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Sample records for aerosol assisted chemical

  1. Development of aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition for thin film fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Marthatika, Dian; Panatarani, Camellia; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to grow a thin film applied in many industrial applications. This paper report the development of an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) which is one of the CVD methods. Newly developed AACVD system consists of a chamber of pyrex glass, two wire-heating elements placed to cover pyrex glass, a substrate holder, and an aerosol generator using an air brush sprayer. The temperature control system was developed to prevent condensation on the chamber walls. The control performances such as the overshoot and settling time were obtained from of the developed temperature controller. Wire-heating elements were controlled at certain setting value to heat the injected aerosol to form a thin film in the substrate. The performance of as-developed AACVD system tested to form a thin film where aerosol was sprayed into the chamber with a flow rate of 7 liters/minutes, and vary in temperatures and concentrations of precursor. The temperature control system have an overshoot around 25 °C from the desired set point temperature, very small temperature ripple 2 °C and a settling time of 20 minutes. As-developed AACVD successfully fabricated a ZnO thin film with thickness of below 1 µm. The performances of system on formation of thin films influenced by the generally controlled process such as values of setting temperature and concentration where the aerosol flow rate was fixed. Higher temperature was applied, the more uniform ZnO thin films were produced. In addition, temperature of the substrate also affected on surface roughness of the obtained films, while concentration of ZnO precursor determined the thickness of produce films. It is concluded that newly simple AACVD can be applied to produce a thin film.

  2. Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Films for Space Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; McNatt, Jeremiah; Dickman, John E.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Kelly, Christopher V.; AquinoGonzalez, Angel R.; Rockett, Angus A.

    2006-01-01

    Copper indium disulfide thin films were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using single source precursors. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties in order to optimize device-quality material. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hot-wall reactor at 395 C yielded best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier, smoother, denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands (1.45, 1.43, 1.37, and 1.32 eV) and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was 1.03 percent.

  3. Electric field assisted aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured metal oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Anupriya J.T.; Bowman, Christopher; Panjwani, Naitik [Department of Chemistry, University College London, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H OAJ (United Kingdom); Warwick, Michael E.A. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H OAJ (United Kingdom); UCL Energy Institute, Central House, 14 Upper Woburn Place, London WC1H 0HY (United Kingdom); Binions, Russell, E-mail: r.binions@qmul.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H OAJ (United Kingdom); School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Nanostructured thin films of tungsten, vanadium and titanium oxides were deposited on gas sensor substrates from the electric field assisted chemical vapour deposition reaction of tungsten hexaphenoxide, vanadyl acetylacetonate and titanium tetraisopropoxide respectively. The electric fields were generated by applying a potential difference between the inter-digitated electrodes of the gas sensor substrates during the deposition. The deposited films were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The application of an electric field, encouraged the formation of interesting and unusual nanostructured morphologies, with a change in scale length and island packing. It was also noted that crystallographic orientation of the films could be controlled as a function of electric field type and strength. The gas sensor properties of the films were also examined; it was found that a two to three fold enhancement in the gas response could be observed from sensors with enhanced morphologies compared to control sensors grown without application of an electric field. - Highlights: • Electric field assisted chemical vapour deposition method • Ability to create high surface area film architectures • Can produce enhanced sensor response • Good control over film properties.

  4. Scalable route to CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Bhachu, D. S.; Scanlon, D. O.; Saban, E. J.; Bronstein, H.; Parkin, I. P.; Carmalt, C. J.; Palgrave, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-ammonium lead iodide is the archetypal perovskite solar cell material. Phase pure, compositionally uniform methyl-ammonium lead iodide thin films on large glass substrates were deposited using ambient pressure aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition. This opens up a route to efficient scale up of hybrid perovskite film growth towards industrial deployment.

  5. Hybrid chemical vapour and nanoceramic aerosol assisted deposition for multifunctional nanocomposite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Dunnill, Charles W.; Goodall, Josie; Darr, Jawwad A.; Binions, Russell, E-mail: uccarbi@ucl.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Hybrid atmospheric pressure chemical vapour and aerosol assisted deposition via the reaction of vanadium acetylacetonate and a suspension of preformed titanium dioxide or cerium dioxide nanoparticles, led to the production of vanadium dioxide nanocomposite thin films on glass substrates. The preformed nanoparticle oxides used for the aerosol were synthesised using a continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis route involving the rapid reaction of a metal salt solution with a flow of supercritical water in a flow reactor. Multifunctional nanocomposite thin films from the hybrid deposition process were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The functional properties of the films were evaluated using variable temperature optical measurements to assess thermochromic behaviour and methylene blue photodecolourisation experiments to assess photocatalytic activity. The tests show that the films are multifunctional in that they are thermochromic (having a large change in infra-red reflectivity upon exceeding the thermochromic transition temperature) and have significant photocatalytic activity under irradiation with 254 nm light.

  6. Nanocomposite Coatings Codeposited with Nanoparticles Using Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghui Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating nanoscale materials into suitable matrices is an effective route to produce nanocomposites with unique properties for practical applications. Due to the flexibility in precursor atomization and delivery, aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD process is a promising way to synthesize desired nanocomposite coatings incorporating with preformed nanoscale materials. The presence of nanoscale materials in AACVD process would significantly influence deposition mechanism and thus affect microstructure and properties of the nanocomposites. In the present work, inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS2 has been codeposited with Cr2O3 coatings using AACVD. In order to understand the codeposition process for the nanocomposite coatings, chemical reactions of the precursor and the deposition mechanism have been studied. The correlation between microstructure of the nanocomposite coatings and the codeposition mechanism in the AACVD process has been investigated. The heterogeneous reaction on the surface of IF-WS2 nanoparticles, before reaching the substrate surface, is the key feature of the codeposition in the AACVD process. The agglomeration of nanoparticles in the nanocomposite coatings is also discussed.

  7. Aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition using nanoparticle precursors: a route to nanocomposite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgrave, Robert G; Parkin, Ivan P

    2006-02-01

    Gold nanoparticle and gold/semiconductor nanocomposite thin films have been deposited using aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A preformed gold colloid in toluene was used as a precursor to deposit gold films onto silica glass. These nanoparticle films showed the characteristic plasmon absorption of Au nanoparticles at 537 nm, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) imaging confirmed the presence of individual gold particles. Nanocomposite films were deposited from the colloid concurrently with conventional CVD precursors. A film of gold particles in a host tungsten oxide matrix resulted from co-deposition with [W(OPh)(6)], while gold particles in a host titania matrix resulted from co-deposition with [Ti(O(i)Pr)(4)]. The density of Au nanoparticles within the film could be varied by changing the Au colloid concentration in the original precursor solution. Titania/gold composite films were intensely colored and showed dichromism: blue in transmitted light and red in reflected light. They showed metal-like reflection spectra and plasmon absorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the presence of metallic gold, and SEM imaging showed individual Au nanoparticles embedded in the films. X-ray diffraction detected crystalline gold in the composite films. This CVD technique can be readily extended to produce other nanocomposite films by varying the colloids and precursors used, and it offers a rapid, convenient route to nanoparticle and nanocomposite thin films. PMID:16448130

  8. Aerosol assisted atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon thin films using liquid cyclic hydrosilanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon (Si) thin films were produced using an aerosol assisted atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique with liquid hydrosilane precursors cyclopentasilane (CPS, Si5H10) and cyclohexasilane (CHS, Si6H12). Thin films were deposited at temperatures between 300 and 500 °C, with maximum observed deposition rates of 55 and 47 nm/s for CPS and CHS, respectively, at 500 °C. Atomic force microscopic analyses of the films depict smooth surfaces with roughness of 4–8 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis indicates that the Si films deposited at 300 °C and 350 °C consist of a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) phase while the films deposited at 400, 450, and 500 °C are comprised predominantly of a hydrogenated nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) phase. The wide optical bandgaps of 2–2.28 eV for films deposited at 350–400 °C and 1.7–1.8 eV for those deposited at 450–500 °C support the Raman data and depict a transition from a-Si:H to nc-Si:H. Films deposited at 450 oC possess the highest photosensitivity of 102–103 under AM 1.5G illumination. Based on the growth model developed for other silanes, we suggest a mechanism that governs the film growth using CPS and CHS. - Highlights: • Si films via AA-APCVD are realized using cyclopentasilane (CPS) and cyclohexasilane (CHS). • Low activation energies of CPS and CHS allow Si thin films at low temperatures (300 °C). • High growth rates of 47–55 nm/s were obtained at 500 °C • Near device quality Si thin films with 2–3 orders of photosensitivity • Si thin films via AA-APCVD are amenable to continuous roll-to-roll manufacturing

  9. Microstructural, chemical and textural characterization of ZnO nanorods synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Pérez-García, S.A. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Unidad Monterrey, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition onto TiO{sub 2} covered borosilicate glass substrates. Deposition parameters were optimized and kept constant. Solely the effect of different nozzle velocities on the growth of ZnO nanorods was evaluated in order to develop a dense and uniform structure. The crystalline structure was characterized by conventional X-ray diffraction in grazing incidence and Bragg–Brentano configurations. In addition, two-dimensional grazing incidence synchrotron radiation diffraction was employed to determine the preferred growth direction of the nanorods. Morphology and growth characteristics analyzed by electron microscopy were correlated with diffraction outcomes. Chemical composition was established by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of wurtzite ZnO and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases. Morphological changes noticed when the deposition velocity was lowered to the minimum, indicated the formation of relatively vertically oriented nanorods evenly distributed onto the TiO{sub 2} buffer film. By coupling two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and computational modeling with ANAELU it was proved that a successful texture determination was achieved and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Texture analysis led to the conclusion of a preferred growth direction in [001] having a distribution width Ω = 20° ± 2°. - Highlights: • Uniform and pure single-crystal ZnO nanorods were obtained by AACVD technique. • Longitudinal and transversal axis parallel to the [001] and [110] directions, respectively. • Texture was determined by 2D synchrotron diffraction and electron microscopy analysis. • Nanorods have its [001] direction distributed close to the normal of the substrate. • Angular spread about the preferred orientation is 20° ± 2°.

  10. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)-nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  11. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of germanium thin films using organogermanium carboxylates as precursors and formation of germania films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpa Y Shah; Amey Wadawale; Vijaykumar S Sagoria; Vimal K Jain; C A Betty; S Bhattacharya

    2012-06-01

    Diethyl germanium bis-picolinate, [Et2Ge(O2CC5H4N)2], and trimethyl germanium quinaldate, [Me3Ge(O2CC9H6N)], have been used as precursors for deposition of thin films of germanium by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). The thermogravimetric analysis revealed complete volatilization of complexes under nitrogen atmosphere. Germanium thin films were deposited on silicon wafers at 700°C employing AACVD method. These films on oxidation under an oxygen atmosphere at 600°C yield GeO2. Both Ge and GeO2 films were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS measurements. Their electrical properties were assessed by current–voltage (–) characterization.

  12. Photocatalytic activity of tin-doped TiO{sub 2} film deposited via aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, Chin Sheng, E-mail: cschua@simtech.a-star.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, 638075 (Singapore); Tan, Ooi Kiang; Tse, Man Siu [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Ding, Xingzhao [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, 638075 (Singapore)

    2013-10-01

    Tin-doped TiO{sub 2} films are deposited via aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition using a precursor mixture composing of titanium tetraisopropoxide and tetrabutyl tin. The amount of tin doping in the deposited films is controlled by the volume % concentration ratio of tetrabutyl tin over titanium tetraisopropoxide in the mixed precursor solution. X-ray diffraction analysis results reveal that the as-deposited films are composed of pure anatase TiO{sub 2} phase. Red-shift in the absorbance spectra is observed attributed to the introduction of Sn{sup 4+} band states below the conduction band of TiO{sub 2}. The effect of tin doping on the photocatalytic property of TiO{sub 2} films is studied through the degradation of stearic acid under UV light illumination. It is found that there is a 10% enhancement on the degradation rate of stearic acid for the film with 3.8% tin doping in comparison with pure TiO{sub 2} film. This improvement of photocatalytic performance with tin incorporation could be ascribed to the reduction of electron-hole recombination rate through charge separation and an increased amount of OH radicals which are crucial for the degradation of stearic acid. Further increase in tin doping results in the formation of recombination site and large anatase grains, which leads to a decrease in the degradation rate. - Highlights: ► Deposition of tin-doped TiO{sub 2} film via aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition ► Deposited anatase films show red-shifted in UV–vis spectrum with tin-dopants. ► Photoactivity improves at low tin concentration but reduces at higher concentration. ► Improvement in photoactivity due to bandgap narrowing from Sn{sup 4+} band states ► Maximum photoactivity achieved occurs for films with 3.8% tin doping.

  13. Growth mechanism of planar or nanorod structured tungsten oxide thin films deposited via aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Min; Blackman, Chris [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is used to deposit tungsten oxide thin films from tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) at 339 to 358 C on quartz substrate. The morphologies of as-deposited thin films, which are comprised of two phases (W{sub 25}O{sub 73} and W{sub 17}O{sub 47}), vary from planar to nanorod (NR) structures as the distance from the inlet towards the outlet of the reactor is traversed. This is related to variation of the actual temperature on the substrate surface (ΔT = 19 C), which result in a change in growth mode due to competition between growth rate (perpendicular to substrate) and nucleation rate (parallel to substrate). When the ratio of perpendicular growth rate to growth rate contributed by nucleation is higher than 7.1, the as-deposited tungsten oxide thin film forms as NR. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Fabrication and gas sensing properties of pure and au-functionalised W03 nanoneedle-like structures, synthesised via aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition method

    OpenAIRE

    Stoycheva, Toni

    2011-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis, it has been investigated and developed the Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) method for direct in-situ growth of intrinsic and Au-functionalised nanostructured WO3, as well as SnO2-based devices for gas sensing applications. The nanostructured material synthesis, device fabrication and their gas sensing properties have been studied. AACVD method was used for synthesis and direct deposition of sensing films onto classical alumina and microhotplat...

  15. Effect of surfactants on the morphology of FeSe films fabricated from a single source precursor by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raja Azadar Hussain; Amin Badshah; Naghma Haider; Malik Dilshad Khan; Bhajan Lal

    2015-03-01

    This article presents the fabrication of FeSe thin films from a single source precursor namely (1-(2-fluorobenzoyl)-3-(4-ferrocenyl-3-methylphenyl)selenourea (MeP2F)) by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). All the films were prepared via similar experimental conditions (temperature, flow rate, concentration, solvent system and reactor type) except the use of three different concentrations of two different surfactants i.e., triton and span. Seven thin films were characterized with PXRD, SEM, AFM, EDS and EDS mapping. The mechanism of the interaction of surfactant with MeP2F was determined with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  16. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  17. Aligned synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with high purity by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition: Effect of water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with high purity and bulk yield were achieved on a silicon substrate by an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The introduction of specific amounts of water vapor played a key role in in situ controlling the purity and surface defects of the nanotubes. The morphology, surface quality and structure of MWCNTs were characterized by secondary and backscattered electron imaging in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Crystallinity and defects of the MWCNTs' were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. In this work, water vapor was found to provide a weak oxidative environment, which enhanced and purified the MWCNTs' growth. However, excessive water vapor would inhibit the MWCNTs growth with a poor surface quality. In addition, it has been found that the surface morphology of the CNTs can be modified intentionally through producing some surface defects by tuning the amount of the water vapor, which may offer more nucleation sites on the chemically inert CNT surface for various applications such as catalyst support.

  18. Deposition of cobalt and nickel sulfide thin films from thio- and alkylthio-urea complexes as precursors via the aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mgabi, L.P.; Dladla, B.S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private bag X1001 KwaDlangezwa, 3880 (South Africa); Malik, M.A. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Garje, Shivram S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400098 (India); Akhtar, J. [Nanoscience and Materials Synthesis Lab, Department of Physics, COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Chak shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan); Revaprasadu, N., E-mail: RevaprasaduN@unizulu.ac.za [Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private bag X1001 KwaDlangezwa, 3880 (South Africa)

    2014-08-01

    We report the synthesis of Co(II) and Ni(II) thiourea and alkylthiourea complexes by reacting the metal salts (CoCl{sub 2} and NiCl{sub 2}) with the thiourea, phenylthiourea and dicyclohexylthiourea ligands in a 1:2 ratio. The complexes, [CoCl{sub 2}(CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}] (I), [CoCl{sub 2}(CSNHC{sub 6}H{sub 5}NH{sub 2}){sub 2} (II) and [CoCI{sub 2}(SC(NHC{sub 6}H{sub 11}){sub 2}){sub 2}] (III), [NiCl{sub 2}(CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}] (IV), [NiCl{sub 2}(CSNHC{sub 6}H{sub 5}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}] (V) and [NiCl{sub 2}(SC(NHC{sub 6}H{sub 11}){sub 2}){sub 2}] (VI) were characterized by C, H, N analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that all complexes undergo a two step decomposition process except for [NiCl{sub 2}(CSNHC{sub 6}H{sub 5}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}] (V) which decomposes in a single step. The complexes were used as single-source precursors for the deposition of cobalt sulfide and nickel sulfide thin films by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition at temperatures between 350 an 500 °C. The crystallinity of the films was determined by X-ray diffraction and their morphology was determined by scanning electron microscopy. The morphology of the cobalt sulfide thin films varies from randomly oriented platelets, to granulated spheres and cubes as the precursor and deposition conditions are changed. For nickel sulfide, the [NiCl{sub 2}(CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}] (IV) complex gave rods whereas the [NiCl{sub 2}(CSNHC{sub 6}H{sub 5}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}] (V) produced spherical particles. - Highlights: • We report the synthesis of Co(II) and Ni(II) thiourea and alkylthiourea complexes. • C, H, N analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy characterization • NiS and CoS thin films deposited by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition • X-ray diffraction characterization of the phase of the films • Film morphology determined by scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Effect of doping on the Structural and Optical Properties of SnO2 Thin Films fabricated by Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve high conductivity and transmittance of transparent conducting oxide (TCO), we attempted to fabricate Mg doped SnO2 (MgxSn1−xO2) thin films and characterized them for their structural and optical properties. The MgxSn1−xO2 thin films have been deposited on glass substrate by using aero-sole assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD). The molar concentration of Mg concentration was changed from 0 to 8%. The confirmation of tetragonal structure and particle size (32 to 87nm) has been calculated of thin films by XRD. The surface roughness is decreased with the increase of the dopant concentration, which has been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical transmission has increased from 54 to 78% and the band gape of pure SnO2 has been found to be in the range of 3.76eV and it is shifted to 3.69eV for 6Wt % Mg doping and then increase on further increasing the Mg doping.

  20. On the influence of DC electric fields on the aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition growth of photoactive titanium dioxide thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Luz; Binions, Russell

    2013-11-01

    Titanium dioxide thin films were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide glass substrate from the electric field assisted aerosol chemical vapor deposition (EACVD) reaction of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP, Ti(OC3H7)4) in toluene on glass substrates at a temperature of 450 °C. DC electric fields were generated by applying a potential difference between the electrodes of the transparent coated oxide coated glass substrates during the deposition. The deposited films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The photoactivity and hydrophilicity of the deposited films were also analyzed using a dye-ink test and water-contact angle measurements. The characterization work revealed that the incorporation of DC electric fields produced significant reproducible changes in the film microstructure, preferred crystallographic orientation, roughness, and film thickness. Photocatalytic activity was calculated from the half-time (t1/2) or time taken to degrade 50% of the initial resazurin dye concentration. A large improvement in photocatalytic activity was observed for films deposited using an electric field with a strong orientation in the (004) direction (t1/2 17 min) as compared to a film deposited with no electric field (t1/2 40 min). PMID:24160408

  1. Controlling pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic, and molecular nitrogen in multi-wall carbon nanotubes using precursors with different N/C ratios in aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusheva, L G; Okotrub, A V; Fedoseeva, Yu V; Kurenya, A G; Asanov, I P; Vilkov, O Y; Koós, A A; Grobert, N

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen-containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs) were synthesized using aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques in conjunction with benzylamine:ferrocene or acetonitrile:ferrocene mixtures. Different amounts of toluene were added to these mixtures in order to change the N/C ratio of the feedstock. X-ray photoelectron and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy detected pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic, and molecular nitrogen forms in the N-MWCNT samples. Analysis of the spectral data indicated that whilst the nature of the nitrogen-containing precursor has little effect on the concentrations of the different forms of nitrogen in N-MWCNTs, the N/C ratio in the feedstock appeared to be the determining factor. When the N/C ratio was lower than ca. 0.01, all four forms existed in equal concentrations, for N/C ratios above 0.01, graphitic and molecular nitrogen were dominant. Furthermore, higher concentrations of pyridinic nitrogen in the outer shells and N2 molecules in the core of the as-produced N-MWCNTs suggest that the precursors were decomposed into individual atoms, which interacted with the catalyst surface to form CN and NH species or in fact diffused through the bulk of the catalyst particles. These findings are important for a better understanding of possible growth mechanisms for heteroatom-containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and therefore paving the way for controlling the spatial distribution of foreign elements in the CNTs using CVD processes. PMID:26104737

  2. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx

    2015-07-15

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO{sub 2} film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MO{sub x}/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MO{sub x} was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO{sub 2} as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition

  3. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO2 film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MOx/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MOx was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO2 as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe2O3 as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition, materials absorptance determined from

  4. Modeling heterogeneous chemical processes on aerosol surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjun Deng; Tijian Wang; Li Liu; Fei Jiang

    2010-01-01

    To explore the possible impact of heterogeneous chemical processes on atmospheric trace components,a coupled box model including gas-phase chemical processes,aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium processes,and heterogeneous chemical processes on the surface of dust,black carbon(BC)and sea salt is set up to simulate the effects of heterogeneous chemistry on the aerosol surface,and analyze the primary factors affecting the heterogeneous processes.Results indicate that heterogeneous chemical processes on the aerosol surface in the atmosphere will affect the concentrations of trace gases such as H2O2,HO2,O3,NO2,NO3,HNO3 and SO2,and aerosols such as SO42-,NO3-and NH4+.Sensitivity tests suggest that the magnitude of the impact of heterogeneous processes strongly depends on aerosol concentration and the surface uptake coefficients used in the box model.However,the impact of temperature on heterogeneous chemical processes is considerably less.The"renoxification"of HNO3 will affect the components of the troposphere such as nitrogen oxide and ozone.

  5. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  6. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  7. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements thro...

  8. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout mos...

  9. Aerosol-assisted fabrication of tin-doped indium oxide ceramic thin films from nanoparticle suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmal Peiris, T. A.; Ghanizadeh, S.; Jayathilake, D. S. Y.; Hutt, D.A.; Wijayantha, K. G. U.; Conway, P. P.; Southee, D. J.; Parkin, I. P.; Marchand, P.; Darr, J. A.; Carmalt, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) thin films were fabricated on float glass substrates from a nanoparticle suspension using a new and inexpensive aerosol-assisted chemical transport (AACT) process. The influence of the solvent type, loading level and film deposition time on the structural, electrical and optical properties of the deposited thin films was investigated. In addition, the effect of the post-deposition heat-treatment of ITO films on the film resistivity and transparency was investigated using ...

  10. Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol constituents from isoprene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted into Earth's atmosphere and is predominantly derived from terrestrial vegetation. Prior studies have focused largely on the hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and have demonstrated that highly oxidized compounds, such as isoprene-derived epoxides, enhance the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through heterogeneous (multiphase) reactions on acidified sulfate aerosol. However, studies on the impact of acidified sulfate aerosol on SOA formation from isoprene ozonolysis are lacking and the current work systematically examines this reaction. SOA was generated in an indoor smog chamber from isoprene ozonolysis under dark conditions in the presence of non-acidified or acidified sulfate seed aerosol. The effect of OH radicals on SOA chemical composition was investigated using diethyl ether as an OH radical scavenger. Aerosols were collected and chemically characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). Analysis revealed the formation of highly oxidized compounds, including organosulfates (OSs) and 2-methylterols, which were significantly enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol. OSs identified in the chamber experiments were also observed and quantified in summertime fine aerosol collected from two rural locations in the southeastern United States during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS).

  11. Chemical distribution in high-solids paint overspray aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, J B; Chan, T L

    1990-03-01

    The chemical composition of high-solids basecoat paint overspray aerosols was determined as a function of particle size. Detailed information on the chemical composition of the overspray aerosols is important in health hazard evaluation since the composition and distribution within the airborne particles may differ significantly from the bulk paint material. This study was conducted in a typical down-draft paint booth equipped with air-atomized spray painting equipment. A fixed paint target was used to simulate typical overspray generation conditions and the aerosols were collected isokinetically with a seven-stage cascade impactor for size-fractionated analysis. The overspray aerosol from six paints consisted of organic paint binders with varying amounts of inorganic species as pigments or luster enhancers. These overspray aerosols had mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) ranging from 2.9 to 9.7 microns. The size-fractionated paint samples collected on the impaction stages were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry on a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXRS) to identify the metallic elements. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine the mass distribution of aluminum and iron as indicators of nonuniform distribution. Three of the aerosols containing aluminum were found to have bimodal distributions with most aluminum distributions having cumulative MMADs larger than the total aerosol. Iron in the aerosols was bimodal for three of the paints with all samples having an overall iron MMAD less than or equal to the overspray aerosol MMAD. Analysis using ultraviolet spectrometry revealed that the organic compounds present in the size-fractionated particulate samples consisted of a single, polydispersed mode with an MMAD similar to that of the total overspray aerosol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2327324

  12. Microwave-assisted Chemical Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been a considerable interest in developing sustainable chemistries utilizing green chemistry principles. Since the first published report in 1986 by Gedye and Giguere on microwave assisted synthesis in household microwave ovens, the use of microwaves as...

  13. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration during transport from clean areas. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  14. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout most of the year, but fails in reproducing the aerosol properties during the winter season, resulting in poor agreement between model and measurements especially during December–January. Nevertheless, through the rest of the year both trends and magnitude of modal concentrations show good agreement with observation, as do the monthly average size distribution properties. The model is also shown to capture individual nucleation events to a certain degree. This indicates that nucleation largely is controlled by the availability of nucleating material (as prescribed by the [H2SO4], availability of condensing material (in this model 15% of primary reactions of monoterpenes (MT are assumed to produce low volatile species and the properties of the size distribution (more specifically, the condensation sink. This is further demonstrated by the fact that the model captures the annual trend in nuclei mode concentration. The model is also used, alongside sensitivity tests, to examine which processes dominate the aerosol size distribution physical properties. It is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that nucleation governs the number concentration while transport from clean areas takes place. It is also shown that primary number emissions almost exclusively govern the CN concentration when air from Central Europe is advected north over Scandinavia. We also show that biogenic emissions have a large influence on the amount of potential CCN observed

  15. Development of filtering devices for chemical aggressive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of filtering devices were tested to deposit chemical aggressive aerosols. Sodium fire aerosols were used as test aerosols. Glas fiber filters, wet scrubbers and sandbed filters were investigated. Commercially available fiber filters and scrubbers were used. Small sized multilayer sandbed filters were developed and optimized with respect to high deposition rate and load capacity and low pressure drop. The experimental results are explained by theoretical calculations. The results of the three different precipitators are compared. Multilayer sandbed filters are with respect to deposition rate and pressure drop similar to fiber filters. Nevertheless the load capacity of a sandbed filter is much higher. (orig./HP)

  16. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Jin, J. S.; Hwang, G. S.; Jang, K. S.; Han, W. S.; OH, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been recently paid attention more in environmental research due to their negative effects on air quality, public health, and climate change. The aerosols contain approximately >20-50% carbonaceous components such as organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) (or elemental carbon [EC]) derived from organic compounds, biomass burning, and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of atmospheric aerosols are strongly dependent on the carbonaceous components. In particular, the BC could significantly affect the regional air quality in the northeastern Asia, because China is one of the foremost BC emission country in the world. Previous studies have mainly focused on the quantification and source identification for carbonaceous aerosols. However, understanding of physical and chemical properties for the carbonaceous aerosols related to environmental contamination and toxicity was still incomplete due to analytical difficulties. This study is addressed to evaluate the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to air pollution through the surface, mass spectroscopic, and electron microscopic analyses, and determination of chemical composition and structure using the air particulate matter (PM2.5 and >PM2.5) samples.

  17. A comparison of aerosol chemical and optical properties from the 1st and 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    P. K. Quinn; T. S. Bates; Coffman, D. J.; Miller, T L; J. E. Johnson; D. S. Covert; Putaud, J.-P.; Neusüß, C.; Novakov, T.

    2011-01-01

    Shipboard measurements of aerosol chemical composition and optical properties were made during both ACE-1 and ACE-2. ACE-1 focused on remote marine aerosol minimally perturbed by continental sources. ACE-2 studied the outflow of European aerosol into the NE Atlantic atmosphere. A variety of air masses were sampled during ACE-2 including Atlantic, polar, Iberian Peninsula, Mediterranean, and Western European. Reported here are mass size distributions of non-sea salt (nss) sulfate, sea salt, an...

  18. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of primary biological aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Deguillaume

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of primary biological aerosols (PBA on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that PBA represent a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affect the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms, namely fungal spores and bacteria, can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of PBA in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  19. Spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE) in microfactory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, R.; Fujisaki, K.; Couthy, Ph; Hof, L. A.; Bleuler, H.

    2005-10-01

    Spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE) is a method for 3D microstructuring of glass or other non-conductive materials with high aspect ratio and smooth surface quality. It is applicable for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices, for MEMS interfacing and similar applications. Typical feature size is in the hundreds of micrometres, down to a few tens of micrometres. It is a table-top technology requiring no clean rooms and no masks and with very modest space usage. It is thus well suited for microfactories. This paper gives a basic introduction to SACE and some machining examples.

  20. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  1. Multi- year Arctic and Antarctic aerosol chemical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Caiazzo, Laura; Calzolai, Giulia; Cappelletti, David; Giardi, Fabio; Grotti, Marco; Malandrino, Mery; Nava, Silvia; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Long term measurements of aerosol chemical composition in polar region are particularly relevant to investigate potential climatic effects of atmospheric components arising from both natural and anthropogenic emissions. In order to improve our knowledge on the atmospheric load and chemical composition of polar aerosol, several measurements and sampling campaigns were carried out both in Antarctica and in the Arctic since 2005.The main results are here reported. As regard as Antarctica, a continuous all-year-round sampling of size-segregated aerosol was carried from 2005 to 2013 at Dome C (East Antarctica; 75° 60' S, 123° 200' E, 3220 m a.s.l. and 1100 km away from the nearest coast). Aerosol was collected by PM10 and PM2.5 samplers and by multi-stage impactors (Dekati 4-stage impactor). Chemical analysis was carried out by Ion Chromatography (ions composition) and ICP-MS (trace metals). Sea spray showed a sharp seasonal pattern, with winter (Apr-Nov) concentrations about ten times larger than summer (Dec-Mar). Besides, in winter, sea spray particles are mainly sub micrometric, while the summer size-mode is around 1-2 um. Meteorological analysis and air mass back trajectory reconstructions allowed the identification of two major air mass pathways: micrometric fractions for transport from the closer Indian-Pacific sector, and sub-micrometric particles for longer trajectories over the Antarctic Plateau. The markers of oceanic biogenic emission (methanesulfonic acid - MSA, and non-sea-salt sulphate) exhibit a seasonal cycle with summer maxima (Nov-Mar). Their size distributions show two modes (0.4- 0.7 um and 1.1-2.1 um) in early summer and just one sub-micrometric mode in full summer. The two modes are related to different transport pathways. In early summer, air masses came primarily from the Indian Ocean and spent a long time over the continent. The transport of sulphur compounds is related to sea spray aerosols and the resulting condensation of H2SO4 and MSA over

  2. Bioaerosol detection by aerosol TOF-mass spectrometry: Application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Stowers, M.A.; Kientz, Ch.E.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    2000-01-01

    In previous publications the use of an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer was reported for the on-line measurements of aerosols (Weiss 1997, Kievit 1995). The apparatus is capable of measuring the size as well as the chemical composition, by the use of Laser Desorption/Ionisation (LDI), of an

  3. Hygroscopic, Morphological, and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Cheek, L.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Littleton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust is a significant source of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. In the Texas Panhandle, daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots are routinely observed in conjunction with increased cattle activity in the late afternoons and early evenings. We conducted a field study to characterize size-selected agricultural aerosols with respect to hygroscopic, morphological, and chemical properties and to attempt to identify any correlations between these properties. To explore the hygroscopic nature of agricultural particles, we have collected size-resolved aerosol samples using a cascade impactor system at a cattle feedlot in the Texas Panhandle and have used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) to determine the water uptake by individual particles in those samples as a function of relative humidity. To characterize the size distribution of agricultural aerosols as a function of time, A GRIMM aerosol spectrometer and Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer and Counter (SMPS) measurements were simultaneously performed in an overall size range of 11 nm to 20 µm diameters at a cattle feedlot. Complementary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles was performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). In addition to the EDS analysis, an ammonia scrubber was used to collect ammonia and ammonium in the gas and particulate phases, respectively. The concentration of these species was quantified offline via UV spectrophotometry at 640 nanometers. The results of this study will provide important particulate emission data from a feedyard, needed to improve our understanding of the role of agricultural particulates in local and regional air quality.

  4. Improving Molecular Level Chemical Speciation of Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worton, D. R.; Decker, M.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    A substantial fraction of fine mode aerosols are organic with the majority formed in the atmosphere through oxidation of gas phase compounds emitted from a variety of natural and man-made sources. As a result, organic aerosols are comprised of thousands of individual organic species whose complexity increases exponentially with carbon number and degree of atmospheric oxidation. Chemical characterization of individual compounds present in this complex mixture provides information on sources and transformation processes that are critical for apportioning organic carbon from an often convoluted mixture of sources and to constrain oxidation mechanisms needed for atmospheric models. These compounds also affect the physical and optical properties of the aerosol but the vast majority remain unidentified and missing from published mass spectral libraries because of difficulties in separating and identifying them. We have developed improved methodologies for chemical identification in order to better understand complex environmental mixtures. Our approach has been to combine two-dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS) and both traditional electron ionization (EI) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization. GC×GC provides improved separation of individual compounds over traditional one dimensional GC and minimizes co-elution of peaks resulting in mass spectra that are virtually free of interferences. VUV ionization is a ';soft' ionization technique that reduces fragmentation and enhances the abundance of the parent or molecular ion, which when combined with high resolution mass spectrometry can provide molecular formulas for chromatographic peaks. We demonstrate our methodology by applying it to identify more than 500 individual compounds in aerosol filter samples collected at Blodgett Forest, a rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Using the EI NIST mass spectral library and molecular formulas determined

  5. Characterization of aerosol chemical composition with aerosol mass spectrometry in Central Europe: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lanz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Real-time measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1 were conducted within the greater Alpine region (Switzerland, Germany, Austria, France and Liechtenstein during several week-long field campaigns in 2002–2009. This region represents one of the most important economic and recreational spaces in Europe. A large variety of sites was covered including urban backgrounds, motorways, rural, remote, and high-alpine stations, and also mobile on-road measurements were performed. Inorganic and organic aerosol (OA fractions were determined by means of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS. The data originating from 13 different field campaigns and the combined data have been utilized for providing an improved temporal and spatial data coverage.

    The average mass concentration of NR-PM1 for the different campaigns typically ranged between 10 and 30 μg m−3. Overall, the organic portion was most abundant, ranging from 36% to 81% of NR-PM1. Other main constituents comprised ammonium (5–15%, nitrate (8–36%, sulfate (3–26%, and chloride (0–5%. These latter anions were, on average, fully neutralized by ammonium. As a major result, time of the year (winter vs. summer and location of the site (Alpine valleys vs. Plateau could largely explain the variability in aerosol chemical composition for the different campaigns and were found to be better descriptors for aerosol composition than the type of site (urban, rural etc.. Thus, a reassessment of classifications of measurements sites might be considered in the future, possibly also for other regions of the world.

    The OA data was further analyzed using positive matrix factorization (PMF and the multi-linear engine ME (factor analysis separating the total OA into its underlying components, such as oxygenated (mostly secondary organic aerosol (OOA, hydrocarbon-like and freshly emitted organic aerosol (HOA, as well as OA from biomass

  6. Size-Resolved Volatility and Chemical Composition of Aged European Aerosol Measured During FAME-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Mohr, C.; Lee, B.; Engelhart, G. J.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S.; Baltensperger, U.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We present first results on the volatility and chemical composition of aged organic aerosol measured during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008 (FAME-2008). Finokalia is located in the Southeast of Crete, Greece, and this remote site allows for the measurement of aged European aerosol as it is transported from Central to Southeastern Europe. We measured the volatility of the aerosol at Finokalia as a function of its size by combining several instruments. We used an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of the particles, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure the volume distribution of particles, and a thermodenuder system to induce changes in size and composition via moderate heating of the particles. The largest fraction of the non-refractory material in the aerosol sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organic material and a small contribution from nitrate. Most of the organic aerosol was highly oxidized, even after only a few days of transport over continental Europe. These highly oxidized organics had lower volatility than fresh primary or secondary aerosol measured in the laboratory. Significant changes in air-parcel trajectories and wind direction led to changes in the chemical composition of the sampled aerosol and corresponding changes of the volatility. These results allow the quantification of the effect of atmospheric processing on organic aerosol volatility and can be used as constraints for atmospheric Chemical Transport Models that predict the aerosol volatility.

  7. Chemical characterization of springtime submicrometer aerosol in Po Valley, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saarikoski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of submicron particles was investigated at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC measurement station in the Po Valley, Italy, in spring 2008. The measurements were performed by using both off-line and on-line instruments. Organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon, organic acids and biomass burning tracers were measured off-line by using a 24-h PM1 filter sampling. More detailed particle chemistry was achieved by using a Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and analyzing the data by positive matrix factorization (PMF. Oxalic acid had the highest concentrations of organic acids (campaign-average 97.4 ng m−3 followed by methane sulfonic, formic, malonic, and malic acids. Samples were also analyzed for glyoxylic, succinic, azelaic and maleic acids. In total, the nine acids composed 1.9 and 3.8% of OC and water-soluble OC, respectively (average, in terms of carbon atoms. Levoglucosan concentration varied from 17.7 to 495 ng m−3 with the concentration decreasing in the course of the campaign most likely due to the reduced use of domestic heating with wood. Six factors were found for organic aerosol (OA at SPC by PMF: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, biomass burning OA (BBOA, nitrogen-containing OA (N-OA and three different oxygenated OAs (OOA-a, OOA-b and OOA-c. Most of the OA mass was composed of OOA-a, HOA and OOA-c (26, 24 and 22%, respectively followed by OOA-b (13%, BBOA (8% and N-OA (7%. As expected, OOAs were the most oxygenated factors with organic matter:organic carbon (OM : OC ratios ranging from 1.9 to 2.2. The diurnal variability of the aerosol chemical composition was greatly affected by the boundary layer meteorology. Specifically, the effect of the nocturnal layer break-up in morning hours was most evident for nitrate and N-OA indicating that these compounds originated mainly from the local sources in the Po Valley. For sulfate and OOA-a the concentration did not

  8. Chemical characterization of springtime submicrometer aerosol in Po Valley, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saarikoski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of submicron particles was investigated at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC measurement station in the Po Valley, Italy, in spring 2008. The measurements were performed by using both off-line and on-line instruments. Organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon, organic acids and biomass burning tracers were measured off-line by using a 24-h PM1 filter sampling. More detailed particle chemistry was achieved by using an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and analyzing the data by positive matrix factorization (PMF. Oxalic acid had the highest concentrations of organic acids (campaign-average 97.4 ng m−3 followed by methane sulfonic, formic, malonic, and malic acids. Samples were also analyzed for glyoxylic, succinic, azelaic and maleic acids. In total, the nine acids composed 1.9 and 3.8% of OC and water-soluble OC, respectively (average, in terms of carbon atoms. Levoglucosan concentration varied from 17.7 to 495 ng m−3 with the concentration decreasing in the course of the campaign most likely due to the reduced use of domestic heating with wood. Six factors were found for organic aerosol (OA at SPC by PMF: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, biomass burning OA (BBOA, nitrogen-containing OA (N-OA and three different oxygenated OAs (OOA-a, OOA-b and OOA-c. Most of the OA mass was composed of OOA-a, HOA and OOA-c (26, 24 and 22%, respectively followed by OOA-b (13%, BBOA (8% and N-OA (7%. As expected, OOAs were the most oxygenated factors with organic matter:organic carbon (OM:OC ratios ranging from 1.9 to 2.2. The diurnal variability of the aerosol chemical composition was greatly affected by the boundary layer meteorology. Specifically, the effect of the nocturnal layer break-up in morning hours was most evident for nitrate and N-OA indicating that these compounds originated mainly from the local sources in the Po Valley. For sulfate and OOA-a the concentration did not

  9. Simulation of aerosol chemical compositions in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrit, Mounir; Kata Sartelet, Karine; Sciare, Jean; Marchand, Nicolas; Pey, Jorge; Sellegri, Karine

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at evaluating the chemical transport model (CTM) Polair3d of the air-quality modelling platform Polyphemus during the ChArMex summer campaigns of 2013, using ground-based measurements performed at ERSA (Cape Corsica, France), and at determining the processes controlling organic aerosol concentrations at ERSA. Simulations are compared to measurements for concentrations of both organic and inorganic species, as well as the ratio of biogenic versus anthropogenic particles, and organic aerosol properties (oxidation state). For inorganics, the concentrations of sulphate, sodium, chloride, ammonium and nitrate are compared to measurements. Non-sea-salt sulphate and ammonium concentrations are well reproduced by the model. However, because of the geographic location of the measurement station at Cape Corsica which undergoes strong wind velocities and sea effects, sea-salt sulphate, sodium, chloride and nitrate concentrations are strongly influenced by the parameterizations used for sea-salt emissions. Different parameterizations are compared and a parameterization is chosen after comparison to sodium measurements. For organics, the concentrations are well modelled when compared to experimental values. Anthropogenic particles are influenced by emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). Measurements allow us to refine the estimation of those emissions, which are currently missing in emission inventories. Although concentrations of biogenic particles are well simulated, the organic chemical compounds are not enough oxidised in the model. The observed oxidation state of organics shows that the oligomerisation of pinonaldehyde was over-estimated in Polyphemus. To improve the oxidation property of organics, the formation of extremely low volatile organic compounds from autoxidation of monoterpenes is added to Polyphemus, using recently published data from chamber experiments. These chemical compounds are highly oxygenated and are formed rapidly, as first

  10. Biological availability of lead in a paint aerosol. 1. Physical and chemical characterization of a lead paint aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, D; Schumacher, R; Covert, D; Eaton, D L

    1984-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of an aerosol of lead-based paint, generated in an industrial spray operation, that might influence the biological availability of lead present in inhaled aerosols. Paint aerosols were collected, and mass-size distribution was determined using a portable cascade impactor under actual occupational conditions. Approx. 2% of the particulate mass collected was in the respirable range (less than 10 micron mean aerodynamic diameter), although the maximum airborne concentration of lead was found to be 2-3 mg/m3. The lead concentration in a dried aerosol was very resistant to chemical digestion. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy showed approx. 11% lead by dry weight, although the wet weight concentration of lead reported by the manufacturer was 12.8%. PMID:6485003

  11. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean - Potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size dis

  12. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean-potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size dis

  13. Aerosol assisted depositions of polymers using an atomiser delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Colin R; Clausen-Thue, Victoria; Parkin, Ivan P

    2011-09-01

    The hydrophobicity, robustness and anti-microbial properties of Sylgard 184 polymer films deposited via AACVD were optimised by using aerosol droplets from an atomiser delivery system, polymer coating substrates and the swell encapsulation of methylene blue. By using an atomiser deposition system (average droplet size 0.35 microm) rather than a misting aerosol system (45 microm) lead to a surface with smaller surface features, which improved hydrophobicity (water contact angle 165 degrees) in addition to increasing the films transparency from ca 10 to 65%. Pre-treating the substrates with the same Sylgard 184 elastomer lead to a highly consistent surface hydrophobicity and an increase in average water contact angle measured (169 degrees). This paper shows the first example of dye incorporation in a CVD derived polymer film-these films have potential as antimicrobial surfaces.

  14. Secondary organic aerosols. Chemical aging, hygroscopicity, and cloud droplet activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Angela

    2011-07-06

    Atmospheric aerosols have an important impact on the radiation balance, and thus, on the climate of the Earth. Aerosol particles scatter and absorb incoming solar and terrestrial radiation. Apart from this direct effect, aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby greatly influencing the microphysics of clouds. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are an important fraction of the total aerosol mass. In many environments these organic compounds are mainly products of the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC). In this study the hygroscopic growth and CCN activation of biogenic SOA were investigated which was formed by the oxidation of VOC with O{sub 3} and photochemically formed OH radicals under low NO{sub x} conditions. For this purpose, a complex mixture of VOC emitted by boreal tree species as gas-phase precursors was used in the Juelich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). In long-term studies in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR {alpha}-pinene or a defined mixture of {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-pinene, limonene, ocimene, {delta}-3-carene served as precursors. Initial precursor concentrations between 40 and 1000 ppbC were investigated. The observed SOA particles were slightly hygroscopic with an average hygroscopicity parameter {kappa}(CCN) = 0.10 {+-} 0.02 and {kappa}(90%RH) = 0.05 {+-} 0.01. Closure between hygroscopic growth and CCN activation data could be achieved allowing either surface tension reduction, limited solubility, or non-ideality of the solution in the droplet. The SOA solutions in equilibrium with RH <95% are possible highly non-ideal. Therefore the organic-water interaction were investigated by applying the UNIFAC model. Calculations for surrogate compounds exhibited the same strong concentration (i.e. RH) dependence of {kappa} at sub-saturation. The growth curves could be fitted and CCN activation predicted by assuming a binary mixture of water and one hypothetical organic compound. The occurrence of

  15. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Adler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS. The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m=1.53(±0.03+0.07i(±0.03, during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m=1.54(±0.01+0.04i(±0.01 compared to m=1.49(±0.01+0.02i(±0.01 of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  16. Atmospheric aerosol compositions in China: spatial/temporal variability, chemical signature, regional haze distribution and comparisons with global aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From 2006 to 2007, the daily concentrations of major inorganic water-soluble constituents, mineral aerosol, organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in ambient PM10 samples were investigated from 16 urban, rural and remote sites in various regions of China, and were compared with global aerosol measurements. A large difference between urban and rural chemical species was found, normally with 1.5 to 2.5 factors higher in urban than in rural sites. Optically-scattering aerosols, such as sulfate (~16%, OC (~15%, nitrate (~7%, ammonium (~5% and mineral aerosol (~35% in most circumstance, are majorities of the total aerosols, indicating a dominant scattering feature of aerosols in China. Of the total OC, ~55%–60% can be attributed to the formation of the secondary organic carbon (SOC. The absorbing aerosol EC only accounts for ~3.5% of the total PM10. Seasonally, maximum concentrations of most aerosol species were found in winter while mineral aerosol peaks in spring. In addition to the regular seasonal maximum, secondary peaks were found for sulfate and ammonium in summer and for OC and EC in May and June. This can be considered as a typical seasonal pattern in various aerosol components in China. Aerosol acidity was normally neutral in most of urban areas, but becomes some acidic in rural areas. Based on the surface visibility observations from 681 meteorological stations in China between 1957 and 2005, four major haze areas are identified with similar visibility changes, namely, (1 Hua Bei Plain in N. China, and the Guanzhong Plain; (2 E. China with the main body in the Yangtze River Delta area; (3 S. China with most areas of Guangdong and the Pearl River Delta area; (4 The Si Chuan Basin in S.W. China. The degradation of visibility in these areas is linked with the emission changes and high PM concentrations. Such quantitative chemical characterization of aerosols is essential in assessing their role in atmospheric

  17. Aerosol-Assisted Extraction of Silicon Nanoparticles from Wafer Slicing Waste for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hee Dong; Kim, Hyekyoung; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Jiwoong; Roh, Kee Min; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Cho, Bong-Gyoo; Park, Eunjun; Kim, Hansu; Luo, Jiayan; Huang, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of silicon debris particles are generated during the slicing of silicon ingots into thin wafers for the fabrication of integrated-circuit chips and solar cells. This results in a significant loss of valuable materials at about 40% of the mass of ingots. In addition, a hazardous silicon sludge waste is produced containing largely debris of silicon, and silicon carbide, which is a common cutting material on the slicing saw. Efforts in material recovery from the sludge and recycling have been largely directed towards converting silicon or silicon carbide into other chemicals. Here, we report an aerosol-assisted method to extract silicon nanoparticles from such sludge wastes and their use in lithium ion battery applications. Using an ultrasonic spray-drying method, silicon nanoparticles can be directly recovered from the mixture with high efficiency and high purity for making lithium ion battery anode. The work here demonstrated a relatively low cost approach to turn wafer slicing wastes into much higher value-added materials for energy applications, which also helps to increase the sustainability of semiconductor material and device manufacturing. PMID:25819285

  18. Chemical characterization and physico-chemical properties of aerosols at Villum Research Station, Greenland during spring 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasius, M.; Iversen, L. S.; Svendsen, S. B.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Nielsen, I. E.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Zhang, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Bilde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosols on the radiation balance and climate are of special concern in Arctic areas, which have experienced warming at twice the rate of the global average. As future scenarios include increased emissions of air pollution, including sulfate aerosols, from ship traffic and oil exploration in the Arctic, there is an urgent need to obtain the fundamental scientific knowledge to accurately assess the consequences of pollutants to environment and climate. In this work, we studied the chemistry of aerosols at the new Villum Research Station (81°36' N, 16°40' W) in north-east Greenland during the "inauguration campaign" in spring 2015. The chemical composition of sub-micrometer Arctic aerosols was investigated using a Soot Particle Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-ToF-AMS). Aerosol samples were also collected on filters using both a high-volume sampler and a low-volume sampler equipped with a denuder for organic gases. Chemical analyses of filter samples include determination of inorganic anions and cations using ion-chromatography, and analysis of carboxylic acids and organosulfates of anthropogenic and biogenic origin using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Previous studies found that organosulfates constitute a surprisingly high fraction of organic aerosols during the Arctic Haze period in winter and spring. Investigation of organic molecular tracers provides useful information on aerosol sources and atmospheric processes. The physico-chemical properties of Arctic aerosols are also under investigation. These measurements include particle number size distribution, water activity and surface tension of aerosol samples in order to deduct information on their hygroscopicity and cloud-forming potential. The results of this study are relevant to understanding aerosol sources and processes as well as climate effects in the Arctic, especially during the Arctic haze

  19. Chemical composition of aerosols in winter/spring in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 aerosol samples were collected by cascade at Meteorological Tower in Beijing. The 12 group aerosol samples obtained were analyzed using PIXE method, which resulted in 20 elemental concentrations and size distribution of elemental concentrations. From the observation, the elemental concentrations,size distribution of elemental concentrations and their variations are analyzed. It shows that concentrations of the most elements in aerosols increase greatly compared with those in the past except that the concentrations of V, K, Sr, and the source of aerosols has changed greatly in the past decade. Fine mode aerosols increase more rapidly in the past decade, which may be due to the contribution of coal combustion and automobile exhaust. Pb content in aerosol is much higher than that at the beginning of 1980s, and has a decreasing trend in recent years because of using non-leaded gasoline.

  20. Estimation of aerosol water and chemical composition from AERONET at Cabauw, the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. van Beelen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of aerosols provides important information on the atmospheric aerosol abundance. However, due to the hygroscopic nature of aerosol particles observed aerosol optical properties are influenced by atmospheric humidity, and the measurements do not unambiguously characterize the aerosol dry mass and composition which complicates the comparison with aerosol models. In this study we derive aerosol water and chemical composition by a modeling approach that combines individual measurements of remotely sensed aerosol properties (e.g. optical thickness, single scattering albedo, refractive index and size distribution from an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer with radiosonde measurements of relative humidity. The model simulates water uptake by aerosols based on the chemical composition and size distribution. A minimization method is used to calculate aerosol composition and concentration, which are then compared to in situ measurements from the Intensive Measurement Campaign At the Cabauw Tower (IMPACT, May 2008, the Netherlands. Computed concentrations show reasonable agreement with surface observations and follow the day-to-day variability in observations. Total dry mass (33 ± 12 μg m−3 and black carbon concentrations (0.7 ± 0.3 μg m−3 are generally accurately computed. The uncertainty in the AERONET (real refractive index (0.025–0.05 introduces larger uncertainty in the modeled aerosol composition (e.g. sulfates, ammonium nitrate or organic matter and leads to an uncertainty of 0.1–0.25 in aerosol water volume fraction. Water volume fraction is highly variable depending on composition, up to >0.5 at 70–80% and <0.1 at 40% relative humidity.

  1. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Astitha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, indicating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols shows that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud, and by entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  2. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. C. Denier van der Gon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, designating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols indicates that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud and entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  3. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  4. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols between Moscow and Vladivostok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kuokka

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The TROICA-9 expedition (Trans-Siberian Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere was carried out at the Trans-Siberian railway between Moscow and Vladivostok in October 2005. Measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were made from an observatory carriage connected to a passenger train. Black carbon (BC concentrations in fine particles (PM2.5, aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm were measured with an aethalometer using a five-minute time resolution. Concentrations of inorganic ions and some organic compounds (Cl, NO3, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, oxalate and methane sulphonate were measured continuously by using an on-line system with a 15-min time resolution. In addition, particle volume size distributions were determined for particles in the diameter range 3–850 nm using a 10-min. time resolution. The continuous measurements were completed with 24-h. PM2.5 filter samples which were stored in a refrigerator and later analyzed in chemical laboratory. The analyses included mass concentrations of PM2.5, ions, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V and Zn. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 varied in the range of 4.3–34.8 μg m−3 with an average of 21.6 μg m−3. Fine particle mass consisted mainly of BC (average 27.6%, SO42− (13.0%, NH4+ (4.1%, and NO3 (1.4%. One of the major constituents was obviously also organic carbon which was not determined. The contribution of BC was high compared with other studies made in Europe and Asia. High concentrations of ions, BC and particle volume were observed between Moscow and roughly 4000 km east of it, as well as close to

  5. Activation of "synthetic ambient" aerosols - Relation to chemical composition of particles <100 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, J.; Hitzenberger, R.; Reischl, G.; Bauer, H.; Leder, K.; Puxbaum, H.

