WorldWideScience

Sample records for advocacy changing perceptions

  1. Practitioner Perceptions of School Library Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School library advocacy is increasingly important due to decreases in funding and staff. National organizations attempt to engage school librarians in advocacy and have developed resources and tools to assist with this task. However, there is little research examining how practicing school librarians engage in advocacy and how their advocacy…

  2. Changing Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Susanne; Wren, Steve; Dawes, Mark; Blinco, Amy; Haines, Brett; Everton, Jenny; Morgan, Ellen; Barton, Craig; Breen, Debbie; Ellison, Geraldine; Burgess, Danny; Stavrou, Jim; Carre, Catherine; Watson, Fran; Cherry, David; Hawkins, Chris; Stapenhill-Hunt, Maria; Gilderdale, Charlie; Kiddle, Alison; Piggott, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    A group of teachers involved in embedding NRICH tasks (http://nrich.maths.org) into their everyday practice were keen to challenge common perceptions of mathematics, and of the teaching and learning of mathematics. In this article, the teachers share what they are doing to change these perceptions in their schools.

  3. Climate Change: On Scientists and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    Last year, I asked a crowd of a few hundred geoscientists from around the world what positions related to climate science and policy they would be comfortable publicly advocating. I presented a list of recommendations that included increased research funding, greater resources for education, and specific emission reduction technologies. In almost every case, a majority of the audience felt comfortable arguing for them. The only clear exceptions were related to geo-engineering research and nuclear power. I had queried the researchers because the relationship between science and advocacy is marked by many assumptions and little clarity. This despite the fact that the basic question of how scientists can be responsible advocates on issues related to their expertise has been discussed for decades most notably in the case of climate change by the late Stephen Schneider.

  4. Breast cancer advocacy: changing perceptions Abogacía y cáncer de mama: el cambio en las percepciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia P Koon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a significant health burden worldwide. In the United States, the Breast Cancer Advocacy Movement has increased awareness, enhanced dialogue, and provided significant funding opportunities that previously did not exist. Various advocacy programs are beginning to emerge in developing countries in response to the increasing impact breast cancer is having in these regions of the world. This paper discusses the influence of the Breast Cancer Advocacy Movement in the US and proposes a format for working in conjunction with medical experts, political leaders and patient advocates to stimulate discussion and encourage sustainable outcomes in breast cancer internationally.El cáncer de mama es una carga significativa de salud en el mundo. En Estados Unidos, el Movimiento de Abogacía para el Control del Cáncer de Mama ha hecho conciencia, mejorado el diálogo y provisto de oportunidades de financiamiento antes inexistentes. En los países en desarrollo, están emergiendo programas para el combate del cáncer de mama en respuesta al impacto creciente de la enfermedad en estas regiones. Este artículo aborda la influencia del movimiento en Estados Unidos y propone un formato para trabajar en conjunto con expertos en medicina, líderes políticos y defensores de pacientes y estimular la discusión y promoción de resultados sostenibles internacionalmente en cuanto al cáncer de mama.

  5. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community.

  6. Changes in Perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Though not the sole element to determine foreign policies, perception is of vital importance in defining an environment, understanding international relations and analyzing potential policy choices. India's "Look East" policy after the Cold War originates from its perception changes toward ASEAN.

  7. Advocacy coalitions, REDD+, and forest governance in Papua New Guinea: how likely is transformational change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Babon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forests in developing countries are increasingly being valued for their role in carbon sequestration. Such interest is reflected in the emergence of international initiatives for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+. REDD+ requires addressing both tropical forests as complex social-ecological systems and the multiple sectors involved in tropical forest resources, which may necessitate transformational change away from business-as-usual approaches to forest governance. We studied the potential for REDD+ to mobilize an influential coalition of actors promoting transformational change in forest governance in Papua New Guinea (PNG, a leading proponent of REDD+ internationally. Combining policy network approaches with the advocacy coalition framework, we identified four advocacy coalitions in the REDD+ policy domain in PNG and estimated the influence of each coalition. We found the most influential advocacy coalition is promoting the status quo rather than governance reforms capable of reducing deforestations and forest degradation, leading us to suggest that business as usual is the dominant perspective in the REDD+ policy domain in PNG. This may explain why, despite the large amount of REDD+ rhetoric, there has been only modest change in formal policy or practice in PNG to date. However, we did find influential coalitions calling for transformational change. Although these are currently minority coalitions, we identified several pathways through which they could increase their power to realize transformational change

  8. Effective social justice advocacy: a theory-of-change framework for assessing progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    This article offers a theory-of-change framework for social justice advocacy. It describes broad outcome categories against which activists, donors and evaluators can assess progress (or lack thereof) in an ongoing manner: changes in organisational capacity, base of support, alliances, data and analysis from a social justice perspective, problem definition and potential policy options, visibility, public norms, and population level impacts. Using these for evaluation enables activists and donors to learn from and rethink their strategies as the political context and/or actors change over time. The paper presents a case study comparing factors that facilitated reproductive rights policy wins during the transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa and factors that undermined their implementation in the post-apartheid period. It argues that after legal and policy victories had been won, failure to maintain strong organizations and continually rethink strategies contributed to the loss of government focus on and resources for implementation of new policies. By implication, evaluating effectiveness only by an actual policy change does not allow for ongoing learning to ensure appropriate strategies. It also fails to recognise that a policy win can be overturned and needs vigilant monitoring and advocacy for implementation. This means that funding and organising advocacy should seldom be undertaken as a short-term proposition. It also suggests that the building and maintenance of organisational and leadership capacity is as important as any other of the outcome categories in enabling success.

  9. The role of advocacy in occasioning community and organizational change in a medical-legal partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Carpenter, Kaston D; Collie-Akers, Vicki; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Cronin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities among low-income individuals remain a significant problem. A number of social determinants are associated with adverse health outcomes. Medical-legal partnerships address legal concerns of low-income individuals to improve health and wellness in adults and children. The Medical-Legal Partnership at Legal Aid of Western Missouri provides free direct legal services for patients with legal concerns affecting health. There is limited evidence regarding the association between advocacy-related efforts and changes within both the medical-legal partnership structure and in health-care facilities. Three health-care organizations in Kansas City, MO participated in implementing the medical-legal partnership model between 2007 and 2010. Advocacy efforts conducted by key medical-legal partnership personnel were strongly associated with changes in health-care organizations and within the medical-legal partnership structure. This study extends the current evidence base by examining the types of advocacy efforts required to bring about community and organizational changes.

  10. Senior Centers and Policy Advocacy: Changing Public Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardasani, Manoj; Goldkind, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    As critical components of the aging continuum of care, senior centers promote older adult health and well-being by providing opportunities for recreation, socialization, nutrition, health education, and access to vital social services. Nationally, a vast network of 11,000 senior centers serves over four million older adults annually. As the United…

  11. The Effects of Advocacy Advertising and Situational Crisis on Perceptions of Social Responsibility, Potential Supportive Behavior and Attitudes Toward Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozby, Jeanie G.; And Others

    Data were collected from 176 college students in a study of the effects of corporate advocacy advertising in crisis situations. The subjects read one of two sets of oil company advertisements, one set using a low advocacy and the other set using a high advocacy approach to explain company activities in relation to current events and social issues.…

  12. Advocacy and technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  13. Parents' perception of self-advocacy of children with myositis: an anonymous online survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Adam M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with complex medical issues experience barriers to the transition of care from pediatric to adult providers. We sought to identify these barriers by elucidating the experiences of patients with idiopathic inflammatory muscle disorders. Methods We collected anonymous survey data using an online website. Patients and their families were solicited from the US and Canada through established clinics for children with idiopathic inflammatory muscle diseases as well as with the aid of a nonprofit organization for the benefit of such individuals. The parents of 45 older children/young adults suffering from idiopathic inflammatory muscle diseases were surveyed. As a basis of comparison, we similarly collected data from the parents of 207 younger children with inflammatory muscle diseases. The survey assessed transition of care issues confronting families of children and young adults with chronic juvenile myositis. Results Regardless of age of the patient, respondents were unlikely to have a designated health care provider assigned to aid in transition of care and were unlikely to be aware of a posted policy concerning transition of care at their pediatrician's office. Additionally, regardless of age, patients and their families were unlikely to have a written plan for moving to adult care. Conclusions We identified deficiencies in the health care experiences of families as pertain to knowledge, self-advocacy, policy, and vocational readiness. Moreover, as children with complex medical issues grow up, parents attribute less self-advocacy to their children's level of independence.

  14. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leas, Eric C; Althouse, Benjamin M; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H; Noar, Seth M; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Ayers, John W

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this "organic advocacy" may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms "climate change" or "global warming" reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573-699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the "DiCaprio effect" surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for "climate change" or "global warming" increased 261% (95%CI, 186-335) and 210% (95%CI 149-272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP's daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio's speech (e.g., "hottest year"), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., "electric car"). Because these data are freely available in real time our analytical strategy provides substantial lead time

  15. Circus monkeys or change agents? Civil society advocacy for HIV/AIDS in adverse policy environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Neil; Harmer, Andrew; Aleshkina, Julia; Bogdan, Daryna; Chkhatarashvili, Ketevan; Murzalieva, Gulgun; Rukhadze, Natia; Samiev, Arnol; Walt, Gill

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the factors enabling and undermining civil society efforts to advocate for policy reforms relating to HIV/AIDS and illicit drugs in three countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine. It examines how political contexts and civil society actors' strengths and weaknesses inhibit or enable advocacy for policy change - issues that are not well understood in relation to specific policy areas such as HIV/AIDS, or particular regions of the world where national policies are believed to be major drivers of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The study is based on in-depth interviews with representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs) (n = 49) and national level informants including government and development partners (n = 22). Our policy analysis identified a culture of fear derived from concerns for personal safety but also risk of losing donor largesse. Relations between CSOs and government were often acrimonious rather than synergistic, and while we found some evidence of CSO collective action, competition for external funding - in particular for HIV/AIDS grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was often divisive. Development partners and government tend to construct CSOs as service providers rather than advocates. While some advocacy was tolerated by governments, CSO participation in the policy process was, ultimately, perceived to be tokenistic. This was because there are financial interests in maintaining prohibitionist legislation: efforts to change punitive laws directed at the behaviors of minority groups such as injecting drug users have had limited impact.

