oxidation experiments.

  10. Ambient measurement of fluorescent aerosol particles with a WIBS in the Yangtze River Delta of China: potential impacts of combustion-related aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiawei; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Minghui; Kuhn, Uwe; Xie, Zhouqing; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of aerosol particles in a polluted atmosphere were studied using a wideband integrated bioaerosol spectrometer (WIBS-4A) in Nanjing, Yangtze River Delta area of China. We observed strong diurnal and day-to-day variations of fluorescent aerosol particles (FAPs). The average number concentrations of FAPs (1-15 µm) detected in the three WIBS measurement channels (FL1: 0.6 cm-3, FL2: 3.4 cm-3, FL3: 2.1 cm-3) were much higher than those observed in forests and rural areas, suggesting that FAPs other than bioaerosols were detected. We found that the number fractions of FAPs were positively correlated with the black carbon mass fraction, especially for the FL1 channel, indicating a large contribution of combustion-related aerosols. To distinguish bioaerosols from combustion-related FAPs, we investigated two classification schemes for use with WIBS data. Our analysis suggests a strong size dependence for the fractional contributions of different types of FAPs. In the FL3 channel, combustion-related particles seem to dominate the 1-2 µm size range while bioaerosols dominate the 2-5 µm range. The number fractions of combustion-related particles and non-combustion-related particles to total aerosol particles were ˜ 11 and ˜ 5 %, respectively.

  11. Influenza A virus transmission via respiratory aerosols or droplets as it relates to pandemic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Mathilde; Fouchier, Ron A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Many respiratory viruses of humans originate from animals. For instance, there are now eight paramyxoviruses, four coronaviruses and four orthomxoviruses that cause recurrent epidemics in humans but were once confined to other hosts. In the last decade, several members of the same virus families have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans. Fortunately, these viruses have not become established in humans, because they lacked the ability of sustained transmission between humans. However, these outbreaks highlighted the lack of understanding of what makes a virus transmissible. In part triggered by the relatively high frequency of occurrence of influenza A virus zoonoses and pandemics, the influenza research community has started to investigate the viral genetic and biological traits that drive virus transmission via aerosols or respiratory droplets between mammals. Here we summarize recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for airborne transmission of zoonotic influenza viruses of subtypes H5, H7 and H9 and pandemic viruses of subtypes H1, H2 and H3. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of respiratory virus transmission is not only key from a basic scientific perspective, but may also aid in assessing the risks posed by zoonotic viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks. PMID:26385895

  12. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model – Part 1: Assessing the influence of constrained multi-generational ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Jathar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-generational oxidation of volatile organic compound (VOC oxidation products can significantly alter the mass, chemical composition and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA compared to calculations that consider only the first few generations of oxidation reactions. However, the most commonly used state-of-the-science schemes in 3-D regional or global models that account for multi-generational oxidation (1 consider only functionalization reactions but do not consider fragmentation reactions, (2 have not been constrained to experimental data; and (3 are added on top of existing parameterizations. The incomplete description of multi-generational oxidation in these models has the potential to bias source apportionment and control calculations for SOA. In this work, we used the Statistical Oxidation Model (SOM of Cappa and Wilson (2012, constrained by experimental laboratory chamber data, to evaluate the regional implications of multi-generational oxidation considering both functionalization and fragmentation reactions. SOM was implemented into the regional UCD/CIT air quality model and applied to air quality episodes in California and the eastern US. The mass, composition and properties of SOA predicted using SOM are compared to SOA predictions generated by a traditional "two-product" model to fully investigate the impact of explicit and self-consistent accounting of multi-generational oxidation. Results show that SOA mass concentrations predicted by the UCD/CIT-SOM model are very similar to those predicted by a two-product model when both models use parameters that are derived from the same chamber data. Since the two-product model does not explicitly resolve multi-generational oxidation reactions, this finding suggests that the chamber data used to parameterize the models captures the majority of the SOA mass formation from multi-generational oxidation under the conditions tested. Consequently, the use of low and high NOx yields

  13. The multi-viewing, multi-channel, multi-polarisation imager on board the future EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation and its application for the aerosol retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Munro, Rose; Lang, Ruediger; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Huckle, Roger; Marbach, Thierry; Poli, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is a global phenomenon. Due to the small size of aerosol particles (typically, 0.1 - 10 micrometers) they are rarely observed by the naked eye. Nevertheless aerosol particles are present in atmospheric air in variable numbers (typically, 100-1000 particles per cubic centimeter of atmospheric air). The particles have different chemical composition, origin, shapes, and internal structure (e.g., dust particles covered by ice, etc.). They influence human health, air quality, climate, downwelling and upwelling radiation, clouds, and precipitation. It is therefore important to monitor aerosol properties on a global scale. Global scale information can only be provided by satellite observations and algorithms for the production of satellite-based aerosol products have been in use already for more than 40 years. In this work we present an update on the recently developed operational EUMETSAT aerosol retrieval algorithm for the Multi-viewing, multi-channel, multi-polarisation Imager (3MI) which will fly on board the future EUMETSAT Polar System Second Generation (EPS-SG), planned for launch in the 2021 timeframe. The 3MI is a two - dimensional push - broom radiometer dedicated to aerosol and cloud characterization for climate monitoring, air quality forecasting and numerical weather prediction with heritage from the POLDER instrument. The first three components of the Stokes vector of the reflected light (I, Q, and U) will be measured at 9 channels in the spectral range from 410 to 2130nm for up to 14 observation directions. Intensity measurements only will be performed at 763, 765, and 910nm. This enables the determination of the degree of linear polarization of reflected light and also the direction of the oscillations of the electric vector in the light beam. The 3MI design consists of a filter and polariser wheel rotating in front of the detectors. For design purposes the spectral channels have been split into VNIR and SWIR filters and polarisers with

  14. Generating Property-Directed Potential Invariants By Backward Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Champion

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issue of lemma generation in a k-induction-based formal analysis of transition systems, in the linear real/integer arithmetic fragment. A backward analysis, powered by quantifier elimination, is used to output preimages of the negation of the proof objective, viewed as unauthorized states, or gray states. Two heuristics are proposed to take advantage of this source of information. First, a thorough exploration of the possible partitionings of the gray state space discovers new relations between state variables, representing potential invariants. Second, an inexact exploration regroups and over-approximates disjoint areas of the gray state space, also to discover new relations between state variables. k-induction is used to isolate the invariants and check if they strengthen the proof objective. These heuristics can be used on the first preimage of the backward exploration, and each time a new one is output, refining the information on the gray states. In our context of critical avionics embedded systems, we show that our approach is able to outperform other academic or commercial tools on examples of interest in our application field. The method is introduced and motivated through two main examples, one of which was provided by Rockwell Collins, in a collaborative formal verification framework.

  15. Influence of fuel ethanol content on primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation potential for a modern flex-fuel gasoline vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Hilkka; Karjalainen, Panu; Saukko, Erkka; Saarikoski, Sanna; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Simonen, Pauli; Murtonen, Timo; Dal Maso, Miikka; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Bloss, Matthew; Ahlberg, Erik; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Pagels, Joakim; Brune, William H.; Keskinen, Jorma; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Hillamo, Risto; Rönkkö, Topi

    2017-04-01

    The effect of fuel ethanol content (10, 85 and 100 %) on primary emissions and on subsequent secondary aerosol formation was investigated for a Euro 5 flex-fuel gasoline vehicle. Emissions were characterized during a New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) using a comprehensive set-up of high time-resolution instruments. A detailed chemical composition of the exhaust particulate matter (PM) was studied using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), and secondary aerosol formation was studied using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber. For the primary gaseous compounds, an increase in total hydrocarbon emissions and a decrease in aromatic BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) compounds was observed when the amount of ethanol in the fuel increased. In regard to particles, the largest primary particulate matter concentrations and potential for secondary particle formation was measured for the E10 fuel (10 % ethanol). As the ethanol content of the fuel increased, a significant decrease in the average primary particulate matter concentrations over the NEDC was found. The PM emissions were 0.45, 0.25 and 0.15 mg m-3 for E10, E85 and E100, respectively. Similarly, a clear decrease in secondary aerosol formation potential was observed with a larger contribution of ethanol in the fuel. The secondary-to-primary PM ratios were 13.4 and 1.5 for E10 and E85, respectively. For E100, a slight decrease in PM mass was observed after the PAM chamber, indicating that the PM produced by secondary aerosol formation was less than the PM lost through wall losses or the degradation of the primary organic aerosol (POA) in the chamber. For all fuel blends, the formed secondary aerosol consisted mostly of organic compounds. For E10, the contribution of organic compounds containing oxygen increased from 35 %, measured for primary organics, to 62 % after the PAM chamber. For E85, the contribution of organic compounds containing oxygen increased from 42 % (primary) to 57

  16. Development, Application, and Transition of Aerosol and Trace Gas Products Derived from Next-Generation Satellite Observations to Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily; Naeger, Aaron; Zavodsky, Bradley; McGrath, Kevin; LaFontaine, Frank

    2016-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has a history of successfully transitioning unique observations and research capabilities to the operational weather community to improve short-term forecasts. SPoRTstrives to bridge the gap between research and operations by maintaining interactive partnerships with end users to develop products that match specific forecast challenges, provide training, and assess the products in the operational environment. This presentation focuses on recent product development, application, and transition of aerosol and trace gas products to operations for specific forecasting applications. Recent activities relating to the SPoRT ozone products, aerosol optical depth composite product, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol index products are discussed.

  17. Expert consensus on an in vitro approach to assess pulmonary fibrogenic potential of aerosolized nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report from an international workshop with the goal of reviewing the state-of-the-science and determine the technical needs to develop an in vitro system that will reduce and eventually replace the use of animals for evaluating the potential inhalation toxicity of nanomaterials (...

  18. A simple model for the generation of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; Kingma, CM

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the mechanism by which the vestibular evoked myogenic potential is generated. Methods: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential generation is modeled by adding a large number of muscle motor unit action potentials. These action potentials occur randomly in time along a 100 ms long

  19. Generation of directional EOF by interactive oscillatory zeta potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2008-11-01

    A steady directional EOF due to a nonlinear interaction between oscillatory axial electrical fields and oscillatory wall potentials (zeta potentials) is presented. This is a new mechanism to produce such a mean flow. It is found that the flow velocity depends not on the external driving frequency but on the phase angle difference between the electric fields and the zeta potentials. The formulation can also be reduced to the static EOF straightforwardly. For the purpose of theoretical demonstration, we use the Debye-Huckel approximation for the zeta potential. Results of planar and cylindrical capillaries are given.

  20. Molecular composition of aged secondary organic aerosol generated from a mixture of biogenic volatile compounds using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kourtchev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Field observations over the past decade indicate that a significant fraction of organic aerosol in remote areas may contain highly oxidised molecules. Aerosol processing or further oxidation (ageing of organic aerosol has been suggested to be responsible for their formation through heterogeneous uptake of oxidants and multigenerational oxidation of vapours by OH radicals. In this study we investigated the influence of several ageing processes on the molecular composition of secondary organic aerosols (SOA using direct infusion and liquid chromatography ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. SOA was formed in simulation chamber experiments from ozonolysis of a mixture of four biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC: α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene and isoprene. The SOA was subsequently aged under three different sets of conditions: in the dark in the presence of residual ozone, with UV irradiation and OH radicals, and using UV light only. Among all studied conditions, only OH radical-initiated ageing was found to influence the molecular composition of the aerosol and showed an increase in carbon oxidation state (OSC and elemental O/C ratios of the SOA components. None of the ageing processes produced an observable effect on the oligomers formed from ozonolysis of the BVOC mixture, which were found to be equally abundant in both "fresh" and "aged" SOA. Additional experiments using α-pinene as the sole precursor demonstrated that oligomers are an important group of compounds in SOA produced from both ozonolysis and OH radical-initiated oxidation processes; however, a completely different set of oligomers is formed under these two oxidation regimes. SOA from the OH radical-initiated α-pinene oxidation had a significantly higher overall OSC and O/C compared to that from pure ozonolysis experiments confirming that the OH radical reaction is more likely to be responsible for the occurrence of highly oxidised species in ambient biogenic SOA.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles: reactive oxygen species generation and potential therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang; Hilt, J. Zach

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a major role in various cellular pathways, via Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. ROS act as a double-edged sword inside the body. At normal conditions, the generation of ROS is in balance with their elimination by scavenger systems, and they can promote cell proliferation as well as differentiation. However, at an increased level, they can cause damages to protein, lead to cellular apoptosis, and contribute to many diseases including cancer. Many recent studies proposed a variety of strategies to either suppress toxicity of ROS generation or exploit the elevated ROS levels for cancer therapy.

  2. Aerosol absorption measurement with a sinusoidal phase modulating fiber optic photo thermal interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuwang; Shao, Shiyong; Mei, Haiping; Rao, Ruizhong

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol light absorption plays an important role in the earth's atmosphere direct and semi-direct radiate forcing, simultaneously, it also has a huge influence on the visibility impairment and laser engineering application. Although various methods have been developed for measuring aerosol light absorption, huge challenge still remains in precision, accuracy and temporal resolution. The main reason is that, as a part of aerosol light extinction, aerosol light absorption always generates synchronously with aerosol light scattering, and unfortunately aerosol light scattering is much stronger in most cases. Here, a novel photo-thermal interferometry is proposed only for aerosol absorption measurement without disturbance from aerosol scattering. The photo-thermal interferometry consists of a sinusoidal phase-modulating single mode fiber-optic interferometer. The thermal dissipation, caused by aerosol energy from photo-thermal conversion when irritated by pump laser through interferometer, is detected. This approach is completely insensitive to aerosol scattering, and the single mode fiber-optic interferometer is compact, low-cost and insensitive to the polarization shading. The theory of this technique is illustrated, followed by the basic structure of the sinusoidal phase-modulating fiber-optic interferometer and demodulation algorithms. Qualitative and quantitative analysis results show that the new photo-thermal interference is a potential approach for aerosol absorption detection and environmental pollution detection.

  3. Potential of polarization/Raman lidar to separate fine dust, coarse dust, maritime, and anthropogenic aerosol profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2017-09-01

    We applied the recently introduced polarization lidar-photometer networking (POLIPHON) technique for the first time to triple-wavelength polarization lidar measurements at 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The lidar observations were performed at Barbados during the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in the summer of 2014. The POLIPHON method comprises the traditional lidar technique to separate mineral dust and non-dust backscatter contributions and the new, extended approach to separate even the fine and coarse dust backscatter fractions. We show that the traditional and the advanced method are compatible and lead to a consistent set of dust and non-dust profiles at simplified, less complex aerosol layering and mixing conditions as is the case over the remote tropical Atlantic. To derive dust mass concentration profiles from the lidar observations, trustworthy extinction-to-volume conversion factors for fine, coarse, and total dust are needed and obtained from an updated, extended Aerosol Robotic Network sun photometer data analysis of the correlation between the fine, coarse and total dust volume concentration and the respective fine, coarse, and total dust extinction coefficient for all three laser wavelengths. Conversion factors (total volume to extinction) for pure marine aerosol conditions and continental anthropogenic aerosol situations are presented in addition. As a new feature of the POLIPHON data analysis, the Raman lidar method for particle extinction profiling is used to identify the aerosol type (marine or anthropogenic) of the non-dust aerosol fraction. The full POLIPHON methodology was successfully applied to a SALTRACE case and the results are discussed. We conclude that the 532 nm polarization lidar technique has many advantages in comparison to 355 and 1064 nm polarization lidar approaches and leads to the most robust and accurate POLIPHON products.

  4. Energy Generation Potential of West African Ocean Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Department of Marine Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Federal University of Petroleum Resources, P.M.B. 1221 ... West Africa in a streamed regular supply. ... system; Design of ocean current generating system whose efficiency relies .... Offloading Liquefied Natural Gas Facility for Offshore West Africa.

  5. Numerical Grid Generation and Potential Airfoil Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    field vectors tangent to the coordinate curve passing across these surfaces. The most common form is transfinite interpolation, which is es- sentially an...interpolation between curves or surfaces rather than points. It is called " transfinite " because it matches coordinate values on an entire curve or...surface. For example, Erikson [5] applies transfinite interpolation for three -dimensional grid generation about wing - body configurations. Some

  6. Evaluation of global onshore wind energy potential and generation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J; Clarke, Leon

    2012-07-17

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance, land suitability factors, cost assumptions, and explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region and with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global economic wind potential under central assumptions, that is, intermediate between optimistic and pessimistic, is estimated to be approximately 119.5 petawatt hours per year (13.6 TW) at less than 9 cents/kWh. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly wind speed (varying by -70% to +450% at less than 9 cents/kWh), land suitability (by -55% to +25%), turbine density (by -60% to +80%), and cost and financing options (by -20% to +200%), many of which have important policy implications. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  7. Modulated exponential films generated by surface acoustic waves and their role in liquid wicking and aerosolization at a pinned drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taller, Daniel; Go, David B.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2013-05-01

    The exponentially decaying acoustic pressure of scattered surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the contact line of a liquid film pinned to filter paper is shown to sustain a high curvature conic tip with micron-sized modulations whose dimension grows exponentially from the tip. The large negative capillary pressure in the film, necessary for offsetting the large positive acoustic pressure at the contact line, also creates significant negative hydrodynamic pressure and robust wicking action through the paper. An asymptotic analysis of this intricate pressure matching between the quasistatic conic film and bulk drop shows that the necessary SAW power to pump liquid from the filter paper and aerosolize, expressed in terms of the acoustic pressure scaled by the drop capillary pressure, grows exponentially with respect to twice the acoustic decay constant multiplied by the drop length, with a universal preexponential coefficient. Global rapid aerosolization occurs at a SAW power twice as high, beyond which the wicking rate saturates.

  8. Potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol in the Mexico City region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2010-01-01

    variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40–60% of the total SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from aromatics, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively downwind. Similar to aircraft observations, the predicted OA/ΔCO ratio for the ROB case increases from 20–30 μg sm−3 ppm−1 up to 60–70 μg sm−3 ppm−1 between a fresh and 1-day aged air mass, while the GRI case produces a 30–40% higher OA growth than observed. The predicted average O/C ratio of total OA for the ROB case is 0.16 at T0, substantially below observed value of 0.5. A much better agreement for O/C ratios and temporal variability (R2=0.63 is achieved with the updated GRI treatment. Both treatments show a deficiency in regard to POA evolution with a tendency to over-evaporate POA upon dilution of the urban plume suggesting that atmospheric HOA may be less volatile than assumed in these parameterizations. This study highlights the important potential role of S/IVOC chemistry in the SOA budget in this region, and highlights the need for improvements in current parameterizations. We note that our simulations did not include other proposed pathways of SOA formation such as formation from very volatile species like glyoxal, which can also contribute SOA mass and especially increase the O/C ratio.

  9. Influence of physical properties and chemical composition of sample on formation of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond laser ablation at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa, E-mail: mhola@sci.muni.c [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Konecna, Veronika [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of sample properties and composition on the size and concentration of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser ablation at 213 nm was investigated for three sets of different materials, each containing five specimens with a similar matrix (Co-cemented carbides with a variable content of W and Co, steel samples with minor differences in elemental content and silica glasses with various colors). The concentration of ablated particles (particle number concentration, PNC) was measured in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 mum) using an optical aerosol spectrometer. The shapes and volumes of the ablation craters were obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by an optical profilometer, respectively. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using SEM. The results of particle concentration measurements showed a significant dominance of particles smaller than 250 nm in comparison with larger particles, irrespective of the kind of material. Even if the number of particles larger than 0.25 mum is negligible (up to 0.1%), the volume of large particles that left the ablation cell can reach 50% of the whole particle volume depending on the material. Study of the ablation craters and the laser-generated particles showed a various number of particles produced by different ablation mechanisms (particle splashing or condensation), but the similar character of released particles for all materials was observed by SEM after particle collection on the membrane filter. The created aerosol always consisted of two main structures - spherical particles with diameters from tenths to units of micrometers originally ejected from the molten surface layer and mum-sized 'fibres' composed of primary agglomerates with diameters in the range between tens and hundreds of nanometers. The shape and structure of ablation craters were in good agreement with particle concentration

  10. Ability of device to collect bacteria from cough aerosols generated by adults with cystic fibrosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Ku

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying lung pathogens and acute spikes in lung counts remain a challenge in the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. Bacteria from the deep lung may be sampled from aerosols produced during coughing. Methods: A new device was used to collect and measure bacteria levels from cough aerosols of patients with CF. Sputum and oral specimens were also collected and measured for comparison. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Streptococcus mitis were detected in specimens using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR molecular assays. Results: Twenty adult patients with CF and 10 healthy controls participated. CF related bacteria (CFRB were detected in 13/20 (65% cough specimens versus 15/15 (100% sputum specimens. Commensal S. mitis was present in 0/17 (0%, p=0.0002 cough specimens and 13/14 (93% sputum samples. In normal controls, no bacteria were collected in cough specimens but 4/10 (40% oral specimens were positive for CFRB. Conclusions: Non-invasive cough aerosol collection may detect lower respiratory pathogens in CF patients, with similar specificity and sensitivity to rates detected by BAL, without contamination by oral CFRB or commensal bacteria.

  11. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikawa, Eri; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), a sulfate (SO 42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct radiative effects and indirect effects on clouds, SO 42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO 2, SO 42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing (RF). Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to RF in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause approximately 470 000 premature deaths in China and an additional 30 000 deaths globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a 50% reduction in premature deaths from the 2000 level to 240 000 in China and 10 000 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths increase 50% from the 2000 level to 720 000 in China and to 40 000 elsewhere. Because the negative RF from SO 42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct RF of -74 mW m -2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m -2 in 2030 depending on the emissions scenario. Our analysis indicates that increased effort to reduce greenhouse gases is essential to address climate change as China's anticipated reduction of aerosols will result in the

  12. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo exploration of charge effects on aerosol evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsmeier, John F.

    Aerosols are potentially generated both during normal operations in a gas cooled Generation IV nuclear reactor and in all nuclear reactors during accident scenarios. These aerosols can become charged due to aerosol generation processes, radioactive decay of associated fission products, and ionizing atmospheres. Thus the role of charge on aerosol evolution, and hence on the nuclear source term, has been an issue of interest. There is a need for both measurements and modeling to quantify this role as these effects are not currently accounted for in nuclear reactor modeling and simulation codes. In this study the role of charge effects on the evolution of a spatially homogenous aerosol was explored via the application of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The primary mechanisms explored were those of coagulation and electrostatic dispersion. This technique was first benchmarked by comparing the results obtained from both monodisperse and polydisperse DSMC evolution of charged aerosols with the results obtained by respectively deterministic and sectional techniques. This was followed by simulation of several polydisperse charged aerosols. Additional comparisons were made between the evolutions of charged and uncharged aerosols. The results obtained using DSMC in simple cases were comparable to those obtained from other techniques, without the limitations associated with more complex cases. Multicomponent aerosols of different component densities were also evaluated to determine the charge effects on their evolution. Charge effects can be significant and further explorations are warranted.

  13. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunoiu M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator’s body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%, equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  14. Infinitesimal generators and quasi-units in potential theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsove, M; Leutwiler, H

    1975-07-01

    The underlying structure is taken as a strongly superharmonic cone [unk], defined as a partially ordered abelian semigroup with identity 0 which admits a multiplication by nonnegative scalars and satisfies two fundamental axioms of a potentialtheoretic character. In terms of a fixed nonzero element e there is introduced on [unk] a one-parameter family of nonlinear operators S(lambda) (lambda >/= 0) closely connected with the abstract theory of quasibounded and singular elements. The semigroup {S(lambda)} admits an infinitesimal generator A, and the elements invariant under A, called quasi-units, generalize the Yosida quasi-units in the theory of Riesz spaces. Quasi-units in [unk] are studied, both from a potentialtheoretic and a function-alanalytic viewpoint, culminating in a spectral representation theorem for quasi-bounded elements which extends the classical Freudenthal spectral theorem of Riesz space theory.

  15. Identifying potential solar power generation sites using satellite apt images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawz-Ul-Haq, K. R.; Siddiqui, Z. R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, satellite APT images have been used to study cloud-cover over Pakistan, so as to determine those areas which have the least frequency of cloudiness. Such areas are likely to receive maximum insolation, and have been shown on a contour map of Pakistan. It is observed that more than half of Pakistan is highly sunny, and has many promising areas for establishing large scale solar electric power generation stations. It is further observed that, some of the productive mineral-rich areas in remote parts, such as Chagai, are highly cloud-free, therefore, it may be possible to meet their mining needs through solar energy. Thus Pakistan, on the threshold of industrialization, has high prospects of obtaining `clean' energy, free of greenhouse gases.

  16. Effect of HC/NOx ratio on the real refractive indices of secondary organic aerosol generated from photooxidation of limonene and α-pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Barkey, B.; Paulson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    The refractive index is the fundamental property controlling aerosol optical properties. The real refractive indices (mr) of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the photooxidation of limonene and α-pinene using different HC/NOx ratios are presented. Limonene and α-pinene are estimated to account for about 16 % and 25 % of global monoterpene emissions. Although the limonene emission rate is lower than of α-pinene, it has much higher SOA yields presumabely because it is doubly unsaturated. Refractive indices were retrieved from polar nephelometer measurements using parallel and perpendicular polarized 532 nm light. Retrievals were performed with a genetic algorithm method using Mie-Lorenz scattering theory and measured particle size distributions. The absolute error associated with the mr retrieval is ± 0.03, and the instrument has sufficient sensitivity to achieve reliable retrievals for aerosol mass concentrations of about 20 μg/m3 with particles larger than about 100 nm in diameter. Examination of the limonene SOA data suggests the most important factor controlling the refractive indexes the particle size, which in turn is influenced by the HC/NOx ratio; the refractive index is much less sensitive to the aerosol mass concentration or aerosol aging. The refractive index ranges from1.38 to 1.56 for limonene and from 1.37 to 1.51 for α-pinene, and generally decreases as the HC/NOx ratio increases (6.3 - 33 and 8.1 - 33 for limonene and α-pinene). Our data show that particle diameter is related to the aerosol refractive index; for limonene, as the HC/NOx ratio decreases, the size of particles increases (150 - 310 nm) and mrs increase from about 1.38 to a maximum of about 1.56. α-Pinene has the same trend for mrs; as the HC/NOx ratio decreases, the maximum size of particles increases (100 - 270 nm) and mrs increases from about 1.37 to a maximum of about 1.52. These results give suggest that chemical components controlling the size of SOA are a

  17. Spatial characterization of electric potentials generated by pulsed microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandagor, V; Cela, C J; Sanders, C A; Greenbaum, E; Lazzi, G; Humayun, M S; Zhou, D M; Castro, R; Gaikwad, S; Little, J

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a report on the in situ characterization of stimulating microelectrodes in the context of multielectrode retinal prosthetic implants. The experimental system approximately replicates the geometric and electrical parameters of Second Sight Medical Products' Argus II Retinal Implant. Topographic maps of electric potentials have been prepared for a 60 electrode structure in which selected electrodes were stimulated with biphasic repetitively pulsed charge densities at 100 microC·cm(-2). Surface contour maps were prepared using a 10 microm diameter recording electrode.

  18. Storing unsteady energy, like photovoltaically generated electric energy, as potential energy

    OpenAIRE

    Kutz, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    A proposal to store unsteady energy in potential energy via lifting masses with a rough quantitative overview. Some applications and methods to harvest the potential energy are also given. A focus is put on photovoltaically generated energy.

  19. Secondary organic aerosol formation by limonene ozonolysis: Parameterizing multi-generational chemistry in ozone- and residence time-limited indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Terpene ozonolysis reactions can be a strong source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. SOA formation can be parameterized and predicted using the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), also known as the SOA yield, which quantifies the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized terpene. Limonene is a monoterpene that is at sufficient concentrations such that it reacts meaningfully with ozone indoors. It has two unsaturated bonds, and the magnitude of the limonene ozonolysis AMF varies by a factor of ∼4 depending on whether one or both of its unsaturated bonds are ozonated, which depends on whether ozone is in excess compared to limonene as well as the available time for reactions indoors. Hence, this study developed a framework to predict the limonene AMF as a function of the ozone [O3] and limonene [lim] concentrations and the air exchange rate (AER, h-1), which is the inverse of the residence time. Empirical AMF data were used to calculate a mixing coefficient, β, that would yield a 'resultant AMF' as the combination of the AMFs due to ozonolysis of one or both of limonene's unsaturated bonds, within the volatility basis set (VBS) organic aerosol framework. Then, β was regressed against predictors of log10([O3]/[lim]) and AER (R2 = 0.74). The β increased as the log10([O3]/[lim]) increased and as AER decreased, having the physical meaning of driving the resultant AMF to the upper AMF condition when both unsaturated bonds of limonene are ozonated. Modeling demonstrates that using the correct resultant AMF to simulate SOA formation owing to limonene ozonolysis is crucial for accurate indoor prediction.

  20. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rissman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32% in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3. Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM. The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  1. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rissman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11% 0.21%, and 0.32% in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3. Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM. The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA for malonic acid and glutaric acid. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before the methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  2. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, T. A.; Varutbangkul, V.; Surratt, J. D.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-06-01

    Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32%) in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3). Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM). The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  3. EEG generator--a model of potentials in a volume conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitan, Lilach; Teicher, Mina; Abeles, Moshe

    2009-11-01

    EEG generator-a model of potentials in a volume conductor. The potential recorded over the cortex electro-corticogram (ECoG) or over the scalp [electroencephalograph (EEG)] derives from the activity of many sources known as "EEG generators." The recorded amplitude is basically a function of the unitary potential of a generator and the statistical relationship between different EEG generators in the recorded population. In this study, we first suggest a new definition of the EEG generator. We use the theory of potentials in a volume conductor and model the contribution of a single synapse activated to the surface potential. We then model the contribution of the generator to the surface potential. Once the generator and its contribution are well defined, we can quantitatively assess the degree of synchronization among generators. The measures obtained by the model for a real life scenario of a group of generators organized in a specific statistical way were consistent with the expected values that were reported experimentally. The study sheds new light on macroscopic modeling approaches which make use of mean soma membrane potential. We showed major contribution of activity of superficial apical synapses to the ECoG signal recorded relative to lower somatic or basal synapses activity.

  4. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  5. STUDY ON SOLID WASTE GENERATION IN KUANTAN, MALAYSIA: ITS POTENTIAL FOR ENERGY GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shahir Zahari,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, most of the municipal solid waste goes to the landfill or dumping sites. The non-hazardous and general industrial waste are often treated together. The existing dumping sites mostly are not properly engineered and managed. Pollutants that are released or discharged from the disposal sites could contaminate groundwater system, flora and fauna which will eventually cause direct and indirect impact to human’s life (Mahmood, 2000. Presently, the amount of solid waste was produced in Kuantan is about 500 tons daily,consisting of 60% domestic waste and 40% of industrial and construction waste. However, the present sanitary landfill is nearly filled up (Ismail, 2006. In order to overcome this problem, an alternative by using incineration (waste to energy system should be applied. By using this technology, solid waste will combusted to generate energy from burning heat. A study was conducted in Kuantan area to determine the daily solid waste generation. These waste generated rates were then calculated for the energy conversion. The results indicated that average value of total energy produced from solid waste of Kuantan is 19.3808kWh for year 2008 and 17.8942kWh foryear 2009 and could be utilized as electricity, in order to save amount of energy and cost used.