    2012-07-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are an important fraction of atmospheric aerosols because of their role in cloud formation. Experimental studies focus either on direct field measurements of complex ambient aerosols or laboratory investigations on well defined aerosols produced from single substances or substance mixtures. In this study, we focussed on the ultrafine aerosol because in terms of number concentration, the majority of the CCN are expected to have sizes in this range. A field study was performed from July 2007 to October 2008 to investigate the activation behaviour of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna (Burkart et al., 2011). Filter samples of the aerosol aerosol in a nebulizer. Chemical analyses of the ultrafine water soluble material were also performed. The CCN properties of the "synthetic ambient" aerosol were obtained using the University of Vienna CCN counter (Giebl et al., 2002; Dusek et al., 2006b) at a nominal supersaturation (SS) of 0.5%. Activation diameters dact ranged from 54.5 nm to 66 nm, were larger than dact of typical single inorganic salts and showed no seasonal pattern in contrast to the fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which ranged from 44% in spring to 15% in winter. The average hygroscopicity parameter κ (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) obtained from the activation curves ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 (average 0.24), which was significantly lower than κchem calculated from the chemical composition (0.43 ± 0.07).

  6. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the aerosol assisted CVD synthesis of magnetite hollow nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monárrez-Cordero, B.E.; Amézaga-Madrid, P., E-mail: patricia.amezaga@cimav.edu.mx; Hernández-Salcedo, P.G.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Leyva-Porras, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M.

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High purity mesoporous hollow magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by AACVD. • Microstructural characteristics strongly depends on the synthesis conditions. • Activation energy of −159 kJ mol{sup −1} was obtained from thermogravimetric analyses of FeCl{sub 2.} • Simulation of concentration distribution of reactants and products was realized. • Simulated and experimental magnetite production rate agreed around 2 × 10{sup −5} mol h{sup −1}. - Abstract: Nowadays, mesoporous magnetite nanoparticles are an important class of new nanomaterials which occupy a valuable position in materials science. Owing to their several advantages over bulk magnetite and particularly with respect to higher adsorption capacity, there is a growing interest towards the use of these materials for the adsorptive removal of a variety of contaminants, including organic dyes from wastewater. Through aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) technique is possible to synthesize spherical hollow nanoparticles with external diameter from 50 to 500 nm, composed of a shell of crystallites smaller than 30 nm. In the AACVD method, the structural morphology of resultant nanoparticles strongly depends on the starting precursors and operating conditions. Some advantages of this technique are the high production rate, continuous operation, use of relatively simple equipment, easy doping and the possibility to scale the process industrially. Therefore, in order to understand the formation of magnetite nanoparticles by AACVD, theoretical simulations were performed on two important steps of the synthesis: (i) temperature and carrier gas flow distribution inside of tubular reactor, and (ii) the distribution of molar concentration of the precursor in the synthesis process. Reaction kinetics of the precursor was studied to determine Arrhenius parameters. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor were calculated experimentally from thermal analysis, these values

  7. Influence of Increasing Deposition Temperature on Electrical Properties of Amorphous Carbon Thin Film Prepared by Aerosol-Assisted Thermal CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the successful deposition of p-type semiconducting amorphous carbon (paC) films fabricated onto the glass substrate by Aerosol-Assisted Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using natural source of camphor oil as the precursor material. The analyze reveal that conductivity and resistivity shows some changes at different deposition temperature, that is the conductivity increase as temperature increase from 350 to 550 degree Celsius, but drop slightly at 550 degree Celsius. Other than that, optical and structural properties were also characterized by using UV-VIS-NIR system and Atomic Force Microscopy. The same trend of optical and electrical can be seen when the measurement from the Taucs plot expose a decreasing value of optical band gap as temperature increase, but slightly increase when temperature increase to 550 degree Celsius. (author)

  8. Physico-chemical properties of aerosols in Sao Paulo, Brazil and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Luiza Godoy, Maria; Godoy, Jose Marcus

    2013-04-01

    Megacities emissions are increasingly becoming a global issue, where emissions from the transportation sector play an increasingly important role. Sao Paulo is a megacity with a population of about 18 million people, 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. As a result of the vehicular and industrial emissions, the air quality in Sao Paulo is bellow WMO standards for aerosol particles and ozone. Many uncertainties are found on gas- and particulate matter vehicular emission factors and their following atmospheric processes, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. Due to the uniqueness of the vehicular fuel in Brazil, largely based on ethanol use, such characterization currently holds further uncertainties. To improve the understanding of the role of this unique emission characteristics, we are running a source apportionment study in Sao Paulo focused on the mechanisms of organic aerosol formation. One of the goals of this study is a quantitative aerosol source apportionment focused on vehicular emissions, including ethanol and gasohol (both fuels used by light-duty vehicles). This study comprises four sampling sites with continuous measurements for one year, where trace elements and organic aerosol are being measured for PM2.5 and PM10 along with real-time NOx, O3, PM10 and CO measurements. Aerosol optical properties and size distribution are being measured on a rotation basis between sampling stations. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to measure in real time VOCs and aerosol composition, respectively. Trace elements were measured using XRF and OC/EC analysis was determined with a Sunset OC/EC instrument. A TSI Nephelometer with 3 wavelengths measure light scattering and a MAAP measure black carbon. Results show aerosol number concentrations ranging between 10,000 and 35,000 cm-3, mostly concentrated in the nucleation and Aitken modes, with a peak in size at 80

  9. Sensitive chemical compass assisted by quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, C. Y.; Ai, Qing; Quan, H. T.; Sun, C. P.

    2012-02-01

    A radical-pair-based chemical reaction might be used by birds for navigation via the geomagnetic direction. The inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could respond to a weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field; this then results in different photopigments to be sensed by the avian eyes. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup, inspired by the avian compass, as an ultrasensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of detection of weak magnetic fields.

  10. Sensitive Chemical Compass Assisted by Quantum Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, C Y; Quan, H T; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    The radical-pair-based chemical reaction could be used by birds for the navigation via the geomagnetic direction. An inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could response to the weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field and then results in different photopigments in the avian eyes to be sensed. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup for the ultra-sensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via the recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the weak magnetic field.

  11. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care. PMID:27136117

  12. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care.

  13. Spatial variation of chemical composition and sources of submicron aerosol in Zurich: factor analysis of mobile aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mohr

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile measurements of PM1 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter D<1 μm chemical composition using a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer and a multi-angle absorption photometer were performed using the PSI mobile laboratory during winter 2007/2008 and December 2008 in the metropolitan area of Zurich, Switzerland. Positive matrix factorization (PMF applied to the organic fraction of PM1 yielded 3 factors: Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA related to traffic emissions; organic aerosol from wood burning for domestic heating purposes (WBOA; and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, assigned to secondary organic aerosol formed by oxidation of volatile precursors. The spatial variation of the chemical composition of PM1 shows a uniform distribution throughout the city: for primary emissions, road traffic is important along major roads (varying between 7 and 14% of PM1 for different sites within the city, but overall, domestic wood burning is more important for the organic aerosol concentrations in Zurich during winter time (varying between 8–15% of PM1 for different sites within the city. OOA makes up the largest fraction of organic aerosol (44% on average. A new method, based on simultaneous on-road mobile and stationary background measurements and using the ratio of on-road sulfate to stationary sulfate to correct for small-scale dynamic effects, allows for the separation of PM1 emitted or produced locally and the PM1 from the regional background. It could be shown that especially during thermal inversions over the Swiss plateau, regional background concentrations contribute substantially to particulate number concentrations (60% on average as well as to the concentrations of PM1 components (on average 60% for black carbon and HOA, over 97% for WBOA and OOA, and more than 94% for the measured inorganic components in downtown Zurich. The results emphasize, on

  14. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  15. Aerosol chemical characterization and role of carbonaceous aerosol on radiative effect over Varanasi in central Indo-Gangetic Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S.; Dumka, U. C.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Ram, Kirpa; Panicker, A. S.; Srivastava, M. K.; Tiwari, Shani; Attri, S. D.; Soni, V. K.; Pandey, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the chemical composition of PM10 aerosols at Varanasi, in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during April to July 2011, with emphasis on examining the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) to the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE). PM10 samples are analysed for carbonaceous aerosols (Organic Carbon, OC and EC) and water-soluble ionic species (WSIS: Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, PO42- NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) and several diagnostic ratios (OC/EC, K+/EC, etc) have been also used for studying the aerosol sources at Varanasi. PM10 mass concentration varies between 53 and 310 μg m-3 (mean of 168 ± 73 μg m-3), which is much higher than the National and International air quality standards. The OC mass concentration varies from 6 μg m-3 to 24 μg m-3 (mean of 12 ± 5 μg m-3; 7% of PM10 mass), whereas EC ranges between 1.0 and 14.3 μg m-3 (4.4 ± 3.9 μg m-3; ˜3% of PM10 mass). The relative low OC/EC of 3.9 ± 2.0 and strong correlation (R2 = 0.82) between them suggest the dominance of primary carbonaceous aerosols. The contribution of WSIS to PM10 is found to be ˜12%, out of which ˜57% and 43% are anions and cations, respectively. The composite DARE estimates via SBDART model reveal significant radiative effect and atmospheric heating rates (0.9-2.3 K day-1). Although the EC contributes only ˜3% to the PM10 mass, its contribution to the surface and atmospheric forcing is significantly high (37-63% and 54-77%, respectively), thus playing a major role in climate implications over Varanasi.

  16. Spatial variation of chemical composition and sources of submicron aerosol in Zurich during wintertime using mobile aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mohr

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile measurements of PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <1 μm chemical composition using a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer and a multi-angle absorption photometer were performed using the PSI mobile laboratory during winter 2007/2008 and December 2008 in the metropolitan area of Zurich, Switzerland. Positive matrix factorization (PMF applied to the organic fraction of PM1 yielded 3 factors: Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA related to traffic emissions; organic aerosol from wood burning for domestic heating purposes (WBOA; and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, assigned to secondary organic aerosol formed by oxidation of volatile precursors. The chemical composition of PM1 was assessed for an urban background site and various sites throughout the city. The background site is dominated by secondary inorganic and organic species (57 %, BC, HOA, and WBOA account for 15 %, 6 %, and 12 %, respectively. As for the other sites, HOA is important along major roads (varying between 7 and 14 % of PM1 for different sites within the city, average all sites 8 %, domestic wood burning makes up between 8–15 % of PM1 for different sites within the city (average all sites 10.5 %. OOA makes up the largest fraction of organic aerosol (44 % on average. A new method allows for the separation and quantification of the local fraction of PM1 emitted or rapidly formed in the city, and the fraction of PM1 originating from the urban background. The method is based on simultaneous on-road mobile and stationary background measurements and the correction of small-scale meteorological effects using the ratio of on-road sulfate to stationary sulfate. Especially during thermal inversions over the Swiss plateau, urban background concentrations contribute substantially to particulate number concentrations (between 40 and 80 % depending on meteorological conditions and

  17. Aerosol sources and their contribution to the chemical composition of aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea during summertime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sciare

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study on the temporal variability of compounds important in controlling aerosol chemical composition was performed during a one-month experiment conducted during summer 2000 at a background site on Crete, in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Contribution of different aerosol sources in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin could be investigated at this location since the site is influenced by a wide range of air masses originating mainly in Europe and Africa. Chemical apportionment was performed for various air mass origins and showed a strong impact of anthropogenic emissions in the Turkey and Central Europe sectors, with black carbon (BC and non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4 concentrations higher than observed in the Eastern and Western Europe sectors. High levels of non-sea-salt calcium (nss-Ca were associated with air masses from Africa but also from Central Turkey. Evidence was found that BC calculation based on light absorbance during dust events was biased. This quality-controlled high temporal resolution dataset allowed to investigate in detail the source-receptor relationships responsible for the levels of BC, nss-SO4 and sulfur dioxide (SO2, observed in Crete. Among the results obtained from this model, the major contribution of Turkey and Central Europe was confirmed in terms of anthropogenic emissions. Comparisons with remote optical properties obtained from Satellite observations (SEAWIFS north of Crete indicates that our ground based aerosol characterization was suitable for describing aerosol properties in the atmospheric column for most of the time during the campaign.

  18. Aerosol chemical elemental mass concentration at lower free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo Freitas, Maria; Dionísio, Isabel; Fialho, Paulo; Barata, Filipe

    2007-08-01

    This paper shows the use of Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique to determine elemental masses collected by a seven-wavelength Aethalometer instrument at the summit of Pico mountain in the Azorean archipelago, situated in the Central North Atlantic Ocean. Each sample corresponds to air particulate matter measured continuously for periods of approximately 24 h taken from 14th July 2001 through 14th July 2002. The statistical analysis of the coefficients of correlation between all the elements identified, permitted to establish six groups that could potentially be associated with the type of source responsible for the aerosol sampled in the lower free troposphere at the Azorean archipelago. Calculation of the synoptic back trajectories helped to corroborate the use of the iron/cesium relation as a tracer for the Saharan dust aerosol. It was demonstrated that INAA constituted an important tool to identify these events.

  19. EVALUATION OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BASED ON CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta,Sachio; Murao, Naoto

    1998-01-01

    研究概要:Atmospheric fine particles, aerosols less than 2μm in diameter, were collected on filters and chemically analyzed in Sapporo, Okinawa island in Japan and Ester-Dome, Alaska in U. S. A. They were made up of nine components such as elemental carbon, organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, sea-salt cations, soil and water. Based on the chemical characterization, it was assumed that atmospheric aerosols comprise seven species of particles such as elemental carbon, organics, ammonium sulfate, a...

  20. Chemical composition, main sources and temporal variability of PM1 aerosols in southern African grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tiitta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Southern Africa is a significant source region of atmospheric pollution, yet long-term data on pollutant concentrations and properties from this region are rather limited. A recently established atmospheric measurement station in South Africa, Welgegund, is strategically situated to capture regional background emissions, as well as emissions from the major source regions in the interior of South Africa. We measured non-refractive submicron aerosols (NR-PM1 and black carbon over a one year period in Welgegund, and investigated the seasonal and diurnal patterns of aerosol concentration levels, chemical composition, acidity and oxidation level. Based on air mass back trajectories, four distinct source regions were determined for NR-PM1. Supporting data utilized in our analysis included particle number size distributions, aerosol absorption, trace gas concentrations, meteorological variables and the flux of carbon dioxide. The dominant submicron aerosol constituent during the dry season was organic aerosol, reflecting high contribution from savannah fires and other combustion sources. Organic aerosol concentrations were lower during the wet season, presumably due to wet deposition as well as reduced emissions from combustion sources. Sulfate concentrations were usually high and exceeded organic aerosol concentrations when air-masses were transported over regions containing major point sources. Sulfate and nitrate concentrations peaked when air masses passed over the industrial Highveld (iHV area. In contrast, concentrations were much lower when air masses passed over the cleaner background (BG areas. Air masses associated with the anti-cyclonic recirculation (ACBIC source region contained largely aged OA. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF analysis of aerosol mass spectra was used to characterize the organic aerosol (OA properties. The factors identified were oxidized organic aerosols (OOA and biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA in the dry season

  1. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  2. Size distribution measurements and chemical analysis of aerosol components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakkanen, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The principal aims of this work were to improve the existing methods for size distribution measurements and to draw conclusions about atmospheric and in-stack aerosol chemistry and physics by utilizing size distributions of various aerosol components measured. A sample dissolution with dilute nitric acid in an ultrasonic bath and subsequent graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis was found to result in low blank values and good recoveries for several elements in atmospheric fine particle size fractions below 2 {mu}m of equivalent aerodynamic particle diameter (EAD). Furthermore, it turned out that a substantial amount of analyses associated with insoluble material could be recovered since suspensions were formed. The size distribution measurements of in-stack combustion aerosols indicated two modal size distributions for most components measured. The existence of the fine particle mode suggests that a substantial fraction of such elements with two modal size distributions may vaporize and nucleate during the combustion process. In southern Norway, size distributions of atmospheric aerosol components usually exhibited one or two fine particle modes and one or two coarse particle modes. Atmospheric relative humidity values higher than 80% resulted in significant increase of the mass median diameters of the droplet mode. Important local and/or regional sources of As, Br, I, K, Mn, Pb, Sb, Si and Zn were found to exist in southern Norway. The existence of these sources was reflected in the corresponding size distributions determined, and was utilized in the development of a source identification method based on size distribution data. On the Finnish south coast, atmospheric coarse particle nitrate was found to be formed mostly through an atmospheric reaction of nitric acid with existing coarse particle sea salt but reactions and/or adsorption of nitric acid with soil derived particles also occurred. Chloride was depleted when acidic species reacted

  3. Effects of Chemical Aging on the Heterogeneous Freezing of Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, K.; Brooks, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosols are emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources and display a wide range of effectiveness in promoting the nucleation of ice in clouds. Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) arise from incomplete combustion and other pollutant sources. Hydrocarbon compounds in diesel motor oil and other fuel blends include compounds such as octacosane (a straight saturated alkane), squalane (a branched saturated alkane) and squalene (an unsaturated branched alkene). At temperatures above -36°C, the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere is facilitated by heterogeneous freezing processes in which atmospheric aerosols act as ice nuclei (IN). The variability in ability of organic particles to facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation causes major uncertainties in predictions of aerosol effects on climate. Further, atmospheric aerosol composition and ice nucleation ability can be altered via chemical aging and reactions with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone. In this study, we take a closer look at the role of chemical oxidation on the efficiency of specific IN during contact freezing laboratory experiments. The freezing temperatures of droplets in contact with representative organic aerosols are determined through the use of an optical microscope apparatus equipped with a cooling stage and a digital camera. Chemical changes at the surface of aerosols due to ozone exposure are characterized using Raman Microspectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance. Our results indicate that oxidation of certain atmospheric organics (soot and PAHS) enhances their ice nucleation ability. In this presentation, results of heterogeneous nucleation on various types of organic aerosols will be presented, and the role of structure in promoting freezing will be discussed.

  4. Assessment of microphysical and chemical factors of aerosols over seas of the Russian Artic Eastern Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobokova, Liudmila; Polkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The newly observed kickoff of the Northern Route development drew serious attention to state of the Arctic Resource environment. Occurring climatic and environmental changes are more sensitively seen in polar areas in particular. Air environment control allows for making prognostic assessments which are required for planning hazardous environmental impacts preventive actions. In August - September 2013, RV «Professor Khlustin» Northern Sea Route expeditionary voyage took place. En-route aerosol sampling was done over the surface of the Beringov, Chukotka and Eastern-Siberia seas (till the town of Pevek). The purpose of sampling was to assess spatio-temporal variability of optic, microphysical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles of the surface layer within different areas adjacent to the Northern Sea Route. Aerosol test made use of automated mobile unit consisting of photoelectric particles counter AZ-10, aetalometr MDA-02, aspirator on NBM-1.2 pump chassis, and the impactor. This set of equipment allows for doing measurements of number concentration, dispersed composition of aerosols within sizes d=0.3-10 mkm, mass concentration of submicron sized aerosol, and filter-conveyed aerosols sampling. Filter-conveyed aerosols sampling was done using method accepted by EMEP and EANET monitoring networks. The impactor channel was upgraded to separate particles bigger than 1 mkm in size, and the fine grain fraction settled down on it. Reverse 5-day and 10-day trajectories of air mass transfer executed at heights of 10, 1500 and 3500 m were analyzed. The heights were selected by considerations that 3000 m is the height which characterizes air mass trend in the lower troposphere. 1500 m is the upper border of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the sampling was done in the Earth's surface layer at less than 10 m. Minimum values of the bespoken microphysical characteristics are better characteristic of higher latitudes where there are no man induced sources of

  5. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  6. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Oxidation of Isoprene Hydroxyhydroperoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri H; Chen, Yuzhi; Zhang, Zhenfa; D'Ambro, Emma L; Zhang, Xuan; Gold, Avram; Turpin, Barbara J; Thornton, Joel A; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Surratt, Jason D

    2016-09-20

    Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions leads to the formation of isoprene hydroxyhydroperoxides (ISOPOOH). Subsequent oxidation of ISOPOOH largely produces isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are known secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors. Although SOA from IEPOX has been previously examined, systematic studies of SOA characterization through a non-IEPOX route from 1,2-ISOPOOH oxidation are lacking. In the present work, SOA formation from the oxidation of authentic 1,2-ISOPOOH under low-NOx conditions was systematically examined with varying aerosol compositions and relative humidity. High yields of highly oxidized compounds, including multifunctional organosulfates (OSs) and hydroperoxides, were chemically characterized in both laboratory-generated SOA and fine aerosol samples collected from the southeastern U.S. IEPOX-derived SOA constituents were observed in all experiments, but their concentrations were only enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate aerosol, consistent with prior work. High-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-AMS) reveals that 1,2-ISOPOOH-derived SOA formed through non-IEPOX routes exhibits a notable mass spectrum with a characteristic fragment ion at m/z 91. This laboratory-generated mass spectrum is strongly correlated with a factor recently resolved by positive matrix factorization (PMF) of aerosol mass spectrometer data collected in areas dominated by isoprene emissions, suggesting that the non-IEPOX pathway could contribute to ambient SOA measured in the Southeastern United States. PMID:27466979

  7. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P. D.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET, EMEP), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10) and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16), and a negative MNMB in the desert

  8. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sič

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI, the ground (AERONET, EMEP, and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10 and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32 in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16, and a negative MNMB in

  9. Decadal trends in aerosol chemical composition at Barrow, Alaska: 1976–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Shaw

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol measurements at Barrow, Alaska during the past 30 years have identified the long range transport of pollution associated with Arctic Haze as well as ocean-derived aerosols of more local origin. Here, we focus on measurements of aerosol chemical composition to assess (1 trends in Arctic Haze aerosol and implications for source regions, (2 the interaction between pollution-derived and ocean-derived aerosols and the resulting impacts on the chemistry of the Arctic boundary layer, and (3 the response of aerosols to a changing climate. Aerosol chemical composition measured at Barrow, AK during the Arctic haze season is compared for the years 1976–1977 and 1997–2008. Based on these two data sets, concentrations of non-sea salt (nss sulfate (SO4= and non-crustal (nc vanadium (V have decreased by about 60% over this 30 year period. Consistency in the ratios of nss SO4=/ncV and nc manganese (Mn/ncV between the two data sets indicates that, although emissions have decreased in the source regions, the source regions have remained the same over this time period. The measurements from 1997–2008 indicate that, during the haze season, the nss SO4= aerosol at Barrow is becoming less neutralized by ammonium (NH4+ yielding an increasing sea salt aerosol chloride (Cl deficit. The expected consequence is an increase in the release of Cl atoms to the atmosphere and a change in the lifetime of volatile organic compounds (VOCs including methane. In addition, summertime concentrations of biogenically-derived methanesulfonate (MSA and nss SO4= are increasing at a rate of 12 and 8% per year, respectively. Further research is required to assess the environmental factors behind the increasing concentrations of biogenic aerosol.

  10. Decadal trends in aerosol chemical composition at Barrow, AK: 1976–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Quinn

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol measurements at Barrow, AK during the past 30 years have identified the long range transport of pollution associated with Arctic Haze as well as ocean-derived aerosols of more local origin. Here, we focus on measurements of aerosol chemical composition to assess 1 trends in Arctic Haze aerosol and implications for source regions, 2 the interaction between pollution-derived and ocean-derived aerosols and the resulting impacts on the chemistry of the Arctic boundary layer, and 3 the response of aerosols to a changing climate. Aerosol chemical composition measured at Barrow, AK during the Arctic haze season is compared for the years 1976–1977 and 1997–2008. Based on these two data sets, concentrations of non-sea salt (nss sulfate (SO4= and non-crustal (nc vanadium (V have decreased by about 60% over this 30 year period. Consistency in the ratios of nss SO4=/ncV and nc manganese (Mn/ncV between the two data sets indicates that, although emissions have decreased in the source regions, the source regions have remained the same over this time period. The measurements from 1997–2008 indicate that, during the haze season, the nss SO4= aerosol at Barrow is becoming less neutralized by ammonium (NH4+ yielding an increasing sea salt aerosol chloride (Cl deficit. The expected consequence is an increase in the release of Cl atoms to the atmosphere and a change in the lifetime of volatile organic compounds (VOCs including methane. In addition, summertime concentrations of biogenically-derived methanesulfonate (MSA and nss SO4= are increasing at a rate of 12 and 8% per year, respectively. Further research is required to assess the environmental factors behind the increasing concentrations of biogenic aerosol.

  11. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles cloud formation and potential

  12. Chemical composition of aerosol in the atmospheric surface layer of the East Antarctica coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Golobokova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of aerosol in the ground layer of the coastal zone in East Antarctica is analyzed in the article. The aerosol samples were taken in 2006–2015 during seasonal works of the Russian Antarctic Expeditions (RAE, namely, these were 52nd–53rd, 55th, and 58th–60th expeditions. Samples were taken in the 200‑km band of the sea-shore zone along routes of the research vessels (REV «Akademik Fedorov» and «Akademik Treshnikov» as well as on territories of the Russian stations Molodezhnaya and Mirny. Although the results obtained did show the wide range of the aerosol concentrations and a certain variability of their chemical composition, some common features of the variability were revealed. Thus, during the period from 2006 to 2014 a decrease of average values of the sums were noted. Spatially, a tendency of decreasing of the ion concentrations was found in the direction from the station Novolazarevskaya to the Molodezhnaya one, but the concentrations increased from the Molodezhnaya to the station Mirny. The sum of ions of the aerosol in the above mentioned coastal zone was, on the average, equal to 2.44 μg/m3, and it was larger than that on the territory of the Antarctic stations Molodezhnaya (0,29 μg/m3 and Mirny (0,50 ág / m3. The main part to the sum of the aerosol ions on the Antarctic stations was contributed by Na+, Ca2+, Cl−, SO4 2−. The main ions in aerosol composition in the coastal zone are ions Na+ and Cl−. The dominant contribution of the sea salt and SO4 2− can be traced in not only the composition of atmospheric aerosols, but also in the chemical composition of the fresh snow in the coastal areas of East Antarctica: at the Indian station Maitri, on the Larsemann Hills, and in a boring located in 55.3 km from the station Progress (K = 1.4÷6.1. It was noted that values of the coefficient of enrichment K of these ions decreases as someone moves from a shore to inland. Estimation of

  13. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  14. Optical and Chemical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols at Amami Oshima and Fukue Islands in Japan in Spring, 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta,Sachio; Murao, Naoto; Yamagata,Sadamu

    2013-01-01

    The optical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols were determined from the ground-based measurements at Amami Oshima in April 2001 during the Asian Atmospheric Particle Environmental Change Studies (APEX) campaign and at Fukue Island in March 2001. At Amami Oshima from April 10 to 16, an aerosol event was observed in which the volume scattering coefficient and sulfate concentration of fine particles increased conspicuously. At the former term of the aerosol event, the single scatter...

  15. High resolution simulations of aerosol microphysics in a global and regionally nested chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.; Marks, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol indirect effect is the largest source of forcing uncertainty in current climate models. This effect arises from the influence of aerosols on the reflective properties and lifetimes of clouds, and its magnitude depends on how many particles can serve as cloud droplet formation sites. Assessing levels of this subset of particles (cloud condensation nuclei, or CCN) requires knowledge of aerosol levels and their global distribution, size distributions, and composition. A key tool necessary to advance our understanding of CCN is the use of global aerosol microphysical models, which simulate the processes that control aerosol size distributions: nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation. Previous studies have found important differences in CO (Chen, D. et al., 2009) and ozone (Jang, J., 1995) modeled at different spatial resolutions, and it is reasonable to believe that short-lived, spatially-variable aerosol species will be similarly - or more - susceptible to model resolution effects. The goal of this study is to determine how CCN levels and spatial distributions change as simulations are run at higher spatial resolution - specifically, to evaluate how sensitive the model is to grid size, and how this affects comparisons against observations. Higher resolution simulations are necessary supports for model/measurement synergy. Simulations were performed using the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem (v9-02). The years 2008 and 2009 were simulated at 4ox5o and 2ox2.5o globally and at 0.5ox0.667o over Europe and North America. Results were evaluated against surface-based particle size distribution measurements from the European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research project. The fine-resolution model simulates more spatial and temporal variability in ultrafine levels, and better resolves topography. Results suggest that the coarse model predicts systematically lower ultrafine levels than does the fine-resolution model. Significant

  16. Experimental Determination of Chemical Diffusion within Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramson, Evan H.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2013-02-28

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Recent experimental evidence from a number of groups indicates that SOA is in a semi-solid phase, the viscosity of which remained unknown. We find that when SOA is made in the presence of vapors of volatile hydrophobic molecules the SOA particles absorb and trap them. Here, we illustrate that it is possible to measure the evaporation rate of these molecules that is determined by their diffusion in SOA, which is then used to calculate a reasonably accurate value for the SOA viscosity. We use pyrene as a tracer molecule and a-pinene SOA as an illustrative case. It takes ~24 hours for half the pyrene to evaporate to yield a viscosity of 10^8 Pa s for a-pinene. This viscosity is consistent with measurements of particle bounce and evaporation rates. We show that viscosity of 10^8 Pa s implies coalescence times of minutes, consistent with the findings that SOA particles are spherical. Similar measurements on aged SOA particles doped with pyrene yield a viscosity of 10^9 Pa s, indicating that hardening occurs with time, which is consistent with observed decrease in water uptake and evaporation rate with aging.

  17. Global and regional impacts of HONO on the chemical composition of clouds and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshorban, Y. F.; Crutzen, P. J.; Steil, B.; Pozzer, A.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-09-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) photolysis can significantly increase HOx (OH+HO2) radical formation, enhancing organic and inorganic oxidation products in polluted regions, especially during winter. It has been reported that chemistry-transport models underestimate sulphate concentrations, mostly during winter. Here we show that HONO can significantly enhance aerosol sulphate (S(VI)), mainly due to the increased formation of H2SO4. Even though in-cloud aqueous phase oxidation of dissolved SO2 (S(IV)) is the main source of S(VI), it appears that HONO related enhancement of H2O2 does not significantly affect sulphate because of the predominantly S(IV) limited conditions, except over eastern Asia. Nitrate is also increased via enhanced gaseous HNO3 formation and N2O5 hydrolysis on aerosol particles. Ammonium nitrate is enhanced in ammonia-rich regions but not under ammonia-limited conditions. Furthermore, particle number concentrations are also higher, accompanied by the transfer from hydrophobic to hydrophilic aerosol modes. This implies a significant impact on the particle lifetime and cloud nucleating properties. The HONO induced enhancements of all species studied are relatively strong in winter though negligible in summer. Simulating realistic HONO levels is found to improve the model-measurement agreement of sulphate aerosols, most apparent over the US. Our results underscore the importance of HONO for the atmospheric oxidizing capacity and the central role of cloud chemical processing in aerosol formation.

  18. Prediction of the rates of chemical transformation of sodium fire aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium fires resulting from accidental releases of liquid sodium from a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) would produce aerosols consisting of oxides of sodium, which would tend to react with available water vapor and carbon dioxide. The hydroxide aerosol particles thus formed would be particularly corrosive and hazardous likely exceeding the U.S. industrial hygiene threshold limit value of 2 mg/m3. Reaction of the hydroxide with carbon dioxide to form the carbonate would make the aerosol substantially less hazardous chemically. The analysis of Clough and Garland is extended to study the rates of transformation of the oxides to hydroxide and the hydroxide to the carbonate, assuming that mass transfer is limiting. The cases studied here are gas-phase transport to solid or liquid particles and the transport within particles which are liquids, solids, or agglomerates. For sodium fire aerosols less than 10 micrometers in diameter, mass-transfer rates in air are sufficiently fast that the particles should be converted to the carbonate within seconds, except those particles which are solid or have a solid shell (and are larger than 1 micrometer). Such non-porous particles would be expected only if the aerosol passes through a liquid state during or after agglomeration, due to melting or the absorption of water

  19. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  20. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection

  1. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  2. Surface Modification of Aerosol-Assisted CVD Produced TiO2 Thin Film for Dye Sensitised Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SuPei Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple and convenient method for the preparation of Ag/TiO2 thin films supported on indium tin oxide, which was achieved by sonochemical deposition of Ag+ on aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposited TiO2 thin films. Posttreatment was performed on the film by immersion in HCl. The as-prepared composite film was characterised by X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The photoelectrochemical measurements and J-V characterisation showed approximately fivefold increase in photocurrent density generation and approximately sevenfold enhancement in dye sensitiser solar cell (DSSC conversion efficiency, which was achieved after modification of the TiO2 film with HCl posttreatment and Ag particle deposition. The improved photocurrent density of 933.30 μA/cm2, as well as DSSC power conversion efficiency of 3.63% with high stability, is an indication that the as-synthesised thin film is a potential candidate for solar energy conversion applications.

  3. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically-resolved aerosol fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Farmer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA, production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocity for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon was 2.05 ± 0.04 mm/s. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm/s and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  4. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-06-01

    An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July-7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA) identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8) corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00-15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity with that of

  5. Study on microwave assisted process in chemical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microwave assisted process is a revolutionary method of extraction that reduces the extraction time to as little as a few seconds, with up to a ten-fold decrease in the use of solvents. The target material is immersed in solvent that is transparent to microwaves, so only the target material is heated, and because of the microwaves tend to heat the inside of the material quickly, the target chemical are expelled in a few seconds. benefits from this process include significant reductions in the amount of energy required and substantial reductions in the cost and dispose of hazardous solvents. A thorough review has been displayed on: using the microwave in extraction, applications of microwave in industry, process flow diagram, mechanism of the process and comparison between microwave process and other extraction techniques (soxhlet, steam distillation and supercritical fluid). This review attempts to summarize the studies about microwave assisted process as a very promising technique. (Author)

  6. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Kamilli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site LHVP in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS. For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS and black carbon photometry (MAAP. In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 μg m3, e.g. during winter.

  7. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilli, K. A.; Poulain, L.; Held, A.; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site Laboratoire d'Hygiène de la Ville de Paris (LHVP) in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS) and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS). For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and black carbon photometry (MAAP). In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 μg m-3, e.g., during winter.

  8. Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols Above a Pristine South East Asian Rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.; Hamilton, J.; Chen, Q.; Martin, S.; Trembath, J.

    2009-04-01

    conjunction with a constant pressure inlet. The aerosols' chemical origins have been further investigated by comparing these spectra to chamber experiments, mass spectral libraries and data from comparable experiments in other locations. These data are also being analysed in conjunction with offline techniques applied to samples collected using filters and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS). Methods used include liquid chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry. These techniques provide a more detailed chemical characterisation of the SOA and water soluble organic carbon, allowing direct links back to gas phase precursors. In conjunction with the field measurements, a programme of chamber experiments is being carried out at Manchester as part of the ACES project. This will generate comparable SOA under controlled conditions and subjecting them to similar analysis.

  9. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated

  10. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Moreno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a~pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples (ICP-AES and ICP-MS and hourly Streaker (PIXE samples of particulate matter collected continuously for six weeks reveal the chemistry of successive waves of natural mineral desert dust ("Kosa" and metalliferous sulphatic pollutants arriving in Western Japan during spring 2011. The main aerosol sources recognised by PMF analysis of Streaker data are mineral dust and fresh sea salt (both mostly in the coarser fraction PM2.5–10, As-bearing sulphatic aerosol (PM0.1–2.5, metalliferous sodic PM interpreted as aged, industrially contaminated marine aerosol, and ZnCu-bearing aerosols. Whereas mineral dust arrivals are typically highly transient, peaking over a few hours, sulphatic intrusions build up and decline more slowly, and are accompanied by notable rises in ambient concentrations of metallic trace elements such as Pb, As, Zn, Sn and Cd. The magnitude of the loss in regional air quality due to the spread and persistence of pollution from mainland Asia is especially clear when cleansing oceanic air advects westward across Japan, removing the continental influence and reducing concentrations of the more undesirable metalliferous pollutants by over 90%. Our new chemical database, especially the Streaker data, demonstrates the rapidly changing complexity of ambient air inhaled during these transboundary events, and implicates Chinese coal combustion as the main source of the anthropogenic aerosol component.

  11. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Moreno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES and Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS, and hourly Streaker with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE samples collected continuously for six weeks reveal the chemistry of successive waves of natural mineral desert dust ("Kosa" and metalliferous sulphatic pollutants arriving in western Japan during spring 2011. The main aerosol sources recognised by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF analysis of Streaker data are mineral dust and fresh sea salt (both mostly in the coarser fraction PM2.5–10, As-bearing sulphatic aerosol (PM0.1–2.5, metalliferous sodic particulate matter (PM interpreted as aged, industrially contaminated marine aerosol, and ZnCu-bearing aerosols. Whereas mineral dust arrivals are typically highly transient, peaking over a few hours, sulphatic intrusions build up and decline more slowly, and are accompanied by notable rises in ambient concentrations of metallic trace elements such as Pb, As, Zn, Sn and Cd. The magnitude of the loss in regional air quality due to the spread and persistence of pollution from mainland Asia is especially clear when cleansing oceanic air advects westward across Japan, removing the continental influence and reducing concentrations of the undesirable metalliferous pollutants by over 90%. Our new chemical database, especially the Streaker data, demonstrates the rapidly changing complexity of ambient air inhaled during these transboundary events, and implicates Chinese coal combustion as the main source of the anthropogenic aerosol component.

  12. Synthesis, microstructural characterization and optical properties of CuO nanorods and nanowires obtained by aerosol assisted CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo-Ruelas, M. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Circuito No. 1, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Apdo. Postal 1552, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31240 (Mexico); Amézaga-Madrid, P. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Esquivel-Pereyra, O. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Circuito No. 1, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Apdo. Postal 1552, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31240 (Mexico); Antúnez-Flores, W.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nanorods and nanowires of CuO were successfully synthesized by AACVD technique. • The carrier gas velocity was a determinant factor for the growth of nanorods or nanowires. • The increase of deposition time generates the reduction in the evenness and distribution density. • The crystalline phase of nanorods and nanowires was monoclinic tenorite. - Abstract: Copper oxide is a particularly interesting material because it presents photovoltaic, electrochemical and catalytic properties. Its unique properties are very important in the area of nanotechnology and may be an advantage because these nanomaterials can be applied in the design and manufacture of nanosensors, photocatalysis area, nanolasers switches and transistors. Nowadays one-dimensional nanostructures as nanorods, nanowires, etc., have generated a great importance and have received considerable attention and study due to their unique physical and chemical properties. In this work we report the synthesis, microstructural characterization and optical properties of CuO nanorods and nanowires grown by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition onto a CuO, ZnO and TiO{sub 2} thin film covered and bare borosilicate glass substrate. Concentration of the precursor solution and carrier gas flux were previously optimized and fixed at 0.1 mol dm{sup −3} and 5 L min{sup −1}, respectively. Other deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, as well the carrier gas velocity and deposition time were varied from 623 to 973 K, 0.88 to 1.77 m s{sup −1} and 11 to 16 min, respectively. Their influence on the morphology, microstructure and optical properties of the nanorods and nanowires were analyzed. The crystalline structure of the materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction; results indicate the presence of the tenorite phase. Surface morphology and microstructure were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission electron

  13. Aerosol-halogen interaction: Change of physico-chemical properties of SOA by naturally released halogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, J.; Balzer, N.; Buxmann, J.; Grothe, H.; Krüger, H.; Platt, U.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or salt pans and salt lakes. These heterogeneous release mechanisms have been overlooked so far, although their potential of interaction with organic aerosols like Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA), Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) or Atmospheric Humic LIke Substances (HULIS) is completely unknown. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organo-halogen compounds or halogenated organic particles in the atmospheric boundary layer. To study the interaction of organic aerosols with reactive halogen species (RHS), SOA was produced from α-pinene, catechol and guaiacol using an aerosol smog-chamber. The model SOAs were characterized in detail using a variety of physico-chemical methods (Ofner et al., 2011). Those aerosols were exposed to molecular halogens in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to halogens, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans, in order to study the complex aerosol-halogen interaction. The heterogeneous reaction of RHS with those model aerosols leads to different gaseous species like CO2, CO and small reactive/toxic molecules like phosgene (COCl2). Hydrogen containing groups on the aerosol particles are destroyed to form HCl or HBr, and a significant formation of C-Br bonds could be verified in the particle phase. Carbonyl containing functional groups of the aerosol are strongly affected by the halogenation process. While changes of functional groups and gaseous species were visible using FTIR spectroscopy, optical properties were studied using Diffuse Reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. Overall, the optical properties of the processed organic aerosols are significantly changed. While chlorine causes a "bleaching" of the aerosol particles, bromine shifts the maximum of UV/VIS absorption to the red end of the UV/VIS spectrum. Further physico-chemical changes were recognized according to the aerosol size-distributions or the

  14. Chemical Characterization of the Aerosol During the CLAMS Experiment Using Aircraft and Ground Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, A. D.; Martins, J.; Artaxo, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Remer, L.; Yamasoe, M.; Fattori, A.

    2002-05-01

    During the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment Nuclepore filters were collected in two ground stations and aboard the University of Wasghington's Convair 580 Reserarch Aircraft. The two ground stations were chosen in strategic positions to characterize the chemical composition, the mass concentration, black carbon (BC) content, and the absorption properties of the aerosol particles at the surface level. One of the stations was located at the Cheasapeake lighthouse (25 km from the coast) and the other one was located at the Wallops Island. Aerosol particles where collected in two stages, fine (d2.5um) and coarse mode (2.5aerosol in the atmospheric column in the CLAMS Experiment area. Some of the filters were also submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis. The particulate matter mass for all the samples were obtained gravimetrically. The concentration of black carbon in the fine filters was optically determined by a broadband reflectance technique. The spectral (from UV to near IR) reflectance in the fine and coarse mode filter were also obtained with a FieldSpec ASD spectrometer. Aerosol elemental characterization (Na through Pb) was obtained by the PIXE (Particle induced X ray emission) analyses of the nuclepore filters. The sources of the aerosol measured at the ground stations were estimated by principal component analyses mainly in the Wallops Island, where a longer time series was collected. One of the main urban components identified in the aerosol during the experiment was sulfate. Black carbon

  15. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Decesari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction". For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1 on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS, (2 on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS, (3 soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, (4 on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG, (5 off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR spectroscopy, and (6 chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS. The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black

  16. Investigating the Chemical Pathways to PAH- and PANH-Based Aerosols in Titan's Atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella Marion; Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, Claire Louise; Salama, Farid

    2011-01-01

    A complex organic chemistry between Titan's two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. These aerosols are at the origin of the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. In situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard Cassini have revealed the presence of large amounts of neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan. In particular, benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3), which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, have been detected, suggesting that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan s aerosols. Moreover, results from numerical models as well as laboratory simulations of Titan s atmospheric chemistry are also suggesting chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN ...) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols.

  17. Chemical properties and morphology of Marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: a mesocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Sellegri, Karine; Charrière, Bruno; Sempéré, Richard; Mas, Sébastien; Marchand, Nicolas; George, Christian; Même, Aurèlie; R'mili, Badr; Delmont, Anne; Schwier, Allison; Rose, Clémence; Colomb, Aurèlie; Pey, Jorge; Langley Dewitt, Helen

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary Sea Salt Aerosol formed at the sea surface from background level of the aerosol. An alternative tool to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment is provided by the mesocosms, which represent an important link between field studies and laboratory experiments. The sea-air transfer of particles and gases was investigated in relation to water chemical composition and biological activity during a mesocosm experiment within the SAM project (Sources of marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean) at the Oceanographic and Marine Station STARESO in Western Corsica (May 2013). Three 2 m mesocosms were filled with screened (treatments: one was left unchanged as control and two were enriched by addition of nitrates and phosphates respecting Redfield ratio (N:P = 16). The evolution of the three systems was followed for 20 days. The set of sensors in each mesocosm was allowed to monitor, at high frequency (every 10 min), the water temperature, conductivity, pH, incident light, fluorescence of chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen concentration. The mesocosm seawaters were daily sampled for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses. Both dissolved and gaseous VOCs were also analyzed. In addition, few liters of seawater from each mesocosm were daily and immediately collected and transferred to a bubble-bursting apparatus to simulate nascent sea spray aerosol. On-line chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction was performed by a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne). Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for

  18. Long-term Chemical Characterization of Submicron Aerosol Particles in the Amazon Forest - ATTO Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Holanda, B. A.; Cirino, G. G.; Saturno, J.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2015-12-01

    The study of the chemical composition of aerosol particles in the Amazon forest represents a step forward to understand the strong coupling between the atmosphere and the forest. For this reason submicron aerosol particles were investigated in the Amazon forest, where biogenic and anthropogenic aerosol particles coexist at the different seasons (wet/dry). The measurements were performed at the ATTO station, which is located about 150 km northeast of Manaus. At ATTO station the Aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM, Aerodyne) and the Multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP, Thermo 5012) have been operated continuously from March 2014 to July 2015. In this study, long-term measurements (near-real-time, ~30 minutes) of PM1 chemical composition were investigated for the first time in this environment.The wet season presented lower concentrations than the dry season (~5 times). In terms of chemical composition, both seasons were dominated by organics (75 and 63%) followed by sulfate (11 and 13%). Nitrate presented different ratio values between the mass-to-charges 30 to 46 (main nitrate fragments) suggesting the presence of nitrate as inorganic and organic nitrate during both seasons. The results indicated that about 75% of the nitrate signal was from organic nitrate during the dry season. In addition, several episodes with elevated amount of chloride, likely in the form of sea-salt from the Atlantic Ocean, were observed during the wet season. During those episodes, chloride comprised up to 7% of the PM1. During the dry season, chloride was also observed; however, with different volatility, which suggested that Chloride was present in different form and source. Moreover, the constant presence of sulfate and BC during the wet season might be related to biomass burning emissions from Africa. BC concentration was 2.5 times higher during the dry season. Further characterization of the organic fraction was accomplished with the positive matrix factorization (PMF), which

  19. 337 nm matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization of single aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L; Murray, K K

    1999-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra were obtained from single particles injected directly into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Aerosol particles were generated at atmospheric pressure using a piezoelectric single-particle generator or a pneumatic nebulizer and introduced into the mass spectrometer through a series of narrow-bore tubes. Particles were detected by light scattering that was used to trigger a 337 nm pulsed nitrogen laser and the ions produced by laser desorption were mass separated in a two-stage reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. MALDI mass spectra of single particles containing bradykinin, angiotensin II, gramicidin S, vitamin B(12) or gramicidin D were obtained at mass resolutions greater than 400 FWHM. For the piezoelectric particle generator, the efficiency of particle delivery was estimated to be approximately 0.02%, and 50 pmol of sample were consumed for each mass spectrum. For the pneumatic nebulizer, mass spectra could be obtained from single particles containing less than 100 amol of analyte, although the sample consumption for a typical mass spectrum was over 400 pmol. PMID:10491586

  20. Waste remediation using in situ magnetically assisted chemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation process (MACS) combines the selective and efficient separation afforded by chemical sorption with the magnetic recovery of ferromagnetic particles. This process is being developed for treating the underground storage tanks at Hanford. These waste streams contain cesium, strontium, and transuranics (TRU) that must be removed before this waste can be disposed of as grout. The separation process uses magnetic particles coated with either (1) a selective ion exchange material or an organic extractant containing solvent (for cesium and strontium removal) or (2) solvents for selective separation of TRU elements (e.g., TRUEX process). These coatings, by their chemical nature, selectively separate the contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the tank using a magnet. Once the particles are removed, the contaminants can either be left on the loaded particles and added to the glass feed slurry or stripped into a small volume of solution so that the extracting particles can be reused. The status of chemistry and separation process is discussed in this paper

  1. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1 in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July–7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1 measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m−3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m−3, with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA emission sources (traffic and food cooking and two secondary OA (SOA types – a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA. Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00–11:00 (BJT: UTC +8 corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00–15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00–13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity

  2. Chemical speciation of chlorine in atmospheric aerosol samples by high-resolution proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is a main elemental component of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). The knowledge of the chemical form of chlorine is of primary importance for source apportionment and for estimation of health effects of APM. In this work the applicability of high-resolution wavelength dispersive proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy for chemical speciation of chlorine in fine fraction atmospheric aerosols is studied. A Johansson-type crystal spectrometer with energy resolution below the natural linewidth of Cl K lines was used to record the high-resolution Kα and Kβ proton induced spectra of several reference Cl compounds and two atmospheric aerosol samples, which were collected for conventional PIXE analysis. The Kα spectra which refers to the oxidation state, showed very minor differences due to the high electronegativity of Cl. However, the Kβ spectra exhibited pronounced chemical effects which were significant enough to perform chemical speciation. The major chlorine component in two fine fraction aerosol samples collected during a 2010 winter campaign in Budapest was clearly identified as NaCl by comparing the high-resolution Cl Kβ spectra from the aerosol samples with the corresponding reference spectra. This work demonstrates the feasibility of high-resolution PIXE method for chemical speciation of Cl in aerosols. - Highlights: ► Chemical specation of Cl in aerosol samples by high resolution PIXE spectroscopy. ► Fine structure of Kα and Kβ lines of reference compounds and APM samples was given. ► Kα spectra were well aligned with each other confirming the same Cl oxidation state. ► Pronounced chemical effects were observed in the Kβ spectra. ► We showed that chemical speciation of Cl was possible on thin aerosol samples

  3. Submicron aerosol source apportionment of wintertime pollution in Paris, France by Double Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2 using Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM and multi-wavelength Aethalometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-E. Petit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Online non-refractory submicron Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS measurements in urban areas have successfully allowed the apportionment of specific sources and/or physical and chemical properties of the organic fraction. However, in order to be fully representative of PM pollution, a comprehensive source apportionment analysis is needed by taking into account all major components of submicron aerosols, creating strengthened bonds between the organic components and pollution sources. We present here a novel two-step methodology to perform such an analysis, by taking advantage of high time resolution of monitoring instruments: the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM and the multi-wavelength absorption measurements (Aethalometer AE31 in Paris, France. As a first step, organic aerosols (OA were deconvoluted to hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, Biomass Burning OA (BBOA and Oxygenated OA (OOA with Positive Matrix Factorization, and black carbon was deconvolved into its wood burning and fossil fuel combustion fractions. A second PMF analysis was then carried out with organic factors, BC fractions and inorganic species (nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, chloride, leading to a~four-factor solution allowing real-time characterization of the major sources of PM1. Outputs of this PMF2 include two dominant combustion sources (wood burning and traffic as well as semi-volatile and low-volatile secondary aerosols. While HOA is found to be emitted by both wood burning and traffic, the latter sources occurred to significantly contribute also to OOA.

  4. Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties Before and After the Manaus Plume in the GoAmazon2014 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Wurm, F.; Holanda, B. A.; Carbone, S.; Arana, A.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for at least one year before and after the Manaus plume. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites called T0 are: ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 ecological research site and a third site called EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated right on the opposite side of the Negro River under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind of Manaus. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analyzed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Aerosol absorption is being studied with several aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several

  5. Summertime aerosol chemical components in the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhouqing; Sun, Liguang; Blum, Joel D.; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei

    2006-05-01

    Samples of aerosols from the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean were collected aboard the R/V Xuelong during summer on the Second Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (July-September 2003). Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) was used to determine chemical compositions of aerosol particles. Multivariate analysis of the SR-XRF data resolved a number of components (factors), which, on the basis of their chemical compositions and from their affiliation with specific meteorological flow patterns, were assigned physical meanings. Five factors explaining 94.7% of the total variance were identified. Ship emissions accounted for 35.3% of the variance (factor 1 (F1)) and are loaded significantly with S, Fe, V, and Ni. The total Fe emitted from ships globally was estimated at 8.60 × 106 kg yr-1. Heavy-metal-rich factors included 34.0% of the variance (F2 and F3) and were interpreted to be pollution carried into the Arctic Ocean by long-range transport. Anthropogenic contributions from industrial regions to the Arctic Ocean during the summer vary and depend on the source locations. Air mass backward trajectories indicate that the metals including Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn come mainly from northern Russia. The third source controlling the chemical compositions of aerosols was sea salt (F4, 12.8%). The role of sea salt decreased from the open sea to areas near pack ice. On the basis of the factor scores of aerosol samples, we infer that chlorine volatilization from sea salt may occur, enhanced by nitrogen and sulfur contamination emitted from ships. Because the global inventories of nitrogen and sulfur for ship exhausts are large, and halogens could have important consequences in possible tropospheric ozone destruction, the role of ships in influencing halogen depression in sea salt should be further investigated. Finally, we also identified a crustal factor (F5, 12.6%) and suggest that crustal elements (e.g., Ca) contaminating sea ice may become reinjected into

  6. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically resolved aerosol fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Farmer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA, production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocities for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon were 2.05 ± 0.04 mm s−1. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm s−1 and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  7. Influences of relative humidity and particle chemical composition on aerosol scattering properties during the 2006 PRD campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Yafang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Jung, Jinsang; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Chang, Shih-Yu; Kim, Young J.; Fan, Shaojia; Zeng, Limin

    In situ measurements of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols were carried out in Guangzhou city, China, from 1 to 31 July 2006 during the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Campaign. The light extinction coefficient of the ambient atmosphere, the aerosol scattering coefficient under dry conditions, the aerosol absorption coefficient under ambient conditions, NO 2 concentration, and relative humidity (RH) were measured by transmissionmeter, an integrating nephelometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), a NO X analyzer, and an automatic meteorological station, respectively. Meanwhile, the molecular scattering coefficient was calculated by the Rayleigh scattering function using the US Standard Atmosphere. A method to calculate the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor f(RH), defined as the ratio of the aerosol scattering coefficient under a wet condition to that under a dry condition (40% RH), is proposed based on these optical parameters. The mean and standard deviation aerosol hygroscopic growth factors at 80% RH ( f(RH)=80%) in Ganzhou were 2.04±0.28, 2.29±0.28, and 2.68±0.59 for urban aerosols, mixed aerosols, and marine aerosols, respectively, with the air mass classification being based on the air mass source region. The relationship between f(RH) and RH is fitted by empirical equations and the fitting parameters are calculated. The relationships between f(RH)=80% and total carbon mass fraction (TCF) in PM 2.5, the water-soluble mass fraction (WSF) in PM 10, and the sea-salt aerosol mass fraction (SSF) in PM 10 reveal that the hygroscopic properties of the observed aerosol have a good positive correlation with the WSF and SSF, but have a negative correlation with the TCF.