  16. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  17. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althouse, Benjamin M.; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H.; Noar, Seth M.; Allem, Jon-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this “organic advocacy” may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms “climate change” or “global warming” reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573–699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the “DiCaprio effect” surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for “climate change” or “global warming” increased 261% (95%CI, 186–335) and 210% (95%CI 149–272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP’s daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio’s speech (e.g., “hottest year”), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., “electric car”). Because these data are freely available in real time our

  18. Southern voices on climate policy choices: Analysis of and lessons learned from civil society advocacy on climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Hannah; Ampomah, Gifty; Prera, Maria Isabel Olazabal; Rabbani, Golam; Zvigadza, Shepard

    2012-05-15

    This report provides an analysis of the tools and tactics advocacy groups use to influence policy responses to climate change at international, regional, national and sub-national levels. More than 20 climate networks and their member organisations have contributed to the report with their experiences of advocacy on climate change, including over 70 case studies from a wide range of countries - including many of the poorest - in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific. These advocacy activities primarily target national governments, but also international and regional processes, donors and the private sector. Analyses and case studies show how civil society plays key roles in pushing for new laws, programmes, policies or strategies on climate change, in holding governments to account on their commitments; in identifying the lack of joined-up government responses to climate change; and in ensuring that national policy making does not forget the poor and vulnerable. The report is the first joint product of the Southern Voices Capacity Building Programme, or for short: Southern Voices on Climate Change.

  19. Perceptions of Health Information Seeking and Partner Advocacy in the Context of a Cardiology Office Visit: Connections with Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checton, Maria G; Greene, Kathryn; Carpenter, Amanda; Catona, Danielle

    2017-05-01

    This paper explores perceived active health information seeking, informal advocacy by a partner or other, cardiac efficacy, and cardiovascular health indicators for patients surveyed while visiting their cardiologist. Participants include 208 patients with a diagnosed heart condition. Variables include predisposing characteristics (e.g., illness severity, demographics), perceived active health information seeking during an office visit, informal advocacy by partner or other, cardiac efficacy, and cardiovascular health indicators (i.e., basal metabolic index (BMI), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides). Data were analyzed using correlations, t-tests, and structural equation modeling. As hypothesized, perceived active health information seeking during an office visit (positively) and informal advocacy by partner or other (negatively) predicted cardiac efficacy. One path was added from active information seeking to BMI. Cardiac efficacy, in turn, significantly predicted total cholesterol and BMI. The model was also replicated for LDLs but not for HDLs or triglycerides. We discuss implications for cardiac disease management.

  20. Perception, Psychedelics, And Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Charles; Gold, Robert

    1973-01-01

    The most profound consequences of the increasingly widespread use of psychedelics may be sociological in nature. Altered states of consciousness create nothing less than new perceptual configurations which may well spell the end of social institutions based upon modes of perception which are incongruent with new perceptions being attained by…

  1. Changing Perceptions in "Adam Bede."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loges, Max L.

    From the very beginning of "Adam Bede," the idea of sight or perception is emphasized. Indeed by reference to a quotation from Wordsworth, George Eliot announces the purpose of the novel: to reveal clearly, to remove from the shade. While most of the characters in "Adam Bede" do not perceive events clearly and must have their erroneous opinions…

  2. Climate change and coastal aquaculture farmers’ risk perceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan; Brandt, Urs Steiner

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of risk perception in relation to climate change threats, comparison of risk perceptions in two different regions, and derives general results of what affect peoples’ level of risk perceptions. Revelation of individual risk perception is essential for local acceptan...

  3. Patient Advocacy in an Obstetric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan-Fancher, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    A correlation study design was used to examine the interrelatedness of power, attitudes regarding intermittent fetal monitoring, and perceived barriers to research utilization with a labor and delivery nurse's attitude toward patient advocacy using the conceptual framework of the science of unitary human beings. The linear combination of the three independent variables was significantly correlated to attitude toward patient advocacy and power as knowing participation in change had the greatest impact on patient advocacy.

  4. Changing perceptions of beauty: a surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Peter A; Zavod, Matthew B

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is a mystery that has been with us for ages. Scholars and scientists have investigated its roots and effects, and its presence is ubiquitous. Has the construct of beauty changed over time? Is our sense of beauty learned or innate? What IS beauty, and can we quantify it? A substantial amount of work supports a Darwinian theory of selection, which predicts a survival advantage based on physical attractiveness. However, there is evidence that certain perceptions of beauty change with time. Indeed, the recent globalization of modern society has wrought changes in our perceptions of beauty. Are patients electing cosmetic surgery procuring a survival advantage, or are they bypassing genetics and setting a new standard for beauty? As facial plastic surgeons, we must be poised to respond to this metamorphosis and understand its roots. Although there is some equivocation and debate about this elusive subject, it is our duty to stay abreast of the current dynamic to make sound judgments that are in the best interests of our patients.

  5. Changing public perceptions of genetically modified foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2001-01-01

    . In esperiment 1, attitude change experiments were conducted with consumers from Denmark, Germany, Italy and the UK (N=1650). Different information strategies were tested against a control group for their ability to change consumers' attitudes and their influence on product choice. Results indicate...... that no attitude change occured. Instead, all strategies seemed to bolster pre-existing attitudes, thereby significantly decreasing consumers' preferences for GM products. The effect did not occur when consumers only saw a labeled product example. In experiment 2, we tested the effects of direct experience......Previous research concerning public perception of GM foods indicates that European consumers hold firm negative attitudes to GM foods. These attitudes, however, are not based on risk-benefit evaluations of particular products. Rather, they seem to be a function of general sociopolitical attitudes...

  6. Secondary Athletic Administrators' Perceptions of Title IX Policy Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Gabriel Grawe

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate North Dakota's Normal Competitive Region (NDNCR) high school athletic administrators' perceptions of 2010 Title IX policy changes respective to their athletic programs. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to investigate the perceptions. Quantitatively, perception data were gathered from a…

  7. Carrying out a Language Policy Change: Advocacy Coalitions and the Management of Linguistic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Marian; Szabo-Gilinger, Eszter; Vigers, Dick; Simicic, Lucija

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on agency in language policy change. The object of the analysis is the processes of bilingualization of signage in three European towns. Located in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Wales, the towns differ in various respects, including the extent to which signage language policies have faced opposition and threatened social…

  8. More than a message: framing public health advocacy to change corporate practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lori; Wallack, Lawrence; Woodruff, Katie

    2005-06-01

    Framing battles in public health illustrate the tension in our society between individual freedom and collective responsibility. This article describes how two frames, market justice and social justice, first articulated in a public health context by Dan Beauchamp, influence public dialogue on the health consequences of corporate practices. The authors argue that public health advocates must articulate the social justice values motivating the changes they seek in specific policy battles that will be debated in the context of news coverage. The authors conclude with lessons for health education practitioners who need to frame public health issues in contentious and controversial policy contexts. Specific lessons include the importance of understanding the existing values and beliefs motivating the public health change being sought, the benefits of articulating core messages that correspond to shared values, and the necessity of developing media skills to compete effectively with adversaries in public debate.

  9. Invoking Subordinate Attitude Change through Counterattitudinal Advocacy: An Experiment in Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Survey. The majority of the participants were assigned to avionics repair shops although there were participants from other areas as well (jet engine...attitude change, despite the salience of futuro argunents which might otherwise have impacted upon the subordinate. It therefore becomes the imperative...Tactical Fighter Wing’s Avionics Branch in December of 1983 and then served as Maintenance Supervisor of the 1st Component Repair Squadron from March 1985

  10. Changing the public perception of physiotherapeutic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, L

    1994-01-01

    Market research was undertaken to establish the public perception of physiotherapy. Using this market research strategic recommendations for the future marketing of physiotherapy are made within the professional context. Marketing will be used to contribute to changing the public perception of physiotherapy. The market research involved a qualitative study of five focus groups of the general public and one focus group of physiotherapists. The responses from the focus groups were used to construct an appropriate questionnaire for the qualitative study. A random sample of 510 members of the general public were then surveyed. The market research results yielded the following key features: The best known conditions treated by physiotherapists are musculoskeletal. The least known are women and children. Client-centered care is sought. The importance of location gives potential for physiotherapists to capitalise on tailoring to clients in their area. Doctors are important for referral and communication about physiotherapy. Marketing should be used to inform doctors of what physiotherapy has to offer. A marketing orientation has begun within physiotherapy; however, it must 'fit' the culture initially to be successful. A marketing strategy should be developed on national, state and individual levels based on a strategic intent. At the state level, strategies must be responsive to area or regional needs. Marketing needs to target identified market segments such as workers compensation organisations. Individual physiotherapists must promote themselves within their region, particularly to doctors and clients with the use of relationship marketing. Informal presentations to community groups and school students about physiotherapy will increase their profile.