  6. The potential economic impact of constructing and operating solar power generation facilities in Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwer, R. K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Riddel, M. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

  7. Ground level environmental protein concentrations in various ecuadorian environments: potential uses of aerosolized protein for ecological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Sarah J.R.; Woodward, Andrea; Castillo, Josemar A.; Swing, Kelly; Hayes, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Large quantities of free protein in the environment and other bioaerosols are ubiquitous throughout terrestrial ground level environments and may be integrative indicators of ecosystem status. Samples of ground level bioaerosols were collected from various ecosystems throughout Ecuador, including pristine humid tropical forest (pristine), highly altered secondary humid tropical forest (highly altered), secondary transitional very humid forest (regrowth transitional), and suburban dry montane deforested (suburban deforested). The results explored the sensitivity of localized aerosol protein concentrations to spatial and temporal variations within ecosystems, and their value for assessing environmental change. Ecosystem specific variations in environmental protein concentrations were observed: pristine 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3, highly altered 0.07 ± 0.05 μg/m3, regrowth transitional 0.17 ± 0.06 μg/m3, and suburban deforested 0.09 ± 0.04 μg/m3. Additionally, comparisons of intra-environmental differences in seasonal/daily weather (dry season 0.08 ± 0.03 μg/m3 and wet season 0.10 ± 0.04 μg/m3), environmental fragmentation (buffered 0.19 ± 0.06 μg/m3 and edge 0.15 ± 0.06 μg/m3), and sampling height (ground level 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3 and 10 m 0.24 ± 0.04 μg/m3) demonstrated the sensitivity of protein concentrations to environmental conditions. Local protein concentrations in altered environments correlated well with satellite-based spectral indices describing vegetation productivity: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (r2 = 0.801), net primary production (NPP) (r2 = 0.827), leaf area index (LAI) (r2 = 0.410). Moreover, protein concentrations distinguished the pristine site, which was not differentiated in spectral indices, potentially due to spectral saturation typical of highly vegetated environments. Bioaerosol concentrations represent an inexpensive method to increase understanding of environmental changes, especially in densely vegetated

  8. Investigation of the spectral responses of laser generated aerosol from household coals using a state-of-the-art multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajtai, Tibor; Utry, Noemi; Pinter, Mate; Kiss-Albert, Gergely; Smausz, Tomi; Konya, Zoltan; Hopp, Bela; Szabo, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of the inherent, spectral features of laser generated and chemically characterized residential coal aerosols generated in our recently introduced laser ablation based LAC generator. The optical absorption and the scattering features of the generated aerosol were investigated by our state-of-the-art multi wavelength PAS instrument (4λ-PAS) and a multi wavelength cosinus sensor (Aurora 3000). The quantified wavelength dependency (AAE and SAE) are deduced from the measured data. Finally, relationship between the optical and the thermochemical characteristics is revealed. Atmospheric light absorbing carbonaceous particulate matter (LAC) is in the middle of scientific interest especially because of its climatic and adverse health relevance. The latest scientific assessments identified atmospheric soot as the second most important anthropogenic emission regarding its climatic effect and as one of the most harmful atmospheric constituents based on its health aspects. LAC dominantly originates from anthropogenic sources, so its real time and selective identification is also essential for the means of its legal regulation. Despite of its significance the inherent properties of LAC are rarely described and the available data is widely spread even in the case of the most intensively studied black or elementary carbon. Therefore, the investigation of the inherent climate and health relevant properties of atmospheric soot is a highly actual issue. Moreover investigation of the optical and toxic properties of LAC originating from the combustion of household coals is almost completely missing from literature. There are two major reasons for that. Firstly, the characteristic parameters of soot are complex and vary in a wide range and depend not only on the initial burning conditions and the type of fuels but also the ambient factors. The other is the lack of a soot standard material and a generator which are suitable for modelling the real atmospheric

  9. A critical examination of spatial biases between MODIS and MISR aerosol products – application for potential AERONET deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Eck

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while sidestepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a kml file.

  10. A Critical Examination of Spatial Biases Between MODIS and MISR Aerosol Products - Application for Potential AERONET Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while side-stepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a km1 file.

  11. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008. A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model.

    Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements.

    The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 or more orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene under low NOx conditions secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species. This analysis is based on the assumption that there were no significant reactions taking place inside the thermodenuder.

  12. Topics in current aerosol research

    CERN Document Server

    Hidy, G M

    1971-01-01

    Topics in Current Aerosol Research deals with the fundamental aspects of aerosol science, with emphasis on experiment and theory describing highly dispersed aerosols (HDAs) as well as the dynamics of charged suspensions. Topics covered range from the basic properties of HDAs to their formation and methods of generation; sources of electric charges; interactions between fluid and aerosol particles; and one-dimensional motion of charged cloud of particles. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic properties of HDAs, followed by a discussion on the form

  13. Bacterial aerosolization from an ultrasonic cleaner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A G; Wilkins, J R; Craddock, J G

    1975-03-01

    An ultrasonic device used for cleaning surgical instruments was found to produce a significant microbial aerosol. No correlation was found between the concentration of aerosol generated and the bacterial contamination in the cleaning solution. Table top contamination around the cleaner was due essentially to splash and dripping, and not from the settling of the aerosol. Recommendations are made for cleaning and disinfection protocols.

  14. Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds and their secondary organic aerosol formation potentials from a petroleum refinery in Pearl River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijuan; Wang, Hao; Chen, Dan; Li, Qinqin; Thai, Phong; Gong, Daocheng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Chunlin; Gu, Yinggang; Zhou, Lei; Morawska, Lidia; Wang, Boguang

    2017-02-08

    A campaign was carried out to measure the emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different areas of a petroleum refinery in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in China. In the refining area, 2-methylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, methylcyclopentane, 3-methylhexane, and butane accounted for >50% of the total VOCs; in the chemical industry area, 2-methylpentane, p-diethylbenzene, 2,3-dimethylbutane, m-diethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were the top five VOCs detected; and in the wastewater treatment area, the five most abundant species were 2-methylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, methylcyclopentane, 3-methylpentane and p-diethylbenzene. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential was estimated using the fractional aerosol coefficients (FAC), secondary organic aerosol potential (SOAP), and SOA yield methods. The FAC method suggests that toluene, p-diethylbenzene, and p-diethylbenzene are the largest contributors to the SOA formation in the refining, chemical industry, and wastewater treatment areas, respectively. With the SOAP method, it is estimated that toluene is the largest contributor to the SOA formation in the refining area, but o-ethyltoluene contributes the most both in the chemical industry and wastewater treatment areas. For the SOA yield method, aromatics dominate the yields and account for nearly 100% of the total in the three areas. The SOA concentrations estimated of the refining, chemical industry and wastewater treatment areas are 30, 3835 and 137μgm(-3), respectively. Despite the uncertainties and limitations associated with the three methods, the SOA yield method is suggested to be used for the estimation of SOA formation from the petroleum refinery. The results of this study have demonstrated that the control of VOCs, especially aromatics such as toluene, ethyltoluene, benzene and diethylbenzene, should be a focus of future regulatory measures in order to reduce PM pollution in the PRD region.

  15. Photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol generated from limonene oxidation by ozone studied with chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA prepared by ozone-initiated oxidation of D-limonene is studied with an action spectroscopy approach, which relies on detection of volatile photoproducts with chemical ionization mass-spectrometry as a function of the UV irradiation wavelength. Efficient photodegradation is observed for a broad range of ozone and D-limonene concentrations (0.1–300 ppm used in the preparation of SOA. The observed photoproducts are dominated by oxygenated C1-C3 compounds such as methanol, formic acid, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and acetone. The irradiation wavelength dependence of the combined yield of the photoproducts closely tracks the absorption spectrum of the SOA material suggesting that photodegradation is not limited to the UV wavelengths. Kinetic simulations suggest that RO2+HO2/RO2 reactions represent the dominant route to photochemically active carbonyl and peroxide species in the limonene SOA material. Similar photodegradation processes are likely to occur in realistic SOA produced by OH- or O3-initiated oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in clean air.

  16. Photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol generated from limonene oxidation by ozone studied with chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA prepared by ozone-initiated oxidation of D-limonene is studied with an action spectroscopy approach, which relies on detection of volatile photoproducts with chemical ionization mass-spectrometry as a function of the UV irradiation wavelength. Efficient photodegradation is observed for a broad range of ozone (0.1–300 ppm and D-limonene (0.02–3 ppm concentrations used in the preparation of SOA. The observed photoproducts are dominated by oxygenated C1-C3 compounds such as methanol, formic acid, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and acetone. The irradiation wavelength dependence of the combined yield of the photoproducts closely tracks the absorption spectrum of the SOA material suggesting that photodegradation is not limited to the UV wavelengths. Kinetic simulations suggest that RO2+HO2/RO2 reactions represent the dominant route to photochemically active carbonyl and peroxide species in the limonene SOA prepared in these experiments. Similar photodegradation processes are likely to occur in realistic SOA produced by OH- or O3-initiated oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in clean air.

  17. Feasibility study: hydroelectric generating potential, Newcastle and Charlo fish hatcheries for Department of Fisheries and Oceans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1984-01-01

    ADI Limited were retained in March 1984 to carry out a feasibility study of potential hydroelectric generation at the Newcastle and Charlo hatchery sites, in accordance with their proposal submitted...

  18. An evaluation method of hydrocarbon generating potential of highly mature and over-mature marine carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程克明; 王兆云

    1997-01-01

    How to restore the residual organic carbon and residual hydrocarbon-generating potential is discussed based on the hydrocarbon degradability of source rock. The results indicate there is linear function relationship between the restoring coefficient of residual organic carbon (Kc) and the vitrinite reflectance (Ro% ) of various kinds of source rock, but the relationship is secondary functional between the restoring coefficient of residual hydrocarbon-generating potential (Ks) and the vitrinite reflectance (R0%). It is pointed out that Kc= (1 - Dresidual)/(1-Dprimary), Xs=Kc (Dprimary/Dresidual). The restoration of residual organic carbon and hydrocarbon-gen era ting potential of the Cambrian and Ordovician highly mature marine carbonate in the Tarim Basin and North China region shows that the lower limit value of hydrocarbon generating potential and the organic matter abundance of carbonate source rock are basically the same as that of clastic rock. The technical difficulty in hydrocarbon generating eva

  19. Towards the regulation of aerosol emissions by their potential health impact: Assessing adverse effects of aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine emissions by combining comprehensive data on the chemical composition and their toxicological effects on human lung cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Streibel, T.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Rheda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Czech, H.; Tiita, P.; Jalava, P.; Kasurinen, S.; Schwemer, T.; Yli-Prilä, P.; Tissari, J.; Lamberg, H.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ship engine emissions are important regarding lung and cardiovascular diseases in coastal regions worldwide. Bio mass burning is made responsible for adverse health effects in many cities and rural regions. The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. Typical lung cell responses to combustion aerosols include inflammation and apoptosis, but a molecular link with the specific chemical composition in particular of ship emissions has not been established. Through an air-liquid interface exposure system (ALI), we exposed human lung cells at-site to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on common heavy fuel oil (HFO) and cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF) as well as to emissions of wood combustion compliances. A special field deployable ALI-exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for this study. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling to characterise the cellular responses. The HFO ship emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds (transition metals, organic toxicants) and particle masses. The cellular responses included inflammation and oxidative stress. Surprisingly, the DF ship emissions, which predominantly contain rather "pure" carbonaceous soot and much less known toxicants, induced significantly broader biological effects, affecting essential cellular pathways (e.g., mitochondrial function and intracellular transport). Therefore the use of distillate fuels for shipping (this is the current emission reduction strategy of the IMO) appears insufficient for diminishing health effects. The study suggests rather reducing the particle emissions

  20. Study on generation and granulometry of a standard aerosol of CINa for use in determinations of filtration efficiency of absolute filters; Estudio sobre la generacion y granulometria de un aerosol patron de CINa para la determinacion de eficacias filtrantes de filtros absolutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milla, E.

    1978-07-01

    This work has as objective the study of the conditions of generation and granulometry of an aerosol generated by atomizing with compressed a i r a solution of CINa in water in order to obtain particles, CINa cubes. The droplets of the spray formed are dried in a stream of air, acting as a carrier, inside the pipe of a bank of test filters. The granulometric analysis has been carried out by sampling in the gaseous phase. A dispersion photometer was used that yields the size spectrum of particles. The variables concerned in generation, whose influence on aerosol granulometry were analyzed are: characteristic diameter of atomizer unit, pressure of compressed air of generation, concentration of saline solution, temperature of air carrier, length of bank pipe, sampling position across a section, length of sampling duct and ratio between speeds in pipe and duct. (Author) 50 refs.

  1. Quantification of Inherent Respirable Dust Generation Potential (IRDGP) of South African Coals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phillips, H

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Advisory Committee Project Summary Project Title: Inherent Respirable Dust Generation Potential (IRDGP) of South African Coals-SIM020604 Author(s): H.R.Phillips and B. K. Belle Agency: University of Witwatersrand Report Date: July2003... Related Projects: Health 607, Sim 02-06-03 Category: Occupational Health Applied Research Occupational Hygiene Summary Project SIM020604 was formulated to determine the Inherent Respirable Dust Generation Potential (IRDGP) of various South...

  2. The economics (or lack thereof) of aerosol geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, M.; Keller, K.; Tuana, N.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the Earth's climate and impose substantial risks for current and future generations. What are scientifically sound, economically viable, and ethically defendable strategies to manage these climate risks? Ratified international agreements call for a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Recent proposals, however, call for the deployment of a different approach: to geoengineer climate by injecting aerosol precursors into the stratosphere. Published economic studies typically suggest that substituting aerosol geoengineering for abatement of carbon dioxide emissions results in large net monetary benefits. However, these studies neglect the risks of aerosol geoengineering due to (i) the potential for future geoengineering failures and (ii) the negative impacts associated with the aerosol forcing. Here we use a simple integrated assessment model of climate change to analyze potential economic impacts of aerosol geoengineering strategies over a wide range of uncertain parameters such as climate sensitivity, the economic damages due to climate change, and the economic damages due to aerosol geoengineering forcing. The simplicity of the model provides the advantages of parsimony and transparency, but it also imposes severe caveats on the interpretation of the results. For example, the analysis is based on a globally aggregated model and is hence silent on the question of intragenerational distribution of costs and benefits. In addition, the analysis neglects the effects of endogenous learning about the climate system. We show that the risks associated with a future geoengineering failure and negative impacts of aerosol forcings can cause geoenginering strategies to fail an economic cost-benefit test. One key to this finding is that a geoengineering failure would lead to dramatic and abrupt climatic changes. The monetary damages due to this failure can

  3. Experimental Aerosol Inoculation and Investigation of Potential Lateral Transmission of Mycobacterium bovis in Virginia Opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Karla A; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Bolin, Steve; Kaneene, John; Sikarskie, James; Greenwald, Rena; Lyashchenko, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    An endemic focus of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) infection in the state of Michigan has contributed to a regional persistence in the animal population. The objective of this study was to determine if Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) contribute to disease persistence by experimentally assessing intraspecies lateral transmission. One wild caught pregnant female opossum bearing 11 joeys (young opossum) and one age-matched joey were obtained for the study. Four joeys were aerosol inoculated with M. bovis (inoculated), four joeys were noninoculated (exposed), and four joeys plus the dam were controls. Four replicate groups of one inoculated and one exposed joey were housed together for 45 days commencing 7 days after experimental inoculation. At day 84 opossums were sacrificed. All four inoculated opossums had a positive test band via rapid test, culture positive, and gross/histologic lesions consistent with caseogranulomatous pneumonia. The exposed and control groups were unremarkable on gross, histology, rapid test, and culture. In conclusion, M. bovis infection within the inoculated opossums was confirmed by gross pathology, histopathology, bacterial culture, and antibody tests. However, M. bovis was not detected in the control and exposed opossums. There was no appreciable lateral transmission of M. bovis after aerosol inoculation and 45 days of cohabitation between infected and uninfected opossums.

  4. Experimental Aerosol Inoculation and Investigation of Potential Lateral Transmission of Mycobacterium bovis in Virginia Opossum (Didelphis virginiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A. Fenton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An endemic focus of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis infection in the state of Michigan has contributed to a regional persistence in the animal population. The objective of this study was to determine if Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana contribute to disease persistence by experimentally assessing intraspecies lateral transmission. One wild caught pregnant female opossum bearing 11 joeys (young opossum and one age-matched joey were obtained for the study. Four joeys were aerosol inoculated with M. bovis (inoculated, four joeys were noninoculated (exposed, and four joeys plus the dam were controls. Four replicate groups of one inoculated and one exposed joey were housed together for 45 days commencing 7 days after experimental inoculation. At day 84 opossums were sacrificed. All four inoculated opossums had a positive test band via rapid test, culture positive, and gross/histologic lesions consistent with caseogranulomatous pneumonia. The exposed and control groups were unremarkable on gross, histology, rapid test, and culture. In conclusion, M. bovis infection within the inoculated opossums was confirmed by gross pathology, histopathology, bacterial culture, and antibody tests. However, M. bovis was not detected in the control and exposed opossums. There was no appreciable lateral transmission of M. bovis after aerosol inoculation and 45 days of cohabitation between infected and uninfected opossums.

  5. Investigation into the oxidative potential generated by the formation of particulate matter from incense combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; BéruBé, Kelly; Lung, Shih-Chun C; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Jones, Tim

    2013-01-15

    The formation of aerosols during combustion plays an important role in allowing released products to interreact, leading to an increase in particulate matter oxidative potential. This study investigated the physicochemistry of incense combustion-derived pollutants, which were emitted into the ambient air as solid and gas phases, followed by the determination of their oxidative potential. Upon combustion of a joss stick, approximately 60% of the mass of incense raw ingredients was released into the ambient air as combustion products including 349.51 mg/g PM(10), 145.48 mg/g CO and 0.16 mg/g NOx. Furthermore, incense combustion produced significant number of primary particles (incense combustion was able to react with CaCO(3) to produce the final product of Ca(NO(3))(2) in the ambient air. Moreover, coagulation could be a vital process for the growth of primary incense combustion particles through the intermixing with volatile organics. The incense particle's reactions with other combustion-derived products could be responsible for their significant oxidative capacity of 33.1-43.4% oxidative DNA damage. This study demonstrated that the oxidative potential of incense particles appeared to be related to the process of particle formation, and also provided novel data for the respiratory exposure assessment.

  6. Analytical assessments on the potential of harnessing tidal currents for electricity generation in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yun Seng; Koh, Siong Lee [Department of Physical Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tunku Abdul Rahman University (Malaysia)

    2010-05-15

    Malaysia is heavily dependent on fossil fuel for electricity generation. With the rapidly diminishing of its fuel reserve and the increasingly negative effects of fossil fuels to the environment, the government has begun to utilise bio-fuel and solar radiation for electricity generation. However, the potential of harnessing other renewable sources, particular ocean energy, in Malaysia has not been fully realised. Therefore, studies were carried out to identify the potential of harnessing ocean energy for electricity generation. The Princeton Ocean Model was used to create a three-dimensional numerical ocean model for Malaysia which was calibrated against measurement by a means of adjoint data assimilation approach. A set of reliable tidal speed and tidal elevation data was therefore generated to determine the types of tides available in Malaysia, the potential areas of installing marine current turbines (MCTs), the total amount of electricity to be generated by MCT, the economical viability and the environmental benefits of using MCT in Malaysia. This paper presents the findings on the studies, encompassing the technical, economical and environmental aspects of installing MCT in Malaysia. The results are critical to policy makers and the potential investors on tidal energy in Malaysia for decision making. It may also help the neighboring countries to realize the possible potential of their ocean energy for electricity generation. (author)

  7. Photochemical Formation of Sulfur-Containing Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2017-06-01

    In order to understand planetary climate systems, modeling the properties of atmospheric aerosols is vital. Aerosol formation plays an important role in planetary climates and is tied to feedback loops that can either warm or cool a planet. Sulfur compounds are known to play an important role in new particle aerosol formation and have been observed in a number of planetary atmospheres throughout our solar system. Our current understanding of sulfur chemistry explains much of what we observe in Earth's atmosphere; however, several discrepancies arise when comparing observations of the Venusian atmosphere with model predictions. This suggests that there are still problems in our fundamental understanding of sulfur chemistry. This is concerning given recent renewed interest in sulfate injections in the stratosphere for solar radiation management geo-engineering schemes. We investigate the role of sunlight as a potential driver of the formation of sulfur-containing aerosols. I will present recent work investigating the generation of large quantities of aerosol from the irradiation of mixtures of SO_2 with water and organic species, using a solar simulator that mimics the light that is available in the Earth's troposphere and the Venusian middle atmosphere. I will present on recent work done in our lab suggesting the formation of sulfurous acid, H_2SO_3, and describe experimental work that supports this proposed mechanism. Additionally I will present on new work showing the highly reactive nature of electronically excited SO_2 with saturated alkane species. The implications of this photochemically induced sulfur aerosol formation in the atmosphere of Earth and other planetary atmospheres will be discussed.

  8. Real refractive indices and volatility of secondary organic aerosol generated from photooxidation and ozonolysis of limonene, α-pinene and toluene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodenuding particles can provide insights into aerosol composition, and may be a way to create particles in laboratory chambers that better mimic the atmosphere. The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA was investigated by evaporating organics from the particles using a thermodenuder (TD at temperatures between ~ 60 and 100 °C. Volatility was influenced by the parent hydrocarbon, oxidation chemistry and relative humidity (RH. For SOA generated from ozonolysis, limonene had lower volatility than α-pinene, and OH scavengers had no influence on volatility. For photooxidation, α-pinene SOA was slightly more volatile than limonene SOA and increasing RH also modestly increased volatility, while toluene SOA was unaffected by heating to 98 °C. For both α-pinene and limonene, the concentration of NOx and the HC/NOx ratio had no discernible effect on SOA volatility. Refractive indices for the original and denuded particles were retrieved from polar nephelometer measurements using parallel and perpendicular polarized 532 nm light. Retrievals were performed with a genetic algorithm method using Mie-Lorenz scattering theory and measured particle size distributions. Retrieved refractive indices for the SOA before thermodenuding varied between 1.35 and 1.61 depending on several factors, including parent hydrocarbon, oxidation chemistry, and SOA generation temperature. For high NOx SOA, as particles shrink, their refractive index returns to the value of the corresponding size particles before heating (limonene or slightly higher (α-pinene. For low NOx however, the resulting refractive index is 0.05 ± 0.02 lower than the corresponding size undenuded particles. Additionally, for α-pinene SOA from ozonolysis with OH radical scavenger, resulting refractive indices were higher by about 0.03 after heating. Consistent with no change in size, refractive indices of toluene SOA were unaffected by heating

  9. Sustainable Production of Second-Generation Biofuels. Potential and perspectives in major economies and developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisentraut, A.

    2010-02-15

    The paper focuses on opportunities and risks presented by second-generation biofuels technologies in eight case study countries: Brazil, Cameroon, China, India, Mexico, South Africa, Tanzania and Thailand. The report begins by exploring the state of the art of second-generation technologies and their production, followed by projections of future demand and a discussion of drivers of that demand. The report then delves into various feedstock options and the global potential for bioenergy production. The final chapter offers a look at the potential for sustainable second-generation biofuel production in developing countries including considerations of economic, social and environmental impacts. Key findings of the report include that: second-generation biofuels produced from agricultural and forestry residues can play a crucial role in the transport sector without competing with food production; the potential for second-generation biofuels should be mobilized in emerging and developing countries where a large share of global residues is produced; less-developed countries will first need to invest in agricultural production and infrastructure in order to improve the framework conditions for the production of second-generation biofuels; financial barriers to production exist in many developing countries; and the suitability of second-generation biofuels against individual developing countries' needs should be evaluated.

  10. Nano-objects emitted during maintenance of common particle generators: direct chemical characterization with aerosol mass spectrometry and implications for risk assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Patrik T., E-mail: patrik.nilsson@design.lth.se; Isaxon, Christina [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden); Eriksson, Axel C. [Lund University, Nuclear Physics (Sweden); Messing, Maria E. [Lund University, Solid State Physics (Sweden); Ludvigsson, Linus; Rissler, Jenny [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden); Hedmer, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan [Lund University, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine (Sweden); Gudmundsson, Anders [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden); Deppert, Knut [Lund University, Solid State Physics (Sweden); Bohgard, Mats; Pagels, Joakim H. [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Nanotechnology gives us materials with enhanced or completely new properties. At the same time, inhalation of manufactured nano-objects has been related to an array of adverse biological effects. We characterized particle emissions, which occurred during maintenance of common metal nanoparticle generators and contrasted the properties of the emitted particles with those originally produced by the generators. A new approach using online aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), for time- and size-resolved measurements of the particle chemical composition, was applied in combination with more conventional techniques for particle sampling and analysis, including electron microscopy. Emissions during maintenance work, in terms of mass and surface area concentration in the size range of 0.02–10 μm, were dominated by large agglomerates (1–5 μm). With AMS, we show that the particle composition depends on both generator type and maintenance task being performed and that the instrument can be used for highly time-resolved selective studies of metal nanoparticle emissions. The emitted agglomerates have a relatively high probability to be deposited in the lower respiratory tract, since the mean particle diameter coincided with a peak in the lung deposition curve. Each of these agglomerates consisted of a very high number (10{sup 3}–10{sup 5}/agglomerate) of nanometer-sized primary particles originating from the particle synthesis process. This made them possess large surface areas, one of the key properties in nanotoxicology. Similar agglomerates may be emitted in a wide range of processes when nanoparticles are manufactured or handled. The fate of such agglomerates, once deposited in the respiratory tract, is unknown and should therefore be considered in future particle toxicological studies. Our results highlight the importance of including micrometer-sized particles in exposure and emission assessments.

  11. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used in order to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. It is also used in order to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory (κ-KT) and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-KT is the suitable framework to describe clay mineral nucleation activity. Apparent differences in κ with respect to size arise from an artifact introduced by improper size-selection methodology. For dust particles with mobility sizes larger than ~300 nm, i.e., ones that are within an atmospherically relevant size range, both κ-KT and FHH theory yield similar critical supersaturations. However, the former requires a single hygroscopicity parameter instead of the two adjustable parameters required by the latter. For dry-generated particles, the size dependence of κ is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much

  12. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    OpenAIRE

    S. Garimella; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; D. J. Cziczo

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the cla...

  13. An Experimental Investigation of the Performance of a Collison Nebulizer Generating H1N1 Influenza Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-04

    bacteria, fungi , atmospheric environmental pollu- tants and pulmonary drug particles suspended in air or another gas.[1] Their generation has numerous...simulate organ- isms in a clinical environment is of utmost importance for the validity and applicability of research results. There- fore, it is...efficiency of collection and control methods for various airborne microorganisms. In addition, it is important to diminish the formation of residue

  14. A scoping review on bio-aerosols in healthcare and the dental environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemouri, Charifa; de Soet, Hans; Crielaard, Wim; Laheij, Alexa

    2017-01-01

    Bio-aerosols originate from different sources and their potentially pathogenic nature may form a hazard to healthcare workers and patients. So far no extensive review on existing evidence regarding bio-aerosols is available. This study aimed to review evidence on bio-aerosols in healthcare and the dental setting. The objectives were 1) What are the sources that generate bio-aerosols?; 2) What is the microbial load and composition of bio-aerosols and how were they measured?; and 3) What is the hazard posed by pathogenic micro-organisms transported via the aerosol route of transmission? Systematic scoping review design. Searched in PubMed and EMBASE from inception to 09-03-2016. References were screened and selected based on abstract and full text according to eligibility criteria. Full text articles were assessed for inclusion and summarized. The results are presented in three separate objectives and summarized for an overview of evidence. The search yielded 5,823 studies, of which 62 were included. Dental hand pieces were found to generate aerosols in the dental settings. Another 30 sources from human activities, interventions and daily cleaning performances in the hospital also generate aerosols. Fifty-five bacterial species, 45 fungi genera and ten viruses were identified in a hospital setting and 16 bacterial and 23 fungal species in the dental environment. Patients with certain risk factors had a higher chance to acquire Legionella in hospitals. Such infections can lead to irreversible septic shock and death. Only a few studies found that bio-aerosol generating procedures resulted in transmission of infectious diseases or allergic reactions. Bio-aerosols are generated via multiple sources such as different interventions, instruments and human activity. Bio-aerosols compositions reported are heterogeneous in their microbiological composition dependent on the setting and methodology. Legionella species were found to be a bio-aerosol dependent hazard to elderly

  15. Assessment of USAFs Hiring Potential of Civilian Scientists and Engineers of the Millennial Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-12

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY ASSESSMENT OF USAF’S HIRING POTENTIAL OF CIVILIAN SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS OF THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION...government organizations. iv Abstract The Millennial Generation (individuals born 1981-2000) is entering the workforce in large numbers and...of Millennials and what they view as important in their work and social lives revealed policy approaches that could ensure the USAF maximizes it

  16. On the generation of electric field and infrared radiation in aerosol clouds due to radon emanation in the atmosphere before earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Liperovsky

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The non-stationary Frenkel model of the generator of spikes of the local electric field with time scales of 1–100 min in the atmosphere near seismic fracture regions some days before strong earthqukes is analysed. The model suggests an aerosol cloud, an increased ionisation velocity (e.g. by radon emanation, and an upward flow of air. It was found that during times of earthquake activity (that means a few days before an earthquake, for realistic increases of the ionization intensity of the atmosphere, mosaic-likely occurring and disappearing pulses of local electric fields with intensities of the order of 103−3×103 Vm−1 should be observable. These electric fields would also cause spikes of non-equilibrium IR emissions (0.7–20 μm and local spikes of the magnetic field. The authors propose to perform special complex Earth-based observations of the night-time emissions of the atmosphere in the IR region and of the magnetic as well as quasi-stationary electric fields at some points near to fracture regions in seismo-active belts.

  17. Prospects of Graphene as a Potential Carrier-Transport Material in Third-Generation Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Towhid H; Islam, Ashraful; Mahmud Hasan, A K; Terdi, M Asri Mat; Arunakumari, M; Prakash Singh, Surya; Alam, Md Khorshed; Bedja, Idriss M; Hafidz Ruslan, Mohd; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Amin, Nowshad; Akhtaruzzaman, Md

    2016-04-01

    Third-generation solar cells are understood to be the pathway to overcoming the issues and drawbacks of the existing solar cell technologies. Since the introduction of graphene in solar cells, it has been providing attractive properties for the next generation of solar cells. Currently, there are more theoretical predictions rather than practical recognitions in third-generation solar cells. Some of the potential of graphene has been explored in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), but it has yet to be fully comprehended in the recent third-generation inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells. In this review, the diverse role of graphene in third-generation OPVs and DSSCs will be deliberated to provide an insight on the prospects and challenges of graphene in inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells.

  18. Coupled generator and combustor performance calculations for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, T. C.; Hnat, J. G.; Marston, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric study of the performance of the MHD generator and combustor components of potential early commercial open-cycle MHD/steam power plants is presented. Consideration is given to the effects of air heater system concept, MHD combustor type, coal type, thermal input power, oxygen enrichment of the combustion, subsonic and supersonic generator flow and magnetic field strength on coupled generator and combustor performance. The best performance is found to be attained with a 3000 F, indirectly fired air heater, no oxygen enrichment, Illinois no. 6 coal, a two-stage cyclone combustor with 85% slag rejection, a subsonic generator, and a magnetic field configuration yielding a constant transverse electric field of 4 kV/m. Results indicate that optimum net MHD generator power is generally compressor-power-limited rather than electric-stress-limited, with optimum net power a relatively weak function of operating pressure.

  19. Influence of Anode Potentials on Current Generation and Extracellular Electron Transfer Paths of Geobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souichiro Kato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are capable of utilizing solid-state compounds, including anodic electrodes, as electron acceptors of respiration via extracellular electron transfer (EET and have attracted considerable attention for their crucial role as biocatalysts of bioelectrochemical systems (BES’s. Recent studies disclosed that anode potentials affect power output and anodic microbial communities, including selection of dominant Geobacter species, in various BES’s. However, the details in current-generating properties and responses to anode potentials have been investigated only for a model species, namely Geobacter sulfurreducens. In this study, the effects of anode potentials on the current generation and the EET paths were investigated by cultivating six Geobacter species with different anode potentials, followed by electrochemical analyses. The electrochemical cultivation demonstrated that the G. metallireducens clade species (G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens constantly generate high current densities at a wide range of anode potentials (≥−0.3 or −0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl, while the subsurface clades species (G. daltonii, G. bemidjensis, G. chapellei, and G. pelophilus generate a relatively large current only at limited potential regions (−0.1 to −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear sweep voltammetry analyses indicated that the G. metallireducens clade species utilize only one EET path irrespective of the anode potentials, while the subsurface clades species utilize multiple EET paths, which can be optimized depending on the anode potentials. These results clearly demonstrate that the response features to anode potentials are divergent among species (or clades of Geobacter.