  8. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive aerosol–cloud–precipitation interaction (ACI scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6 and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  9. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    OpenAIRE

    K. A. Kamilli; L. Poulain; A. Held; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site Laboratoire d'Hygiène de la Ville de Paris (LHVP) in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and ...

  10. Chemical evolution of organic aerosol in Los Angeles during the CalNex 2010 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holzinger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During the CalNex study (15 May to 16 June 2010 a large suite of instruments was operated at the Los Angeles area ground supersite to characterize the sources and atmospheric processing of atmospheric pollution. The thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS was deployed to an urban area for the first time and detected 691 organic ions in aerosol samples, the mean total concentration of which was estimated as 3.3 μg m−3. Based on comparison to total organic aerosol (OA measurements, we estimate that approximately 50% of the OA mass at this site was directly measured by the TD-PTR-MS. Based on correlations with aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS OA components, the ions were grouped to represent hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, local OA (LOA, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA, and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA. Mass spectra and thermograms of the ion groups are mostly consistent with the assumed sources and/or photochemical origin of the OA components. The mass spectra of ions representing the primary components HOA and LOA included the highest m/z, consistent with their higher resistance to thermal decomposition, and they were volatilized at lower temperatures. Photochemical ageing weakens C-C bond strengths (also resulting in chemical fragmentation, and produces species of lower volatility (through the addition of functional groups. Accordingly the mass spectra of ions representing the oxidized OA components (SV-OOA, and LV-OOA lack the highest masses and they are volatilized at higher temperatures. Chemical parameters like mean carbon number (nC, mean carbon oxidation state (OSC, and the atomic ratios O/C and H/C of the ion groups are consistent with the expected sources and photochemical processing of the aerosol components. Our data suggest that chemical fragmentation gains importance over functionalization as photochemical age of OA increases. Surprisingly, the photochemical age of OA decreases during the

  11. Chemical composition and sources of coastal marine aerosol particles during the 2008 VOCALS-REx campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-N. Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of aerosol particles (Dp ≤ 1.5 μm was measured over the southeast Pacific ocean during the VOCALS-REx experiment between 16~October and 15 November 2008 using the US DOE G-1 aircraft. The objective of these flights was to gain an understanding of the sources and evolution of these aerosols, and how they interacted with the marine stratus cloud layer that prevails in this region of the globe. Our measurements showed that the marine boundary layer (MBL aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO42−, followed by Na+, Cl−, Org, NH4+, and NO3−, in decreasing order of importance; CH3SO3−1 (MSA, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their limits of detection of ~0.05 and ~0.15 μg m−3 for anions and cations, respectively. The aerosols were strongly acidic as the NH4+ to SO42− equivalence ratio was typically − deficits caused by both HNO3 and H2SO4, and were externally mixed with SO42− particles as the AMS detected no NO3− whilst uptake of HNO3 occurred only on SSA particles. The SSA loading as a function of wind speed agreed with that calculated from published relationships, and contributed only a small fraction of the total accumulation mode particle number. Vertical distribution of MBL SSA particles (Dp ≤ ~1.5 μm was uniform, suggesting a very limited dilution from entrainment of free tropospheric (FT air. It was inferred that because all of the aerosol species (except SSA exhibited a strong land-to-sea gradient, they were of continental origin. Comparison of relative changes in median values using LOWESS fits as proxies suggests that (1 an oceanic source of NH3 is present between 72° W and 76° W, and (2 additional organic aerosols from biomass burns or biogenic precursors were emitted from coastal regions south of 31° S, with possible cloud processing, and (3 FT contributions to MBL gas and aerosols were negligible. Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra obtained with

  12. Chemically-resolved aerosol volatility measurements from two megacity field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54–230°C with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS standard aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6%·K−1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA, oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA, and biomass-burning OA (BBOA separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. A new technique using the AMS background signal was demonstrated to quantify the fraction of species up to four orders-of-magnitude less volatile than those detectable in the MS mode, which for OA represent ~5% of the non-refractory (NR OA signal. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered

  13. Aerosol direct radiative effects over the northwest Atlantic, northwest Pacific, and North Indian Oceans: estimates based on in-situ chemical and optical measurements and chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bates

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial era is that due to aerosols, a substantial fraction of which is the uncertainty associated with scattering and absorption of shortwave (solar radiation by anthropogenic aerosols in cloud-free conditions (IPCC, 2001. Quantifying and reducing the uncertainty in aerosol influences on climate is critical to understanding climate change over the industrial period and to improving predictions of future climate change for assumed emission scenarios. Measurements of aerosol properties during major field campaigns in several regions of the globe during the past decade are contributing to an enhanced understanding of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on light scattering and climate. The present study, which focuses on three regions downwind of major urban/population centers (North Indian Ocean (NIO during INDOEX, the Northwest Pacific Ocean (NWP during ACE-Asia, and the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA during ICARTT, incorporates understanding gained from field observations of aerosol distributions and properties into calculations of perturbations in radiative fluxes due to these aerosols. This study evaluates the current state of observations and of two chemical transport models (STEM and MOZART. Measurements of burdens, extinction optical depth (AOD, and direct radiative effect of aerosols (DRE – change in radiative flux due to total aerosols are used as measurement-model check points to assess uncertainties. In-situ measured and remotely sensed aerosol properties for each region (mixing state, mass scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and angular scattering properties and their dependences on relative humidity are used as input parameters to two radiative transfer models (GFDL and University of Michigan to constrain estimates of aerosol radiative effects, with uncertainties in each step propagated through the analysis. Constraining the radiative

  14. Global and Regional Impacts of HONO on the Chemical Composition of Clouds and Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshorbany, Y. F.; Crutzen, P. J.; Steil, B.; Pozzer, A.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, realistic simulation of nitrous acid (HONO) based on the HONO / NOx ratio of 0.02 was found to have a significant impact on the global budgets of HOx (OH + HO2) and gas phase oxidation products in polluted regions, especially in winter when other photolytic sources are of minor importance. It has been reported that chemistry-transport models underestimate sulphate concentrations, mostly during winter. Here we show that simulating realistic HONO levels can significantly enhance aerosol sulphate (S(VI)) due to the increased formation of H2SO4. Even though in-cloud aqueous phase oxidation of dissolved SO2 (S(IV)) is the main source of S(VI), it appears that HONO related enhancement of H2O2 does not significantly affect sulphate because of the predominantly S(IV) limited conditions, except over eastern Asia. Nitrate is also increased via enhanced gaseous HNO3 formation and N2O5 hydrolysis on aerosol particles. Ammonium nitrate is enhanced in ammonia-rich regions but not under ammonia-limited conditions. Furthermore, particle number concentrations are also higher, accompanied by the transfer from hydrophobic to hydrophilic aerosol modes. This implies a significant impact on the particle lifetime and cloud nucleating properties. The HONO induced enhancements of all species studied are relatively strong in winter though negligible in summer. Simulating realistic HONO levels is found to improve the model measurement agreement of sulphate aerosols, most apparent over the US. Our results underscore the importance of HONO for the atmospheric oxidizing capacity and corroborate the central role of cloud chemical processing in S(IV) formation

  15. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. Effects of analyte concentration and matrix-to-analyte ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeson, M.D.; Murray, K.K.; Russell, D.H. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-07-01

    We have recently developed an aerosol-liquid introduction interface for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. In this study, we examine the effect of matrix-to-analyte ratio and analyte concentration on analyte ion yield. These studies were performed using bradykinin, gramicidin S, bovine insulin, and myoglobin as analytes and {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and 4-nitroaniline as matrices. The optimum matrix-to-analyte molar ratio for aerosol MALDI was determined to be 10-100:1, which is lower than that typically used for conventional surface MALDI (100-10 000:1). The ion yield was found to be a nonlinear function of analyte concentration. Possible explanations for these observations are discussed. 43 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Characterization of aerosol optical properties, chemical composition and mixing states in the winter season in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong; Huang, Yuanlong; Li, Ling; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Gao, Song; Gross, Deborah S

    2014-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosols at the single particle level were studied in Shanghai from December 22 to 28, 2009. A Cavity-Ring-Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD-AES) and a nephelometer were deployed to measure aerosol light extinction and scattering properties, respectively. An Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to detect single particle sizes and chemical composition. Seven particle types were detected. Air parcels arrived at the sampling site from the vicinity of Shanghai until mid-day of December 25, when they started to originate from North China. The aerosol extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients all dropped sharply when this cold, clean air arrived. Aerosol particles changed from a highly aged type before this meteorological shift to a relatively fresh type afterwards. The aerosol optical properties were dependent on the wind direction. Aerosols with high extinction coefficient and scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) were observed when the wind blew from the west and northwest, indicating that they were predominantly fine particles. Nitrate and ammonium correlated most strongly with the change in aerosol optical properties. In the elemental carbon/organic carbon (ECOC) particle type, the diurnal trends of single scattering albedo (SSA) and elemental carbon (EC) signal intensity had a negative correlation. We also found a negative correlation (r=-0.87) between high mass-OC particle number fraction and the SSA in a relatively clean period, suggesting that particulate aromatic components might play an important role in light absorption in urban areas. PMID:25499489

  17. Characterization of aerosol optical properties, chemical composition and mixing states in the winter season in Shanghai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Tang; Yuanlong Huang; Ling Li; Hong Chen; Jianmin Chen; Xin Yang; Song Gao

    2014-01-01

    Physical and chemical properdes of ambient aerosols at the single particle level were studied in Shanghai from December 22 to 28,2009.A Cavity-Ring-Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD-AES) and a nephelometer were deployed to measure aerosol light extinction and scattering properties,respectively.An Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS)was used to detect single particle sizes and chemical composition.Seven particle types were detected.Air parcels arrived at the sampling site from the vicinity of Shanghai until mid-day of December 25,when they started to originate from North China.The aerosol extinction,scattering,and absorption coefficients all dropped sharply when this cold,clean air arrived.Aerosol particles changed from a highly aged type before this meteorological shift to a relatively fresh type afterwards.The aerosol optical properties were dependent on the wind direction.Aerosols with high extinction coefficient and scattering Angstr(o)m exponent (SAE) were observed when the wind blew from the west and northwest,indicating that they were predominantly fine particles.Nitrate and ammonium correlated most strongly with the change in aerosol optical properties.In the elemental carbon/organic carbon (ECOC) particle type,the diurnal trends of single scattering albedo (SSA) and elemental carbon (EC) signal intensity had a negative correlation.We also found a negative correlation (r =-0.87) between high mass-OC particle number fraction and the SSA in a relatively clean period,suggesting that particulate aromatic components might play an important role in light absorption in urban areas.

  18. Optical, physical and chemical properties of transported African mineral dust aerosols in the Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Di Biagio, Claudia; Chevaillier, Servanne; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Loisil, Rodrigue; Triquet, Sylvain; Zapf, Pascal; Roberts, Greg; Bourrianne, Thierry; Torres, Benjamin; Blarel, Luc; Sellegri, Karine; Freney, Evelyn; Schwarzenbock, Alfons; Ravetta, François; Laurent, Benoit; Mallet, Marc; Formenti, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The transport of mineral dust aerosols is a global phenomenon with strong climate implications. Depending on the travel distance over source regions, the atmospheric conditions and the residence time in the atmosphere, various transformation processes (size-selective sedimentation, mixing, condensation of gaseous species, and weathering) can modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust, which, in turn, can change the dust's optical properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of these properties, and their temporal evolution with transport time. Within the frame of the ChArMex project (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), two intensive airborne campaigns (TRAQA, TRansport and Air QuAlity, 18 June - 11 July 2012, and ADRIMED, Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, 06 June - 08 July 2013) have been performed over the Central and Western Mediterranean, one of the two major transport pathways of African mineral dust. In this study we have set up a systematic strategy to determine the optical, physical and optical properties of mineral dust to be compared to an equivalent dataset for dust close to source regions in Africa. This study is based on airborne observations onboard the SAFIRE ATR-42 aircraft, equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the particle scattering and backscattering coefficients (nephelometer at 450, 550, and 700 nm), the absorption coefficient (PSAP at 467, 530, and 660 nm), the extinction coefficient (CAPS at 530 nm), the aerosol optical depth (PLASMA at 340 to 1640 nm), the size distribution in the extended range 40 nm - 30 µm by the combination of different particle counters (SMPS, USHAS, FSSP, GRIMM) and the chemical composition obtained by filter sampling. The chemistry and transport model CHIMERE-Dust have been used to classify the air masses according to

  19. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  20. Aerosol-Assisted Solid Debris Collection for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and has made its first shots on-target. While upcoming experiments will be focused on achieving ignition, a variety of subsequent experiments are planned for the facility, including measurement of cross sections, astrophysical measurements, and investigation of hydrodynamic instability in the target capsule. In order to successfully execute several of these planned experiments, the ability to collect solid debris following a NIF capsule shot will be required. The ability to collect and analyze solid debris generated in a shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will greatly expand the number of nuclear reactions studied for diagnostic purposes. Currently, reactions are limited to only those producing noble gases for cryogenic collection and counting with the Radchem Apparatus for Gas Sampling (RAGS). The radchem solid collection diagnostic has already been identified by NIF to be valuable for the determination and understanding of mix generated in the target capsule's ablation. LLNL is currently developing this solid debris collection capability at NIF, and is in the stage of testing credible designs. Some of these designs explore the use of x-ray generated aerosols to assist in collection of solid debris. However, the variety of harsh experimental conditions this solid collection device will encounter in NIF are challenging to replicate. Experiments performed by Gary Grim et al. at Sandia National Laboratory's RHEPP1 facility have shown that ablation causes a cloud of material removed from an exposed surface to move normal to and away from the surface. This ablation is certain to be a concern in the NIF target chamber from the prompt x-rays, gamma rays, etc. generated in the shot. The cloud of ablated material could interfere with the collection of the desired reaction debris by slowing down the debris so that the kinetic energy is too low to allow implantation, or by stopping the debris from reaching the

  1. Flight-based chemical characterization of biomass burning aerosols within two prescribed burn smoke plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Pratt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning represents a major global source of aerosols impacting direct radiative forcing and cloud properties. Thus, the goal of a number of current studies involves developing a better understanding of how the chemical composition and mixing state of biomass burning aerosols evolve during atmospheric aging processes. During the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Layer Clouds (ICE-L in the fall of 2007, smoke plumes from two small Wyoming Bureau of Land Management prescribed burns were measured by on-line aerosol instrumentation aboard a C-130 aircraft, providing a detailed chemical characterization of the particles. After ~2–4 min of aging, submicron smoke particles, produced primarily from sagebrush combustion, consisted predominantly of organics by mass, but were comprised primarily of internal mixtures of organic carbon, elemental carbon, potassium chloride, and potassium sulfate. Significantly, the fresh biomass burning particles contained minor mass fractions of nitrate and sulfate, suggesting that hygroscopic material is incorporated very near or at the point of emission. The mass fractions of ammonium, sulfate, and nitrate increased with aging up to ~81–88 min and resulted in acidic particles. Decreasing black carbon mass concentrations occurred due to dilution of the plume. Increases in the fraction of oxygenated organic carbon and the presence of dicarboxylic acids, in particular, were observed with aging. Cloud condensation nuclei measurements suggested all particles >100 nm were active at 0.5% water supersaturation in the smoke plumes, confirming the relatively high hygroscopicity of the freshly emitted particles. For immersion/condensation freezing, ice nuclei measurements at −32 °C suggested activation of ~0.03–0.07% of the particles with diameters greater than 500 nm.

  2. Chemical insights, explicit chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol from methylglyoxal and glyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Lim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospherically abundant, volatile water soluble organic compounds formed through gas phase chemistry (e.g., glyoxal (C2, methylglyoxal (C3 and acetic acid have great potential to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA via aqueous chemistry in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols. This paper (1 provides chemical insights into aqueous-phase OH radical-initiated reactions leading to SOA formation from methylglyoxal and (2 uses this and a previously published glyoxal mechanism (Lim et al., 2010 to provide SOA yields for use in chemical transport models. Detailed reaction mechanisms including peroxy radical chemistry and a full kinetic model for aqueous photochemistry of acetic acid and methylglyoxal are developed and validated by comparing simulations with the experimental results from previous studies (Tan et al., 2010, 2012. This new methylglyoxal model is then combined with the previous glyoxal model (Lim et al., 2010, and is used to simulate the profiles of products and to estimate SOA yields.

    At cloud relevant concentrations (∼ 10−6–∼ 10−3 M; Munger et al., 1995 of glyoxal and methylglyoxal, the major photooxidation products are oxalic acid and pyruvic acid, and simulated SOA yields (by mass are ∼ 120% for glyoxal and ∼ 80% for methylglyoxal. Oligomerization of unreacted aldehydes during droplet evaporation could enhance yields. In wet aerosols, where total dissolved organics are present at much higher concentrations (∼ 10 M, the major products are oligomers formed via organic radical-radical reactions, and simulated SOA yields (by mass are ∼ 90% for both glyoxal and methylglyoxal.

  3. Sources and chemical characterization of organic aerosol during the summer in the eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostenidou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The concentration and chemical composition of the non-refractory fine particulate matter (NR-PM1 and black carbon (BC levels were measured during the summer of 2012 in the suburbs of two Greek cities, Patras and Athens, in an effort to better understand the chemical processing of particles in the high photochemical activity environment of the Eastern Mediterranean. The composition of PM1 was surprisingly similar in both areas demonstrating the importance of regional sources for the corresponding pollution levels. The PM1 average mass concentration was 9–14 μg m−3. The contribution of sulphate was around 38%, while organic aerosol (OA contributed approximately 45% in both cases. PM1 nitrate levels were low (2%. The oxygen to carbon (O : C atomic ratio was 0.50 ± 0.08 in Patras and 0.47 ± 0.11 in Athens. In both cases the PM1 was acidic. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the high resolution organic aerosol mass spectra obtained by an Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS. For Patras five OA sources could be identified: 19% very oxygenated OA (V-OOA, 38% moderately oxygenated OA (M-OOA, 21% biogenic oxygenated OA (b-OOA, 7% hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA-1 associated with traffic sources and 15% hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA-2 related to other primary emissions (including cooking OA. For Athens the corresponding source contributions were: V-OOA (35%, M-OOA (30%, HOA-1 (18% and HOA-2 (17%. In both cities the major component was OOA, suggesting that under high photochemical conditions most of the OA in the Eastern Mediterranean is quite aged. The contribution of the primary sources (HOA-1 and HOA-2 was important (22% in Patras and 33% in Athens but not dominant.

  4. Flight-based chemical characterization of biomass burning aerosols within two prescribed burn smoke plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Pratt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning represents a major global source of aerosols impacting direct radiative forcing and cloud properties. Thus, the goal of a number of current studies involves developing a better understanding of how the chemical composition and mixing state of biomass burning aerosols evolve during atmospheric aging processes. During the Ice in Cloud Experiment – Layer Clouds (ICE-L in fall of 2007, smoke plumes from two small Wyoming Bureau of Land Management prescribed burns were measured by on-line aerosol instrumentation aboard a C-130 aircraft, providing a detailed chemical characterization of the particles. After ~2–4 min of aging, submicron smoke particles, produced primarily from sagebrush combustion, consisted predominantly of organics by mass, but were comprised primarily of internal mixtures of organic carbon, elemental carbon, potassium chloride, and potassium sulfate. Significantly, 100 % of the fresh biomass burning particles contained minor mass fractions of nitrate and sulfate, suggesting that hygroscopic material is incorporated very near or at the point of emission. The mass fractions of ammonium, sulfate, and nitrate increased with aging up to ~81–88 min and resulted in acidic particles, with both nitric acid and sulfuric acid present. Decreasing black carbon mass concentrations occurred due to dilution of the plume. Increases in the fraction of oxygenated organic carbon and the presence of dicarboxylic acids, in particular, were observed with aging. Cloud condensation nuclei measurements suggested all particles >100 nm were active at 0.5 % water supersaturation in the smoke plumes, confirming the relatively high hygroscopicity of the freshly emitted particles. For immersion/condensation freezing, ice nuclei measurements at −32 °C suggested activation of ~0.03–0.07 % of the particles with diameters greater than 500 nm.

  5. Chemical Characterization of Submicron Aerosol Particles in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira De Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Godoy, J.; Godoy, M. L.; de Assunção, J. V.; Alves, N. D.; Artaxo, P.

    2013-12-01

    Megacities, large urban conglomerates with a population of 10 million or more inhabitants, are increasingly receiving attention as strong pollution hotspots with significant global impact. The emissions from such large centers in both the developed and developing parts of the world are strongly impacted by the transportation sector. The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), located in the Southeast of Brazil, is a megacity with a population of 18 million people and 7 million vehicles, many of which fuelled by a considerably amount of anhydrous ethanol. Such fleet is considered a unique case of large scale biofuel usage worldwide. Despite the large impact on human health and atmospheric chemistry/dynamics, many uncertainties are found in terms of gas and particulate matter emissions from vehicles and their atmospheric reactivity, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. In order to better understand aerosol life cycle on such environment, a suite of instruments for gas and particulate matter characterization has been deployed in two sampling sites within the SPMA, including an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The instrumentation was deployed at the rooftop of a 45m high building in the University of São Paulo during winter/spring 2012. The site is located roughly 6km downwind of the city center with little influence from local sources. The second site is located in a downtown area, sampling at the top floor of the Public Health Faculty, approximately 10m above ground. The instrumentation was deployed at the Downtown site during summer/fall 2013. The average non-refractory submicron aerosol concentration at the University site was 6.7 μg m-3, being organics the most abundant specie (70%), followed by NO3 (12%), NH4 (8%), SO4 (8%) and Chl (2%). At the Downtown site, average aerosol concentration was 15.1 μg m-3, with Organics composing 65% of the mass, followed by NH4 (12%), NO3 (11%), SO4 (11%) and Chl (1%). The analysis of specific fragmentation

  6. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  7. Radiolysis and hydrolysis of magnetically assisted chemical separation particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process is designed to separate transuranic (TRU) elements out of high-level waste (HLW) or TRU waste. Magnetic microparticles (1--25 μm) were coated with octyl (phenyl)N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP) and tested for removing TRU elements from acidic nitrate solutions. The particles were contacted with nitric acid solutions and Hanford plutonium finishing plant (PFP) simulant, irradiated with a high intensity 60Co γ-ray source, and evaluated for effectiveness in removing TRU elements from 2m HNO3 solutions. The resistance of the coatings and magnetic cores to radiolytic damage and hydrolytic degradation was investigated by irradiating samples of particles suspended in a variety of solutions with doses of up to 5 Mrad. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetic susceptibility measurements, and physical observations of the particles and suspension solutions were used to assess physical changes to the particles. Processes that affect the surface of the particles dramatically alter the binding sites for TRU in solution. Hydrolysis played a larger role than radiolysis in the degradation of the extraction capacity of the particles

  8. Development of an aerosol chemical transport model RAQM2 and predictions of Northeast Asian aerosol mass, size, chemistry, and mixing type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kajino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol chemical transport model, Regional Air Quality Model 2 (RAQM2, was developed to simulate Asian air quality. We implemented a simple version of a modal-moment aerosol dynamics model (MADMS and achieved a completely dynamic (non-equilibrium solution of a gas-to-particle mass transfer over a wide range of aerosol diameters from 1 nm to super μm. To consider a variety of atmospheric aerosol properties, a category approach was utilized, in which the aerosols were distributed into 4 categories: Aitken mode (ATK, soot-free accumulation mode (ACM, soot aggregates (AGR, and coarse mode (COR. Condensation, evaporation, and Brownian coagulations for each category were solved dynamically. A regional-scale simulation (Δ x = 60 km was performed for the entire year of 2006 covering the Northeast Asian region. Statistical analyses showed that the model reproduced the regional-scale transport and transformation of the major inorganic anthropogenic and natural air constituents within factors of 2 to 5. The modeled PM1/bulk ratios of the chemical components were consistent with the observations, indicating that the simulations of aerosol mixing types were successful. Non-sea salt SO42- mixed with ATK + ACM was the largest at Hedo in summer, whereas it mixed with AGR was substantial in cold seasons. Ninety-eight percent of the modeled NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Hedo, whereas 53.7% of the NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Gosan, located upwind toward the Asian continent. The condensation of HNO3 onto sea salt particles during transport over the ocean makes the difference in the NO3- mixing type at the two sites. Because the aerosol mixing type alters optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity, its accurate prediction and evaluation are indispensable for aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction studies.

  9. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  10. [Chemical Composition of the Single Particle Aerosol in Winter in Nanning Using SPAMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-lin; Song, Hong-jun; Chen, Zhi-ming; Huang, Jiong-li; Yang, Jun-chao; Mao, Jing-ying; Li, Hong; Liang, Gui-yun; Mo, Zhao-yu

    2016-02-15

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was performed to characterize the PM2.5 in Nanning from 15 to 24 February 2015. The correlation (R2) between the PM2.5 number concentration and the mass concentration of PM2.5 obtained using SPAMS was 0.76. The particle number concentration could reflect the atmospheric pollution situation to some degree. The Art-2a classification method was used to classify the chemical composition of PM2.5. The results showed that the principal chemical constituents were elemental carbon, organic elements carbon hybrid particles, organic carbon, rich potassium particles, mineral substance, rich sodium particles, second inorganic particles, levoglucosan and other heavy metals. Among them, the composition of elemental carbon was the highest, followed by organic carbon and rich potassium particles. The particle size of 80% of PM2.5 was mainly concentrated in the range of 0.2 microm to 1.0 microm with a peak value occurring at 0. 62 microm. The particle size distribution characteristics of different chemical components were similar. The number concentration of the chemical components in PM2.5 had the same variation tread with the mass concentration of PM2.5 over time. To a certain extent, the change in chemical composition could reflect the instantaneous pollution source. PMID:27363128

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATION WITH A COMPREHENSIVE CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODEL OF NITRATE, SULFATE, AND AMMONIUM AEROSOL DISTRIBUTIONS OVER EAST ASIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meigen Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The transport and chemical production processes of nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols over East Asia were investigated by use of the Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system coupled with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). For the evaluation of the model's ability in depicting their3-dimensional concentration distributions and temporal variations, modeled concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols are compared with the observations obtained at a ground station in Japan in March 2001 and onboard of an aircraft DC-8 on 18 and 21 March 2001 during the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P)field campaign. Comparison shows that simulated values of nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols are generally in good agreement with their observed data, and the model captures most important observed features, and reproduces temporal and spatial variations of nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium aerosol concentrations reasonably well, e.g., the timing and locations of the concentration spikes of nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols are well reproduced, but large discrepancies between observed and simulated values are also clearly seen at some points and some times due to the coarse grid resolution and uncertainties of the emissions used in this study. This comparison results indicate that CMAQ is able to simulate the distributions of nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols and their related species in the troposphere over East Asia reasonably well.

  12. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  13. The ToF-ACSM: a portable aerosol chemical speciation monitor with TOFMS detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fröhlich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new instrument for monitoring aerosol composition, the time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM, combining precision state-of-the-art time-of-flight mass spectrometry with stability, reliability, and easy handling, which are necessities for long-term monitoring operations on the scale of months to years. Based on Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS technology, the ToF-ACSM provides continuous online measurements of chemical composition and mass of non-refractory submicron aerosol particles. In contrast to the larger AMS, the compact-sized and lower-priced ToF-ACSM does not feature particle sizing, similar to the widely-used quadrupole-ACSM (Q-ACSM. Compared to the Q-ACSM, the ToF-ACSM features a better mass resolution of M/ΔM = 600 and better detection limits on the order of −3 for a time resolution of 30 min. With simple upgrades these limits can be brought down by another factor of ~ 8. This allows for operation at higher time resolutions and in low concentration environments. The associated software packages (single packages for integrated operation and calibration and analysis provide a high degree of automation and remote access, minimising the need for trained personnel on site. Intercomparisons with Q-ACSM, C-ToF-AMS, nephelometer and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS measurements, performed during a first long-term deployment (> 10 months on the Jungfraujoch mountain ridge (3580 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps, agree quantitatively. Additionally, the mass resolution of the ToF-ACSM is sufficient for basic mass defect resolved peak fitting of the recorded spectra, providing a data stream not accessible to the Q-ACSM. This allows for quantification of certain hydrocarbon and oxygenated fragments (e.g. C3H7+ and C2H3O+, both occurring at m/Q = 43 Th, as well as improving inorganic/organic separation.

  14. The ToF-ACSM: a portable aerosol chemical speciation monitor with TOFMS detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fröhlich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a new instrument for monitoring aerosol composition, the economy time-of-flight-aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM, combining precision of state-of-the-art time-of-flight mass spectrometry with stability, reliability, and easy handling, which are necessities for long-term monitoring operations on the scale of months to years. Based on Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS technology, the ToF-ACSM provides continuous online measurements of chemical composition and mass of non-refractory submicron aerosol particles. In contrast to the larger AMS, the compact-sized and lower-priced ToF-ACSM does not feature particle sizing, similar to the widely-used quadrupole-ACSM (Q-ACSM. Compared to the Q-ACSM, the ToF-ACSM features a better mass resolution of M/ΔM = 600 and better detection limits on the order of −3 for a time resolution of 30 min. With simple upgrades these limits can be brought down by another factor of ~8. This allows for operation at higher time resolutions and in low concentration environments. The associated software packages (single packages for integrated operation & calibration and analysis provide a high degree of automation and remote access, minimising the need for trained personnel on site. Intercomparisons with Q-ACSM, C-ToF-AMS, nephelometer and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS measurements, performed during a first long-term deployment (>6 months on the Jungfraujoch mountain ridge (3580 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps agree quantitatively. Additionally, the mass resolution of the ToF-ACSM is sufficient for basic mass defect resolved peak fitting of the recorded spectra, providing a data stream not accessible to the Q-ACSM. This allows for quantification of certain hydrocarbon and oxygenated fragments (e.g. C3H7+ and C2H3O+, both occurring at m/Q = 43 Th, as well as improving inorganic/organic separation.

  15. Marine Primary Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: physical and chemical properties from a mesocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'anna, B.; Sellegri, K.; Charriere, B.; Sempere, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; R'Mili, B.; Schwier, A. N.; Rose, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminated the contribution of Primary Sea Salt Aerosol (SSA) formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. An alternative tool to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment is provided by the mesocosms, which represent an important link between field studies and laboratory experiments. A mesocosms experiment was performed in May 2013 at the Oceanographic and Marine Station STARESO in Western Corsica. Three mesocosms were simultaneously filled with pooled and screened (water column depth of 2 m and contained 2260 L of Bay water and covered with transparent (teflon film) dome to prevent atmospheric contamination. The three mesocosms were equipped with a pack of optical and physicochemical sensors and received different treatements: one was left unchanged as control and two were enriched by addition of nitrates and phosphates respecting Redfield ration (N:P = 16). The evolution of the three systems was followed for 20 days. A set of sensors in each mesocosm were established at 0.5 m and allowed to monitor at high frequency (every 2 min): water temperature, conductivity, pH, incident light, fluorescence of chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen concentration. The mesocosms waters were daily sampled for chemical (dissolved oxygen, colored dissolved organic matter, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, transparent polyssacharides, dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentration) analyses. Finally, few liters of sea-water from each mesocosms were sampled daily and immediately transferred to a bubble-bursting apparatus to simulate SSA. Size distribution and particle number were followed by SMPS and APS in the range of 10nm to 10μm. The hygroscopic properties were investigated by a CCN device. On-line chemical

  16. Chemical aging of m-xylene secondary organic aerosol: laboratory chamber study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Seinfeld

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA can reside in the atmosphere for a week or more. While its initial formation from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds tends to take place in the first few hours after emission, SOA can continue to evolve chemically over its atmospheric lifetime. Simulating this chemical aging over an extended time in the laboratory has proven to be challenging. We present here a procedure for studying SOA aging in laboratory chambers that is applied to achieve 36 h of oxidation. The formation and evolution of SOA from the photooxidation of m-xylene under low-NOx conditions and in the presence of either neutral or acidic seed particles is studied. In SOA aging, increasing molecular functionalization leads to less volatile products and an increase in SOA mass, whereas gas-phase or particle-phase fragmentation chemistry results in more volatile products and a loss of SOA. The challenge is to discern from measured chamber variables the extent to which these processes are important for a given SOA system. In the experiments conducted, m-xylene SOA mass increased over the initial 12-h of photooxidation and decreased beyond that time. The oxidation of the SOA, as manifested in the O:C elemental ratio and fraction of organic ion detected at m/z 44 measured by the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, decreased during the first 5 h of reaction, reached a minimum, and then increased continuously until the 36 h termination. This behavior is consistent with an initial period in which, as the mass of SOA increases, products of higher volatility partition to the aerosol phase, followed by an aging period in which gas- and particle-phase reaction products become increasingly more oxidized. After about 12–13 h, the SOA mass reaches a maximum and decreases, suggesting the existence of fragmentation chemistry. When irradiation is stopped 12.4 h into one experiment, and OH generation ceases, no loss of SOA is observed, indicating

  17. Chemical composition of free tropospheric aerosol for PM1 and coarse mode at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cozic

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of submicron (fine mode and supermicron (coarse mode aerosol particles has been investigated at the Jungfraujoch high alpine research station (3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland as part of the GAW aerosol monitoring program since 1999. A clear seasonality was observed for all major components throughout the period with low concentrations in winter (predominantly free tropospheric aerosol and higher concentrations in summer (enhanced vertical transport of boundary layer pollutants. In addition, mass closure was attempted during intensive campaigns in March 2004, February–March 2005 and August 2005. Ionic, carbonaceous and non-refractory components of the aerosol were quantified as well as the PM1 and coarse mode total aerosol mass concentrations. A relatively low conversion factor of 1.8 for organic carbon (OC to particulate organic matter (OM was found in winter (February–March 2005. Organics, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate were the major components of the fine aerosol fraction that were identified, while calcium and nitrate were the only two measured components contributing to the coarse mode. The aerosol mass concentrations for fine and coarse mode aerosol measured during the intensive campaigns were not typical of the long-term seasonality due largely to dynamical differences. Average fine and coarse mode concentrations during the intensive field campaigns were 1.7 μg m−3 and 2.4 μg m−3 in winter and 2.5 μg m−3 and 2.0 μg m−3 in summer, respectively. The mass balance of aerosols showed higher contributions of calcium and nitrate in the coarse mode during Saharan dust events (SDE than without SDE.

  18. Chemical composition of free tropospheric aerosol for PM1 and coarse mode at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cozic

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of submicron (fine mode and supermicron (coarse mode aerosol particles has been investigated since 1999 within the GAW aerosol monitoring program at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland. Clear seasonality was observed for all major components in the last 9 years with low concentrations in winter (predominantly free tropospheric aerosol and higher concentrations in summer (enhanced vertical transport of boundary layer pollutants. In addition, mass closure was attempted during intensive experiments in March 2004, February–March 2005 and August 2005. Ionic, carbonaceous and refractory components of the aerosol were quantified as well as the PM1 and coarse mode total aerosol mass concentrations. A relatively low conversion factor of 1.8 for organic carbon (OC to particulate organic matter (OM in winter (February–March 2005 was found. Organics, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate were the major identified components of the fine aerosol fraction, while calcium and nitrate were the two major measured components in the coarse mode. The aerosol mass concentrations for fine and coarse mode aerosol during the intensive campaigns were not typical of the long term seasonality due largely to dynamical differences. Average fine and coarse mode concentrations during the intensive field campaigns were 1.7 μg m−3 and 2.4 μg m−3 in winter and 2.5 μg m−3 and 2.0 μg m−3 in summer, respectively. The mass balance of aerosols showed higher contributions of calcium and nitrate in the coarse mode during Saharan dust events (SDE than without SDE.

  19. Particle morphology of various SiC-based nanocomposite powders made by the aerosol-assisted synthesis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czosnek, Cezary; Janik, Jerzy F

    2008-02-01

    Herein, we present a part of a study on the preparation of SiC-based composite nanopowders by the two-stage Aerosol-Assisted Vapor Phase Synthesis (AAVS) method from organosilicon precursors (neat hexamethyldisiloxane, neat tetramethoxysilane, ethanol solutions of polydimethylsiloxane). Upon generation, liquid aerosol droplets were transported in a stream of argon through a ceramic reactor tube maintained at 1200 degrees C. The resulting solid by-products were collected on a nylon filter as bulk powders. Each raw powder was, subsequently, pyrolyzed in a furnace reactor heated to 1650 degrees C under a flow of argon. After the final pyrolysis at 1650 degrees C, mostly nanocrystalline silicon carbide powder with small quantities of free excess carbon was obtained from the neat hexamethyldisiloxane system, composite powder of not fully converted silica and SiC was prepared from the neat tetramethoxysilane system, and C-rich/SiC composite was made from the ethanol/polydimethylsiloxane solution system. The prevailing phase of the SiC component was the regular beta-SiC polytype. Most of the powders were composed of spheroidal particles--morphology imprinted during aerosol generation at 1200 degrees C and not much affected by the second-stage bulk pyrolysis at 1650 degrees C. The specifics of spheroidal morphology were characteristic of the applied precursor system. PMID:18464426

  20. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Reticulated N-Doped Carbonaceous Submicron Spheres for Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiawei; Long, Yuan; Wang, Yiyan; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhan, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article described a facile one-step method to prepare reticulated N-doped carbonaceous submicron spheres. Through a simple aerosol-assisted technology, glucosamine sulfate used as a carbon source was aerosolized and carbonized to functionalized carbonaceous submicron spheres. The electrostatic attraction between protonated amino groups and sulfate in the aerosol droplets induced a self-assembly and led to the formation of reticular structure, avoiding the use of templates. Compared to bare carbonaceous materials produced from glucose, reticulated N-doped carbonaceous spheres exhibit higher efficiency in the removal of Cr(VI), where the doping of element nitrogen led to electrostatic attraction between protonated nitrogen and chromium ions, and reticulated structure created relatively higher surface area and pore volume, facilitating materials to contact with Cr(VI) ions. XPS characterization proved these novel N-doped carbonaceous materials could effectively transform Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) because of the surface reducing groups. For the practical application, several factors including the initial pH, materials dosage and recycle numbers on the removal performance were studied.

  1. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Reticulated N-Doped Carbonaceous Submicron Spheres for Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiawei; Long, Yuan; Wang, Yiyan; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhan, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article described a facile one-step method to prepare reticulated N-doped carbonaceous submicron spheres. Through a simple aerosol-assisted technology, glucosamine sulfate used as a carbon source was aerosolized and carbonized to functionalized carbonaceous submicron spheres. The electrostatic attraction between protonated amino groups and sulfate in the aerosol droplets induced a self-assembly and led to the formation of reticular structure, avoiding the use of templates. Compared to bare carbonaceous materials produced from glucose, reticulated N-doped carbonaceous spheres exhibit higher efficiency in the removal of Cr(VI), where the doping of element nitrogen led to electrostatic attraction between protonated nitrogen and chromium ions, and reticulated structure created relatively higher surface area and pore volume, facilitating materials to contact with Cr(VI) ions. XPS characterization proved these novel N-doped carbonaceous materials could effectively transform Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) because of the surface reducing groups. For the practical application, several factors including the initial pH, materials dosage and recycle numbers on the removal performance were studied. PMID:27299376

  2. Chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles over the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bezantakos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and water uptake characteristics of sub-micrometer atmospheric particles in the region of the Aegean Sea were measured between 25 August and 11 September 2011 in the framework of the Aegean-Game campaign. High time-resolution measurements of the chemical composition of the particles were conducted using an airborne compact Time-Of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cTOF-AMS. These measurements involved two flights from the island of Crete to the island of Lemnos and back. A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA located on the island of Lemnos was used to measure the ability of the particles to take up water. The HTDMA measurements showed that the particles were internally mixed, having hygroscopic growth factors that ranged from 1.00 to 1.59 when exposed to 85% relative humidity. When the aircraft flew near the ground station on Lemnos, the cTOF-AMS measurements showed that the organic volume fraction of the particles ranged from 43 to 56%. These measurements corroborate the range of hygroscopic growth factors measured by the HTDMA during that time. Good closure between HTDMA and cTOF-AMS measurements was achieved when assuming that the organic species were hydrophobic and had an average density that corresponds to aged organic species. Using the results from the closure study, the cTOF-AMS measurements were employed to determine a representative aerosol hygroscopic parameter κmix for the whole path of the two flights. Calculated κmix values ranged from 0.17 to 1.03 during the first flight and from 0.15 to 0.93 during the second flight. Air masses of different origin as determined by back trajectory calculations can explain the spatial variation in the chemical composition and κmix values of the particles observed in the region.

  3. Cloud Formation Potential of Biomass Burning Aerosol Surrogate-Particles Chemically Aged by OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R. M.; Wang, J.; Li, Z. Q.; Knopf, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous or multiphase reactions between trace gases such as OH and atmospheric aerosol can influence physicochemical properties of the particles including composition, morphology and lifetime. In this work, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) exposed to OH radicals is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type and OH exposure ([OH]×time) using a CCN counter coupled to a custom-built aerosol flow reactor (AFR). The composition of particles collected by a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) first subjected to different OH exposures is analyzed by Raman and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative compounds found in BBA that have different hygroscopicity, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals. BBA surrogate-particles are generated following atomization of aqueous solutions with mass ratios LEV:MNC:KS of 1:0:0, 0:1:0, 0:0:1, 1:1:0, 0:1:1, 1:0:1, 1:1:1, and 1:0.03:0.3. OH radicals are generated in the AFR following photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O using a variable intensity ultra-violet (UV) lamp, which allows equivalent atmospheric OH exposures from days to weeks. In addition, we investigate how κ changes i) in response to varying [O3] with and without OH, and ii) at a fixed OH exposure while varying RH. The impact of OH exposure on the CCN activity of BBA will be presented and its atmospheric implications will be discussed.

  4. Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "aerosol chemical to aerosol optical properties" module using data from the MILAGRO campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Barnard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparison between observed aerosol optical properties from the MILAGRO field campaign, which took place in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA during March 2006, and values simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem model, reveals large differences. To help identify the source of the discrepancies, data from the MILAGRO campaign are used to evaluate the "aerosol chemical to aerosol optical properties" module implemented in the full chemistry version of the WRF-Chem model. The evaluation uses measurements of aerosol size distributions and chemical properties obtained at the MILAGRO T1 site. These observations are fed to the module, which makes predictions of various aerosol optical properties, including the scattering coefficient, Bscat; the absorption coefficient, Babs; and the single-scattering albedo, ϖ0; all as a function of time. Values simulated by the module are compared with independent measurements obtained from a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS at a wavelength of 870 nm. Because of line losses and other factors, only "fine mode" aerosols with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm are considered here. Over a 10-day period, the simulations of hour-by-hour variations of Bscat are not satisfactory, but simulations of Babs and ϖ0 are considerably better. When averaged over the 10-day period, the computed and observed optical properties agree within the uncertainty limits of the measurements and simulations. Specifically, the observed and calculated values are, respectively: (1 Bscat, 34.1±5.1 Mm−1 versus 30.4±3.4 Mm−1; (2 Babs, 9.7±1.0 Mm−1 versus 11.7±1.2 Mm−1; and (3 ϖ0, 0.78±0.05 and 0.74±0.03. The discrepancies in values of ϖ0 simulated by the full WRF-Chem model thus cannot be attributed to the

  5. Laboratory analogues simulating Titan's atmospheric aerosols: Compared chemical compositions of grains and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Jomard, François; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere. The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The main parameter probed is the CH4/N2 ratio to explore various possible chemical regimes. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions could be explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes. The higher nitrogen content in the grains possibly involves a higher optical absorption than the one measured on the films, with a possible impact on Titan's radiative models.

  6. Chemical, aerosol and optical measurements in the plumes of three midwestern coal-fired power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, L. W.; Anderson, J. A.; Blumenthal, D. L.; Mcdonald, J. A.; Macias, E. S.; Hering, S. V.; Wilson, W. E.

    Airborne measurements were made in and near the plumes of the following mid western coal-fired power plants in 1981: Kincaid in central Illinois in February, La Cygne near Kansas City in March and Labadie near St. Louis in August and September. One objective of these measurements was to obtain data (reported elsewhere) to be used for the evaluation of plume visibility models. The results of the chemical and aerosol measurements are reported here. Good agreement was obtained from different measurement methods for SO 2 and sulfate, but not for two different nitrate measurement methods. No more than a few per cent of the NO x emitted by these plants was NO 2, and NO 2 formation in the plumes could be accounted for by the ozone loss at the observed distances (up to 100 km in winter and 40 km in summer). Sulfate formation rates were in agreement with prior data, and there was no evidence of increased sulfate formation rates in a scrubbed plume (La Cygne). Both aerosol size distributions and sulfur particle size distributions were measured and showed reasonable agreement. The amount of light scattering by particles in the plume was quite variable, in pan because of variations in their mean particle size. The summer measurements were conducted during a rainy and hazy period when the Labadie plume typically could be seen from the ground only within a few km of the source. During this time, the visual impact of the plume was minimal.

  7. Recent work in Canada for the proposed Chemical and Aerosol Sounding Satellite (CASS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K. A.; Melo, S. M.; Moreau, L. M.; Perron, G. P.; Bourdeau, J.; Michels, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Chemical and Aerosol Sounding Satellite (CASS) mission is a proposed CSA-NASA collaboration to address the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) recommendation for continuity in climate-quality profile measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric composition. The mission would include two instruments: an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS-II) and a UV/VIS spectrometer (SAGE III). The two CASS sensors would focus primarily on trace gas and aerosol measurements using the solar occultation technique. These global measurements are aimed at understanding the changes that are occurring in our atmosphere including recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer, changes in climate due to increasing greenhouse gases and increasing pollution in the troposphere. Over the past year, two studies have been funded by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) to examine the development of the ACE-FTS-II instrument and to investigate the accommodation of the CASS instruments on different platforms. In parallel, a small Canadian mission definition team has been established to work on the science objectives and mission requirements within the Canadian context. This presentation will describe the results of these two CSA-funded studies and the progress that has been made by the Canadian definition team.

  8. Chemical apportionment of aerosol optical properties during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tingting; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Liu, Xingang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jie; Zhao, Xiujuan; Du, Wei; Wang, Zifa; Sun, Yele

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing, China, using the highly time-resolved measurements by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer and a cavity attenuated phase shift extinction monitor. The average (±σ) extinction coefficient (bext) and absorption coefficient (bap) were 186.5 (±184.5) M m-1 and 23.3 (±21.9) M m-1 during APEC, which were decreased by 63% and 56%, respectively, compared to those before APEC primarily due to strict emission controls. The aerosol composition and size distributions showed substantial changes during APEC; as a response, the mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM1 was decreased from 4.7 m2 g-1 to 3.5 m2 g-1. Comparatively, the average single-scattering albedo (SSA) remained relatively unchanged, illustrating the synchronous reductions of bext and bap during APEC. MSE and SSA were found to increase as function of the oxidation degree of organic aerosol (OA), indicating a change of aerosol optical properties during the aging processes. The empirical relationships between chemical composition and particle extinction were established using a multiple linear regression model. Our results showed the largest contribution of ammonium nitrate to particle extinction, accounting for 35.1% and 29.3% before and during APEC, respectively. This result highlights the important role of ammonium nitrate in the formation of severe haze pollution during this study period. We also observed very different optical properties of primary and secondary aerosol. Owing to emission controls in Beijing and surrounding regions and also partly the influences of meteorological changes, the average bext of secondary aerosol during APEC was decreased by 71% from 372.3 M m-1 to 108.5 M m-1, whereas that of primary aerosol mainly from cooking, traffic, and biomass burning emissions showed a smaller reduction from 136.7 M m-1 to 71.3 M m-1. As a result

  9. Size distribution and chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol formed from Cl-initiated oxidation of toluene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingqiang Huang; Weijun Zhang; Xuejun Gu; Changjin Hu; Weixiong Zhao; Zhenya Wang; Li Fang

    2012-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from Cl-initiated oxidation of toluene was investigated in a home-made smog chamber.The size distribution and chemical composition of SOA particles were measured using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer and the aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS),respectively.According to a large number of single aerosol diameter and mass spectra,the size distribution and chemical composition of SOA were obtained statistically.Experimental results showed that SOA particles created by Cl-initiated oxidation of toluene is predominantly in the form of fine particles,which have diameters less than 2.5 μm (i.e.,PM2.5),and glyoxal,benzaldehyde,benzyl alcohol,benzoquinone,benzoic acid,benzyl hydroperoxide and benzyl methyl nitrate are the major products components in the SOA.The possible reaction mechanisms leading to these products are also proposed.

  10. Pattern of aerosol mass loading and chemical composition over the atmospheric environment of an urban coastal station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G.; Nair, Prabha R.; Aryasree, S.; Hegde, Prashant; Jacob, Salu

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol sampling was carried out at four locations in and around Cochin (9°58‧ N, 76°17‧ E), an urban area, located on the southwest coast of India. The gravimetric estimates of aerosol mass loading showed wide range from 78 μg m-3 to >450 μg m-3, occasionally reaching values >500 μg m-3, associated with regional source characteristics. Most of the values were above the air quality standard. Both boundary layer and synoptic scale airflow pattern play role in the temporal features in aerosol mass loading and chemical composition. Chemical analysis of the aerosol samples were done for anionic species viz; F-, Cl-, Br-, NO2-,   NO3-,   PO43-,   SO42- and metallic/cationic species viz; Na, Ca, K, Mg, NH4+, Fe, Al, Cu, Mg, Pb, etc using Ion Chromatography, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma- Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). At all the locations, extremely high mass concentration of SO42- was observed with the mean value of 13±6.4 μg m-3 indicating the strong anthropogenic influence. Statistical analysis of the chemical composition data was carried out and the principal factors presented. Seasonal variation of these chemical species along with their percentage contributions and regional variations were also examined. Increase in level of Na in aerosol samples indicated the influence of monsoonal activity. Most of the species showed mass concentrations well above those measured over another coastal site Thiruvananthapuram (8°29‧ N, 76°57‧ E) situated ~220 km south of Cochin revealing the highly localized aerosol features.

  11. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian continental aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the Northern Hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol.

    Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. The aerosol optical depth data showed a clear though moderate seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06 ± 0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. AERONET size distributions showed a generally bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of fine dust, biomass burning and marine biogenic material.

    In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – ion beam analysis and ion chromatography. Ion beam analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated with Si, with the Fe/Al ratio somewhat higher than values reported from Northern Hemisphere sites (as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. These data may be used to attempt to build a signature of soil in this

  12. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  13. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  14. Identification and quantification of individual chemical compounds in biogenic secondary organic aerosols using GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, M.; Worton, D. R.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A. W.; Ruehl, C.; Zhao, Y.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have adverse effects on human health and air quality and affect radiative forcing and thus climate. While the organic fraction of aerosols is substantial, the sources and chemistry leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosols are very poorly understood. Characterizing individual compounds present in organic aerosol provides insights into the sources, formation mechanisms and oxidative transformations that have taken place. Fifteen aerosol samples collected over a 5 day period at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, part of the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) in July 2009, were analyzed using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). Approximately 600 compounds were observed in each sample as significant peaks in the chromatogram. Of these, around a third were identified by matching the unique electron ionization (EI) mass spectrum of each compound to the NIST library of characteristic fragmentation patterns. One filter sample was also analyzed using vacuum ultraviolet ionization (VUV) instead of EI. This 'soft' ionization technique results in much less fragmentation yielding the molecular ion of each compound, from which the exact mass was determined. If the formula of the EI library matched compound equaled the high mass resolution VUV molecular weight within a certain tolerance (< 30 ppm), then the library match was considered confirmed; 226 compounds were identified in this way. Using the VUV technique 234 additional compounds that were not in the EI mass spectral database were assigned chemical formulas based on the observed molecular weights. The chemical formulas in conjunction with the location of the compound in the GCxGC chromatogram were used to provide further classification of these compounds based on their likely functionalization. The broad array of observed oxygenated

  15. Physical and chemical properties of pollution aerosol particles transported from North America to Greenland as measured during the POLARCAT summer campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Quennehen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the POLARCAT-France campaign, aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties over Greenland were measured onboard the French ATR-42 research aircraft. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was used to determine air mass origins. The study focuses particularly on the characterization of air masses transported from the North American continent. Air masses that picked up emissions from Canadian and Alaskan boreal forest fires as well as from the cities on the American east coast were identified and selected for a detailed study. Measurements of CO concentrations, aerosol chemical composition, aerosol size distributions, aerosol volatile fractions and aerosol light absorption (mainly from black carbon are used in order to study the relationship between CO enhancement, ageing of the air masses, aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions. Aerosol size distributions are in good agreement with previous studies, even though, wet scavenging potentially occurred along the pathway between the emission sources and Greenland leading to lower concentrations in the aerosol accumulation mode. The measured aerosol size distributions show a significant enhancement of Aitken mode particles. It is demonstrated that the Aitken mode is largely composed of black carbon, while the accumulation mode is more dominated by organics, as deduced from aerosol mass spectrometric AMS and aerosol volatility measurements. Overall, during the campaign rather small amounts of black carbon from the North American continent were transported towards Greenland. An important finding given the potential climate impacts of black carbon in the Arctic.

  16. Novel Approaches to the Sampling of Atmospheric Aerosols and Determination of Chemical Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Parshintsev, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    The Earth s climate is a highly dynamic and complex system in which atmospheric aerosols have been increasingly recognized to play a key role. Aerosol particles affect the climate through a multitude of processes, directly by absorbing and reflecting radiation and indirectly by changing the properties of clouds. Because of the complexity, quantification of the effects of aerosols continues to be a highly uncertain science. Better understanding of the effects of aerosols requires more informat...