  11. The Changing Perception of the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, D

    2015-01-01

    The solar system has changed dramatically since its birth, and so did our understanding of it. A considerable research effort has been invested in the past decade in an attempt to reconstruct the solar system history, including the earliest stages some 4.5 billion years ago. The results indicate how several processes, such as planetary migration and dynamical instabilities, acted to relax the orbital spacing of the outer planets, and provided the needed perturbation to explain the present planetary orbits that are not precisely circular and coplanar. Here we highlight this work and illustrate the key results in a computer simulation that unifies several recently developed theories. The emerging view represents another step away from the initial perception of the solar system as part of unchanging heavens.

  12. Students' Perception of Change in the Singapore Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research that examines students' perception of the change in the Singapore Education System and how that impacts on their satisfaction and outlook. Analysis of the data obtained through a questionnaire and face-to-face interviews shows that the more favourable the perception of change amongst students, the…

  13. Pediatric behavior guidance in the 21st century workshop C report - advocacy and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, Rocio B; Nelson, Travis

    2014-01-01

    This report outlines a series of recommendations derived from an advocacy and policy workshop at the 2013 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) Behavior Guidance Symposium. The committee charge was to address two questions: (1) what should be done to change public and media perception of behavior guidance, if anything, and: (2) what should be done to insure that needed behavior guidance techniques will be available for practicing pediatric dentists in the future. Members of the workshop voiced a wide variety of opinions and impressions of how public perception and media promotion of behavior guidance affect the practice of pediatric dentistry. A diverse assortment of strategies to promote the availability of these techniques in the future was suggested. This report will serve to inform policy and advocacy efforts by AAPD to improve children's oral health and promote excellence in patient care.

  14. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  15. Climate change and coastal environmental risk perceptions in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Stuart J; Jacobson, Susan K

    2013-11-30

    Understanding public perceptions of climate change risks is a prerequisite for effective climate communication and adaptation. Many studies of climate risk perceptions have either analyzed a general operationalization of climate change risk or employed a case-study approach of specific adaptive processes. This study takes a different approach, examining attitudes toward 17 specific, climate-related coastal risks and cognitive, affective, and risk-specific predictors of risk perception. A survey of 558 undergraduates revealed that risks to the physical environment were a greater concern than economic or biological risks. Perceptions of greater physical environment risks were significantly associated with having more pro-environmental attitudes, being female, and being more Democratic-leaning. Perceptions of greater economic risks were significantly associated with having more negative environmental attitudes, being female, and being more Republican-leaning. Perceptions of greater biological risks were significantly associated with more positive environmental attitudes. The findings suggest that focusing on physical environment risks maybe more salient to this audience than communications about general climate change adaptation. The results demonstrate that climate change beliefs and risk perceptions are multifactorial and complex and are shaped by individuals' attitudes and basic beliefs. Climate risk communications need to apply this knowledge to better target cognitive and affective processes of specific audiences, rather than providing simple characterizations of risks.

  16. [Review on farmer's climate change perception and adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Yan

    2014-08-01

    As the most serious challenge that the humankind is facing, climate change has been strengthened vulnerability in many countries and regions, and how to scientifically adapt to climate change has become the global issue of common concern to the international community today. The impact of climate change on farming people depending on the nature resource is especially remarkable, and understanding farmers' adaptation mechanism and process is very important to effectively make the adaptation policy. As the basis of understanding the human response action, public perception has provided a new perspective to verify the farmers' adaptation mechanism and process about climate change. Based on the recent theoretical and empirical developments of farmers' perception and adaptation, the impact of climate change on the farmers' livelihood was analyzed, and the main adaptation obstacles which the farmers faced in response to climate change were summarized systematically. Then, we analyzed the relationship between the farmers' climate change perception and adaptation, illuminated the key cognitive elements in the process of the farmers' climate change adaptation and introduced the framework to analyze the relationship between the farmers' climate change perception and adaptation. At last, this review put forward the key questions which should be considered in study on the relationship between the farmers' climate change perception and adaptation.

  17. Perception and Change in Update Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, D.J.N. van; Eijck, D.J.N. van; Verbrugge, R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Three key ways of updating one's knowledge are (i) perception of states of affairs, e.g., seeing with one's own eyes that something is the case, (ii) recep- tion of messages, e.g., being told that something is the case, and (iii) drawing new conclusions from known facts. If one represents k

  18. Perception and Change in Update Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, D.J.N. van; Verbrugge, R.

    2012-01-01

    Three key ways of updating one's knowledge are (i) perception of states of affairs, e.g., seeing with one's own eyes that something is the case, (ii) reception of messages, e.g., being told that something is the case, and (iii) drawing new conclusions from known facts. If one represents knowledge b

  19. Global environmental change: local perceptions, understandings, and explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyhälä, Aili; Fernández-Llamazares, Álvaro; Lehvävirta, Hertta; Byg, Anja; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel; Salpeteur, Matthieu; Thornton, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Global environmental change (GEC) is an increasingly discussed phenomenon in the scientific literature as evidence of its presence and impacts continues to grow. Yet, while the documentation of GEC is becoming more readily available, local perceptions of GEC— particularly in small-scale societies—and preferences about how to deal with it, are still largely overlooked. Local knowledge and perceptions of GEC are important in that agents make decisions (including on natural resource management) based on individual perceptions. We carried out a systematic literature review that aims to provide an exhaustive state-of-the-art of the degree to and manner in which the study of local perceptions of change are being addressed in GEC research. We reviewed 126 articles found in peer-reviewed journals (between 1998 and 2014) that address local perceptions of GEC. We used three particular lenses of analysis that are known to influence local perceptions, namely (i) cognition, (ii) culture and knowledge, and (iii) possibilities for adaptation.We present our findings on the geographical distribution of the current research, the most common changes reported, perceived drivers and impacts of change, and local explanations and evaluations of change and impacts. Overall, we found the studies to be geographically biased, lacking methodological reporting, mostly theory based with little primary data, and lacking of indepth analysis of the psychological and ontological influences in perception and implications for adaptation. We provide recommendations for future GEC research and propose the development of a “meta-language” around adaptation, perception, and mediation to encourage a greater appreciation and understanding of the diversity around these phenomena across multiple scales, and improved codesign and facilitation of locally relevant adaptation and mitigation strategies. PMID:27695479

  20. Perspective: Physician advocacy: what is it and how do we do it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Mark A; Wong, Shale L; Federico, Steven G

    2010-01-01

    Many medical authors and organizations have called for physician advocacy as a core component of medical professionalism. Despite widespread acceptance of advocacy as a professional obligation, the concept remains problematic within the profession of medicine because it remains undefined in concept, scope, and practice. If advocacy is to be a professional imperative, then medical schools and graduate education programs must deliberately train physicians as advocates. Accrediting bodies must clearly define advocacy competencies, and all physicians must meet them at some basic level. Sustaining and fostering physician advocacy will require modest changes to both undergraduate and graduate medical education. Developing advocacy training and practice opportunities for practicing physicians will also be necessary. In this article, as first steps toward building a model for competency-based physician advocacy training and delineating physician advocacy in common practice, the authors propose a definition and, using the biographies of actual physician advocates, describe the spectrum of physician advocacy.

  1. The voice of Florence Nightingale on advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selanders, Louise C; Crane, Patrick C

    2012-01-31

    Modern nursing is complex, ever changing, and multi focused. Since the time of Florence Nightingale, however, the goal of nursing has remained unchanged, namely to provide a safe and caring environment that promotes patient health and well being. Effective use of an interpersonal tool, such as advocacy, enhances the care-giving environment. Nightingale used advocacy early and often in the development of modern nursing. By reading her many letters and publications that have survived, it is possible to identify her professional goals and techniques. Specifically, Nightingale valued egalitarian human rights and developed leadership principles and practices that provide useful advocacy techniques for nurses practicing in the 21st century. In this article we will review the accomplishments of Florence Nightingale, discuss advocacy in nursing and show how Nightingale used advocacy through promoting both egalitarian human rights and leadership activities. We will conclude by exploring how Nightingale's advocacy is as relevant for the 21st century as it was for the 19th century.

  2. Advocacy to address disabling diseases: TDR holds brainstorming session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The UN Development Program/World Bank/World Health Organization's Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases hosted a meeting in January 1998 to discuss new ways of generating sustained commitment to combat disabling tropical diseases, such as filariasis and onchocerciasis. The participants agreed that advocacy should be targeted to a wider audience than the health sector, including international donors, industry, national governments, and endemic communities themselves. Advocacy efforts will be supported by development of a standard protocol that will 1) identify and present the type of evidence that generates sustainable commitment, 2) develop and use appropriate messages for each audience, 3) evaluate new advocacy approaches for their impact on behavioral change and disease control, and 4) evaluate advocacy campaigns. Advocacy about lymphatic filariasis will target all levels, while advocacy about onchocerciasis will target national and local levels.

  3. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... The JPB Foundation 2016 Bladder Cancer ... 2016 Young Investigator Awardees The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) has announced the recipients of the 2016 ...