  20. Effects of Aerosol on Cloud Liquid Water Path: Statistical Method a Potential Source for Divergence in Past Observation Based Correlative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousmane Sy Savane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies show a divergence in correlation between aerosol and cloud proxies, which has been thought of in the past as the results of varying physical mechanisms. Though modeling studies have supported this idea, from an observational standpoint it is difficult to attribute with confidence the correlations to specific physical mechanisms. We explore a methodology to assess the correlation between cloud water path and aerosol optical depth using Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aqua retrieved aerosol and cloud properties for absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types over land and over the Atlantic Ocean for various meteorological conditions. The data covers a three-month period, June through August, during which different aerosol types are predominant in specific regions. Our approach eliminates outliers; sorts the data into aerosol bins; and the mean Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD value for each bin and the corresponding mean Cloud Water Path (CWP value are determined. The mean CWP is plotted against the mean AOD. The response curve for all aerosol types shows a peak CWP value corresponding to an aerosol loading value AODpeak. The peak is used to divide the total range of aerosol loading into two sub ranges. For AOD value below AODpeak, mean CWP and mean AOD are positively correlated. The correlation between mean CWP and mean AOD is negative for aerosol loading above AODpeak. Irrespective of aerosol type, atmospheric water vapor content and lower tropospheric static stability, the peak observed for each aerosol type seems to describe a universal feature that calls for further investigation. It has been observed for a variety of geographical locations and different seasons.

  1. The potentiality of hydrocarbon generation of the Jurassic source rocks in Salam-3x well,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. El Nady

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the identification of the potential and generating capability of oil generation in the Jurassic source rocks in the Salam-3x well. This depending on the organo-geochemical analyses of cutting samples representative of Masajid, Khatatba and Ras Qattara formations, as well as, representative extract samples of the Khatatba and Ras Qattara formations. The geochemical analysis suggested the potential source intervals within the encountered rock units as follows: Masajid Formation bears mature source rocks and have poor to fair generating capability for generating gas (type III kerogen. Khatatba Formation bears mature source rock, and has poor to good generating capability for both oil and gas. Ras Qattara Formation constituting mature source rock has good to very good generating capability for both oil and gas. The burial history modeling shows that the Masajid Formation lies within oil and gas windows; Khatatba and Ras Qattara formations lie within the gas window. From the biomarker characteristics of source rocks it appears that the extract is genetically related as the majority of them were derived from marine organic matters sources (mainly algae deposited under reducing environment and take the direction of increasing maturity and far away from the direction of biodegradation. Therefore, Masajid Formation is considered as effective source rocks for generating hydrocarbons, while Khatatba and Ras Qattara formations are the main source rocks for hydrocarbon accumulations in the Salam-3x well.

  2. Resent Progress in Research on Calibration Instrument for Radioactive Aerosol Monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi-lin; CHEN; Yong-yong; WU; Chang-ping; XING; Yu; MENG; Jun; YANG; Qiao-ling

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive aerosol monitors are widely used in monitoring the radioactivity concentration of the artificial nuclides in gaseous effluents from the nuclear facilities.An on-developing calibration instrument for radioactive aerosol monitors consists of an α and β aerosol generating unit,aerosol transferring unit,measurement unit of radioactivity concentration of aerosol for instruments calibrated and the waste gas

  3. Bio-aerosols in indoor environment: composition, health effects and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Padma; Sudharsanam, Suchithra; Steinberg, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Bio-aerosols are airborne particles that are living (bacteria, viruses and fungi) or originate from living organisms. Their presence in air is the result of dispersal from a site of colonization or growth. The health effects of bio-aerosols including infectious diseases, acute toxic effects, allergies and cancer coupled with the threat of bioterrorism and SARS have led to increased awareness on the importance of bio-aerosols. The evaluation of bio-aerosols includes use of variety of methods for sampling depending on the concentration of microorganisms expected. There have been problems in developing standard sampling methods, in proving a causal relationship and in establishing threshold limit values for exposures due to the complexity of composition of bio-aerosols, variations in human response to their exposure and difficulties in recovering microorganisms. Currently bio-aerosol monitoring in hospitals is carried out for epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infectious diseases, research into airborne microorganism spread and control, monitoring biohazardous procedures and use as a quality control measure. In India there is little awareness regarding the quality of indoor air, mould contamination in indoor environments, potential source for transmission of nosocomial infections in health care facilities. There is an urgent need to undertake study of indoor air, to generate baseline data and explore the link to nosocomial infections. This article is a review on composition, sources, modes of transmission, health effects and sampling methods used for evaluation of bio-aerosols, and also suggests control measures to reduce the loads of bio-aerosols.

  4. Thermal potential of ion-exchange membranes and its application to thermoelectric power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, Miikka; Manzanares Andreu, Jose; Kontturi, Kyösti; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    The low efficiency and high price of thermoelectric semiconductors has generated interest in unconventional forms of thermoelectric materials. In this article, ionic thermoelectricity has been studied with commercial ion-exchange membranes for different aqueous 1:1 electrolytes. The theory of thermal membrane potential has been derived taking into account the ionic heats of transport, the non-isothermal Donnan potentials, the temperature polarization, and the thermally-induced concentration p...

  5. An economic analysis of the electricity generation potential from biogas resources in the state of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Juan S.

    Anaerobic digestion is a process that is a common part of organic waste management systems and is used in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The process produces biogas, which contains methane, and it can be burned to generate electricity. Previous reports have indicated that based on the availability of feedstocks there is a large potential for biogas production and use for electricity generation in the state of Indiana. However, these reports varied in their consideration of important factors that affect the technical and economic feasibility of being able to develop the resources available. The goal of this thesis is to make a more targeted assessment of the electricity generation potential from biogas resources at CAFOs, WWTPs, and MSW landfills in Indiana. A capital budgeting model is used to estimate the net present value (NPV) of biogas electricity projects at facilities that are identified as technically suitable. A statewide estimate of the potential generation capacity is made by estimating the number of facilities that could profitably undertake a biogas electricity project. In addition this thesis explored the impact that different incentive policies would have on the economic viability of these projects. The results indicated that the electricity generation potential is much smaller when technical and economic factors are taken into account in addition to feedstock availability. In particular it was found that projects at hog farms are unlikely to be economically feasible in the present even when financial incentives are considered. In total, 47.94 MW of potential generating capacity is estimated from biogas production at CAFOs, WWTPs, and MSW landfills. Though results indicated that 37.10 MW of capacity are economically feasible under current operating conditions, sensitivity analysis reveals that these projects are very sensitive to capital cost assumptions

  6. Institutional Analysis of Knowledge Generation Resource Potential at the Enterprises of Regional Military-Industrial Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Vasilyevich Popov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the processes of knowledge generation at the enterprises of military-industrial complex, which are the leaders of the regional innovative activity. The target of the research is to develop the methodology based on the use of resource application potential for increasing the efficiency of knowledge generation at the instrument-making enterprises of military-industrial complex. The system analysis of the knowledge generation processes is conducted at one of them. It allows to draw a conclusion that such enterprises have a lack of the institutes of knowledge generation processes. The authors are offered a technique of the development of the knowledge generation system at the military-industrial enterprises based on the accounting of assets and opportunities of the enterprise in the realization of intellectual activity. The developed technique is based on the determination of the horizontal resource potential of knowledge generation and allows to determine the potential of resource application at each stage of product life cycle. The comparison of the actual and theoretical values of horizontal resource potential allows to correct the distribution of a share of each of resources within a stage, and therefore, to optimize the realization of tasks at a specific stage. The offered tools were implemented in 2015 at one of the regional military-Industrial enterprises. The methodological tools of the research include the methods of expert assessment, mathematical statistics and the institutional analysis. On the basis of the offered technique and received empirical results, the institutional spiral of knowledge generation during the filling of state order at the military-industrial enterprise is developed. Its implementation will promote the decrease in the level of uncertainty during the whole life cycle of innovative activity product. The developed institutional spiral of knowledge generation at instrument-making military

  7. Dimethylamine Addition to Formaldehyde Catalyzed by a Single Water Molecule: A Facile Route for Atmospheric Carbinolamine Formation and Potential Promoter of Aerosol Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Matthew K; Francisco, Joseph S; Verdicchio, Marco; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Sinha, Amitabha

    2016-03-10

    We use ab initio calculations to investigate the energetics and kinetics associated with carbinolamine formation resulting from the addition of dimethylamine to formaldehyde catalyzed by a single water molecule. Further, we compare the energetics for this reaction with that for the analogous reactions involving methylamine and ammonia separately. We find that the reaction barrier for the addition of these nitrogen-containing molecules onto formaldehyde decreases along the series ammonia, methylamine, and dimethylamine. Hence, starting with ammonia, the reaction barrier can be "tuned" by the substitution of an alkyl group in place of a hydrogen atom. The reaction involving dimethylamine has the lowest barrier with the transition state being 5.4 kcal/mol below the (CH3)2NH + H2CO + H2O separated reactants. This activation energy is significantly lower than that for the bare reaction occurring without water, H2CO + (CH3)2NH, which has a barrier of 20.1 kcal/mol. The negative barrier associated with the single-water molecule catalyzed reaction of dimethylamine with H2CO to form the carbinolamine (CH3)2NCH2OH suggests that this reaction should be energetically feasible under atmospheric conditions. This is confirmed by rate calculations which suggest that the reaction will be facile even in the gas phase. As amines and oxidized organics containing carbonyl functional groups are common components of secondary organic aerosols, the present finding has important implications for understanding how larger, less volatile organic compounds can be generated in the atmosphere by combining readily available smaller components as required for promoting aerosol growth.

  8. Assessment of agricultural biomass potential to electricity generation in Riau Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papilo, P.; Kusumanto, I.; Kunaifi, K.

    2017-05-01

    Utilization of biomass as a source of electrical power is one potential solution that can be developed in order to increase of the electrification ratio and to Achieve the national energy security. However, now it is still difficult, to Determine the amount of potential energy that can be used as an alternative power generation. Therefore, as a preliminary step to assess the feasibility of biomass development as a power generation source, an analysis of potential resources are required, especially from some of the main commodities, both of residues of agriculture and plantation. This study aims to assessing the potential of biomass-based supply from unutilized resources that can be Obtained from the residues of agricultural and plantations sectors, such as rice straw and rice husk; Dry straw and chaff of rice; corn stalks and cobs; stalks of cassava; and fiber, shell, empty fruit Bunches, kernels and liquid wastes in the palm oil factories. More research is focused on the theoretical energy potential measurements using a statistical approach which has been developed by Biomass Energy Europe (BEE). Results of the assessment has been done and showed that the total theoretical biomass energy that can be produced is equal to 77,466,754.8 Gj year -1. Theoretically, this potential is equivalent to generate electricityof year 21,518,542.8 MWh -1.

  9. Mechanistic understanding of aerosol emissions from a brazing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A T; Biswas, P

    2000-01-01

    Welding operations produce gaseous and aerosol by-products that can have adverse health effects. A laboratory furnace study was conducted to aid understanding of the chemical and aerosol behavior of a widely used, self-fluxing brazing alloy (89% Cu, 6% Ag, 5% P) that is also used with a supplemental fluxing compound to prevent oxidation at the molten metal surface. The results indicate that the aerosols generated by the alloy are transient (produced over a short duration of time) and are associated with mass transfer of phosphorus species from the molten metal surface to the surrounding gas. In contrast, when the alloy was used in conjunction with the supplemental fluxing compound, a relatively nontransient, submicron-size aerosol was generated that was several orders of magnitude higher in concentration. Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis suggests that fluoride (a major constituent in the fluxing compound) played a significant role in reacting with the brazing alloy metals to form gas phase metal fluoride compounds that had high vapor pressures when compared with their elemental or oxide forms. As these metal-fluoride vapors cooled, submicron-size particles were formed mainly through nucleation and condensation growth processes. In addition, the equilibrium results revealed the potential formation of severe pulmonary irritants (HF and BF3) from heating the supplemental fluxing compound. These results demonstrated the importance of fluxing compounds in the formation of brazing fumes, and suggest that fluxing compounds could be selected that serve their metallurgical intention and suppress the formation of aerosols.

  10. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    OpenAIRE

    R. Chirico; P. F. DeCarlo; M. F. Heringa; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; WEHRLE G; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-01-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and the correspo...

  11. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    OpenAIRE

    R. Chirico; P. F. DeCarlo; M. F. Heringa; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; WEHRLE G; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-01-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and th...

  12. Assessment of the Potential of Biomass Gasification for Electricity Generation in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barun Kumar Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is an agriculture based country where more than 65 percent of the people live in rural areas and over 70% of total primary energy consumption is covered by biomass, mainly agricultural waste and wood. Only about 6% of the entire population has access to natural gas, primarily in urban areas. Electricity production in Bangladesh largely depends on fossil fuel whose reserve is now under threat and the government is now focusing on the alternating sources to harness electricity to meet the continuous increasing demand. To reduce the dependency on fossil fuels, biomass to electricity could play a vital role in this regard. This paper explores the biomass based power generation potential of Bangladesh through gasification technology—an efficient thermochemical process for distributed power generation. It has been estimated that the total power generation from the agricultural residue is about 1178 MWe. Among them, the generation potential from rice husk, and bagasses is 1010 MWe, and 50 MWe, respectively. On the other hand, wheat straw, jute stalks, maize residues, lentil straw, and coconut shell are also the promising biomass resources for power generation which counted around 118 MWe. The forest residue and municipal solid waste could also contribute to the total power generation 250 MWe and 100 MWe, respectively.

  13. A Study on Hydrocarbon—Generating Potential and Kinetics of Source—Rock Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查明; 毛超林; 等

    1995-01-01

    A study on the potential and kinetics of hydrocarborn(HC) generation of 30 source-rock samples from a certain depression has been made by means of ROCK-EVAL technique .In the pyrolysis experiment, the source material types, maturation and hydrocarbon-generating potential of source rocks from three Upper Jurassic horizons of that area have been evaluated in terms of such indicators as the type-index, hydrocarbon-generating potential and maximum pyrolysis temperaturw(Tmax) .The results show that the pyrolysis HC yield of immature source rocks is much higher than that of mature rocks in case that the source mateuial is of high quantity and organic matter is abundant, which suggests that it is important for evaluating the HC-generating potential to use immature samples for pyrolysis.In the pyrolytic simulation experiments on other two immature samples,it was found that the hydrocarbon yield is temperature-dependent, and thereafter the kinetical parameters for source rocks, such as reactional grade, appearant activation energy and frequency factor were calculated.

  14. Evaluation of potential opportunities for electric power generation from landfill gas at “Tsalapitsa”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganev Ivaylo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential opportunities for electric power generation from landfill gas (LFG utilization were estimated for the second largest landfill site in Bulgaria, situated near the city of Plovdiv. The work performed was based on detailed analysis of experimentally obtained and model-predicted features of the “Tsalapitsa” landfill site. The study presents a short description of the site, the global characteristics of the disposed municipal solid waste, and the experimentally obtained methane composition of the LFG. Based on the above described observations, the potential for LFG recovery at “Tsalapitsa” was determined, together with that for electric power generation for the next 25 years. A set of recommendations was then developed regarding the parameters required for the installation of electric power generation from LFG in Plovdiv.

  15. International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop on Aerosol Forecast Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  16. Measurement of scattering and absorption properties of dust aerosol in a Gobi farmland region of northwestern China - a potential anthropogenic influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jianrong; Huang, Jianping; Shi, Jinsen; Hu, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Tian; Zhang, Guolong; Huang, Zhongwei; Wang, Xin; Jin, Hongchun

    2017-06-01

    We conducted a comprehensive field campaign to explore the optical characteristics of mineral dust in Dunhuang farmland near the Gobi Desert of northwest China during spring of 2012. The day-to-day and diurnal variations of dust aerosol showed prominent features throughout the experiment, primarily attributable to frequent dust events and local anthropogenic emissions. The overall average mass concentrations of the particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 µm (PM10), light scattering coefficient (σsp, 670), absorption coefficient (σap, 670), and single-scattering albedo (SSA670) were 113 ± 169 µg m-3, 53.3 ± 74.8 Mm-1, 3.2 ± 2.4 Mm-1, and 0.913 ± 0.05, respectively, which were comparable to the background levels in the southern United States but smaller than those in the eastern and other northwestern Chinese cities. The anthropogenic dust produced by agricultural cultivations (e.g., land planning, plowing, and disking) exerted a significant superimposed effect on high dust concentrations in Dunhuang farmland prior to the growing season (i.e., from 1 April to 10 May). Strong south valley wind and vertical mixing in daytime scavenged the pollution, and the weak northeast mountain wind and stable inversion layer at night favorably accumulated the air pollutants near the surface. In the afternoon (13:00-18:00 LT, local time), mean SSA670 was 0.945 ± 0.04 predominantly from dust particles, whereas finer particles and lower SSA670 values ( ˜ 0.90-0.92) were measured at night, suggesting the potential influence by the mixed dust pollutants. During a typical biomass burning event on 4 April 2012, σap, 670 increased from ˜ 2.0 to 4.75 Mm-1 and SSA670 changed from ˜ 0.90 to ˜ 0.83, implying remarkable modification of aerosol absorptive properties induced by human activities. The findings of this study would help to advance an in-depth understanding of the interaction among dust aerosol, atmospheric chemistry, and climate change in a desert

  17. Combined X-Ray and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterization of Sea Spray Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Gilles, M. K.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Radway, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol along with mineral dust dominates the global mass flux of particles to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol particles are of particular interest because of their continual impact on cloud formation, precipitation, atmospheric chemical processes, and thus global climate. Here we report on the physical/chemical characteristics of sub-surface waters, aerosolized sea spray particles, and particles/organic species present in surface microlayer (SML) samples collected during oceanic field campaigns and generated during laboratory experiments, revealing a biogenic primary source of the organic fraction of airborne particles. We also report on ice nucleation experiments with aerosolized particles collected during the May 2014 WACS II North Atlantic cruise and with laboratory generated exudate material from diatom cultures with the potential to impact cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Physicochemical analyses using a multi-modal approach which includes Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near-Edge Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence and chemical similarity of polysaccharide-rich transparent exopolymer (TEP) material and proteins in both SML sea spray aerosol and ice forming aerosol particles, regardless of the extent of biological activity in surface waters. Our results demonstrate a direct relationship between the marine environment and composition of marine aerosol through primary particle emission.

  18. Aerosol transport in the coastal environment and effects on extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Leeuw, G. de; Berkowicz, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aerosol in the coastal environment consists of a complicated mixture of anthropogenic and rural aerosol generated over land, and sea spray aerosol. Also, particles are generate dover sea by physical and chemical processes and the chemical composition may change due to condensation/evaporation of

  19. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia: AEROSOL AND MONSOON CLIMATE INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhanqing [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Lau, W. K. -M. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Ramanathan, V. [Department of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences, University of California, San Diego California USA; Wu, G. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Ding, Y. [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing China; Manoj, M. G. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Liu, J. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Qian, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Li, J. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Zhou, T. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Fan, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Rosenfeld, D. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem Israel; Ming, Y. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory, NOAA, Princeton New Jersey USA; Wang, Y. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Huang, J. [College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou China; Wang, B. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Hawaii USA; School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Xu, X. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Lee, S. -S. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Cribb, M. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Zhang, F. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Yang, X. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Zhao, C. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Takemura, T. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Wang, K. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Xia, X. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Yin, Y. [School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Zhang, H. [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing China; Guo, J. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Zhai, P. M. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Sugimoto, N. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba Japan; Babu, S. S. [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram India; Brasseur, G. P. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-11-15

    Asian monsoons and aerosols have been studied extensively which are intertwined in influencing the climate of Asia. This paper provides a comprehensive review of ample studies on Asian aerosol, monsoon and their interactions. The region is the primary source of aerosol emissions of varies species, influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes. On continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulation. The atmospheric thermodynamic state may also be altered by the aerosol serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of numerous monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from biomass burning, and biogenic aerosols from vegetation are considered integral components of an intrinsic aerosol-monsoon climate system, subject to external forcings of global warming, anthropogenic aerosols, and land use and change. Future research on aerosol-monsoon interactions calls for an integrated approach and international collaborations based on long-term sustained observations, process measurements, and improved models, as well as using observations to constrain model simulations and projections.

  20. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F Galati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF regulates both action potential (AP generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  1. VDAC electronics: 2. A new, anaerobic mechanism of generation of the membrane potentials in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial hexokinase (HK) and creatine kinase (CK) known to form complexes with a voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) have been reported to increase cell death resistance under hypoxia/anoxia. In this work we propose a new, non-Mitchell mechanism of generation of the inner and outer membrane potentials at anaerobic conditions. The driving force is provided by the Gibbs free energy of the HK and CK reactions associated with the VDAC-HK and the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator)-CK-VDAC complexes, respectively, both functioning as voltage generators. In the absence of oxygen, the cytosolic creatine phosphate can be directly used by the ANT-CK-VDAC contact sites to produce ATP from ADP in the mitochondrial matrix. After that, ATP released through the fraction of unbound ANTs in exchange for ADP is used in the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the outer membrane VDAC-HK electrogenic complexes to convert cytosolic glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. A simple computational model based on the application of Ohm's law to an equivalent electrical circuit showed a possibility of generation of the inner membrane potential up to -160mV, under certain conditions, and of relatively high outer membrane potential without wasting of ATP that normally leads to cell death. The calculated membrane potentials depended on the restriction of ATP/ADP diffusion in narrow cristae and through the cristae junctions. We suggest that high inner membrane potential and calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by generated positive outer membrane potential prevent mitochondrial permeability transition, thus allowing the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and cell survival in the absence of oxygen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  3. The potential of nuclear energy to generate clean electric power in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stecher, Luiza C.; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Menzel, Francine; Giarola, Rodrigo S.; Coelho, Talita S., E-mail: luizastecher@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The generation of electricity in Brazil is concentrated in hydroelectric generation, renewable and clean source, but that does not satisfy all the demand and leads to necessity of a supplementary thermal sources portion. Considering the predictions of increase in demand for electricity in the next years, it becomes necessary to insert new sources to complement the production taking into account both the volume being produced and the needs of environmental preservation. Thus, nuclear power can be considered a potential supplementary source for electricity generation in Brazil as well as the country has large reserves of fissile material, the generation emits no greenhouse gases, the country has technological mastery of the fuel cycle and it enables the production of large volumes of clean energy. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the potential of nuclear energy in electricity production in Brazil cleanly and safely, ensuring the supplies necessary to maintain the country's economic growth and the increased demand sustainable. For this, will be made an analysis of economic and social indicators of the characteristics of our energy matrix and the availability of our sources, as well as a description of the nuclear source and arguments that justify a higher share of nuclear energy in the matrix of the country. Then, after these analysis, will notice that the generation of electricity from nuclear source has all the conditions to supplement safely and clean supply of electricity in Brazil. (author)

  4. Propagation of respiratory aerosols by the vuvuzela.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Man Lai

    Full Text Available Vuvuzelas, the plastic blowing horns used by sports fans, recently achieved international recognition during the FIFA World Cup soccer tournament in South Africa. We hypothesised that vuvuzelas might facilitate the generation and dissemination of respiratory aerosols. To investigate the quantity and size of aerosols emitted when the instrument is played, eight healthy volunteers were asked to blow a vuvuzela. For each individual the concentration of particles in expelled air was measured using a six channel laser particle counter and the duration of blowing and velocity of air leaving the vuvuzela were recorded. To allow comparison with other activities undertaken at sports events each individual was also asked to shout and the measurements were repeated while using a paper cone to confine the exhaled air. Triplicate measurements were taken for each individual. The mean peak particle counts were 658 × 10(3 per litre for the vuvuzela and 3.7 × 10(3 per litre for shouting, representing a mean log(10 difference of 2.20 (95% CI: 2.03,2.36; p 97% of particles captured from either the vuvuzela or shouting were between 0.5 and 5 microns in diameter. Mean peak airflows recorded for the vuvuzela and shouting were 6.1 and 1.8 litres per second respectively. We conclude that plastic blowing horns (vuvuzelas have the capacity to propel extremely large numbers of aerosols into the atmosphere of a size able to penetrate the lower lung. Some respiratory pathogens are spread via contaminated aerosols emitted by infected persons. Further investigation is required to assess the potential of the vuvuzela to contribute to the transmission of aerosol borne diseases. We recommend, as a precautionary measure, that people with respiratory infections should be advised not to blow their vuvuzela in enclosed spaces and where there is a risk of infecting others.

  5. A Novel Algorithm of Forecasting the Potential Development of Generation in the Distribution Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Bajor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel method of forecasting the potential for the development of various types of generation, including renewable, connecting to the distribution grid. The proposed algorithm is based on the idea of identifying different factors influencing the possibility of developing various types of generation in different time horizons. Descriptions of subsequent stages of the forecasting procedure, used terms and the software implementing the algorithm, developed by the authors, are also included in the paper. Finally, comments regarding the reliability of the results obtained using the method are described.

  6. The second harmonic generation in symmetrical and asymmetrical Gaussian potential quantum wells with applied electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Hui; Chen, Ni; Mo, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Hai

    2015-12-01

    A detailed investigation of the second harmonic generation in symmetrical and asymmetrical Gaussian potential quantum wells under the influence of applied electric field by using the compact-density-matrix approach and the finite difference method. The results show that the second-harmonic generation susceptibility obtained in two cases can reach the magnitude of 10-4 m/V, which depend dramatically on the applied electric field and the structural parameters. Finally, the resonant peak and its corresponding to the resonant energy are also taken into account.

  7. Hydrocarbon Generating Potential of Mineral—Bituminous Matrix in Source Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建平; 黄第藩

    1998-01-01

    Mineral-bituminous matrix(MBM) makes up a major part of source rocks,but its potential in hydrocarbon generation is uncertain,Mineral and organic (Maceral and kerogen) compositions,organic maturity and fluorescence of MBM are studied based on source rock samples from eastern Jiuquan(Jiudong)Basin.The results show that MBM is dominated by inorganic minerals and among the small percentage of organic components those of secondary origins are predominant over the primary species.This strongly indicates that the significance of MBM in hydrocarbon generation is limited.

  8. Feasibility and performance evaluation of generating and recording visual evoked potentials using ambulatory Bluetooth based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Roger M; Oken, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Report contains the design overview and key performance measurements demonstrating the feasibility of generating and recording ambulatory visual stimulus evoked potentials using the previously reported custom Complementary and Alternative Medicine physiologic data collection and monitoring system, CAMAS. The methods used to generate visual stimuli on a PDA device and the design of an optical coupling device to convert the display to an electrical waveform which is recorded by the CAMAS base unit are presented. The optical sensor signal, synchronized to the visual stimulus emulates the brain's synchronized EEG signal input to CAMAS normally reviewed for the evoked potential response. Most importantly, the PDA also sends a marker message over the wireless Bluetooth connection to the CAMAS base unit synchronized to the visual stimulus which is the critical averaging reference component to obtain VEP results. Results show the variance in the latency of the wireless marker messaging link is consistent enough to support the generation and recording of visual evoked potentials. The averaged sensor waveforms at multiple CPU speeds are presented and demonstrate suitability of the Bluetooth interface for portable ambulatory visual evoked potential implementation on our CAMAS platform.

  9. A ten-year global record of absorbing aerosols above clouds from OMI's near-UV observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torrres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction continues to be one of the leading uncertain components of climate models, primarily due to the lack of an adequate knowledge of the complex microphysical and radiative processes associated with the aerosolcloud system. The situations when aerosols and clouds are found in the same atmospheric column, for instance, when light-absorbing aerosols such as biomass burning generated carbonaceous particles or wind-blown dust overlay low-level cloud decks, are commonly found over several regional of the world. Contrary to the cloud-free scenario over dark surface, for which aerosols are known to produce a net cooling effect (negative radiative forcing) on climate, the overlapping situation of absorbing aerosols over cloud can potentially exert a significant level of atmospheric absorption and produces a positive radiative forcing at top-of-atmosphere. The magnitude of direct radiative effects of aerosols above cloud depends directly on the aerosol loading, microphysical-optical properties of the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud deck, and geometric cloud fraction. We help in addressing this problem by introducing a novel product of optical depth of absorbing aerosols above clouds retrieved from near-UV observations made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board NASA's Aura platform. The presence of absorbing aerosols above cloud reduces the upwelling radiation reflected by cloud and produces a strong `color ratio' effect in the near-UV region, which can be unambiguously detected in the OMI measurements. Physically based on this effect, the OMACA algorithm retrieves the optical depths of aerosols and clouds simultaneously under a prescribed state of atmosphere. The algorithm architecture and results from a ten-year global record including global climatology of frequency of occurrence and above-cloud aerosol optical depth, and a discussion on related future field campaigns are presented.

  10. THEORY OF GENERATIONS AS A TOOL FOR ANALYSIS, FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF LABOUR POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Gurova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern Strauss–Howe generational theory created at the intersection of economic, sociological, historical and psychological Sciences. She focuses primarily on difference of attitudes of generations, due to the specific social environment, corresponding to a certain period of time. Such a perspective on issues related to the human factor in the economy, has recently attracted interest not only from researchers, but also finds application for solving practical problems in some fields of business.Subject / theme. The article is devoted to one of the urgent contemporary socio-economic problems – the issue of the formation and development of labor potential. In this context, the theory of generations is offered by the authors as a tool for the study of qualitative parameters of human resources and the planning of future work opportunities in our country. In particular, the article considers the main aspects of the classical version of the Strauss–Howe generational theory and its Russian adaptation. Statistics describing the General demographics and working population of Russia from the point of view of generational groups. On this basis, a forecast is made of the labor potential of the country in the long term structure, review and compare the basic values and business characteristics of its constituent generations. Problem areas for which use of generational approach is rational are revealed and the corresponding recommendations are made.Objectives. The purpose of this article is justification of the possible application of provisions of modern theories of generations to identify and predict the dynamics of qualitative characteristics of the domestic workforce, as well as the prospects of its use in order to control the formation and development of labor potential.Methods. Methodological basis of the presented work make comparative and economic-statistical and socio-cultural methods of analysis.Results. In the framework of this article

  11. A continuum model of piezoelectric potential generated in a bent ZnO nanorod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Z Z; Wen, L Y; Wu, D M [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China); Wang, X F; Zhang, X A; Chang, S L, E-mail: zzshao2009@gmail.co [Center of Materials Science, College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2010-06-23

    A continuum model of piezoelectric potential generated in a bent ZnO nanorod cantilever is presented by means of the first piezoelectric effect approximation. The analytical solution of the model shows that the piezoelectric potential in the nanorod is proportional to the lateral force but is independent along the longitudinal direction. The electric potential in the tensile area and that in the compressive area are antisymmetric in the cross section of the nanorod, which makes the nanorod a 'parallel plate capacitor' for piezoelectric nanodevices, such as a nanogenerator. The magnitude of piezoelectric potential for a ZnO nanorod of 50 nm diameter and 600 nm length bent by a 80 nN lateral force is about 0.27 V, which is in good agreement with the finite element method calculation.

  12. Mesoscale generation of available potential energy in the warm sector of an extratropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Ruminski, M. G.; Starr, D. OC.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of available potential energy (APE) was evaluated in the warm sector of an extratropical cyclone containing intense convective activity. Mesoscale rawinsonde data from AVE-SESAME '79 was employed. Parametrization techniques were used for latent and sensible heating components, and variations for the Kuo scheme provided convective latent heat release. Radiative transfer models were used to obtain estimates of infrared and solar processes. The results indicated that solar heating was greater than IR cooling near midday. An extensive low-level cloud deck was the most radiatively active area. Negative generation of APE occurred during most of the period for the SESAME domain as a whole. The leading contributor was convective latent heating located primarily in regions of negative efficiency. Infrared cooling was the only component to consistently produce positive generation. Sensible heating provided an important sink of APE in the low levels during the afternoon.