  17. Satellite assisted aerosol correlation in a sequestered CO2 leakage controlled site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.; Nakaema, Walter M.; de Medeiros, José A. G.; Moreira, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. For such task a mimetic sequestration site has been deployed in Florianopolis, Brazil, in order to verify the performance of monitoring plataforms to detect and quantify leakages of ground injected CO2, namely a Cavity Ring Down System (CRDS) - Los Gatos Research - an Eddy Covariance System (Campbell Scientific and Irgason) and meteorological tower for wind, humidity, precipitation and temperature monitoring onsite. The measurement strategy for detecting CO2 leakages can be very challenging since environmental and phytogenic influence can be very severe and play a role on determining if the values measured are unambiguous or not. One external factor to be considered is the amount of incoming solar radiation which will be the driving force for the whole experimental setup and following this reasoning the amount of aerosols in the atmospheric column can be a determinant factor influencing the experimental results. Thus the investigation of measured fluxes CO2 and its concentration with the aforementioned experimental instruments and their correlation with the aerosol data should be taken into account by means of satellite borne systems dedicated to measure aerosol vertical distribution and its optical properties, in this study we have selected CALIPSO and MODIS instrumentation to help on deriving the aerosol properties and CO2 measurements.

  18. The chemical processing of gas-phase carbonyl compounds by sulfuric acid aerosols: 2,4-pentanedione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozière, Barbara; Riemer, Daniel D.

    This work investigates the interactions between gas-phase carbonyl compounds and sulfuric acid aerosols. It focuses on understanding the chemical processes, giving a first estimate of their importance in the atmosphere, and suggesting directions for further investigations. The solubility and reactivity of a compound with a large enolization constant, 2,4-pentanedione, in water/sulfuric acid solutions 0-96 wt% have been investigated at room temperature using the bubble column/GC-FID technique. 2,4-pentanedione was found to undergo aldol condensation at acidities as low as 20 wt% H 2SO 4, that is, well in the tropospheric range of aerosol composition. In agreement with well-established organic chemical knowledge, this reaction resulted in changes of color of the solutions of potential importance for the optical properties of the aerosols. 2,4-pentanedione was also found to undergo retroaldol reaction, specific to dicarbonyl compounds, producing acetone and acetaldehyde. The Henry's law coefficient for 2,4-pentanedione was found to be a factor 5 larger than the one of acetone over the whole range of acidity, with a value in water of H (297 K)=(155±27) M atm -1. A chemical system is proposed to describe the transformations of carbonyl compounds in sulfuric acid aerosols. Aldol condensation is likely to be the most common reaction for these compounds, probably involving a large number of the ones present in the atmosphere and a wide range of aerosol compositions. The enolization constant contributes as a proportional factor to the rate constant for aldol condensation, and is shown in this work to contribute as an additive constant to the Henry's law coefficient. In addition to the many important aspects of these reactions illustrated in this work, the rate of aldol condensation was estimated to be potentially fast enough for the losses of some compounds in acidic aerosols to compete with their gas-phase chemistry in the atmosphere.

  19. Aerosol Types using Passive Remote Sensing: Global Distribution, Consistency Check, Total-Column Investigation and Translation into Composition Derived from Climate and Chemical Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Dawson, K. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Redemann, J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Butler, C. F.; Holben, B. N.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Froyd, K. D.; Dibb, J. E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in chemical transport models (CTMs) and global climate models (GCMs), we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. We apply the SCMC method to two different total-column datasets of aerosol optical properties: inversions from the ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and retrievals from the space-borne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances) instrument. The POLDER retrievals that we use differ from the standard POLDER retrievals [Deuzé et al., 2001] as they make full use of multi-angle, multispectral polarimetric data [Hasekamp et al., 2011]. We analyze agreement in the aerosol types inferred from both AERONET and POLDER globally. Then, we investigate how our total-column "effective" SCMC aerosol types relate to different aerosol types within the column (i.e. either a mixture of different types within one layer in the vertical or the stacking of different aerosol types within the vertical column). For that, we compare AERONET-SCMC aerosol types to collocated NASA LaRC HSRL vertically resolved aerosol types [Burton et al., 2012] during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne field experiments, mostly over Texas in Aug-Sept 2013. Finally, in order to evaluate the GEOS-Chem CTM aerosol types, we translate each of our SCMC aerosol type into a unique distribution of GEOS-Chem aerosol composition (e.g. biomass burning, dust, sulfate, sea salt). We bridge the gap between remote sensing and model-inferred aerosol types by using multiple years of collocated AERONET

  20. The chemical composition of organic nitrogen in marine rainwater and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, K. E.; Hastings, M. G.; Peters, A.; Sigman, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The current state of knowledge on organic nitrogen in the atmosphere is very limited. Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is a subset of the complex water soluble organic matter measured in atmospheric aerosols and rainwater; as such, it impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties. In marine and continental atmospheric deposition, the organic N fraction can be 20-80% of total N potentially influencing receiving ecosystems. Therefore, atmospheric WSON plays an important role in both atmospheric chemistry and the global biogeochemical N cycle. However, the sources (i.e., anthropogenic vs. terrestrial vs. marine), composition (e.g., reduced or oxidized N), potential connections to inorganic N (NO3- and NH4+), and spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric WSON are largely unknown. Samples were collected on or near the island of Bermuda (32.27°N, 64.87°W), which is located in the western North Atlantic and experiences seasonal changes in transport that allow for study of both anthropogenically and primarily marine influenced air masses. Rainwater samples (n=7) and aqueous extracted aerosol samples (n=4) were analyzed by positive ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to characterize the chemical composition of the water soluble organic N on a per compound level. We found ~ 800 N containing compounds in 8 compound classes. The CHON+ compound class contained the largest number of N compounds (~ 460). Compared to continental rainwater [Altieri et al., ES&T, 2009], the CHON+ compounds in the marine samples are as dominant in number, yet have less regular patterns and lower O:C ratios for comparable N:C ratios. In fact, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples than in continental rainwater samples. No organosulfates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected in the marine samples, both of

  1. Aerosol-Assisted Synthesis of Porous TiNx Oy @C Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Vincent; Clavel, Guylhaine; Antonietti, Markus; Giordano, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Porous TiNx Oy -based particles were synthesized by an aerosol spray process. At first, the starting sol solution containing the metal precursor and the nitrogen source is sprayed to form an aerosol that is subsequently pyrolysed at different temperatures. The obtained dried particles are an amorphous coordination "polymer" rich in carbon and nitrogen. These "glassy" particles are finally thermally treated at 800 °C, promoting the crystallization of the particles and the release of a major part of the carbon. As the particles keep their original shape, carbon loss and density increase during the crystallization step and lead to the development of an accessible pore structure. The process was analyzed and extended to the synthesis of other metal nitrides, such as VN and W2 N, thereby showing its general validity for the production of functional nanocrystalline nitride ceramics with high porosity still occupying a relatively small volume, and otherwise not easily accessible. PMID:27380832

  2. Chemical aging of m-xylene secondary organic aerosol: laboratory chamber study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Seinfeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA can reside in the atmosphere for a week or more. While its initial formation from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds tends to take place in the first few hours after emission, SOA can continue to evolve chemically over its atmospheric lifetime. Simulating this chemical aging over an extended time in the laboratory has proven to be challenging. We present here a procedure for studying SOA aging in laboratory chambers that is applied to achieve 36 h of oxidation. The formation and evolution of SOA from the photooxidation of m-xylene under low-NOx conditions and in the presence of either neutral or acidic seed particles is studied. In SOA aging, increasing molecular functionalization leads to less volatile products and an increase in SOA mass, whereas gas- or particle-phase fragmentation chemistry results in more volatile products and a loss of SOA. The challenge is to discern from measured chamber variables the extent to which these processes are important for a given SOA system. In the experiments conducted, m-xylene SOA mass, calculated under the assumption of size-invariant particle composition, increased over the initial 12–13 h of photooxidation and decreased beyond that time, suggesting the existence of fragmentation chemistry. The oxidation of the SOA, as manifested in the O:C elemental ratio and fraction of organic ion detected at m/z 44 measured by the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, increased continuously starting after 5 h of irradiation until the 36 h termination. This behavior is consistent with an initial period in which, as the mass of SOA increases, products of higher volatility partition to the aerosol phase, followed by an aging period in which gas- and particle-phase reaction products become increasingly more oxidized. When irradiation is stopped 12.4 h into one experiment, and OH generation ceases, minimal loss of SOA is observed, indicating that the loss of SOA is either

  3. Aerosol-Assisted Synthesis of Monodisperse Single-Crystalline α-Cristobalite Nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xingmao; Bao, Lihong; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Dunphy, Darren R.; Li, Xiaodong; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse single-crystalline α-cristobalite nanospheres have been synthesized by hydrocarbon-pyrolysis-induced carbon deposition on amorphous silica aerosol nanoparticles, devitrification of the coated silica at high temperature, and subsequent carbon removal by oxidation. The nanosphere size can be well controlled by tuning the size of the colloidal silica precursor. Uniform, high-purity nanocrystalline α-cristobalite is important for catalysis, nanocomposites, advanced polishing, and und...

  4. Latitudinal Variation of Chemical Composition in Marine Aerosol Over the Central North Pacific in the Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, M.; Narita, Y.; Mano, Y.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshida, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Miura, K.

    2006-12-01

    Aeolian dust and gaseous and particulate pollutants from the Asian continent are transported eastward over the North Pacific. These natural and anthropogenic materials in the atmosphere can influence regional and global climate by altering the Earth's radiative balance. From the view of biogeochemical cycles, the atmospheric deposition of aerosols containing iron and other essential trace elements may contribute in sustaining primary productivity of phytoplankton, food web structure and chemical properties of marine atmosphere in the central North Pacific region. During the South-North cross-section cruise from 8 August to 21 September 2005, we conducted atmospheric sampling of aerosol and gaseous components on board R/V Hakuho Maru. Results from 10S to 53N along 160E revealed high nitrate concentration in the high latitude zone corresponded with back-air trajectories to subarctic North Pacific from the Asian continent during the summer. The atmospheric supply of nitrogen compounds may affect the primary production of stratified surface layer in the region. Non-sea-salt sulfate concentration was also high over the subarctic region, and downwind of the Hawaii islands. Volcanic and anthropogenic sulfur are suspected to be the sources of nss-sulfate. However, as an indicator of marine biogenic sulfate, methane sulfonic acid (MSA) is also correlated well with the concentration peaks of nss-sulfate both the vicinity of Hawaii islands and subarctic region. We will attempt to separate nss-sulfate into two fractions, marine biogenic and anthropogenic by using the relation between trace metals and sulfate over the source regions.

  5. Inhalation toxicology of industrial plutonium and uranium oxide aerosols I. Physical chemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fabrication of mixed plutonium and uranium oxide fuel, large quantities of dry powders are processed, causing dusty conditions in glove box enclosures. Inadvertent loss of glove box integrity or failure of air filter systems can lead to human inhalation exposure. Powdered samples and aerosol samples of these materials obtained during two fuel fabrication process steps have been obtained. A regimen of physical chemical tests of properties of these materials has been employed to identify physical chemical properties which may influence their biological behavior and dosimetry. Materials to be discussed are 750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the ball milling operation and 1750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the centerless grinding of fuel pellets. Results of x-ray diffraction studies have shown that the powder generated by the centerless grinding of fuel pellets is best described as a solid solution of UOx and PuOx consistent with its temperature history. In vitro dissolution studies of both mixed oxide materials indicate a generally similar dissolution rate for both materials. In one solvent, the material with the higher temperature history dissolves more rapidly. The x-ray diffraction and in vitro dissolution results as well as preliminary results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses will be compared and the implications for the associated biological studies will be discussed. (author)

  6. Temperature effect on physical and chemical properties of secondary organic aerosol from m-xylene photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Cocker III

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and physical differences of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formed at select isothermal temperatures (278 K, 300 K, and 313 K are explored with respect to density, particle volatility, particle hygroscopicity, and elemental chemical composition. A transition point in SOA density, volatility, hygroscopicity and elemental composition is observed near 290–292 K as SOA within an environmental chamber is heated from 278 K to 313 K, indicating the presence of a thermally labile compound. No such transition points are observed for SOA produced at 313 K or 300 K and subsequently cooled to 278 K. The SOA formed at the lowest temperatures (278 K is more than double the SOA formed at 313 K. SOA formed at 278 K is less hydrophilic and oxygenated while more volatile and dense than SOA formed at 300 K or 313 K. The properties of SOA formed at 300 K and 313 K when reduced to 278 K did not match the properties of SOA initially formed at 278 K. This study demonstrates that it is insufficient to utilize the enthalpy of vaporization when predicting SOA temperature dependence.

  7. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties ofBiomass Burn Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Lewis, K.; Desyaterik, Yury; Wang, Z.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Arnott, W.P.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, M.K.

    2008-01-29

    Aerosols generated from burning different plant fuels were characterized to determine relationships between chemical, optical and physical properties. Single scattering albedo ({omega}) and Angstrom absorption coefficients ({alpha}{sub ap}) were measured using a photoacoustic technique combined with a reciprocal nephelometer. Carbon-to-oxygen atomic ratios, sp{sup 2} hybridization, elemental composition and morphology of individual particles were measured using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM/EDX). Particles were grouped into three categories based on sp2 hybridization and chemical composition. Measured {omega} (0.4-1.0 at 405 nm) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0-3.5) values displayed a fuel dependence. The category with sp{sup 2} hybridization >80% had values of {omega} (<0.5) and {alpha}{sub ap} ({approx}1.25) characteristic of light absorbing soot. Other categories with lower sp2 hybridization (20 to 60%) exhibited higher {omega} (>0.8) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0 to 3.5) values, indicating increased absorption spectral selectivity.

  8. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia,and Look Rock, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S.; Bairai, Solomon T.; Mueller, Stephen; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    A year-long near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia, in 2012) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee, in 2013) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (up to 76 %) and sulfate (up to 31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the 1 year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA) and 91Fac (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed up to 66 % of total OA mass. HOA was observed during the entire year only at the urban site (on average 21 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly ( ˜ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is well correlated with the m/z 82 ion associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of IEPOX-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The

  9. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO: chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Hersey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1–2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Regardless of regime, organic aerosol (OA is the most significant constituent of nonrefractory submicron Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55 % of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively. The overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively, with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA in Los Angeles. Online analysis of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC indicates that water soluble organic mass (WSOM reaches maxima near 14:00–15:00 local time (LT, but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly

  10. Urban aerosol in Oporto, Portugal: Chemical characterization of PM10 and PM2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Danilo; Ferreira, Catarina; Alves, Célia; Duarte, Mácio; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Frosini, Daniele; Colombi, Cristina; Gianelle, Vorne; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Several urban and industrial areas in Southern Europe are not capable of meeting the implemented EU standards for particulate matter. Efficient air quality management is required in order to ensure that the legal limits are not exceeded and that the consequences of poor air quality are controlled and minimized. Many aspects of the direct and indirect effects of suspended particulate matter on climate and public health are not well understood. The temporal variation of the chemical composition is still demanded, since it enables to adopt off-set strategies and to better estimate the magnitude of anthropogenic forcing on climate. This study aims to provide detailed information on concentrations and chemical composition of aerosol from Oporto city, an urban center in Southern Europe. This city is located near the coast line in the North of Portugal, being the country's second largest urban area. Moreover, Oporto city economic prospects depend heavily on a diversified industrial park, which contribute to air quality degradation. Another strong source of air pollution is traffic. The main objectives of this study are: 1) to characterize the chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 by setting up an orchestra of aerosol sampling devices in a strategic place in Oporto; 2) to identify the sources of particles exploring parameters such as organic and inorganic markers (e.g. sugars as tracers for biomass burning; metals and elemental carbon for industrial and vehicular emissions); 3) to evaluate long range transport of pollutants using back trajectory analysis. Here we present data obtained between January 2013 and January 2014 in a heavy traffic roadside sampling site located in the city center. Different PM10 and PM2.5 samplers were operated simultaneously in order to collect enough mass on different filter matrixes and to fulfill the requirements of analytical methodologies. More than 100 aerosol samples were collected and then analysed for their mass concentration and

  11. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO: chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles Basin aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Hersey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1–2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence.

    Organic aerosol (OA is the most significant constituent of Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55% of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively, and that the overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively, with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA in Los Angeles.

    Water soluble organic mass (WSOM reaches maxima near 14:00–15:00 local time (LT, but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the

  12. Hygroscopicity and chemical composition of Antarctic sub-micrometre aerosol particles and observations of new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic near-coastal sub-micrometre aerosol particle features in summer were characterised based on measured data on aerosol hygroscopicity, size distributions, volatility and chemical ion and organic carbon mass concentrations. Hysplit model was used to calculate the history of the air masses to predict the particle origin. Additional measurements of meteorological parameters were utilised. The hygroscopic properties of particles mostly resembled those of marine aerosols. The measurements took place at 130 km from the Southern Ocean, which was the most significant factor affecting the particle properties. This is explained by the lack of additional sources on the continent of Antarctica. The Southern Ocean was thus a likely source of the particles and nucleating and condensing vapours. The particles were very hygroscopic (HGF 1.75 at 90 nm and very volatile. Most of the sub-100 nm particle volume volatilised below 100 °C. Based on chemical data, particle hygroscopic and volatile properties were explained by a large fraction of non-neutralised sulphuric acid together with organic material. The hygroscopic growth factors assessed from chemical data were similar to measured. Hygroscopicity was higher in dry continental air masses compared with the moist marine air masses. This was explained by the aging of the marine organic species and lower methanesulphonic acid volume fraction together with the changes in the inorganic aerosol chemistry as the aerosol had travelled long time over the continental Antarctica. Special focus was directed in detailed examination of the observed new particle formation events. Indications of the preference of negative over positive ions in nucleation could be detected. However, in a detailed case study, the neutral particles dominated the particle formation process. Freshly nucleated particles had the smallest hygroscopic growth factors, which increased subsequent to particle aging.

  13. Hygroscopicity and chemical composition of Antarctic sub-micrometre aerosol particles and observations of new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic near-coastal sub-micrometre aerosol particle features in summer were characterised based on measured data on aerosol hygroscopicity, size distributions, volatility and chemical ion and organic carbon mass concentrations. Hysplit model was used to calculate the history of the air masses to predict the particle origin. Additional measurements of meteorological parameters were utilised. The hygroscopic properties of particles mostly resembled those of marine aerosols. The measurements took place at 130 km from the Southern Ocean, which was the most significant factor affecting the particle properties. This is explained by the lack of additional sources on the continent of Antarctica. The Southern Ocean was thus a likely source of the particles and nucleating and condensing vapours. The particles were very hygroscopic (HGF 1.75 at 90 nm and very volatile. Most of the sub-100 nm particle volume volatilised below 100 °C. Based on chemical data, particle hygroscopic and volatile properties were explained by a large fraction of non-neutralised sulphuric acid together with organic material. The hygroscopic growth factors assessed from chemical data were similar to measured. Hygroscopicity was higher in dry continental air masses compared with the moist marine air masses. This was explained by the aging of the marine organic species and lower methanesulphonic acid volume fraction together with the changes in the inorganic aerosol chemistry as the aerosol had travelled long time over the continental Antarctica. Special focus was directed in detailed examination of the observed new particle formation events. Indications of the preference of negative over positive ions in nucleation could be detected. However, in a detailed case study, the neutral particles dominated the particle formation process. Freshly nucleated particles had the smallest hygroscopic growth factors, which increased subsequent to particle aging.

  14. Chemical composition of size-segregated aerosols in Lhasa city, Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xin; Kang, Shichang; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Bin; Wen, Tianxue; Wang, Pengling; Wang, Yuesi; Cong, Zhiyuan

    2016-06-01

    To reveal the chemical characteristics of size-segregated aerosols in the high-altitude city of Tibetan Plateau, eight-size aerosol samples were collected in Lhasa from March 2013 to February 2014. The annual mean of online PM2.5 was 25.0 ± 16.0 μg m- 3, which was much lower than Asian cities but similar with some European cities. The annual mean concentrations of organic carbon (OC, 7.92 μg m- 3 in PM2.1 and 12.66 μg m- 3 in PM9.0) and elemental carbon (EC, 1.00 μg m- 3 in PM2.1 and 1.21 μg m- 3 in PM9.0) in Lhasa aerosols were considerably lower than those heavily polluted cities such as Beijing and Xi'an, China and Kathmandu, Nepal. Sulfate, NO3-, NH4+ and Ca2 + were 0.75 ± 0.31, 0.82 ± 0.35, 0.38 ± 0.34 and 0.57 ± 0.29 μg m- 3 in fine particles while in coarse particles they were 0.57 ± 0.37, 0.73 ± 0.23, 0.07 ± 0.03 and 2.52 ± 1.37 μg m- 3, respectively. Secondary water-soluble ions composed 35.8% of the total ionic components in fine particles according to the established electroneutrality, while in coarse particles they took up only 9.3%. Ca2 + (40.6%) was the major component of the coarse particles. For seasonality, the concentrations of OC, EC, SO42 -, NH4+, K+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Cl- and Na+ presented higher values during late autumn and winter but were relatively lower in spring and summer. Nevertheless, NO3- was considerably higher in summer and autumn, presumably due to increased tourist-vehicle emissions. During winter and spring, [Ca2 +]/[NO3-+ SO42 -] ratios in coarse particles showed higher values of 7.31 and 6.17, respectively, emphasizing the dust influence. [NO3-]/[SO42 -] ratios in fine particles during spring, summer and autumn exceeding 1 indicated that the currently predominant vehicle exhaust makes a greater contribution to the aerosols. While more stationary sources such as coal and biomass burning existed in winter since the [NO3-]/[SO42 -] ratio was less than 1. Different sources and formation processes lead to a bimodal size

  15. The effect of physical and chemical aerosol properties on warm cloud droplet activation

    OpenAIRE

    G. McFiggans; P. Artaxo; Baltensperger, U.; H. Coe; Facchini, M. C.; Feingold, G; S. Fuzzi; Gysel, M.; A. Laaksonen; U. Lohmann; T. F. Mentel; Murphy, D. M.; C. D. O'Dowd; Snider, J.R.; E. Weingartner

    2006-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric aerosol on climate forcing may be very substantial but are quantified poorly at present; in particular, the effects of aerosols on cloud radiative properties, or the "indirect effects" are credited with the greatest range of uncertainty amongst the known causes of radiative forcing. This manuscript explores the effects that the composition and properties of atmospheric aerosol can have on the activation of droplets in warm clouds, so potentially influencing the magn...

  16. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 1: Study of physical and chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisok, J.; Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Makuch, P.; Petelski, T.; Chilinski, M.; Kaminski, J. W.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Rozwadowska, A.; Jefimow, M.; Markuszewski, P.; Neuber, R.; Pakszys, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Struzewska, J.; Zielinski, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties during iAREA2014 campaign that took place on Svalbard between 15th of Mar and 4th of May 2014. With respect to field area, the experiment consisted of two sites: Ny-Ålesund (78°55‧N, 11°56‧E) and Longyearbyen (78°13‧N, 15°33‧E) with further integration of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station in Hornsund (77°00‧N, 15°33‧E). The subject of this study is to investigate the in-situ, passive and active remote sensing observations as well as numerical simulations to describe the temporal variability of aerosol single-scattering properties during spring season on Spitsbergen. The retrieval of the data indicates several event days with enhanced single-scattering properties due to the existence of sulphate and additional sea-salt load in the atmosphere which is possibly caused by relatively high wind speed. Optical results were confirmed by numerical simulations made by the GEM-AQ model and by chemical observations that indicated up to 45% contribution of the sea-salt to a PM10 total aerosol mass concentration. An agreement between the in-situ optical and microphysical properties was found, namely: the positive correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient measured by the nephelometer and effective radius obtained from laser aerosol spectrometer as well as negative correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient and the Ångstrom exponent indicated that slightly larger particles dominated during special events. The in-situ surface observations do not show any significant enhancement of the absorption coefficient as well as the black carbon concentration which might occur during spring. All of extensive single-scattering properties indicate a diurnal cycle in Longyearbyen, where 21:00-5:00 data stays at the background level, however increasing during the day by the factor of 3-4. It is considered to be highly connected with local emissions originating

  17. Chemical Composition, Seasonal Variation and Size distribution of Atmospheric Aerosols at an Alpine Site in Guanzhong Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    PM10 and size-segregated aerosol samples were collected at Mt. Hua (2065 a.s.m) in central China, and determined for carbonaceous fraction, ions and organic composition. The concentration of most chemical compositions in summer are lower than those in winter, due to decreased emissions of biomass and coal burning for house heating. High temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions are favorable for secondary aerosol formation, resulting in higher concentrations of SO42- and NH4+ in summer. Non-dehydrated sugars are increased in summer because of the enhanced metabolism. Carbon preference index results indicate that n-alkanes at Mt. Hua are derived mostly by plant wax. Low Benzo(a)pyrene/Benzo(a)pyrene ratios indicate that mountain aerosols are more aged. Concentrations of biogenic (BSOA, the isoprene/pinene/caryophyllene oxidation products) and anthropogenic (ASOA, mainly aromatic acids) SOA positively correlated with temperature . However, a decreasing trend of BSOA concentration with an increase in RH was observed during the sampling period, although a clear trend between ASOA and RH was not found. Based on the AIM Model calculation, we found that during the sampling period an increase in RH resulted in a decrease in the aerosol acidity and thus reduced the effect of acid-catalysis on BSOA formation. Size distributions of K+ and NH4+ present as an accumulation mode, in contrast to Ca2+ and Mg2+, which are mainly existed in coarse particles. SO42- and NO3- show a bimodal pattern. Dehydrated sugars, fossil fuel derived n-alkanes and PAHs presented unimode size distribution, whereas non-dehydrated sugars and plant wax derived n-alkanes showed bimodal pattern. Most of the determined BSOA are formed in the aerosol phase and enriched in the fine mode except for cis-pinonic acid, which is formed in the gas phase and subsequently partitioned into aerosol phase and thus presents a bimodal pattern with a major peak in the coarse mode.

  18. Novel Approach for Evaluating Secondary Organic Aerosol from Aromatic Hydrocarbons: SOA Yield and Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijie; Tang, Ping; Nakao, Shunsuke; Qi, Li; Kacarab, Mary; Cocker, David

    2016-04-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons account for 20%-30% of urban atmospheric VOCs and are major contributors to anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, prediction of SOA from aromatic hydrocarbons as a function of structure, NOx concentration, and OH radical levels remains elusive. Innovative SOA yield and chemical composition evaluation approaches are developed here to investigate SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons. SOA yield is redefined in this work by adjusting the molecular weight of all aromatic precursors to the molecular weight of benzene (Yield'= Yieldi×(MWi/MWBenzene); i: aromatic hydrocarbon precursor). Further, SOA elemental ratio is calculated on an aromatic ring basis rather than the classic mole basis. Unified and unique characteristics in SOA formed from aromatic hydrocarbons with different alkyl groups (varying in carbon number and location on aromatic ring) are explored by revisiting fifteen years of UC Riverside/CE-CERT environmental chamber data on 129 experiments from 17 aromatic precursors at urban region relevant low NOx conditions (HC:NO 11.1-171 ppbC:ppb). Traditionally, SOA mass yield of benzene is much greater than that of other aromatic species. However, when adjusting for molecular weight, a similar yield is found across the 17 different aromatic precursors. More importantly, four oxygens per aromatic ring are observed in the resulting SOA regardless of the alkyl substitutes attached to the ring, which majorly affect H/C ratio in SOA. Therefore, resulting SOA bulk composition from aromatic hydrocarbons can be predicted as C6+nH6+2nO4 (n: alkyl substitute carbon number). Further, the dominating role of the aromatic ring carbons is confirmed by studying the chemical composition of SOA formed from the photooxidation of an aromatic hydrocarbon with a 13C isotopically labeled alkyl carbon. Overall, this study unveils the similarity in SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons enhancing the understanding of SOA formation from

  19. Chemical and physical drivers of the evolution of organic aerosols over forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Diurnal evolution of organic aerosol over boreal and tropical forests The first research question of this thesis is: how do local surface forcings and large-scale meteorological forcings shape the evolution of organic aerosol over the boreal and tropical forest? This question is de

  20. Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex Mixtures (UCM) inAtmospheric Organics: Insights into Emission Sources, Atmospheric Processing andSecondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies suggest that semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban atmospheres. However, knowledge of the chemical composition of SVOCs is limited by current analytical techniques, which are typically unable to...

  1. Chemical composition of Titan's aerosols analogues characterized with a systematic pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Cyril; Raulin, Francois; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; GCMS Team

    2014-05-01

    The in situ chemical characterization of Titan's atmosphere was achieved in 2005 with two instruments present onboard the Huygens atmospheric probe : the Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyzer (ACP) devoted to collect and pyrolyse Titan's aerosols ; the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) experiment devoted to analyze gases collected in the atmosphere or coming from the aerosols pyrolysis. The GCMS was developed by Hasso Niemann in the filiation of the quadrupole mass spectrometers he built for several former space missions. The main objectives were to : determine the concentration profile of the most abundant chemical species; seek for minor atmospheric organic species not detected with remote observations ; give a first view of the organic aerosols structure; characterize the condensed volatiles present at the surface (e.g. lakes) in case of survival of the probe to the landing impact. Taking into account for the potential complexity of the gaseous samples to be analyzed, it was decided to couple to the MS analyzer a gas chromatograph capable to separate volatile species from light inorganic molecules and noble gases, to organic compounds including aromatics. This was the first GCMS analyzer that worked in an extraterrestrial environment since the Viking missions on Mars. Even if the GCMS coupling mode did not provide any result of interest, it has been demonstrated to be functional during the Huygens descent. But, the direct MS analysis of the atmosphere, and the pyrolysis-MS analysis of aerosols allowed to make great discoveries which are still of primary importance to describe the Titan's lower atmosphere composition. This contribution aims at presenting this instrument that worked in the Titan's atmosphere, and summarizing the most important discoveries it allowed.

  2. Proposed chemical mechanisms leading to secondary organic aerosol in the reactions of aliphatic amines with hydroxyl and nitrate radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Derek J.; Clark, Christopher H.; Tang, Xiaochen; Cocker, David R.; Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Silva, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    The presence and importance of amines in the atmosphere, including aliphatic amines, continues to gain more attention. The atmospheric reaction mechanisms of these amines with key atmospheric radicals are important to predict both daytime and nighttime atmospheric chemistry. While previous studies have focused on the production of amine salts, this analysis looks at the importance of peroxy radical reactions to the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Atmospheric oxidation mechanisms are presented to explain the observed chemistry. A series of environmental chamber experiments were conducted in which aliphatic tertiary and secondary amines were reacted with either hydroxyl radical (OH) or nitrate radical (NO3). Chemical composition of the aerosol products was obtained with a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a Particle Into Liquid Sampler Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PILS-ToF-MS), while the chemical composition of the gas-phase products was obtained with a Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometer (SIFT-MS). A number of aerosol-phase mass spectra showed highly oxidized fragments at a much higher molecular weight (MW) than the amine precursor. It is proposed that these larger compounds are oligomers formed through peroxy radical reactions with hydrogen rearrangement. Another reaction pathway observed was the formation of amine salts. The relative importance of each pathway to the overall production of aerosol is found to be dependent on the type of amine and oxidant. For example, the oligomers were observed in the tertiary methyl amines, while the formation of amine salts was more prevalent in the secondary and tertiary ethyl amines.

  3. Optical properties and chemical composition of aerosol particles at an urban location: An estimation of the aerosol mass scattering and absorption efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titos, G.; Foyo-Moreno, I.; Lyamani, H.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated aerosol optical properties, mass concentration and chemical composition over a 1 year period (from March 2006 to February 2007) at an urban site in Southern Spain (Granada, 37.18°N, 3.58°W, 680 m above sea level). Light-scattering and absorption measurements were performed using an integrating nephelometer and a MultiAngle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), respectively, with no aerosol size cut-off and without any conditioning of the sampled air. PM10 and PM1 (ambient air levels of atmospheric particulate matter finer than 10 and 1 microns) were collected with two high volume samplers, and the chemical composition was investigated for all samples. Relative humidity (RH) within the nephelometer was below 50% and the weighting of the filters was also at RH of 50%. PM10 and PM1 mass concentrations showed a mean value of 44 ± 19 μg/m3 and 15 ± 7 μg/m3, respectively. The mineral matter was the major constituent of the PM10-1 fraction (contributing more than 58%) whereas organic matter and elemental carbon (OM+EC) contributed the most to the PM1 fraction (around 43%). The absorption coefficient at 550 nm showed a mean value of 24 ± 9 Mm-1 and the scattering coefficient at 550 nm presented a mean value of 61 ± 25 Mm-1, typical of urban areas. Both the scattering and the absorption coefficients exhibited the highest values during winter and the lowest during summer, due to the increase in the anthropogenic contribution and the lower development of the convective mixing layer during winter. A very low mean value of the single scattering albedo of 0.71 ± 0.07 at 550 nm was calculated, suggesting that urban aerosols in this site contain a large fraction of absorbing material. Mass scattering and absorption efficiencies of PM10 particles exhibited larger values during winter and lower during summer, showing a similar trend to PM1 and opposite to PM10-1. This seasonality is therefore influenced by the variations on PM composition. In addition, the mass

  4. Characteristics of aerosol size distributions and chemical compositions during wintertime pollution episodes in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zirui; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Junke; Yu, Yangchun; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the features of particle pollution, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were performed at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013. The particle number and volume concentration from 14 nm to 1000 nm were (37.4 ± 15.3) × 103 cm- 3 and (85.2 ± 65.6) μm3 cm- 3, respectively. N-Ait (Aitken mode) particles dominated the number concentration, whereas N-Acc (accumulation mode) particles dominated the volume concentration. Submicron particles were generally characterized by a high content of organics and SO42 -, and a low level of NO3- and Cl-. Two types of pollution episodes were observed, characterized by the "explosive growth" (EXP) and "sustained growth" (SUS) of PM2.5. Fine particles greater than 100 nm dominated the volume concentration during the ends of these pollution episodes, shifting the maximum of the number size distribution from 60 nm to greater than 100 nm in a few hours (EXP) or a few days (SUS). Secondary transformation is the main reason for the pollution episodes; SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) accounted for approximately 42% (EXP) and greater than 60% (SUS) of the N-Acc particle mass increase. The size distributions of particulate organics and SNA varied on timescales of hours to days, the characteristics of which changed from bimodal to unimodal during the evolution of haze episodes. The accumulation mode (peaking at approximately 500-700 nm) was dominated by organics that appeared to be internally mixed with nitrate or sulfate. The sulfate was most likely formed via heterogeneous reactions, because the SOR was constant under dry conditions (RH 50%, suggesting an important contribution from heterogeneous reactions with abundant aerosol water under wet conditions. Finally, the correlations between [NO3-]/[SO42 -] and [NH4+]/[SO42 -] suggest that the homogenous reaction between HNO3 and NH3 dominated the formation of nitrate under conditions of lower aerosol acidity. Therefore

  5. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, A.; Barsanti, K.

    2013-07-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) module in the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4) was updated by replacing existing two-product (2p) parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS) fits (MZ4-C1), and by treating SOA formation from the following additional volatile organic compounds (VOCs): isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes (MZ4-C2). Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base case and updated model simulations. Updates to the model resulted in significant increases in annual average SOA mass concentrations, particularly for the MZ4-C2 simulation in which the additional SOA precursor VOCs were treated. Annual average SOA concentrations predicted by the MZ4-C2 simulation were 1.00 ± 1.04 μg m-3 in South America, 1.57 ± 1.88 μg m-3 in Indonesia, 0.37 ± 0.27 μg m-3 in the USA, and 0.47 ± 0.29 μg m-3 in Europe with corresponding increases of 178, 406, 311 and 292% over the base-case simulation, respectively, primarily due to inclusion of isoprene. The increases in predicted SOA mass concentrations resulted in corresponding increases in SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD) by ~ 1-6%. Estimated global SOA production was 5.8, 6.6 and 19.1 Tg yr-1 with corresponding burdens of 0.22, 0.24 and 0.59 Tg for the base-case, MZ4-C1 and MZ4-C2 simulations, respectively. The predicted SOA budgets fell well within reported ranges for comparable modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr-1, but were lower than recently reported observationally constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr-1. For MZ4-C2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface also were in reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Total organic aerosol (OA) mass concentrations at the surface, however, were slightly over-predicted in Europe, Amazonian regions and Malaysian Borneo

  6. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmud

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The secondary organic aerosol (SOA module in the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4 was updated by replacing existing two-product (2p parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS fits (MZ4-C1, and by treating SOA formation from the following additional volatile organic compounds (VOCs: isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes (MZ4-C2. Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base case and updated model simulations. Updates to the model resulted in significant increases in annual average SOA mass concentrations, particularly for the MZ4-C2 simulation in which the additional SOA precursor VOCs were treated. Annual average SOA concentrations predicted by the MZ4-C2 simulation were 1.00 ± 1.04 μg m−3 in South America, 1.57 ± 1.88 μg m−3 in Indonesia, 0.37 ± 0.27 μg m−3 in the USA, and 0.47 ± 0.29 μg m−3 in Europe with corresponding increases of 178, 406, 311 and 292% over the base-case simulation, respectively, primarily due to inclusion of isoprene. The increases in predicted SOA mass concentrations resulted in corresponding increases in SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD by ~ 1–6%. Estimated global SOA production was 5.8, 6.6 and 19.1 Tg yr−1 with corresponding burdens of 0.22, 0.24 and 0.59 Tg for the base-case, MZ4-C1 and MZ4-C2 simulations, respectively. The predicted SOA budgets fell well within reported ranges for comparable modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr−1, but were lower than recently reported observationally constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr−1. For MZ4-C2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface also were in reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Total organic aerosol (OA mass concentrations at the surface, however, were slightly over-predicted in Europe, Amazonian

  7. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahmud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The secondary organic aerosol (SOA module in the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4 has been updated by replacing existing two-product (2p parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS fits, and by treating SOA formation from the following volatile organic compounds (VOCs: isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes. Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base-case and updated model versions. The base-case MOZART-4 predicted annual average SOA of 0.36 ± 0.50 μg m−3 in South America, 0.31 ± 0.38 μg m−3 in Indonesia, 0.09 ± 0.05 μg m−3 in the USA, and 0.12 ± 0.07 μg m−3 in Europe. Concentrations from the updated versions of the model showed a~marked increase in annual average SOA. Using the updated set of parameters alone (MZ4-v1 increased annual average SOA by ~8%, ~16%, ~56%, and ~108% from the base-case in South America, Indonesia, USA, and Europe, respectively. Treatment of additional parent VOCs (MZ4-v2 resulted in an even more dramatic increase of ~178–406% in annual average SOA for these regions over the base-case. The increases in predicted SOA concentrations further resulted in increases in corresponding SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD by <1% for MZ4-v1 and ~1–6% for MZ4-v2. Estimated global SOA production was ~6.6 Tg yr−1 and ~19.1 Tg yr−1 with corresponding burdens of ~0.24 Tg and ~0.59 Tg using MZ4-v1 and MZ4-v2, respectively. The SOA budgets predicted in the current study fall well within reported ranges for similar modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr−1, but are lower than recently reported observationally-constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr−1. With MZ4-v2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface were also in

  8. Legal aspects and international assistance related to the deliberate use of chemicals to cause harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Ian R; Gutschmidt, Kersten; Cosivi, Ottorino

    2005-10-30

    National and international law is an essential component of the array of measures serving to protect against the hostile release of biological or chemical agents, and to help to mitigate the consequences should such a release nevertheless take place. These includes the Geneva Protocol of 1925, the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993, for which the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) has been established in 1997. In addition to the OPCW, the international community has made preparations through the United Nations (e.g. United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Health Organization) for assistance to governments against which biological and chemical weapons might be used. This paper provides an overview of the international mechanisms for assistance and is based on the Second Edition of the Public Health Response to Biological and Chemical Weapons: WHO Guidance (). Toxicologists throughout the world should know these regulations and act accordingly.

  9. Chemical characterization of organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol derived from the photooxidation of alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Matthieu; Da Silva Barbosa, Thais; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    We report the formation of aliphatic organosulfates (OSs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of C10-C12 alkanes. The results complement those from our laboratories reporting the formation of OSs and sulfonates from gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both studies strongly support the formation of OSs from the gas-phase oxidation of anthropogenic precursors, as hypothesized on the basis of recent field studies in which aromatic and aliphatic OSs were detected in fine aerosol collected from several major urban locations. In this study, dodecane, cyclodecane and decalin, considered to be important SOA precursors in urban areas, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber in the presence of either non-acidified or acidified ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Aerosols collected from all experiments were characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Most of the OSs identified could be explained by formation of gaseous epoxide precursors with subsequent acid-catalyzed reactive uptake onto sulfate aerosol and/or heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides. The OSs identified here were also observed and quantified in fine urban aerosol samples collected in Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, CA, USA. Several OSs identified from the photooxidation of decalin and cyclodecane are isobars of known monoterpene organosulfates, and thus care must be taken in the analysis of alkane-derived organosulfates in urban aerosol.

  10. Aerosol chemical composition and light scattering during a winter season in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Gao, Jian; Wang, Han; Chai, Faihe; Wang, Shulan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate PM2.5 contributions to light scattering under different air pollution levels, PM2.5 and its major chemical components, PM10, size-segregated water-soluble ions, and aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) under dry conditions were measured at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013 when heavy pollution events frequently occurred. Measurements were categorized into three pollution levels including heavy-polluted (Air Quality Index (AQI) ≥ 200), light-polluted (200 > AQI ≥ 100) and clean periods (AQI 0.95) during the different pollution levels. The mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM2.5 was 4.9 m2 g-1 during the heavy-polluted period, which was higher than those during the light-polluted (4.3 m2 g-1) and clean periods (3.6 m2 g-1). To further evaluate the impact of individual chemical components of PM2.5 on light scattering, a multiple linear regression equation of measured bsp against the mass concentration of (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, Organic Matter (OM), EC, Fine Soil (FS), Coarse Matter (CM) and Other chemical compounds were performed. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and OM were the dominant species contributing to bsp under both dry and ambient conditions. OM contributed more to bsp than the sum of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 did under the dry condition during all the pollution periods and this was also the case under the ambient condition during the light-polluted and clean periods. However, the total contributions of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 to bsp under the ambient condition was 55%, much more than the 29% contribution from OM during the heavy-polluted period. High (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 concentrations and their hygroscopicity were the main reasons causing visibility degradation during the heavy-polluted period, and the effect can be enhanced under high RH conditions.

  11. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Slade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low-soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA surrogate particles exposed to OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH and O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR. Levoglucosan (LEV, 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC, and potassium sulfate (KS serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~ 0.1, indicating that chemically aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH-exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC or inorganic ions

  12. Temporal and vertical variations of aerosol physical and chemical properties over West Africa: AMMA aircraft campaign in summer 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Matsuki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available While the Sahelian belt in West Africa stretches in the border between the global hot-spots of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols, the presence of West African Monsoon is expected to create significant vertical and temporal variations in the regional aerosol properties through transport and mixing of particles from various sources (mineral dust, biomass burning, sulfates, sea salt. In order to improve our understanding of the evolution of the aerosol-cloud system over such region across the onset of the summer monsoon, the French ATR-42 research aircraft was deployed in Niamey, Niger (13°30' N, 02°05' E in summer 2006, during the three special observation periods (SOPs of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA project. These three SOPs covered both dry and wet periods before and after the onset of the Western African Monsoon.

    State of the art physico-chemical aerosol measurements on the ATR-42 showed a notable seasonal transition in averaged number size distributions where (i the Aitken mode is dominating over the accumulation mode during the dry season preceding the monsoon arrival and (ii the accumulation mode increasingly gained importance after the onset of the West African monsoon and even dominated the Aitken mode after the monsoon had fully developed. The parameters for the mean log-normal distributions observed in respective layers characterized by the different wind regimes (monsoon layer, SAL, free troposphere are presented, together with the major particle compositions found in the accumulation mode particles. Thereby, results of this study should facilitate radiative transfer calculations, validation of satellite remote sensors, and detailed transport modeling by partners within and outside the AMMA community.

    Extended analysis of the chemical composition of single aerosol particles by a transmission electron microscope (TEM coupled to an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX revealed

  13. Fabrication of porous materials (metal, metal oxide and semiconductor) through an aerosol-assisted route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Hiesang

    Porous materials have gained attraction owing to their vast applications in catalysts, sensors, energy storage devices, bio-devices and other areas. To date, various porous materials were synthesized through soft and hard templating approaches. However, a general synthesis method for porous non-oxide materials, metal alloys and semiconductors with tunable structure, composition and morphology has not been developed yet. To address this challenge, this thesis presents an aerosol method towards the synthesis of such materials and their applications for catalysis, hydrogen storage, Li-batteries and photo-catalysis. The first part of this thesis presents the synthesis of porous metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors with controlled pore structure, crystalline structure and morphology. In these synthesis processes, metal salts and organic ligands were employed as precursors to create porous metal-carbon frameworks. During the aerosol process, primary metal clusters and nanoparticles were formed, which were coagulated/ aggregated forming the porous particles. Various porous particles, such as those of metals (e.g., Ni, Pt, Co, Fe, and Ni xPt(1-x)), metal oxides (e.g., Fe3O4 and SnO2) and semiconductors (e.g., CdS, CuInS2, CuInS 2x-ZnS(1-x), and CuInS2x-TiO2(1-x)) were synthesized. The morphology, porous structure and crystalline structure of the particles were regulated through both templating and non-templating methods. The second part of this thesis explores the applications of these materials, including propylene hydrogenation and H2 uptake capacity of porous Ni, NiPt alloys and Ni-Pt composites, Li-storage of Fe3O4 and SnO2, photodegradation of CuInS2-based semiconductors. The effects of morphology, compositions, and porous structure on the device performance were systematically investigated. Overall, this dissertation work unveiled a simple synthesis approach for porous particles of metals, metal alloys, metal oxides, and semiconductors with controlled

  14. Chemical composition of ambient aerosol, ice residues and cloud droplet residues in mixed-phase clouds: single particle analysis during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamphus

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Two different single particle mass spectrometers were operated in parallel at the Swiss High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m a.s.l. during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6 in February and March 2007. During mixed phase cloud events ice crystals from 5 μm up to 20 μm were separated from large ice aggregates, non-activated, interstitial aerosol particles and supercooled droplets using an Ice-Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI. During one cloud period supercooled droplets were additionally sampled and analyzed by changing the Ice-CVI setup. The small ice particles and droplets were evaporated by injection into dry air inside the Ice-CVI. The resulting ice and droplet residues (IR and DR were analyzed for size and composition by two single particle mass spectrometers: a custom-built Single Particle Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT and a commercial Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, TSI Model 3800. During CLACE 6 the SPLAT instrument characterized 355 individual ice residues that produced a mass spectrum for at least one polarity and the ATOFMS measured 152 particles. The mass spectra were binned in classes, based on the combination of dominating substances, such as mineral dust, sulfate, potassium and elemental carbon or organic material. The derived chemical information from the ice residues is compared to the JFJ ambient aerosol that was sampled while the measurement station was out of clouds (several thousand particles analyzed by SPLAT and ATOFMS and to the composition of the residues of supercooled cloud droplets (SPLAT: 162 cloud droplet residues analyzed, ATOFMS: 1094. The measurements showed that mineral dust particles were strongly enhanced in the ice particle residues. 57% of the SPLAT spectra from ice residues were dominated by signatures from mineral compounds, and 78% of the ATOFMS spectra. Sulfate and nitrate containing particles were strongly

  15. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in northwest China: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-12-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of submicron particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 11 July-7 August 2012. The average (PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory (PM1 (NR-(PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105 μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. Organic aerosol (OA) on average consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns, both with peak at ~ 07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8), corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking-emission related OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ~ 07:00 and 15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak between ~ 08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon maximum in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by downward mixing of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during nighttime. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA was

  16. PM2.5 Chemical Compositions and Aerosol Optical Properties in Beijing during the Late Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanbo Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily PM2.5 mass concentrations and chemical compositions together with the aerosol optical properties were measured from 8–28 November 2011 in Beijing. PM2.5 mass concentration varied from 15.6–237.5 μg∙m−3 and showed a mean value of 111.2 ± 73.4 μg∙m−3. Organic matter, NH4NO3 and (NH42SO4 were the major constituents of PM2.5, accounting for 39.4%, 15.4%, and 14.9% of the total mass, respectively, while fine soil, chloride salt, and elemental carbon together accounted for 27.7%. Daily scattering and absorption coefficients (σsc and σap were in the range of 31.1–667 Mm−1 and 8.24–158.0 Mm−1, with mean values of 270 ± 200 Mm−1 and 74.3 ± 43.4 Mm−1. Significant increases in σsc and σap were observed during the pollution accumulation episodes. The revised IMPROVE algorithm was applied to estimate the extinction coefficient (bext. On average, organic matter was the largest contributor, accounting for 44.6% of bext, while (NH42SO4, NH4NO3, elemental carbon, and fine soil accounted for 16.3% 18.0%, 18.6%, and 2.34% of bext, respectively. Nevertheless, the contributions of (NH42SO4 and NH4NO3 were significantly higher during the heavy pollution periods than those on clean days. Typical pollution episodes were also explored, and it has been characterized that secondary formation of inorganic compounds is more important than carbonaceous pollution for visibility impairment in Beijing.

  17. Near Real-Time, Microchip Assay of Aerosol Chemical Composition Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A compact, autonomous and rugged instrument to measure the concentration of inorganic ions, and possibly organic acids, in atmospheric aerosols is proposed. This...

  18. Physico-chemical study of the anthropic aerosol and of its evolutions in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijing aerosols are characterised for the 2003-2004 period using an inclusive experimental set up for aerosol mass, chemistry and number, deployed at three sites. Aerosol size segregation in two fractions (fine and coarse) appears appropriated for source identification and investigations about gas-to-particle interactions. Several various sources contribute to air pollution: traffic, coal burning and industrial activities. The present study also shows how summer aerosol is influenced by the photochemical formation of secondary particles, and the significant amount of coarse and fine mineral dust all year long. Coal burning in winter has a lower influence than assessed in the past. The origin and altitude of the air masses entering Beijing are of key interest to understand the ageing of pollutants and their regional redistribution. By its expected effects onto these regional parameters, climate change may strongly affect Beijing air pollution in the coming decades. (author)

  19. Analysis of the chemical and physical properties of combustion aerosols: State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of combustion aerosols on human health is well documented byepidemiological studies, however the effect of low concentrations of ultrafineparticles on the human lung are not yet fully understood. With the advent ofnovel measurement technologies for simultaneous charact...

  20. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  1. Aerosol characteristics at a rural station in southern peninsular India during CAIPEEX-IGOC: physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, D S; Srivastava, A K; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, M K; Pandey, A K; Tiwari, S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-04-01

    To understand the boundary layer characteristics and pathways of aerosol-cloud interaction, an Integrated Ground Observational Campaign, concurrent with Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment, was conducted by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, under Ministry of Earth Sciences at Mahabubnagar (a rural environment, which is ~100 km away from an urban city Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh), during the period of July-November 2011. Collected samples of PM2.5 and PM10 were analyzed for water-soluble ionic species along with organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). During study period, the average mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were about 50(±10) and 69(±14) μg m(-3), respectively, which are significantly higher than the prescribed Indian National Ambient Air Quality Standards values. The chemical species such as sum of anions and cations from measured chemical constituents were contributed to be 31.27 and 38.49% in PM2.5 and 6.35 and 5.65% to the PM10, whereas carbonaceous species contributed ~17.3 and 20.47% for OC and ~3.0 and 3.10% for EC, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 during study period was ~0.73(±0.2), indicating that the dominance of fine size particles. Carbonaceous analysis results showed that the average concentration of OC was 14 and 8.7 μg m(-3), while EC was 2.1 and 1.5 μg m(-3) for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. The ratios between OC and EC were estimated, which were 6.6 and 5.7 for PM10 and PM2.5, suggesting the presence of secondary organic aerosol. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounts 23% of PM10 in which the contribution of OC is 20% and EC is 3%, while 20% of PM2.5 mass in which the contribution of OC is 17% and EC is 3%. Out of the total aerosols mass, water-soluble constituents contributed an average of 45% in PM10 and 38% in PM2.5 including about 39% anions and 6% cations in PM10, while 31% anions and 7% cations in PM2.5 aerosol mass collectively at study site. PMID

  2. Preparation of silicon carbide SiC-based nanopowders by the aerosol-assisted synthesis and the DC thermal plasma synthesis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czosnek, Cezary, E-mail: czosnek@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Bućko, Mirosław M. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Janik, Jerzy F. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Olejniczak, Zbigniew [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Bystrzejewski, Michał; Łabędź, Olga [University of Warsaw, Department of Chemistry, 1 Pasteura St., 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Huczko, Andrzej, E-mail: ahuczko@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Department of Chemistry, 1 Pasteura St., 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Make-up of the SiC-based nanopowders is a function of the C:Si:O ratio in precursor. • Two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis offers conditions close to equilibrium. • DC thermal plasma synthesis yields kinetically controlled SiC products. - Abstract: Nanosized SiC-based powders were prepared from selected liquid-phase organosilicon precursors by the aerosol-assisted synthesis, the DC thermal plasma synthesis, and a combination of the two methods. The two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis method provides at the end conditions close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The single-stage thermal plasma method is characterized by short particle residence times in the reaction zone, which can lead to kinetically controlled products. The by-products and final nanopowders were characterized by powder XRD, infrared spectroscopy FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy SEM, and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. BET specific surface areas of the products were determined by standard physical adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. The major component in all synthesis routes was found to be cubic silicon carbide β-SiC with average crystallite sizes ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. In some cases, it was accompanied by free carbon, elemental silicon or silica nanoparticles. The final mesoporous β-SiC-based nanopowders have a potential as affordable catalyst supports.