  4. Changes in context and perception of maximum reaching height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagman, Jeffrey B; Day, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    Successfully performing a given behavior requires flexibility in both perception and behavior. In particular, doing so requires perceiving whether that behavior is possible across the variety of contexts in which it might be performed. Three experiments investigated how (changes in) context (ie point of observation and intended reaching task) influenced perception of maximum reaching height. The results of experiment 1 showed that perceived maximum reaching height more closely reflected actual reaching ability when perceivers occupied a point of observation that was compatible with that required for the reaching task. The results of experiments 2 and 3 showed that practice perceiving maximum reaching height from a given point of observation improved perception of maximum reaching height from a different point of observation, regardless of whether such practice occurred at a compatible or incompatible point of observation. In general, such findings show bounded flexibility in perception of affordances and are thus consistent with a description of perceptual systems as smart perceptual devices.

  5. Climate change risk perception and communication: addressing a critical moment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Nick

    2012-06-01

    Climate change is an increasingly salient issue for societies and policy-makers worldwide. It now raises fundamental interdisciplinary issues of risk and uncertainty analysis and communication. The growing scientific consensus over the anthropogenic causes of climate change appears to sit at odds with the increasing use of risk discourses in policy: for example, to aid in climate adaptation decision making. All of this points to a need for a fundamental revision of our conceptualization of what it is to do climate risk communication. This Special Collection comprises seven papers stimulated by a workshop on "Climate Risk Perceptions and Communication" held at Cumberland Lodge Windsor in 2010. Topics addressed include climate uncertainties, images and the media, communication and public engagement, uncertainty transfer in climate communication, the role of emotions, localization of hazard impacts, and longitudinal analyses of climate perceptions. Climate change risk perceptions and communication work is critical for future climate policy and decisions.

  6. NITARP: Changing Perceptions of Science Among Secondary Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, Russell; Kilts, Kelly; Urbanowski, Vincent; Rutherford, Thomas; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2017-01-01

    The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archival Research Program (NITARP) provides secondary teachers and their students with an authentic, high-level research experience. NITARP participants work alongside one another as colleagues, allowing both teachers and students to experience the challenges of actual research. Teachers and students learn that science doesn’t always follow the prescriptive methodology taught in most high schools. Current NITARP students and teachers were interviewed on how their perceptions of the methods by which science is really conducted changed over the course of the program. Following participation in the NITARP program, both teacher and student perceptions of how science operates were found to have changed in many ways.

  7. Upright perception and ocular torsion change independently during head tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Kheradmand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We maintain a stable perception of the visual world despite continuous movements of our eyes, head and body. Perception of upright is a key aspect of such orientation constancy. Here we investigated whether changes in upright perception during sustained head tilt were related to simultaneous changes in torsional position of the eyes. We used a subjective visual vertical (SVV task, modified to track changes in upright perception over time, and a custom video method to measure ocular torsion simultaneously. We tested twelve subjects in upright position, during prolonged (~15min lateral head tilts of 20 degrees, and also after the head returned to upright position. While the head was tilted, SVV drifted in the same direction as the head tilt (left tilt: -5.4±1.4 o and right tilt: +2.2±2.1 o. After the head returned to upright position, there was an SVV aftereffect with respect to the pre-tilt baseline, which was also in the same direction as the head tilt (left tilt: -3.9±0.6 o and right tilt: +2.55±1.0 o. Neither the SVV drift nor the SVV aftereffect were correlated with the changes in ocular torsion. Using the Bayesian spatial-perception model we show that the pattern of SVV drift and aftereffect in our results could be explained by a drift and an adaptation in sensory inputs that encode head orientation. The fact that ocular torsion (mainly driven by the otoliths could not account for the perceptual changes suggests that neck proprioception could be the primary source of drift in upright perception during head tilt, and subsequently the aftereffect in upright position.

  8. THE ROLE OF PERSONAL BRAND IN THE ADVOCACY ACTIVITY,IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Anamaria IOAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The advocacy activity is of significant importance for the business community, the perception of its need to influence the legislative process in order to have a transparent legislative procedure, the necessity of understanding the way in which the decisions are taken and the desire of the business community to assist the changing of laws and norms being linking elements of the advocacy activity to the business environment. The branding impact is practically immeasurable in social and cultural terms as it over exceeded the commercial origins. It has spread in education, sports, fashion, tourism, arts, theater, literature, regional and national politics and in almost all other fields that we could think of. The non-profit and charitable organizations that compete with the commercial brands in the emotional territory of the minds and hearts of people, for the money in their pockets, use branding more and more.

  9. Advocacy and Accessibility Standards in the New "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ashley K.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the changes in the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification's 2010 "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors" as they relate to Section C: Advocacy and Accessibility. Ethical issues are identified and discussed in relation to advocacy skills and to advocacy with, and on behalf of, the client; to…

  10. Developmental Changes in Adolescents’ Perceptions of Relationships with Their Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, I.H.A. de; Branje, S.J.T.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    This 4-wave longitudinal study examines developmental changes in adolescents’ perceptions of parent–adolescent relationships by assessing parental support, conflict with parents, and parental power. A total of 951 early adolescents (50.4% boys) and 390 middle adolescents (43.3% boys) participated. U

  11. Public Perception of Climate Change in Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Odafivwotu Ohwo

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the public perception of climate change in Yenagoa. The sample survey method was adopted, which involved the administration of 360 questionnaires to randomly selected households. The results showed that 43.33% of respondents lack adequate knowledge of climate change. Further interview revealed that 55.3% of the respondents are unaware that carbon dioxide (CO2) is the major greenhouse gas, contributing about 55% to global warming. It was revealed that responde...

  12. The Change of Perceptions Each Other

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fu: It seems that most of us don't think miniature Cold War an appropriate term for current U. S. -Russia relations. To be more exact,the two are ill at ease with each other or in the state of cold peace, a term to your liking, which depicts a partial, phased and restrained confrontation, definitely not a return to the superpower contention seen in the Cold War years. Both "cold" and "no war" reflect the reality. The lowering of original bilateral warmth has much to do with their mutual assessment, especially changes in U.S. assessment of Russian domestic develorments. Well, let us shift our discussion to this topic.

  13. Climate Change Perceptions of NY State Farmers: The Role of Risk Perceptions and Adaptive Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Bruno; Burnham, Morey; Terracina-Hartman, Carol; Sopchak, Amanda R.; Selfa, Theresa

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is expected to severely impact agricultural practices in many important food-producing regions, including the Northeast United States. Changing climate conditions, such as increases in the amount of rainfall, will require farmers to adapt. Yet, little is known with regard to farmers' perceptions and understandings about climate change, especially in the industrialized country context. This paper aims at overcoming this research limitation, as well as determining the existing contextual, cognitive, and psychological barriers that can prevent adoption of sustainable practices of farmers in New York State. The study is framed within the adaptive capacity and risk perception literature, and is based on a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with farmers in 21 farms in two counties in Central New York. The results reveal diverging views about the long-term consequences of climate change. Results also reveal that past experience remains as the most important source of information that influences beliefs and perceptions about climate change, confirming previous research.

  14. Public health and media advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns.

  15. Advocacy for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  16. Can Knowledge Deficit Explain Societal Perception of Climate Change Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, R.; McNeal, K.; Bondell, H.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change literacy efforts have had a rough journey in the past decade. Although scientists have become increasingly convinced about anthropological climate change, change in public opinion has been underwhelming. The unexplained gap between scientific consensus and public opinion has made this topic an important research area in the realm of public understanding of science. Recent research on climate change risk perception (CCRP) has advanced an intriguing hypothesis, namely, cultural cognition thesis (CCT), which posits that the public has adequate knowledge to understand climate change science but people tend to use this knowledge solely to promote their culturally motivated view-point of climate change. This talk provides evidence to demonstrate that despite culture playing a significant role in influencing CCRP, knowledge deficiency remains a persistent problem in our society and contributes to the aforementioned gap. However, such deficits can remain undiagnosed due to limitations of survey design.

  17. Nurse leaders' perceptions of an approaching organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Susanne; Eriksson, Katie; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to achieve more profound understanding of nurse leaders' perceptions of an approaching organizational change. We used a three-dimensional hermeneutical method of interpretation to analyze text from 17 interviews. The results suggest that nurse leaders were positive toward and actively engaged in continual change to their units, even though they perceived themselves as mere spectators of the change process. The nurse leaders believed that change might benefit patients and patient care, yet their adaptation lacked deeper engagement. The approaching merger affected the nurse leaders' identities on a deeply personal level. They experienced uneasiness and anxiety with regard to being nurse leaders, the future of nursing care, and their mandate as patient advocates. Nurse leaders are in a critical position to influence the success of organizational change, but the organizations covered in this study were not incorporating their knowledge and experiences into the change.

  18. Patient advocacy: the technologist's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the various ways in which imaging professionals can demonstrate patient advocacy on a day-to-day basis and throughout their careers. Advocacy encompasses a wide range of attitudes and activities, and implementing its principles can bring new enthusiasm to the workplace and increase job satisfaction. After completing this article, readers will: Describe the fundamental aspects of advocacy. Know how to handle conflict and explain why conflict is necessary. Understand the challenges to advocacy. Apply patient advocacy in the context of diagnostic imaging. Recognize the radiologic technologist's important role in ensuring patient safety. Identify how professional codes and standards, as well as federal and state laws, encourage advocacy efforts.

  19. Climate Trends and Farmers' Perceptions of Climate Change in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Brian P.; Wineman, Ayala; Sitko, Nicholas J.