  13. Second generation bioethanol potential from selected Malaysia's biodiversity biomasses: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditiya, H B; Chong, W T; Mahlia, T M I; Sebayang, A H; Berawi, M A; Nur, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperature, worsening air quality and drastic declining of fossil fuel reserve are the inevitable phenomena from the disorganized energy management. Bioethanol is believed to clear out the effects as being an energy-derivable product sourced from renewable organic sources. Second generation bioethanol interests many researches from its unique source of inedible biomass, and this paper presents the potential of several selected biomasses from Malaysia case. As one of countries with rich biodiversity, Malaysia holds enormous potential in second generation bioethanol production from its various agricultural and forestry biomasses, which are the source of lignocellulosic and starch compounds. This paper reviews potentials of biomasses and potential ethanol yield from oil palm, paddy (rice), pineapple, banana and durian, as the common agricultural waste in the country but uncommon to be served as bioethanol feedstock, by calculating the theoretical conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and starch components of the biomasses into bioethanol. Moreover, the potential of the biomasses as feedstock are discussed based on several reported works.

  14. A new field method to characterise the runoff generation potential of burned hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Gary; Lane, Patrick; Langhans, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of post fire runoff generation is critical for the estimation of post fire erosion processes and rates. Typical field measures for determining infiltration model parameters include ring infiltrometers, tension infiltrometers, rainfall simulators and natural runoff plots. However predicting the runoff generating potential of post-fire hillslopes is difficult due to the high spatial variability of soil properties relative to the size of the measurement method, the poorly understood relationship between water repellence and runoff generation, known scaling issues with all the above hydraulic measurements, and logistical limitations for measurements in remote environments. In this study we tested a new field method for characterizing surface runoff generation potential that overcomes these limitations and is quick, simple and cheap to apply in the field. The new field method involves the manual application of a 40mm depth of Brilliant Blue FCF food dye along a 10cm wide and 5m long transect along the contour under slightly-ponded conditions. After 24 hours the transect is excavated to a depth of 10cm and the percentage dyed area within the soil profile recorded manually. The dyed area is an index of infiltration potential of the soil during intense rainfall events, and captures both spatial variability and water repellence effects. The dye measurements were made adjacent to long term instrumented post fire rainfall-runoff plots on 7 contrasting soil types over a 6 month period, and the results show surprisingly strong correlations (r2 = 0.9) between the runoff-ratio from the plots and the dyed area. The results are used to develop an initial conceptual model that links the dye index with an infiltration model and parameters suited to burnt hillslopes. The capacity of this method to provide a simple, and reliable indicator of post fire runoff potential from different fire severities, soil types and treatments is explored in this presentation.

  15. Inbuilt Potential of YEM Medium and Its Constituents to Generate Ag/Ag2O Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yamal, G.; Sharmila, P.; Rao, K. S.; Pardha-Saradhi, P.

    2013-01-01

    We discovered that Yeast Extract Mannitol (YEM) medium possessed immense potential to generate silver nanoparticles from AgNO3 upon autoclaving, which was evident from (i) alteration in color of the medium; (ii) peak at ∼410 nm in UV-Vis spectrum due to surface plasmon resonance specific to silver nanoparticles; and (iii) TEM investigations. TEM coupled with EDX confirmed that distinct nanoparticles were composed of silver. Yeast extract and mannitol were key components of YEM medium responsi...

  16. Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Annette C.; Campleman, Sharan L.; Long, Christopher M.; Peterson, Michael K.; Weatherstone, Susan; Quick, Will; Lewis, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is increasingly being used for power generation; however, assessment of potential occupational health and safety (OH&S) concerns related to usage of biomass fuels in combustion-based generation remains limited. We reviewed the available literature on known and potential OH&S issues associated with biomass-based fuel usage for electricity generation at the utility scale. We considered three potential exposure scenarios—pre-combustion exposure to material associated with the fuel, exposure to combustion products, and post-combustion exposure to ash and residues. Testing of dust, fungal and bacterial levels at two power stations was also undertaken. Results indicated that dust concentrations within biomass plants can be extremely variable, with peak levels in some areas exceeding occupational exposure limits for wood dust and general inhalable dust. Fungal spore types, identified as common environmental species, were higher than in outdoor air. Our review suggests that pre-combustion risks, including bioaerosols and biogenic organics, should be considered further. Combustion and post-combustion risks appear similar to current fossil-based combustion. In light of limited available information, additional studies at power plants utilizing a variety of technologies and biomass fuels are recommended. PMID:26206568

  17. Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette C. Rohr

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is increasingly being used for power generation; however, assessment of potential occupational health and safety (OH&S concerns related to usage of biomass fuels in combustion-based generation remains limited. We reviewed the available literature on known and potential OH&S issues associated with biomass-based fuel usage for electricity generation at the utility scale. We considered three potential exposure scenarios—pre-combustion exposure to material associated with the fuel, exposure to combustion products, and post-combustion exposure to ash and residues. Testing of dust, fungal and bacterial levels at two power stations was also undertaken. Results indicated that dust concentrations within biomass plants can be extremely variable, with peak levels in some areas exceeding occupational exposure limits for wood dust and general inhalable dust. Fungal spore types, identified as common environmental species, were higher than in outdoor air. Our review suggests that pre-combustion risks, including bioaerosols and biogenic organics, should be considered further. Combustion and post-combustion risks appear similar to current fossil-based combustion. In light of limited available information, additional studies at power plants utilizing a variety of technologies and biomass fuels are recommended.

  18. Climatic effects of 1950–2050 changes in US anthropogenic aerosols – Part 2: Climate response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Leibensperger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the climate response to US anthropogenic aerosol sources over the 1950 to 2050 period by using the NASA GISS general circulation model (GCM and comparing to observed US temperature trends. Time-dependent aerosol distributions are generated from the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model applied to historical emission inventories and future projections. Radiative forcing from US anthropogenic aerosols peaked in 1970–1990 and has strongly declined since due to air quality regulations. We find that the regional radiative forcing from US anthropogenic aerosols elicits a strong regional climate response, cooling the central and eastern US by 0.5–1.0 °C on average during 1970–1990, with the strongest effects on maximum daytime temperatures in summer and autumn. Aerosol cooling reflects comparable contributions from direct and indirect (cloud-mediated radiative effects. Absorbing aerosol (mainly black carbon has negligible warming effect. Aerosol cooling reduces surface evaporation and thus decreases precipitation along the US east coast, but also increases the southerly flow of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico resulting in increased cloud cover and precipitation in the central US. Observations over the eastern US show a lack of warming in 1960–1980 followed by very rapid warming since, which we reproduce in the GCM and attribute to trends in US anthropogenic aerosol sources. Present US aerosol concentrations are sufficiently low that future air quality improvements are projected to cause little further warming in the US (0.1 °C over 2010–2050. We find that most of the potential warming from aerosol source controls in the US has already been realized over the 1980–2010 period.

  19. Electronic cigarette aerosols and copper nanoparticles induce mitochondrial stress and promote DNA fragmentation in lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, Chad A.; Rutagarama, Pierrot; Ahmad, Tanveer; Sundar, Isaac K.; Elder, Alison; Rahman, Irfan, E-mail: irfan_rahman@urmc.rochester.edu

    2016-09-02

    Oxidants or nanoparticles have recently been identified as constituents of aerosols released from various styles of electronic cigarettes (E-cigs). Cells in the lung may be directly exposed to these constituents and harbor reactive properties capable of incurring acute cell injury. Our results show mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and aerosol containing copper nanoparticles when exposed to human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) using an Air-Liquid Interface culture system, evident by elevated levels of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS). Increased mtROS after aerosol exposure is associated with reduced stability of OxPhos electron transport chain (ETC) complex IV subunit and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Increased levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in HFL-1 conditioned media were also observed. These findings reveal both mitochondrial, genotoxic, and inflammatory stresses are features of direct cell exposure to E-cig aerosols which are ensued by inflammatory duress, raising a concern on deleterious effect of vaping. - Graphical abstract: Oxidants and possibly reactive properties of metal particles in E-cig aerosols impart mitochondrial oxidative stress and DNA damage. These biological effects accompany inflammatory response which may raise concern regarding long term E-cig use. Mitochondria may be particularly sensitive to reactive properties of E-cig aerosols in addition to the potential for them to induce genotoxic stress by generating increased ROS. - Highlights: • Mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and metal nanoparticles. • Increased mtROS by E-cig aerosol is associated with disrupted mitochondrial energy. • E-cig causes nuclear DNA fragmentation. • E-cig aerosols induce pro-inflammatory response in human fibroblasts.

  20. Aerosols generated during beryllium machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyny, J W; Hoover, M D; Mroz, M M; Ellis, K; Maier, L A; Sheff, K L; Newman, L S

    2000-01-01

    Some beryllium processes, especially machining, are associated with an increased risk of beryllium sensitization and disease. Little is known about exposure characteristics contributing to risk, such as particle size. This study examined the characteristics of beryllium machining exposures under actual working conditions. Stationary samples, using eight-stage Lovelace Multijet Cascade Impactors, were taken at the process point of operation and at the closest point that the worker would routinely approach. Paired samples were collected at the operator's breathing zone by using a Marple Personal Cascade Impactor and a 35-mm closed-faced cassette. More than 50% of the beryllium machining particles in the breathing zone were less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter. This small particle size may result in beryllium deposition into the deepest portion of the lung and may explain elevated rates of sensitization among beryllium machinists.

  1. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: laboratory experimental demonstration of the transport pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Shu, Xin; Dugas, Victoria; Woodson, Isaiah; Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga; Zhang, Zenghui; Hung, Francisco R; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills in the deep-sea environment such as the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico release vast quantities of crude oil into the sea-surface environment. Various investigators have discussed the marine transport and fate of the oil into different environmental compartments (air, water, sediment, and biota). The transport of the oil into the atmosphere in these previous investigations has been limited to only evaporation, a volatility dependent pathway. In this work, we studied the aerosolization of oil spill matter via bursting bubbles as they occur during whitecaps in a laboratory aerosolization reactor. By evaluating the alkane content in oil mousse, crude oil, the gas phase, and particulate matter we clearly demonstrate that aerosolization via bursting bubbles is a solubility and volatility independent transport pathway for alkanes. The signature of alkane fractions in the native oil and aerosolized matter matched well especially for the less volatile alkanes (C20-C29). Scanning electron microscope interfaced with energy dispersive X-ray images identified the carbon fractions associated with salt particles of aerosols. Theoretical molecular dynamics simulations in the accompanying paper lend support to the observed propensity for alkanes at air-salt water interfaces of breaking bubbles and the produced droplets. The presence of a dispersant in the aqueous phase increased the oil ejection rate at the surface especially for the C20-C29 alkanes. The information presented here emphasizes the need to further study sea-spray aerosols as a possible transport vector for spilled oil in the sea surface environment.

  2. Potential feedback between aerosols and meteorological conditions in a heavy pollution event over the Tibetan Plateau and Indo-Gangetic Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junhua; Duan, Keqin; Kang, Shichang; Shi, Peihong; Ji, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    A regional climate model, WRF-Chem, was used to investigate the feedback between aerosols and meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The numerical experiments (15-km horizontal resolution) with and without the aerosol effects are driven by reanalysis of data for 1-31 March 2009, when a heavy pollution event (13-19 March) occurred. The results showed that the model captured the spatial and temporal meteorological conditions and aerosol optical characteristics during the heavy pollution days. Aerosols induced cooling at the surface and warming in the middle troposphere due to their radiative effects, and resulted in a more stable PBL over the IGP. Aerosol-induced 2-m relative humidity (RH) was increased. The stable PBL likely led to the surface PM2.5 concentration increase of up to 21 μg m-3 (15 %) over the IGP. For the TP, the atmospheric profile did not drastically change due to fewer radiative effects of aerosols in the PBL compared with those over the IGP. The aerosol-induced RH decreased due to cloud albedo and cloud lifetime effect, and led to a reduction in surface PM2.5 concentration of up to 17 μg m-3 (13 %). These results suggest a negative and positive feedback over the TP and IGP, respectively, between aerosol concentrations and changes of aerosol-induced meteorological conditions. Similar positive feedbacks have been observed in other heavily polluted regions (e.g., the North China Plain). The results have implications for the study of air pollution on weather and environment over the TP and IGP.

  3. Potential feedback between aerosols and meteorological conditions in a heavy pollution event over the Tibetan Plateau and Indo-Gangetic Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junhua; Duan, Keqin; Kang, Shichang; Shi, Peihong; Ji, Zhenming

    2017-05-01

    A regional climate model, WRF-Chem, was used to investigate the feedback between aerosols and meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The numerical experiments (15-km horizontal resolution) with and without the aerosol effects are driven by reanalysis of data for 1-31 March 2009, when a heavy pollution event (13-19 March) occurred. The results showed that the model captured the spatial and temporal meteorological conditions and aerosol optical characteristics during the heavy pollution days. Aerosols induced cooling at the surface and warming in the middle troposphere due to their radiative effects, and resulted in a more stable PBL over the IGP. Aerosol-induced 2-m relative humidity (RH) was increased. The stable PBL likely led to the surface PM2.5 concentration increase of up to 21 μg m-3 (15 %) over the IGP. For the TP, the atmospheric profile did not drastically change due to fewer radiative effects of aerosols in the PBL compared with those over the IGP. The aerosol-induced RH decreased due to cloud albedo and cloud lifetime effect, and led to a reduction in surface PM2.5 concentration of up to 17 μg m-3 (13 %). These results suggest a negative and positive feedback over the TP and IGP, respectively, between aerosol concentrations and changes of aerosol-induced meteorological conditions. Similar positive feedbacks have been observed in other heavily polluted regions (e.g., the North China Plain). The results have implications for the study of air pollution on weather and environment over the TP and IGP.

  4. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced.

  5. pfSNP: An integrated potentially functional SNP resource that facilitates hypotheses generation through knowledge syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Chong, Samuel S; Lee, Caroline G L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, >14,000,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are reported. Identifying phenotype-affecting SNPs among these many SNPs pose significant challenges. Although several Web resources are available that can inform about the functionality of SNPs, these resources are mainly annotation databases and are not very comprehensive. In this article, we present a comprehensive, well-annotated, integrated pfSNP (potentially functional SNPs) Web resource (http://pfs.nus.edu.sg/), which is aimed to facilitate better hypothesis generation through knowledge syntheses mediated by better data integration and a user-friendly Web interface. pfSNP integrates >40 different algorithms/resources to interrogate >14,000,000 SNPs from the dbSNP database for SNPs of potential functional significance based on previous published reports, inferred potential functionality from genetic approaches as well as predicted potential functionality from sequence motifs. Its query interface has the user-friendly "auto-complete, prompt-as-you-type" feature and is highly customizable, facilitating different combination of queries using Boolean-logic. Additionally, to facilitate better understanding of the results and aid in hypotheses generation, gene/pathway-level information with text clouds highlighting enriched tissues/pathways as well as detailed-related information are also provided on the results page. Hence, the pfSNP resource will be of great interest to scientists focusing on association studies as well as those interested to experimentally address the functionality of SNPs.

  6. [Mechanism of the generation of evoked potentials in the rabbit neocortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockberger, H; Rappelsberger, P

    1983-12-01

    This paper describes the analyses of evoked potentials recorded in different neocortical areas (Area precentralis 1 and 2, occipitalis 1 and 2) and elicited by different stimulation techniques (antidromic stimulation of the pyramidal tract, electrical stimulation of thalamic nuclei, the optic nerve and finally random dot stimulation of the retina). Field potentials were recorded intracortically with a 16-fold electrode. The analyses of field potentials with the current-source-density method yielded an estimation of the current source and sink density distributions within the six neocortical layers. Hence spatio-temporal patterns of layer specific activation processes (sinks and sources) can be described for the various evoked potentials. The results can be summarized as follows: every evoked potential shows a spatio-temporal pattern of sources and sinks which is independent of the neocortical area and the mode of stimulation. However, the late components of the evoked potentials show great variations in their generation mechanisms, thus indicating regional differences in neocortical architectonics. These observations are discussed with regard to morphology, electrical activity and functional properties of the studied neocortical areas.

  7. Research of transport and deposition of aerosol in human airway replica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mravec Filip

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern about knowledge of aerosol transport in human lungs is caused by great potential of use of inhaled pharmaceuticals. Second substantial motive for the research is an effort to minimize adverse effects of particular matter emitted by traffic and industry on human health. We created model geometry of human lungs to 7th generation of branching. This model geometry was used for fabrication of two physical models. The first one is made from thin walled transparent silicone and it allows a measurement of velocity and size of aerosol particles by Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA. The second one is fabricated by stereolithographic method and it is designed for aerosol deposition measurements. We provided a series of measurements of aerosol transport in the transparent model and we ascertained remarkable phenomena linked with lung flow. The results are presented in brief. To gather how this phenomena affects aerosol deposition in human lungs we used the second model and we developed a technique for deposition fraction and deposition efficiency assessment. The results confirmed that non-symmetric and complicated shape of human airways essentially affects transport and deposition of aerosol. The research will now focus on deeper insight in aerosol deposition.

  8. In vivo evaluation of the potential neurotoxicity of aerosols released from mechanical stress of nano-TiO2 additived paints in mice chronically exposed by inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manixay, S.; Delaby, S.; Gaie-Levrel, F.; Wiart, M.; Motzkus, C.; Bencsik, A.

    2017-06-01

    Engineered Nanomaterials (ENM) provide technical and specific benefits due to their physical-chemical properties at the nanometer scale. For instance, many ENM are used to improve products in the building industry. Nanoscaled titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most used ENM in this industry. Incorporated in different matrix, cement, glass, paints… TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) provide the final product with anti-UV, air purification and self-cleaning properties, thanks to their photocatalytic activity. However, ageing processes of such products, as photocatalytic paints, during a mechanical stress have been shown to release TiO2 NPs from this matrix associated with sanding dust. Thus, workers who sand painted walls could be exposed to TiO2 NPs through inhalation. As inhalation may lead to a translocation of particulate matter to the brain via olfactory or trigeminal nerves, there is an urgent need for evaluating a potential neurotoxicity. In order to provide new knowledge on this topic, we developed a dedicated experimental set-up using a rodent model exposed via inhalation. The aerosol released from a mechanical stress of photocatalytic paints containing TiO2 NPs was characterized and coupled to an exposition chamber containing group of mice free to move and chronically exposed (2 hours per day for 5 days a week during 8 weeks).

  9. Investigation of the formation of benzoyl peroxide, benzoic anhydride, and other potential aerosol products from gas-phase reactions of benzoylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, Christen M.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products of the reaction of benzaldehyde with Cl atoms and with OH radicals in air in the absence of NOx were investigated in an environmental chamber in order to better understand the possible role of organic peroxy radical self-reactions in SOA formation. SOA products and authentic standards were analyzed using mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, and results show that the yields of benzoyl peroxide (C6H5C(O)OO(O)CC6H5) and benzoic anhydride (C6H5C(O)O(O)CC6H5), two potential products from the gas-phase self-reaction of benzoylperoxy radicals (C6H5C(O)OO·), were less than 0.1%. This is in contrast to results of recent studies that have shown that the gas-phase self-reactions of β-nitrooxyperoxy radicals formed from reactions of isoprene with NO3 radicals form dialkyl peroxides that contribute significantly to gas-phase and SOA products. Such reactions have also been proposed to explain the gas-phase formation of extremely low volatility dimers from autooxidation of terpenes. The results obtained here indicate that, at least for benzoylperoxy radicals, the self-reactions form only benzoyloxy radicals. Analyses of SOA composition and volatility were inconclusive, but it appears that the SOA may consist primarily of oligomers formed through heterogeneous/multiphase reactions possibly involving some combination of phenol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and peroxybenzoic acid.

  10. Generation of spatiotemporally correlated spike trains and local field potentials using a multivariate autoregressive process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutnisky, Diego A; Josić, Kresimir

    2010-05-01

    Experimental advances allowing for the simultaneous recording of activity at multiple sites have significantly increased our understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns in neural activity. The impact of such patterns on neural coding is a fundamental question in neuroscience. The simulation of spike trains with predetermined activity patterns is therefore an important ingredient in the study of potential neural codes. Such artificially generated spike trains could also be used to manipulate cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo. Here, we propose a method to generate spike trains with given mean firing rates and cross-correlations. To capture this statistical structure we generate a point process by thresholding a stochastic process that is continuous in space and discrete in time. This stochastic process is obtained by filtering Gaussian noise through a multivariate autoregressive (AR) model. The parameters of the AR model are obtained by a nonlinear transformation of the point-process correlations to the continuous-process correlations. The proposed method is very efficient and allows for the simulation of large neural populations. It can be optimized to the structure of spatiotemporal correlations and generalized to nonstationary processes and spatiotemporal patterns of local field potentials and spike trains.

  11. Long-term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Eastern Lapland, Finland: the impact of Kola air pollution to new particle formation and potential CCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrö, Ella-Maria; Väänänen, Riikka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Virkkula, Aki; Asmi, Ari; Nieminen, Tuomo; Dal Maso, Miikka; Petäjä, Tuukka; Keronen, Petri; Aalto, Pasi; Riipinen, Ilona; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Hari, Pertti; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    Sulphur and primary emissions have been decreasing largely all over Europe, resulting in improved air quality and decreased direct radiation forcing by aerosols. The smelter industry in Kola Peninsula is one of largest sources of anthropogenic SO2 within the Arctic domain and since late 1990s the sulphur emissions have been decreasing rapidly (Paatero et al., 2008; Prank et al., 2010). New particle formation (NPF) is tightly linked with the oxidizing product of SO2, namely sulphuric acid (H2SO4), since it is known to be the key component in atmospheric nucleation (Sipilä et al., 2010). Thus, decreasing sulphur pollution may lead to less NPF. However, low values of condensation sink (CS), which is determined by the amount of pre-existing particles, favours NPF. We used 14 years (1998-2011) of aerosol number size distribution and trace gas data from SMEAR I station in Eastern Lapland, Finland, to investigate these relationships between SO2, NPF and CS. The station is a clean background station with occasional sulphur pollution episodes when the air masses arrive over Kola Peninsula. We found that while SO2 decreased by 11.3 % / year, the number of clear NPF event days was also decreasing by 9.9 % / year. At the same time, CS was decreasing also (-8.0 % / year) leading to formation of more particles per single NPF event (J3 increased by 29.7 % / year in 2006-2011) but the low vapour concentrations of H2SO4 (proxy decreased by 6.2 % / year) did not allow them to grow into climatically relevant sizes. Over the time, concentrations of potential CCN (cloud condensing nuclei) were also decreasing with more moderate pace, -4.0 % / year. The events started on average earlier after sunrise when the SO2 concentration during the start of the event was higher and NPF occurred more frequently in air masses which were travelling over Kola. Despite the total decrease in sulphur pollution originating from Kola there is currently no evidence of cleaning of the emissions, rather the

  12. MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF AN AEROSOL GENERATOR FOR VERY HIGH NUMBER CURRENTS BASED ON A FREE TURBULENT JET. (R827354C008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we report on theoretical and experimental work on aerosol formation in a free turbulent jet. A hot DEHS vapor issues through a circular nozzle into slowly moving cold air. Vapor concentration and temperatures are such that particles are formed via homogeneous nuc...

  13. Generation and marketing of secondaries. Situation and potentials; Herstellung und Vermarktung von Sekundaerrohstoffen. Situation, Probleme, Loesungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, T.U. [bvse - Bundesverband Sekundaerrohstoffe und Entsorgung e.V., Bonn (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    For reasons of protection of the environment and the climate waste management is shifted more and more towards the generation of resources meeting the requirements of an industrial society. This development of sustainable use of waste derived resources is supported by the steadily increasing prices for energy and primary sources. National, European, and international politics enhance the generation of secondaries for instance by the 3R initiative of the G8 nations. Thus, waste management is performed to obtain more secondaries, to use their energy contents, and to reduce the hazardous potential in waste flows. Secondaries are used either to substitute primary sources or fuels. For years, medium sized companies extract valuable resource from waste flows, especially since they do not operate disposal sites. Thus, secondary raw materials can be generated, on the background of better prices, more competitive to primary sources out of monofractions and from mixture flows. Besides the use of secondaries in primary markets they created their own markets. To enhance the quantities of secondaries, the various waste flows have to be kept strictly separately from household wastes. Thus, the medium sized companies efficiently fulfil the political and market requirements and generate valuable resources. (orig.)

  14. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siomos N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC, that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  15. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  16. Aerosol Emission Monitoring and Assessment of Potential Exposure to Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Manufacture of Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Drew; Chen, Sheng-Chieh; Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y H

    2015-11-01

    Recent animal studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may pose a significant health risk to those exposed in the workplace. To further understand this potential risk, effort must be taken to measure the occupational exposure to CNTs. Results from an assessment of potential exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) conducted at an industrial facility where polymer nanocomposites were manufactured by an extrusion process are presented. Exposure to MWCNTs was quantified by the thermal-optical analysis for elemental carbon (EC) of respirable dust collected by personal sampling. All personal respirable samples collected (n = 8) had estimated 8-h time weighted average (TWA) EC concentrations below the limit of detection for the analysis which was about one-half of the recommended exposure limit for CNTs, 1 µg EC/m(3) as an 8-h TWA respirable mass concentration. Potential exposure sources were identified and characterized by direct-reading instruments and area sampling. Area samples analyzed for EC yielded quantifiable mass concentrations inside an enclosure where unbound MWCNTs were handled and near a pelletizer where nanocomposite was cut, while those analyzed by electron microscopy detected the presence of MWCNTs at six locations throughout the facility. Through size selective area sampling it was identified that the airborne MWCNTs present in the workplace were in the form of large agglomerates. This was confirmed by electron microscopy where most of the MWCNT structures observed were in the form of micrometer-sized ropey agglomerates. However, a small fraction of single, free MWCNTs was also observed. It was found that the high number concentrations of nanoparticles, ~200000 particles/cm(3), present in the manufacturing facility were likely attributable to polymer fumes produced in the extrusion process. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  17. Organic richness and gas generation potential of Permian Barren Measures from Raniganj field, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annapurna Boruah; S Ganapathi

    2015-07-01

    The organic geochemistry of shales in terms of its organic richness, hydrocarbon source potential, thermal maturity, depositional environment, etc., are essential stipulations for shale gas resources assessment. In this study, a total of 32 core samples of Permian Barren Measures from four boreholes in Raniganj field of Damodar Basin were analysed to evaluate their gas generation potential using Rock–Eval pyrolysis techniques. Petrographic analysis brings out the lithofacies of Barren Measures as carbonaceous silty shale, iron rich claystone and sand-shale intercalation. The total organic content (TOC) of the shale units of Barren Measures ranges from 3.75 to 20.9 wt%, whereas hydrogen index (HI) ranges from 58.45 to 125.34 mg HC/g TOC. Present study suggests early to late maturated (0.6–1%) organic matters in Barren Measures with gas prone type III kerogen. The study analysed the effect of burial history on the preservation and maturation of organic matters. The organic richness, kerogen type, thermal maturity and petrographic properties of Barren Measures signify fair to excellent gas generation potential.

  18. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles air. Our results provide improved

  19. Linear-scaling generation of potential energy surfaces using a double incremental expansion

    CERN Document Server

    König, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    We present a combination of the incremental expansion of potential energy surfaces (PESs), known as n-mode expansion, with the incremental evaluation of the electronic energy in a many-body approach. The application of semi-local coordinates in this context allows the generation of PESs in a very cost-efficient way. For this, we employ the recently introduced FALCON (Flexible Adaptation of Local COordinates of Nuclei) coordinates. By introducing an additional transformation step, concerning only a fraction of the vibrational degrees of freedom, we can achieve linear scaling of the accumulated cost of the single point calculations required in the PES generation. Numerical examples of these double incremental approaches for oligo-phenyl examples show fast convergence with respect to the maximum number of simultaneously treated fragments and only a modest error introduced by the additional transformation step. The approach, presented here, represents a major step towards the applicability of vibrational wave fun...

  20. Effects of a potential fourth fermion generation on the Higgs boson mass bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhold, P; Kallarackal, J

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds. This investigation is based on the numerical evaluation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. In particular, the considered model obeys a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying $SU(2)_L\\times U(1)_Y$ symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. We present our results on the modification of the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds induced by the presence of a hypothetical very heavy fourth quark doublet. Finally, we compare these findings to the standard scenario of three fermion generations.

  1. Effects of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhold, Philipp; Kallarackal, Jim

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds. This investigation is based on the numerical evaluation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. In particular, the considered model obeys a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying ${SU}(2)_L\\times {U}(1)_Y$ symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. We present our results on the modification of the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds induced by the presence of a hypothetical very heavy fourth quark doublet. Finally, we compare these findings to the standard scenario of three fermion generations.

  2. ARD generation and corrosion potential of exposed roadside rockmass at Boeun and Mujoo, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sang Woo; Cheong, Young Wook; Yim, Gil Jae; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2007-06-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a longstanding problem often associated with the resulting corrosion due to the acidity generated from sulfidic oxidation. To evaluate characteristics of ARD and corrosion, samples from the road side rock mass of Boeun and Mujoo were analysed using X-ray diffraction, acid/base accounting and Leaching tests. The results indicated that many samples had a pyritic origin and can be regarded as acid-generating rocks. The Leaching test showed that the average pH of the leachates of samples from both Boeun and Mujoo were moderately acidic, ranging from 3 to 4. Interestingly, as acidity increases from pH 4, the SO4-, Fe, Al and Mg concentrations increase abnormally. Samples from roadside slope of Mujoo showed high corrosive potential. Maximum sulfide oxidation rate of a sample taken from Mujoo was as high as 5,166 mg/kg/week.

  3. Hydrocarbon generation conditions and exploration potential of the Taoudeni Basin, Mauritania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Wenzhe

    2009-01-01

    The Taoudeni Basin is a typical and steady intracratonic basin in Mauritania, northwest Africa. There are six sets of potential source rocks and five regional unconformable surfaces of the Infracambrian and Paleozoic developed in the basin. We used seismic stratigraphic correlation to recover the denudation thickness of formations at a particular well location. Studies of the hydrocarbon generation history of the basin illustrate that hydrocarbon migration and accumulation occurred in the end of the Carboniferous, and after that, the whole basin suffered denudation for a long period of time. Because there is no thick Mesozoic overburden in the basin, the Silurian source rocks could not generate hydrocarbon in the Mesozoic era for the second time. Consequently, the prospects for successful hydrocarbon exploration in the basin are not good.

  4. A PC-based generator of surface ECG potentials for computer electrocardiograph testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, D; Palagi, G; Bedini, R

    1994-02-01

    The system is composed of an electronic circuit, connected to a PC, whose outputs, starting from ECGs digitally collected by commercial interpretative electrocardiographs, simulate virtual patients' limb and chest electrode potentials. Appropriate software manages the D/A conversion and lines up the original short-term signal in a ring buffer to generate continuous ECG traces. The device also permits the addition of artifacts and/or baseline wanders/shifts on each lead separately. The system has been accurately tested and statistical indexes have been computed to quantify the reproduction accuracy analyzing, in the generated signal, both the errors induced on the fiducial point measurements and the capability to retain the diagnostic significance. The device integrated with an annotated ECG data base constitutes a reliable and powerful system to be used in the quality assurance testing of computer electrocardiographs.