  3. Preparation of silicon carbide SiC-based nanopowders by the aerosol-assisted synthesis and the DC thermal plasma synthesis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Make-up of the SiC-based nanopowders is a function of the C:Si:O ratio in precursor. • Two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis offers conditions close to equilibrium. • DC thermal plasma synthesis yields kinetically controlled SiC products. - Abstract: Nanosized SiC-based powders were prepared from selected liquid-phase organosilicon precursors by the aerosol-assisted synthesis, the DC thermal plasma synthesis, and a combination of the two methods. The two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis method provides at the end conditions close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The single-stage thermal plasma method is characterized by short particle residence times in the reaction zone, which can lead to kinetically controlled products. The by-products and final nanopowders were characterized by powder XRD, infrared spectroscopy FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy SEM, and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. BET specific surface areas of the products were determined by standard physical adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. The major component in all synthesis routes was found to be cubic silicon carbide β-SiC with average crystallite sizes ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. In some cases, it was accompanied by free carbon, elemental silicon or silica nanoparticles. The final mesoporous β-SiC-based nanopowders have a potential as affordable catalyst supports

  4. Review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer for agriculture produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadhel, M.I. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Sopian, K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Alghoul, M.A. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Over the past three decades there has been nearly exponential growth in drying R and D on a global scale. Improving of the drying operation to save energy, improve product quality as well as reduce environmental effect remained as the main objectives of any development of drying system. A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is a new solar drying system, which have contributed to better cost-effectiveness and better quality dried products as well as saving energy. A solar collector is adapted to provide thermal energy in a reactor so a chemical reaction can take place. This reduces the dependency of the drying technology on fossil energy for heating. In this paper a review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is presented (the system model and the results from experimental studies on the system performance are discussed). The review of heat pump dryers and solar assisted heat pump dryer is presented. Description of chemical heat pump types and the overview of chemical heat pump dryer are discussed. The combination of chemical heat pump and solar technology gives extra efficiency in utilizing energy. (author)

  5. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  6. Chemical and physical characteristics of aerosol particles at a remote coastal location, Mace Head, Ireland, during NAMBLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Coe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A suite of aerosol physical and chemical measurements were made at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, Co. Galway, Ireland, a coastal site on the eastern seaboard of the north Atlantic Ocean during NAMBLEX. The data have been used in this paper to show that over a wide range of aerosol sizes there is no impact of the inter-tidal zone or the surf zone on measurements made at 7 m above ground level or higher. During the measurement period a range of air mass types were observed. During anticyclonic periods and conditions of continental outflow Aitken and accumulation mode were enhanced by a factor of 5 compared to the marine sector, whilst coarse mode particles were enhanced during westerly conditions. Baseline marine conditions were rarely met at Mace Head during NAMBLEX and high wind speeds were observed for brief periods only. The NAMBLEX experiment focussed on a detailed assessment of photochemistry in the marine environment, investigating the linkage between the HOx and the halogen radical cycles. Heterogeneous losses are important in both these cycles. In this paper loss rates of gaseous species to aerosol surfaces were calculated for a range of uptake coefficients. Even when the accommodation coefficient is unity, lifetimes due to heterogeneous loss of less than 10 s were never observed and rarely were they less than 500 s. Diffusional limitation to mass transfer is important in most conditions as the coarse mode is always significant. We calculate a minimum overestimate of 50% in the loss rate if this is neglected and so it should always be considered when calculating loss rates of gaseous species to particle surfaces. HO2 and HOI have accommodation coefficients of around 0.03 and hence we calculate lifetimes due to loss to particle surfaces of 2000 s or greater under the conditions experienced during NAMBLEX. Aerosol composition data collected during this experiment provide representative information on the input aerosol

  7. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  8. MORPHOLOGY OF BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS AND UBIQUITY OF 50-NANOMETER BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengfu Fu; Liangjun Xu; Wei Ye; Yiquan Chen; Mingyu Jiang; Xueqin Xu

    2006-01-01

    Different-sized aerosols were collected by an Andersen air sampler to observe the detailed morphology of the black carbon (BC) aerosols which were separated chemically from the other accompanying aerosols, using a Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The results indicate that most BC aerosols are spherical particles of about 50 nm in diameter and with a homogeneous surface. Results also show that these particles aggregate with other aerosols or with themselves to form larger agglomerates in the micrometer range. The shape of these 50-nm BC spherical particles was found to be very similar to that of BC particles released from petroleum-powered vehicular internal combustion engines. These spherical BC particles were shown to be different from the previously reported fullerenes found using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).

  9. Chemical characteristics of organic aerosols in Algiers city area: influence of a fat manufacture plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Meklati, Brahim Youcef; Cecinato, Angelo

    Total concentrations and homologue distributions of organic fraction constituents have been determined in particulate matter emitted from different units of a fat manufacturer (i.e. oils refining and conditioning plants, and production and conditioning units of a soap industry) located in Algiers area, as well as in atmospheric aerosols. In particular n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated. Organic aerosol contents varied broadly among the plant units, depending upon nature of the manufactured products. The percent composition of all classes of compounds investigated in ambient atmosphere was similar to those observed indoor at industrial plant units. Organic acids, n-alkanoic as well as n-alkenoic, appeared by far the most abundant organic constituents of aerosols, both indoor and outdoor, ranging from 7.7 to 19.8 and from 12.7 to 17.1 μg m -3, respectively. The huge occurrence of acids and n-alkanes in ambient aerosols was consistent with their high levels present in oil and fat materials. Among minor components of aerosols, n-alkan-2-ones and PAH, seemed to be related to thermally induced ageing and direct combustion of raw organic material used for oil and soap production.

  10. Summer-winter differences in the relationships among background southeastern U.S. aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships among aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties are useful for evaluating regional climate models, developing satellite-based aerosol retrievals, and understanding aerosol sources and processes. Since aerosol loading and optical properties vary primarily on seasonal scales in the southeastern U.S., it is important that such studies be carried out over multiple seasons but few (if any) such multi-season studies have been conducted in the region. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1080m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were also made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. Some of the major findings will be presented. Higher values of lower tropospheric aerosol light scattering coefficient at 550nm (a proxy for aerosol loading) are associated with higher single-scattering albedo (SSA) and lower hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) during both summer and winter. Absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is typically well under 1 during summer and near 1.3-1.4 during winter. Lowest summer AAE values coincide with large, highly-reflective particles and higher aerosol light scattering coefficient but summer AAE is only weakly anti-correlated with organic and sulfate mass concentrations. Winter AAE is consistent with a mixture of elemental carbon and light-absorbing organic carbon, possibly influenced by regional residential wood-burning during winter. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to sulfate and organic aerosol mass fractions during both summer and winter

  11. Special issue: Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol - Dedication to Professor Magda Claeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Jason D.; Szmigielski, Rafal; Faye McNeill, V.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are suspensions of liquid and solid particles that have diameters ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers (μm). Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5, aerosols with aerodynamic diameters of 2.5 μm or less) are especially important since they can adversely affect air quality and human health as well as play a critical role in Earth's climate system. In terms of aerosol climate effects, PM2.5 can directly affect climate by scattering or absorbing incoming solar radiation or indirectly by acting as nuclei on which cloud droplets and ice particles form. As a result, a better understanding of processes that determine the formation and sinks of PM2.5 is needed for developing effective policies that improve air quality and public health as well as to accurately predict the response of the climate system due to changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  12. Optical and chemical characterization of aerosols emitted from coal, heavy and light fuel oil, and small-scale wood combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Anna K; Saarnio, Karri; Lamberg, Heikki; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Teinilä, Kimmo; Carbone, Samara; Tissari, Jarkko; Niemelä, Ville; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Kytömäki, Jorma; Artaxo, Paulo; Virkkula, Aki; Pirjola, Liisa; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Particle emissions affect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Therefore, it is essential to know the physical and chemical characteristics of them. This work studied the chemical, physical, and optical characteristics of particle emissions from small-scale wood combustion, coal combustion of a heating and power plant, as well as heavy and light fuel oil combustion at a district heating station. Fine particle (PM1) emissions were the highest in wood combustion with a high fraction of absorbing material. The emissions were lowest from coal combustion mostly because of efficient cleaning techniques used at the power plant. The chemical composition of aerosols from coal and oil combustion included mostly ions and trace elements with a rather low fraction of absorbing material. The single scattering albedo and aerosol forcing efficiency showed that primary particles emitted from wood combustion and some cases of oil combustion would have a clear climate warming effect even over dark earth surfaces. Instead, coal combustion particle emissions had a cooling effect. Secondary processes in the atmosphere will further change the radiative properties of these emissions but are not considered in this study.

  13. Review of analytical techniques to determine the chemical forms of vapours and aerosols released from overheated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review has been undertaken of appropriate analytical techniques to monitor and measure the chemical effects that occur in large-scale tests designed to study severe reactor accidents. Various methods have been developed to determine the chemical forms of the vapours, aerosols and deposits generated during and after such integral experiments. Other specific techniques have the long-term potential to provide some of the desired data in greater detail, although considerable efforts are still required to apply these techniques to the study of radioactive debris. Such in-situ and post-test methods of analysis have been also assessed in terms of their applicability to the analysis of samples from the Phebus-FP tests. The recommended in-situ methods of analysis are gamma-ray spectroscopy, potentiometry, mass spectrometry, and Raman/UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Vapour/aerosol and deposition samples should also be obtained at well-defined time intervals during each experiment for subsequent post-test analysis. No single technique can provide all the necessary chemical data from these samples, and the most appropriate method of analysis involves a complementary combination of autoradiography, AES, IR, MRS, SEMS/EDS, SIMS/LMIS, XPS and XRD

  14. Chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol for source apportionment at Monterrey, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Y.; Mendoza, A.; Fraser, M. P.; Herckes, P.

    2015-07-01

    , source attribution results obtained using the CMB model indicate that emissions from motor vehicle exhausts are the most important, accounting for the 64 % of the PM2.5. The vegetative detritus and biomass burning had the smallest contribution (2.2 % of the PM2.5). To our knowledge, this is the second study to explore the broad chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol in Mexico and the first for the MMA.

  15. Chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol for source apportionment at Monterrey, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mancilla

    2015-07-01

    events. Finally, source attribution results obtained using the CMB model indicate that emissions from motor vehicle exhausts are the most important, accounting for the 64 % of the PM2.5. The vegetative detritus and biomass burning had the smallest contribution (2.2 % of the PM2.5. To our knowledge, this is the second study to explore the broad chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol in Mexico and the first for the MMA.

  16. Hygroscopic and chemical properties of aerosols collected near a copper smelter: implications for public and environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2012-09-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g., arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18-0.55 μm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10-0.32 μm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  17. Efficiency of five chemical protective clothing materials against nano and submicron aerosols when submitted to mechanical deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Mehdi; Hallé, Stéphane; Tuduri, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Due to their potential toxicity, the use of nanoparticles in the workplace is a growing concern. Some studies indicate that nanoparticles can penetrate the skin and lead to adverse health effects. Since chemical protective clothing is the last barrier to protect the skin, this study aims to better understand nanoparticle penetration behaviour in dermal protective clothing under mechanical deformation. For this purpose, five of the most common types of fabrics used in protective clothing, one woven and four nonwoven, were chosen and submitted to different simulated exposure conditions. They were tested against polydispersed NaCl aerosols having an electrical-mobility diameter between 14 and 400 nm. A bench-scale exposure setup and a sampling protocol was developed to measure the level of penetration of the aerosols through the material samples of disposable coveralls and lab coat, while subjecting them to mechanical deformations to simulate the conditions of usage in the workplace. Particle size distribution of the aerosol was determined upstream and downstream using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The measured efficiencies demonstrated that the performances of nonwoven materials were similar. Three nonwovens had efficiencies above 99%, while the woven fabric was by far, the least effective. Moreover, the results established that mechanical deformations, as simulated for this study, did not have a significant effect on the fabrics' efficiencies.

  18. Chemical Aging and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity of Biomass Burning Aerosol Proxies in the Presence of OH Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Jonathan H., Jr.

    Biomass burning aerosol (BBA) can adversely impact regional and global air quality and represents a significant source of organic aerosol (OA) to the atmosphere that can affect climate. Aerosol particles can alter the transfer of radiation in earth's atmosphere directly by scattering and absorbing radiation or indirectly via cloud formation. Gas-to-particle, also termed heterogeneous, oxidation reactions can significantly alter the particle's physical and chemical properties. In turn, this can lead to the degradation of biomolecular markers for air quality-related aerosol source apportionment studies, the particles' lifetime, and modify the particles' abilities to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). However, the rates, mechanisms, and conditions by which these multiphase oxidation reactions occur and influence the CCN activity of OA is not well understood. The work presented here aims to determine the reactivity and products from the interaction of BBA surrogate-particles and trace gas-phase oxidants and to link the effects of OA chemical aging on the particles' ability to nucleate clouds. The reactive uptake of OH by BBA surrogate-substrates and particles, including levoglucosan, nitroguaiacol, abietic acid, and methyl-nitrocatechol, was determined as a function of both OH concentration and relative humidity (RH) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry coupled to various flow reactors. OH reactive uptake decreased with increasing OH concentration, indicative of OH adsorption followed by reaction. OH oxidation led to significant volatilization, i.e. mass loss of the organic material, as determined by application of high resolution proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Volatilized reaction products were identified, providing mechanistic insight of the chemical pathways in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of BBA. The reactive uptake of OH by levoglucosan particles increased with RH due to enhanced OH and organic bulk diffusivity. In

  19. Sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of UTLS secondary sulfate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring upper-tropospheric-lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS sulfate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulfuric acid/water droplets, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulfate and bisulfate ions and the undissociated sulfuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulfuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interfering parameters like the ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile uncertainties

  20. Functional group analysis by H NMR/chemical derivatization for the characterization of organic aerosol from the SMOCC field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tagliavini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble organic compounds (WSOC in aerosol samples collected in the Amazon Basin in a period encompassing the middle/late dry season and the beginning of the wet season, were investigated by H NMR spectroscopy. HiVol filter samples (PM2.5 and PM>2.5 and size-segregated samples from multistage impactor were subjected to H NMR characterization. The H NMR methodology, recently developed for the analysis of organic aerosol samples, has been improved by exploiting chemical methylation of carboxylic groups with diazomethane, which allows the direct determination of the carboxylic acid content of WSOC. The content of carboxylic carbons for the different periods and sizes ranged from 12% to 20% of total measured carbon depending on the season and aerosol size, with higher contents for the fine particles in the transition and wet periods with respect to the dry period. A comprehensive picture is presented of WSOC functional groups in aerosol samples representative of the biomass burning period, as well as of transition and semi-clean atmospheric conditions. A difference in composition between fine (PM2.5 and coarse (PM>2.5 size fractions emerged from the NMR data, the former showing higher alkylic content, the latter being largely dominated by R-O-H (or R-O-R' functional groups. Very small particles (<0.14 μm, however, present higher alkyl-chain content and less oxygenated carbons than larger fine particles (0.42–1.2 μm. More limited variations were found between the average compositions in the different periods of the campaign.

  1. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, T.; Kojima, T.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Rosa, J. de la; Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Chiari, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-01-01

    The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and M

  2. Size-Resolved Chemical Analysis of Individual Atmospheric Aerosols near Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsch, M.; Barrett, T. E.; Sheesley, R. J.; Pratt, K.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is having noticeable impacts on the Arctic with increasing temperatures and decreasing sea ice coverage. Loss of sea ice is leading to development of oil and gas extraction activities and increased shipping in the Arctic. Arctic aerosol emissions are expected to increase with increasing anthropogenic activities and production of sea spray aerosol. These particles have significant climate effects, including interacting with radiation, forming cloud droplets and ice crystals, and depositing onto surfaces. Given the complexity and evolving nature of atmospheric particles, as well as the challenges associated with Arctic measurements, significant uncertainties remain in our understanding of particle sources, evolution, and impacts in the Arctic. To investigate the size and chemistry of individual particles in real-time, an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed to Barrow, Alaska during August-September 2015. Parallel size-resolved number concentration measurements allow the quantification of number and mass concentrations of particles from various sources, including sea spray aerosol, biomass burning, and diesel combustion, for example.

  3. Mass distributions and morphological and chemical characterization of urban aerosols in the continental Balkan area (Belgrade).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đorđević, D; Buha, J; Stortini, A M; Mihajlidi-Zelić, A; Relić, D; Barbante, C; Gambaro, A

    2016-01-01

    This work presents characteristics of atmospheric aerosols of urban central Balkans area, using a size-segregated aerosol sampling method, calculation of mass distributions, SEM/EDX characterization, and ICP/MS analysis. Three types of mass distributions were observed: distribution with a pronounced domination of coarse mode, bimodal distribution, and distribution with minimum at 1 μm describing the urban aerosol. SEM/EDX analyses have shown morphological difference and variation in the content of elements in samples. EDX spectra demonstrate that particles generally contain the following elements: Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg, Ni, K, Si, S. Additionally, the presence of As, Br, Sn, and Zn found in air masses from southeast segment points out the anthropogenic activities most probably from mining activities in southeastern part of Serbia. The ratio Al/Si equivalent to the ratio of desert dust was associated with air masses coming from southeastern and southwestern segments, pointing to influences from North Africa and Middle East desert areas whereas the Al/Si ratio in other samples is significantly lower. In several samples, we found high values of aluminum in the nucleation mode. Samples with low share of crustal elements in the coarse mode are collected when Mediterranean air masses prevailed, while high share in the coarse mode was associated with continental air masses that could be one of the approaches for identification of the aerosol origin. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:26347417

  4. Modeling of photolysis rates over Europe: impact on chemical gaseous species and aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact of photolysis rate calculation on European air composition and air quality monitoring. In particular, the impact of cloud parametrisation and the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates are analysed. Photolysis rates are simulated using the Fast-JX photolysis scheme and gas and aerosol concentrations over Europe are simulated with the regional model Polair3D of the Polyphemus platform. The photolysis scheme is first use to update the clear sky tabulation used in the previous Polair3D version. Important differences in photolysis rates are simulated, mainly due to updated cross-sections in the Fast-JX scheme. In the previous Polair3D version, clouds were taken into account by multiplying the clear-sky photolysis rates using a correction factor. In a second stage, the impact of clouds is taken into account more accurately by simulating them directly in the photolysis scheme. Differences in photolysis rates inside clouds are as high as differences between simulations with and without clouds. Outside clouds, the differences are small. The largest difference in gas concentrations is simulated for OH with a mean increase of its tropospheric burden of 4 to 5%.

    To take into account the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates, Polair3D and Fast-JX are coupled. Photolysis rates are updated every hour. Large impact on photolysis rates is observed at the ground, decreasing with altitude. The aerosol species that impact the most photolysis rates is dust especially in South Europe. Strong impact is also observed over anthropogenic emission regions (Paris, The Po and the Ruhr Valley where mainly nitrate and sulphate reduced the incoming radiation. Differences in photolysis rates lead to changes in gas concentrations, with the largest impact simulated for OH and NO concentrations. At the ground, monthly mean concentrations of both species are reduced over Europe by around 10 to 14% and their tropospheric burden by around 10

  5. Microwave-irradiation-assisted hybrid chemical approach for titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesis: microbial and cytotoxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Rajendran, Bhavapriya; Avadhani, Ganesh S; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. It is used for protection against UV exposure due to its light-scattering properties and high refractive index. Though TNPs are increasingly used, the synthesis of TNPs is tedious and time consuming; therefore, in the present study, microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach was used for TNP synthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNPs can be synthesized only in 2.5 h; however, the commonly used chemical approach using muffle furnace takes 5 h. The activity of TNP depends on the synthetic protocol; therefore, the present study also determined the effect of microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach synthetic protocol on microbial and cytotoxicity. The results showed that TNP has the best antibacterial activity in decreasing order from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The IC50 values of TNP for HCT116 and A549 were found to be 6.43 and 6.04 ppm, respectively. Cell death was also confirmed from trypan blue exclusion assay and membrane integrity loss was observed. Therefore, the study determines that the microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach is time-saving; hence, this technique can be upgraded from lab scale to industrial scale via pilot plant scale. Moreover, it is necessary to find the mechanism of action at the molecular level to establish the reason for greater bacterial and cytotoxicological toxicity. Graphical abstract A graphical representation of TNP synthesis.

  6. Microwave-irradiation-assisted hybrid chemical approach for titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesis: microbial and cytotoxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Rajendran, Bhavapriya; Avadhani, Ganesh S; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. It is used for protection against UV exposure due to its light-scattering properties and high refractive index. Though TNPs are increasingly used, the synthesis of TNPs is tedious and time consuming; therefore, in the present study, microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach was used for TNP synthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNPs can be synthesized only in 2.5 h; however, the commonly used chemical approach using muffle furnace takes 5 h. The activity of TNP depends on the synthetic protocol; therefore, the present study also determined the effect of microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach synthetic protocol on microbial and cytotoxicity. The results showed that TNP has the best antibacterial activity in decreasing order from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The IC50 values of TNP for HCT116 and A549 were found to be 6.43 and 6.04 ppm, respectively. Cell death was also confirmed from trypan blue exclusion assay and membrane integrity loss was observed. Therefore, the study determines that the microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach is time-saving; hence, this technique can be upgraded from lab scale to industrial scale via pilot plant scale. Moreover, it is necessary to find the mechanism of action at the molecular level to establish the reason for greater bacterial and cytotoxicological toxicity. Graphical abstract A graphical representation of TNP synthesis. PMID:26976013

  7. Phase state of ambient aerosol linked with water uptake and chemical aging in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Hu, Weiwei; Leong, Yu J.; Taylor, Nathan F.; Miettinen, Pasi; Palm, Brett B.; Mikkonen, Santtu; Collins, Don R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Virtanen, Annele

    2016-09-01

    During the summer 2013 Southern Aerosol and Oxidant Study (SOAS) field campaign in a rural site in the southeastern United States, the effect of hygroscopicity and composition on the phase state of atmospheric aerosol particles dominated by the organic fraction was studied. The analysis is based on hygroscopicity measurements by a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA), physical phase state investigations by an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI) and composition measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). To study the effect of atmospheric aging on these properties, an OH-radical oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was used to simulate longer atmospheric aging times of up to 3 weeks. Hygroscopicity and bounce behavior of the particles had a clear relationship showing higher bounce at elevated relative humidity (RH) values for less hygroscopic particles, which agrees well with earlier laboratory studies. Additional OH oxidation of the aerosol particles in the OFR increased the O : C and the hygroscopicity resulting in liquefying of the particles at lower RH values. At the highest OH exposures, the inorganic fraction starts to dominate the bounce process due to production of inorganics and concurrent loss of organics in the OFR. Our results indicate that at typical ambient RH and temperature, organic-dominated particles stay mostly liquid in the atmospheric conditions in the southeastern US, but they often turn semisolid when dried below ˜ 50 % RH in the sampling inlets. While the liquid phase state suggests solution behavior and equilibrium partitioning for the SOA particles in ambient air, the possible phase change in the drying process highlights the importance of thoroughly considered sampling techniques of SOA particles.

  8. Chemical composition and aerosol size distribution of the middle mountain range in the Nepal Himalayas during the 2009 pre-monsoon season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shrestha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particle number size distribution and chemical composition were measured at two low altitude sites, one urban and one relatively pristine valley, in Central Nepal during the 2009 pre-monsoon season (May–June. This is the first time that aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured simultaneously at lower elevation in the Middle Himalayan region in Nepal. The aerosol size distribution was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, 14~340 nm, and the chemical composition of the filter samples collected during the field campaign was analyzed in the laboratory. Teflon membrane filters were used for ion chromatography (IC and water-soluble organic carbon and nitrogen analysis. Quartz fiber filters were used for organic carbon and elemental carbon analysis. Multi-lognormal fits to the measured aerosol size distribution indicated a consistent larger mode around 100 nm which is usually the oldest, most processed background aerosol. The smaller mode was located around 20 nm, which is indicative of fresh but not necessarily local aerosol. The diurnal cycle of the aerosol number concentration showed the presence of two peaks (early morning and evening, during the transitional period of boundary layer growth and collapse. The increase in number concentration during the peak period was observed for the entire size distribution. Although the possible contribution of local emissions in size ranges similar to the larger mode cannot be completely ruled out, another plausible explanation is the mixing of aged elevated aerosol in the residual layer during the morning period as suggested by previous studies. Similarly, the evening time concentration peaks when the boundary layer becomes shallow concurrent with increase in local activity. A decrease in aerosol number concentration was observed during the nighttime with the development of cold (downslope mountain winds that force the low level warmer air in the valley to

  9. Source identification and airborne chemical characterisation of aerosol pollution from long-range transport over Greenland during POLARCAT summer campaign 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We deployed an aerosol mass spectrometer during the POLARCAT (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements and Models, of Climate, Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport summer campaign in Greenland in June/July 2008 on the research aircraft ATR-42. Online size resolved chemical composition data of submicron aerosol were collected up to 7.6 km altitude in the region 60 to 71° N and 40 to 60° W. Biomass burning (BB and fossil fuel combustion (FF plumes originating from North America, Asia, Siberia and Europe were sampled. Transport pathways of detected plumes included advection below 700 hPa, air mass uplifting in warm conveyor belts, and high altitude transport in the upper troposphere. By means of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, trace gas analysis of O3 and CO, particle size distributions and aerosol chemical composition 48 pollution events were identified and classified into five chemically distinct categories. Aerosol from North American BB consisted of 22% particulate sulphate, while with increasing anthropogenic and Asian influence aerosol was composed of up to 37% sulphate category mean value. Overall, it was found that the organic matter fraction was larger (85% in pollution plumes than for background conditions (71%. Despite different source regions and emission types the particle oxygen to carbon ratio of all plume classes was around 1 indicating low-volatile highly oxygenated aerosol. Also the volume size distributions were rather similar for all sampled plume categories. This can be explained by the relatively long transport times of roughly one week from North America and two weeks from Asia/Siberia. The derived aerosol lifetime for North American emissions was about 9 ± 2 days.

  10. Synthesis of Carbon Nano tubes from Palm Oil Using Zinc Nitrate as a Catalyst by Aerosol-assisted Catalytic Single Furnace CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nano tubes (CNTs) were formed by Aerosol-Assisted Catalytic Single furnace CVD (AACSFCVD) System. This method was based on the pyrolysis of liquid aerosols containing 0.05 M Zinc Nitrate Zn (NO3)2.H2O solution as catalyst into the furnace which contains hydrocarbons as carbon source (Palm Oil). The samples were prepared by vaporization of the catalyst source heated at 180 degree Celsius into the reaction furnace with the Palm Oil precursor in an alumina boat. The reaction furnace was heated at 800-900 degree Celsius for 1 hour depositing CNTs which was then annealed at 450 degree Celsius to eliminate impurities in the CNTs. Then, the sample was characterized using Raman Spectroscope (RS) obtaining Raman spectra and the image of the CNTs produced were obtained from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). (author)

  11. Physical properties, chemical composition, sources, spatial distribution and sinks of indoor aerosol particles in a university lecture hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, I.; Dosztály, K.; Borsós, T.; Söveges, B.; Weidinger, T.; Kristóf, G.; Péter, N.; Kertész, Zs.

    2013-01-01

    PM10 mass, particle number (N) and CO2 concentrations, particle number size distributions and meteorological parameters were determined with high time resolution, and daily aerosol samples were collected in the PM10-2.0 and PM2.0 size fractions for chemical analysis in the middle of a university lecture hall for one week. Median concentrations for the PM10 mass and N of 15.3 μg m-3 and 3.7 × 103 cm-3, respectively were derived. The data are substantially smaller than the related outdoor levels or typical values for residences. There were considerable concentration differences for workdays, weekends and various lectures. Main sources of PM10 mass include the usage of chalk sticks for writing, wiping the blackboard, ordinary movements and actions of students and cleaning. High PM10 mass concentration levels up to 100 μg m-3 were realised for short time intervals after wiping the blackboard. The mass concentrations decreased rapidly after the emission source ceased to be active. Two classes of coarse particles were identified. General indoor dust particles exhibited a residence time of approximately 35 min, while the residence time for the chalk dust particles was approximately 20 min as lower estimates. Emission source rate for wiping the blackboard was estimated to be between 8 and 14 mg min-1. This represents a substantial emission rate but the source is active only up to 1 min. Suspension of the chalk (made mainly of gypsum) dust particles was confirmed by enrichment of Ca and S in the hall with respect to ambient urban aerosol. Contribution of ambient aerosol via the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) facility was considerable for time intervals when the indoor sources of PM10 mass were not intensive. The HVAC facility introduces, however, the major amount of aerosol particles from the outdoors as far as their number concentration is regarded. Mean contribution of ultrafine particles to the total particle number was (69 ± 7)%, which is smaller

  12. Continuous measurements at the urban roadside in an Asian megacity by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM): particulate matter characteristics during fall and winter seasons in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C.; Lee, B. P.; Huang, D.; Jie Li, Y.; Schurman, M. I.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Chan, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    Non-refractory submicron aerosol is characterized using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) in the fall and winter seasons of 2013 on the roadside in an Asian megacity environment in Hong Kong. Organic aerosol (OA), characterized by application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), and sulfate are found to be dominant. Traffic-related organic aerosol shows good correlation with other vehicle-related species, and cooking aerosol displays clear mealtime concentration maxima and association with surface winds from restaurant areas. Contributions of individual species and OA factors to high NR-PM1 are analyzed for hourly data and daily data; while cooking emissions in OA contribute to high hourly concentrations, particularly during mealtimes, secondary organic aerosol components are responsible for episodic events and high day-to-day PM concentrations. Clean periods are either associated with precipitation, which reduces secondary OA with a lesser impact on primary organics, or clean oceanic air masses with reduced long-range transport and better dilution of local pollution. Haze events are connected with increases in contribution of secondary organic aerosol, from 30 to 50 % among total non-refractory organics, and the influence of continental air masses.

  13. Continuous measurements at the urban roadside in an Asian Megacity by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM: particulate matter characteristics during fall and winter seasons in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-refractory submicron aerosol is characterized using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM in the fall and winter seasons of 2013 at the roadside in an Asian megacity environment in Hong Kong. Organic aerosol (OA, characterized by application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF, and sulfate are found dominant. Traffic-related organic aerosol shows good correlation with other vehicle-related species, and cooking aerosol displays clear meal-time concentration maxima and association with surface winds from restaurant areas. Contributions of individual species and OA factors to high NR-PM1 are analyzed for hourly data and daily data; while cooking emissions in OA contribute to high hourly concentrations, particularly during meal times, secondary organic aerosol components are responsible for episodic events and high day-to-day PM concentrations. Clean periods are either associated with precipitation, which reduces secondary OA with a~lesser impact on primary organics, or clean oceanic air masses with reduced long-range transport and better dilution of local pollution. Haze events are connected with increases in contribution of secondary organic aerosol, from 30 to 50 % among total non-refractory organics, and influence of continental air masses.

  14. Fabrication of ordered nanoporous anodic alumina prepatterned by mold-assisted chemical etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leu Ing-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, a simple and cost-effective method to create patterned nanoindentations on Al surface via mold-assisted chemical etching process is demonstrated. This report shows the reaction-diffusion method which formed nanoscale shallow etch pits by the absorption/liberation behaviors of chemical etchant in poly(dimethylsiloxane stamp. During subsequent anodization, it was possible to obtain the ordered nanopore arrays with 277 nm pitch that were guided by the prepatterned etch pits. The prepatterned etch pits obtained can guide the growth of AAO nanopores during anodization and facilitate the preparation of ordered nanopore arrays.

  15. Laser-assisted chemical liquid-phase deposition of metals for micro- and optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Kordás, K. (Krisztián)

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The demands toward the development of simple and cost-effective fabrication methods of metallic structures with high lateral resolution on different substrates - applied in many fields of technology, such as in microelectronics, optoelectronics, micromechanics as well as in sensor and actuator applications - gave the idea to perform this research. Due to its simplicity, laser-assisted chemical liquid-phase deposition (LCLD) has been investigated and applied for the metallization o...

  16. Connecting Organic Aerosol Climate-Relevant Properties to Chemical Mechanisms of Sources and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Joel

    2015-01-26

    The research conducted on this project aimed to improve our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere, and how the properties of the SOA impact climate through its size, phase state, and optical properties. The goal of this project was to demonstrate that the use of molecular composition information to mechanistically connect source apportionment and climate properties can improve the physical basis for simulation of SOA formation and properties in climate models. The research involved developing and improving methods to provide online measurements of the molecular composition of SOA under atmospherically relevant conditions and to apply this technology to controlled simulation chamber experiments and field measurements. The science we have completed with the methodology will impact the simulation of aerosol particles in climate models.

  17. Mid-Infrared Mapping of Jupiter's Temperatures, Aerosol Opacity and Chemical Distributions with IRTF/TEXES

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, L N; Orton, G S; Sinclair, J A; Giles, R S; Irwin, P G J; Encrenaz, T

    2016-01-01

    Global maps of Jupiter's atmospheric temperatures, gaseous composition and aerosol opacity are derived from a programme of 5-20 $\\mu$m mid-infrared spectroscopic observations using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Image cubes from December 2014 in eight spectral channels, with spectral resolutions of $R\\sim2000-12000$ and spatial resolutions of $2-4^\\circ$ latitude, are inverted to generate 3D maps of tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, 2D maps of upper tropospheric aerosols, phosphine and ammonia, and 2D maps of stratospheric ethane and acetylene. The results are compared to a re-analysis of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations acquired during Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter in December 2000, demonstrating that this new archive of ground-based mapping spectroscopy can match and surpass the quality of previous investigations, and will permit future studies of Jupiter's evolving atmosphere. We identify mid-i...

  18. Production Mechanisms, Number Concentration, Size Distribution. Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Petters, Markus; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bates. Tim; O'Dowd, Colin; Reid, Jeff; Lewis, Ernie R.; Gantt, Brett; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Bird, James; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ceburnis, Darius; Chang, Rachel; Clark, Antony; deLeeuw, Gerrit; Deane, Grant; DeMott, Paul J.; Elliot, Scott; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fairall, Chris W.; Hawkins, Lelia; Hu, Yongxiang; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Over forty scientists from six countries convened in Raleigh, NC on June 4-6 2012 to review the status and prospects of sea spray aerosol research. Participants were researchers from the oceanography and atmospheric science communities, including academia, private industry, and government agencies. The recommendations from the working groups are summarized in a science prioritization matrix that is meant to prioritize the research agenda and identify areas of investigation by the magnitude of their impact on proposed science questions. Str

  19. Aerosol generation and charging phenomena in plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Bruce Riley

    This thesis is concerned with advancing the theoretical study of the origin and acquisition of particle charge from aerosol generation. A newly designed integral mobility charge analyzer was constructed and calibrated to measure the electrical charge distribution on aerosol particles between 10 nanometer (nm) and 10 micrometer ( m m). The charge analyzer can be used in a wide variety of laboratory and industrial applications due to its broad operating range. Initially, the analyzer performance was tested by generating a variety of aerosol particles with and without neutralization by two different radioactive sources. As a result, experimental charge distributions can be compared with analytical and numerical models of spray and contact electrification related to the interface's double layer. The liquid surface can be simply modeled as a flat plate electrical capacitor with a stored dipole charge layer near the interface. Experimental research will investigate the charge state of a surface double layer using the interaction of dissolved particles. Ion interactions with a particle- liquid interface in the electrical double layer can be analyzed by measuring the aerosol charge distribution from different concentrations of salts, colloids and organic solutions. However, the main thesis research goal is to monitor charged contaminants in process exhaust using the developed integral mobility charge analyzer. Experimental measurements can then be correlated with the dynamic behavior of different nucleated species in the reactor. Hypothetically, particles formed in the plasma volume will have a different charge and size distribution than exhaust line particles originating from unreacted gas species in the pump line. A thorough understanding of the charge level of particles within the plasma volume is necessary to understand the charging, trapping and behavior of contaminant species in the CVD film processes. Charge neutralization by free ion attachment in the exhaust lines

  20. Mid-infrared mapping of Jupiter's temperatures, aerosol opacity and chemical distributions with IRTF/TEXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, T. K.; Orton, G. S.; Sinclair, J. A.; Giles, R. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Encrenaz, T.

    2016-11-01

    Global maps of Jupiter's atmospheric temperatures, gaseous composition and aerosol opacity are derived from a programme of 5-20 μm mid-infrared spectroscopic observations using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Image cubes from December 2014 in eight spectral channels, with spectral resolutions of R ∼2000 - 12 , 000 and spatial resolutions of 2-4° latitude, are inverted to generate 3D maps of tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, 2D maps of upper tropospheric aerosols, phosphine and ammonia, and 2D maps of stratospheric ethane and acetylene. The results are compared to a re-analysis of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations acquired during Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter in December 2000, demonstrating that this new archive of ground-based mapping spectroscopy can match and surpass the quality of previous investigations, and will permit future studies of Jupiter's evolving atmosphere. The visibility of cool zones and warm belts varies from channel to channel, suggesting complex vertical variations from the radiatively-controlled upper troposphere to the convective mid-troposphere. We identify mid-infrared signatures of Jupiter's 5-μm hotspots via simultaneous M, N and Q-band observations, which are interpreted as temperature and ammonia variations in the northern Equatorial Zone and on the edge of the North Equatorial Belt (NEB). Equatorial plumes enriched in NH3 gas are located south-east of NH3-desiccated 'hotspots' on the edge of the NEB. Comparison of the hotspot locations in several channels across the 5-20 μm range indicate that these anomalous regions tilt westward with altitude. Aerosols and PH3 are both enriched at the equator but are not co-located with the NH3 plumes. The equatorial temperature minimum and PH3/aerosol maxima have varied in amplitude over time, possibly as a result of periodic equatorial brightenings and the fresh updrafts of

  1. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kitanovski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((–ESI-MS/MS. The NMR and product ion (MS2 spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG, 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG, and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG. Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia by means of HPLC/(–ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  2. Characterization of Organic Nitrate Formation in Limonene Secondary Organic Aerosol using High-Resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxon, Cameron; Hammes, Julia; Peng, Jianfei; Hallquist, Mattias; Pathak, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that organic nitrates (RONO2) are prevalent in the boundary layer, and can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Monoterpenes, including limonene, have been shown to be precursors for the formation of these organic nitrates. Limonene has two double bonds, either of which may be oxidized by NO3 or O3. This leads to the generation of products that can subsequently condense or partition into the particle phase, producing secondary organic aerosol. In order to further elucidate the particle and gas phase product distribution of organic nitrates forming from the reactions of limonene and the nitrate radical (NO3), a series of experiments were performed in the Gothenburg Flow Reactor for Oxidation Studies at Low Temperatures (G-FROST), described by previous work. N2O5 was used as the source for NO3 and NO2, and a characterized diffusion source was used to introduce limonene into the flow reactor. All experiments were conducted in the absence of light, and the concentration of limonene was increased step-wise throughout each experiment to modify the ratio of N2O5to limonene. The experiments were conducted such that both limonene- and N2O5-limited regimes were present. Gas and particle phase products were measured using an iodide High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) coupled to a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO, and particle size and SOA mass concentrations were derived using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CIMS measurement techniques have previously been employed for the measurement of organic nitrate products of such compounds using multiple reagent ions. The use of this instrumentation allowed for the identification of chemical formulas for gas and particle phase species. The findings from the experiments will be presented in terms of the relative gas-particle partitioning of major products and the effects of N2O5/limonene ratios on product distributions. Additionally, a

  3. Chemical Imaging of Ambient Aerosol Particles: Observational Constraints on Mixing State Parameterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan

    2015-09-28

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy/near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on June 27th and 28th during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects (CARES) study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. Both microscopy imaging techniques showed more changes over these two days in the mixing state at the T0 site than at the T1 site. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a build-up of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this build-up. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations; the first was dominated by aged sea salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population), the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  4. Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alpert, Peter; Knopf, Daniel A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.

    2015-09-01

    A new parameterization for quantifying the mixing state of aerosol populations has been applied for the first time to samples of ambient particles analyzed using spectro-microscopy techniques. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy/near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM/NEXAFS) and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDX) were used to probe the composition of the organic and inorganic fraction of individual particles collected on 27 and 28 June during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects study in the Central Valley, California. The first field site, T0, was located in downtown Sacramento, while T1 was located near the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mass estimates of the aerosol particle components were used to calculate mixing state metrics, such as the particle-specific diversity, bulk population diversity, and mixing state index, for each sample. The STXM data showed evidence of changes in the mixing state associated with a buildup of organic matter confirmed by collocated measurements, and the largest impact on the mixing state was due to an increase in soot dominant particles during this buildup. The mixing state from STXM was similar between T0 and T1, indicating that the increased organic fraction at T1 had a small effect on the mixing state of the population. The CCSEM/EDX analysis showed the presence of two types of particle populations: the first was dominated by aged sea-salt particles and had a higher mixing state index (indicating a more homogeneous population); the second was dominated by carbonaceous particles and had a lower mixing state index.

  5. The chemical and microphysical properties of secondary organic aerosols from Holm Oak emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lang-Yona

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years. But, possible effects of climate change on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC emissions as well as on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA produced from these VOC are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature on the VOC emissions of Mediterranean Holm Oak and small Mediterranean stand of Wild Pistacio, Aleppo Pine, and Palestine Oak have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber. For Holm Oak the optical and microphysical properties of the resulting SOA were investigated.

    Monoterpenes dominated the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5% and Mediterranean stand (97%. Higher temperatures enhanced the overall VOC emission but with different ratios of the emitted species. The amount of SOA increased linearly with the emission strength with a fractional mass yield of 6.0±0.6%, independent of the detailed emission pattern. The investigated particles were highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor of 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation was 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties did not depend on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/−0.1 of the SOA observed by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry.

    The increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈20% per degree was stronger than e.g. for Boreal tree species (≈10% per degree. The SOA yield for Mediterranean trees determined here is similar as for Boreal trees. Increasing mean temperature in Mediterranean areas could thus have a stronger impact on BVOC emissions and SOA formation than in areas with Boreal forests.

  6. The chemical and microphysical properties of secondary organic aerosols from Holm Oak emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Yona, N.; Rudich, Y.; Mentel, Th. F.; Bohne, A.; Buchholz, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Spindler, C.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2010-08-01

    The Mediterranean region is expected to experience substantial climatic change in the next 50 years. But, possible effects of climate change on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well as on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) produced from these VOC are yet unexplored. To address such issues, the effects of temperature on the VOC emissions of Mediterranean Holm Oak and small Mediterranean stand of Wild Pistacio, Aleppo Pine, and Palestine Oak have been studied in the Jülich plant aerosol atmosphere chamber. For Holm Oak the optical and microphysical properties of the resulting SOA were investigated. Monoterpenes dominated the VOC emissions from Holm Oak (97.5%) and Mediterranean stand (97%). Higher temperatures enhanced the overall VOC emission but with different ratios of the emitted species. The amount of SOA increased linearly with the emission strength with a fractional mass yield of 6.0±0.6%, independent of the detailed emission pattern. The investigated particles were highly scattering with no absorption abilities. Their average hygroscopic growth factor of 1.13±0.03 at 90% RH with a critical diameter of droplet activation was 100±4 nm at a supersaturation of 0.4%. All microphysical properties did not depend on the detailed emission pattern, in accordance with an invariant O/C ratio (0.57(+0.03/-0.1)) of the SOA observed by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry. The increase of Holm oak emissions with temperature (≈20% per degree) was stronger than e.g. for Boreal tree species (≈10% per degree). The SOA yield for Mediterranean trees determined here is similar as for Boreal trees. Increasing mean temperature in Mediterranean areas could thus have a stronger impact on BVOC emissions and SOA formation than in areas with Boreal forests.

  7. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2016-02-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for solid fuel OA and hydrocarbon-like OA, these three factors have similar volatility, which is inferred from the change in mass concentration after heating at 120 °C. Finally, we discuss the relationship

  8. Sources, seasonality, and trends of Southeast US aerosol: an integrated analysis of surface, aircraft, and satellite observations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We use an ensemble of surface (EPA CSN, IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET, aircraft (SEAC4RS, and satellite (MODIS, MISR observations over the Southeast US during the summer-fall of 2013 to better understand aerosol sources in the region and the relationship between surface particulate matter (PM and aerosol optical depth (AOD. The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM with 25 km × 25 km resolution over North America is used as a common platform to interpret measurements of different aerosol variables made at different times and locations. Sulfate and organic aerosol (OA are the main contributors to surface PM2.5 (mass concentration of PM finer than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter and AOD over the Southeast US. GEOS-Chem simulation of sulfate requires a missing oxidant, taken here to be stabilized Criegee intermediates, but which could alternatively reflect an unaccounted for heterogeneous process. Biogenic isoprene and monoterpenes account for 60 % of OA, anthropogenic sources for 30 %, and open fires for 10 %. 60 % of total aerosol mass is in the mixed layer below 1.5 km, 20 % in the cloud convective layer at 1.5–3 km, and 20 % in the free troposphere above 3 km. This vertical profile is well captured by GEOS-Chem, arguing against a high-altitude source of OA. The extent of sulfate neutralization (f = [NH4+]/(2[SO42−] + [NO3−] is only 0.5–0.7 mol mol−1 in the observations, despite an excess of ammonia present, which could reflect suppression of ammonia uptake by organic aerosol. This would explain the long-term decline of ammonium aerosol in the Southeast US, paralleling that of sulfate. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction over the Southeast US follows closely that of aerosol mass. GEOS-Chem reproduces observed total column aerosol mass over the Southeast US within 6 %, column aerosol extinction within 16 %, and space-based AOD within 21 %. The large AOD decline observed from summer to winter is driven by sharp declines in both

  9. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Garcia Guillen, G.; Aguilar Martinez, J.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties.

  10. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties

  11. ARTICLES: Influence Factors on Particle Growth for On-line Aerosol Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei-wei; Ti, Ru-fang; Zhang, Zi-Iiang; Zheng, Hai-yang; Fang, Li

    2010-06-01

    An evaporation/condensation flow cell was developed and interfaced with the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line bioaerosol detection and characterization, which allows matrix addition by condensation onto the laboratory-generated bioaerosol particles. The final coated particle exiting from the condenser is then introduced into the aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer or home-built aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and its aerodynamic size directly effects on the matrix-to-analyte molar ratio, which is very important for MALDI technique. In order to observe the protonated analyte molecular ion, and then determine the classification of biological aerosols, the matrix-to-analyte molar ratio must be appropriate. Four experimental parameters, including the temperature of the heated reservoir, the initial particle size, its number concentration, and the matrix material, were tested experimentally to analyze their influences on the final particle size. This technique represents an on-line system of detection that has the potential to provide rapid and reliable identification of airborne biological aerosols.

  12. Simulating the detailed chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol formed on a regional scale during the TORCH 2003 campaign in the southern UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Following on from the companion study (Johnson et al., 2006, a photochemical trajectory model (PTM has been used to simulate the chemical composition of organic aerosol for selected events during the 2003 TORCH (Tropospheric Organic Chemistry Experiment field campaign. The PTM incorporates the speciated emissions of 124 non-methane anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC and three representative biogenic VOC, a highly-detailed representation of the atmospheric degradation of these VOC, the emission of primary organic aerosol (POA material and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA material. SOA formation was represented by the transfer of semi- and non-volatile oxidation products from the gas-phase to a condensed organic aerosol-phase, according to estimated thermodynamic equilibrium phase-partitioning characteristics for around 2000 reaction products. After significantly scaling all phase-partitioning coefficients, and assuming a persistent background organic aerosol (both required in order to match the observed organic aerosol loadings, the detailed chemical composition of the simulated SOA has been investigated in terms of intermediate oxygenated species in the Master Chemical Mechanism, version 3.1 (MCM v3.1. For the various case studies considered, 90% of the simulated SOA mass comprises between ca. 70 and 100 multifunctional oxygenated species derived, in varying amounts, from the photooxidation of VOC of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. The anthropogenic contribution is dominated by aromatic hydrocarbons and the biogenic contribution by α- and β-pinene (which also constitute surrogates for other emitted monoterpene species. Sensitivity in the simulated mass of SOA to changes in the emission rates of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC has also been investigated for 11 case study events, and the results have been compared to the detailed chemical composition data. The role of accretion chemistry in SOA formation, and its

  13. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol and particle growth events at a national background site (3295 m a.s.l. in the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Du

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols exert highly uncertain impacts on radiative forcing and also have detrimental effects on human health. While aerosol particles are widely characterized in megacities in China, aerosol composition, sources and particle growth in rural areas in the Tibetan Plateau remain less understood. Here we present the results from an autumn study that was conducted from 5 September to 15 October 2013 at a national background monitoring station (3295 m a.s.l. in the Tibetan Plateau. The submicron aerosol composition and particle number size distributions were measured in situ with an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS. The average mass concentration of submicron aerosol (PM1 is 11.9 μg m−3 (range: 1.0–78.4 μg m−3 for the entire study, which is much lower than those observed at urban and rural sites in eastern China. Organics dominated PM1 on average accounting for 43%, followed by sulfate (28% and nitrate (1%. Positive matrix factorization analysis of ACSM organic aerosol (OA mass spectra identified an oxygenated OA (OOA and a biomass burning OA (BBOA. The OOA dominated OA composition accounting for 85% on average, 17% of which was inferred from aged BBOA. The BBOA contributed a considerable fraction of OA (15% due to the burning of cow dung and straws in September. New particle formation and growth events were frequently observed (80% of time throughout the study. The average particle growth rate is 2.0 nm h−1 (range: 0.8–3.2 nm h−1. By linking the evolution of particle number size distribution to aerosol composition, we found an elevated contribution of organics during particle growth periods and also a positive relationship between the growth rate and the fraction of OOA in OA, which potentially indicates an important role of organics in particle growth in the Tibetan Plateau.

  14. Seasonality of new particle formation in Vienna, Austria - Influence of air mass origin and aerosol chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Demattio, Anselm; Wagner, Robert; Burkart, Julia; Zíková, Naděžda; Vodička, Petr; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Steiner, Gerhard; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2015-10-01

    The impact of air mass origin and season on aerosol chemical composition and new particle formation and growth events (NPF events) in Vienna, Austria, is investigated using impactor samples from short-term campaigns and two long-term number size distribution datasets. The results suggest that air mass origin is most important for bulk PM concentrations, chemical composition of the coarse fraction (>1.5 μm) and the mass size distribution, and less important for chemical composition of the fine fraction (<1.5 μm). Continental air masses (crustal elements) were distinguished from air masses of marine origin (traces of sea salt). NPF events were most frequent in summer (22% of measurement days), and least frequent in winter (3% of measurement days). They were associated with above-average solar radiation and ozone concentrations, but were largely independent of PM2.5. Air mass origin was a secondary influence on NPF, largely through its association with meteorological conditions. Neither a strong dependence on the PM2.5 loading of the air masses, nor indications of a source area for NPF precursors outside the city were found.

  15. Global aerosol modeling with the online NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model: sensitivity to fire injection height prescription and secondary organic aerosol schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Michele; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Soares, Joana; Obiso, Vincenzo; Janjic, Zavisa; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    We develop and evaluate a fully online-coupled model simulating the life-cycle of the most relevant global aerosols (i.e. mineral dust, sea-salt, black carbon, primary and secondary organic aerosols, and sulfate) and their feedbacks upon atmospheric chemistry and radiative balance. Following the capabilities of its meteorological core, the model has been designed to simulate both global and regional scales with unvaried parameterizations: this allows detailed investigation on the aerosol processes bridging the gap between global and regional models. Since the strong uncertainties affecting aerosol models are often unresponsive to model complexity, we choose to introduce complexity only when it clearly improves results and leads to a better understanding of the simulated aerosol processes. We test two important sources of uncertainty - the fires injection height and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production - by comparing a baseline simulation with experiments using more advanced approaches. First, injection heights prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with climatological injection heights derived from satellite measurements and produced through the Integrated Monitoring and Modeling System For Wildland Fires (IS4FIRES). Also global patterns of SOA produced by the yield conversion of terpenes as prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with those simulated by the two-product approach of Tsigaridis et al. (2003, ACP). We evaluate our simulations using a variety of observations and measurement techniques. Additionally, we discuss our results in comparison to other global models within AEROCOM and ACCMIP.

  16. Saharan dust aerosol over the central Mediterranean Sea: optical columnar measurements vs. aerosol load, chemical composition and marker solubility at ground level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marconi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at the determination of the mineral contribution to PM10 in the central Mediterranean Sea on the basis of 7 yr of PM10 chemical composition daily measurements made on the island of Lampedusa (35.5° N, 12.6° E. Aerosol optical depth measurements are carried out in parallel while sampling with a multi-stage impactor, and observations with an optical particle counter were performed in selected periods. Based on daily samples, the total content and soluble fraction of selected metals are used to identify and characterize the dust events. The total contribution is determined by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission while the composition of the soluble fraction by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy after extraction with HNO3 at pH 1.5. The average PM10 concentration at Lampedusa calculated over the period June 2004–December 2010 is 31.5 μg m−3, with low interannual variability. The annual means are below the EU annual standard for PM10, but 9.9% of the total number of daily data exceed the daily threshold value established by the European Commission for PM (50 μg m−3, European Community, EC/30/1999. The Saharan dust contribution to PM10 was derived by calculating the contribution of Al, Si, Fe, Ti, non-sea-salt (nss Ca, nssNa, and nssK oxides in samples in which PIXE data were available. Cases with crustal content exceeding the 75th percentile of the crustal oxide content distribution were identified as dust events. Using this threshold we identify 175 events; 31.6% of them (55 events present PM10 higher than 50 μg m−3, with dust contributing by 33% on average. The annual average crustal contribution to PM10 is 5.42 μg m−3, reaching a value as high as 67.9 μg m−3, 49% of PM10, during an intense Saharan dust event. The crustal aerosol amount and contribution to PM10 shows a very small seasonal dependence; conversely, the dust columnar burden displays an evident annual cycle, with a strong

  17. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration

  18. Performance analysis of solar-assisted chemical heat-pump dryer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadhel, M.I. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, 75450, Melaka (Malaysia); Sopian, K.; Daud, W.R.W. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-11-15

    A solar-assisted chemical heat-pump dryer has been designed, fabricated and tested. The performance of the system has been studied under the meteorological conditions of Malaysia. The system consists of four main components: solar collector (evacuated tubes type), storage tank, solid-gas chemical heat pump unit and dryer chamber. A solid-gas chemical heat pump unit consists of reactor, condenser and evaporator. The reaction used in this study (CaCl2-NH{sub 3}). A simulation has been developed, and the predicted results are compared with those obtained from experiments. The maximum efficiency for evacuated tubes solar collector of 80% has been predicted against the maximum experiment of 74%. The maximum values of solar fraction from the simulation and experiment are 0.795 and 0.713, respectively, whereas the coefficient of performance of chemical heat pump (COP{sup h}) maximum values 2.2 and 2 are obtained from simulation and experiments, respectively. The results show that any reduction of energy at condenser as a result of the decrease in solar radiation will decrease the coefficient of performance of chemical heat pump as well as decrease the efficiency of drying. (author)

  19. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

  20. Sources, seasonality, and trends of southeast US aerosol: an integrated analysis of surface, aircraft, and satellite observations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; Hair, J. W.; Fenn, M. A.; Butler, C. F.; Wagner, N. L.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Millet, D. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.