    2017-02-01

    A number of studies use meteorological records to analyze climate trends and assess the impact of climate change on agricultural yields. While these provide quantitative evidence on climate trends and the likely effects thereof, they incorporate limited qualitative analysis of farmers' perceptions of climate change and/or variability. The present study builds on the quantitative methods used elsewhere to analyze climate trends, and in addition compares local narratives of climate change with evidence found in meteorological records in Zambia. Farmers offer remarkably consistent reports of a rainy season that is growing shorter and less predictable. For some climate parameters—notably, rising average temperature—there is a clear overlap between farmers' observations and patterns found in the meteorological records. However, the data do not support the perception that the rainy season used to begin earlier, and we generally do not detect a reported increase in the frequency of dry spells. Several explanations for these discrepancies are offered. Further, we provide policy recommendations to help farmers adapt to climate change/variability, as well as suggestions to shape future climate change policies, programs, and research in developing countries.

  20. Climate change impacts: Public policies and perception in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elona Pojani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the main impacts of climate change in Albania. More specifically the paper will try to analyze the public response toward these new challenges. This analysis will be preceded by a brief review of the international literature regarding climate change consequences. In addition, the paper will discuss public perception and awareness toward climate change. This discussion will be based on a survey which has involved a wide range of population. The main results of the survey show that the level of awareness of the study group (which consisted mainly on high educated participants about climate change and its relationship with the development is very low. Therefore more emphasis should be put to information regarding environmental issues, through education system and awareness campaigns.

  1. Visuomotor adaptation changes stereoscopic depth perception and tactile discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Robert; Fantoni, Carlo; Caudek, Corrado; Assad, John A; Domini, Fulvio

    2013-10-23

    Perceptual judgments of relative depth from binocular disparity are systematically distorted in humans, despite in principle having access to reliable 3D information. Interestingly, these distortions vanish at a natural grasping distance, as if perceived stereo depth is contingent on a specific reference distance for depth-disparity scaling that corresponds to the length of our arm. Here we show that the brain's representation of the arm indeed powerfully modulates depth perception, and that this internal calibration can be quickly updated. We used a classic visuomotor adaptation task in which subjects execute reaching movements with the visual feedback of their reaching finger displaced farther in depth, as if they had a longer arm. After adaptation, 3D perception changed dramatically, and became accurate at the "new" natural grasping distance, the updated disparity scaling reference distance. We further tested whether the rapid adaptive changes were restricted to the visual modality or were characteristic of sensory systems in general. Remarkably, we found an improvement in tactile discrimination consistent with a magnified internal image of the arm. This suggests that the brain integrates sensory signals with information about arm length, and quickly adapts to an artificially updated body structure. These adaptive processes are most likely a relic of the mechanisms needed to optimally correct for changes in size and shape of the body during ontogenesis.

  2. Advocacy and child neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D

    2014-11-01

    Pediatricians have a unique opportunity to intervene in the lives of children to identify and to prevent neglect. While it remains important to care for individual patients affected by neglect, the ecological model of child neglect requires intervention at the parent, family, community, and societal levels. Pediatricians can improve the outcomes for children by advocating for policies and interventions at each level. Effective advocacy principally requires the willingness to tackle broader issues beyond individual clinical care. Working with local, state, and national organizations, pediatricians can contribute a unified voice to promote evidence-based policies and programs that improve the well-being of children.

  3. Advocacy and IPR, tutorial 4

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    With open access and repositories assuming a high profile some may question whether advocacy is still necessary. Those involved in the business of setting up and populating repositories are aware that in the majority of institutions there is still a great need for advocacy. This tutorial will give participants an opportunity to discuss different advocacy methods and approaches, including the 'top down' and 'bottom up' approach, publicity methods and the opportunities offered by funding body positions on open access. Participants will have the opportunity to share experiences of what works and what doesn't. The advocacy role often encompasses responsibility for advising academics on IPR issues. This is a particularly critical area where repository staff are engaged in depositing content on behalf of academics. The tutorial will offer an opportunity to discuss the IPR issues encountered by those managing repositories. The tutorial will draw on the experience of participants who have been engaged in advocacy act...

  4. Factors Influencing Smallholder Farmers' Climate Change Perceptions: A Study from Farmers in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtemariam, Lemlem Teklegiorgis; Gandorfer, Markus; Kassa, Getachew Abate; Heissenhuber, Alois

    2016-08-01

    Factors influencing climate change perceptions have vital roles in designing strategies to enrich climate change understanding. Despite this, factors that influence smallholder farmers' climate change perceptions have not yet been adequately studied. As many of the smallholder farmers live in regions where climate change is predicted to have the most negative impact, their climate change perception is of particular interest. In this study, based on data collected from Ethiopian smallholder farmers, we assessed farmers' perceptions and anticipations of past and future climate change. Furthermore, the factors influencing farmers' climate change perceptions and the relation between farmers' perceptions and available public climate information were assessed. Our findings revealed that a majority of respondents perceive warming temperatures and decreasing rainfall trends that correspond with the local meteorological record. Farmers' perceptions about the past climate did not always reflect their anticipations about the future. A substantial number of farmers' anticipations of future climate were less consistent with climate model projections. The recursive bivariate probit models employed to explore factors affecting different categories of climate change perceptions illustrate statistical significance for explanatory variables including location, gender, age, education, soil fertility status, climate change information, and access to credit services. The findings contribute to the literature by providing evidence not just on farmers' past climate perceptions but also on future climate anticipations. The identified factors help policy makers to provide targeted extension and advisory services to enrich climate change understanding and support appropriate farm-level climate change adaptations.

  5. Factors Influencing Smallholder Farmers' Climate Change Perceptions: A Study from Farmers in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtemariam, Lemlem Teklegiorgis; Gandorfer, Markus; Kassa, Getachew Abate; Heissenhuber, Alois

    2016-08-01

    Factors influencing climate change perceptions have vital roles in designing strategies to enrich climate change understanding. Despite this, factors that influence smallholder farmers' climate change perceptions have not yet been adequately studied. As many of the smallholder farmers live in regions where climate change is predicted to have the most negative impact, their climate change perception is of particular interest. In this study, based on data collected from Ethiopian smallholder farmers, we assessed farmers' perceptions and anticipations of past and future climate change. Furthermore, the factors influencing farmers' climate change perceptions and the relation between farmers' perceptions and available public climate information were assessed. Our findings revealed that a majority of respondents perceive warming temperatures and decreasing rainfall trends that correspond with the local meteorological record. Farmers' perceptions about the past climate did not always reflect their anticipations about the future. A substantial number of farmers' anticipations of future climate were less consistent with climate model projections. The recursive bivariate probit models employed to explore factors affecting different categories of climate change perceptions illustrate statistical significance for explanatory variables including location, gender, age, education, soil fertility status, climate change information, and access to credit services. The findings contribute to the literature by providing evidence not just on farmers' past climate perceptions but also on future climate anticipations. The identified factors help policy makers to provide targeted extension and advisory services to enrich climate change understanding and support appropriate farm-level climate change adaptations.

  6. Visiting a climate-influenced national park: the stability of climate change perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Matthew Tyler James; Hallo, Jeffrey C; Wright, Brett A; Moore, Dewayne; Powell, Robert B

    2013-11-01

    Understanding perceptions of global environmental issues, such as climate change, can help inform resource management, policy development, and communication with constituents. Although a considerable amount of research documents citizens' perceptions of climate change, few have investigated how interactions with climate-impacted parks and protected areas influence these perceptions, and consequently elements of environmental management. Using a mixed methods Instrument Development Approach, the researchers examined the stability of park visitors' (N = 429) climate change perceptions during a daylong interaction with climate-sensitive and influenced resources at Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska. Results indicate that global-level beliefs about climate change remained relatively stable during a park experience, but perceptions about climate change at the park-level (e.g., impacts) appeared more malleable. Findings also revealed the type of park experience (terrestrial vs. marine) can influence the degree of change in visitors' perceptions. Implications for communication, outreach, and park management are discussed.

  7. Bahamians and Climate Change: An Analysis of Risk Perception and Climate Change Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, R.; Owens, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Commonwealth of the Bahamas is forecasted to be adversely impacted by the effects of climate change. This presentation will present the results of an assessment of the risk perception toward climate change and climate change literacy among Bahamians. 499 Bahamians from the health care and hospitality industries participated in surveys and/or focus groups and three (3) areas of climate change literacy (attitude, behavior and knowledge) were analyzed as well as risk perception. In general, 1) Bahamians demonstrated an elementary understanding of the underlying causes of climate change, 2) possessed positive attitudes toward adopting new climate change policies, and 3) are already adjusting their behaviors in light of the current predictions. This research also resulted in the development of a model of the relationships between the climate literacy subscales (attitude, behavior and knowledge) and risk perception. This study also examined information sources and their impacts on climate change literacy. As the source of information is important in assessing the quality of the information, participants also identified the source(s) of most of their climate change information. The TV news was cited as the most common source for climate change information among Bahamians. As there is limited active research generating specific climate change information in the Bahamas, all the information Bahamians receive as it pertains to climate change is generated abroad. As a result, Bahamians must decipher through to make sense of it on an individual level. From the focus groups, many of the participants have been able to view possible changes through a cultural lens and are willing to make adjustments to maintain the uniqueness and viability of the Bahamas and to preserve it for generations. Continued study of Bahamians' climate change literacy will inform adaption and mitigation policy as well as individual action.

  8. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  9. Mentors' Perceptions of Factors Associated with Change in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Nina; Jacobs, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Mentors' perceptions of factors associated with educational change were identified following an individualized mentoring program about constructivist curriculum for early childhood educators. A qualitative case study analysis of the mentors' journals of six classrooms was conducted to review their perceptions of change. Classroom…

  10. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively.

  11. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy.