  5. The Potential of Energy Storage Systems with Respect to Generation Adequacy and Economic Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Kyle Joseph

    Intermittent energy resources, including wind and solar power, continue to be rapidly added to the generation fleet domestically and abroad. The variable power of these resources introduces new levels of stochasticity into electric interconnections that must be continuously balanced in order to maintain system reliability. Energy storage systems (ESSs) offer one potential option to compensate for the intermittency of renewables. ESSs for long-term storage (1-hour or greater), aside from a few pumped hydroelectric installations, are not presently in widespread use in the U.S. The deployment of ESSs would be most likely driven by either the potential for a strong internal rate of return (IRR) on investment and through significant benefits to system reliability that independent system operators (ISOs) could incentivize. To assess the potential of ESSs three objectives are addressed. (1) Evaluate the economic viability of energy storage for price arbitrage in real-time energy markets and determine system cost improvements for ESSs to become attractive investments. (2) Estimate the reliability impact of energy storage systems on the large-scale integration of intermittent generation. (3) Analyze the economic, environmental, and reliability tradeoffs associated with using energy storage in conjunction with stochastic generation. First, using real-time energy market price data from seven markets across the U.S. and the physical parameters of fourteen ESS technologies, the maximum potential IRR of each technology from price arbitrage was evaluated in each market, along with the optimal ESS system size. Additionally, the reductions in capital cost needed to achieve a 10% IRR were estimated for each ESS. The results indicate that the profit-maximizing size of an ESS is primarily determined by its technological characteristics (round-trip charge/discharge efficiency and self-discharge) and not market price volatility, which instead increases IRR. This analysis demonstrates

  6. Effects of acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot welding with mild-steel on pulmonary, vascular and immune responses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Meighan, Terence G.; Erdely, Aaron; Fedan, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Janet A.; Bilgesu, Suzan; Waugh, Stacey; Anderson, Stacey; Marshall, Nikki B.; Afshari, Aliakbar; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Spot welding is used in the automotive and aircraft industries, where high-speed, repetitive welding is needed to join thin sections of metal. Epoxy adhesives are applied as sealers to the metal seams. Pulmonary function abnormalities and airway irritation have been reported in spot welders, but no animal toxicology studies exist. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate vascular, immune and lung toxicity measures after exposure to these metal fumes in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by inhalation to 25 mg/m3 to either mild-steel spot welding aerosols with sparking (high metal, HM) or without sparking (low metal, LM) for 4 h/d for 3, 8 and 13 d. Shams were exposed to filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung gene expression and ex vivo BAL cell challenge were performed to assess lung toxicity. Lung resistance (RL) was evaluated before and after challenge with inhaled methacholine (MCh). Functional assessment of the vascular endothelium in isolated rat tail arteries and leukocyte differentiation in the spleen and lymph nodes via flow cytometry was also done. Immediately after exposure, baseline RL was significantly elevated in the LM spot welding aerosols, but returned to control level by 24 h postexposure. Airway reactivity to MCh was unaffected. Lung inflammation and cytotoxicity were mild and transient. Lung epithelial permeability was significantly increased after 3 and 8 d, but not after 13 d of exposure to the HM aerosol. HM aerosols also caused vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased CD4+, CD8+ and B cells in the spleen. Only LM aerosols caused increased IL-6 and MCP-1 levels compared with sham after ex vivo LPS stimulation in BAL macrophages. Acute inhalation of mild-steel spot welding fumes at occupationally relevant concentrations may act as an irritant as evidenced by the increased RL and result in endothelial dysfunction, but otherwise had minor effects on the lung. PMID:25140454

  7. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  8. Integrated approach towards understanding interactions of mineral dust aerosol with warm clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant

    2011-12-01

    to biases as it generates a bimodal size distribution with a broad range of hygroscopicity. It is found that smaller particles generated in the more hygroscopic peak follow CCN activation by KT, while the larger peak is less hydrophilic with activation similar to dry generated dust that follow FHH-AT. Droplet activation kinetics measurements demonstrate that dry generated mineral aerosol display retarded activation kinetics with an equivalent water vapor uptake coefficient that is 30 - 80% lower relative to ammonium sulfate aerosol. Wet generated mineral aerosols, however, display similar activation kinetics to ammonium sulfate. These results suggest that at least a monolayer of water vapor (the rate-limiting step for adsorption) persists during the timescale of aerosol generation in the experiment, and questions the atmospheric relevance of studies on mineral aerosol generated from wet atomization method. A new parameterization of cloud droplet formation from insoluble dust CCN for regional and global climate models is also developed. The parameterization framework considers cloud droplet formation from dust CCN activating via FHH-AT, and soluble aerosol with activation described through KT. The parameterization is validated against a numerical parcel model, agreeing with predictions to within 10% (R2 ˜ 0.98). The potential role of dust GCCN activating by FHH-AT within warm stratocumulus and convective clouds is also evaluated. It is found that under pristine aerosol conditions, dust GCCN can act as collector drops with implications to dust-cloud-precipitation linkages. Biases introduced from describing dust GCCN activation by KT are also addressed. The results demonstrate that dust particles do not require deliquescent material to act as CCN in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the impact of dust particles as giant CCN on warm cloud and precipitation must be considered. Finally, the new parameterization of cloud droplet formation can be implemented in regional and

  9. The role of aerosol absorption in solar dimming over East Asia and its implications for regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Persad, Geeta; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    Surface-based observations have identified statistically significant trends in clear-sky surface solar radiation (SSR) over South and East Asia since the 1960s. The trends are generally negative, indicating a reduction in clear-sky SSR or a "dimming." The dimming is strongly driven by aerosol emissions over the region, but little work has been done to quantify the particular aerosol mechanisms that produce the trend or the contribution to the surface values from aerosol absorption within the atmospheric column. The redistribution of shortwave radiation that these aerosol effects imply has the potential to significantly impact regional circulation and precipitation. We conduct experiments over East Asia in two generations of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's Atmospheric General Circulation Model, AM2.1 and AM3, in order to analyze the characteristics of the SSR trends that the models produce and to understand the particular aerosol mechanisms responsible. AM2.1 and AM3 have significantly different aerosol treatments, including differences in aerosol mixing and interactivity with model meteorology. We use the models' standalone radiation module to analyze how various aerosol characteristics in the two models (such as aerosol mixing state, hygroscopicity, and seasonal distribution) contribute to the trends produced. We find that the two models produce similar trends in clear-sky SSR, comparable to the observed trend, but via significantly different aerosol mechanisms with different regional climate implications. Both models' dimming trends, however, are strongly driven by increased aerosol absorption since 1960. The implications of this redistribution of solar heating between the surface and atmosphere for Asia's regional climate will be discussed.

  10. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  11. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  12. Different developmental potential of pluripotent stem cells generated by different reprogramming strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Jiang; Yixue Li; Jiarui Wu; Jinsong Li; Guohui Ding; Jiangwei Lin; Man Zhang; Linyu Shi; Wenjian Lv; Hui Yang; Huasheng Xiao; Gang Pei

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Recent studies show that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated through ectopic expression of transcription factors retain an epigenetic memory of their original somatic cells (Kim et al., 2010; Polo et al., 2010) or aberrant silencing of a single imprinted gene cluster (Liu et al.,2010; Stadtfeld et al., 2010), which affects their developmental and differentiation potentials.In contrast, nuclear transfer can more faithfully reprogramme somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)cells (nuclear transfer ES cells, ntESCs)(Brambrink et al., 2006; Wakayama et al.,2006).

  13. A Streaming Potential/Current-Based Microfluidic Direct Current Generator for Self-Powered Nanosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Sihong; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Pan, Caofeng; Lin, Long; Yu, Ruomeng; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Li; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-11-01

    A simple but practical method to convert the hydroenergy of microfluids into continuous electrical output is reported. Based on the principle of streaming potential/current, a microfluidic generator (MFG) is demonstrated using patterned micropillar arrays as a quasi-porous flow channel. The continuous electrical output makes this MFG particularly suitable as a power source in self-powered systems. Using the proposed MFG to power a single nanowire-based pH sensor, a self-powered fluid sensor system is demonstrated.

  14. Development and validation of a dispersion model for aerosols and studies on their coagulation as potential influence source; Entwicklung und Validierung eines Ausbereitungsmodells fuer Aerosole und Untersuchungen zu deren Koagulation als potentieller Einflussquelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodomez, Philipp

    2010-09-15

    In the context of dispersion modelling of aerosols in the vicinity of agricultural sites the adoption of dynamical models is more and more usual. Such a model, STAR3D (Simulated Transmission of Aerosols 3D) was newly developed. It is based on the numerical evaluation of the Navier-Stokes-Equations and the subsequent calculation of the particle trajectories using the Langevin-Equation. In the course of the transmission different effects like the sedimentation, diffusion and coagulation of the particles must be considered. For the estimation of the influence of the coagulation a test chamber was build. It could be shown, that the effect of the particle coagulation can be neglected for dispersion modelling in outdoor areas. Finally a field survey was arranged to evaluate STAR3D. At twelve measurement points the mean deviation between the measured and simulated values was 24 percent. (orig.)

  15. Bioassay for estimating the biogenic methane-generating potential of coal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.J.P.; Voytek, M.A.; Warwick, P.D.; Corum, M.D.; Cohn, A.; Bunnell, J.E.; Clark, A.C.; Orem, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of secondary biogenic methane in coal beds is likely controlled by a combination of factors such as the bioavailability of coal carbon, the presence of a microbial community to convert coal carbon to methane, and an environment supporting microbial growth and methanogenesis. A set of treatments and controls was developed to bioassay the bioavailability of coal for conversion to methane under defined laboratory conditions. Treatments included adding a well-characterized consortium of bacteria and methanogens (enriched from modern wetland sediments) and providing conditions to support endemic microbial activity. The contribution of desorbed methane in the bioassays was determined in treatments with bromoethane sulfonic acid, an inhibitor of microbial methanogenesis. The bioassay compared 16 subbituminous coal samples collected from beds in Texas (TX), Wyoming (WY), and Alaska (AK), and two bituminous coal samples from Pennsylvania (PA). New biogenic methane was observed in several samples of subbituminous coal with the microbial consortium added, but endemic activity was less commonly observed. The highest methane generation [80????mol methane/g coal (56??scf/ton or 1.75??cm3/g)] was from a south TX coal sample that was collected from a non-gas-producing well. Subbituminous coals from the Powder River Basin, WY and North Slope Borough, AK contained more sorbed (original) methane than the TX coal sample and generated 0-23????mol/g (up to 16??scf/ton or 0.5??cm3/g) new biogenic methane in the bioassay. Standard indicators of thermal maturity such as burial depth, nitrogen content, and calorific value did not explain differences in biogenic methane among subbituminous coal samples. No original methane was observed in two bituminous samples from PA, nor was any new methane generated in bioassays of these samples. The bioassay offers a new tool for assessing the potential of coal for biogenic methane generation, and provides a platform for studying the

  16. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-08-03

    The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise

  17. Potential impact of carbonaceous aerosol on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) and precipitation during Asian summer monsoon in a global model simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Fadnavis, Suvarna

    2017-09-28

    Recent satellite observations show efficient vertical transport of Asian pollutants from the surface to the upper-level anticyclone by deep monsoon convection. In this paper, we examine the transport of carbonaceous aerosols, including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC), into the monsoon anticyclone using of ECHAM6-HAM, a global aerosol climate model. Further, we investigate impacts of enhanced (doubled) carbonaceous aerosol emissions on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), underneath monsoon circulation and precipitation from sensitivity simulations. The model simulation shows that boundary layer aerosols are transported into the monsoon anticyclone by the strong monsoon convection from the Bay of Bengal, southern slopes of the Himalayas and the South China Sea. Doubling of emissions of both BC and OC aerosols over Southeast Asia (10° S–50° N, 65–155° E) shows that lofted aerosols produce significant warming (0.6–1 K) over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) near 400–200 hPa and instability in the middle/upper troposphere. These aerosols enhance radiative heating rates (0.02–0.03 K day−1) near the tropopause. The enhanced carbonaceous aerosols alter aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at the surface by −4.74 ± 1.42 W m−2, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) by +0.37 ± 0.26 W m−2 and in the atmosphere by +5.11 ± 0.83 W m−2 over the TP and Indo-Gangetic Plain region (15–35° N, 80–110° E). Atmospheric warming increases vertical velocities and thereby cloud ice in the upper troposphere. Aerosol induced anomalous warming over the TP facilitates the relative strengthening of the monsoon Hadley circulation and increases moisture inflow by strengthening the cross-equatorial monsoon jet. This increases precipitation amounts over India (1–4 mm day−1) and eastern China (0.2–2 mm day−1). These results are significant at the 99 % confidence level.

  18. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  19. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  20. The potential effects of electromagnetic fields generated by cabling between offshore wind turbines upon elasmobranch fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, A.B.; Taylor, H

    2001-09-01

    This report details research supervised by Dr Andrew Gill, at the University of Liverpool, on behalf of the Countryside Council for Wales to assess the potential effects of electromagnetic fields generated by cabling between offshore wind turbines upon Elasmobranch Fishes. The report contains four main sections: 1. A review of the literature relating to electroreception in elasmobranchs and relevant literature on offshore wind farm developments. 2. A review of the current situation regarding offshore wind developments focussing on their environmental impacts with particular implications for British elasmobranches. 3. A summary of the current status and extent of relevant biological knowledge of British elasmobranchs. 4. A pilot study which experimentally demonstrates the response of the benthic elasmobranch, the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula, to two electric fields, one simulating prey and the other the maximum potential output from unburied undersea cables. Finally, the report provides recommendations for future research considerations.

  1. Behaviour Generation in Humanoids by Learning Potential-Based Policies from Constrained Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Howard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement generation that is consistent with observed or demonstrated behaviour is an efficient way to seed movement planning in complex, high-dimensional movement systems like humanoid robots. We present a method for learning potential-based policies from constrained motion data. In contrast to previous approaches to direct policy learning, our method can combine observations from a variety of contexts where different constraints are in force, to learn the underlying unconstrained policy in form of its potential function. This allows us to generalise and predict behaviour where novel constraints apply. We demonstrate our approach on systems of varying complexity, including kinematic data from the ASIMO humanoid robot with 22 degrees of freedom.

  2. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators.

  3. A study of electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation in asymmetrical Gaussian potential quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wangjian

    2014-12-01

    Electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation in asymmetrical Gaussian potential quantum wells is investigated using the effective mass approximation employing the compact density matrix method and the iterative approach. Our results show that the absolute value, the real part and the imaginary part of second-harmonic generation are greatly affected by the height of the Gaussian potential quantum wells, the range of the Gaussian confinement potential and the applied electric field. The relationship between the absolute value and the imaginary part of second-harmonic generation together with the relationship between the absolute value and the real part of second-harmonic generation is studied. It is found that no matter how the height of the Gaussian potential quantum wells, the range of the Gaussian confinement potential and the applied electric field vary, the resonant peaks of the absolute value of second-harmonic generation do not originate from the imaginary part but from the real part.

  4. The Diabatic Heating and the Generation of Available Potential Energy: Results from NCEP Reanalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tao; WU Guoxiong; GUO Yufu

    2005-01-01

    In the existing studies on the atmospheric energy cycle, the attention to the generation of available potential energy (APE) is restricted to its global mean value. The geographical distributions of the generation of APE and its mechanism of formation are investigated by using the three-dimensional NCEP/NCAR diabatic heating reanalysis in this study. The results show that the contributions from sensible heating and net radiation to the generation of zonal and time-mean APE (Gz) are mainly located in high and middle latitudes with an opposite sign, while the latent heating shows a dominant effect on Gz mainly in the tropics and high latitudes where the contributions from the middle and upper tropospheres are also contrary to that from the low troposphere. In high latitudes, the Gz is much stronger for the Winter Hemisphere than for the Summer Hemisphere, and this is consistent with the asymmetrical feature shown by the reservoir of zonal and time-mean APE in two hemispheres, which suggests that the generation of APE plays a fundamental role in maintaining the APE in the global atmospheric energy cycle. The same contributions to the generation of stationary eddy APE (GSE) from the different regions related to the maintenance of longitudinal temperature contrast are likely arisen by different physics. Specifically, the positive contributions to GSE from the latent heating in the western tropical Pacific and from the sensible heating over land are dominated by the heating at warm regions, whereas those from the latent heating in the eastern tropical Pacific and from the sensitive heating over the oceans are dominated by the cooling at cold regions. Thus, our findings provide an observational estimate of the generation of eddy APE to identify the regional contributions in the climate simulations because it might be correct for the wrong reasons in the general circulation model (GCM). The largest positive contributions to the generation of transient eddy APE (GTE) are

  5. Ca2+ involvement in the action potential generation of myenteric neurones in the rat oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laet, A; Cornelissen, W; Adriaensen, D; Van Bogaert, P-P; Scheuermann, D W; Timmermans, J-P

    2002-04-01

    Intracellular recordings were used to study the physiological behaviour of rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, which are embedded in striated muscle. Injection of depolarizing pulses evoked action potentials with a clear 'shoulder' in all neurones. This shoulder disappeared under low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 micromol L-1) did not impede spike firing, whereas under combined TTX and low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions the action potentials were completely abolished, indicating that TTX- resistant action potentials are mediated by a Ca2+ current. Further experiments with omega-conotoxin GVIA (100 nmol L-1) revealed that these Ca2+ currents enter the cell via N-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (see also accompanying paper). Tetraethylammonium (10 mmol L-1) caused broadening of the action potentials, which probably resulted from prolonged Ca2+ influx due to blockade of the delayed rectifier K+ channel. Although Ca2+ appears to be involved in the spike generation of all rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, only a minority (14%) shows a slow afterhyperpolarization. Thus, no strict correlation exists between the presence of a shoulder and a slow afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, morphological identification of 25 of the impaled neurones revealed that there was no strict correlation between morphology and electrophysiological behaviour. Consequently, rat oesophageal myenteric neurones appear to differ in several aspects from myenteric neurones in smooth muscle regions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  7. Action potential generation in an anatomically constrained model of medial superior olive axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Simon; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Hellmundt, Franziska; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt; Leibold, Christian

    2014-04-09

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) encode interaural time differences (ITDs) with sustained firing rates of >100 Hz. They are able to generate such high firing rates for several hundred milliseconds despite their extremely low-input resistances of only few megaohms and high synaptic conductances in vivo. The biophysical mechanisms by which these leaky neurons maintain their excitability are not understood. Since action potentials (APs) are usually assumed to be generated in the axon initial segment (AIS), we analyzed anatomical data of proximal MSO axons in Mongolian gerbils and found that the axon diameter is <1 μm and the internode length is ∼100 μm. Using a morphologically constrained computational model of the MSO axon, we show that these thin axons facilitate the excitability of the AIS. However, for ongoing high rates of synaptic inputs the model generates a substantial fraction of APs in its nodes of Ranvier. These distally initiated APs are mediated by a spatial gradient of sodium channel inactivation and a strong somatic current sink. The model also predicts that distal AP initiation increases the dynamic range of the rate code for ITDs.

  8. Mapping the potential for decentralized energy generation based on RES in Western Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Daniel R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the countries of the Western Balkans are mostly electrified, there are still regions which do not have access to the electricity network or where the network capacity is insufficient. For the most part such areas are under special care of the state (i. e. underdeveloped, devastated by war, depopulated, on islands or in mountainous regions. Since the decentralized energy generation covers a broad range of technologies, including many renewable energy technologies that provide small-scale power at sites close to the users, such concept could be of interest for these locations. This paper identifies the areas in Western Balkans where such systems could be applied. Consideration is given to geographical locations as well as possible applications. Wind, hydro, solar photovoltaic, and biomass conversion systems were taken into consideration. Since the renewable energy sources data for Western Balkans region are rather scarce, the intention was to give a survey of the present situation and an estimate of future potential for decentralized energy generation based on renewable energy sources. The decentralized energy generation based on renewable energy sources in Western Balkans will find its niche easier for the users that will produce electricity for their own needs and for the users located in remote rural areas (off-grid applications.

  9. Potential for energy generation from anaerobic digestion of food waste in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xian Fang; Nair, Jaya; Ho, Goen

    2013-03-01

    Published national and state reports have revealed that Australia deposits an average of 16 million Mg of solid waste into landfills yearly, of which approximately 12.6% is comprised of food. Being highly biodegradable and possessing high energy content, anaerobic digestion offers an attractive treatment option alternative to landfilling. The present study attempted to identify the theoretical maximum benefit of food waste digestion in Australia with regard to energy recovery and waste diversion from landfills. The study also assessed the scope for anaerobic process to utilize waste for energy projects through various case study scenarios. Results indicated anaerobic digestion of total food waste generated across multiple sites in Australia could generate 558 453 dam(3) of methane which translated to 20.3 PJ of heating potential or 1915 GWe in electricity generation annually. This would contribute to 3.5% of total current energy supply from renewable sources. Energy contribution from anaerobic digestion of food waste to the total energy requirement in Australia remains low, partially due to the high energy consumption of the country. However its appropriateness in low density regions, which are prevalent in Australia, may allow digesters to have a niche application in the country.

  10. Development of Cells for Generation of Potential Difference from Aloe Vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogendra B. Gandole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s need of this modern world is to introduce the renewable, sustainable, pollution free and an efficient energy sources. In this paper, some fundamental investigations are demonstrated for generating an electrical energy from living plants like Aloe Vera. The energy is generated by embedding the electrodes and cells into the plant to allow flow of ions using redox reaction. Here multiple tests have been conducted using different type of electrodes, cells and plants as an attempt to determine the characteristics of the generating system. Though the research work in this field is in infancy, we were able to produce the potential difference of about 1.221V using single pair of electrode and cell. Such hypothesis has been tested at different time of the day and different seasons of the year. Also, lots of new types of materials has been tested and used in combination to give better performance for the development of such a green energy. In future, this green energy could be used for low power electrical and electronic appliances for their operation

  11. Source rock potential for hydrocarbon generation of Makum coals, Upper Assam, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, K.; Dutta, M.N.; Das, P.K. [Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh (India). Dept. of Applied Geology

    2008-07-15

    The Makum Coalfield is the most important coalfield in Northeast India as far as coal resources are concerned. In this communication, an attempt has been made to evaluate the possibility of coal as a source material for oil and gas generation. Twenty-five coal samples were collected from different collieries of the Makum Coalfield and have been analysed using Rock-Eval and vitrinite reflectance with coal petrography. It has been observed that the total organic matter content of the Makum Coalfield varies between 59.11 and 84.55% and the hydrogen indices of the studied samples ranges from 150 to 354 mg Hc/g Corg and contain predominantly type II kerogen. Vitrinite reflectance (0.49-0.86 Ro%) studies reflect that the maturity regime of kerogen falls within the oil-generation window. Hydrogen indices and T-max reflect that the coals are immature and fall in the zone of 40% type II kerogen. The relationship between atomic H/C and atomic O/C reflects that the coals are rich in vitrinite and are of type III kerogen. The higher hydrogen indices reflect increasing amount of lipid-rich material in the Makum Coalfield, either from cutinite, resinite, exinite (terrestrial macerals) or from marine algal materials. Kerogen is type II or type III, mainly gas-prone and tends to be immature with subordinate oil-generation potential.

  12. Efficient generation of Heisenberg Hamiltonian matrices for VB calculations of potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmachev, A. M.; Robb, M. A.

    The spin-Hamiltonian valence bond theory relies upon covalent configurations formed by singly occupied orbitals differing by their spin counterparts. This theory has been proven to be successful in studying potential energy surfaces of the ground and lowest excited states in organic molecules when used as a part of the hybrid molecular mechanics - valence bond method. The method allows one to consider systems with large active spaces formed by n electrons in n orbitals and relies upon a specially proposed graphical unitary group approach. At the same time, the restriction of the equality of the numbers of electrons and orbitals in the active space is too severe: it excludes from the consideration a lot of interesting applications. We can mention here carbocations and systems with heteroatoms. Moreover, the structure of the method makes it difficult to study charge-transfer excited states because they are formed by ionic configurations. In the present work we tackle these problems by significant extension of the spin-Hamiltonian approach. We consider (i) more general active space formed by n ± m electrons in n orbitals and (ii) states with the charge transfer. The main problem addressed is the generation of Hamiltonian matrices for these general cases. We propose a scheme combining operators of electron exchange and hopping, generating all nonzero matrix elements step-by-step. This scheme provides a very efficient way to generate the Hamiltonians, thus extending the applicability of spin-Hamiltonian valence bond theory.

  13. Assessment of municipal solid waste generation and recyclable materials potential in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohamed Osman; Hassan, Mohd Nasir; Mujeebu, M Abdul

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a forecasting study of municipal solid waste generation (MSWG) rate and potential of its recyclable components in Kuala Lumpur (KL), the capital city of Malaysia. The generation rates and composition of solid wastes of various classes such as street cleansing, landscape and garden, industrial and constructional, institutional, residential and commercial are analyzed. The past and present trends are studied and extrapolated for the coming years using Microsoft office 2003 Excel spreadsheet assuming a linear behavior. The study shows that increased solid waste generation of KL is alarming. For instance, the amount of daily residential SWG is found to be about 1.62 kg/capita; with the national average at 0.8-0.9 kg/capita and is expected to be increasing linearly, reaching to 2.23 kg/capita by 2024. This figure seems reasonable for an urban developing area like KL city. It is also found that, food (organic) waste is the major recyclable component followed by mix paper and mix plastics. Along with estimated population growth and their business activities, it has been observed that the city is still lacking in terms of efficient waste treatment technology, sufficient fund, public awareness, maintaining the established norms of industrial waste treatment etc. Hence it is recommended that the concerned authority (DBKL) shall view this issue seriously.

  14. Quantitative Study of Biogas Generation Potential from Different Landfill Sites of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper was study of waste composition and quantitative analysis of biogas generation potential with its recovery at Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada landfill sites (LFS of Nepal. The waste management practice in LFS are significant deciding factors for the assessment of environmental impacts caused including the release of green house gases like methane, carbondioxide etc to the atmosphere, that could contribute significantly to global warming and climate change. The total waste disposed to Sisdole LFS, Pokhara LFS and Karaute Dada LFS are 410, 80 and 7.8 tons respectively.  The waste composition was studied onsite with waste reduction method and analyzed for their composition. The organic component of wastes was found high as 61.6%, 52.5% and 65% at Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada LFS respectively. The biogas potential at these landfill sites were 12157.78 cum, 851.99 cum and 169 cum of biogas per day in Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada LFS respectively. 4.68, 0.33 and 0.07 MW energy per day can be generated from these amounts of biogas produced in Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada LFS respectively. Proper gas collection system can be the source of income from these landfill sites and help to mitigate the adverse impact of methane that is being released from these landfill sites

  15. Nonlinear electron acoustic structures generated on the high-potential side of a double layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pottelette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High-time resolution measurements of the electron distribution function performed in the auroral upward current region reveals a large asymmetry between the low- and high-potential sides of a double-layer. The latter side is characterized by a large enhancement of a locally trapped electron population which corresponds to a significant part (~up to 30% of the total electron density. As compared to the background hot electron population, this trapped component has a very cold temperature in the direction parallel to the static magnetic field. Accordingly, the differential drift between the trapped and background hot electron populations generates high frequency electron acoustic waves in a direction quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The density of the trapped electron population can be deduced from the frequency where the electron acoustic spectrum maximizes. In the auroral midcavity region, the electron acoustic waves may be modulated by an additional turbulence generated in the ion acoustic range thanks to the presence of a pre-accelerated ion beam located on the high-potential side of the double layer. Electron holes characterized by bipolar pulses in the electric field are sometimes detected in correlation with these electron acoustic wave packets.

  16. [The evaluation of hydrocarbon potential generation for source rocks by near-infrared diffuse reflection spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Jia; Xu, Xiao-Xuan; Song, Ning; Wu, Zhong-Chen; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, Jin; Cao, Xue-Wei; Wang, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflection spectra were compared and evaluated for hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance often exhibits significant differences in the spectra due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the particles, so the signal-to-noise ratio of NIR is much lower than MIR It is too difficult to get accurate results by NIR without using a strong spectral preprocessing method to remove systematic noise such as base-line variation and multiplicative scatter effects. In the present paper, orthogonal signal correction (OSC) and an improved algorithm of it, i.e. direct orthogonal signal correction (DOSC), are used as different methods to preprocess both the NIR and MIR spectra of the hydrocarbon source rocks. Another algorithm, wavelet multi-scale direct orthogonal signal correction (WMDOSC), which is a combination of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and DOSC, is also used as a preprocessing method. Then, the calibration model of hydrocarbon source rocks before and after pretreatment was established by interval partial least square (iPLS). The experimental results show that WMDOSC is more successfully applied to preprocess the NIR spectra data of the hydrocarbon source rocks than other two algorithms, and NIR performed as good as MIR in the analysis of hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks with WMDOSC-iPLS pretreatment calibration model.

  17. Quail as a potential mixing vessel for the generation of new reassortant influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Kitikoon, Pravina; Wannaratana, Suwarak; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Tuanudom, Ranida; Pakpinyo, Somsak; Sasipreeyajan, Jiroj; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2012-12-07

    Quail has been proposed as one of the intermediate hosts supporting the generation of newly reassortant influenza A viruses (IAVs) with the potential to infect humans. To evaluate the role of quail as an intermediate host of IAVs, co-infections of quail with swine-origin pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) duck H3N2 (dkH3N2) viruses (n=10) or endemic Thai swine H1N1 (swH1N1) and dkH3N2 viruses (n=10) were conducted. Three additional groups of five quail were each inoculated with pH1N1, swH1N1 and dkH3N2 as control groups to verify that each virus can infect quail. Our result showed that co-infected quail shed higher viral titers from the respiratory tract than single virus infected quail. This study confirmed that reassortant viruses could be readily generated in the respiratory tract of quail from both the pH1N1/dkH3N2 co-infected group (100% of quail generating reassortant viruses) and the swH1N1/dkH3N2 (33% of quail generating reassortant viruses) co-infected group without discernible clinical signs. The reassortment efficacy between the two combination of viruses was different in that the frequency of reassortant viruses was significantly higher in pH1N1/dkH3N2 co-infected quail (21.4%) compared to swH1N1/dkH3N2 co-infected quail (0.8%), indicating that gene combinations in pH1N1 have a higher potential to reassort with dkH3N2 compared to swH1N1. In summary, our result confirmed that quail could be an intermediate host of IAVs for generating new reassortant viruses. Our finding highlights the importance of monitoring IAVs especially pH1N1 in quail.

  18. Potential of Electricity Generation on the Western Coast of Mediterranean Sea in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Shata, A. S.; Abdelaty, S. M.; Hanitsch, R.

    2008-01-01

    A technical and economic assessment has been made of the electricity generation by wind turbines located at three promising potential wind sites: Sidi Barrani, Mersa Matruh and El Dabaa in the extreme northwest of Egypt along the Mediterranean Sea. These contiguous stations along the coast have an annual mean wind speed greater than 5.0 m/s at a height of 10 m. Weibull's parameters and the power law coefficient for all seasons have been estimated and used to describe the distribution and behavior of seasonal winds at these stations. The annual values of wind potential at the heights of 70-100 m above the ground level were obtained by extrapolation of the 10 m data from the results of our previous work using the power law. The three stations have a high wind power density, ranging from 340-425 to 450-555 W/m2 at the heights of 70-100 m, respectively. In this paper, an analysis of the cost per kWh of electricity generated by two different systems has been made: one using a relatively large single 2 MW wind turbine and the other - 25 small wind turbines (80 kW, total 2 MW) arranged in a wind farm. The yearly energy output of each system at each site was determined, and the electricity generation costs in each case were also calculated and compared with those at using diesel oil, natural gas and photovoltaic systems furnished by the Egyptian Electricity Authority. The single 2 MW wind turbine was found to be more efficient than the wind farm. For all the three considered stations the electricity production cost was found to be less than 2 ɛ cent/kWh, which is about half the specific cost of the wind farm.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential changes in multiple pattern generating neurons using voltage sensitive dye imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Städele, Carola; Andras, Peter; Stein, Wolfgang

    2012-01-15

    Optical imaging using voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) is a promising technique for the simultaneous activity recording of many individual neurons. While such simultaneous recordings are critical for the understanding of the integral functionality of neural systems, functional interpretations on a single neuron level are difficult without knowledge of the connectivity of the underlying circuit. Central pattern generating circuits, such as the pyloric and gastric mill circuits in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of crustaceans, allow such investigations due to their well-known connectivities and have already contributed much to our understanding of general neuronal mechanisms. Here we present for the first time simultaneous optical recordings of the pattern generating neurons in the STG of two crustacean species using bulk loading of the VSD di-4-ANEPPS. We demonstrate the recording of firing activities and synaptic interactions of the circuit neurons as well as inter-circuit interactions in their functional context, i.e. without artificial stimulation. Neurons could be uniquely identified using simple event-triggered averaging. We tested this technique in two different species of crustaceans (lobsters and crabs), since several crustacean species are used for studying motor pattern generation. The signal-to-noise ratio of the optical signal was high enough in both species to derive phase-relationship between the network neurons, as well as action potentials and excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. We argue that imaging of neural networks with identifiable neurons with well-known connectivity, like in the STG, is crucial for the understanding of emergence of network functionality.