    2015-09-01

    We use an ensemble of surface (EPA CSN, IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET), aircraft (SEAC4RS), and satellite (MODIS, MISR) observations over the southeast US during the summer-fall of 2013 to better understand aerosol sources in the region and the relationship between surface particulate matter (PM) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM) with 25 × 25 km2 resolution over North America is used as a common platform to interpret measurements of different aerosol variables made at different times and locations. Sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) are the main contributors to surface PM2.5 (mass concentration of PM finer than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) and AOD over the southeast US. OA is simulated successfully with a simple parameterization, assuming irreversible uptake of low-volatility products of hydrocarbon oxidation. Biogenic isoprene and monoterpenes account for 60 % of OA, anthropogenic sources for 30 %, and open fires for 10 %. 60 % of total aerosol mass is in the mixed layer below 1.5 km, 25 % in the cloud convective layer at 1.5-3 km, and 15 % in the free troposphere above 3 km. This vertical profile is well captured by GEOS-Chem, arguing against a high-altitude source of OA. The extent of sulfate neutralization (f = [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-]) is only 0.5-0.7 mol mol-1 in the observations, despite an excess of ammonia present, which could reflect suppression of ammonia uptake by OA. This would explain the long-term decline of ammonium aerosol in the southeast US, paralleling that of sulfate. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction over the southeast US follows closely that of aerosol mass. GEOS-Chem reproduces observed total column aerosol mass over the southeast US within 6 %, column aerosol extinction within 16 %, and space-based AOD within 8-28 % (consistently biased low). The large AOD decline observed from summer to winter is driven by sharp declines in both sulfate and OA from August to October. These declines

  1. Chemical characterization of aerosols at the summit of Mountain Tai in Central East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C.; Zhuang, G.; Huang, K.; Li, J.; Zhang, R.; Wang, Q.; Liu, T.; Sun, Y.; Guo, Z.; Fu, J. S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-07-01

    PM2.5 and TSP samples were collected at the summit of Mountain Tai (MT) (1534 m a.s.l.) in spring 2006/2007 and summer 2006 to investigate the characteristics of aerosols over central eastern China. For comparison, aerosol samples were also collected at Tazhong, Urumqi, and Tianchi in Xinjiang in northwestern China, Duolun and Yulin in northern China, and two urban sites in the megacities, Beijing and Shanghai, in 2007. Daily mass concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 ranged from 39.6-287.6 μg m-3 and 17.2-235.7 μg m-3 respectively at the summit of MT. Averaged concentrations of PM2.5 showed a pronounced seasonal variation with higher concentration in summer than spring. 17 water-soluble ions (SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, F-, PO43-, NO2-, CH3COO-, CH2C2O42-, C2H4C2O42-, HCOO-, MSA, C2O42-, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+), and 19 elements of all samples were measured. SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ were the major water-soluble species in PM2.5, accounting for 61.50 % and 72.65 % of the total measured ions in spring and summer, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TSP was 0.37(2006) and 0.49(2007) in spring, while up to 0.91 in summer, suggesting that aerosol particles were primarily comprised of fine particles in summer and of considerable coarse particles in spring. Crustal elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, etc.) showed higher concentration in spring than summer, while most of the pollution species (SO42-, NO3-, K+, NO2-, NH4+, Cl-, organic acids, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr) from local/regional anthropogenic emissions or secondary formation presented higher concentration in summer. The ratio of Ca/Al suggested the impact of Asian dust from the western deserts on the air quality in this region. The high concentration of K+ in PM2.5 (4.41 μg m-3) and its good correlation with black carbon (r = 0.90) and oxalic acid (r = 0.87) suggested the severe pollution from biomass burning, which was proved to be a main source of fine particles over central eastern China in summer. The contribution of biomass

  2. Review and evaluation of extractants for strontium removal using magnetically assisted chemical separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.B.; Rogers, R.D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nunez, L.; Ziemer, M.D.; Pleune, T.T.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    A literature review on extractants for strontium removal was initially performed at Northern Illinois University to assess their potential in magnetically assisted chemical separation. A series of potential strontium extractants was systematically evaluated there using radioanalytical methods. Initial experiments were designed to test the uptake of strontium from nitric acid using several samples of magnetic extractant particles that were coated with various crown ether ligands. High partition coefficient (K{sub d}) values for stimulant tank waste were obtained. Further studies demonstrated that the large partitioning was due to uncoated particles.

  3. Differences across the ITCZ in the chemical characteristics of the Indian Ocean MBL aerosol during INDOEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Norman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The water soluble inorganic part of the sub-micrometer aerosol was measured from two research vessels over the Indian Ocean during the winter monsoon season (February and March as part of the INDOEX project in 1998 and 1999. Additional measurements were made of gas phase SO2 from one of the vessels in 1999. All samples collected north of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone, ITCZ, were clearly affected by continental, anthropogenic sources. A sharp transition occurred across the ITCZ with concentrations of nss-SO42-, NH4+ and nss-K+ being lower by a factor of 7-15, >20 and >40, respectively, on the southern side of the ITCZ. The contribution from DMS to the sub-micrometer nss-SO42- was estimated to be up to 40% in clean air north of the ITCZ but less than 10% in polluted air originating from India. South of the ITCZ virtually all nss-SO42- was likely to be derived from oxidation of DMS. The concentration of SO2 decreased rapidly with distance from the Indian coast, the molar ratio SO2/nss-SO42- reaching values below 5% after 35 h travel time over the ocean. Surprisingly, MSA, which is derived from DMS, also showed higher concentrations in the sub-micrometer aerosol north of the ITCZ than south of it. This could be explained by the larger sub-micrometer surface area available north of the ITCZ for the condensation of MSA. South of the ITCZ a major part of the MSA was found on the super-micrometer particles. An analysis based on the air trajectories showed that systematic variation in the observed concentrations was associated with variations in the transport from source regions. For example, differences in time since air parcels left the Arabian or Indian coasts was shown to be an important factor for explaining the substantial differences in absolute concentrations.

  4. Chemicals loading in acetylated bamboo assisted by supercritical CO2 based on phase equilibrium data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silviana, Petermann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia has a large tropical forest. However, the deforestation still appears annually and vastly. This reason drives a use of bamboo as wood alternative. Recently, there are many modifications of bamboo in order to prolong the shelf life. Unfortunately, the processes need more chemicals and time. Based on wood modification, esterifying of bamboo was undertaken in present of a dense gas, i.e. supercritical CO2. Calculation of chemicals loading referred to ASTM D1413-99 by using the phase equilibrium data at optimum condition by a statistical design. The results showed that the acetylation of bamboo assisted by supercritical CO2 required 14.73 kg acetic anhydride/m3 of bamboo for a treatment of one hour.

  5. Laser assisted chemically shaped unstable resonator, for high power coherent laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser assisted chemical etching (LACE) is used to etch a continuous graded channel, set inside a wide stripe graded-index and separate confinement heterostructure (GRIN-SCH) for laser diodes, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). After a procedure of growing-etching-regrowing, a two-part waveguide is formed inside such modified structure, that is characterized by a negative change in the lateral effective refractive index (ERI). This effects the cavity to work as an unstable resonator. Procedures on the photo etching process are described, including the GaAs photochemistry and the optical system, with special emphasis on the fabrication of the approximately parabolic channels, as this represents a novel step. We call the cavity fabricated by this method, the shaped unstable resonator (SHUR). (Author)

  6. Chemical and aerosol characterisation of the troposphere over West Africa during the monsoon period as part of AMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Reeves

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During June, July and August 2006 five aircraft took part in a campaign over West Africa to observe the aerosol content and chemical composition of the troposphere and lower stratosphere as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA project. These are the first such measurements in this region during the monsoon period. In addition to providing an overview of the tropospheric composition, this paper provides a description of the measurement strategy (flights performed, instrumental payloads, wing-tip to wing-tip comparisons and points to some of the important findings discussed in more detailed in other papers in this special issue.

    The ozone data exhibits an "S" shaped vertical profile which appears to result from significant losses in the lower troposphere due to rapid deposition to forested areas and photochemical destruction in the moist monsoon air, and convective uplift of O3-poor air to the upper troposphere. This profile is disturbed, particularly in the south of the region, by the intrusions in the lower and middle troposphere of air from the Southern Hemisphere impacted by biomass burning. Comparisons with longer term data sets suggest the impact of these intrusions on West Africa in 2006 was greater than in other recent wet seasons. There is evidence for net photochemical production of ozone in these biomass burning plumes as well as in urban plumes, in particular that from Lagos, convective outflow in the upper troposphere and in boundary layer air affected by nitrogen oxide emissions from recently wetted soils. This latter effect, along with enhanced deposition to the forested areas, contributes to a latitudinal gradient of ozone in the lower troposphere. Biogenic volatile organic compounds are also important in defining the composition both for the boundary layer and upper tropospheric convective outflow.

    Mineral dust was found to be the most abundant and ubiquitous aerosol type in the

  7. Aircraft measurements over Europe of an air pollution plume from Southeast Asia – aerosol and chemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An air pollution plume from Southern and Eastern Asia, including regions in India and China, was predicted by the FLEXPART particle dispersion model to arrive in the upper troposphere over Europe on 24–25 March 2006. According to the model, the plume was exported from Southeast Asia only six days earlier, transported into the upper troposphere by a warm conveyor belt, and travelled to Europe in a fast zonal flow. This is confirmed by the retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO from AIRS satellite measurements, which are in excellent agreement with the model results over the entire transport history. The research aircraft DLR Falcon was sent into this plume west of Spain on 24 March and over Southern Europe on 25 March. On both days, the pollution plume was indeed found close to the predicted locations and, thus, the measurements taken allowed the first detailed characterization of the aerosol content and chemical composition of an anthropogenic pollution plume after a nearly hemispheric transport event. The mixing ratios of CO, reactive nitrogen (NOy and ozone (O3 measured in the Asian plume were all clearly elevated over a background that was itself likely elevated by Asian emissions: CO by 17–34 ppbv on average (maximum 60 ppbv and O3 by 2–9 ppbv (maximum 22 ppbv. Positive correlations existed between these species, and a ΔO3/ΔCO slope of 0.25 shows that ozone was formed in this plume, albeit with moderate efficiency. Nucleation mode and Aitken particles were suppressed in the Asian plume, whereas accumulation mode aerosols were strongly elevated and correlated with CO. The suppression of the nucleation mode was likely due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface due to the transported larger particles. Super-micron particles, likely desert dust, were found in part of the Asian pollution plume and also in surrounding cleaner air. The aerosol light absorption coefficient was enhanced in the plume (average values for individual plume

  8. Aircraft measurements over Europe of an air pollution plume from Southeast Asia – aerosol and chemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An air pollution plume from Southern and Eastern Asia, including regions in India and China, was predicted by the FLEXPART particle dispersion model to arrive in the upper troposphere over Europe on 24–25 March 2006. According to the model, the plume was exported from Southeast Asia six days earlier, transported into the upper troposphere by a warm conveyor belt, and travelled to Europe in a fast zonal flow. This is confirmed by the retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO from AIRS satellite measurements, which are in excellent agreement with the model results over the entire transport history. The research aircraft DLR Falcon was sent into this plume west of Spain on 24 March and over Southern Europe on 25 March. On both days, the pollution plume was found close to the predicted locations and, thus, the measurements taken allowed the first detailed characterization of the aerosol content and chemical composition of an anthropogenic pollution plume after a nearly hemispheric transport event. The mixing ratios of CO, reactive nitrogen (NOy and ozone (O3 measured in the Asian plume were all clearly elevated over a background that was itself likely elevated by Asian emissions: CO by 17–34 ppbv on average (maximum 60 ppbv and O3 by 2–9 ppbv (maximum 22 ppbv. Positive correlations existed between these species, and a ΔO3/ΔCO slope of 0.25 shows that ozone was formed in this plume, albeit with moderate efficiency. Nucleation mode and Aitken particles were suppressed in the Asian plume, whereas accumulation mode aerosols were strongly elevated and correlated with CO. The suppression of the nucleation mode was likely due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface of the transported larger particles. Super-micron particles, likely desert dust, were found in part of the Asian pollution plume and also in surrounding cleaner air. The aerosol light absorption coefficient was enhanced in the plume (average values for individual plume encounters 0.25–0

  9. Interhemispheric differences in the chemical characteristics of the Indian Ocean aerosol during INDOEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Norman

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The water soluble inorganic part of the sub-micrometer aerosol was measured from two research vessels over the Indian Ocean during the winter monsoon season (February and March as part of the INDOEX project in 1998 and 1999. Additional measurements were made of gas phase SO2 from one of the vessels in 1999. All samples collected north of the ITCZ were clearly affected by continental, anthropogenic sources. A sharp transition occurred across the ITCZ with concentrations of nss-SO42, NH4+ and nss-K+ being lower by a factor of 7--15, >20 and >40, respectively, on the southern side of the ITCZ. The contribution from DMS to the sub-micrometer nss-SO42 was estimated to be up to 40% in clean air north of the ITCZ but less than 10% in polluted air originating from India. South of the ITCZ virtually all nss-SO42 was likely to be derived from oxidation of DMS. The concentration of chem{SO_2} decreased rapidly with distance from the Indian coast, the ratio SO2nss-SO42 reaching values below 5% after 35 h travel time over the ocean. Surprisingly, MSA, which is derived from DMS, also showed higher concentrations in the sub-micrometer aerosol north of the ITCZ than south of it. This could be explained by the larger sub-micrometer surface area available north of the ITCZ for the condensation of MSA. South of the ITCZ a major part of the MSA was found on the super-micrometer particles. The total amount of MSA, on both sub-micrometer and super-micrometer particles, varied little across the ITCZ. An analysis based on the air trajectories showed that systematic variation in the observed concentrations was associated with variations in the transport from source regions. For example, differences in time since air parcels left the Arabian or Indian coasts was shown to be an important factor for explaining the substantial

  10. Graphene-assisted growth of high-quality AlN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing; Chen, Zhaolong; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Tongbo; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Yun; Yuan, Guodong; Li, Jinmin

    2016-08-01

    High-quality AlN films were directly grown on graphene/sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The graphene layers were directly grown on sapphire by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD), a low-cost catalyst-free method. We analyzed the influence of the graphene layer on the nucleation of AlN at the initial stage of growth and found that sparse AlN grains on graphene grew and formed a continuous film via lateral coalescence. Graphene-assisted AlN films are smooth and continuous, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) values for (0002) and (10\\bar{1}2) reflections are 360 and 622.2 arcsec, which are lower than that of the film directly grown on sapphire. The high-resolution TEM images near the AlN/sapphire interface for graphene-assisted AlN films clearly show the presence of graphene, which kept its original morphology after the 1200 °C growth of AlN.

  11. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  12. ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC DISPERSION OF DEFORMABLE AERO-SOLS IN THE PRESENCE OF AN ELECTRIC FIELD AND CHEMICAL REACTION USING TAYLOR DISPERSION MODEL*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUDRAIAH N.; DEVARAJU N.; NG Chiu-On

    2011-01-01

    Under the effects of electric field and chemical reaction, the problem of dispersion of aerosols in a poorly conducting fluid in a channel is solved analytically using the mixture theory together with a regular perturbation technique.It is shown that the aerosols are dispersed relative to a plane moving with the mean speed of atmospheric fluid as well as the mean speed of agglomeration of aerosol with a relative diffusion coefficient, called the Taylor dispersion coefficient.This coefficient is numerically computed and the results reveal that it increases with an increase in the electric number, but decreases with increasing porous parameter.The physical explanations for the phenomena are given in this article.

  13. Aerosols in the CALIOPE air quality modelling system: validation and analysis of PM levels, optical depths and chemical composition over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basart

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The CALIOPE high-resolution air quality modelling system is developed and applied to Europe (12 km × 12 km, 1 h. The modelled daily to seasonal aerosol variability over Europe in 2004 have been evaluated and analysed. The aerosols are estimated from two models, CMAQv4.5 (AERO4 and BSC-DREAM8b. CMAQv4.5 calculates biogenic, anthropogenic and sea salt aerosol and BSC-DREAM8b provides the natural mineral dust contribution from North African deserts. For the evaluation, we use daily PM10/PM2.5 and chemical composition data from 54 stations of the EMEP/CREATE network and coarse and fine aerosol optical depth (AOD data from 35 stations of the AERONET sun photometer network. The model achieves daily PM10 and PM2.5 correlations of 0.57 and 0.47, respectively, and total, coarse and fine AOD correlations of 0.51, 0.63, and 0.53, respectively. The higher correlations of the PM10 and the coarse mode AOD are largely due to the accurate representation of the African dust influence in the forecasting system. Overall PM and AOD levels are underestimated. The evaluation of the chemical composition highlights underestimations of the modelled fine fractions particularly for carbonaceous matter (EC and OC and secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA; i.e. nitrates, sulphates and ammonium. The scores of the bulk parameters are significantly improved after applying a simple model bias correction based on the chemical composition observations. SIA are dominant in the fine fractions representing up to 80 % of the aerosol budget in latitudes beyond 40° N. The highest aerosol concentrations are found over the industrialized and populated areas of the Po Valley and the Benelux regions. High values in southern Europe are linked to the transport of coarse particles from the Sahara desert which contributes up to 40 % of the total aerosol mass. Close to the surface, maxima dust seasonal concentrations (>30 μg m–3 are found between spring and early autumn. We estimate

  14. Chemical characterization of aerosols at the summit of Mountain Tai in Central East China

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    C. Deng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available PM2.5 and TSP samples were collected at the summit of Mountain Tai (MT (1534 m a.s.l. in spring 2006/2007 and summer 2006 to investigate the characteristics of aerosols over central eastern China. For comparison, aerosol samples were also collected at Tazhong, Urumqi, and Tianchi in Xinjiang in northwestern China, Duolun and Yulin in northern China, and two urban sites in the megacities, Beijing and Shanghai, in 2007. Daily mass concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 ranged from 39.6–287.6 μg m−3 and 17.2–235.7 μg m−3 respectively at the summit of MT. Averaged concentrations of PM2.5 showed a pronounced seasonal variation with higher concentration in summer than spring. 17 water-soluble ions (SO42−, NO3, Cl, F, PO43−, NO2, CH3COO, CH2C2O42−, C2H4C2O42−, HCOO, MSA, C2O42−, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, and 19 elements of all samples were measured. SO42−, NO3, and NH4+ were the major water-soluble species in PM2.5, accounting for 61.50 % and 72.65 % of the total measured ions in spring and summer, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TSP was 0.37(2006 and 0.49(2007 in spring, while up to 0.91 in summer, suggesting that aerosol particles were primarily comprised of fine particles in summer and of considerable coarse particles in spring. Crustal elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, etc. showed higher concentration in spring than summer, while most of the pollution species (SO42−, NO3, K

  15. Chemical properties and origin of dust aerosols in Beijing during springtime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renjian Zhang; Zhiwei Han; Tiantao Cheng; Jun Tao

    2009-01-01

    Ground observation of dust aerosols was conducted in Beijing in the spring of 2005 in order to investigate the element composition and origin of mineral dust. Mass concentrations of most mineral elements of particles increased during dust events. Mineral elements were predominant in the sums of total element loadings in both dusty and non-dusty days. Mg, Si, Fe, Al or Ti can be used as an indicator of dust outflow; Cl can be viewed as an evidence of dust particles mixing with anthropogenic emissions. Mineral and pollutant elements showed a bimodal mass particle-size distribution (MSD) in non-dusty days, and a trimodal distribution in dusty days, but their peak concentrations fell in different size stages. Zn and S were mainly enriched in fine particles, whereas Cl was enriched in medium particles, but most mineral elements and Cu were enriched in coarse particles. Mineral elements were dominated by crustal material in dusty even non-dusty days, but pollutant elements were from non-crustal material including local and remote sources. Back trajectory analysis indicated that dust particles in Beijing mainly originated from the Gobi and desert regions of Mongolian and northern China.

  16. Vertical Profiles and Chemical Properties of Aerosol Particles upon Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard Islands

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    B. Moroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Size-segregated particle samples were collected in the Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in April 2011 both at ground level and in the free atmosphere exploiting a tethered balloon equipped also with an optical particle counter (OPC and meteorological sensors. Individual particle properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive microanalysis (SEM-EDS. Results of the SEM-EDS were integrated with particle size and optical measurements of the aerosols properties at ground level and along the vertical profiles. Detailed analysis of two case studies reveals significant differences in composition despite the similar structure (layering and the comparable texture (grain size distribution of particles in the air column. Differences in the mineral chemistry of samples point at both local (plutonic/metamorphic complexes in Svalbard and remote (basic/ultrabasic magmatic complexes in Greenland and/or Iceland geological source regions for dust. Differences in the particle size and shape are put into relationship with the mechanism of particle formation, that is, primary (well sorted, small or secondary (idiomorphic, fine to coarse grained origin for chloride and sulfate crystals and transport/settling for soil (silicate, carbonate and metal oxide particles. The influence of size, shape, and mixing state of particles on ice nucleation and radiative properties is also discussed.

  17. Chemical Analysis of Organic Aerosols Using Reactive Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Nizkorodov, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization (nano-DESI) technique integrated with high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) enables molecular level analysis of organic aerosol (OA) samples. In nano-DESI, analyte is desorbed into a small volume solvent bridge formed between two capillaries positioned in contact with analyte and enables fast and efficient characterization of OA collected on substrates without sample preparation. We report applications of the nano-DESI/HR-MS approach in a number of our recent studies focused on molecular identification of organic compounds in laboratory and in field collected OA samples. Reactive nano-DESI approach where selected reagent is added to the solvent is used for examining the presence of individual species containing specific functional groups and for their quantification within complex mixtures of OA. Specifically, we use the Girard's reagent T (GT) to probe and quantify carbonyl compounds in the SOA mixtures. We estimate for the first time the amounts of dimers and trimers in the SOA mixtures. We found that the most abundant dimer in limonene/O3 SOA was detected at the ˜0.5 pg level and the total amount of dimers and trimers in the analyzed sample was ˜11 pg. Understanding of the OA composition at the molecular level allowed us to identify key aging reactions, including the transformation of carbonyls to imines and carbonyl-imine oligomerization, that may contribute to the formation of brown carbon in the atmosphere.

  18. Physico-chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol derived from catechol and guaiacol as a model substance for atmospheric humic-like substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ofner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol was produced from the aromatic precursors catechol and guaiacol by reaction with ozone in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight and humidity and investigated for its properties as a proxy for humic-like substances (HULIS. Beside a small particle size, a relatively low molecular weight and typical optical features in the UV/VIS spectral range, HULIS contain a typical aromatic and/or olefinic chemical structure and highly oxidized functional groups within a high chemical diversity. Various methods were used to characterize the secondary organic aerosols obtained: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR demonstrated the formation of different carbonyl containing functional groups as well as structural and functional differences between aerosols formed at different environmental conditions. UV/VIS spectroscopy of filter samples showed that the particulate matter absorbs far into the visible range up to more than 500 nm. Ultrahigh resolved mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS determined O/C-ratios between 0.3 and 1 and main molecular weights between 200 and 500 Da. Temperature-programmed-pyrolysis mass spectroscopy identified carboxylic acids and lactones as major functional groups. Particle sizing using CNC-DMPS demonstrated the formation of small particles during a secondary organic aerosol formation process. Particle imaging using field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM showed spherical particles, forming clusters and chains. Hence, secondary organic aerosols from catechol and guaiacol are appropriate model substances for studies of the processing of aromatic secondary organic aerosols and atmospheric HULIS on the laboratory scale.

  19. In-Flight Chemical Composition Observations of Aircraft Emissions using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Commercial aircraft are an important source of aerosols to the upper troposphere. The microphysical and chemical properties of these emitted aerosols govern their ability to act as ice nuclei, both in near-field contrails and for cirrus formation downstream. During the ACCESS-II (Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions) campaign, NASA DC-8 CFM56-2-C1 engine emissions were sampled systematically at a range of cruise-relevant thrust levels and at several altitudes. Sampling was done aboard the NASA HU-25 Falcon aircraft, which was equipped with a suite of aerosol and gas-phase instruments focused on assessing the effects of burning different fuel mixtures on aerosol properties and their associated contrails. Here we present in-flight measurements of particle chemical composition made by a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The AMS was able to sufficiently resolve near-field (within 100m) aircraft emissions plumes. Low-sulfur HEFA (hydro-processed esters and fatty-acids) and JetA fuels yielded particles that contained 11 and 8% sulfate, respectively, compared to 30% sulfate contribution for traditional JetA fuel. Each of the fuels produced organic aerosol with similarly low oxygen content. Lubrication oils, which are not a combustion product but result from leaks in the engine, were likely a dominant fraction of the measured organic mass based on mass-spectral marker analysis. These results are compared to similar engine conditions from ground-based testing.

  20. Use of computer-assisted prediction of toxic effects of chemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current revision of the European policy for the evaluation of chemicals (REACH) has lead to a controversy with regard to the need of additional animal safety testing. To avoid increases in animal testing but also to save time and resources, alternative in silico or in vitro tests for the assessment of toxic effects of chemicals are advocated. The draft of the original document issued in 29th October 2003 by the European Commission foresees the use of alternative methods but does not give further specification on which methods should be used. Computer-assisted prediction models, so-called predictive tools, besides in vitro models, will likely play an essential role in the proposed repertoire of 'alternative methods'. The current discussion has urged the Advisory Committee of the German Toxicology Society to present its position on the use of predictive tools in toxicology. Acceptable prediction models already exist for those toxicological endpoints which are based on well-understood mechanism, such as mutagenicity and skin sensitization, whereas mechanistically more complex endpoints such as acute, chronic or organ toxicities currently cannot be satisfactorily predicted. A potential strategy to assess such complex toxicities will lie in their dissection into models for the different steps or pathways leading to the final endpoint. Integration of these models should result in a higher predictivity. Despite these limitations, computer-assisted prediction tools already today play a complementary role for the assessment of chemicals for which no data is available or for which toxicological testing is impractical due to the lack of availability of sufficient compounds for testing. Furthermore, predictive tools offer support in the screening and the subsequent prioritization of compound for further toxicological testing, as expected within the scope of the European REACH program. This program will also lead to the collection of high-quality data which will broaden the

  1. Non-refractory PM1 in SE Asia: Chemically speciated aerosol fluxes and concentrations above contrasting land-uses in SE Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gavin; Farmer, Delphine; di Marco, Chiara; Misztal, Pawel; Sueper, Donna; Kimmel, Joel; Jimenez, Jose; Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko

    2010-05-01

    New measurements of VOC emissions (measured with leaf cuvettes, and ecosystem fluxes obtained from eddy covariance measurements) suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest, in Borneo. These larger sources of isoprene measured over oil palm, allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions, contrasts with the composition of the atmosphere in the semi-remote tropical forest environment. The difference in the atmospheric composition above different land-uses has the potential to lead to contrasting chemistry and physics controlling the formation and processing of particulate matter. Thus land use changes, driven by the economics of biofuels, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions, chemical processing and composition of organic aerosol over both (semi-)natural and anthropogenic land uses in the tropical environment. Ecosystem flux measurements of chemically-speciated non-refractory PM1 were made over two contrasting land uses in the Malaysian state of Sabah, on the island of Borneo during 2008. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) site at a tropical rain forest location as well as the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as a collaboration between three UK NERC funded projects (OP3, APPRAISE/ACES and DIASPORA). Recent technical developments using ToF detectors allow us to record 10 Hz full mass spectra at both high resolution (HR) and unit-mass resolution (UMR), suitable for the calculation of local eddy-covariance fluxes. The measurements provide information on the deposition rate of anthropogenic aerosol components (e.g. sulphate, nitrate, ammonium and hydrocarbon-like aerosol) to tropical forest and oil palm. At the same time, any biogenic secondary organic

  2. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Van Wyngarden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40–80 wt % in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H2SO4 with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, Attenuated Total Reflectance–Fourier Transform Infrared and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, which was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence for products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal

  3. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyngarden, A. L.; Pérez-Montaño, S.; Bui, J. V. H.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.

    2015-04-01

    Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt%) in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H2SO4) with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene that was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher-order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence of products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal and

  4. Chemical speciation of vanadium in particulate matter emitted from diesel vehicles and urban atmospheric aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Martin M; Toner, Brandy M; Overdier, Joel T; Schauer, James J; Fakra, Sirine C; Hu, Shaohua; Herner, Jorn D; Ayala, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development and application of an integrated set of analytical tools that enable accurate measurement of total, extractable, and, importantly, the oxidation state of vanadium in sub-milligram masses of environmental aerosols and solids. Through rigorous control of blanks, application of magnetic-sector-ICPMS, and miniaturization of the extraction/separation methods we have substantially improved upon published quantification limits. The study focused on the application of these methods to particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel vehicles, both in baseline configuration without after-treatment and also equipped with advanced PM and NO(x) emission controls. Particle size-resolved vanadium speciation data were obtained from dynamometer samples containing total vanadium pools of only 0.2-2 ng and provide some of the first measurements of the oxidation state of vanadium in diesel vehicle PM emissions. The emission rates and the measured fraction of V(V) in PM from diesel engines running without exhaust after-treatment were both low (2-3 ng/mile and 13-16%, respectively). The V(IV) species was measured as the dominant vanadium species in diesel PM emissions. A significantly greater fraction of V(V) (76%) was measured in PM from the engine fitted with a prototype vanadium-based selective catalytic reductors (V-SCR) retrofit. The emission rate of V(V) determined for the V-SCR equipped vehicle (103 ng/mile) was 40-fold greater than that from the baseline vehicle. A clear contrast between the PM size-distributions of V(V) and V(IV) emissions was apparent, with the V(V) distribution characterized by a major single mode in the ultrafine (vanadium-containing fine-particle PM from the V-SCR identified V(2)O(5) as the dominant vanadium species. PMID:22050708

  5. Chemical composition and sources of ambient aerosol in an urban environment over Athens, Greece: Case study on the role of wintertime biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosi, Christina

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the chemical composition of aerosols over the Greater Athens Area (GAA). To achieve this, particulate matter sampling has been conducted on a 6h-24h basis and more than 700 aerosol samples were collected at downtown Athens, in Thissio from January 2013 to December 2015. All samples, after mass quantification, were analyzed for major anions (Cl^-, Br^-, NO{_3^-}, SO{_4-2}, PO{_4-3}, C_2O{_4-2}), cations (NH{_4^+}, K^+, Na^+, Mg+2, Ca+2), trace elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, V, Zn, Mn, Ni, Pb, P, S, Sb), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). Aerosol chemical mass closure calculations indicated that carbonaceous aerosol constitutes a major component, along with nitrate and sulfate anions, dust, cations and EC. Moreover, during the winter periods of December 2012-January 2013 and December 2013-January 2014, air pollution due to excessive use of biomass for domestic heating has been reported as a major environmental problem in the area. To assess the importance of biomass burning as a source of air pollution over the GAA three main sugars specific biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also analyzed during the winter period. Acknowledgments This work was supported by the State Scholarship Foundation ("IKY Fellowships of Excellence for Postgraduate Studies in Greece - Siemens Programme") in the framework of the Hellenic Republic-Siemens Settlement Agreement.

  6. Chemical and aerosol characterisation of the troposphere over West Africa during the monsoon period as part of AMMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, C. E.; Formenti, P.; Afif, C.; Ancellet, G.; Attié, J.-L.; Bechara, J.; Borbon, A.; Cairo, F.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Fierli, F.; Flamant, C.; Gomes, L.; Hamburger, T.; Jambert, C.; Law, K. S.; Mari, C.; Jones, R. L.; Matsuki, A.; Mead, M. I.; Methven, J.; Mills, G. P.; Minikin, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Nielsen, J. K.; Oram, D. E.; Parker, D. J.; Richter, A.; Schlager, H.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Thouret, V.

    2010-08-01

    During June, July and August 2006 five aircraft took part in a campaign over West Africa to observe the aerosol content and chemical composition of the troposphere and lower stratosphere as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project. These are the first such measurements in this region during the monsoon period. In addition to providing an overview of the tropospheric composition, this paper provides a description of the measurement strategy (flights performed, instrumental payloads, wing-tip to wing-tip comparisons) and points to some of the important findings discussed in more detail in other papers in this special issue. The ozone data exhibits an "S" shaped vertical profile which appears to result from significant losses in the lower troposphere due to rapid deposition to forested areas and photochemical destruction in the moist monsoon air, and convective uplift of ozone-poor air to the upper troposphere. This profile is disturbed, particularly in the south of the region, by the intrusions in the lower and middle troposphere of air from the southern hemisphere impacted by biomass burning. Comparisons with longer term data sets suggest the impact of these intrusions on West Africa in 2006 was greater than in other recent wet seasons. There is evidence for net photochemical production of ozone in these biomass burning plumes as well as in urban plumes, in particular that from Lagos, convective outflow in the upper troposphere and in boundary layer air affected by nitrogen oxide emissions from recently wetted soils. This latter effect, along with enhanced deposition to the forested areas, contributes to a latitudinal gradient of ozone in the lower troposphere. Biogenic volatile organic compounds are also important in defining the composition both for the boundary layer and upper tropospheric convective outflow. Mineral dust was found to be the most abundant and ubiquitous aerosol type in the atmosphere over Western Africa. Data

  7. Chemical and aerosol characterisation of the troposphere over West Africa during the monsoon period as part of AMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Reeves

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During June, July and August 2006 five aircraft took part in a campaign over West Africa to observe the aerosol content and chemical composition of the troposphere and lower stratosphere as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA project. These are the first such measurements in this region during the monsoon period. In addition to providing an overview of the tropospheric composition, this paper provides a description of the measurement strategy (flights performed, instrumental payloads, wing-tip to wing-tip comparisons and points to some of the important findings discussed in more detail in other papers in this special issue.

    The ozone data exhibits an "S" shaped vertical profile which appears to result from significant losses in the lower troposphere due to rapid deposition to forested areas and photochemical destruction in the moist monsoon air, and convective uplift of ozone-poor air to the upper troposphere. This profile is disturbed, particularly in the south of the region, by the intrusions in the lower and middle troposphere of air from the southern hemisphere impacted by biomass burning. Comparisons with longer term data sets suggest the impact of these intrusions on West Africa in 2006 was greater than in other recent wet seasons. There is evidence for net photochemical production of ozone in these biomass burning plumes as well as in urban plumes, in particular that from Lagos, convective outflow in the upper troposphere and in boundary layer air affected by nitrogen oxide emissions from recently wetted soils. This latter effect, along with enhanced deposition to the forested areas, contributes to a latitudinal gradient of ozone in the lower troposphere. Biogenic volatile organic compounds are also important in defining the composition both for the boundary layer and upper tropospheric convective outflow.

    Mineral dust was found to be the most abundant and ubiquitous aerosol type in the

  8. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative aging of organic aerosol particles, we illustrate how the

  9. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    uncertainties by "the I-beams". Only an uncertainty range rather than a best estimate is presented for direct aerosol forcing by mineral dust and for indirect aerosol forcing. An assessment of the present level of scientific understanding is indicated at the bottom of the figure (reproduced by permission of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The importance of atmospheric aerosols to issues of societal concern has motivated much research intended to describe their loading, distribution, and properties and to develop understanding of the controlling processes to address such issues as air pollution, acid deposition, and climate influences of aerosols. However, description based wholly on measurements will inevitably be limited in its spatial and temporal coverage and in the limited characterization of aerosol properties. These limitations are even more serious for predictions of future emissions and provide motivation for concurrent theoretical studies and development of model-based description of atmospheric aerosols.An important long-range goal, which has already been partly realized, is to develop quantitative understanding of the processes that control aerosol loading, composition, and microphysical properties as well as the resultant optical and cloud-nucleating properties. An objective is to incorporate these results into chemical transport models that can be used for predictions. Such models are required, for example, to design approaches to achieve air quality standards and to assess and predict aerosol influences on climate change. Much current research is directed toward enhancing this understanding and to evaluating it by comparison of model results and observations. However, compared to gases, models involving particles are far more complex because of the need to specify additional parameters such as particle sizes and size distributions, compositions as a function of size, particle shapes, and temporal and spatial variations, including reactions that occur

  10. Program of technical assistance to the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons, informal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Currently, U.S. organizations provide technical support to the U.S. Delegation for its work as part of the Preparatory Commission (PrepCom) of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in The Hague. The current efforts of the PrepCom are focussed on preparations for the Entry-Into-Force (EIF) of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons (often referred to as the {open_quotes}Chemical Weapons Convention{close_quotes} (CWC)). EIF of the CWC is expected in 1995, and shortly thereafter the PrepCom will cease to exist, with the OPCW taking over responsibilities under the CWC. A U.S. program of technical assistance to the OPCW for its verification responsibilities may be created as part of U.S. policy objectives after EIF of the CWC. In the summary below, comments by participants are presented in Square Brackets Some of the same points arose several times during the discussions; they are grouped together under the most pertinent heading.

  11. Hygroscopicity Behavior, Activation Properties and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosol at a Background Site in the Megacity Region of Peking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Silvia; Nowak, Andreas; Mildenberger, Katrin; Göbel, Tina; Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of China suffer from heavy air pollution (both gaseous and particulate) caused by strong economic growth in the last two decades. However, knowledge concerning the physical and chemical properties of the resulting aerosol particles populations, and their effects on the optical properties of the atmosphere, is still sparse. In the framework of the investigations presented here, comprehensive measurements concerning aerosol particle hygroscopicity, CCN ability, composition, and optical properties were performed. The investigations are part of the DFG-funded project HaChi (Haze in China) and are conducted in collaboration with the Peking University. A conclusive parameterization of aerosol hygroscopicity and activation data is aimed for, which will then be implemented in a meso-scale model to investigate aerosol-cloud-radiation and precipitation interactions. During two intensive measurements campaigns (March 2009 and July/ August 2009), in-situ aerosol measurements have been performed in an air-conditioned mobile laboratory next to the Wuqing Meteorological Station (39°23'8.53"N, 117°1'25.88"E), which is located between Bejing and Tijanjin and is thereby an ideal background site in a megacity region. The particle number size distribution (TDMPS), the particle optical properties (MAAP and nephelometer) and their hygroscopic properties at high RH (HH-TDMA, LACIS-mobile) were characterized as well as their cloud nucleating properties above supersaturation (DMT-CCNC). 24 h PM1 particle samples were continuously collected over the two campaigns in winter and summer using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). Additionally two 6h size-resolved samples (daytime and night-time) were collected each day applying an 11-stage Berner impactor. The size-selection of HH-TDMA, LACIS and the CCNC was synchronized with the Berner stages. Opening analysis of the winter campaign data showed that the HH-TDMA usually detected a hydrophobic and a hygroscopic mode, i.e., the

  12. Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition – Technological Design Of Functional Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januś M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (PA CVD method allows to deposit of homogeneous, well-adhesive coatings at lower temperature on different substrates. Plasmochemical treatment significantly impacts on physicochemical parameters of modified surfaces. In this study we present the overview of the possibilities of plasma processes for the deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings doped Si and/or N atoms on the Ti Grade2, aluminum-zinc alloy and polyetherketone substrate. Depending on the type of modified substrate had improved the corrosion properties including biocompatibility of titanium surface, increase of surface hardness with deposition of good adhesion and fine-grained coatings (in the case of Al-Zn alloy and improving of the wear resistance (in the case of PEEK substrate.

  13. Electron behaviour in CH4/H2 gas mixture in electron-assisted chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Li-Fang; Ma Bo-Qin; Wang Zhi-Jun

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons in CH4/H2 gas mixture in electron-assisted chemical vapour deposition of diamond is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The electron drift velocity in gas mixture is obtained over a wide range of E/P (the ratio of the electric field to gas pressure) from 1500 to 300000 (V/m kPa-1). The electron energy distribution and average energy under different gas pressure (0.1-20kPa) and CH4 concentration (0.5%-10.0%) are calculated. Their effects on the diamond growth are also discussed. It is believed that these results will be helpful to the selection of optimum experimental conditions for high quality diamond film deposition.

  14. Biological functionalization and patterning of porous silicon prepared by Pt-assisted chemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous silicon fabricated via Pt-assisted chemical etching of p-type Si (1 0 0) in 1:1:1 EtOH/HF/H2O2 solution possesses a longer durability in air and in aqueous media than anodized one, which is advantageous for biomedical applications. Its surface SiHx (x = 1 and 2) species can react with 10-undecylenic acid completely under microwave irradiation, and subsequent derivatizations of the end carboxylic acid result in affinity capture of proteins. We applied two approaches to produce protein microarrays: photolithography and spotting. The former provides a homogeneous microarray with a very low fluorescence background, while the latter presents an inhomogeneous microarray with a high noise background.

  15. Bilayer–metal assisted chemical etching of silicon microwire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon microwires with lateral dimension from 5 μm to 20 μm and depth as long as 20 μm are prepared by bilayer metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE. A bilayer metal configuration (Metal 1 / Metal 2 was applied to assist etching of Si where metal 1 acts as direct catalyst and metal 2 provides mechanical support. Different metal types were investigated to figure out the influence of metal catalyst on morphology of etched silicon. We find that silicon microwires with vertical side wall are produced when we use Ag/Au bilayer, while cone–like and porous microwires formed when Pt/Au is applied. The different micro-/nano-structures in as-etched silicon are demonstrated to be due to the discrepancy of work function of metal catalyst relative to Si. Further, we constructed a silicon microwire arrays solar cells in a radial p–n junction configurations in a screen printed aluminum paste p–doping process.

  16. The variation of organ doses with the particle size and chemical form of an inhaled radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, radiation doses to organs are calculated as a function of the particle size of the inhaled radioactive material. Aerosols with an Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) from 0.1 μm to 20 μm are considered and doses accumulated by various organs in periods ranging from 1 day to 70 years are given for 65 radionuclides. A computer program is used which calculates the transformations taking place in each organ per curie of inhaled nuclide from the basic radioactivity and metabolic data. The program also calculates the resulting doses both for the organ in which the transformations occur and from penetrating radiation emitted as a result of transformations in other organs. The effects of particle size and chemical form of the nuclides on the doses received by organs are discussed. Tables of doses accumulated by 10 specific organs and other organs together with effective whole body doses are given for particle sizes 0.1 μm, 1 μm and 10 μm (AMAD). (author)

  17. The application of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of high explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle (~1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  18. Chemical Composition of Summertime PM_(2.5) and Its Relationship to Aerosol Optical Properties in Guangzhou,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Urban aerosols have a large effect on the deterioration of air quality and the degradation of atmospheric visibility.Characterization of the chemical composition of PM 2.5 and in situ measurements of the optical properties of aerosols were conducted in July 2008 at an urban site in Guangzhou,Southern China.The mean PM 2.5 concentration for the entire period was 53.7±23.2 μg m 3.The mean PM 2.5 concentration (82.7±25.4 μg m 3) on hazy days was roughly two times higher than that on clear days (38.8±8.7 μg m 3).The total water-soluble ion species and the total average carbon accounted for 47.9%±4.3% and 35.2%±4.5%,respectively,of the major components of PM 2.5.The increase of secondary and carbonaceous aerosols,in particular ammonium sulfate,played an important role in the formation of haze pollution.The mean absorption and scattering coefficients and the single scattering albedo over the whole period were 53±20 M m 1,226±111 M m 1,and 0.80±0.04,respectively.PM 2.5 had a high linear correlation with the aerosol extinction coefficient,elemental carbon (EC) was correlated with aerosol absorption,and organic carbon (OC) and SO 4 2 were tightly linked to aerosol scattering.

  19. Size-resolved aerosol chemical analysis of extreme haze pollution events during early 2013 in urban Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Anthropogenic species substantially accumulated in both fine and coarse particles. • Secondary organic carbon in PM1.1 decreased from clear to haze days. • The mass peak shifted to larger particles from clear to haze days. • The NO3−/SO42− ratio decreased with enhanced haze pollution. • Both mobile local and stationary regional sources were vital for haze formation. - Abstract: Using size-resolved filter sampling and chemical characterization, high concentrations of water-soluble ions, carbonaceous species and heavy metals were found in both fine (PM2.1) and coarse (PM2.1–9) particles in Beijing during haze events in early 2013. Even on clear days, average mass concentration of submicron particles (PM1.1) was several times higher than that previously measured in most of abroad urban areas. A high concentration of particulate matter on haze days weakens the incident solar radiation, which reduces the generation rate of secondary organic carbon in PM1.1. We show that the peak mass concentration of particles shifted from 0.43–0.65 μm on clear days to 0.65–1.1 μm on lightly polluted days and to 1.1–2.1 μm on heavily polluted days. The peak shifts were also found for the following species: organic carbon, elemental carbon, NH4+, SO42−, NO3−, K, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Our findings demonstrate that secondary inorganic aerosols (36%) and organic matter (26%) dominated the fine particle mass on heavily polluted days, while their contribution reduced to 29% and 18%, respectively, on clear days. Besides fine particles, anthropogenic chemical species also substantially accumulated in the coarse mode, which suggests that particles with aerodynamic diameter larger than 2.1 μm cannot be neglected during severe haze events

  20. The chemical composition of aerosols from Wildland fires: Current state of the science and possible new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildland fire emits a substantial quantity of aerosol to the atmosphere. These aerosols typically comprise a complex mixture of organic matter and refractory elemental or black carbon with a relatively minor contribution of inorganic matter from soils and plant micronutrients. Id...

  1. Traffic-generated changes in the chemical characteristics of size-segregated urban aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta

    2014-10-01

    The road traffic impact on the concentrations of 13 fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their components was assessed. PM was sampled at two points in Katowice (southern Poland), a background point beyond the effects of road traffic, and a near-highway traffic point. The samples were analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, 8 water-soluble ions, 24 elements, and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The traffic emissions (mainly particles from car exhaust) enriched the ultrafine, submicron, and fine PM particles with elemental carbon. The traffic-caused re-suspension of the road and soil dust affecting the concentrations and chemical composition of the coarse PM fraction. However, for each PM fraction, the carcinogenic equivalent ratios, assumed as a measure of the hazard from 16 PAHs in this paper, were similar at the two sampling points. The traffic emissions from the highway appeared to have a weaker influence on the concentrations and chemical composition of PM in a typical urban area of southern Poland than elsewhere in Europe.

  2. Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol from cis-3-Hexenol and cis-3-Hexenyl Acetate: Effect of Chemical Composition, Humidity, and Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Rebecca M; Bateman, Adam P; Jain, Shashank; Li, Yong Jie; Martin, Scot; Petrucci, Giuseppe A

    2016-05-17

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in Earth's radiative balance directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly, by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Atmospheric aerosol is dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a class of BVOCs that contribute to SOA, yet their role in the Earth's radiative budget is poorly understood. In this work we measured the scattering efficiency (at 450, 525, and 635 nm), absorption efficiency (between 190 and 900 nm), particle phase, bulk chemical properties (O:C, H:C), and molecular-level composition of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of two GLVs: cis-3-hexenol (HXL) and cis-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA). Both HXL and CHA produced SOA that was weakly absorbing, yet CHA-SOA was a more efficient absorber than HXL-SOA. The scatter efficiency of SOA from both systems was wavelength-dependent, with the stronger dependence exhibited by HXL-SOA, likely due to differences in particle size. HXL-SOA formed under both dry (10% RH) and wet (70% RH) conditions had the same bulk chemical properties (O:C), yet significantly different optical properties, which was attributed to differences in molecular-level composition. We have found that SOA derived from green leaf volatiles has the potential to affect the Earth's radiative budget, and also that bulk chemical properties can be insufficient to predict SOA optical properties. PMID:27074496

  3. Aerosol assisted synthesis of hierarchical tin–carbon composites and their application as lithium battery anode materials

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Juchen

    2013-01-01

    We report a method for synthesizing hierarchically structured tin-carbon (Sn-C) composites via aerosol spray pyrolysis. In this method, an aqueous precursor solution containing tin(ii) chloride and sucrose is atomized, and the resultant aerosol droplets carried by an inert gas are pyrolyzed in a high-temperature tubular furnace. Owing to the unique combination of high reaction temperature and short reaction time, this method is able to achieve a hetero-structure in which small Sn particles (15 nm) are uniformly embedded in a secondary carbon particle. This procedure allows the size and size distribution of the primary Sn particles to be tuned, as well as control over the size of the secondary carbon particles by addition of polymeric surfactant in the precursor solution. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the resultant Sn-C composites demonstrate attractive electrochemical performance in terms of overall capacity, electrochemical stability, and coulombic efficiency. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. The physical and chemical evolution of aerosols in smelter and power plant plumes: an airborne study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banic, C.; Leaitch, W.R.; Strawbridge, K.; Tanabe, R.; Wong, H.; Gariepy, C.; Simonetti, A.; Nejedly, Z.; Campbell, J.L.; Lu, J.; Skeaff, J.; Paktunc, D.; MacPherson, J.I.; Daggupaty, S.; Geonac' h, H.; Chatt, A.; Lamoureux, M. [Environmental Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-06-15

    National and international concern about the health effects and continued use of Pb, Cd, As and Hg as well as other metals has defined a need for improved estimates of the long-term risks to ecosystems and human health from metals released from mining, metallurgical and energy production activities. A research aircraft was used to determine the microphysical and chemical properties of airborne particulate metal emissions from the Nanticoke coal-fired power-generating station located on the north shore of Lake Erie, Ontario, and the Horne copper smelter at Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. These properties are critical to the determination of the deposition rates of the metals emitted, and hence the potential for these species to have impacts on local or distant ecosystems. An overview of the measurements made during the study is given. The size distributions of particles emitted from the stacks and observed within 5 km of the point of emission are briefly described. After dilution by ambient air, the concentration of particles smaller than 0.135 {mu}m in diameter in the plumes is tens of thousands per cubic centimetre, far exceeding the concentrations found in ambient air. However, in the size range 0.135 to 3 {mu}m diameter the plumes generally contribute about one to four times more particles than present in ambient air.

  5. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapcariu, Sean C; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  6. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Sapcariu

    Full Text Available Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO and diesel fuel (DF, two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase, or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out. Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular

  7. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapcariu, Sean C; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  8. Chemical characterisation of atmospheric aerosols during a 2007 summer field campaign at Brasschaat, Belgium: sources and source processes of biogenic secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gómez-González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of organic marker compounds and inorganic species were performed on PM2.5 aerosols from a Belgian forest site that is severely impacted by urban pollution ("De Inslag", Brasschaat, Belgium during a 2007 summer period within the framework of the "Formation mechanisms, marker compounds, and source apportionment for biogenic atmospheric aerosols (BIOSOL" project. The measured organic species included (i low-molecular weight (MW dicarboxylic acids (LMW DCAs, (ii methanesulfonate (MSA, (iii terpenoic acids originating from the oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, d-limonene and Δ3-carene, and (iv organosulfates related to secondary organic aerosol from the oxidation of isoprene and α-pinene. The organic tracers explained, on average, 5.3 % of the organic carbon (OC, of which 0.7 % was due to MSA, 3.4 % to LMW DCAs, 0.6 % to organosulfates, and 0.6 % to terpenoic acids. The highest atmospheric concentrations of most species were observed during the first five days of the campaign, which were characterised by maximum day-time temperatures >22 °C. Most of the terpenoic acids and the organosulfates peaked during day-time, consistent with their local photochemical origin. High concentrations of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA and low concentrations of cis-pinonic acid were noted during the first five days of the campaign, indicative of an aged biogenic aerosol. Several correlations between organic species were very high (r>0.85, high (0.7<r<0.85, or substantial (0.5<r<0.7, suggesting that they are generated through similar formation pathways. Substantial correlations with temperature were found for OC, water-soluble OC, MBTCA, and several other organic species. MBTCA and terebic acid were highly correlated with the temperature (r>0.7 and showed an Arrhenius-type relationship, consistent with their formation through OH radical chemistry.

  9. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Lanthanides determination in red wine using ultrasound assisted extraction, flow injection, aerosol desolvation and ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501.970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, Clarissa M.M. dos; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce, E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501.970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasound was investigated and applied for red wine samples preparation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aliquots of 50 {mu}L of sample were nebulized and transported to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FI and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LODs of the ICP-MS method for lanthanides determination were at ng L{sup -1} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanides concentration allowed red wines classification. - Abstract: This paper deals with the determination of the fourteen naturally occurring elements of the lanthanide series in red wine. Ultrasound (US) was used for sample preparation prior lanthanides determination using ICP-MS. Flow injection (FI) and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used for nebulization of aliquots of 50 {mu}L of sample and its subsequent transportation to plasma. Sample preparation procedures, matrix interference and time of sonication were evaluated. Better results for lanthanides in red wine were obtained by sonication with US probe for 90 s and sample 10-fold diluted. The limits of detection of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Pr, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu and Yb were 6.57, 10.8, 9.97, 9.38, 2.71, 1.29, 1.22, 0.52, 2.35, 0.96, 2.30, 0.45, 0.24 and 1.35 ng L{sup -1}, respectively. Red wines of different varieties from three countries of South America were discriminated according to the country of origin by means of multivariate analysis of lanthanides concentration.