  12. “We Are Not Really Marketing Mental Health”: Mental Health Advocacy in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Reuben; Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Crooks, Megan; Mangezi, Walter; Abas, Melanie; Katz, Craig; Thornicroft, Graham; Semrau, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Few people with mental disorders in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) receive treatment, in part because mental disorders are highly stigmatized and do not enjoy priority and resources commensurate with their burden on society. Advocacy has been proposed as a means of building political will and community support for mental health and reducing stigma, but few studies have explored the practice and promise of advocacy in LMICs. Methods We conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with leaders in health and mental health in Zimbabwe to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the challenges and opportunities of the country’s mental health system. We coded the transcripts using the constant comparative method, informed by principles of grounded theory. Few interview questions directly concerned advocacy, yet in our analysis, advocacy emerged as a prominent, cross-cutting theme across participants and interview questions. Results Two thirds of the respondents discussed advocacy, often in depth, returning to the concept throughout the interview and emphasizing their belief in advocacy’s importance. Participants described six distinct components of advocacy: the advocates, to whom they advocate (“targets”), what they advocate for (“asks”), how advocates reach their targets (“access”), how they make their asks (“arguments”), and the results of their advocacy (“outcomes”). Discussion Despite their perception that mental health is widely misunderstood and under-appreciated in Zimbabwe, respondents expressed optimism that strategically speaking out can reduce stigma and increase access to care. Key issues included navigating hierarchies, empowering service users to advocate, and integrating mental health with other health initiatives. Understanding stakeholder perceptions sets the stage for targeted development of mental health advocacy in Zimbabwe and other LMICs. PMID:27607240

  13. Global climate change attitudes and perceptions among south American zoo visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Jerry F; Clayton, Susan; Kelly, Lisa-Anne DeGregoria; Grajal, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    There is a substantial gap between the scientific evidence for anthropogenic climate change and the human response to this evidence. Perceptions of and responses to climate change can differ among regions of the world, as well as within countries. Therefore, information about the public's attitudes and perceptions related to climate change is essential to the development of relevant educational resources. In the present study, zoo visitors in four South American countries responded to a questionnaire regarding their attitudes and perceptions toward global climate change. Results indicated that most respondents are already highly concerned about global climate change and are interested in greater engagement in pro-environmental behaviors. Visitors also perceive various obstacles to engagement in climate change mitigation behaviors. We discuss the results of our study in terms of addressing visitors' climate change attitudes and perceptions within the social and emotional context of zoo settings.

  14. Predictors of public climate change awareness and risk perception around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien Ming; Markowitz, Ezra M.; Howe, Peter D.; Ko, Chia-Ying; Leiserowitz, Anthony A.

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is a threat to human societies and natural ecosystems, yet public opinion research finds that public awareness and concern vary greatly. Here, using an unprecedented survey of 119 countries, we determine the relative influence of socio-demographic characteristics, geography, perceived well-being, and beliefs on public climate change awareness and risk perceptions at national scales. Worldwide, educational attainment is the single strongest predictor of climate change awareness. Understanding the anthropogenic cause of climate change is the strongest predictor of climate change risk perceptions, particularly in Latin America and Europe, whereas perception of local temperature change is the strongest predictor in many African and Asian countries. However, other key factors associated with public awareness and risk perceptions highlight the need to develop tailored climate communication strategies for individual nations. The results suggest that improving basic education, climate literacy, and public understanding of the local dimensions of climate change are vital to public engagement and support for climate action.

  15. College Student Narratives about Learning and Using Self-Advocacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly-Cano, Meada; Vaccaro, Annemarie; Newman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Self-advocacy is the ability to communicate one's needs and wants and to make decisions about the supports needed to achieve them (Stodden, Conway, & Chang, 2003). Research shows self-advocacy skills are related to academic performance and successful adaptation to college (Adams & Proctor, 2010; Getzel & Thoma, 2008; Hadley, 2006;…

  16. Exploration of Undergraduate Preservice Teachers' Experiences Learning Advocacy: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, Kelley; Childers-McKee, Cherese; Benavides, Aerin

    2014-01-01

    Applying transformational critical advocacy research in college instruction can be a powerful way to engage students in challenging inequity in society and promoting positive changes. Few studies systematically measure the impact of such pedagogy on the development of college students' beliefs about advocacy. In this mixed methods study, we…

  17. Tactile Perception for Stroke Induce Changes in Electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Nae Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study provided a neurophysiological evidence on tactile perception in individuals with chronic stroke. Occupational therapists should consider an active tactile exploration as a useful modality on occupational performance in rehabilitation training.

  18. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described.

  19. Educational Technology Training Workshops for Mathematics Teachers: An Exploration of Perception Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wilfred Wing Fat; Yuen, Allan Hoi Kau

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of educational technology training workshops on perception changes of mathematics teachers. Three perceptions, namely, pedagogical orientation, efficacy, and liking in relation to technology integration, were explored in this study. Two research questions were addressed: Do educational technology training workshops…

  20. 78 FR 58343 - Information Collection Activities: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S. National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... National Park Service Information Collection Activities: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S... reference Information Collection 1024-NEW, Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S. National Parks in.... II. Data OMB Control Number: XXXX-New. Title: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in US...

  1. Competition Advocacy: the Italian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rebecchini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Competition advocacy is considered, together with enforcement, the core business of an antitrust authority. Broadly speaking there are at least three main tasks regularly performed by most, if not all, antitrust agencies that are amenable to the advocacy function: addressing laws and regulations in order to remove unnecessary impediments to competition; engaging in sector enquiries to understand markets behavior and identify critical issues; explaining the benefits of open competitive markets to the public opinion. This article examines these three main tasks and outlines the challenges for competition agencies, with references to the experience of the Italian Competition Authority (ICA and the initiatives undertaken at international level.

  2. Doctors on Values and Advocacy: A Qualitative and Evaluative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Siun; Little, Miles

    2016-05-11

    Doctors are increasingly enjoined by their professional organisations to involve themselves in supraclinical advocacy, which embraces activities focused on changing practice and the system in order to address the social determinants of health. The moral basis for doctors' decisions on whether or not to do so has been the subject of little empirical research. This opportunistic qualitative study of the values of medical graduates associated with the Sydney Medical School explores the processes that contribute to doctors' decisions about taking up the advocate role. Our findings show that personal ideals were more important than professional commitments in shaping doctors' decisions on engagement in advocacy. Experiences in early life and during training, including exposure to power and powerlessness, significantly influenced their role choices. Doctors included supraclinical advocacy in their mature practices if it satisfied their desire to achieve excellence. These findings suggest that common approaches to promoting and facilitating advocacy as an individual professional obligation are not fully congruent with the experiences and values of doctors that are significant in creating the advocate. It would seem important to understand better the moral commitments inherent in advocacy to inform future developments in codes of medical ethics and medical education programs.

  3. Stereotypes and Educators: How Can We Change the Public's Perception of Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses what the public wants from educators in public schools, re-evaluates the stereotype of educators, proposes improvement of communication, and recommends a media-blitz to change the public's perception of educators. (JK)

  4. Advocacy Networks and Romani Politics in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vermeersch

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the impact of the activity of international solidarity and human rights organizations on the political involvement of the Roma in Central and Eastern Europe. It will conclude that the increase of an international advocacy network focussing on the plight of the Roma has offered new opportunities to domestic Romani organizations for pressuring governments to change state behaviour or to introduce new policy. In some cases, governments have even appointed Romani personalities from well-known advocacy organizations to advisory positions. However, the influence of a growing advocacy network has not been able yet to create a better democratically elected representation of the Roma in the central arenas of political decision-making on domestic level. Moreover, within domestic Romani movements there is growing discussion about the legitimacy and accountability of Romani advisors.

  5. Changes in health perceptions after exposure to human suffering: using discrete emotions to understand underlying processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia A Paschali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine whether exposure to human suffering is associated with negative changes in perceptions about personal health. We further examined the relation of possible health perception changes, to changes in five discrete emotions (i.e., fear, guilt, hostility/anger, and joviality, as a guide to understand the processes underlying health perception changes, provided that each emotion conveys information regarding triggering conditions. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: An experimental group (N = 47 was exposed to images of human affliction, whereas a control group (N = 47 was exposed to relaxing images. Participants in the experimental group reported more health anxiety and health value, as well as lower health-related optimism and internal health locus of control, in comparison to participants exposed to relaxing images. They also reported more fear, guilt, hostility and sadness, as well as less joviality. Changes in each health perception were related to changes in particular emotions. CONCLUSION: These findings imply that health perceptions are shaped in a constant dialogue with the representations about the broader world. Furthermore, it seems that the core of health perception changes lies in the acceptance that personal well-being is subject to several potential threats, as well as that people cannot fully control many of the factors the determine their own well-being.

  6. Advocacy and policy issues Tutorial 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial is aimed at those who are new to the area of repositories and who want to learn more about key advocacy and policy issues. The tutorial will include information and advice on putting together an institutional advocacy campaign and developing policies for your repository. There will be opportunities for participants to share experiences and to ask questions. The tutorial will include a practical exercise in developing an advocacy presentation. Participants with experience of advocacy are welcome to attend the session to share their experiences, but should bear in mind that it is aimed primarily at those looking for help and advice in advocacy matters.