  20. An AERONET-based aerosol classification using the Mahalanobis distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Patrick; Giordano, Marco; Ward, Carolyne; Giles, David; Holben, Brent

    2016-09-01

    We present an aerosol classification based on AERONET aerosol data from 1993 to 2012. We used the AERONET Level 2.0 almucantar aerosol retrieval products to define several reference aerosol clusters which are characteristic of the following general aerosol types: Urban-Industrial, Biomass Burning, Mixed Aerosol, Dust, and Maritime. The classification of a particular aerosol observation as one of these aerosol types is determined by its five-dimensional Mahalanobis distance to each reference cluster. We have calculated the fractional aerosol type distribution at 190 AERONET sites, as well as the monthly variation in aerosol type at those locations. The results are presented on a global map and individually in the supplementary material. Our aerosol typing is based on recognizing that different geographic regions exhibit characteristic aerosol types. To generate reference clusters we only keep data points that lie within a Mahalanobis distance of 2 from the centroid. Our aerosol characterization is based on the AERONET retrieved quantities, therefore it does not include low optical depth values. The analysis is based on "point sources" (the AERONET sites) rather than globally distributed values. The classifications obtained will be useful in interpreting aerosol retrievals from satellite borne instruments.

  1. An AERONET-Based Aerosol Classification Using the Mahalanobis Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Patrick; Giordano, Marco; Ward, Carolyne; Giles, David; Holben, Brent

    2016-01-01

    We present an aerosol classification based on AERONET aerosol data from 1993 to 2012. We used the AERONET Level 2.0 almucantar aerosol retrieval products to define several reference aerosol clusters which are characteristic of the following general aerosol types: Urban-Industrial, Biomass Burning, Mixed Aerosol, Dust, and Maritime. The classification of a particular aerosol observation as one of these aerosol types is determined by its five-dimensional Mahalanobis distance to each reference cluster. We have calculated the fractional aerosol type distribution at 190 AERONET sites, as well as the monthly variation in aerosol type at those locations. The results are presented on a global map and individually in the supplementary material. Our aerosol typing is based on recognizing that different geographic regions exhibit characteristic aerosol types. To generate reference clusters we only keep data points that lie within a Mahalanobis distance of 2 from the centroid. Our aerosol characterization is based on the AERONET retrieved quantities, therefore it does not include low optical depth values. The analysis is based on point sources (the AERONET sites) rather than globally distributed values. The classifications obtained will be useful in interpreting aerosol retrievals from satellite borne instruments.

  2. Encoding of High Frequencies Improves with Maturation of Action Potential Generation in Cultured Neocortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Evgeny S.; Bal, Natalia V.; Malyshev, Aleksey; Ierusalimsky, Victor N.; Spivak, Yulia; Balaban, Pavel M.; Volgushev, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    The ability of neocortical neurons to detect and encode rapid changes at their inputs is crucial for basic neuronal computations, such as coincidence detection, precise synchronization of activity and spike-timing dependent plasticity. Indeed, populations of cortical neurons can respond to subtle changes of the input very fast, on a millisecond time scale. Theoretical studies and model simulations linked the encoding abilities of neuronal populations to the fast onset dynamics of action potentials (APs). Experimental results support this idea, however mechanisms of fast onset of APs in cortical neurons remain elusive. Studies in neuronal cultures, that are allowing for accurate control over conditions of growth and microenvironment during the development of neurons and provide better access to the spike initiation zone, may help to shed light on mechanisms of AP generation and encoding. Here we characterize properties of AP encoding in neocortical neurons grown for 11–25 days in culture. We show that encoding of high frequencies improves upon culture maturation, which is accompanied by the development of passive electrophysiological properties and AP generation. The onset of APs becomes faster with culture maturation. Statistical analysis using correlations and linear model approaches identified the onset dynamics of APs as a major predictor of age-dependent changes of encoding. Encoding of high frequencies strongly correlated also with the input resistance of neurons. Finally, we show that maturation of encoding properties of neurons in cultures is similar to the maturation of encoding in neurons studied in slices. These results show that maturation of AP generators and encoding is, to a large extent, determined genetically and takes place even without normal micro-environment and activity of the whole brain in vivo. This establishes neuronal cultures as a valid experimental model for studying mechanisms of AP generation and encoding, and their maturation. PMID

  3. Toxicity evaluation of e-juice and its soluble aerosols generated by electronic cigarettes using recombinant bioluminescent bacteria responsive to specific cellular damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Shiv; Mitchell, Robert J; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2017-04-15

    Electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are widely used as an alternative to traditional cigarettes but their safety is not well established. Herein, we demonstrate and validate an analytical method to discriminate the deleterious effects of e-cigarette refills (e-juice) and soluble e-juice aerosol (SEA) by employing stress-specific bioluminescent recombinant bacterial cells (RBCs) as whole-cell biosensors. These RBCs carry luxCDABE-operon tightly controlled by promoters that specifically induced to DNA damage (recA), superoxide radicals (sodA), heavy metals (copA) and membrane damage (oprF). The responses of the RBCs following exposure to various concentrations of e-juice/SEA was recorded in real-time that showed dose-dependent stress specific-responses against both the e-juice and vaporized e-juice aerosols produced by the e-cigarette. We also established that high doses of e-juice (4-folds diluted) lead to cell death by repressing the cellular machinery responsible for repairing DNA-damage, superoxide toxicity, ion homeostasis and membrane damage. SEA also caused the cellular damages but the cells showed enhanced bioluminescence expression without significant growth inhibition, indicating that the cells activated their global defense system to repair these damages. DNA fragmentation assay also revealed the disintegration of total cellular DNA at sub-toxic doses of e-juice. Despite their state of matter, the e-juice and its aerosols induce cytotoxicity and alter normal cellular functions, respectively that raises concerns on use of e-cigarettes as alternative to traditional cigarette. The ability of RBCs in detecting both harmful effects and toxicity mechanisms provided a fundamental understanding of biological response to e-juice and aerosols.

  4. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  5. Aerosol Observation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The aerosol observation system (AOS) is the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) platform for in situ aerosol measurements at the surface. The principal...

  6. Corruption of the Fas Pathway Delays the Pulmonary Clearance of Murine Osteosarcoma Cells, Enhances Their Metastatic Potential, and Reduces the Effect of Aerosol Gemcitabine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Nancy; Koshkina, Nadezhda V.; Jia, Shu-Fang; Khanna, Chand; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Worth, Laura L.; Kleinerman, Eugenie S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary metastases continue to be a significant problem in osteosarcoma. Apoptosis dysfunction is known to influence tumor development. Fas (CD95, APO-1)/FasL is one of the most extensively studied apoptotic pathways. Because FasL is constitutively expressed in the lung, cells that express Fas should be eliminated by lung endothelium. Cells with low or no cell surface Fas expression may be able to evade this innate defense mechanism. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate Fas expression in osteosarcoma lung metastases and the effect of gemcitabine on Fas expression and tumor growth. Experimental Design and Results Using the K7M2 murine osteosarcoma model, Fas expression was quantified using immunohistochemistry. High levels of Fas were present in primary tumors, but no Fas expression was present in actively growing lung metastases. Blocking the Fas pathway using Fas-associated death domain dominant-negative delayed tumor cell clearance from the lung and increased metastatic potential. Treatment of mice with aerosol gemcitabine resulted in increased Fas expression and subsequent tum or regression. Conclusions We conclude that corruption of the Fas pathway is critical to the ability of osteosarcoma cells to grow in the lung. Agents such as gemcitabine that up-regulate cell surface Fas expression may therefore be effective in treating osteosarcoma lung metastases. These data also suggest that an additional mechanism by which gemcitabine induces regression of osteosarcoma lung metastases is mediated by enhancing the sensitivity of the tumor cells to the constitutive FasL in the lung. PMID:17671136

  7. Preliminary investigation of the potential of harnessing tidal energy for electricity generation in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.S.; Seng, L.Y. [Tunku Abdul Rahman Univ. (Malaysia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Malaysia relies heavily on fossil fuels to meet its energy demands. However, Malaysia has started to explore the use of other forms of renewable energy such as solar energy, biofuels and tidal power. This paper focused on the potential of harnessing tidal energy in Malaysia for electricity production. There are several sites with great potential for tidal energy conversion, which could supplement the energy needs of Malaysia while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Illustrations were included to show the amplitude of the main harmonic component of the tidal range around Malaysia. The main harmonic component found in the region has a maximum amplitude of 1.4 m, confirming the potential of tidal energy in Malaysia's Ocean. Since the tidal cycle is highly predictable, it has the potential to be a very reliable renewable energy source. Two main approaches are being researched internationally to harness the energy from tides, notably the barrage approach and the tidal stream approach. For the barrage approach, a physical barrier is created within the sea, and a sluice gate controls the flow of sea water. In the tidal stream approach, horizontal axis turbines are placed in the path of tidal currents to generate electricity, similar to the operation of wind turbines. This paper described the flow velocity, power output, availability of power supply and monthly yield of turbines using both the barrage and tidal stream approaches. The study showed that for the barrage approach, there are 6 sites in Malaysia where 14,970 kWH of energy can be generated monthly with a single turbine with a 5 m long blade. The tidal stream approach showed equally promising results at 2 sites. It was concluded that tidal energy is a promising form of renewable energy because of its cyclic, reliable and predictable nature and the vast energy contained within it. According to United Kingdom Department of Trade and Industry, 10 per cent of the United Kingdom's electricity needs could be

  8. Aerosol meteorology and Philippine receptor observations of Maritime Continent aerosol emissions for the 2012 7SEAS southwest monsoon intensive study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Jeffrey S; Lagrosas, Nofel D.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Atwood, Samuel A.; Boyd, Thomas J.; Ghate, Virendra P.; Lynch, Peng; Posselt, Derek J; Simpas, James B; Uy, Sherdon N; Zaiger, Kimo; Blake, Donald R; Bucholtz, Anthony; Campbell, James A.; Chew, Boon Ning; Cliff, Steven; Holben, Brent N; Holz, Robert E.; Hyer, Edward J.; Ogren, John A.; Kriedendweiss, Sonia; Kuciaskas, Arunas; Lolli, Simone; Oo, Min; Perry, Kevin; Salinas, Santo V.; Sessions, Walter; Smirnov, Alexander; Walker, Annette; Wang, Qing; Yu, Liya; Zhang, Jianglong; Zhao, Yongjing

    2016-11-15

    perturbed by easterly waves, leading at times to total flow reversal in the South China Sea. Two slowly propagating super typhoons just east of the Philippines also strongly modulated Maritime Continent flow patterns and convection. Whereas in 2011 large synoptic scale aerosol events transported high concentrations of smoke into the middle South China and Sulu Seas over days, in 2012, measured smoke and pollution events exhibited a much more stochastic component, where sharp pulses of concentrated smoke and pollution over 6-12 hours would propagate through convectively active regimes. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System simulations captured longer wavelength aerosol event onsets quite well, but largely failed to capture the timing of high frequency phenomenon. Also observed were two nucleation events in cleaner and polluted conditions, as well as the urban plume from Puerto Princessa. These suggest that pockets of locally generated high particle counts are not uncommon in the region. Perhaps most interestingly, several cases of squall lines heralding major aerosol events were observed, as opposed to the previous observations in 2011 of these lines largely scavenging aerosol particles from the marine boundary layer. We hypothesize that these phenomenon maybe a result of aged cold pools associated with coastal convection during an aerosol ejection event. Or, perhaps these events point to moisture convergence or lifting along an aerosol front. Regardless, the research findings of the 2012 cruise nicely complement the narrative started by the 2011 research cruise, and point to the importance of small scale phenomenon such as sea breezes and squall lines embedded in the large scale monsoonal flow patterns in dominating aerosol lifecycle and potentially effects.

  9. Relation between Streaming Potential and Streaming Electrification Generated by Streaming of Water through a Sandwich-type Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Kazunori; NIKAIDO, Mitsuru; Hara, Yoshinori; Tanizaki, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Both streaming potential and accumulated charge of water flowed out were measured simultaneously using a sandwich-type cell. The voltages generated in divided sections along flow direction satisfied additivity. The sign of streaming potential agreed with that of streaming electrification. The relation between streaming potential and streaming electrification was explained from a viewpoint of electrical double layer in glass-water interface.

  10. Relation between Streaming Potential and Streaming Electrification Generated by Streaming of Water through a Sandwich-type Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Kazunori; NIKAIDO, Mitsuru; Hara, Yoshinori; Tanizaki, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Both streaming potential and accumulated charge of water flowed out were measured simultaneously using a sandwich-type cell. The voltages generated in divided sections along flow direction satisfied additivity. The sign of streaming potential agreed with that of streaming electrification. The relation between streaming potential and streaming electrification was explained from a viewpoint of electrical double layer in glass-water interface.

  11. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Lau, W. K.-M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wu, G.; Ding, Y.; Manoj, M. G.; Liu, J.; Qian, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, T.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ming, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Wang, B.; Xu, X.; Lee, S.-S.; Cribb, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Zhao, C.; Takemura, T.; Wang, K.; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, H.; Guo, J.; Zhai, P. M.; Sugimoto, N.; Babu, S. S.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing severity of droughts/floods and worsening air quality from increasing aerosols in Asia monsoon regions are the two gravest threats facing over 60% of the world population living in Asian monsoon regions. These dual threats have fueled a large body of research in the last decade on the roles of aerosols in impacting Asian monsoon weather and climate. This paper provides a comprehensive review of studies on Asian aerosols, monsoons, and their interactions. The Asian monsoon region is a primary source of emissions of diverse species of aerosols from both anthropogenic and natural origins. The distributions of aerosol loading are strongly influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes, which are, in turn, modulated by aerosol effects. On a continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulations. The atmospheric thermodynamic state, which determines the formation of clouds, convection, and precipitation, may also be altered by aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Absorbing aerosols such as black carbon and desert dust in Asian monsoon regions may also induce dynamical feedback processes, leading to a strengthening of the early monsoon and affecting the subsequent evolution of the monsoon. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of different monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from

  12. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  13. Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Ravelo, R.

    1999-10-05

    A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone and nitrate radical can also result in monoterpene reactions that contribute to aerosol mass. We are currently planning field studies in Puerto Rico to assess these aerosol issues and other atmospheric chemistry questions. Puerto Rico has a number of key features that make it very attractive for a field study of this sort. The principal feature is the island's very regular meteorology and its position in the Caribbean Sea relative to the easterly trade winds. This meteorology and the island's rectangular shape (100 x 35 miles) make it highly suitable for simplification of boundary layer conditions. In addition, the long stretch between Puerto Rico and the nearest pollution sources in Africa and southern Europe make the incoming background air relatively clean and constant. Furthermore, Puerto Rico has approximately 3.5 million people with a very well defined source region and a central area of rain forest vegetation. These features make Puerto Rico an ideal locale for assessing aerosol processes. The following sections describe specific areas of atmospheric chemistry that can be explored during the proposed field study.

  14. [Potential of hematopoietic stem cells as the basis for generation of advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönig, H; Heiden, M; Schüttrumpf, J; Müller, M M; Seifried, E

    2011-07-01

    Individualized, (stem) cell-based therapies of congenital and acquired illnesses are among the most exciting medical challenges of the twenty-first century. Before the full potential of such therapies can be achieved, many basic scientific and biotechnological questions remain to be answered. What is the ideal source for the generation of such cellular drugs is one of those issues. In many respects, hematopoietic stem cells fulfill the requirements for stem cells as starting material for novel cellular therapeutics, including the simple access to large amounts of stem cells, the availability of good phenotypic markers for their prospective isolation, and an extensive body of knowledge about the in vitro manipulation of these cells. This manuscript discusses the general and specific usability of hematopoietic stem cells as starting material for novel cellular therapeutics and presents some examples of hematological and nonhematological therapeutic approaches which are based on hematopoietic stem cells.

  15. Potential trends in snowmelt-generated peak streamflows in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Kumar, Mukesh; Link, Timothy E.

    2016-05-01

    Previously reported impacts of climate warming on streamflow peaks are varied, and the controls on the variations remain unclear. Using physically based linked snowpack and watershed hydrological models, we evaluated the potential changes in seasonal snowmelt-generated streamflow peak (Qmax) due to warming in a small semiarid mountain watershed. Results suggest that the trend in Qmax with warming is strongly governed by the conversion of precipitation phase, accumulated snow amount prior to the melt season, and snowmelt rate during the ablation period. Under a warming climate, the trend in Qmax is expected to be decreasing for relatively warm regions but increasing for cold regions. Climate regimes that are most susceptible to dominant precipitation phase transitions from snow to rain are likely to experience larger decreases in Qmax with warming. This study serves as a first step toward assessing the varied impacts on Qmax due to warming vis-a-vis the specific catchment hydroclimatology.

  16. A Potential Transmitter Architecture for Future Generation Green Wireless Base Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cijvat Ellie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current radio frequency power amplifiers in 3G base stations have very high power consumption leading to a hefty cost and negative environmental impact. In this paper, we propose a potential architecture design for future wireless base station. Issues associated with components of the architecture are investigated. The all-digital transmitter architecture uses a combination of envelope elimination and restoration (EER and pulse width modulation (PWM/pulse position modulation (PPM modulation. The performance of this architecture is predicted from the measured output power and efficiency curves of a GaN amplifier. 57% efficiency is obtained for an OFDM signal limited to 8 dB peak to average power ratio. The PWM/PPM drive signal is generated using the improved Cartesian sigma delta techniques. It is shown that an RF oversampling by a factor of four meets the WLAN spectral mask, and WCDMA specification is met by an RF oversampling of sixteen.

  17. A Potential Transmitter Architecture for Future Generation Green Wireless Base Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Faulkner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Current radio frequency power amplifiers in 3G base stations have very high power consumption leading to a hefty cost and negative environmental impact. In this paper, we propose a potential architecture design for future wireless base station. Issues associated with components of the architecture are investigated. The all-digital transmitter architecture uses a combination of envelope elimination and restoration (EER and pulse width modulation (PWM/pulse position modulation (PPM modulation. The performance of this architecture is predicted from the measured output power and efficiency curves of a GaN amplifier. 57% efficiency is obtained for an OFDM signal limited to 8 dB peak to average power ratio. The PWM/PPM drive signal is generated using the improved Cartesian sigma delta techniques. It is shown that an RF oversampling by a factor of four meets the WLAN spectral mask, and WCDMA specification is met by an RF oversampling of sixteen.

  18. Evaluating the Potential of Imaging Rover for Automatic Point Cloud Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cera, V.; Campi, M.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents a phase of an on-going interdisciplinary research concerning the medieval site of Casertavecchia (Italy). The project aims to develop a multi-technique approach for the semantic - enriched 3D modeling starting from the automatic acquisition of several data. In particular, the paper reports the results of the first stage about the Cathedral square of the medieval village. The work is focused on evaluating the potential of an imaging rover for automatic point cloud generation. Each of survey techniques has its own advantages and disadvantages so the ideal approach is an integrated methodology in order to maximize single instrument performance. The experimentation was conducted on the Cathedral square of the ancient site of Casertavecchia, in Campania, Italy.

  19. Potentially Low Cost Solution to Extend Use of Early Generation Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonna, Joseph E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In preparing a case report on Brown-Séquard syndrome for publication, we made the incidental finding that the inexpensive, commercially available three-dimensional (3D rendering software we were using could produce high quality 3D spinal cord reconstructions from any series of two-dimensional (2D computed tomography (CT images. This finding raises the possibility that spinal cord imaging capabilities can be expanded where bundled 2D multi-planar reformats and 3D reconstruction software for CT are not available and in situations where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is either not available or appropriate (e.g. metallic implants. Given the worldwide burden of trauma and considering the limited availability of MRI and advanced generation CT scanners, we propose an alternative, potentially useful approach to imaging spinal cord that might be useful in areas where technical capabilities and support are limited. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:463-466.

  20. Co-generation potentials of municipal solid waste landfills in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Goran B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste management in the Republic of Serbia is based on landfilling. As a result of such year-long practice, a huge number of municipal waste landfills has been created where landfill gas has been generated. Landfill gas, which is essentially methane (50-55% and carbon dioxide (40-45% (both GHGs, has a great environmental impact which can be reduced by using landfill gas in cogeneration plants to produce energy. The aim of this paper is to determine economic and environmental benefits from such energy production. For that purpose, the database of cogeneration potentials (CP of 51 landfills in the Republic of Serbia (RS was created. Amount of landfill gas generated at each municipal landfill was calculated by applying a first order decay equation which requires the data about solid waste production and composition and about some landfill characteristics. For all landfills, which have over 100,000 m3 each, a techno-economic analysis about building a CHP plant was conducted. The results have shown, that the total investment in 14 CHP plants with payback period of less than 7 years amounts € 11,721,288. The total nominal power of these plants is 7 MW of electrical power and 7.9 MW of thermal power, and an average payback period is about 61 months. In addition, using landfill biogas as energy source in proposed plants would reduce methane emission for 161,000 tons of CO2 equivalent per year. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42013: Research of cogeneration potential of municipal and industrial energy power plant in Republic of Serbia and opportunities for rehabilitation of existing and construction of new cogeneration plants

  1. POTENTIAL DEFICIENCIES IN EDUCATION, INSTRUMENTATION, AND WARNINGS FOR LOCALLY GENERATED TSUNAMIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Walker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of historical data for Hawaii reveals that significant tsunamis have been reported for only four of twenty-six potentially tsunamigenic earthquakes from 1868 through 2009 with magnitudes of 6.0 or greater. During the same time period, three significant tsunamis have been reported for substantially smaller earthquakes. This historical perspective, the fact that the last significant local tsunami occurred in 1975, and an understandable preoccupation with tsunamis generated around the margins of the Pacific, all combine to suggest apparent deficiencies in: (1 personal awareness of what to do in the event of a possible local tsunami; (2 the distribution of instrumentation capable of providing rapid confirmation that a local tsunami has been generated; and (3 the subsequent issuance of timely warnings for local tsunamis. With these deficiencies, far more lives may be lost in Hawaii due to local tsunamis than will result from tsunamis that have originated along the margins of the Pacific. Similar deficiencies may exist in other areas of the world threatened by local tsunamis.

  2. Generation of an adenovirus-parvovirus chimera with enhanced oncolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Bonifati, Serena; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Mailly, Laurent; Daeffler, Laurent; Deryckère, François; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    In this study, our goal was to generate a chimeric adenovirus-parvovirus (Ad-PV) vector that combines the high-titer and efficient gene transfer of adenovirus with the anticancer potential of rodent parvovirus. To this end, the entire oncolytic PV genome was inserted into a replication-defective E1- and E3-deleted Ad5 vector genome. As we found that parvoviral NS expression inhibited Ad-PV chimera production, we engineered the parvoviral P4 early promoter, which governs NS expression, by inserting into its sequence tetracycline operator elements. As a result of these modifications, P4-driven expression was blocked in the packaging T-REx-293 cells, which constitutively express the tetracycline repressor, allowing high-yield chimera production. The chimera effectively delivered the PV genome into cancer cells, from which fully infectious replication-competent parvovirus particles were generated. Remarkably, the Ad-PV chimera exerted stronger cytotoxic activities against various cancer cell lines, compared with the PV and Ad parental viruses, while being still innocuous to a panel of tested healthy primary human cells. This Ad-PV chimera represents a novel versatile anticancer agent which can be subjected to further genetic manipulations in order to reinforce its enhanced oncolytic capacity through arming with transgenes or retargeting into tumor cells.

  3. Cardiac Regenerative Medicine: The Potential of a New Generation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambria, Elena; Steiger, Julia; Günter, Julia; Bopp, Annina; Wolint, Petra; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Emmert, Maximilian Y

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy holds great potential to prompt myocardial regeneration in patients with ischemic heart disease. The selection of the most suitable cell type is pivotal for its successful application. Various cell types, including crude bone marrow mononuclear cells, skeletal myoblast, and hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors, have already advanced into the clinical arena based on promising results from different experimental and preclinical studies. However, most of these so-called first-generation cell types have failed to fully emulate the promising preclinical data in clinical trials, resulting in heterogeneous outcomes and a critical lack of translation. Therefore, different next-generation cell types are currently under investigation for the treatment of the diseased myocardium. This review article provides an overview of current stem cell therapy concepts, including the application of cardiac stem (CSCs) and progenitor cells (CPCs) and lineage commitment via guided cardiopoiesis from multipotent cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or pluripotent cells such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, it introduces new strategies combining complementary cell types, such as MSCs and CSCs/CPCs, which can yield synergistic effects to boost cardiac regeneration.

  4. NASA's Vision for Potential Energy Reduction from Future Generations of Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Through a robust partnership with the aviation industry, over the past 50 years NASA programs have helped foster advances in propulsion technology that enabled substantial reductions in fuel consumption for commercial transports. Emerging global trends and continuing environmental concerns are creating challenges that will very likely transform the face of aviation over the next 20-40 years. In recognition of this development, NASA Aeronautics has established a set of Research Thrusts that will help define the future direction of the agency's research technology efforts. Two of these thrusts, Ultra-Efficient Commercial Vehicles and Transition to Low-Carbon Propulsion, serve as cornerstones for the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) project. The AATT project is exploring and developing high-payoff technologies and concepts that are key to continued improvement in energy efficiency and environmental compatibility for future generations of fixed-wing, subsonic transports. The AATT project is primarily focused on the N+3 timeframe, or 3 generations from current technology levels. As should be expected, many of the propulsion system architectures technologies envisioned for N+3 vary significantly from todays engines. The use of batteries in a hybrid-electric configuration or deploying multiple fans distributed across the airframe to enable higher bypass ratios are just two examples of potential advances that could enable substantial energy reductions over current propulsion systems.

  5. Investigation on the potential generation of ultrafine particles from the tire-road interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathissen, Marcel; Scheer, Volker; Vogt, Rainer; Benter, Thorsten

    2011-11-01

    There has been some discussion in the literature on the generation of ultrafine particles from tire abrasion of studded and non-studded tires tested in the laboratory environment. In the present study, the potential generation of ultrafine particles from the tire road interface was investigated during real driving. An instrumented Sport Utility Vehicle equipped with summer tires was used to measure particle concentrations with high temporal resolution inside the wheel housing while driving on a regular asphalt road. Different driving conditions, i.e., straight driving, acceleration, braking, and cornering were applied. For normal driving conditions no enhanced particle number concentration in the size range 6-562 nm was found. Unusual maneuvers associated with significant tire slip resulted in measurable particle concentrations. The maximum of the size distribution was between 30 and 60 nm. An exponential increase of the particle concentration with velocity was measured directly at the disc brakes for full stop brakings. A tracer gas experiment was carried out to estimate the upper limit of the emission factor during normal straight driving.

  6. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára; Mačičková, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation.

  7. Potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaran, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The main aim is to present the available updated knowledge regarding the potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise (LFN) from an open window in a moving car where the negative effects of LFN induced by heating components and/or heating, ventilation and air-conditioning are assessed. Furthermore, the assessment of noise in chosen enclosed spaces, such as rooms, offices, and classrooms, or other LFN sources and their effect on the human being were investigated. These types of noise are responsible for disturbance during relaxation, sleep, mental work, education, and concentration, which may reflect negatively on the comfort and health of the population and on the mental state of people such as scientific staff and students. The assessment points out the most exposed areas, and analyzes the conditions of standing wave generation in these rooms caused by outdoor and/or indoor sources. Measurements were made for three different enclosed spaces (office, flat, and passenger car) and sources (traffic specific noise at intersections, noise induced by pipe vibration, and aerodynamic noise) and their operating conditions. For the detection of LFN, the A-weighted sound pressure level and vibration were measured and a fast Fourier transform analysis was used. The LFN sources are specified and the direct effects on the human are reported. Finally, this paper suggests the possibilities for the assessment of LFN and some possible measures that can be taken to prevent or reduce them.

  8. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  9. [Potential difference across the membrane of subcellular particles. V. Generation of potential differences by mitochondria and submitochondrial particles under anaerobic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, E A; Vladimirova, M A; Tsofina, L M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown by the mehtod of penetrating ions that Site O and I of the respiratory chain of submitochondrial particles are able to generate a membrane potential of the normal value under anaerobic conditons. When succinate is an electron donor and ferricyanide-an acceptor (Site II), the oxygen addition sharply increases the membrane potential at pH above 7.5 and does not change or even decreases it in reaction conditions more acid than pH 6.5. The generation of the membrane potential at low pH and in the absence of oxygen is predicted by the chemielectric hypothesis and cannot be explained by the chemiosmotic one. Mitochondria usually generate the membrane potential without O2 at pH 7.5 in the presence of ferricyanide when the substrate concentration exceeds 5 mM.

  10. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  11. Identification of Reserved Energy Resource Potentials for Nigeria Power Generation Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Akwukwaegbu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical power is the most widely used form of power in the industrialized countries. In Nigeria the epileptic pattern of electricity supply has affected every aspect of our economy and therefore required a strong political will and commitment on the part of Government to tackle. The solution to this problem lies in identifying and harnessing the abundant reserve energy resources available in various locations all over the country. This paper thus dwelt on identifying various sources of reserve energy potentials that abound in Nigeria which when harnessed and deployed appropriately will be sufficient to provide for both immediate and future electric power need of the country. The approach deployed in the study include the review of available statistical data of Nigeria reserve energy resources; identify the scale of its availability, location and the realizable amount of electric power from such reserve. The results show that the proven and estimated reserved energy resources of coal, natural gas and new hydro potentials could contribute a total of 96,079.40MW to the grid system, and when added to the existing installed electric power generation capacity of 12,066MW will give a total of 108,145.40MW

  12. A population level computational model of the basal ganglia that generates parkinsonian Local Field Potential activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirogiannis, George L; Tagaris, George A; Sakas, Damianos; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2010-02-01

    Recordings from the basal ganglia's subthalamic nucleus are acquired via microelectrodes immediately prior to the application of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment for Parkinson's Disease (PD) to assist in the selection of the final point for the implantation of the DBS electrode. The acquired recordings reveal a persistent characteristic beta band peak in the power spectral density function of the Local Field Potential (LFP) signals. This peak is considered to lie at the core of the causality-effect relationships of the parkinsonian pathophysiology. Based on LFPs acquired from human subjects during DBS for PD, we constructed a computational model of the basal ganglia on the population level that generates LFPs to identify the critical pathophysiological alterations that lead to the expression of the beta band peak. To this end, we used experimental data reporting that the strengths of the synaptic connections are modified under dopamine depletion. The hypothesis that the altered dopaminergic modulation may affect both the amplitude and the time course of the postsynaptic potentials is validated by the model. The results suggest a pivotal role of both of these parameters to the pathophysiology of PD.

  13. Phosphorus in the aerosols over oceans transported offshore from China to the Arctic Ocean:Speciation, spatial distribution, and potential sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chen; XIE Zhouqing; KANG Hui; YU Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected from July to September 2008 onboard a round-trip cruise over the Eastern China Sea, Japan Sea, Western North Pacific Ocean, and the Arctic Ocean (31.1°N–85.18°N, 122.48°E–146.18°W). Total phosphorus (TP) and total inorganic phosphorus (TIP) were analyzed. The organic phosphorus (OP) was calculated by subtracting TIP from TP. Average concentrations of TP in the East Asia, Western North Paciifc and Arctic Ocean were 7.90±6.45, 6.87±6.66 and 7.13±6.76 ng∙m-3, while TIP levels were 6.67±5.02, 6.07±6.58, and 6.23±5.96 along the three regions. TP and TIP levels varied considerably both spatially and temporally over the study extent. TIP was found to be the dominant species in most samples, accounting for 86.6% of TP on average. OP was also a signiifcant fraction of TP due to the primary biogenic aerosol (PBA) contribution. The phosphorus in the atmospheric aerosol over the Arctic Ocean had a higher concentration than previous model simulations. Source apportionment analysis indicates that dust is an important phosphorus source which can be globally transported, and thus dust aerosol may be an important nutrient source in some remote regions.