  11. Lanthanides determination in red wine using ultrasound assisted extraction, flow injection, aerosol desolvation and ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ultrasound was investigated and applied for red wine samples preparation. ► Aliquots of 50 μL of sample were nebulized and transported to plasma. ► FI and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used. ► LODs of the ICP-MS method for lanthanides determination were at ng L−1 level. ► Lanthanides concentration allowed red wines classification. - Abstract: This paper deals with the determination of the fourteen naturally occurring elements of the lanthanide series in red wine. Ultrasound (US) was used for sample preparation prior lanthanides determination using ICP-MS. Flow injection (FI) and pneumatic nebulization/aerosol desolvation were used for nebulization of aliquots of 50 μL of sample and its subsequent transportation to plasma. Sample preparation procedures, matrix interference and time of sonication were evaluated. Better results for lanthanides in red wine were obtained by sonication with US probe for 90 s and sample 10-fold diluted. The limits of detection of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Pr, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu and Yb were 6.57, 10.8, 9.97, 9.38, 2.71, 1.29, 1.22, 0.52, 2.35, 0.96, 2.30, 0.45, 0.24 and 1.35 ng L−1, respectively. Red wines of different varieties from three countries of South America were discriminated according to the country of origin by means of multivariate analysis of lanthanides concentration.

  12. Using a moving measurement platform for determining the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols between Moscow and Vladivostok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kuokka

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The TROICA-9 expedition (Trans-Siberian Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere was carried out at the Trans-Siberian railway between Moscow and Vladivostok in October 2005. Measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were made from an observatory carriage connected to a passenger train. Black carbon (BC concentrations in fine particles (PM2.5, aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm were measured with an aethalometer using a five-minute time resolution. Concentrations of inorganic ions and some organic compounds (Cl, NO3, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, oxalate and methane sulphonate were measured continuously by using an on-line system with a 15-min time resolution. In addition, particle volume size distributions were determined for particles in the diameter range 3–850 nm using a 10-min time resolution. The continuous measurements were completed with 24-h PM2.5 filter samples stored in a refrigerator and analyzed later in a chemical laboratory. The analyses included the mass concentrations of PM2.5, ions, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V and Zn. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 varied in the range of 4.3–34.8 μg m−3 with an average of 21.6 μg m−3. Fine particle mass consisted mainly of BC (average 27.6%, SO42− (13.0%, NH4+ (4.1% and NO3 (1.4%. One of the major constituents was obviously organic carbon which was not determined. The contribution of BC was high compared with other studies made in Europe and Asia. High concentrations of ions, BC and particle volume were observed between Moscow and roughly 4000 km east of it, as well as close to Vladivostok

  13. Evaluating Sources of Chemical Pathways of Aerosol Production on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation using Isotopic and Geochemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M. Z.; Michalski, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Increase emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) as a result of the development of oil, gas and coal resources in the Four Corners region of the United States have caused concern for area American Indian tribes that levels of ozone, acid rain, and aerosols or particulate matter (PM) may increase on reservation lands. NOx in the atmosphere plays an important role in the formation of these pollutants and high levels are indicators of poor air quality and exposure to them has been linked to a host of human health effects and environmental problems facing today's society. Nitrogen oxides are eventually oxidized in the atmosphere to form nitric acid and particulate nitrate which falls to earth's surface by way of dry or wet deposition. In the end, it is the removal of NOx from the atmosphere by chemical conversion to nitrate that halts this production of oxidants, acid, and aerosols. Despite the importance of understanding atmospheric nitrate production there remains major deficiencies in estimating the significant key reactions that transform atmospheric NOx. This project will examine the chemical composition (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and stable isotope composition (N15, O17, O18, Δ17O) of aerosols (PM2.5-PM10) collected on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation to provide insight into the sources of NOx and the oxidation pathways that convert NOx into nitrate on these reservation lands.

  14. Top-Down Inversion of Aerosol Emissions through Adjoint Integration of Satellite Radiance and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Qu, W.; Kopacz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of aerosol emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources are needed to study the impacts of tropospheric aerosol on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying the aerosol sources with the current bottom-up methods. This study presents a new top-down approach that spatially constrains the amount of aerosol emissions from satellite (MODIS) observed reflectance with the adjoint of a chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem). We apply this technique with a one-month case study (April 2008) over the East Asia. The bottom-up estimated sulfate-nitrate-ammonium precursors, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), all from INTEX-B 2006 inventory, emissions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) from Bond-2007 inventory, and mineral dust simulated from DEAD dust mobilization scheme, are spatially optimized from the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint constrained by the aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived from MODIS reflectance with the GEOS-Chem aerosol single scattering properties. The adjoint inverse modeling for the study period yields notable decreases in anthropogenic aerosol emissions over China: 436 Gg (33.5%) for SO2, 378 Gg (34.5%) for NH3, 319 (18.8%) for NOx, 10 Gg (9.1%) for BC, and 30 Gg (15.0%) for OC. The total amount of the mineral dust emission is reduced by 56.4% from the DEAD mobilization module which simulates dust production of 19020 Gg. Sub-regional adjustments are significant and directions of changes are spatially different. The model simulation with optimized aerosol emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from sun-spectrophotometer observed AOD from AERONET, MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD, OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 and SO2 columns, and surface aerosol concentrations measured over both anthropogenic pollution and dust source regions. Assuming the used bottom-up anthropogenic

  15. Optical-chemical-microphysical relationships and closure studies for mixed carbonaceous aerosols observed at Jeju Island; 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer, particle sizing, and filter analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Flowers

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Transport of aerosols in pollution plumes from the mainland Asian continent was observed in situ at Jeju, South Korea during the Cheju Asian Brown Cloud Plume-Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX field campaign throughout August and September 2008 using a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PASS-3, chemical filter analysis, and size distributions. The PASS-3 directly measures the effects of morphology (e.g. coatings on light absorption that traditional filter-based instruments are unable to address. Transport of mixed sulfate, carbonaceous, and nitrate aerosols from various Asian pollution plumes to Jeju accounted for 74% of the deployment days, showing large variations in their measured chemical and optical properties. Analysis of eight distinct episodes, spanning wide ranges of chemical composition, optical properties, and source regions, reveals that episodes with higher organic carbon (OC/sulfate (SO42− and nitrate (NO3/SO42− composition ratios exhibit lower single scatter albedo at shorter wavelengths (ω405. We infer complex refractive indices (n–ik as a function of wavelength for the high, intermediate, and low OC/SO42− pollution episodes by using the observed particle size distributions and the measured optical properties. The smallest mean particle diameter corresponds to the high OC/SO42− aerosol episode. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k is greater for the high OC/SO42− episode at all wavelengths. A distinct, sharp increase in k at short wavelength implies enhanced light absorption by OC, which accounts for 50% of the light absorption at 405 nm, in the high OC/SO42− episode. Idealized analysis indicates increased absorption at 781 nm by factors greater than 3 relative to denuded black carbon in the laboratory. We hypothesize

  16. Aerosols Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovski, Igor

    2011-01-01

    This self-contained handbook and ready reference examines aerosol science and technology in depth, providing a detailed insight into this progressive field. As such, it covers fundamental concepts, experimental methods, and a wide variety of applications, ranging from aerosol filtration to biological aerosols, and from the synthesis of carbon nanotubes to aerosol reactors.Written by a host of internationally renowned experts in the field, this is an essential resource for chemists and engineers in the chemical and materials disciplines across multiple industries, as well as ideal supplementary

  17. Mixing of mineral dust with urban pollution aerosol over Dakar (Senegal): impact on dust physico-chemical and radiative properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; Veira, A.; Mund, S.; Esselborn, M.; Kiemle, C.; Weinzierl, B.; Hamburger, T.; Ehret, G. (Institut fur Physik der Atmosphaere, Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)), e-mail: andreas.petzold@dlr.de; Lieke, K.; Kandler, K. (Institut fur Angewandte Geowissenschaften, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) in 2008, the mixing of the urban pollution plume of Dakar (Senegal) with mineral dust was studied in detail using the German research aircraft Falcon which was equipped with a nadir-looking high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and extensive aerosol in situ instrumentation. The mineral dust layer as well as the urban pollution plume were probed remotely by the HSRL and in situ. Back trajectory analyses were used to attribute aerosol samples to source regions.We found that the emission from the region of Dakar increased the aerosol optical depth (532 nm) from approximately 0.30 over sea and over land east of Dakar to 0.35 in the city outflow. In the urban area, local black carbon (BC) emissions, or soot respectively, contributed more than 75% to aerosol absorption at 530 nm. In the dust layer, the single-scattering albedo at 530 nm was 0.96 - 0.99, whereas we found a value of 0.908 +- 0.018 for the aerosol dominated by urban pollution. After 6 h of transport over the North Atlantic, the externally mixed mode of secondary aerosol particles had almost completely vanished, whereas the BC agglomerates (soot) were still externally mixed with mineral dust particles

  18. Size-resolved aerosol chemical analysis of extreme haze pollution events during early 2013 in urban Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Shili; Pan, Yuepeng, E-mail: panyuepeng@mail.iap.ac.cn; Liu, Zirui; Wen, Tianxue; Wang, Yuesi, E-mail: wys@mail.iap.ac.cn

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Anthropogenic species substantially accumulated in both fine and coarse particles. • Secondary organic carbon in PM{sub 1.1} decreased from clear to haze days. • The mass peak shifted to larger particles from clear to haze days. • The NO{sub 3}{sup −}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio decreased with enhanced haze pollution. • Both mobile local and stationary regional sources were vital for haze formation. - Abstract: Using size-resolved filter sampling and chemical characterization, high concentrations of water-soluble ions, carbonaceous species and heavy metals were found in both fine (PM{sub 2.1}) and coarse (PM{sub 2.1–9}) particles in Beijing during haze events in early 2013. Even on clear days, average mass concentration of submicron particles (PM{sub 1.1}) was several times higher than that previously measured in most of abroad urban areas. A high concentration of particulate matter on haze days weakens the incident solar radiation, which reduces the generation rate of secondary organic carbon in PM{sub 1.1}. We show that the peak mass concentration of particles shifted from 0.43–0.65 μm on clear days to 0.65–1.1 μm on lightly polluted days and to 1.1–2.1 μm on heavily polluted days. The peak shifts were also found for the following species: organic carbon, elemental carbon, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, K, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Our findings demonstrate that secondary inorganic aerosols (36%) and organic matter (26%) dominated the fine particle mass on heavily polluted days, while their contribution reduced to 29% and 18%, respectively, on clear days. Besides fine particles, anthropogenic chemical species also substantially accumulated in the coarse mode, which suggests that particles with aerodynamic diameter larger than 2.1 μm cannot be neglected during severe haze events.

  19. In-situ physical and chemical characterization of the Eyjafjallajökull aerosol plume in the free troposphere over Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sandrini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of physical and chemical properties at the Mt. Cimone GAW-WMO Global Station (2165 m a.s.l. allowed the detection of the volcanic aerosol plume resulting from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption of spring 2010. The event affected the site after a transport over a distance of more than 3000 km. Two main transport episodes were detected during the eruption period, showing a volcanic fingerprint discernible against the free tropospheric background conditions typical of the site, the first from 19 to 21 April and the second from 18 to 20 May 2010. The paper reports the modification of aerosol characteristics observed during the two episodes, both characterized by an abrupt increase in fine and, especially, coarse mode particle number. Analysis of major, minor and trace elements by different analytical techniques (Ionic Chromatography, PIXE-PIGE and ICP-MS were performed on aerosols collected by ground level discrete sampling. The resulting database allows the characterization of aerosol chemical composition during the volcanic plume transport and in background conditions. During the passage of the volcanic plume, the fine fraction was dominated by sulphates, denoting the secondary origin of this mode, mainly resulting from in-plume oxidation of volcanic SO2. By contrast, the coarse fraction was characterized by increased concentration of numerous elements of crustal origin, such as Fe, Ti, Mn, Ca, Na, and Mg, which enter the composition of silicate minerals. Data analysis of selected elements (Ti, Al, Fe, Mn allowed the estimation of the volcanic plume's contribution to total PM10, resulting in a local enhancement of up to 9.5 μg m-3, i.e. 40% of total PM10, on 18 May, which was the most intense of the two episodes. These results appear significant, especially in the light of the huge distance of Mt. Cimone from the source, confirming the widespread diffusion of the Eyjafjallajokull ashes over Europe.

  20. Correlations in the chemical composition of rural background atmospheric aerosol in the UK determined in real time using time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddows, David C S; Donovan, Robert J; Harrison, Roy M; Heal, Mathew R; Kinnersley, Robert P; King, Martin D; Nicholson, David H; Thompson, Katherine C

    2004-02-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to determine, in real time, the size and chemical composition of individual particles in the atmosphere at the remote inland site of Eskdalemuir, Scotland. A total of 51,980 particles, in the size range 0.3-7.4 microm, were detected between the 25th and 30th June 2001. Rapid changes in the number density, size and chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol were observed. These changes are attributed to two distinct types of air mass; a polluted air mass that had passed over the British mainland before reaching Eskdalemuir, interposed between two cleaner air masses that had arrived directly from the sea. Such changes in the background aerosol could clearly be very important to studies of urban aerosols and attempts at source apportionment. The results of an objective method of data analysis are presented. Correlations were sought between the occurrence of: lithium, potassium, rubidium, caesium, beryllium, strontium, barium, ammonium, amines, nitrate, nitrite, boron, mercury, sulfate, phosphate, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine and carbon (both elemental and organic hydrocarbon) in both fine (d 2.5 microm) particle fractions. Several previously unreported correlations were observed, for instance between the elements lithium, beryllium and boron. The results suggest that about 2 in 3 of all fine particles (by number rather than by mass), and 1 in 2 of all coarse particles containing carbon, consisted of elemental carbon rather than organic hydrocarbon (although a bias in the sensitivity of the ATOFMS could have affected these numbers). The ratio of the number of coarse particles containing nitrate anions to the number of particles containing chloride anions exceeded unity when the air mass had travelled over the British mainland. The analysis also illustrates that an air mass of marine origin that had travelled slowly over agricultural land can accumulate amines and ammonium.

  1. Etchant wettability in bulk micromachining of Si by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Lee, Yeong Bahl; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-05-01

    Wet bulk micromachining of Si by metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) has successfully been demonstrated. Based on the mechanism of defective etching results from Ag and Au metal catalyst experiments, the wettability of etchant solution, in addition to metal type, has been found to have profound effect on the etching process. Addition of low surface tension co-solvent, ethanol in this work, into conventional etchant formulation has enabled complete wetting of etchant on surface, which prevents hydrogen bubble attachment on sample surface during the etching. The complete elimination of bubble attachment guarantees very uniform etch rate on all over the sample surface, and thus prevents premature fragmentation/rupture of catalyst metal layer. Under the optimized etching conditions, the MaCE could be done for up to 12 h without any noticeable film rupture and thus etching defects. Thanks to very smooth surface of the etched patterns, conformal contact and direct bonding of elastomer on such surface has been easily accomplished. The method demonstrated here can pave the way for application of simple, low-cost MaCE process in the bulk micromachining of Si for various applications.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition graphene transfer process to a polymeric substrate assisted by a spin coater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Felipe; da Rocha, Caique O. C.; Medeiros, Gabriela S.; Fechine, Guilhermino J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new method to transfer chemical vapor deposition graphene to polymeric substrates is demonstrated here, it is called direct dry transfer assisted by a spin coater (DDT-SC). Compared to the conventional method DDT, the improvement of the contact between graphene-polymer due to a very thin polymeric film deposited by spin coater before the transfer process prevented air bubbles and/or moisture and avoided molecular expansion on the graphene-polymer interface. An acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, a high impact polystyrene, polybutadiene adipate-co-terephthalate, polylactide acid, and a styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer are the polymers used for the transfers since they did not work very well by using the DDT process. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to identify, to quantify, and to qualify graphene transferred to the polymer substrates. The quantity of graphene transferred was substantially increased for all polymers by using the DDT-SC method when compared with the DDT standard method. After the transfer, the intensity of the D band remained low, indicating low defect density and good quality of the transfer. The DDT-SC transfer process expands the number of graphene applications since the polymer substrate candidates are increased.

  3. Ultralight boron nitride aerogels via template-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yangxi; Li, Bin; Yang, Siwei; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Changrui; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Boron nitride (BN) aerogels are porous materials with a continuous three-dimensional network structure. They are attracting increasing attention for a wide range of applications. Here, we report the template-assisted synthesis of BN aerogels by catalyst-free, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on graphene-carbon nanotube composite aerogels using borazine as the B and N sources with a relatively low temperature of 900 °C. The three-dimensional structure of the BN aerogels was achieved through the structural design of carbon aerogel templates. The BN aerogels have an ultrahigh specific surface area, ultralow density, excellent oil absorbing ability, and high temperature oxidation resistance. The specific surface area of BN aerogels can reach up to 1051 m2 g-1, 2-3 times larger than the reported BN aerogels. The mass density can be as low as 0.6 mg cm-3, much lower than that of air. The BN aerogels exhibit high hydrophobic properties and can absorb up to 160 times their weight in oil. This is much higher than porous BN nanosheets reported previously. The BN aerogels can be restored for reuse after oil absorption simply by burning them in air. This is because of their high temperature oxidation resistance and suggests broad utility as water treatment tools.

  4. Metal-assisted chemical etching of Ge surface and its effect on photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyo; Choo, Hyeokseong; Kim, Changheon; Oh, Eunseok; Seo, Dongwan; Lim, Sangwoo

    2016-05-01

    Ge surfaces were etched by means of metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE). The behavior of the MaCE reaction in diluted H2O2 was compared with that of a conventional etchant of HF/H2O2/H2O mixture (FPM). Herein we first report that a pyramidal structure on Ge (0 0 1) can be prepared by MaCE in dilute H2O2 solution, without the use of HF. Contrastingly, an octagonal trench structure was prepared by 4/5/1 FPM treatment of Ge (0 0 1) surface. This octagonal structure consisted of a square base, four large facets connected to the base, and other four small facets adjacent to the four large facets, which were considered to be (0 0 1), {1 1 0}, and {1 1 1}, respectively. The octagonal trench was formed as a result of the difference in etch rate of Ge depending on the orientation: {1 0 0} > {1 1 0} > {1 1 1}. Ge surfaces treated by MaCE exhibited improved solar cell efficiency due to their improved light absorption, which led to significant increases in the cells' short circuit current and fill factor. The results suggest that optimized MaCE procedures can be an effective method to improve the performance of Ge-based photovoltaic devices.

  5. Physical and Chemical Roles of Metalworking Fluids in a Vibration-Assisted Tapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Takeshi; Nakano, Ken

    A vibration-assisted tapping system has been developed in which a piezoelectric-zirconate-titanate (PZT) oscillator applies small-amplitude vibrations to a workpiece and a torque transducer measures the time-evolving torque during the tapping process. To investigate the roles of metalworking fluids, four different metalworking conditions have been examined: without metalworking fluids (dry), with an additive-free fluid (base oil), with an oiliness-agent-containing fluid (fluid A), and with an extreme-pressure-agent-containing fluid (fluid B). The time evolutions of the tapping torque have been obtained for tapping M3 threads in S45C steel with varying vibration amplitudes, vibration frequencies, and tapping speed. It has been found that the present system decreases the tapping torque; in particular, a decrement of up to 14% in the tapping torque is obtained for fluid A using 800-Hz vibrations with an amplitude of 5 μm at a tapping speed of 3 rpm. Increments in the vibration amplitude and frequency lead to decrements in the tapping torque, but the effect of the vibration tends to fade with increasing tapping speeds. It appears that vibrations enhance not only the physical effects but also the chemical effects of metalworking fluids.

  6. Ship diesel emission aerosols: A comprehensive study on the chemical composition, the physical properties and the molecular biological and toxicological effects on human lung cells of aerosols from a ship diesel engine operated with heavy or light diesel fuel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Dietmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Paur, H.; Dilger, M.; Mülhopt, S.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Hirvonen, M.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Berube, K.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Arteaga Salas, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Reda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Gröger, T.; Weiss, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties, transformation processes and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. This is performed by thorough comprehensive chemical and physical characterization of combustion aerosols (including application of advantageous on-line methods) and studying of biological effects on human lung cell-cultures. A new ALI air-liquid-interface (ALI) exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for the HICE-measurements. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized (e.g. proteomics). By using stable isotope labeling technologies (13C-Glucose/metabolomics; 2H-Lysine/SILAC-proteomics), high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of molecular-biological effects is achievable even at sub-toxic effect dose levels. Aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine (heavy/light fuel oil) have been investigated. The effect of wood combustion and ship diesel PM e.g. on the protein expression of ALI-exposed A549 cells was compared. Filtered aerosol is used as gas-reference for the isotope labeling based method (SILAC). Therefore the effects of wood combustion- and shipping diesel-PM can be directly compared. Ship diesel aerosol causes a broader distribution in the observed fold changes (log2), i.e. more proteins are significantly up-/down-regulated in case of shipping diesel PM-exposure. This corresponds to a stronger biological reaction if compared to wood combustion-PM exposure. The chemical analysis results on wood combustion- and ship diesel-PM depict more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)/oxidized-PAH but less of some transition metals (V, Fe) in the wood combustion case. Interestingly, alkylated PAH are considerably more abundant in shipping PM, suggesting that PAH/Oxy-PAH may be less relevant for

  7. Changes in chemical components of aerosol particles in different haze regions in China from 2006 to 2013 and contribution of meteorological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, Y. Q.; Liu, H. L.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Since there have been individual reports of persistent haze-fog events in January 2013 in central-eastern China, questions on factors causing the drastic differences in changes in 2013 from changes in adjacent years have been raised. Changes in major chemical components of aerosol particles over the years also remain unclear. The extent of meteorological factors contributing to such changes is yet to be determined. The study intends to present the changes in daily based major water-soluble constituents, carbonaceous species, and mineral aerosol in PM10 at 13 stations within different haze regions in China from 2006 to 2013, which are associated with specific meteorological conditions that are highly related to aerosol pollution (parameterized as an index called Parameter Linking Aerosol Pollution and Meteorological Elements - PLAM). No obvious changes were found in annual mean concentrations of these various chemical components and PM10 in 2013, relative to 2012. By contrast, wintertime mass of these components was quite different. In Hua Bei Plain (HBP), sulfate, organic carbon (OC), nitrate, ammonium, element carbon (EC), and mineral dust concentrations in winter were approximately 43, 55, 28, 23, 21, and 130 μg m-3, respectively; these masses were approximately 2 to 4 times higher than those in background mass, which also exhibited a decline during 2006 to 2010 and then a rise till 2013. The mass of these concentrations and PM10, except minerals, respectively, increased by approximately 28 to 117 % and 25 % in January 2013 compared with that in January 2012. Thus, persistent haze-fog events occurred in January 2013, and approximately 60 % of this increase in component concentrations from 2012 to 2013 can be attributed to severe meteorological conditions in the winter of 2013. In the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) area, winter masses of these components, unlike HBP, have not significantly increase since 2010; PLAM were also maintained at a similar level without

  8. Observations about chemical composition of aerosols in the Brazilian Amazon region - Case study: Biomass burning in the subequatorial Amazon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioda, A.; Monteiro, I. L.; Almeida, A. C.; Hacon, S. S.; Dallacort, R.; Ignotti, E.; Godoy, J. M.; Loureiro, A. L.; Morais, F.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-04-01

    The study was carried out in two cities in the Brazilian Amazon region, Tangará da Serra (14 ° 37'10 "S, 57 ° 29'09" W, 427 m asl), located in a transition area between the Amazon biome and the Cerrado and has the characteristics of urban area in Amazon region; and Alta Floresta (9 ° 52 '32 "S, 56 ° 5' 10" W, 283 m asl) situated in the extreme north of the state of Mato Grosso (MT), both in the subequatorial Amazon region. Tangara da Serra has the largest production of sugar cane in the subequatorial Amazon region. They are located 800 km from each other. These two regions are inserted in a region with typical cycles of drought and rain that alter air pollution levels, and lies in the dispersion path of the pollution plume resulting from burnings in the Brazilian Amazon and pollution emanating from neighboring countries. Both cities have wet tropical climate with two well defined seasons: rainy summer (November to May) and dry winter (June to October). During the dry winter, biomass burnings are frequent in these regions. In 2008, the Department of the Environment has banned fires in the period from July 15 to September 15 throughout the State. In this study chemical characterization was performed for approximately 100 aerosol samples collected in each site during 2008. Fine and coarse aerosol samples collected in SFUs were analyzed by ion chromatography for determination of cations (Na+, K+, NH3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+), anions (SO42-, Cl- and NO3-) and organic acids (acetate and formiate) and also measures of black carbon (BC) (Aethalometer). The results showed that for both sites the average concentrations were quite similar for PM2.5 (16 µg/m3), PM10 (11 and 13 µg/m3) and black carbon (1.4 µg/m3 for PM2.5 and 1.6 µg/m3 for PM10). Sulfate was the predominant species in fine (45%) and coarse (26%) particles in both sites. The sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.01-1.92 µg/m3 in PM2.5 and 0.01-1.66 µg/m3 in PM10 in Tangará da Serra and 0.01-2.93 µg/m3 in PM2

  9. Aerosol-Assisted Fast Formulating Uniform Pharmaceutical Polymer Microparticles with Variable Properties toward pH-Sensitive Controlled Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation is highly attractive for oral drug delivery. Microparticles are a common form of drug carrier for this purpose. There is still a high demand on efficient methods to fabricate microparticles with uniform sizes and well-controlled particle properties. In this paper, uniform hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP-based pharmaceutical microparticles loaded with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic model drugs have been directly formulated by using a unique aerosol technique, i.e., the microfluidic spray drying technology. A series of microparticles of controllable particle sizes, shapes, and structures are fabricated by tuning the solvent composition and drying temperature. It is found that a more volatile solvent and a higher drying temperature can result in fast evaporation rates to form microparticles of larger lateral size, more irregular shape, and denser matrix. The nature of the model drugs also plays an important role in determining particle properties. The drug release behaviors of the pharmaceutical microparticles are dependent on their structural properties and the nature of a specific drug, as well as sensitive to the pH value of the release medium. Most importantly, drugs in the microparticles obtained by using a more volatile solvent or a higher drying temperature can be well protected from degradation in harsh simulated gastric fluids due to the dense structures of the microparticles, while they can be fast-released in simulated intestinal fluids through particle dissolution. These pharmaceutical microparticles are potentially useful for site-specific (enteric delivery of orally-administered drugs.

  10. Smart Magnetically Responsive Hydrogel Nanoparticles Prepared by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Method for Biomedical and Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M. El-Sherbiny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel spray gelation-based method to synthesize a new series of magnetically responsive hydrogel nanoparticles for biomedical and drug delivery applications. The method is based on the production of hydrogel nanoparticles from sprayed polymeric microdroplets obtained by an air-jet nebulization process that is immediately followed by gelation in a crosslinking fluid. Oligoguluronate (G-blocks was prepared through the partial acid hydrolysis of sodium alginate. PEG-grafted chitosan was also synthesized and characterized (FTIR, EA, and DSC. Then, magnetically responsive hydrogel nanoparticles based on alginate and alginate/G-blocks were synthesized via aerosolization followed by either ionotropic gelation or both ionotropic and polyelectrolyte complexation using CaCl2 or PEG-g-chitosan/CaCl2 as crosslinking agents, respectively. Particle size and dynamic swelling were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS and microscopy. Surface morphology of the nanoparticles was examined using SEM. The distribution of magnetic cores within the hydrogels nanoparticles was also examined using TEM. In addition, the iron and calcium contents of the particles were estimated using EDS. Spherical magnetic hydrogel nanoparticles with average particle size of 811 ± 162 to 941 ± 2 nm were obtained. This study showed that the developed method is promising for the manufacture of hydrogel nanoparticles, and it represents a relatively simple and potential low-cost system.

  11. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  12. Long-term real-time chemical characterization of submicron aerosols at Montsec (Southern Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.

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    A. Ripoll

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Real-time measurements of inorganic (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and black carbon (BC and organic submicron aerosols from a continental background site (Montsec, MSC, 1570 m a.s.l. in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB were conducted for 10 months (July 2011–April 2012. An Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM was co-located with other on-line and off-line PM1 measurements. Analyses of the hourly, diurnal, and seasonal variations are presented here, for the first time for this region. Seasonal trends in PM1 components are attributed to variations in: evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL height, air mass origin, and meteorological conditions. In summer, the higher temperature and solar radiation increases convection, enhancing the growth of the PBL and the transport of anthropogenic pollutants towards high altitude sites. Furthermore, the regional recirculation of air masses over the WMB creates a continuous increase in the background concentrations of PM1 components and causes the formation of reserve strata at relatively high altitudes. Sporadically, MSC is affected by air masses from North Africa. The combination of all these atmospheric processes at local, regional and continental scales results in a high variability of PM1 components, with poorly defined daily patterns, except for the organic aerosols (OA. OA was mostly oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, with two different types: semi-volatile (SV-OOA and low-volatile (LV-OOA, and both showed marked diurnal cycles regardless of the air mass origin, especially SV-OOA. This different diurnal variation compared to inorganic aerosols suggested that OA components at MSC are not only associated with anthropogenic and long-range-transported secondary OA (SOA, but also with recently-produced biogenic SOA. Very different conditions drive the aerosol phenomenology in winter at MSC. The thermal inversions and the lower vertical development of the PBL leave MSC in the free

  13. Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a power plant plume: Implications for secondary organic nitrate and organosulfate aerosol formation, NO3 radical chemistry, and N2O5 heterogeneous hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, R.A.; Kleinman, L.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Brechtel, F. J.; Gilles, M. K.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Laskin, A.; Madronich, S.; Onasch, T. B.; Pekour, M. S.; Springston, S. R.; Thornton, J. A.; Tivanski, A. V.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-06-01

    Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a coal-fired power plant plume was monitored with the Department of Energy Grumman Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the 2002 New England Air Quality Study field campaign. Quasi-Lagrangian sampling in the plume at increasing downwind distances and processing times was guided by a constant-volume balloon that was released near the power plant at sunset. While no evidence of fly ash particles was found, concentrations of particulate organics, sulfate, and nitrate were higher in the plume than in the background air. The enhanced sulfate concentrations were attributed to direct emissions of gaseous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, some of which had formed new particles as evidenced by enhanced concentrations of nucleation-mode particles in the plume. The aerosol species were internally mixed and the particles were acidic, suggesting that particulate nitrate was in the form of organic nitrate. The enhanced particulate organic and nitrate masses in the plume were inferred as secondary organic aerosol, which was possibly formed from NO{sub 3} radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and other trace organic gases in the presence of acidic sulfate particles. Microspectroscopic analysis of particle samples suggested that some sulfate was in the form of organosulfates. Microspectroscopy also revealed the presence of sp{sup 2} hybridized C = C bonds, which decreased with increasing processing time in the plume, possibly because of heterogeneous chemistry on particulate organics. Constrained plume modeling analysis of the aircraft and tetroon observations showed that heterogeneous hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} was negligibly slow. These results have significant implications for several issues related to the impacts of power plant emissions on air quality and climate.

  14. Chemical analysis of aerosol in the Venusian cloud layer by reaction gas chromatography on board the Vega landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, B. G.; Drozdov, Y. V.; Melnikov, V. V.; Rotin, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.; Bondarev, V. B.; Dolnikov, G. G.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Nenarokov, D. F.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment on sulfuric acid aerosol determination in the Venusian cloud layer on board the Vega landers is described. An average content of sulfuric acid of approximately 1 mg/cu m was found for the samples taken from the atmosphere at heights from 63 to 48 km and analyzed with the SIGMA-3 chromatograph. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was revealed in the gaseous sample at the height of 48 km. From the experimental results and blank run measurements, a suggestion is made that the Venusian cloud layer aerosol consists of more complicated particles than the sulfuric acid water solution does.

  15. Fluorinion transfer in silver-assisted chemical etching for silicon nanowires arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Tianyu; Xu, Youlong, E-mail: ylxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Zhengwei; Mao, Shengchun

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • How Ag transfers F{sup −} to the adjacent Si atom was investigated and deduced by DFT at atomic scale. • Three-electrode CV tests proved the transferring function of Ag in the etching reaction. • Uniform SiNWAs were fabricated on unpolished silicon wafers with KOH pretreatment. - Abstract: Uniform silicon nanowires arrays (SiNWAs) were fabricated on unpolished rough silicon wafers through KOH pretreatment followed by silver-assisted chemical etching (SACE). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the function of silver (Ag) at atomic scale in the etching process. Among three adsorption sites of Ag atom on Si(1 0 0) surface, Ag(T4) above the fourth-layer surface Si atoms could transfer fluorinion (F{sup −}) to adjacent Si successfully due to its stronger electrostatic attraction force between Ag(T4) and F{sup −}, smaller azimuth angle of F−Ag(T4)−Si, shorter bond length of F−Si compared with F−Ag. As F{sup −} was transferred to adjacent Si by Ag(T4) one by one, the Si got away from the wafer in the form of SiF{sub 4} when it bonded with enough F{sup −} while Ag(T4) was still attached onto the Si wafer ready for next transfer. Cyclic voltammetry tests confirmed that Ag can improve the etching rate by transferring F{sup −} to Si.

  16. Changes in chemical components of aerosol particles in different haze regions in China from 2006 to 2013 and contribution of meteorological factors

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    X. Y. Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since individuals experienced persistent haze-fog events in January 2013 in central-eastern China, questions on factors causing differences in drastic changes in 2013 from those in adjacent years have been raised. Changes in major chemical components of aerosol particles over the years also remain unclear. The extent of meteorological factors contributed to such changes is yet to be determined. The study intends to present the changes in daily-based major water-soluble constituents, carbonaceous species and mineral aerosol in PM10 at 13 stations within different haze regions in China from 2006 to 2013, associated with specific meteorological conditions that are highly related with aerosol pollution (parameterized as an index called "PLAM". No obvious changes were found in annual mean concentrations of these various chemical components and PM10 in 2013, relative to 2012. By contrast, wintertime mass of these components were quite different, in Hua Bei Plain (HBP, sulfate, OC, nitrate, ammonium, EC, and mineral dust concentrations in winter were approximately 43, 55, 28, 23, 21 and 130 μg m−3, respectively; these masses were approximately two to four times higher than those in background mass, also exhibiting a decline during 2006 to 2010, and then a rise till 2013. The mass of these concentrations and PM10, except mineral, respectively increased by approximately 28 to 117 and 25 % in January 2013 compared with that in January 2012. Thus, persistent haze-fog events occurred in January 2013, and approximately 60 % of this increase in component concentrations from 2012 to 2013 can be attributed to severe meteorological conditions in the winter of 2013. In Yangtzi River Delta (YRD area, winter masses of these components, unlike HBP, did not significantly increase since 2010; PLAM was also maintained at a similar level without significant changes. In the Pearl River Delta (PRD area, the regional background concentrations of the major chemical

  17. Long-term record of aerosol optical properties and chemical composition from a high-altitude site (Manora Peak in Central Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ram

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This MS reports on a long-term study of aerosol optical properties and chemical composition, conducted during February 2005–July 2008, from a high-altitude site (Manora Peak, ~2000 m a.s.l. in the central Himalaya. The chemical analyses suggest that, on average, total carbonaceous aerosols (TCA and water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS contribute nearly 25% and 10% of the total suspended particulate (TSP mass, respectively. Both, TSP and aerosol optical depth (AOD exhibit significant increase during summer months, with simultaneous increase in the abundance of mineral dust under the prevailing south-westerly winds and long-range transport from desert regions (from middle-East and Thar Desert in western India. The temporal variability in the abundance pattern of carbonaceous species (EC, OC is also significantly pronounced, with lower concentrations occurring during summertime (April–June and monsoon (July–August and relatively high during post-monsoon (September–November and wintertime (December–March. The WSOC/OC ratios (range: 0.32 to 0.83 during summer and post-monsoon suggest significant contribution from secondary organic aerosols. The mass fraction of absorbing EC (elemental carbon ranges from less than a percent (during summer and monsoon to as high as 7.6% (during winter and absorption coefficient (babs, at 678 nm varied as 0.9–33.9 Mm−1 (1 Mm−1=10−6 m−1. The linear regression analysis between (babs and EC concentration (μgC m−3 yields a slope of 12.2(±2.3 m2 g−1, referred as mass absorption efficiency (σabs of EC. However, temporal data suggests lower σabs values during winter and higher in summer and post-monsoon. The change in the mixing state of aerosols and/or variability in the emission sources could be a plausible reason for the variability in σabs at this

  18. Towards the regulation of aerosol emissions by their potential health impact: Assessing adverse effects of aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine emissions by combining comprehensive data on the chemical composition and their toxicological effects on human lung cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Streibel, T.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Rheda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Czech, H.; Tiita, P.; Jalava, P.; Kasurinen, S.; Schwemer, T.; Yli-Prilä, P.; Tissari, J.; Lamberg, H.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ship engine emissions are important regarding lung and cardiovascular diseases in coastal regions worldwide. Bio mass burning is made responsible for adverse health effects in many cities and rural regions. The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. Typical lung cell responses to combustion aerosols include inflammation and apoptosis, but a molecular link with the specific chemical composition in particular of ship emissions has not been established. Through an air-liquid interface exposure system (ALI), we exposed human lung cells at-site to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on common heavy fuel oil (HFO) and cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF) as well as to emissions of wood combustion compliances. A special field deployable ALI-exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for this study. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling to characterise the cellular responses. The HFO ship emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds (transition metals, organic toxicants) and particle masses. The cellular responses included inflammation and oxidative stress. Surprisingly, the DF ship emissions, which predominantly contain rather "pure" carbonaceous soot and much less known toxicants, induced significantly broader biological effects, affecting essential cellular pathways (e.g., mitochondrial function and intracellular transport). Therefore the use of distillate fuels for shipping (this is the current emission reduction strategy of the IMO) appears insufficient for diminishing health effects. The study suggests rather reducing the particle emissions

  19. Multiphase chemical kinetics of OH radical uptake by molecular organic markers of biomass burning aerosols: humidity and temperature dependence, surface reaction, and bulk diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M; Slade, Jonathan H; Berkemeier, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Knopf, Daniel A; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-05-14

    Multiphase reactions of OH radicals are among the most important pathways of chemical aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Reactive uptake of OH by organic compounds has been observed in a number of studies, but the kinetics of mass transport and chemical reaction are still not fully understood. Here we apply the kinetic multilayer model of gas-particle interactions (KM-GAP) to experimental data from OH exposure studies of levoglucosan and abietic acid, which serve as surrogates and molecular markers of biomass burning aerosol (BBA). The model accounts for gas-phase diffusion within a cylindrical coated-wall flow tube, reversible adsorption of OH, surface-bulk exchange, bulk diffusion, and chemical reactions at the surface and in the bulk of the condensed phase. The nonlinear dependence of OH uptake coefficients on reactant concentrations and time can be reproduced by KM-GAP. We find that the bulk diffusion coefficient of the organic molecules is approximately 10(-16) cm(2) s(-1), reflecting an amorphous semisolid state of the organic substrates. The OH uptake is governed by reaction at or near the surface and can be kinetically limited by surface-bulk exchange or bulk diffusion of the organic reactants. Estimates of the chemical half-life of levoglucosan in 200 nm particles in a biomass burning plume increase from 1 day at high relative humidity to 1 week under dry conditions. In BBA particles transported to the free troposphere, the chemical half-life of levoglucosan can exceed 1 month due to slow bulk diffusion in a glassy matrix at low temperature. PMID:25686209

  20. Chemical relations between atmospheric aerosols, deposition and stone decay layers on historic buildings at the mediterranean coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, K.; Van Grieken, R.

    To evaluate the effects of the environment on weathering of historical buildings in the Mediterranean Basin, an elaborate study has been carried out at four monuments, with specific interest directed on the action of air pollution and marine salts. The composition of the atmosphere around the monuments has been investigated by monitoring the aerosols and the total deposition. These results are combined with the stone decay phenomena to interpret the deterioration at the respective monuments. In Eleusis, Greece, a highly industrialized area, high concentrations of heavy metals and sulphate are found in the aerosols and deposition and in the decay layers of the stone, while the marine influence is obscured, in spite of its location close to the sea. In Malta and in Cadiz (Spain), the influence of the sea dominates in the stone weathering process. In Bari (Italy), next to the effects of marine aerosols on the stone decay inside and outside the building, high concentrations of sulphate are observed on the outside stones. The aerosols and depositions reflect a relatively small influence of anthropogenic derived elements; this points out the action of gaseous SO 2 on the stones.

  1. Chemical insights, explicit chemistry, and yields of secondary organic aerosol from OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in the aqueous phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Lim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospherically abundant, volatile water-soluble organic compounds formed through gas-phase chemistry (e.g., glyoxal (C2, methylglyoxal (C3, and acetic acid have great potential to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA via aqueous chemistry in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols. This paper (1 provides chemical insights into aqueous-phase OH-radical-initiated reactions leading to SOA formation from methylglyoxal and (2 uses this and a previously published glyoxal mechanism (Lim et al., 2010 to provide SOA yields for use in chemical transport models. Detailed reaction mechanisms including peroxy radical chemistry and a full kinetic model for aqueous photochemistry of acetic acid and methylglyoxal are developed and validated by comparing simulations with the experimental results from previous studies (Tan et al., 2010, 2012. This new methylglyoxal model is then combined with the previous glyoxal model (Lim et al., 2010, and is used to simulate the profiles of products and to estimate SOA yields. At cloud-relevant concentrations (~ 10−6 − ~ 10−3 M; Munger et al., 1995 of glyoxal and methylglyoxal, the major photooxidation products are oxalic acid and pyruvic acid, and simulated SOA yields (by mass are ~ 120% for glyoxal and ~ 80% for methylglyoxal. During droplet evaporation oligomerization of unreacted methylglyoxal/glyoxal that did not undergo aqueous photooxidation could enhance yields. In wet aerosols, where total dissolved organics are present at much higher concentrations (~ 10 M, the major oxidation products are oligomers formed via organic radical–radical reactions, and simulated SOA yields (by mass are ~ 90% for both glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Non-radical reactions (e.g., with ammonium could enhance yields.

  2. Evidence for heavy fuel oil combustion aerosols from chemical analyses at the island of Lampedusa: a possible large role of ships emissions in the Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Becagli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol chemical composition made on the island of Lampedusa, south of the Sicily channel, during years 2004–2008, are used to identify the influence of heavy fuel oil (HFO combustion emissions on aerosol particles in the Central Mediterranean. Aerosol samples influenced by HFO are characterized by elevated Ni and V soluble fraction (about 80% for aerosol from HFO combustion, versus about 40% for crustal particles, high V and Ni to Si ratios, and values of Vsol>6 ng m−3. Evidence of HFO combustion influence is found in 17% of the daily samples. Back trajectories analysis on the selected events show that air masses prevalently come from the Sicily channel region, where an intense ship traffic occurs. This behavior suggests that single fixed sources like refineries are not the main responsible for the elevated V and Ni events, which are probably mainly due to ships emissions.

    Vsol, Nisol, and non-sea salt SO42− (nssSO42− show a marked seasonal behaviour, with an evident summer maximum. Such a pattern can be explained by several processes: (i increased photochemical activity in summer, leading to a faster production of secondary aerosols, mainly nssSO42−, from the oxidation of SO2 (ii stronger marine boundary layer (MBL stability in summer, leading to higher concentration of emitted compounds in the lowest atmospheric layers. A very intense event in spring 2008 was studied in detail, also using size segregated chemical measurements. These data show that elements arising from heavy oil combustion (V, Ni, Al, Fe are distributed in the sub-micrometric fraction of the aerosol, and the metals are present as free metals, carbonates, oxides hydrates or labile complex with organic ligands, so that they are dissolved in mild condition (HNO3, pH1.5.

    Data suggest a characteristic nss

  3. Fourteen months of on-line measurements of the non-refractory submicron aerosol at the Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) - chemical composition, origins and organic aerosol sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, R.; Cubison, M. J.; Slowik, J. G.; Bukowiecki, N.; Canonaco, F.; Croteau, P. L.; Gysel, M.; Henne, S.; Herrmann, E.; Jayne, J. T.; Steinbacher, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-10-01

    Chemically resolved (organic, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium) data of non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) aerosol from the first long-term deployment (27 July 2012 to 02 October 2013) of a time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM) at the Swiss high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (JFJ; 3580 m a.s.l.) are presented. Besides total mass loadings, diurnal variations and relative species contributions during the different meteorological seasons, geographical origin and sources of organic aerosol (OA) are discussed. Backward transport simulations show that the highest (especially sulfate) concentrations of NR-PM1 were measured in air masses advected to the station from regions south of the JFJ, while lowest concentrations were seen from western regions. OA source apportionment for each season was performed using the Source Finder (SoFi) interface for the multilinear engine (ME-2). OA was dominated in all seasons by oxygenated OA (OOA, 71-88 %), with lesser contributions from local tourism-related activities (7-12 %) and hydrocarbon-like OA related to regional vertical transport (3-9 %). In summer the OOA can be separated into a background low-volatility OA (LV-OOA I, possibly associated with long-range transport) and a slightly less oxidised low-volatility OA (LV-OOA II) associated with regional vertical transport. Wood burning-related OA associated with regional transport was detected during the whole winter 2012/2013 and during rare events in summer 2013, in the latter case attributed to small-scale transport for the surrounding valleys. Additionally, the data were divided into periods with free tropospheric (FT) conditions and periods with planetary boundary layer (PBL) influence, enabling the assessment of the composition for each. Most nitrate and part of the OA are injected from the regional PBL, while sulfate is mainly produced in the FT. The south/north gradient of sulfate is also pronounced in FT air masses (sulfate mass fraction from the south: 45

  4. Intercomparison of modal and sectional aerosol microphysics representations within the same 3-D global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Mann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the most advanced aerosol-climate models it is common to represent the aerosol particle size distribution in terms of several log-normal modes. This approach, motivated by computational efficiency, makes assumptions about the shape of the particle distribution that may not always capture the properties of global aerosol. Here, a global modal aerosol microphysics module (GLOMAP-mode is evaluated and improved by comparing against a sectional version (GLOMAP-bin and observations in the same 3-D global offline chemistry transport model. With both schemes, the model captures the main features of the global particle size distribution, with sub-micron aerosol approximately unimodal in continental regions and bi-modal in marine regions. Initial bin-mode comparisons showed that the current values for two size distribution parameter settings in the modal scheme (mode widths and inter-modal separation sizes resulted in clear biases compared to the sectional scheme. By adjusting these parameters in the modal scheme, much better agreement is achieved against the bin scheme and observations. Annual mean surface-level mass of sulphate, sea-salt, black carbon (BC and organic carbon (OC are within 25% in the two schemes in nearly all regions. Surface level concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, surface area density and condensation sink also compare within 25% in most regions. However, marine CCN concentrations between 30° N and 30° S are systematically 25–60% higher in the modal model, which we attribute to differences in size-resolved particle growth or cloud-processing. Larger differences also exist in regions or seasons dominated by biomass burning and in free-troposphere and high-latitude regions. Indeed, in the free-troposphere, GLOMAP-mode BC is a factor 2–4 higher than GLOMAP-bin, likely due to differences in size-resolved scavenging. Nevertheless, in most parts of the atmosphere, we conclude that bin

  5. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  6. Chemically Compatible Sacrificial Layer-Assisted Lift-Off Patterning Method for Fabrication of Organic Light-Emitting Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wonsuk; Kim, Min-Hoi; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2011-08-01

    We developed a generic platform to pattern combinatorial functional layers composed of different classes of organic materials using a repetitive lift-off method based on a chemically compatible sacrificial layer (SL) for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The essential features come from the chemically compatible SL of a fluorous-polymer that can be generated by laser-inscription or transfer-printing. The precise registration of lateral patterns of different materials was achieved on a single substrate through a series of SL-assisted lift-off processes. The chemical compatibility of the SL and the stability of the light-emitting characteristics were shown in a fluorous-solvent treated monochrome OLEDs.

  7. Effects of Siberian wildfires on the chemical composition and acidity of atmospheric aerosols of remote urban, rural and background territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive forest fires occurred during the summer of 2012 in Siberia. This work presents the influence of long-range atmospheric smoke on the aerosol properties at urban, suburban and background sites, which are located 400–800 km from the fire source. The higher levels of submicron particles (PM1), organic (OC), secondary organic (SOC) and elemental (EC) carbon were observed at all sampling sites, whereas an increase in ionic species HCOO−, K+, NO3−, and Cl− and a decrease in pH was higher at the background and suburban sites in comparison with the urban site. Other natural and anthropogenic factors appear to be more significant for ions Ca2+ + Mg2+, HCO3−, NH4+, SO42− and Na+. The present study indicates that the impact of remote fires on the aerosol characteristics depends on their background (without fires) levels at the sampling sites. - Highlights: • Characterization of smoke samples from long-term remote wildfires in Siberia. • Impact of wildfires upon aerosol characteristics depend on a type of sampling site. • Higher levels of PM1, OC and SOC were found at all sites (urban, rural, and background). • Tracers of wildfires at rural and background sites were K+, HCOO−, Cl−, NO3− and pH. • Variations of Ca2+ + Mg2+, HCO3−, SO42−, NH4+ and Na+ were defined by other sources. - The impact of remote fires on the aerosol characteristics depends on the type of sampling site and activity of prevalent local sources

  8. Influence of the voltage waveform during nanocomposite layer deposition by aerosol-assisted atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profili, J.; Levasseur, O.; Naudé, N.; Chaneac, C.; Stafford, L.; Gherardi, N.

    2016-08-01

    This work examines the growth dynamics of TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings in plane-to-plane Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBDs) at atmospheric pressure operated in a Townsend regime using nebulized TiO2 colloidal suspension in hexamethyldisiloxane as the growth precursors. For low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal voltages applied to the DBD cell, with voltage amplitudes lower than the one required for discharge breakdown, Scanning Electron Microscopy of silicon substrates placed on the bottom DBD electrode reveals significant deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) close to the discharge entrance. On the other hand, at higher frequencies (HF), the number of TiO2 NPs deposited strongly decreases due to their "trapping" in the oscillating voltage and their transport along the gas flow lines. Based on these findings, a combined LF-HF voltage waveform is proposed and used to achieve significant and spatially uniform deposition of TiO2 NPs across the whole substrate surface. For higher voltage amplitudes, in the presence of hexamethyldisiloxane and nitrous oxide for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic layers, it is found that TiO2 NPs become fully embedded into a silica-like matrix. Similar Raman spectra are obtained for as-prepared TiO2 NPs and for nanocomposite TiO2-SiO2 coating, suggesting that plasma exposure does not significantly alter the crystalline structure of the TiO2 NPs injected into the discharge.

  9. A study of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of ambient aerosol particles in Southeast Asia during hazy and nonhazy days

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, S. W.; Balasubramanian, R.; Wang, W.

    2006-05-01

    Many Southeast Asian countries have been constantly plagued by recurring smoke haze episodes as a result of traditional slash-and-burn practices in agricultural areas to clear crop lands or uncontrolled forest fires. However, our current knowledge on the physiochemical and optical properties of ambient aerosols associated with regional haze phenomenon is still fairly limited. Therefore a comprehensive field study was carried out in Singapore from March 2001 to March 2002 under varying weather conditions to gain a better understanding of the characteristics. The physical (size distribution of mass and number concentrations), chemical (mass concentrations of chemical components: 14 ions, 24 metals, elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC)), and optical (light absorption (bap) and scattering (bsp) by particles) characteristics of ambient aerosol particles were investigated. The results are reported separately for clear and hazy days by categorizing the days as clear or hazy on the basis of visibility data. It was observed that the average concentrations of PM2.5 and most chemical components increased approximately by a factor of 2 on hazy days. Backward air trajectories together with the hot spot distributions in the region indicated that the degradation in Singapore's air quality on hazy days was attributable to large-scale forest fires in Sumatra. This visibility degradation was quantitatively measured on the basis of the light absorption and scattering by particles. As expected, scattering rather than absorption controlled atmospheric visibility, and PM2.5 particles present on hazy days were more efficient at scattering light than those found on clear days.

  10. Dependence of aerosol scattering coefficients on relative humidity observed at two coastal sites on the East China Sea: Comparison to remote observations and influence of chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.; Taketani, F.; Irie, H.; Komazaki, Y.; Takashima, H.; Xiaole, P.; Takami, A.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    We employed an integrating nephelometer equipped with a humidifier (where the relative humidity (RH) was scanned between 40 and 90%) to measure the aerosol scattering coefficients and their dependence on RH at Fukue Island (32.75N, 128.68E), west of Japan, in May 2009 and at Rudong, Jiangsu, China (32.26N, 121.37E) in May/June 2010, aiming at better characterization of optical properties of the regional-scale aerosol pollution over East Asia. The two coastal sites are located east and west of the East China Sea and are separated by about 700 km. The observed scattering coefficients are normalized by the concurrently measured PM2.5 mass concentrations and thereby behaviors of the mass scattering coefficients are discussed. At Fukue, the mass scattering coefficients under the ambient RH conditions were >1.5 times higher than those observed under the dry condition (RH = 40%), suggesting that the RH effect was crucial in determining optical properties under ambient conditions. The coefficients under the ambient RH conditions, rather than the dry values, agreed better with the extinction coefficients determined by MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique based on remote measurements of O4 optical depths. The single-scattering albedo (SSA), estimated in combination to the absorption coefficients determined by a MAAP (Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer) instrument, had similar average values (~0.95) at the two sites. The SSA values at the two sites were commonly lowered (to below 0.90) when the air traveled from the North China Plain region. At Fukue, the RH dependence was found to be weakened when the organics/sulfate ratio increased (as observed by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer), while such influence of chemical composition was less clear at Rudong, possibly masked by large temporal variations in the particle size distributions.

  11. U.S. assistance in the destruction of Russia's chemical weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Mostoller, Eric Charles

    2000-01-01

    The thesis examines the present status of Russia's chemical weapons destruction program, which is to be implemented according to the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). It assesses the magnitude of the challenges in destroying the world's largest chemical weapons stockpile, which is located at seven sites in western Russia. It also evaluates the environmental and international security concerns posed by the conditions at these sites and the disastrous implications of a failure of this che...