  7. Walker's Sampler: Youth Advocacy Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Clarence; And Others

    This resource book, which provides a sampling of programs developed by the Youth Advocacy Projects of the Teacher Corps on behalf of troubled youth, is organized ln tbree major sections. Section I presents outlines, resources, and critiques of staff development courses, organized according to target youth group(s) and by subject area. Section II…

  8. Communicating Sustainability: Student Perceptions of a Behavior Change Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, D. Matthew; Feng, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the impacts of a science-based environmental communication campaign at a university dining hall. The impacts are assessed in terms of student attitudes toward sustainability, food consumption choices and perceptions and understanding of the campaign and the information it communicated.…

  9. Changing Public Perception in Wisconsin: Manufacturing a "Good Life"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Haley

    2006-01-01

    Careers in manufacturing are high-wage and high-tech. Yet, a future workforce shortage may be on the horizon. It appears a negative public perception--one that brings to mind low wages, assembly-line work and lay-offs--is thwarting young adults from pursuing manufacturing careers across the country. This article describes how the Wisconsin…

  10. Self-reported evaluation of competencies and attitudes by physicians-in-training before and after a single day legislative advocacy experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntoon Kristin M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advocacy is increasingly being recognized as a core element of medical professionalism and efforts are underway to incorporate advocacy training into graduate and undergraduate medical school curricula. While limited data exist to quantify physician attitudes toward advocacy, even less has been done to assess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of future physicians. The purpose of this study was to assess students’ experiences and attitudes toward legislative advocacy, cutting out using a convience sample. Methods A paper survey based on previously validated surveys was administered to a convenience sample of premedical and medical student participants attending a National Advocacy Day in Washington, DC, in March 2011, both before and after their advocacy experiences. Responses were anonymous and either categorical ( or ordinal, using a 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed statistically to evaluate demographics and compare changes in pre- and post-experience attitude and skills. Results Data from 108 pre-advocacy and 50 post-advocacy surveys were analyzed yielding a response rate of 46.3%. Following a single advocacy experience, subjects felt they were more likely to contact their legislators about healthcare issues (p = 0.03, to meet in person with their legislators (p  Conclusions A one-time practical advocacy experience has a positive influence on students’ knowledge, skills and attitudes towards legislative advocacy. Practical experience is an important method of furthering medical education in advocacy and further research is necessary to assess its impact in a broader population.

  11. Agricultural Producer Perceptions of Climate Change and Climate Education Needs for the Central Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Amber Campbell; Kahl, Daniel; PytlikZillig, Lisa; Champion, Ben; Abdel-Monem, Tarik; Steffensmeier, Timothy; Rice, Charles W.; Hubbard, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The Central Great Plains Climate Education Partnership conducted focus groups throughout Kansas to gain a better understanding of farmer perceptions and attitudes towards climate change education. Results indicate concern about climatic changes, even if producers are unsure that "human caused climate change" is occurring. Participants…

  12. Reducing violent injuries: priorities for pediatrician advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolins, J C; Christoffel, K K

    1994-10-01

    A basic framework for developing an advocacy plan must systematically break down the large task of policy development implementation into manageable components. The basic framework described in detail in this paper includes three steps: Setting policy objectives by narrowing the scope of policy, by reviewing policy options, and by examining options against selected criteria. Developing strategies for educating the public and for approaching legislative/regulatory bodies. Evaluating the effectiveness of the advocacy action plan as a process and as an agent for change. To illustrate the variety of ways in which pediatricians can be involved in the policy process to reduce violent injuries among children and adolescents, we apply this systematic approach to three priority areas. Prohibiting the use of corporal punishment in schools is intended to curb the institutionalized legitimacy of violence that has been associated with future use of violence. Efforts to remove handguns from the environments of children and adolescents are aimed at reducing the numbers of firearm injuries inflicted upon and by minors. Comprehensive treatment of adolescent victims of assault is intended to decrease the reoccurrence of violent injuries.

  13. China’s soft power: changing the world perception

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Chaudhry Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited China has focused on improving its image in the world by relying more on its soft power by investing billions of dollars simply to convince the world to accept its rise in the international system. This paper uses both quantitative and qualitative methods in order to grade and assess China’s success with these efforts. While I could not find any significant relationship between China’s tools of soft power and its positive perception bu...

  14. Herders' perceptions of and responses to climate change in northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S; Jasra, W A; Ismail, M; Shrestha, R M; Yi, S L; Wu, N

    2013-09-01

    Migratory pastoralism is an adaptation to a harsh and unstable environment, and pastoral herders have traditionally adapted to environmental and climatic change by building on their in-depth knowledge of this environment. In the Hindu Kush Himalayan region, and particularly in the arid and semiarid areas of northern Pakistan, pastoralism, the main livelihood, is vulnerable to climate change. Little detailed information is available about climate trends and impacts in remote mountain regions; herders' perceptions of climate change can provide the information needed by policy makers to address problems and make decisions on adaptive strategies in high pastoral areas. A survey was conducted in Gilgit-Baltistan province of Pakistan to assess herders' perceptions of, and adaptation strategies to climate change. Herders' perceptions were gathered in individual interviews and focus group discussions. The herders perceived a change in climate over the past 10-15 years with longer and more intense droughts in summer, more frequent and heavier snowfall in winter, and prolonged summers and relatively shorter winters. These perceptions were validated by published scientific evidence. The herders considered that the change in climate had directly impacted pastures and then livestock by changing vegetation composition and reducing forage yield. They had adopted some adaptive strategies in response to the change such as altering the migration pattern and diversifying livelihoods. The findings show that the herder communities have practical lessons and indigenous knowledge related to rangeland management and adaptation to climate change that should be shared with the scientific community and integrated into development planning.

  15. Herders' Perceptions of and Responses to Climate Change in Northern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S.; Jasra, W. A.; Ismail, M.; Shrestha, R. M.; Yi, S. L.; Wu, N.

    2013-09-01

    Migratory pastoralism is an adaptation to a harsh and unstable environment, and pastoral herders have traditionally adapted to environmental and climatic change by building on their in-depth knowledge of this environment. In the Hindu Kush Himalayan region, and particularly in the arid and semiarid areas of northern Pakistan, pastoralism, the main livelihood, is vulnerable to climate change. Little detailed information is available about climate trends and impacts in remote mountain regions; herders' perceptions of climate change can provide the information needed by policy makers to address problems and make decisions on adaptive strategies in high pastoral areas. A survey was conducted in Gilgit-Baltistan province of Pakistan to assess herders' perceptions of, and adaptation strategies to climate change. Herders' perceptions were gathered in individual interviews and focus group discussions. The herders perceived a change in climate over the past 10-15 years with longer and more intense droughts in summer, more frequent and heavier snowfall in winter, and prolonged summers and relatively shorter winters. These perceptions were validated by published scientific evidence. The herders considered that the change in climate had directly impacted pastures and then livestock by changing vegetation composition and reducing forage yield. They had adopted some adaptive strategies in response to the change such as altering the migration pattern and diversifying livelihoods. The findings show that the herder communities have practical lessons and indigenous knowledge related to rangeland management and adaptation to climate change that should be shared with the scientific community and integrated into development planning.

  16. Climate Change Risk Perception and Policy Preferences. The Role of Affect, Imagery, and Values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiserowitz, A. [Decision Research, 1201 Oak Street, Suite 200, Eugene, OR 97401 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    A national, representative survey of the U.S. public found that Americans have moderate climate change risk perceptions, strongly support a variety of national and international policies to mitigate climate change, and strongly oppose several carbon tax proposals. Drawing on the theoretical distinction between analytic and experiential decision-making, this study found that American risk perceptions and policy support are strongly influenced by experiential factors, including affect, imagery, and values, and demonstrates that public responses to climate change are influenced by both psychological and socio-cultural factors.

  17. Academic Librarians' Perceptions of Teamwork and Organizational Structure in a Time of Rapid Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of academic librarians on two topics: the delivery of services to students and faculty in a time of rapid technological changes and an organizational structure appropriate for delivering services to students in a time of rapid technological changes. Several researchers agree that to…

  18. Climate variability and change in southern Mali : Learning from farmer perceptions and on-farm trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traore, B.; Wijk, van M.T.; Descheemaeker, K.K.E.; Corbeels, M.; Rufino, M.C.; Giller, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural production in the Sudano–Sahelian zone of west Africa is highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate variability and climate change. The present study aimed to understand farmers’ perceptions of climate variability and change and to evaluate adaptation options together with farmers, inc

  19. Changing Organizational Culture and Instructional Methods in Elementary Schools: Perceptions of Teachers and Professional Educational Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Hanna; Gavin, Suss; Shlomo, Sharan

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines teachers' perceptions of organizational changes in their elementary schools. These changes occurred following the implementation of a long-term comprehensive school improvement project (CSIP). One hundred and seventy one teachers who taught in six elementary schools located in two different school districts in Israel…

  20. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  1. Undetectable Changes in Image Resolution of Luminance-Contrast Gradients Affect Depth Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Morita, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.). It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch) as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder). In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays.

  2. 78 FR 73586 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project..., Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  3. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  4. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... cancellation of the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee..., Acting Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  5. Population-focused nursing: advocacy for vulnerable populations in an RN-BSN program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Melissa; Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative learning activity for online RN-BSN students designed to foster advocacy for vulnerable populations. The Vulnerable Population Advocacy Assignment, included as a component of the online Population-Focused Nursing class, provides students with the opportunity to identify and develop an awareness of issues impacting vulnerable populations and to advocate for policy changes that will influence the health of individuals, families, and populations. RN-BSN students build on previous knowledge and skills in professional communication and advocacy as they develop a policy statement designed to address health disparities impacting local, national, and global populations.