  14. Potential of human twin embryos generated by embryo splitting in assisted reproduction and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noli, Laila; Ogilvie, Caroline; Khalaf, Yacoub; Ilic, Dusko

    2017-03-01

    Embryo splitting or twinning has been widely used in veterinary medicine over 20 years to generate monozygotic twins with desirable genetic characteristics. The first human embryo splitting, reported in 1993, triggered fierce ethical debate on human embryo cloning. Since Dolly the sheep was born in 1997, the international community has acknowledged the complexity of the moral arguments related to this research and has expressed concerns about the potential for reproductive cloning in humans. A number of countries have formulated bans either through laws, decrees or official statements. However, in general, these laws specifically define cloning as an embryo that is generated via nuclear transfer (NT) and do not mention embryo splitting. Only the UK includes under cloning both embryo splitting and NT in the same legislation. On the contrary, the Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine does not have a major ethical objection to transferring two or more artificially created embryos with the same genome with the aim of producing a single pregnancy, stating that 'since embryo splitting has the potential to improve the efficacy of IVF treatments for infertility, research to investigate the technique is ethically acceptable'. Embryo splitting has been introduced successfully to the veterinary medicine several decades ago and today is a part of standard practice. We present here an overview of embryo splitting experiments in humans and non-human primates and discuss the potential of this technology in assisted reproduction and research. A comprehensive literature search was carried out using PUBMED and Google Scholar databases to identify studies on embryo splitting in humans and non-human primates. 'Embryo splitting' and 'embryo twinning' were used as the keywords, alone or in combination with other search phrases relevant to the topics of biology of preimplantation embryos. A very limited number of studies have been conducted in humans and non

  15. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chirico

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Diesel particulate matter (DPM is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA and the corresponding SOA formation at atmospherically relevant concentrations for three in-use diesel vehicles with different exhaust aftertreatment systems. One vehicle lacked exhaust aftertreatment devices, one vehicle was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC and the final vehicle used both a DOC and diesel particulate filter (DPF. The experiments presented here were obtained from the vehicles at conditions representative of idle mode, and for one car in addition at a speed of 60 km/h. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS was used to measure the organic aerosol (OA concentration and to obtain information on the chemical composition. For the conditions explored in this paper, primary aerosols from vehicles without a particulate filter consisted mainly of black carbon (BC with a low fraction of organic matter (OM, OM/BC<0.5, while the subsequent aging by photooxidation resulted in a consistent production of SOA only for the vehicles without a DOC and with a deactivated DOC. After 5 h of aging ~80% of the total organic aerosol was on average secondary and the estimated "emission factor" for SOA was 0.23–0.56 g/kg fuel burned. In presence of both a DOC and a DPF, primary particles with a mobility diameter above 5 nm were 300±19 cm−3, and only 0.01 g SOA per kg fuel burned was produced within 5 h after lights on. The mass spectra indicate that POA was mostly a non-oxidized OA with an oxygen to carbon atomic ratio (O

  16. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-12-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and the corresponding SOA formation at atmospherically relevant concentrations for three in-use diesel vehicles with different exhaust aftertreatment systems. One vehicle lacked exhaust aftertreatment devices, one vehicle was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and the third vehicle used both a DOC and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The experiments presented here were obtained from the vehicles at conditions representative of idle mode, and for one car in addition at a speed of 60 km/h. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used to measure the organic aerosol (OA) concentration and to obtain information on the chemical composition. For the conditions explored in this paper, primary aerosols from vehicles without a particulate filter consisted mainly of black carbon (BC) with a low fraction of organic matter (OM, OM/BC < 0.5), while the subsequent aging by photooxidation resulted in a consistent production of SOA only for the vehicles without a DOC and with a deactivated DOC. After 5 h of aging ~80% of the total organic aerosol was on average secondary and the estimated "emission factor" for SOA was 0.23-0.56 g/kg fuel burned. In presence of both a DOC and a DPF, only 0.01 g SOA per kg fuel burned was produced within 5 h after lights on. The mass spectra indicate that POA was mostly a non-oxidized OA with an oxygen to carbon atomic ratio (O/C) ranging from 0.10 to 0.19. Five hours of oxidation led to a more oxidized OA with an O/C range of 0

  17. Wind energy as a potential generation source at Ras Benas, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ahmed Shata [Physics Department, Faculty of Science in Port Said, Suez Canal University (Egypt)

    2010-10-15

    Analysis of the wind characteristics in Ras Benas city located on the east coast of Red Sea in Egypt using measured data (wind, pressure and temperature) and Weibull function were made. Statistical analysis model to evaluate the wind energy potential was introduced. According to the power calculations done for the site, the annual mean wind density is 315 kW/m{sup 2} at a height of 70 m above ground level. This station has a huge wind energy potential for electricity generation, especially during spring and summer seasons, comparing with some European countries. In addition, the monthly wind turbine efficiency parameter ({eta}{sub monthly}) has been calculated by using a commercial wind turbine 1 MW with 70 m hub height to help designers and users in evaluating the potentialities and choosing the suitable wind turbine for the considered site. The use of wind turbine with capacity greater than 1000 kW at this station was recommended. Ras Benas station was selected to install 30 MW-wind farm consists of 20 commercial wind turbines (Nordex S 77) with hub heights and Rotor diameter were 100 and 77 m, respectively. This site has annual wind speed more than 9.8 m/s at 100 m height and enough area to locate these turbines. The estimated energy production using WASP Program of these wind farm was 130 GWh/year. Furthermore, the production costs was found 1.3EUR cent/kWh, which is a competition price at the wind energy world market. (author)

  18. Generation and classification of the translational shape-invariant potentials based on the analytical transfer matrix method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Ming-Huang; Yu Zi-Xing; Li Cui-Cui; Tu Kai

    2011-01-01

    For the conventional translational shape-invariant potentials (TSIPs),it has demonstrated that the phase contribution devoted by the scattered subwaves in the analytical transfer matrix quantization condition is integrable and independent of n.Based on this fact we propose a novel strategy to generate the whole set of conventional TSIPs and classify them into three types.The generating functions are given explicitly and the Morse potential is taken as an example to illustrate this strategy.

  19. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  20. Changes in atmospheric aerosol loading retrieved from space based measurements during the past decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Vountas, M.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Chang, D. Y.; Richter, A.; Hilboll, A.

    2013-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosol, generated from natural and anthropogenic sources, plays a key role in regulating visibility, air quality, and acid deposition. It is directly linked to and impacts on human health. It also reflects and absorbs incoming solar radiation and thereby influences the climate change. The cooling by aerosols is now recognized to have partly masked the atmospheric warming from fossil fuel combustion emissions. The role and potential management of short-lived climate pollutants such as aerosol are currently a topic of much scientific and public debate. Our limited knowledge of atmospheric aerosol and its influence on the Earth's radiation balance has a significant impact on the accuracy and error of current predictions of the future global climate change. In the past decades, environmental legislation in industrialized countries has begun to limit the release of anthropogenic pollutants. In contrast, in Asia as a result of the recent rapid economic development, emissions from industry and traffic have increased dramatically. In this study, the temporal changes/trends of atmospheric aerosols, derived from the satellite instruments MODIS (on board Terra and Aqua), MISR (Terra), and SeaWiFS (OrbView-2) during the past decade, are investigated. Whilst the aerosol optical thickness, AOT, over Western Europe decreases (i.e. by up to about -40% from 2003 to 2008) and parts of North America, a statistically significant increase (about +34% in the same period) over East China is observed and attributed to both the increase in industrial output and the Asian desert dust.

  1. Estimating marine aerosol particle volume and number from Maritime Aerosol Network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD, aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The "average solution" MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the "best solution" dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data. However, without accurate AOD data and prior knowledge of

  2. Effects of seed aerosols on the growth of secondary organic aerosols from the photooxidation of toluene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Li-qing; WANG Zhen-ya; HUANG Ming-qiang; FANG Li; ZHANG Wei-jun

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (·OH)-initiated photooxidation reaction of toluene was carried out in a self-made smog chamber. Four individual seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium silicate and calcium chloride, were introduced into the chamber to assess their influence on the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). It was found that the low concentration of seed aerosols might lead to high concentration of SOA particles. Seed aerosols would promote rates of SOA formation at the start of the reaction and inhibit its formation rate with prolonging the reaction time. In the case of cv. 9000 pt/cm3 seed aerosol load, the addition of sodium silicate induced a same effect on the SOA formation as ammonium nitrate. The influence of the four individual seed aerosols on the generation of SOA increased in the order of calcium chloride>sodium silicate and ammonium nitrate> ammonium sulfate.

  3. Status of the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied. Recent activities in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project include studies of (1) the thermal hydraulic conditions existing during Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) aerosol tests in steam-air environments, (2) the thermal output and aerosol mass generation rates for plasma torch aerosol generators, and (3) the influence of humidity on the shape of agglomerated aerosols of various materials. A new Aerosol-Moisture Interaction Test (AMIT) facility was prepared at the NSPP site to accommodate the aerosol shape studies; several tests with Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol have been conducted. In addition to the above activities a special study was conducted to determine the suitability of the technique of aerosol production by plasma torch under the operating conditions of future tests of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Type of Aerosols Determination Over Malaysia by AERONET Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H.; Tan, F.; Abdullah, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols are one of the most interesting studies by the researchers due to the complicated of their characteristic and are not yet well quantified. Besides that there still have huge uncertainties associated with changes in Earth's radiation budget. The previous study by other researchers shown a lot of difficulties and challenges in quantifying aerosol influences arise. As well as the heterogeneity from the aerosol loading and properties: spatial, temporal, size, and composition. In this study, we were investigated the aerosol characteristics over two regions with different environmental conditions and aerosol sources contributed. The study sites are Penang and Kuching, Malaysia where ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer was deployed. The types of the aerosols for both study sites were identified by analyzing aerosol optical depth, angstrom parameter and spectral de-convolution algorithm product from sun-photometer. The analysis was carried out associated with the in-situ meteorological data of relative humidity, visibility and air pollution index. The major aerosol type over Penang found in this study was hydrophobic aerosols. Whereas the hydrophilic type of the aerosols was highly distributed in Kuching. The major aerosol size distributions for both regions were identified in this study. The result also shows that the aerosol optical properties were affected by the types and characteristic of aerosols. Therefore, in this study we generated an algorithm to determine the aerosols in Malaysia by considered the environmental factors. From this study we found that the source of aerosols should always being consider in to retrieve the accurate information of aerosol for air quality study.

  5. On the Potential of a New Generation of Magnetometers for MEG: A Beamformer Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boto, Elena; Bowtell, Richard; Krüger, Peter; Fromhold, T. Mark; Morris, Peter G.; Meyer, Sofie S.; Barnes, Gareth R.; Brookes, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a sophisticated tool which yields rich information on the spatial, spectral and temporal signatures of human brain function. Despite unique potential, MEG is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) which is caused by both the inherently small magnetic fields generated by the brain, and the scalp-to-sensor distance. The latter is limited in current systems due to a requirement for pickup coils to be cryogenically cooled. Recent work suggests that optically-pumped magnetometers (OPMs) might be a viable alternative to superconducting detectors for MEG measurement. They have the advantage that sensors can be brought to within ~4 mm of the scalp, thus offering increased sensitivity. Here, using simulations, we quantify the advantages of hypothetical OPM systems in terms of sensitivity, reconstruction accuracy and spatial resolution. Our results show that a multi-channel whole-head OPM system offers (on average) a fivefold improvement in sensitivity for an adult brain, as well as clear improvements in reconstruction accuracy and spatial resolution. However, we also show that such improvements depend critically on accurate forward models; indeed, the reconstruction accuracy of our simulated OPM system only outperformed that of a simulated superconducting system in cases where forward field error was less than 5%. Overall, our results imply that the realisation of a viable whole-head multi-channel OPM system could generate a step change in the utility of MEG as a means to assess brain electrophysiological activity in health and disease. However in practice, this will require both improved hardware and modelling algorithms. PMID:27564416

  6. A review of atmospheric aerosol measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Peter H.

    Recent developments in atmospheric aerosol measurements are reviewed. The topics included complement those covered in the recent review by Chow (JAWMA 45: 320-382, 1995) which focuses on regulatory compliance measurements and filter measurements of particulate composition. This review focuses on measurements of aerosol integral properties (total number concentration, CCN concentration, optical coefficients, etc.), aerosol physical chemical properties (density, refractive index, equilibrium water content, etc.), measurements of aerosol size distributions, and measurements of size-resolved aerosol composition. Such measurements play an essential role in studies of secondary aerosol formation by atmospheric chemical transformations and enable one to quantify the contributions of various species to effects including light scattering/absorption, health effects, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol measurement evolved from an art to a science in the 1970s following the development of instrumentation to generate monodisperse calibration aerosols of known size, composition, and concentration. While such calibration tools permit precise assessments of instrument responses to known laboratory-generated aerosols, unquantifiable uncertainties remain even when carefully calibrated instruments are used for atmospheric measurements. This is because instrument responses typically depend on aerosol properties including composition, shape, density, etc., which, for atmospheric aerosols, may vary from particle-to-particle and are often unknown. More effort needs to be made to quantify measurement accuracies that can be achieved for realistic atmospheric sampling scenarios. The measurement of organic species in atmospheric particles requires substantial development. Atmospheric aerosols typically include hundreds of organic compounds, and only a small fraction (˜10%) of these can be identified by state-of-the-art analytical methodologies. Even the measurement of the total particulate organic

  7. The potential of high heat generating granites as EGS source to generate power and reduce CO2 emissions, western Arabian shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharam, D.; Lashin, A.; Al Arifi, N.; Al Bassam, A.; El Alfy, M.; Ranjith, P. G.; Varun, C.; Singh, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Saudi Arabia's dependence on oil and gas to generate electricity and to desalinate sea water is widely perceived to be economically and politically unsustainable. A recent business as usual simulation concluded that the Kingdom would become an oil importer by 2038. There is an opportunity for the country to over come this problem by using its geothermal energy resources. The heat flow and heat generation values of the granites spread over a cumulative area of 161,467 sq. km and the regional stress regime over the western Saudi Arabian shield strongly suggest that this entire area is potential source of energy to support 1) electricity generation, 2) fresh water generation through desalination and 3) extensive agricultural activity for the next two decades. The country can adopt a policy to harness this vast untapped enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to mitigate climate and fresh water related issues and increase the quantity of oil for export. The country has inherent expertise to develop this resource.

  8. Potential application of LIBS to NNSA next generation safeguards initiative (NGSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barefield Ii, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Ron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamontagne, Stephen A [DOE/NNSA/NA241; Veal, Kevin [NN/ADTR

    2009-01-01

    In a climate in which states and nations have been and perhaps currently are involved in the prol iferation of nuclear materials and technologies, advanced methodologies and improvements in current measurement techniques are needed to combat new threats and increased levels of sophistication. The Department of Energy through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has undertaken a broad review of International Safeguards. The conclusion from that review was that a comprehensive initiative to revitalize international safeguards technology and the human resource base was urgently needed to keep pace with demands and increasingly sophisticated emerging safeguards challenges. To address these challenges, NNSA launched the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to develop policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and infrastructure necessary to sustain the international safeguards system as its mission evolves for the next 25 years. NGSI is designed to revitalize and strengthen the U.S. safeguards technical base, recognizing that without a robust program the United States of America will not be in a position to exercise leadership or provide the necessary support to the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). International safeguards as administrated by the IAEA are the primary vehicle for verifying compliance with the peaceful use and nonproliferation of nuclear materials and technologies. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy or LIBS has the potential to support the goals of NGSI as follows: by providing (1) automated analysis in complex nuclear processing or reprocessing facilities in real-time or near real-time without sample preparation or removal, (2) isotopic and important elemental ratio (Cm/Pu, Cm/U, ... etc) analysis, and (3) centralized remote control, process monitoring, and analysis of nuclear materials in nuclear facilities at multiple locations within the facility. Potential application of LIBS to international safeguards as

  9. Hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in rat and human corneas: the potential of second harmonic generation microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Latour

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Second Harmonic Generation (SHG microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet's membrane, in the posterior cornea. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet's membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily

  10. Characterization of Cooking-Related Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Blanc, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    The temperatures at which food is cooked are usually high enough to drive oils and other organic compounds out of materials which are being prepared for consumption. As these compounds move away from the hot cooking surface and into the atmosphere, they can participate in chemical reactions or condense to form particles. Given the high concentration of cooking in urban areas, cooking-related aerosols likely contribute to the overall amount of particulate matter on a local scale. Reported here are results for the mid-infrared optical characterization of aerosols formed during the cooking of several meat and vegetable samples in an inert atmosphere. The samples were heated in a novel aerosol generator that is designed to collect particles formed immediately above the cooking surface and inject them into a laminar aerosol flow cell. Preliminary results for the chemical processing of cooking-related aerosols in synthetic air will also be presented.

  11. Indoor aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morawska, L.; Afshari, Alireza; N. Bae, G.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by growing considerations of the scale, severity, and risks associated with human exposure to indoor particulate matter, this work reviewed existing literature to: (i) identify state-of-the-art experimental techniques used for personal exposure assessment; (ii) compare exposure levels...... reported for domestic/school settings in different countries (excluding exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and particulate matter from biomass cooking in developing countries); (iii) assess the contribution of outdoor background vs indoor sources to personal exposure; and (iv) examine scientific...... understanding of the risks posed by personal exposure to indoor aerosols. Limited studies assessing integrated daily residential exposure to just one particle size fraction, ultrafine particles, show that the contribution of indoor sources ranged from 19% to 76%. This indicates a strong dependence on resident...

  12. Bio-aerosols in indoor environment: Composition, health effects and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Padma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-aerosols are airborne particles that are living (bacteria, viruses and fungi or originate from living organisms. Their presence in air is the result of dispersal from a site of colonization or growth. The health effects of bio-aerosols including infectious diseases, acute toxic effects, allergies and cancer coupled with the threat of bioterrorism and SARS have led to increased awareness on the importance of bio-aerosols. The evaluation of bio-aerosols includes use of variety of methods for sampling depending on the concentration of microorganisms expected. There have been problems in developing standard sampling methods, in proving a causal relationship and in establishing threshold limit values for exposures due to the complexity of composition of bio-aerosols, variations in human response to their exposure and difficulties in recovering microorganisms. Currently bio-aerosol monitoring in hospitals is carried out for epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infectious diseases, research into airborne microorganism spread and control, monitoring biohazardous procedures and use as a quality control measure. In India there is little awareness regarding the quality of indoor air, mould contamination in indoor environments, potential source for transmission of nosocomial infections in health care facilities. There is an urgent need to undertake study of indoor air, to generate baseline data and explore the link to nosocomial infections. This article is a review on composition, sources, modes of transmission, health effects and sampling methods used for evaluation of bio-aerosols, and also suggests control measures to reduce the loads of bio-aerosols.

  13. Potential of pulsed corona discharges generated in water for the degradation of persistent pharmaceutical residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschik, Robert; Lukes, Petr; Jablonowski, Helena; Hammer, Malte U; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kolb, Juergen F

    2015-11-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants and in particular pharmaceutical residues are a potential risk for potable water where they are found in increasing concentrations. Different environmental effects could already be linked to the presence of pharmaceuticals in surface waters even for low concentrations. Many pharmaceuticals withstand conventional water treatment technologies. Consequently, there is a need for new water purification techniques. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP), and especially plasmas with their ability to create reactive species directly in water, may offer a promising solution. We developed a plasma reactor with a coaxial geometry to generate large volume corona discharges directly in water and investigated the degradation of seven recalcitrant pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, diatrizoate, diazepam, diclofenac, ibuprofen, 17α-ethinylestradiol, trimethoprim). For most substances we observed decomposition rates from 45% to 99% for treatment times of 15-66 min. Especially ethinylestradiol and diclofenac were readily decomposed. As an inherent advantage of the method, we found no acidification and only an insignificant increase in nitrate/nitrite concentrations below legal limits for the treatment. Studies on the basic plasma chemical processes for the model system of phenol showed that the degradation is primarily caused by hydroxyl radicals.

  14. Characteristics of the summit lakes of Ambae volcano and their potential for generating lahars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions through crater lakes often generate lahars, causing loss of life and property. On Ambae volcano, recent eruptive activities have rather tended to reduce the water volume in the crater lake (Lake Voui, in turn, reducing the chances for outburst floods. Lake Voui occupies a central position in the summit caldera and is well enclosed by the caldera relief. Eruptions with significantly higher magnitude than that of 1995 and 2005 are required for an outburst. A more probable scenario for lahar events is the overflow from Lake Manaro Lakua bounded on the eastern side by the caldera wall. Morphology and bathymetry analysis have been used to identify the weakest point of the caldera rim from which water from Lake Manaro Lakua may overflow to initiate lahars. The 1916 disaster described on south-east Ambae was possibly triggered by such an outburst from Lake Manaro Lakua. Taking into account the current level of Lake Manaro Lakua well below a critical overflow point, and the apparently low potential of Lake Voui eruptions to trigger lahars, the Ambae summit lakes may not be directly responsible for numerous lahar deposits identified around the Island.

  15. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  16. Energy generation potential from coals of the Charqueadas Coalfield, RS, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa da Silva, Z. C.; Heemann, R.; Castro, L.; Ketzer, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Three coal seams, I2B (Inferior 2), I1F (Inferior 1) and MB, from the Charqueadas Coalfield located in the central-east region of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil were studied on the basis of geological, petrographic, chemical and geochemical techniques and correlated to the SR1, SR2 and SR3 coal seams from the Santa Rita Coalfield. The Charqueadas Coalfield reserves reach 2,993x106 metric tons of coal distributed in six coal seams. The study of sedimentary and organic facies is made on the subsurface data from five boreholes drilled in the area. There show a well marked lateral facies change from sub aquatic to sub aerial environment, conditioned by both the water level variations and the irregular palaeotopography of the basement. The coals change from limnic to forest-terrestrial moor types characterized by variations of composition in terms of macerals, microlithotypes and mineral matter. The coals are rich in mineral matter (28 to 40%); the vitrinite content reaches 50 %, inertinite 44 % and liptinite varies from 10 to 30 %, in mineral matter free basis. Among the microlithotypes carbominerite and vitrite are predominant. Rank studies carried out by different methods (vitrinite reflectance, max and red-green quotient among others) gave conflicting results, which are explained by the strong bituminization of the vitrinite. However, agreement between fluorescence measurements and organic geochemical parameters (e.g. CPI values) confirm that the coals are of a High Volatile Bituminous B/C (ASTM) or Gasflammkohle (DIN) rank. Based on these characteristics, the Charqueadas coal seams show great potential for use in Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) and Enhanced Coalbed Methane (ECBM) projects. Nowadays the state of Rio Grande do Sul is rapidly growing and needs to increase the energy efficiency to attend the industrial demands, filling the gap between supply and energy generation. As with conventional IGCC, UCG gas can be used to generate

  17. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  18. Longitudinal assessment of thrombin generation potential in response to alteration of antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, W O

    2013-02-01

    The impact of changing antiplatelet therapy on thrombin generation potential in patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is unclear. We assessed patients within 4 weeks of TIA or ischaemic stroke (baseline), and then 14 days (14d) and >90 days (90d) after altering antiplatelet therapy. Thrombin generation was assessed in platelet poor plasma. Ninety-one patients were recruited. Twenty-four were initially assessed on no antiplatelet therapy, and then after 14d (N = 23) and 90d (N = 8) on aspirin monotherapy; 52 were assessed on aspirin monotherapy, and after 14 and 90 days on aspirin and dipyridamole combination therapy; 21 patients were assessed on aspirin and after 14 days (N = 21) and 90 days (N = 19) on clopidogrel. Peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at 14 and 90 days (p ≤ 0.04) in the overall cohort. We assessed the impact of individual antiplatelet regimens on thrombin generation parameters to investigate the cause of this effect. Lag time and time-to-peak thrombin generation were unchanged at 14 days, but reduced 90 days after commencing aspirin (p ≤ 0.009). Lag time, peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at both 14 and 90 days after adding dipyridamole to aspirin (p ≤ 0.01). Lag time was reduced 14 days after changing from aspirin to clopidogrel (p = 0.045), but this effect was not maintained at 90 days (p = 0.2). This pilot study did not show any consistent effects of commencing aspirin, or of changing from aspirin to clopidogrel on thrombin generation potential during follow-up. The addition of dipyridamole to aspirin led to a persistent reduction in peak and total thrombin generation ex vivo, and illustrates the diverse, potentially beneficial, newly recognised \\'anti-coagulant\\' effects of dipyridamole in ischaemic CVD.

  19. A Methodology for Calculating EGS Electricity Generation Potential Based on the Gringarten Model for Heat Extraction From Fractured Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, Chad

    2017-05-01

    Existing methodologies for estimating the electricity generation potential of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) assume thermal recovery factors of 5% or less, resulting in relatively low volumetric electricity generation potentials for EGS reservoirs. This study proposes and develops a methodology for calculating EGS electricity generation potential based on the Gringarten conceptual model and analytical solution for heat extraction from fractured rock. The electricity generation potential of a cubic kilometer of rock as a function of temperature is calculated assuming limits on the allowed produced water temperature decline and reservoir lifetime based on surface power plant constraints. The resulting estimates of EGS electricity generation potential can be one to nearly two-orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methodologies. The flow per unit fracture surface area from the Gringarten solution is found to be a key term in describing the conceptual reservoir behavior. The methodology can be applied to aid in the design of EGS reservoirs by giving minimum reservoir volume, fracture spacing, number of fractures, and flow requirements for a target reservoir power output. Limitations of the idealized model compared to actual reservoir performance and the implications on reservoir design are discussed.

  20. Ling’s Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Tamagawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling’s adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling’s adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling’s adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology.

  1. Ling's Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-26

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling's adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling's adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling's adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology.

  2. PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL CHARACTERISTIC OF YOUNG GENERATION WITH A VARYING ADAPTATION POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолий Степанович Пуликов

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Goal:  to study certain characteristics of emotional constitution of young generation in Siberia and their dependence on adaptive capability.Method and methodology:  124 apparently healthy young male students of Zheleznogorsk branch ofKrasnoyarskStatePedagogicalUniversity named after V.P. Astafyev were examined on a volunteer basis upon their informed consent.Up-to-date conventional techniques were used for making anthropometric measurements and conducting functional study.Personality questionnaire by G.Y. Eysenck was used for referring students to emotional types.Results: body weight of young males from Zheleznogorsk increases from asthenic to normosthenic and picnic types of build, while the height decreases from normosthenic and asthenic to picnic types. About 40% of young males are of normosthenic build and about 30% each can be referred to picnic or asthenic types.As far as adaptation potential is concerned, in the majority of young males strain of adaptation mechanisms or poor adaptation (90-92% are present, and only 8-10% have normal adaptation characteristics.Parameters of adaptation capabilities in characteristics of emotional status adequately reflect functional activity of central links of regulation and adaptation ‘resources’. Among characteristic features of emotional constitution of young males from Zheleznogorsk are moderate and considerable introversion, a high degree of emotional stability in situations when adaptation mechanisms are strained, and rather high emotional instability among young males with normal adaptation characteristics and even higher among those with poor adaptation mechanisms. All these are probably connected with radioecological situation at Zheleznogorsk.Scope of application of results: medicine, psychology, age-specific physiology, anthropology, neurology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-21

  3. Potential decline in geothermal energy generation due to rising temperatures under climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, E.; Ortega, S.; Gonzalez-Duque, D.; Ruiz-Carrascal, D.

    2016-12-01

    Geothermal energy production depends on the difference between air temperature and the geothermal fluid temperature. The latter remains approximately constant over time, so the power generation varies according to local atmospheric conditions. Projected changes in near-surface air temperatures in the upper levels of the tropical belt are likely to exceed the projected temperature anomalies across many other latitudes, which implies that geothermal plants located in these regions may be affected, reducing their energy output. This study focuses on a hypothetical geothermal power plant, located in the headwaters of the Claro River watershed, a key high-altitude basin in Los Nevados Natural Park, on the El Ruiz-Tolima volcanic massif, in the Colombian Central Andes, a region with a known geothermal potential. Four different Atmospheric General Circulation Models where used to project temperature anomalies for the 2040-2069 prospective period. Their simulation outputs were merged in a differentially-weighted multi-model ensemble, whose weighting factors were defined according to the capability of individual models to reproduce ground truth data from a set of digital data-loggers installed in the basin since 2008 and from weather stations gathering climatic variables since the early 50s. Projected anomalies were computed for each of the Representative Concentration Pathways defined by the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report in the studied region. These climate change projections indicate that air temperatures will likely reach positive anomalies in the range +1.27 ºC to +3.47 ºC, with a mean value of +2.18 ºC. Under these conditions, the annual energy output declines roughly 1% per each degree of increase in near-surface temperature. These results must be taken into account in geothermal project evaluations in the region.

  4. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  5. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Dye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marburg virus (MARV was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs containing the glycoprotein (GP, matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  6. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, John M; Warfield, Kelly L; Wells, Jay B; Unfer, Robert C; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Nichols, Donald K; Aman, M Javad; Bavari, Sina

    2016-04-08

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ) challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  7. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  8. Hospital washbasin water: risk of Legionella-contaminated aerosol inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier, P; Landelle, C; Reyrolle, M; Nicolle, M C; Slimani, S; Etienne, J; Vanhems, P; Jarraud, S

    2013-12-01

    The contamination of aerosols by washbasin water colonized by Legionella in a hospital was evaluated. Aerosol samples were collected by two impingement technologies. Legionella was never detected by culture in all the (aerosol) samples. However, 45% (18/40) of aerosol samples were positive for Legionella spp. by polymerase chain reaction, with measurable concentrations in 10% of samples (4/40). Moreover, immunoassay detected Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. anisa, and potentially viable bacteria were seen on viability testing. These data suggest that colonized hospital washbasins could represent risks of exposure to Legionella aerosol inhalation, especially by immunocompromised patients.

  9. Theoretical aspects of electrical power generation from two-phase flow streaming potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherwood, J.D.; Xie, Yanbo; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    A theoretical analysis of the generation of electrical streaming currents and electrical power by two-phase flow in a rectangular capillary is presented. The injection of a second, non-conducting fluid phase tends to increase the internal electrical resistance of the electrical generator, thereby

  10. CCN activation of ambient and "synthetic ambient" urban aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Julia; Reischl, Georg; Steiner, Gerhard; Bauer, Heidi; Leder, Klaus; Kistler, Magda; Puxbaum, Hans; Hitzenberger, R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activation properties of the urban aerosol in Vienna, Austria, were investigated in a long term (11 month) field study. Filter samples of the aerosol below 100 nm were taken in parallel to these measurements, and later used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosols. Activation parameters of this "synthetic ambient" aerosol were also obtained. Hygroscopicity parameters κ [1] were calculated both for the urban and the "synthetic ambient" aerosol and also from the chemical composition. Average κ for the "synthetic ambient" aerosol ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 with an average value of 0.24, while the κ from the chemical composition of this "synthetic ambient" aerosol was significantly higher (average 0.43). The full results of the study are given elsewhere [2,3].

  11. Early growth dynamical implications for the steerability of stratospheric solar radiation management via sulfur aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduhn, François; Schallock, Jennifer; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol growth dynamics may have implications for the steerability of stratospheric solar radiation management via sulfur particles. This paper derives a set of critical initial growth conditions that are analyzed as a function of two key parameters: the initial concentration of the injected sulfuric acid and its dilution rate with the surrounding air. Based upon this analysis, early aerosol growth dynamical regimes may be defined and classified in terms of their likelihood to serve as candidates for the controlled generation of a radiatively effective aerosol. Our results indicate that the regime that fulfills all critical conditions would require that airplane turbines be used to provide sufficient turbulence. The regime's parameter space is narrow and related to steep gradients, thus pointing to potential fine tuning requirements. More research, development, and testing would be required to refine our findings and determine their global-scale implications.

  12. Food waste generation and potential interventions at Rhodes University, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Kathleen; Thondhlana, Gladman; Kua, Harn Wei

    2016-10-01

    Estimation of food waste generation represents the first step when considering efforts to reduce waste generation and monitor food waste reduction against set targets. This study reports on an estimation of food waste generated in university dining halls at Rhodes University, South Africa. Daily food waste generation was estimated at about 555g per student or 2tonnes across all sample dining halls, translating to about 450tonnes per year. The results show that food waste is influenced by an array of contextual factors, including distance to dining hall, gender composition of hall and meal times and meal options. It is estimated that the university could save up to US$ 80000 annually for every 10% reduction in the current rate of food waste generation. Possible educational, technical and administrative interventions for food waste reduction are discussed.