  12. Fabrication of microchannels in single-crystal GaN by wet-chemical-assisted femtosecond-laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated micro- and nano-fabrication of wide band-gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Nanoscale craters were successfully formed by wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation, in which the laser beam is focused onto a single-crystal GaN substrate in a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. This allows efficient removal of ablation debris produced by chemical reactions during ablation, resulting in high-quality ablation. However, a two-step processing method involving irradiation by a fs-laser beam in air followed by wet etching, distorts the shape of the crater because of residual debris. The threshold fluence for wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation is lower than that for fs-laser ablation in air, which is advantageous for improving fabrication resolution since it reduces thermal effects. We have fabricated craters as small as 510 nm by using a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with an NA of 0.73. Furthermore, we have formed three-dimensional hollow microchannels in GaN by fs-laser direct-writing in HCl solution.

  13. Source Allocation of Long-Range Asian Dusts Transportation across the Taiwan Strait by Innovative Chemical-Assisted Identification Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsiu Jen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used the backward trajectory calculation to obtain the transportation routes of Asian dusts and further combined the chemical composition with the enrichment factor (EF and the grey relational analysis (GR to identify the potential sources of eighteen Asian dust storm (ADS events. The results showed that the chemical compositions of atmospheric particles sampled at the Pescadores Islands were very similar to source soils fugitively emitted from Inner Mongolia, which could assist in identifying the source regions of Asian dusts. This study further compared the source allocation of Asian dusts obtained from EF, GR, and backward trajectory, which showed that the source regions of Asian dusts obtained from these three methods were quite similar. The similarity of backward trajectory and GR reached as high as 83.3%. Moreover, the similarity of backward trajectory calculation and EF or GR was up to 77.8% while that of the GR and EF was up to 83.3%. Overall, these three methods can successfully allocate the source regions of Asian dusts by 66.7%. Moreover, these innovative chemical-assisted methods can be successfully applied to identify the source regions of Asian dusts for 18 ADS events.

  14. Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a power plant plume: Implications for secondary organic nitrate and organosulfate aerosol formation, NO₃ radical chemistry, and N₂O₅ heterogeneous hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Gilles, Marry K.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Laskin, Alexander; Madronich, Sasha; Onasch, Timothy B.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Springston, Stephen R.; Thornton, Joel A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-06-22

    Chemical evolution of aerosols and trace gases in the Salem Harbor power plant plume was monitored with the DOE G-1 aircraft on the night of July 30-31, 2002. Quasi-Lagrangian sampling in the plume at increasing downwind distances/processing times was guided by a constant-volume tetroon that was released near the power plant at sunset. While no evidence of fly ash particles was found, concentrations of particulate organics, sulfate, and nitrate were higher in the plume than in the nearby background air. These species were internally mixed and the particles were acidic, suggesting that particulate nitrate was in the form of organic nitrate. The enhanced particulate organic and nitrate masses in the plume were inferred to be as secondary organic aerosol, possibly formed from the NO3 radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and other trace organic gases in the presence of acidic sulfate particles. The enhanced particulate sulfate concentrations observed in the plume were attributed to direct emissions of gaseous SO3/H2SO4 from the power plant. Furthermore, concentration of nucleation mode particles was significantly higher in the plume than in background air, suggesting that some of the emitted H2SO4 had nucleated to form new particles. Spectromicroscopic analyses of particle samples suggested that some sulfate was likely in the form of organosulfates. Constrained Lagrangian model analysis of the aircraft and tetroon observations showed that heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 was negligibly slow. These results have significant implications for several scientific and regulatory issues related to the impacts of power plant emissions on atmospheric chemistry, air quality, visibility, and climate.

  15. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO, Siberia, during a summer campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Mikhailov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ∼34% in the accumulation vs. ∼47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ∼70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ∼35% RH for submicron particles vs. ∼50% RH for supermicron particles. This ∼15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws fraction was estimated to be ∼0

  16. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in central Siberia (61° N, 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical compositions of aerosol particles were analyzed by x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38 % of particulate matter (PM) in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water-soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8 % of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34 % in the accumulation mode vs. ~ 47 % in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4 % RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same relative humidity (RH), starting at ~ 70 %, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35 % RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50 % RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15 % RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4 % RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv,ws value related to the water-soluble (ws

  17. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  18. Chemical and Aerosol Characteristics of Asian Outflow as Observed during INTEX-B and TRACE-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, L.; Anderson, B. E.; Winstead, E. L.; Chen, G.; Clarke, A.; Dibb, J.; Scheuer, E.; Sachse, G.; Blake, D.; Fuelberg, H.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Intercontinental Transport and Chemistry Experiment, phase B (INTEX-B) was conducted in the spring of 2006 to investigate the transport and transformation of gases and aerosols on transcontinental/intercontinental scales and to assess the impacts of the aged pollutants on air quality and climate. To accomplish these goals, the instrumented, North Dakota DC-8 aircraft was deployed during two separate phases to study vastly different pollution and transport phenomena. During the first 3 weeks of March, the aircraft was based in Houston and flew sorties over Mexico City and the western Gulf to examine the composition, outflow pathways, and evolution of pollution from Mexico City. The second phase took place between April 17 and May 15, and involved basing the aircraft at first Hickam AFB, Hawaii, then Anchorage, AK to examine the outflow of pollution from Asia at different points along the transport pathway. In this presentation, we analyze data from the second phase of INTEX-B to characterize the composition of Asian outflow as a function of age (e.g. C2H2/CO ratio) and vertical location (0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, and >8 km). We use airmass trajectories to identify the primary Asian continental source regions that influence atmospheric composition within the Northeast Pacific region and characterize those source regions using aerosol and gas phase tracers. In addition, we compare INTEX-B vertical profiles of trace gas and aerosol species with similar measurements recorded aboard the DC-8 just off the Asian coast during the 2001 NASA Transport and Chemistry near the Equator - Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment to evaluate changes in species concentrations/characteristics during the approximately 10-day transport period between the two regions.

  19. Insights into a dust event transported through Beijing in spring 2012: Morphology, chemical composition and impact on surface aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Niu, Hongya; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Chen, Chen; Wu, Yusheng; Shang, Dongjie; Hu, Min

    2016-09-15

    Multiple approaches were used to investigate the evolution of surface aerosols in Beijing during the passage of a dust event at high altitude, which was from the Gobi areas of southern Mongolia and covered a wide range of North China. Single particle analysis with electron microscope showed that the majority of coarse particles were mineral ones, and most of them were in the size range of 1-7μm with a peak of number concentration at about 3.5μm. Based on elemental composition and morphology, the mineral particles could be classified into several groups, including Si-rich (71%), Ca-rich (15%), Fe-rich (6%), and halite-rich (2%), etc., and they were the main contributors to the aerosol optical depth as the dust occurred. The size distributions of surface aerosols were significantly affected by the dust intrusion. The average number concentration of accumulation mode particles during the event was about 400cm(-3), which was much lower than that in heavily polluted days (6300cm(-3)). At the stage of floating dust, the number concentration of accumulation mode particles decreased, and coarse particles contributed to total volume concentration of particulate matter as much as 90%. The accumulation mode particles collected in this stage were mostly in the size range of 0.2-0.5μm, and were rectangular or spherical. They were considered to be particles consisting of ammonium sulfate. New particle formation (NPF) was observed around noon in the three days during the dust event, indicating that the passage of the dust was probably favorable for NPF. PMID:27177135

  20. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  1. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a

  2. Chemical and physical influences on aerosol activation in liquid clouds: an empirical study based on observations from the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple empirical model to predict the number of aerosols which activate to form cloud droplets in a warm, free tropospheric cloud has been established, based on data from four summertime Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE campaigns at the Jungfraujoch (JFJ. It is shown that 76% of the observed variance in droplet numbers can be represented by a model accounting only for the number of potential CCN (defined as number of particles larger than 90 nm in diameter, while the mean errors in the model representation may be reduced by the addition of further explanatory variables, such as the mixing ratios of O3, CO and the height of the measurements above cloud base. The model has similar ability to represent the observed droplet numbers in each of the individual years, as well as for the two predominant local wind directions at the JFJ (north west and south east. Given the central European location of the JFJ, with air masses in summer being representative of the free troposphere with regular boundary layer in-mixing via convection, we expect that this model is applicable to warm, free tropospheric clouds over the European continent.

  3. Role of fluorine atoms in the oxidation-hydrolysis process of plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition fluorinated silicon nitride film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, O.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Palacio, C. (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain))

    The oxidation and/or hydrolysis of a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition fluorinated silicon nitride film in a moisture atmosphere has been studied. The film presents fluorine atoms incorporated as -SiF, -SiF[sub 2], -SiF[sub 3], and [-SiF[sub 2]-][sub n] groups. The open structure of the film, due to the high fluorine content as [-SiF[sub 2]-][sub n], favors the penetration of oxygen and water molecules in the network. The evolution of the film has been explained by the different reactivity of the silicon atoms depending on their chemical environment. The role of fluorine atoms incorporated into the film has been established. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Microwave assisted rapid growth of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanosheet networks for ethanol chemical sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hazmi, Faten [Department of Physics, College of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21569 (Saudi Arabia); Umar, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmadumar786@gmail.com [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Dar, G.N. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Sayari, S.A. [Department of Physics, College of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21569 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hajry, A. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Kim, S.H. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Tuwirqi, Reem M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21569 (Saudi Arabia); Alnowaiserb, Fowzia [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); El-Tantawy, Farid [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2012-04-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile microwave-assisted synthesis and characterizations of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanosheet networks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fabrication of ethanol sensor based on (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanosheet networks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good sensitivity ({approx}3.991 {mu}A cm{sup -2} mM{sup -1}) and lower detection limit (5 {mu}M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This research opens a way to utilize Mg(OH){sub 2} nanostructures for chemical sensors applications. - Abstract: This paper reports a facile microwave-assisted synthesis of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanosheet networks and their utilization for the fabrication of efficient ethanol chemical sensor. The synthesized nanosheets networks were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties using various analysis techniques such as field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The detailed morphological and structural investigations reveal that the synthesized (Mg(OH){sub 2}) products are nanosheet networks, grown in high density, and possessing hexagonal crystal structure. The optical band gap of as-synthesized Mg(OH){sub 2} nanosheet networks was examined by UV-Vis absorption spectrum, and found to be 5.76 eV. The synthesized nanosheet networks were used as supporting matrices for the fabrication of I-V technique based efficient ethanol chemical sensor. The fabricated ethanol sensor based on nanosheet networks exhibits good sensitivity ({approx}3.991 {mu}A cm{sup -2} mM{sup -1}) and lower detection limit (5 {mu}M), with linearity (R = 0.9925) in short response time (10.0 s). This work demonstrate that the simply synthesized Mg(OH){sub 2} nanosheet networks can effectively be used for the fabrication of efficient ethanol chemical sensors.

  5. Effect of MW-assisted roasting on nutritional and chemical properties of hazelnuts

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Kalkan; Sai Kranthi Vanga; Yvan Gariepy; Vijaya Raghavan

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the flavor, texture, color, and appearance of hazelnuts, they are roasted during postharvest processing. In this study, raw hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L.) were roasted using microwave (MW) and MW-assisted hot air methods under various roasting conditions. The hazelnuts roasted were then examined to determine the percent DPPH radical scavenging activity, antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, resistant starch, non-resistant starch, total starch, and protein concentr...

  6. Using the chemical equilibrium partitioning space to explore factors influencing the phase distribution of compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wania

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many atmospheric and chemical variables influence the partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and condensed phases of compounds implicated in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. The large number of factors and their interaction makes it often difficult to assess their relative importance and concerted impact. Here we introduce a two-dimensional space, which maps regions of dominant atmospheric phase distribution within a coordinate system defined by equilibrium partitioning coefficients between the gas phase, an aqueous phase and a water insoluble organic matter (WIOM phase. Placing compounds formed from the oxidation of n-alkanes, terpenes and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons on the maps based on their predicted partitioning properties allows for a simple graphical assessment of their equilibrium phase distribution behaviour. Specifically, it allows for the simultaneous visualization and quantitative comparison of the impact on phase distribution of changes in atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, salinity, WIOM phase polarity, organic aerosol load, and liquid water content, and chemical properties (such as oxidation state, molecular size, functionalization, and dimerisation. The graphical analysis reveals that the addition of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups increases the affinity of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons for the aqueous phase more rapidly than their affinity for WIOM, suggesting that the aqueous phase may often be relevant even for substances that are considerably larger than the C2 and C3 compounds that are typically believed to be associated with aqueous SOA. In particular, the maps identify some compounds that contribute to SOA formation if partitioning to both WIOM and aqueous phase is considered, but would remain in the gas phase if either condensed phase were neglected. For example, many semi-volatile α-pinene oxidation products will contribute to aqueous SOA under the high liquid water

  7. A one-year comprehensive chemical characterisation of fine aerosol (PM2.5) at urban, suburban and rural background sites in the region of Paris (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Bonnaire, N.; Nicolas, J. B.; Petit, J.-E.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Féron, A.

    2013-08-01

    Studies describing the chemical composition of fine aerosol (PM2.5) in urban areas are often conducted for a few weeks only and at one sole site, giving thus a narrow view of their temporal and spatial characteristics. This paper presents a one-year (11 September 2009-10 September 2010) survey of the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 in the region of Paris, which is the second most populated "Larger Urban Zone" in Europe. Five sampling sites representative of suburban (SUB), urban (URB), northeast (NER), northwest (NWR) and south (SOR) rural backgrounds were implemented. The major chemical components of PM2.5 were determined including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and the major ions. OC was converted to organic matter (OM) using the chemical mass closure methodology, which leads to conversion factors of 1.95 for the SUB and URB sites, and 2.05 for the three rural ones. On average, gravimetrically determined PM2.5 annual mass concentrations are 15.2, 14.8, 12.6, 11.7 and 10.8 μg m-3 for SUB, URB, NER, NWR and SOR sites, respectively. The chemical composition of fine aerosol is very homogeneous at the five sites and is composed of OM (38-47%), nitrate (17-22%), non-sea-salt sulfate (13-16%), ammonium (10-12%), EC (4-10%), mineral dust (2-5%) and sea salt (3-4%). This chemical composition is in agreement with those reported in the literature for most European environments. On an annual scale, Paris (URB and SUB sites) exhibits its highest PM2.5 concentrations during late autumn, winter and early spring (higher than 15 μg m-3 on average, from December to April), intermediates during late spring and early autumn (between 10 and 15 μg m-3 during May, June, September, October, and November) and the lowest during summer (below 10 μg m-3 during July and August). PM levels are mostly homogeneous on a regional scale, during the whole project (e.g. for URB plotted against NER sites: slope = 1.06, r2=0.84, n=330), suggesting the importance of mid- or long

  8. The Influence of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Attitude toward Chemistry: A Case for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effect of computer-assisted instruction on conceptual understanding of chemical bonding and attitude toward chemistry was investigated. The study employed a quasi-experimental design involving 11 grade students; 25 in an experimental and 25 in a control group. The Chemical Bonding Achievement Test (CBAT) consisting of 15…

  9. Organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN

  10. Intercomparison of modal and sectional aerosol microphysics representations within the same 3-D global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Mann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A global modal aerosol microphysics module (GLOMAP-mode is evaluated and improved by comparing against a sectional version (GLOMAP-bin and observations in the same 3-D global offline chemistry transport model. With both schemes, the model captures the main features of the global particle size distribution, with sub-micron aerosol approximately unimodal in continental regions and bi-modal in marine regions. Initial bin-mode comparisons showed that various size distribution parameter settings (mode widths and inter-modal separation sizes resulted in clear biases compared to the sectional scheme. By adjusting these parameters in the modal scheme, much better agreement is achieved against the bin scheme and observations. Surface mass of sulphate, sea-salt, black carbon (BC and organic carbon (OC are, on the annual mean, within 25 % in the two schemes in nearly all regions. On the annual mean, surface level concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, surface area density and condensation sink also compare within 25 % in most regions. However, marine CCN concentrations between 30° N and 30° S are systematically higher in the modal scheme, by 25–60 %, which we attribute to differences in size-resolved particle growth or cloud-processing. Larger differences also exist in regions or seasons dominated by biomass burning and in free-troposphere and high-latitude regions. Indeed, in the free-troposphere, GLOMAP-mode BC is a factor 2–4 higher than GLOMAP-bin, likely due to differences in size-resolved scavenging. Nevertheless, in most parts of the atmosphere, we conclude that bin-mode differences are much less than model-observation differences, although some processes are missing in these runs which may pose a bigger challenge to modal schemes (e.g. boundary layer nucleation, ultra-fine sea-spray. The findings here underline the need for a spectrum of complexity in global models, with size-resolved aerosol properties

  11. A Comparison Analysis of Chemical Composition of Aerosols in the Dust and Non-Dust Periods in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仁健; 徐永福; 韩志伟

    2004-01-01

    Dust events occurred frequently in Beijing in recent years. In this work, 120 aerosol samples were collected in two typical dust events (21-22 March and 15 May) and a non-dust period in Beijing from March to May 2001. Samples were analyzed for major elemental components by the Proton Induced Xray Emission (PIXE) method. Results show that the enrichment factors of crustal elements such as Mg,Al, and Ti had little differences between the dust period and the non-dust period in Beijing, while the enrichment factors of other elements that have a relation to anthropogenic emissions were very low during the dust period. The results derived by using multivariate factor analysis from the observation data show that the sources such as soil dust, industry, and fuel combustion were among the major contributors to the particles in Beijing.

  12. Chemical and optical properties of aerosols and their interrelationship in winter in the megacity Shanghai of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tingting; Qiao, Liping; Zhou, Min; Qu, Yu; Du, Jianfei; Liu, Xingang; Lou, Shengrong; Chen, Changhong; Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Qing; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A field campaign on air quality was carried out in Shanghai in winter of 2012. The concentrations of NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, CO, and PM2.5 increased during haze formation. The average masses of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) were 10.3, 11.7 and 6.7 μg/m(3) during the haze episodes, which exceeded the average (9.2, 7.9, and 3.4 μg/m(3)) of these components in the non-haze days. The mean values for the aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp), aerosol absorption coefficient (bap) and single scattering albedo (SSA) were 288.7, 27.7 and 0.91 Mm(-1), respectively. A bi-peak distribution was observed for the mass concentrations of CO, NO, NO2, and NOx. More sulfate was produced during daytime than that in the evening due to photochemical reactions. The mass concentration of NH4(+) achieved a small peak at noontime. NO3(-) showed lower concentrations in the afternoon and higher concentrations in the early morning. There were obvious bi-peak diurnal patterns for bsp and bap as well as SSA. bsp and bap showed a positive correlation with PM2.5 mass concentration. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, organic mass, elemental carbon and coarse mass accounted for 21.7%, 19.3%, 31.0%, 9.3% and 12.3% of the total extinction coefficient during non-haze days, and 25.6%, 24.3%, 30.1%, 8.1% and 8.2% during hazy days. Organic matter was the largest contributor to light extinction. The contribution proportions of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate to light extinction were significantly higher during the hazy time than during the non-haze days. PMID:25597663

  13. Chemical characterization of aerosols at the summit of Mountain Tai in the middle of central east China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Deng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available PM2.5 and TSP samples were collected at the summit of Mountain Tai (MT (1534 m a.s.l. in spring 2006/2007 and summer 2006 to investigate the characteristics of aerosols over central eastern China. For comparison, aerosol samples were also collected at Tazhong, Urumqi, Tianchi in Xinjiang in northwestern China, Duolun and Yulin in northern China, and two urban sites in the megacities, Beijing and Shanghai, in spring 2007. Daily mass concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 ranged from 39.6–276.9 μg/m3 and 17.2–235.7 μg/m3 respectively at the summit of MT. Averaged concentrations of PM2.5 showed a pronounced seasonal variation with higher concentration in summer than spring. 17 water-soluble ions (SO42−, NO3, Cl, F, PO43−, NO2, CH3COO, CH2C2O42−, C2H4C2O42−, HCOO, MSA, C2O42−, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, and 19 elements of 176 samples from MT were measured. SO42−, NO3, and NH4+ were the major water-soluble species in PM2.5, accounting for 61.5% and 73.8% of the total measured ions in spring and summer, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TSP was 0.37(2006 and 0.49(2007 in spring, while up to 0.91 in summer, suggesting that aerosol particles were primarily comprised of fine particles in summer and of considerable coarse particles in spring. Crustal elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, etc. showed higher concentration in spring than summer, while most pollution species (SO42−, NO3, K

  14. US technical assistance to the IAEA and the chemical weapons convection (CWC) - a review and look to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indusi, J.; Parsick, R.J.; Reisman, A.W.

    1997-08-01

    This paper reviews the Safeguards mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and describes U.S. technical support programs. We also review the mandate of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and speculate on the technical areas where U.S. assistance may prove useful. The IAEA was organized in 1957 in response to President Eisenhower`s {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace{close_quotes} initiative presented to the UN General Assembly on December 8, 1953. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) has been organized by a Preparatory Commission (PREPCOM) to prepare for the entry-into-force of this new convention which prohibits the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons and on their destruction. The safeguards mandate of the IAEA is to carry out verifications of nuclear material pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other voluntary but legally binding agreements. U.S. technical support programs have provided and continue to provide assistance in the form of Cost-Free Experts (CFE`s), systems studies on new safeguards approaches, training, computerized information systems, and equipment for nuclear materials measurements and containment and surveillance systems. Because the CWC just recently entered into force (April 29, 1997), verification procedures of the OPCW are not yet fully developed. However, it is expected, and can already be seen for many aspects of the technical task, that there are many similarities between the verification activities of the OPCW and those carried out by the IAEA. This paper will discuss potential technical support areas that can help strengthen the OPCW. 9 refs.

  15. Microwave-assisted chemical oxidation of biological waste sludge: simultaneous micropollutant degradation and sludge solubilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Oncu, Nalan; Akmehmet Balcioglu, Isil

    2013-10-01

    Microwave-assisted hydrogen peroxide (MW/H2O2) treatment and microwave-assisted persulfate (MW/S2O8(2-)) treatment of biological waste sludge were compared in terms of simultaneous antibiotic degradation and sludge solubilization. A 2(3) full factorial design was utilized to evaluate the influences of temperature, oxidant dose, and holding time on the efficiency of these processes. Although both MW/H2O2 and MW/S2O8(2-) yielded ≥97% antibiotic degradation with 1.2g H2O2 and 0.87 g S2O8(2-) per gram total solids, respectively, at 160 °C in 15 min, MW/S2O8(2-) was found to be more promising for efficient sludge treatment at a lower temperature and a lower oxidant dosage, as it allows more effective activation of persulfate to produce the SO4(-) radical. Relative to MW/H2O2, MW/S2O8(2-) gives 48% more overall metal solubilization, twofold higher improvement in dewaterability, and the oxidation of solubilized ammonia to nitrate in a shorter treatment period. PMID:23928124

  16. Effect of MW-assisted roasting on nutritional and chemical properties of hazelnuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kalkan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the flavor, texture, color, and appearance of hazelnuts, they are roasted during postharvest processing. In this study, raw hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L. were roasted using microwave (MW and MW-assisted hot air methods under various roasting conditions. The hazelnuts roasted were then examined to determine the percent DPPH radical scavenging activity, antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, resistant starch, non-resistant starch, total starch, and protein concentration. The roasting experiments were done using a completely randomized factorial arrangement of two roasting types by three roasting times (9, 15, and 21 min by three roasting temperatures (70, 90, and 110°C using three replications within each experiment. These roasting methods were found to yield significant differences in antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, resistant starch, non-resistant starch, and protein concentration between MW and MW-assisted hot air roasting processes, while no difference was found in percent DPPH radical scavenging activity and total starch. The results obtained may be of great importance to the food research community and industrial hazelnut roasting technologies.

  17. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm−3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm−3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94 and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58 of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm−3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed

  18. Origins of atmospheric aerosols. Basic concepts on aerosol main physical properties; L`aerosol atmospherique: ses origines quelques notions sur les principales proprietes physiques des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renoux, A. [Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France). Laboratoire de Physique des aerosols et de transferts des contaminations

    1996-12-31

    Natural and anthropogenic sources of atmospheric aerosols are reviewed and indications of their concentrations and granulometry are given. Calculation of the lifetime of an atmospheric aerosol of a certain size is presented and the various modes of aerosol granulometry and their relations with photochemical and physico-chemical processes in the atmosphere are discussed. The main physical, electrical and optical properties of aerosols are also presented: diffusion coefficient, dynamic mobility and relaxation time, Stokes number, limit rate of fall, electrical mobility, optical diffraction

  19. The effect of meteorological and chemical factors on the agreement between observations and predictions of fine aerosol composition in Southwestern Ontario during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Markovic

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met was an intensive, collaborative field campaign during the summer of 2007 that investigated the effects of transboundary pollution, local pollution, and local meteorology on regional air quality in Southwestern Ontario. This analysis focuses on the measurements of the inorganic constituents of particulate matter with diameter of less than 1 μm (PM1, with a specific emphasis on nitrate. We evaluate the ability of AURAMS, the Environment Canada's chemical transport model, to represent regional air pollution in SW Ontario by comparing modelled aerosol inorganic chemical composition with measurements from Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS onboard the National Research Council (NRC of Canada Twin Otter aircraft and at a ground site in Harrow, ON. The agreement between modelled and measured pNO3 at the ground site (observed mean (M_obs = 0.50 μg m−3; modelled mean (M_mod = 0.58 μg m−3; root mean square error (RSME = 1.27 μg m−3 was better than aloft (M_obs = 0.32 μg m−3; M_mod = 0.09 μg m−3; RSME = 0.48 μg m−3. Possible reasons for discrepancies include errors in (i emission inventories, (ii atmospheric chemistry, (iii predicted meteorological parameters, or (iv gas/particle thermodynamics in the model framework. Using the inorganic thermodynamics model, ISORROPIA, in an offline mode, we find that the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium is consistent with observations of gas and particle composition at Harrow. We develop a framework to assess the sensitivity of PM1 nitrate to meteorological and chemical parameters and find that errors in both the predictions of relative humidity and free ammonia (FA ≡ NH3(g + NH4+ − SO42− are responsible for the poor agreement between modelled and measured values.

  20. The effect of meteorological and chemical factors on the agreement between observations and predictions of fine aerosol composition in southwestern Ontario during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Markovic

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met was an intensive, collaborative field campaign during the summer of 2007 that investigated the effects of transboundary pollution, local pollution, and local meteorology on air quality in southwestern Ontario. This analysis focuses on the measurements of the inorganic constituents of particulate matter with diameter of less than 1 μm (PM1, with a specific emphasis on nitrate. We evaluate the ability of AURAMS, Environment Canada's chemical transport model, to represent regional air pollution in SW Ontario by comparing modelled aerosol inorganic chemical composition with measurements from Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS onboard the National Research Council (NRC of Canada Twin Otter aircraft and at a ground site in Harrow, ON. The agreement between modelled and measured pNO3 at the ground site (observed mean (Mobs = 0.50 μg m−3; modelled mean (Mmod = 0.58 μg m−3; root mean square error (RSME = 1.27 μg m−3 was better than aloft (Mobs = 0.32 μg m−3; Mmod = 0.09 μg m−3; RSME = 0.48 μg m−3. Possible reasons for discrepancies include errors in (i emission inventories, (ii atmospheric chemistry, (iii predicted meteorological parameters, or (iv gas/particle thermodynamics in the model framework. Using the inorganic thermodynamics model, ISORROPIA, in an offline mode, we find that the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium is consistent with observations of gas and particle composition at Harrow. We develop a framework to assess the sensitivity of PM1 nitrate to meteorological and chemical parameters and find that errors in both the predictions of relative humidity and free ammonia (FA ≡ NH3(g + pNH4+ − 2 · pSO42- are responsible for

  1. Nature of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Desert Areas in the Asian Continent: Chemical State and Number Concentration of Particles Measured at Dunhuang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of aerosol were made in August and October 2001, and January 2002, at Dunhuang, China (40o00'N, 94o30'E), to understand the nature of atmospheric particles over the desert areas in the Asian continent. Balloon-borne measurements with an optical particle counter suggested that particle size and concentration had a noticeable peak in size range of super micron in not only the boundary mixing layer but also the free troposphere. Thickness of the boundary mixing layer, from distributions of particle concentration, was about 4 km in summer (17 August 2001), about2.5 km in fall (17 October 2001), and about 3 km in winter (11 January 2002), which suggest active mixing of particles near the boundary in summer. Number-size distribution of particle showed a noticeable peak in the super micron particles size range in the mixing boundary layer: 0.4-2 particles cm-3 at diameter>1.2 μm in summer, 0.05-4 particles cm-3 at diameter >1.2 μm in fall, and 0.1-5 particles cm-3 at diameter>1.2 μm in winter. In winter strong inversion of atmospheric temperature was found in the height range from the boundary to about 3 km and vertical distribution of particle concentration well corresponded with the temperature distribution. Chemical elements of individual aerosols, which were collected in the boundary layer atmosphere at Dunhuang (18 October 2001) were analyzed with an electron microscope equipped with EDX. Those single particle analysis suggested that most of the particles with supermicron size were soil particles, and those particles had little sulfate on its surface. This is a very important different point,comparing with the chemical state of soil particles, which were transported from the desert area of China to Japan, and showed frequently the existence of sulfate on the particle surface. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that dust particles can be chemically modified during their long-range transport from desert areas to Japan

  2. Structural and XPS studies of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites prepared by ALD and Ag-assisted chemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Porous silicon/TiO2 nanocomposites have been investigated. • Morphology and chemical composition of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites were established. • Valence-band XPS maximums for PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites were found and analyzed. - Abstract: PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) were investigated. The morphology and phase structure of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The mean size of TiO2 nanocrystals was determined by TEM and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the chemical elemental composition by observing the behavior of the Ti 2p, O 1s and Si 2p lines. TEM, Raman spectroscopy and XPS binding energy analysis confirmed the formation of TiO2 anatase phase inside the PSi matrix. The XPS valence band analysis was performed in order to investigate the modification of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites electronic structure. Surface defects states of Ti3+ at PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites were identified by analyzing of XPS valence band spectra

  3. Seasonal variations and sources of mass and chemical composition for PM10 aerosol in Hangzhou,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junji Cao; Zhenxing Shen; Judith C.Chow; Guowei Qi; John G.Watsonc

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol observation was conducted for four seasons from September 2001 to August 2002 at five sampling sites in Hangzhou, South China, on PM10 mass, 22 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Cd, Ba, and Pb), 5 major ions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and NH4+), and organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), showing that PM10 mass ranged from 46.7 to 270.8 μg/m3, with an annual average of 119.2 μg/m3. Na, AI, Si, S. K, Ca, and Fe were the most abundant elements in PM10, most ors being in the form of SO42-. SO42-, NO4-, and NH4+ were the major ions, which contributed to about 20%; of the PM10 mass. The mean seasonal concentrations for SO42- , averaged over all sites, were found to be 18.0, 18.5, 24.Z and 21.4 μg/m3. for spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively, while the corresponding Ioadings for NO3- were 72, 4.7, 7.1, and 11.2μg/m3. and for NH4+ were 6.0, 5.9, 8.2. and 9.3 μg/m3, in the form mostly of NH4NO3 in spring, autumn, and winter, and mostly of (NH4)2SO4 in summer. The low NO3-/SO42- ratio found indicates coal combustion as the major source throughout the year. The mean annual concentrations of OC and EC in PM10 were found to be 21A, and 4.1 μg/m3, respectively. Material balance calculation indicated that fugitive dust, the secondary aerosol, and carbonaceous matter were the most abundant species in PM10 for the four seasons, as is characteristic for cities in South China.

  4. Chemical and optical properties of aerosols and their interrelationship in winter in the megacity Shanghai of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingting Han; Liping Qiao; Min Zhou; Yu Qu; Jianfei Du; Xingang Liu; Shengrong Lou

    2015-01-01

    A field campaign on air quality was carried out in Shanghai in winter of 2012.The concentrations of NO,NO2,NOx,SO2,CO,and PM2.5 increased during haze formation.The average masses of SO42-,NO3-and NH4+ were 10.3,11.7 and 6.7 μg/m3 during the haze episodes,which exceeded the average (9.2,7.9,and 3.4 μg/m3) of these components in the non-haze days.The mean values for the aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp),aerosol absorption coefficient (bap) and single scattering albedo (SSA) were 288.7,27.7 and 0.91 Mm-1,respectively.A bi-peak distribution was observed for the mass concentrations of CO,NO,NO2,and NOx.More sulfate was produced during daytime than that in the evening due to photochemical reactions.The mass concentration of NH4+ achieved a small peak at noontime.NO3-showed lower concentrations in the afternoon and higher concentrations in the early morning.There were obvious bi-peak diurnal patterns for bsp and bap as well as SSA.bsp and bap showed a positive correlation with PM2.5 mass concentration.(NH4)2SO4,NH4NO3,organic mass,elemental carbon and coarse mass accounted for 21.7%,19.3%,31.0%,9.3% and 12.3% of the total extinction coefficient during non-haze days,and 25.6%,24.3%,30.1%,8.1% and 8.2% during hazy days.Organic matter was the largest contributor to light extinction.The contribution proportions of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate to light extinction were significantly higher during the hazy time than during the non-haze days.

  5. Physicochemical variations in atmospheric aerosols recorded at sea onboard the Atlantic-Mediterranean 2008 Scholar Ship cruise (Part I): Particle mass concentrations, size ratios, and main chemical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Noemí; Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Bhatia, Ravinder; Spiro, Baruch; Hanvey, Melanie

    2010-07-01

    We report on ambient atmospheric aerosols present at sea during the Atlantic-Mediterranean voyage of Oceanic II (The Scholar Ship) in spring 2008. A record was obtained of hourly PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 particle size fraction concentrations and 24-h filter samples for chemical analysis which allowed for comparison between levels of crustal particles, sea spray, total carbon, and secondary inorganic aerosols. On-board monitoring was continuous from the equatorial Atlantic to the Straits of Gibraltar, across the Mediterranean to Istanbul, and back via Lisbon to the English Channel. Initially clean air in the open Atlantic registered PM 10 levels polluted by increasingly coarse PM as the ship approached land. Away from major port cities, the main sources of atmospheric contamination identified were dust intrusions from North Africa (NAF), smoke plumes from biomass burning in sub-Saharan Africa and Russia, industrial sulphate clouds and other regional pollution sources transported from Europe, sea spray during rough seas, and plumes emanating from islands. Under dry NAF intrusions PM 10 daily mean levels averaged 40-60 μg m -3 (30-40 μg m -3 PM 2.5; c. 20 μg m -3 PM 1), peaking briefly to >120 μg m -3 (hourly mean) when the ship passed through curtains of higher dust concentrations amassed at the frontal edge of the dust cloud. PM 1/PM 10 ratios ranged from very low during desert dust intrusions (0.3-0.4) to very high during anthropogenic pollution plume events (0.8-1).

  6. Aerosol mass spectrometric analysis of the chemical composition of non-refractory PM(1) samples from school environments in Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilley, Leigh R; Ayoko, Godwin A; Jayaratne, E Rohan; Salimi, Farhad; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-08-01

    Long-term exposure to vehicle emissions has been associated with detrimental health effects. Children are amongst the most susceptible group and schools represent an environment where they can experience significant exposure to vehicle emissions. However, there are limited studies on children's exposure to vehicle emissions in schools. The aim of this study was to quantify the concentration of organic aerosol (OA) and in particular, vehicle emissions that children are exposed to during school hours. Therefore an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (TOF-AMS) was deployed at five urban schools in Brisbane, Australia. TOF-AMS enabled the chemical composition of the non-refractory (NR-PM1) to be analysed with a high temporal resolution to assess the concentration of vehicle emissions and other OA components during school hours. The organic fraction at each school comprised the majority of NR-PM1. Primary emissions were found to dominate the OA at only one school which had an O:C ratio of 0.17, due to fuel powered gardening equipment used near the TOF-AMS. A significant source of the OA at two of the schools was aged vehicle emissions from nearby highways. More oxidised OA was observed at the remaining two schools, which also recorded strong biomass burning influences. In general, the diurnal cycle of the total OA concentration varied between schools and was found to be at a minimum during school hours. The major organic component that school children were exposed to during school hours was secondary OA at all schools. Peak exposure of school children to vehicle emissions occurred during school drop-off and pick-up times. Unless a school is located near major roads, children are exposed predominately to regional secondary OA as opposed to local emissions during school hours in urban environments. PMID:23644356

  7. Aerosol scattering coefficients and major chemical compositions of fine particles observed at a rural site in the central Pearl River Delta, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinming Wang; Xiang Ding; Xiaoxin Fu; Quanfu He; Shaoyi Wang; Franc(o)is Bernard; Xiuying Zhao; Dui Wu

    2012-01-01

    During November-December 2010 aerosol scattering coefficients were monitored using a single-waved (525 nm) Nephelometer at a regional monitoring station in the central Pearl River Delta region and 24-hr fine particle (PM2.5) samples were also collected during the period using quartz filters for the analysis of major chemical components including organic carbon (OC),elemental carbon (EC),sulfate,nitrate and ammonium.In average,these five components accounted for about 85% of PM2.5 mass and contributed 42% (OC),19% (SO42-),12% (NO3-),8.4% (NH4+ ) and 3.7% (EC),to PM2.5 mass.A relatively higher mass scattering efficiency of 5.3 m2/g was obtained for fine particles based on the linear regression between scattering coefficients and PM2.5 mass concentrations.Chemical extinction budget based on IMPROVE approach revealed that ammonium sulfate,particulate organic matter,ammonium nitrate and EC in average contributed about 32%,28%,20% and 6% to the light extinction coefficients,respectively.

  8. Observation of attachment ratio of fission products on solution aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosols has been observed to elucidate the role of chemical effects in the generation mechanism of fissionproduct aerosols. Primary aerosols generated from aqueous solution of sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate were passed through a fission-product chamber, and radioactive aerosols were generated by attaching fission products to the primary aerosol particles. Attachment ratios of the fission products on aerosols were estimated from activity measurements. It was found that the attachment ratio of the sodium chloride solution aerosol is larger than that of the ammonium sulfate solution aerosol. (author)

  9. Highly efficient and reliable chemically assisted enucleation method for handmade cloning in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajta, Gábor; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul; Skou, Christina T.;

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to find an efficient and reliable assisted procedure for enucleation related to the handmade cloning (HMC) technique. After in vitro maturation oocytes were incubated in 0.5 µgmL-¹ demecolcine for 2 h. Subsequently, zonae pellucidae were digested with pronase......, and one-third of the cytoplasm connected to an extrusion cone was removed by hand using a microblade. The remaining two-thirds were used as recipients for HMC, and reconstructed and activated embryos were cultured for 7 days. The time-dependent manner of the development of extrusion cones, the efficiency...... ultrastructure of the oocyte organelles, however, appeared to be unaltered by the treatments. Considering that no oocyte selection based on polar body presence was performed, this system seems to be more efficient and reliable than any other enucleation method. Moreover, expensive equipment (inverted...

  10. Adaptive Finite Element Method Assisted by Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Cotter, Simon L.

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often analyzed by solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, which is a drift-diffusion partial differential equation for the probability distribution function. Efficient numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation requires adaptive mesh refinements. In this paper, we present a mesh refinement approach which makes use of a stochastic simulation of the underlying chemical system. By observing the stochastic trajectory for a relatively short amount of time, the areas of the state space with nonnegligible probability density are identified. By refining the finite element mesh in these areas, and coarsening elsewhere, a suitable mesh is constructed and used for the computation of the stationary probability density. Numerical examples demonstrate that the presented method is competitive with existing a posteriori methods. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  11. Applications of aerosol model in the reactor containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mossad Slama

    2014-10-01

    For spatially homogeneous aerosol of uniform chemical composition, the aerosol dynamic equation is solved in closed volume to simulate the radionuclide particle transport in the containment. The effects of initial conditions on the aerosol distribution, boundary layer thickness and the aerosol behaviour under source reinforcement (external source are considered.

  12. Synthesis of diamond-like carbon films on Si substrates by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Meng [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ogawa, Shuichi, E-mail: ogasyu@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takabayashi, Susumu; Otsuji, Taiichi [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutionary Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, K' s Gobancho Bldg., 7 Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Takakuwa, Yuji [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films grown by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PA-PECVD) have attracted attention as a gate insulator for graphene-channel field effect transistors (GFETs). In this study, the possibility of using PA-PECVD to grow insulating DLC films for GFETs is explored by focusing on the growth rate and uniformity of DLC films on Si substrates. Initially, the DLC films were formed at a constant rate but the growth rate decreased rapidly when the thickness reached approximately 400 nm. This is because of a decrease in photoelectron emissions from the Si substrates as they are covered by DLC films which absorb UV photons. However, the DLC films formed uniformly at thicknesses less than 16%. This result indicates that PA-PECVD is a promising method for growing DLC films as the gate dielectric layer of GFETs.

  13. The Enhanced Light Absorptance and Device Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon Fabricated by Metal-assisted Chemical Etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hao; Guo, Anran; Guo, Guohui; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-12-01

    We use metal-assisted chemical etching (MCE) method to fabricate nanostructured black silicon on the surface of C-Si. The Si-PIN photoelectronic detector based on this type of black silicon shows excellent device performance with a responsivity of 0.57 A/W at 1060 nm. Silicon nanocone arrays can be created using MCE treatment. These modified surfaces show higher light absorptance in the near-infrared range (800 to 2500 nm) compared to that of C-Si with polished surfaces, and the variations in the absorption spectra of the nanostructured black silicon with different etching processes are obtained. The maximum light absorptance increases significantly up to 95 % in the wavelength range of 400 to 2500 nm. Our recent novel results clearly indicate that nanostructured black silicon made by MCE has potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic detectors. PMID:27368764

  14. Growth of large size diamond single crystals by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition: Recent achievements and remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallaire, Alexandre; Achard, Jocelyn; Silva, François; Brinza, Ovidiu; Gicquel, Alix

    2013-02-01

    Diamond is a material with outstanding properties making it particularly suited for high added-value applications such as optical windows, power electronics, radiation detection, quantum information, bio-sensing and many others. Tremendous progresses in its synthesis by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition have allowed obtaining single crystal optical-grade material with thicknesses of up to a few millimetres. However the requirements in terms of size, purity and crystalline quality are getting more and more difficult to achieve with respect to the forecasted applications, thus pushing the synthesis method to its scientific and technological limits. In this paper, after a short description of the operating principles of the growth technique, the challenges of increasing crystal dimensions both laterally and vertically, decreasing and controlling point and extended defects as well as modulating crystal conductivity by an efficient doping will be detailed before offering some insights into ways to overcome them.

  15. Pulse Operation of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser by Pulsed Gas Discharge with the Assistance of Spark Pre-ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-Fu; YU Hai-Jun; DUO Li-Ping; JIN Yu-Qi; WANG Jian; SANG Feng-Ting; FANG Ben-Jie; WANG De-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    The continuous wavelength chemical oxygen-iodine laser can be turned into pulse operation mode in order to obtain high energy and high pulse power. We propose an approach to produce iodine atoms instantaneously by pulsed gas discharge with the assistance of spark pre-ionization to achieve the pulsed goal. The influence of spark pre-ionization on discharge homogeneity is discussed. Voltage-current characteristics are shown and discussed in existence of the pre-ionization capacitor and peaking capacitor. The spark pre-ionization and peaking capacitor are very helpful in obtaining a stable and homogeneous discharge. The lasing is achieved at the total pressure of 2.2-2.9 kPa and single pulse energy is up to 180m J, the corresponding specific output energy is 1.0 J/L.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the behaviour of electrons during electron-assisted chemical vapour deposition of diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽芳; 陈俊英; 董国义; 尚勇

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons during electron-assisted chemical vapour deposition of diamond is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The electron energy distribution and velocity distribution are obtained over a wide range of reduced field E/N (the ratio of the electric field to gas molecule density) from 100 to 2000 in units of 1Td=10-17Vcm2.Their effects on the diamond growth are also discussed. Themain results obtained are as follows. (1) The velocity profile is asymmetric for the component parallel to the field.Ihe velocity distribution has a peak shift in the field direction. Most electrons possess non-zero velocity parallel to the substrate. (2) The number of atomic H is a function of E/N. (3) High-quality diamond can be obtained under the condition of E/N from 50 to 800Td due to sufficient atomic H and electron bombardment.

  17. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  18. A plug flow model for chemical reactions and aerosol nucleation and growth in an alkali-containing flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, K. A.; Livbjerg, Hans

    2000-01-01

    multicomponent growth models are treated. The local gas phase composition is determined from a gas phase chemical equilibrium calculation combined with finite reaction rate kinetics for slower reactions. The model is useful in the analysis of boiler operation with respect to the formation of particles, HCl, SO2......The paper presents a numerical model for the simulation of gas to particle conversion and the chemical changes during cooling of a flue gas from the combustion of fuels rich in volatile alkali species. For the homogeneous nucleation of alkali species the model uses the classical theory modified...

  19. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle-component-based factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Stroud

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007 in southern Ontario (ON, Canada, were used to evaluate Environment Canada's regional chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA. Environment Canada's operational numerical weather prediction model and the 2006 Canadian and 2005 US national emissions inventories were used as input to the chemical transport model (named AURAMS. Particle-component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON and two rural sites (Harrow and Bear Creek, ON to derive hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA factors. Co-located carbon monoxide (CO, PM2.5 black carbon (BC, and PM1 SO4 measurements were also used for evaluation and interpretation, permitting a detailed diagnostic model evaluation.

    At the urban site, good agreement was observed for the comparison of daytime campaign PM1 POA and HOA mean values: 1.1 μg m−3 vs. 1.2 μg m−3, respectively. However, a POA overprediction was evident on calm nights due to an overly-stable model surface layer. Biases in model POA predictions trended from positive to negative with increasing HOA values. This trend has several possible explanations, including (1 underweighting of urban locations in particulate matter (PM spatial surrogate fields, (2 overly-coarse model grid spacing for resolving urban-scale sources, and (3 lack of a model particle POA evaporation process during dilution of vehicular POA tail-pipe emissions to urban scales. Furthermore, a trend in POA bias was observed at the urban site as a function of the BC/HOA ratio, suggesting a possible association of POA underprediction for diesel combustion sources. For several time periods, POA overprediction was also observed for sulphate-rich plumes, suggesting that our model POA fractions for the PM2.5 chemical

  20. Instrumentation for tropospheric aerosol characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Young, S.E.; Becker, C.H.; Coggiola, M.J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wollnik, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A new instrument has been developed that determines the abundance, size distribution, and chemical composition of tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols with diameters down to 0.2 {mu}m. In addition to aerosol characterization, the instrument also monitors the chemical composition of the ambient gas. More than 25.000 aerosol particle mass spectra were recorded during the NASA-sponsored Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) field program using NASA`s DC-8 research aircraft. (author) 7 refs.

  1. Selective removal technology using chemical etching and excimer assistance in precision recycle of color filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pai shan PA

    2011-01-01

    Color filters are produced using semiconductor production techniques although problems with Iow yield remain to be addressed. This study presents a new means of selective removal using excimer irradiation, chemical etching, or electrochemical machining on the fifth generation TFT LCDs. The selective removal of microstructure layers from the color filter surface of an optoelectronic flat panel display, as well as complete removal of the ITO thin-films, RGB layer, or resin black matrix (BM) layer from the substrate is possible. Individual defective film layers can be removed, or all films down to the Cr layer or bare glass can be completely eliminated. Experimental results demonstrate that defective ITO thin-films, RGB layers, or the resin BM layer can now be recycled with a great precision. When the ITO or RGB layer proves difficult to remove, excimer light can be used to help with removal. During this recycling process, the use of 225 nm excimer irradiation before chemical etching, or electrochemical machining, makes removal of stubborn film residues easy, effectively improving the quality of recycled color filters and reducing fabrication cost.

  2. G3 Assisted Rational Design of Chemical Sensor Array Using Carbonitrile Neutral Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatimah Alias

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Combined computational and experimental strategies for the systematic design of chemical sensor arrays using carbonitrile neutral receptors are presented. Binding energies of acetonitrile, n-pentylcarbonitrile and malononitrile with Ca(II, Mg(II, Be(II and H+ have been investigated with the B3LYP, G3, CBS-QB3, G4 and MQZVP methods, showing a general trend H+ > Be(II > Mg(II > Ca(II. Hydrogen bonding, donor-acceptor and cation-lone pair electron simple models were employed in evaluating the performance of computational methods. Mg(II is bound to acetonitrile in water by 12.5 kcal/mol, and in the gas phase the receptor is more strongly bound by 33.3 kcal/mol to Mg(II compared to Ca(II. Interaction of bound cations with carbonitrile reduces the energies of the MOs involved in the proposed σ-p conjugated network. The planar malononitrile-Be(II complex possibly involves a π-network with a cationic methylene carbon. Fabricated potentiometric chemical sensors show distinct signal patterns that can be exploited in sensor array applications.

  3. Aqueous dispersions of few-layer-thick chemically modified magnesium diboride nanosheets by ultrasonication assisted exfoliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Bedar, Amita; Kannan, Aadithya; Jasuja, Kabeer

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of graphene has led to a rising interest in seeking quasi two-dimensional allotropes of several elements and inorganic compounds. Boron, carbon’s neighbour in the periodic table, presents a curious case in its ability to be structured as graphene. Although it cannot independently constitute a honeycomb planar structure, it forms a graphenic arrangement in association with electron-donor elements. This is exemplified in magnesium diboride (MgB2): an inorganic layered compound comprising boron honeycomb planes alternated by Mg atoms. Till date, MgB2 has been primarily researched for its superconducting properties; it hasn’t been explored for the possibility of its exfoliation. Here we show that ultrasonication of MgB2 in water results in its exfoliation to yield few-layer-thick Mg-deficient hydroxyl-functionalized nanosheets. The hydroxyl groups enable an electrostatically stabilized aqueous dispersion and create a heterogeneity leading to an excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence. These chemically modified MgB2 nanosheets exhibit an extremely small absorption coefficient of 2.9 ml mg−1 cm−1 compared to graphene and its analogs. This ability to exfoliate MgB2 to yield nanosheets with a chemically modified lattice and properties distinct from the parent material presents a fundamentally new perspective to the science of MgB2 and forms a first foundational step towards exfoliating metal borides. PMID:26041686

  4. Chemical characteristics of aerosols in MABL of Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during spring inter-monsoon: A comparative study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashwini Kumar; A K Sudheer; M M Sarin

    2008-07-01

    The chemical composition of aerosols in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) of Bay of Bengal (BoB) and Arabian Sea (AS) has been studied during the spring and inter-monsoon (March–May 2006) based on the analysis of water soluble constituents (Na+, NH$^{+}_{4}$, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl−, NO$^{−}_{3}$ and SO$^{2−}_{4}$), crustal elements (Al, Fe, and Ca) and carbonaceous species (EC, OC). The total suspended particulates (TSP) ranged from 5.2 to 46.6 g m−3 and 8.2 to 46.9 g m−3 during the sampling transects in the BoB and AS respectively. The water-soluble species, on average, accounted for 44% and 33% of TSP over BoB and AS respectively, with dominant contribution of SO$^{2−}_{4}$ over both the oceanic regions. However, distinct differences with respect to elevated abundances of NH$^{+}_{4}$ in the MABL of BoB and that of Na+ and Ca2+ in AS are clearly evident. The non-sea-salt component of SO$^{2−}_{4}$ ranging from 82 to 98% over BoB and 35 to 98% over AS; together with nss-Ca2+/nss-$SO^{2−}_{4}$ equivalent ratios 0.12 to 0.5 and 0.2 to 1.16, respectively, provide evidence for the predominance of anthropogenic constituents and chemical transformation processes occurring within MABL. The concentrations of OC and EC average around 1.9 and 0.4 g m−3 in BoB and exhibit a decreasing trend from north to south; however, abundance of these carbonaceous species are not significantly pronounced over AS. The abundance of Al, used as a proxy for mineral aerosols, varied from 0.2 to 1.9 g m−3 over BoB and AS, with a distinctly different spatial pattern – decreasing north to south in BoB in contrast to an increasing pattern in the Arabian Sea.

  5. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part 1: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with co-located instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for 3 weeks during the late-fall - early-winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to the tuning and calibration of each instrument, whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical, and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual Q-ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three Q-ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025, 1999) and were found to be 9, 15, 19, 28, and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate, and ammonium, respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of Q-ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented, along with a discussion of some

  6. Physico-chemical study of the anthropic aerosol and of its evolutions in Beijing; Etude physico-chimique de l'aerosol anthropique et de ses evolutions a Pekin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinot, B

    2006-05-15

    Beijing aerosols are characterised for the 2003-2004 period using an inclusive experimental set up for aerosol mass, chemistry and number, deployed at three sites. Aerosol size segregation in two fractions (fine and coarse) appears appropriated for source identification and investigations about gas-to-particle interactions. Several various sources contribute to air pollution: traffic, coal burning and industrial activities. The present study also shows how summer aerosol is influenced by the photochemical formation of secondary particles, and the significant amount of coarse and fine mineral dust all year long. Coal burning in winter has a lower influence than assessed in the past. The origin and altitude of the air masses entering Beijing are of key interest to understand the ageing of pollutants and their regional redistribution. By its expected effects onto these regional parameters, climate change may strongly affect Beijing air pollution in the coming decades. (author)

  7. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison – Part I: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM and consistency with Time-of-Flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM, High Resolution ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and other co-located instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Crenn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for three weeks during the late fall–early winter period (November–December 2013. The first week was dedicated to tuning and calibration of each instrument whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1 were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9 were observed systematically for each individual ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025 and were found to be of 9, 15, 19, 28 and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate and ammonium respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented as well as a discussion of some

  8. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part I: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with Time-of-Flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), High Resolution ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and other co-located instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-07-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for three weeks during the late fall-early winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to tuning and calibration of each instrument whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025) and were found to be of