  13. The Application of Surface Potential Test on Hand-making Insulation for Generator Stator End-winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhu-mao; Liu, Qing; Wang, Tian-zheng; Bai, Lu; Li, Yan-peng

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the advantage of surface potential test on hand-making insulation for generator stator end-winding insulation detection, compared with DC or AC withstand voltage test, also details the test principle, connection method and test notes. And through the case, surface potential test on hand-making insulation proved effective for insulation quality detection after generator stator end-winding maintenance, and the experimental data is useful and reliable for the electrical equipment operation and maintenance in the power plant.

  14. Diagnostic potential of recombinant scFv antibodies generated against hemagglutinin protein of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali eRajput

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human influenza A viruses have been the cause of enormous socio-economic losses worldwide. In order to combat such a notorious pathogen, hemagglutinin protein (HA has been a preferred target for generation of neutralizing-antibodies, as potent therapeutic/ diagnostic agents. In the present study, recombinant anti-HA single chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies were constructed using the phage display technology to aid in diagnosis and treatment of human influenza A virus infections. Spleen cells of mice hyper-immunized with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1 virus were used as the source for recombinant antibody (rAb production. The antigen-binding phages were quantified after 6 rounds of bio-panning against A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1, A/California/07/2009 (H1N1-like, or A/Udorn/307/72(H3N2 viruses. The phage yield was maximum for the A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1, however, considerable cross-reactivity was observed for the other virus strains as well. The HA-specific polyclonal rAb preparation was subjected to selection of single clones for identification of high reactive relatively conserved epitopes. The high affinity rAbs were tested against certain known conserved HA epitopes by peptide ELISA. Three recombinant mAbs showed reactivity with both the H1N1 strains and one (C5 showed binding with all the three viral strains. The C5 antibody was thus used for development of an ELISA test for diagnosis of influenza virus infection. Based on the sample size in the current analysis, the ELISA test demonstrated 83.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Thus, the ELISA, developed in our study, may prove as a cheaper alternative to the presently used real time RT-PCR test for detection of human influenza A viruses in clinical specimens, which will be beneficial, especially in the developing countries. Since, the two antibodies identified in this study are reactive to conserved HA epitopes; these may prove as potential therapeutic agents as well.

  15. Evaluating potentials for future generation off-shore wind-power outside Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benestad, R. E.; Haugen, J.; Haakenstad, H.

    2012-12-01

    With todays critical need of renewable energy sources, it is naturally to look towards wind power. With the long coast of Norway, there is a large potential for wind farms offshore Norway. Although there are more challenges with offshore wind energy installations compared to wind farms on land, the offshore wind is generally higher, and there is also higher persistence of wind speed values in the power generating classes. I planning offshore wind farms, there is a need of evaluation of the wind resources, the wind climatology and possible future changes. In this aspect, we use data from regional climate model runs performed in the European ENSEMBLE-project (van der Linden and J.F.B. Mitchell, 2009). In spite of increased reliability in RCMs in the recent years, the simulations still suffer from systematic model errors, therefore the data has to be corrected before using them in wind resource analyses. In correcting the wind speeds from the RCMs, we will use wind speeds from a Norwegian high resolution wind- and wave- archive, NORA10 (Reistad et al 2010), to do quantile mapping (Themeβl et. al. 2012). The quantile mapping is performed individually for each regional simulation driven by ERA40-reanalysis from the ENSEMBLE-project corrected against NORA10. The same calibration is then used to the belonging regional climate scenario. The calibration is done for each grid cell in the domain and for each day of the year centered in a +/-15 day window to make an empirical cumulative density function for each day of the year. The quantile mapping of the scenarios provide us with a new wind speed data set for the future, more correct compared to the raw ENSEMBLE scenarios. References: Reistad M., Ø. Breivik, H. Haakenstad, O. J. Aarnes, B. R. Furevik and J-R Bidlo, 2010, A high-resolution hindcast of wind and waves for The North Sea, The Norwegian Sea and The Barents Sea. J. Geophys. Res., 116. doi:10.1029/2010JC006402. Themessl M. J., A. Gobiet and A. Leuprecht, 2012

  16. Measuring the Chemical Potential of the Martian Regolith to Generate and Sustain Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    1999-01-01

    A critical component for identifying chemical biosignatures is the ability to assess in-situ the potential of an aqueous geochemical environment to generate and sustain life. On Mars or other solar bodies, in-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporites in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced or possess the chemical parameters within which life may have existed, or may still exist. A variety of analytical techniques have been proposed for use in detecting and identify signatures of past or present life. These techniques fall into two groups; visual observation with instruments such as cameras or optical/atomic-force microscopes; or elemental chemical analysis with such instruments as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and diffraction (XRD), a-proton backscatter (APX), y-ray, Mossbauer, Raman, IR, UV/VIS spectroscopies, gas chromatography (GC), or mass spectrometry (MS). Direct observation of an identifiable lifeform by the first set of instruments in a single sample is highly unlikely, especially for extinct organisms or on the surface. The later instruments can provide vital data as to the elemental mineralogy and geological history of the planet, but are highly inadequate for understanding the chemistry of the planet in terms of indigenous life or interactions with human explorers. Techniques such as XRD, XRF, and APX, provide elemental composition at high limits of detection. Some of this data can be extrapolated or interpolated to provide chemical parameters such as oxidation state or composition. Gas chromatography (GC) without standards and non-specific detectors, has little chance of identifying a mixture of unknown components. Combined with GC or by itself, mass spectrometry (MS) can provide identification of compounds, but in both cases the sample must be appropriately prepared for accurate and reliable analysis. Life as we know it, and probably identify it as

  17. Measuring the Chemical Potential of the Martian Regolith to Generate and Sustain Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    1999-01-01

    A critical component for identifying chemical biosignatures is the ability to assess in-situ the potential of an aqueous geochemical environment to generate and sustain life. On Mars or other solar bodies, in-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporites in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced or possess the chemical parameters within which life may have existed, or may still exist. A variety of analytical techniques have been proposed for use in detecting and identify signatures of past or present life. These techniques fall into two groups; visual observation with instruments such as cameras or optical/atomic-force microscopes; or elemental chemical analysis with such instruments as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and diffraction (XRD), a-proton backscatter (APX), y-ray, Mossbauer, Raman, IR, UV/VIS spectroscopies, gas chromatography (GC), or mass spectrometry (MS). Direct observation of an identifiable lifeform by the first set of instruments in a single sample is highly unlikely, especially for extinct organisms or on the surface. The later instruments can provide vital data as to the elemental mineralogy and geological history of the planet, but are highly inadequate for understanding the chemistry of the planet in terms of indigenous life or interactions with human explorers. Techniques such as XRD, XRF, and APX, provide elemental composition at high limits of detection. Some of this data can be extrapolated or interpolated to provide chemical parameters such as oxidation state or composition. Gas chromatography (GC) without standards and non-specific detectors, has little chance of identifying a mixture of unknown components. Combined with GC or by itself, mass spectrometry (MS) can provide identification of compounds, but in both cases the sample must be appropriately prepared for accurate and reliable analysis. Life as we know it, and probably identify it as

  18. Oil and gas generation potential of different age sediments of the transcarpathian depression according to TOC content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрій Андрійович Локтєв

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of views on genesis of natural gases in the depths of Transcarpathian depression is given in the article. Besides another aspect that is mentioned is definition of potential source rocks of oil and gas within the depression by the analysis of the cores on TOC amount and oil and gas generation potential of Miocene thicknesses of sediments as well as preneogene basement

  19. A study on the power generation potential of mini wind turbine in east coast of Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basrawi, Firdaus; Ismail, Izwan; Ibrahim, Thamir Khalil; Idris, Daing Mohamad Nafiz Daing; Anuar, Shahrani

    2017-03-01

    A small-scale wind turbine is an attractive renewable energy source, but its economic viability depends on wind speed. The aim of this study is to determine economic viability of small-scale wind turbine in East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The potential energy generated has been determined by wind speed data and power curved of. Hourly wind speed data of Kuantan throughout 2015 was collected as the input. Then, a model of wind turbine was developed based on a commercial a 300W mini wind turbine. It was found that power generation is 3 times higher during northeast monsoon season at 15 m elevation. This proved that the northeast monsoon season has higher potential in generating power by wind turbine in East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. However, only a total of 153.4 kWh/year of power can be generated at this condition. The power generator utilization factor PGUI or capacity ratio was merely 0.06 and it is not technically viable. By increasing the height of wind turbine to 60 m elevation, power generation amount drastically increased to 344 kWh/year, with PGUI of 0.13. This is about two-thirds of PGUI for photovoltaic technology which is 0.21 at this site. If offshore condition was considered, power generation amount further increased to 1,328 kWh/year with PGUI of 0.51. Thus, for a common use of mini wind turbine that is usually installed on-site at low elevation, it has low power generation potential. But, if high elevation as what large wind turbine needed is implemented, it is technically viable option in East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

  20. Papers of the 15. french congress on the aerosols CFA 99; Actes du 15. congres francais sur les aerosols CFA 99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This french congress on the aerosols took place in Paris the 8 and 9 december 1999. It was presented in four main themes: bio-aerosols and filtering; the aerosols metrology; the aerosols in the environment; aerosols physic and applications. Seven papers have been analyzed in INIS data base for their specific interest in the nuclear industry. They concern the aerosol capture simulation, the aerosols sampling in workplace environment, a ring-effect ion generator development for the charge and the neutralization of an aerosol cloud, the radon 222 characterization in a house, a particle re-entrainment, the electrical charge process of beta emitter radioactive aerosols, the simulation of air flows in many filters. The other ones are analyzed in the ETDE data base. (A.L.B.)

  1. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  2. A model for estimation of potential generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Marcelo Guimarães; Magrini, Alessandra; Mahler, Cláudio Fernando; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2012-02-01

    Sales of electrical and electronic equipment are increasing dramatically in developing countries. Usually, there are no reliable data about quantities of the waste generated. A new law for solid waste management was enacted in Brazil in 2010, and the infrastructure to treat this waste must be planned, considering the volumes of the different types of electrical and electronic equipment generated. This paper reviews the literature regarding estimation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), focusing on developing countries, particularly in Latin America. It briefly describes the current WEEE system in Brazil and presents an updated estimate of generation of WEEE. Considering the limited available data in Brazil, a model for WEEE generation estimation is proposed in which different methods are used for mature and non-mature market products. The results showed that the most important variable is the equipment lifetime, which requires a thorough understanding of consumer behavior to estimate. Since Brazil is a rapidly expanding market, the "boom" in waste generation is still to come. In the near future, better data will provide more reliable estimation of waste generation and a clearer interpretation of the lifetime variable throughout the years.

  3. Seasonal analysis of the generation and composition of solid waste: potential use--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Virgen, Quetzalli; Taboada-González, Paul; Ojeda-Benítez, Sara

    2013-06-01

    Ensenada health officials lack pertinent information on the sustainable management of solid waste, as do health officials from other developing countries. The aims of this research are: (a) to quantify and analyze the household solid wastes generated in the city of Ensenada, Mexico, and (b) to project biogas production and estimate generation of electrical energy. The characterization study was conducted by socioeconomic stratification in two seasonal periods, and the biogas and electrical energy projections were performed using the version 2.0 Mexico Biogas Model. Per capita solid waste generation was 0.779 ± 0.019 kg per person per day within a 98 % confidence interval. Waste composition is composed mainly of food scraps at 36.25 %, followed by paper and cardboard at 21.85 %, plastic at 12.30 %, disposable diapers at 6.26 %, and textiles at 6.28 %. The maximum capacity for power generation is projected to be 1.90 MW in 2019. Waste generated could be used as an intermediate in different processes such as recycling (41.04 %) and energy recovery (46.63 %). The electrical energy that could be obtained using the biogas generated at the Ensenada sanitary landfill would provide roughly 60 % of the energy needed for street lighting.

  4. The influence of metallurgy on the formation of welding aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Anthony T

    2002-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that insoluble ultrafine aerosols (ie., particles whose physical diameters are less than 100 nm) may cause adverse health effects due to their small size, and that toxicological response may be more appropriately represented by particle number or particle surface area. Unfortunately, current exposure criteria and the associated air-sampling techniques are primarily mass-based. Welding processes are high-temperature operations that generate substantial number concentrations of ultrafine aerosols. Welding aerosols are formed primarily through the nucleation of metal vapors followed by competing growth mechanisms such as coagulation and condensation. Experimental results and mathematical tools are presented to illustrate how welding metallurgy influences the chemical aspects and dynamic processes that initiate and evolve the resultant aerosol. This research suggests that a fundamental understanding of metallurgy and aerosol physics can be exploited to suppress the formation of undesirable chemical species as well as the amount of aerosol generated during a welding process.

  5. Action potential generation in the small intestine of W mutant mice that lack interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malysz, J; Thuneberg, L; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte

    1996-01-01

    The small intestine of W/Wv mice lacks both the network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), associated with Auerbach's plexus, and pacemaker activity, i.e., it does not generate slow-wave-type action potentials. The W/Wv muscle preparations showed a wide variety of electrical activities, rangin...

  6. Generation of the membrane potential and its impact on the motility, ATP production and growth in Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation of an electrical membrane potential (''), the major constituent of the proton motive force (pmf) is crucial for the ATP synthesis, bacterial growth and motility. The pmf drives the rotation of flagella and is vital for the microaerophilic human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni to coloniz...

  7. On the magnetic field and the electrical potential generated by bioelectric sources in an anisotropic volume conductor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.J.; Elias, P.J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The electrical conductivity in biological tissue is often dependent on the direction of the fibres. In the paper the influence of this anisotropic nature on the electrical potential and magnetic field generated by a current dipole is studied analytically. Three different methods are discussed. The

  8. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  9. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    depth gradient, with AOD(500 nm) extremes from 0.1 to 1.1. On the Pacific transit from Honolulu to Hachijo AOD(500 nm) averaged 0.2, including increases to 0.4 after several storms, suggesting the strong impact of wind-generated seasalt. The AOD maximum, found in the Sea of Japan, was influenced by dust and anthropogenic sources. (4) In Beijing, single scattering albedo retrieved from AERONET sun-sky radiometry yielded midvisible SSA=0.88 with strong wavelength dependence, suggesting a significant black carbon component. SSA retrieved during dust episodes was approx. 0.90 and variable but wavelength neutral reflecting the presence of urban haze with the dust. Downwind at Anmyon Island SSA was considerably higher, approx. 0.94, but wavelength neutral for dust episodes and spectrally dependent during non dust periods. (5) Satellite retrievals show major aerosol features moving from Asia over the Pacific; however, determining seasonal-average aerosol effects is hampered by sampling frequency and large-scale cloud systems that obscure key parts of aerosol patterns. Preliminary calculations using, satellite-retrieved AOD fields and initial ACE-Asia aerosol properties (including sulfates, soot, and dust) yield clear-sky aerosol radiative effects in the seasonal-average ACE-Asia plume exceeding those of manmade greenhouse gases. Quantifying all-sky direct aerosol radiative effects is complicated by the need to define the height of absorbing aerosols with respect to cloud decks.

  10. Isospectral Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potentials with Position Dependent Mass Generated by Supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Cruz, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work a position dependent mass Hamiltonian with the same spectrum of the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller one was constructed by means of the underlying potential algebra. The corresponding wave functions are determined by using the factorization method. A new family of isospectral potentials are constructed by applying a Darboux transformation. An example is presented in order to illustrate the formalism.

  11. Assessing current and future techno-economic potential of concentrated solar power and photovoltaic electricity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köberle, Alexandre C.; Gernaat, David E H J; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2015-01-01

    CSP and PV technologies represent energy sources with large potentials. We present cost-supply curves for both technologies using a consistent methodology for 26 regions, based on geoexplicit information on solar radiation, land cover type and slope, exploring individual potential and interdependenc

  12. A Comprehensive View of Global Potential for Hydro-generated Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Smith, Steven J.; Edmonds, James A.; Li, Hongyi; Clarke, Leon E.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we assess global hydropower potential using runoff and stream flow data, along with turbine technology performance, cost assumptions, and environmental considerations. The results provide the first comprehensive quantification of global hydropower potential including gross, technical, economic, and exploitable estimates. Total global potential of gross, technical, economic, and exploitable hydropower are estimated to be approximately 128, 39, 32, and 27 petawatt hours per year, respectively. The economic and exploitable potential of hydropower are calculated at less than 9 cents/kWh. We find that hydropower has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region. Globally, hydropower can potentially supply about 1.5 times the total electricity demand in 2005. Estimated hydropower resources in a number of countries are sufficient to accommodate their demand for electricity in 2005, e.g., Brazil (5.6 times), Russia (4.6 times), and Canada (3.5 times). A sensitivity analysis indicates that hydropower estimates are not highly sensitive to five key parameters: design flow (varying by -2% to +1% at less than 9 cents/kWh), cost and financing options (by -7% to +6%), turbine efficiency (by -10% to +10%), stream flow (by -10% to +10%), and fixed charge rate (by -6% to 5%). This sensitivity analysis emphasizes the reliable role of hydropower for future energy systems, when compared to other renewable energy resources with larger uncertainty in their future potentials.

  13. Exploring the potential of next-generation sequencing in detection of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Schapendonk, Claudia M E; Koopmans, Marion P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Schürch, Anita C; Pas, Suzan D; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Poovorawan, Yong; Haagmans, Bart L; Smits, Saskia L

    2014-10-01

    Efficient detection of human respiratory viral pathogens is crucial in the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Sequence-independent amplification of nucleic acids combined with next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analyses is a promising strategy for identifying pathogens in clinical and public health settings. It allows the characterization of hundreds of different known pathogens simultaneously and of novel pathogens that elude conventional testing. However, major hurdles for its routine use exist, including cost, turnaround time, and especially sensitivity of the assay, as the detection limit is dependent on viral load, host genetic material, and sequencing depth. To obtain insights into these aspects, we analyzed nasopharyngeal aspirates from a cohort of 81 Thai children with respiratory disease for the presence of respiratory viruses using a sequence-independent next-generation sequencing approach and routinely used diagnostic real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time RT-PCR) assays. With respect to the detection of rhinovirus and human metapneumovirus, the next-generation sequencing approach was at least as sensitive as diagnostic real-time RT-PCR in this small cohort, whereas for bocavirus and enterovirus, next-generation sequencing was less sensitive than real-time RT-PCR. The advantage of the sequencing approach over real-time RT-PCR was the immediate availability of virus-typing information. Considering the development of platforms capable of generating more output data at declining costs, next-generation sequencing remains of interest for future virus diagnosis in clinical and public health settings and certainly as an additional tool when screening results from real-time RT-PCR are negative.

  14. A new technique for the deposition of standard solutions in total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) using pico-droplets generated by inkjet printers and its applicability for aerosol analysis with SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittschen, U.E.A. [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: ursula.fittschen@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Hauschild, S. [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Amberger, M.A. [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Lammel, G. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstrasse 53, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Foerster, S. [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Wobrauschek, P. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Jokubonis, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pepponi, G. [ITC-irst, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Falkenberg, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Broekaert, J.A.C. [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    A new technique for the deposition of standard solutions on particulate aerosol samples using pico-droplets for elemental determinations with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is described. It enables short analysis times without influencing the sample structure and avoids time consuming scanning of the sample with the exciting beam in SR-TXRF analysis. Droplets of picoliter volume ({approx} 5-130 pL) were generated with commercially available and slightly modified inkjet printers operated with popular image processing software. The size of the dried droplets on surfaces of different polarity namely silicone coated and untreated quartz reflectors, was determined for five different printer types and ten different cartridge types. The results show that droplets generated by inkjet printers are between 50 and 200 {mu}m in diameter (corresponding to volumes of 5 to 130 pL) depending on the cartridge type, which is smaller than the width of the synchrotron beam used in the experiments (< 1 mm at an energy of 17 keV at the beamline L at HASYLAB, Hamburg). The precision of the printing of a certain amount of a single element standard solution was found to be comparable to aliquoting with micropipettes in TXRF, where for 2.5 ng of cobalt relative standard deviations of 12% are found. However, it could be shown that the printing of simple patterns is possible, which is important when structured samples have to be analysed.

  15. Implications of Climate Policies for Future Aerosol: Health and Economic Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selin, N. E.; Wang, C.; Sokolov, A. P.; Paltsev, S.; Webster, M. D.; Reilly, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    We quantify the global changes in atmospheric aerosol (PM2.5) and their related health and economic impacts under a reference case and four greenhouse gas stabilization scenarios to 2050. Policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions could reduce emissions of aerosol precursors, due to reduced energy use or cleaner energy generation. We assess these potential benefits using climate policy scenarios from the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) framework, which consists of a set of coupled models for the climate, ecosystem, atmospheric chemistry and economy, at global scale. We use aerosol precursor emissions and greenhouse gas forcings from the IGSM to drive the MIT/NCAR version of the Community Atmospheric Model version 3 (CAM3). We calculate the influence of future aerosol precursor emissions changes, climatic changes, and their combined effects on population-weighted average PM2.5 in sixteen global regions. We then use an economic and health model to quantify the implications of these changes for human disease and the global economy. Finally, we compare the magnitude of these changes to the cost of greenhouse gas policies. We find that global aerosol-related health and economic benefits associated with climate policies are smaller than estimated global costs of climate policy, but not negligible in the context of policy analysis.

  16. Domestic use of overseas renewable energy -Potential as power generating fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomofumi; Murata, Kenji; Kamiya, Shoji; Ota, Ken-ichiro; Sakata, Ko; Fukuda, Kenzo; Ishimoto, Yuki

    2010-09-15

    For Japan, it will be very important in the future to establish a social system that can consistently import or produce a set amount of resource supplies without green house gas emissions. In this study, we developed a concept for a global hydrogen energy system using wind power generation as a hydrogen source, investigated its economic efficiency, compared it with power generating fuels used at existing thermal power plants, and examined the feasibility of the global hydrogen energy system. As a result, it would be more effective to decommission existing oil-fired thermal power plants and construct new hydrogen turbine plants.

  17. Ionic mechanisms in the generation of subthreshold oscillations and action potential clustering in entorhinal layer II stellate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransén, Erik; Alonso, Angel A; Dickson, Clayton T; Magistretti, Jacopo; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    A multicompartmental biophysical model of entorhinal cortex layer II stellate cells was developed to analyze the ionic basis of physiological properties, such as subthreshold membrane potential oscillations, action potential clustering, and the medium afterhyperpolarization. In particular, the simulation illustrates the interaction of the persistent sodium current (I(Nap)) and the hyperpolarization activated inward current (Ih) in the generation of subthreshold membrane potential oscillations. The potential role of Ih in contributing to the medium hyperpolarization (mAHP) and rebound spiking was studied. The role of Ih and the slow calcium-activated potassium current Ikappa(AHP) in action potential clustering was also studied. Representations of Ih and I(Nap) were developed with parameters based on voltage-clamp data from whole-cell patch and single channel recordings of stellate cells (Dickson et al., J Neurophysiol 83:2562-2579, 2000; Magistretti and Alonso, J Gen Physiol 114:491-509, 1999; Magistretti et al., J Physiol 521:629-636, 1999a; J Neurosci 19:7334-7341, 1999b). These currents interacted to generate robust subthreshold membrane potentials with amplitude and frequency corresponding to data observed in the whole cell patch recordings. The model was also able to account for effects of pharmacological manipulations, including blockade of Ih with ZD7288, partial blockade with cesium, and the influence of barium on oscillations. In a model with a wider range of currents, the transition from oscillations to single spiking, to spike clustering, and finally tonic firing could be replicated. In agreement with experiment, blockade of calcium channels in the model strongly reduced clustering. In the voltage interval during which no data are available, the model predicts that the slow component of Ih does not follow the fast component down to very short time constants. The model also predicts that the fast component of Ih is responsible for the involvement in the

  18. Evaluation of the discmini personal aerosol monitor for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jessica Breyan

    This work evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, 104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 16% of those measured by the CPC for polydispersed aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (+/-35% for most tests and +101% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present.

  19. Effect of Set Potential on Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Electricity Generation from Biocathode Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Liping

    2011-06-01

    Setting a biocathode potential at ?300 mV improved the subsequent performance of an MFC for Cr(VI) reduction compared to a control (no set potential). With this set potential, the startup time was reduced to 19 days, the reduction of Cr(VI) was improved to 19.7 mg/L d, and the maximum power density was increased to 6.4 W/m3 compared to the control (26 days, 14.0 mg/L d and 4.1 W/m3). Set potentials of ?150 mV and ?300 mV also improved system performance and led to similarly higher utilization of metabolic energy gained (PMEG) than set potentials of +200 mV and ?450 mV. We observed putative pili at ?150 and ?300 mV potentials, and aggregated precipitates on bacterial surfaces in both poised and nonpoised controls. These tests show that there are optimal potentials that can be set for developing a Cr(VI) biocathode. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Potential production of electricity from biogas generated in a sanitary landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quetzalli Aguilar-Virgen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Energy forms the cornerstone of almost every economic, social and cultural sector in modern societies. Energy is regarded as an irreplaceable ingredient in such societies’ industrial development. The aim of this research was to estimate the generation of biogas in the city of Ensenada’s sanitary landfill to ascertain the amount of energy which could be generated from the solid waste being disposed of. Biogas estimates were conducted in two stages: a waste characterisation study followed by implementing the regulations proposed by SCS Engineers (SCS Engineers, 2009 regarding the Mexican biogas model (version 2.0. The results showed that a large quantity of organic matter (around 70% is a key element in anaerobic degradation of waste. As to energy generation, it is believed that a full 1.90 MW capacity will be reached in 2019. Such energy could increase Ensenada’s current electricity generation capacity by 3.46% and provide 60% of the energy needed for street lighting, thereby leading to USD $1.423 million in savings.

  1. NanoCrySP technology for generation of drug nanocrystals: translational aspects and business potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shete, Ganesh; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Drug nanocrystals have rapidly evolved into a mature drug delivery strategy in the last decade, with almost 16 products currently on the market. Several "top-down" technologies are available in the market for generation of nanocrystals. Despite several advantages, very few bottom-up technologies have been explored for commercial purpose. This short communication highlights a novel, bottom-up, spray drying based technology-NanoCrySP-to generate drug nanocrystals. Nanocrystals are generated in the presence of non-polymeric excipients that act as crystallization inducer for the drug. Excipients encourage crystallization of drug by plasticization, primary heterogeneous nucleation, and imparting physical barrier to crystal growth. Nanocrystals have shown significant improvement in dissolution and thereby oral bioavailability. NanoCrySP technology is protected through patents in India, the USA, and the European Union. NanoCrySP can be utilized for (i) pharmaceutical development of new chemical entities, (ii) differentiated products of existing molecules, and (iii) generic drug products. The aggregation of drug nanocrystals generated using NanoCrySP poses significant challenges in the nanocrystal-based product development. Addition of stabilizers either during spray drying or during dissolution has shown beneficial effects.

  2. Potential of MgB2 superconductors in direct drive generators for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Liu, Dong; Magnusson, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    -Pin concept nacelle. A series of topologies are investigate by adding more iron components to the generator, such as rotor back iron, field winding pole, magnetic teeth and armature back iron. This method is used to investigate 6 topologies and to determine the optimal cost of the different topologies...

  3. On the Potential of PUF for Pseudonym Generation in Vehicular Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit, Jonathan; Bösch, Christoph; Feiri, Michael; Kargl, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Most proposals for security of vehicular networks foresee the generation of a comparatively large number of changing pseudonyms to prevent vehicles from being identified or tracked. Most proposals rely on communication with backend pseudonym providers to refill a vehicle’s pseudonym pool which creat

  4. Exploring the potential of next-generation sequencing in detection of respiratory Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Prachayangprecha (Slinporn); C.M.E. Schapendonk (Claudia); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita); S.D. Pas (Suzan); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); Y. Poovorawan (Yong); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); S.L. Smits (Saskia)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractEfficient detection of human respiratory viral pathogens is crucial in the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Sequence-independent amplification of nucleic acids combined with next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analyses is a promising str

  5. Chemical and aerosol processes in the transition from closed to open cells during VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kazil

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and aerosol processes in the transition from closed- to open-cell circulation in the remote, cloudy marine boundary layer are explored. It has previously been shown that precipitation can initiate a transition from the closed- to the open-cellular state, but that the boundary layer cannot maintain this open-cell state without a resupply of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Potential sources include wind-driven production of sea salt particles from the ocean, nucleation from the gas phase, and entrainment from the free troposphere. In order to investigate aerosol sources in the marine boundary layer and their role in supplying new particles, we have coupled in detail chemical, aerosol, and cloud processes in the WRF/Chem model, and added state-of-the-art representations of sea salt emissions and aerosol nucleation. We introduce the new features of the model and conduct simulations of the marine boundary layer in the transition from a closed- to an open-cell state. Results are compared with observations in the Southeast Pacific boundary layer during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx. The transition from the closed- to the open-cell state generates conditions that are conducive to nucleation by forming a cloud-scavenged, ultra-clean layer below the inversion base. Open cell wall updrafts loft dimethyl sulfide from the ocean surface into the ultra-clean layer, where it is oxidized during daytime to SO2 and subsequently to H2SO4. Low H2SO4 condensation sink values in the ultra-clean layer allow H2SO4 to rise to concentrations at which aerosol nucleation proceeds efficiently. The existence of the ultra-clean layer is confirmed by observations. We find that the observed DMS flux from the ocean in the VOCALS-REx region can support a nucleation source of aerosol in open cells that exceeds sea salt emissions in terms of the number

  6. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

    2003-01-28

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

  7. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Griesfeller, J.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-08-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013), algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun photometer

  8. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holzer-Popp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI project Aerosol_cci (2010–2013, algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1 a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2 a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3 a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008 of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun

  9. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  10. Stratospheric Aerosol--Observations, Processes, and Impact on Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresmer, Stefanie; Thomason, Larry W.; von Hobe, Marc; Hermann, Markus; Deshler, Terry; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Stenke, Andrea; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weigel, Ralf; Fueglistaler, Stephan; Prata, Fred J.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Schlager, Hans; Barnes, John E.; Antuna-Marrero, Juan-Carlos; Fairlie, Duncan; Palm, Mathias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Rex, Markus; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bourassa, Adam; Plane, John M. C.; Klocke, Daniel; Carn, Simon A.; Clarisse, Lieven; Trickl, Thomas; Neeley, Ryan; James, Alexander D.; Rieger, Landon; Wilson, James C.; Meland, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stratospheric aerosol and its role in climate have increased over the last decade due to the observed increase in stratospheric aerosol since 2000 and the potential for changes in the sulfur cycle induced by climate change. This review provides an overview about the advances in stratospheric aerosol research since the last comprehensive assessment of stratospheric aerosol was published in 2006. A crucial development since 2006 is the substantial improvement in the agreement between in situ and space-based inferences of stratospheric aerosol properties during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, new measurement systems and techniques, both in situ and space based, have been developed for measuring physical aerosol properties with greater accuracy and for characterizing aerosol composition. However, these changes induce challenges to constructing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology. Currently, changes in stratospheric aerosol levels less than 20% cannot be confidently quantified. The volcanic signals tend to mask any nonvolcanically driven change, making them difficult to understand. While the role of carbonyl sulfide as a substantial and relatively constant source of stratospheric sulfur has been confirmed by new observations and model simulations, large uncertainties remain with respect to the contribution from anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions. New evidence has been provided that stratospheric aerosol can also contain small amounts of nonsulfatematter such as black carbon and organics. Chemistry-climate models have substantially increased in quantity and sophistication. In many models the implementation of stratospheric aerosol processes is coupled to radiation and/or stratospheric chemistry modules to account for relevant feedback processes.

  11. Coherent Evaluation of Aerosol Data Products from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval from satellite has practically become routine, especially during the last decade. However, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, thereby leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus, and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood, there will be no way of developing reliable model inputs and climate data records from sa