  6. Child maltreatment law and policy as a foundation for child advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, Donald C; Krugman, Richard D

    2009-04-01

    Advocacy for children is a fundamental pediatric concern and activity. Notwithstanding achievements for children to date, pediatrics can do more in the twenty-first century to advocate for children and promote research on ways in which advocacy for children can be improved. Evidence-based advocacy should take many directions including legislation, system change in local and state agencies such as social services and health departments, financial assistance including Medicaid, evidence provided to courts at trial and on appeal through "friend of the court" participation, family guidance, public education, and the promotion of pediatric law and bioethics.

  7. Changes in illness perceptions mediated the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy in severe functional somatic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sara Sletten; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Ørnbøl, Eva

    2014-01-01

    . Methods We analysed additional data from a randomised controlled trial comparing completers of cognitive behavioural group therapy (46 patients) to an enhanced usual care group (66 patients). Proposed mediators (illness perceptions) and primary (physical health) and secondary (somatic symptoms and illness...... year after treatment (sum of indirect effects 1.556, BCa 95% CI (0.006; 3.620)). Improving perceived control was particularly important. Changes in illness perceptions from baseline to 16 months after randomisation were associated with clinically meaningful improvements in physical health, somatic......Objective Although there is substantial evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy alleviates symptoms in functional somatic syndromes, the mechanisms of change are less investigated. This study examined whether changes in illness perceptions mediated the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy...

  8. Comparing smallholder farmers’ perception of climate change with meteorological data: A case study from southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayansina Ayanlade

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines smallholder farmers’ perceptions of climate change, climate variability and their impacts, and adaptation strategies adopted over the past three decades. We use ethnographic analysis, combined with Cumulative Departure Index (CDI, Rainfall Anomaly Index (RAI analysis, and correlation analysis to compare farmers’ perceptions in Southwestern Nigeria with historical meteorological data, in order to assess the way farmers’ observations mirror the climatic trends. The results show that about 67% of farmers who participated had observed recent changes in climate. Perceptions of rural farmers on climate change and variability are consistent with the climatic trend analysis. RAI and CDI results illustrate that not less than 11 out of 30 years in each study site experienced lower-than-normal rainfall. Climatic trends show fluctuations in both early growing season (EGS and late growing season (LGS rainfall and the 5-year moving average suggests a reduction in rainfall over the 30 years. Climatic trends confirmed farmers’ perceptions that EGS and LGS precipitations are oscillating, that rainfall onset is becoming later, and EGS rainfall is reducing. Overall impacts of climate change on both crops and livestock appear to be highly negative, much more on maize (62.8%, yam (52.2%, poultry (67% and cattle (63.2%. Years of farming experiences and level of income of farmers appear to have a significant relationship with farmers’ choice of adaptation strategies, with r≥0.60@ p<0.05 and r≥0.520@ p<0.05 respectively. The study concluded that farmers’ perceptions of climate change mirror meteorological analysis, though their perceptions were based on local climate parameters. Smallholder farmers are particularly vulnerable to climate change since the majority of them do not have enough resources to cope.

  9. The Perception of Changes Among Participants of Drug Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Opora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The positive changes among addicted people usually don’t happen by themselves, but they are results of the process which stays under the impact of the aspirations, values and priorities of the person at the moment. Enhancing the motivation of addicted people requires a huge effort from them what helps in making changes in the life style. The presented article contains results of the research. The main aim was describing critical events, which appeared among people addicted to drugs and made them to change their life styles. Additionally the article describes an classifies changes which were noticed by the participants of the stationary psychotherapy of drug addiction.

  10. Context-dependent changes in tactile perception during movement execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juravle, Georgiana; McGlone, Francis; Spence, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Tactile perception is inhibited during movement execution, a phenomenon known as tactile suppression. Here, we investigated whether the type of movement determines whether or not this form of sensory suppression occurs. Participants performed simple reaching or exploratory movements. Tactile discrimination thresholds were calculated for vibratory stimuli delivered to participants' wrists while executing the movement, and while at rest (a tactile discrimination task, TD). We also measured discrimination performance in a same vs. different task for the explored materials during the execution of the different movements (a surface discrimination task, SD). The TD and SD tasks could either be performed singly or together, both under active movement and passive conditions. Consistent with previous results, tactile thresholds measured at rest were significantly lower than those measured during both active movement and passive touch (that is, tactile suppression was observed). Moreover, SD performance was significantly better under conditions of single-tasking, active movements, as well as exploratory movements, as compared to conditions of dual-tasking, passive movements, and reaching movements, respectively. Therefore, the present results demonstrate that when active hand movements are made with the purpose of gaining information about the surface properties of different materials an enhanced perceptual performance is observed. As such, it would appear that tactile suppression occurs for irrelevant tactual features during both reaching and exploratory movements, but not for those task-relevant features that result from action execution during tactile exploration. Taken together, then, these results support a context-dependent modulation of tactile suppression during movement execution.

  11. Context-dependent changes in tactile perception during movement execution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana eJuravle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tactile perception is inhibited during movement execution, a phenomenon known as tactile suppression. Here, we investigated whether the type of movement determines whether or not this form of sensory suppression occurs. Participants performed simple reaching or exploratory movements. Tactile discrimination thresholds were calculated for vibratory stimuli delivered to participants’ wrists while executing the movement, and while at rest (a tactile discrimination task, TD. We also measured discrimination performance in a same vs. different task for the explored materials during the execution of the different movements (a surface discrimination task, SD. The TD and SD tasks could either be performed singly or together, both under active movement and passive conditions. Consistent with previous results, tactile thresholds measured at rest were significantly lower than those measured during both active movement and passive touch (that is, tactile suppression was observed. Moreover, SD performance was significantly better under conditions of single-tasking, active movements, as well as exploratory movements, as compared to conditions of dual-tasking, passive movements, and reaching movements, respectively. Therefore, the present results demonstrate that when active hand movements are made with the purpose of gaining information about the surface properties of different materials enhanced perceptual performance is observed. As such, it would appear that tactile suppression occurs for irrelevant tactual features during both reaching and exploratory movements, but not for those task-relevant features that result from action execution during tactile exploration. Taken together, then, these results support a context-dependent modulation of tactile suppression during movement execution.

  12. From Classroom to Capitol: Building Advocacy Capacity Through State-Level Advocacy Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Lydia; Starry, Bethany; Gangi, Catherine; Lube, Lauren M; Cedergren, Anders; Whitney, Emily; Rees, Keely

    2016-11-01

    This commentary provides insight from Community Health Education and Master of Public Health students on the benefits of participating in a state-level Advocacy Experience and provides a theoretical framework for increased advocacy intention among students as a result of participating in a state-level Advocacy Experience. Providing students the opportunity to translate what they learn about advocacy in the classroom into advocacy in action with policy makers is vital to the career development of our future health education professionals and is key to increasing advocacy capacity within our profession. This article builds on previous work from emerging public health professionals highlighting the role of policy advocacy in professional development and provides additional perspectives from the next generation of health education specialists.

  13. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  14. The Perceptions to Climate Change among Rural Farming Households in the Niger Delta Area, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaziye, P. O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the perceptions to climate change among rural farming households in the Niger Delta Area, Nigeria. The basic objective was to determine the rural farming household’s perception to climate change in the Area and the specific objective was to determine the direction of change of the climate change indicators (whether increasing, decreasing or constant. Multistage sampling procedure was sampled 739 rural farming households (respondents for the study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistic. Socio – economic profile of the respondents indicated that 37.69% of rural farming households falls between the age bracket of 47 to 51 years and majority (60.0% having educational qualification below secondary school level. The study also reveals 76% had no extension contact during the farming season and 78.6% of respondents are not aware of the phenomenon of climate change. The study noticed an increasing change in the climate change indicators except longer raining season that is decreasing in the Area. The perception to the cause of climate indicators was mostly attributed to natural occurrence by God/gods (67.7%. Awareness campaign on climate change is recommended in the rural areas for climate change information.

  15. Can Perceptions of Environmental and Climate Change in Island Communities Assist in Adaptation Planning Locally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Shankar; Vaccaro, Ismael; Abernethy, Kirsten; Albert, Simon; de Pablo, Javier Fernández-López

    2015-12-01

    Local perceptions of environmental and climate change, as well as associated adaptations made by local populations, are fundamental for designing comprehensive and inclusive mitigation and adaptation plans both locally and nationally. In this paper, we analyze people's perceptions of environmental and climate-related transformations in communities across the Western Solomon Islands through ethnographic and geospatial methods. Specifically, we documented people's observed changes over the past decades across various environmental domains, and for each change, we asked respondents to identify the causes, timing, and people's adaptive responses. We also incorporated this information into a geographical information system database to produce broad-scale base maps of local perceptions of environmental change. Results suggest that people detected changes that tended to be acute (e.g., water clarity, logging intensity, and agricultural diseases). We inferred from these results that most local observations of and adaptations to change were related to parts of environment/ecosystem that are most directly or indirectly related to harvesting strategies. On the other hand, people were less aware of slower insidious/chronic changes identified by scientific studies. For the Solomon Islands and similar contexts in the insular tropics, a broader anticipatory adaptation planning strategy to climate change should include a mix of local scientific studies and local observations of ongoing ecological changes.

  16. Infants' perception of lightness changes related to cast shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    When humans perceive the lightness of an object’s surface in shadows there is an implicit assumption that cast shadows dim the surface. In two experiments, we investigated whether 5- to 8-month-old infants make this assumption about shadows. According to this shadow assumption, the apparent change in lightness produced by shadows on an object’s surface are attributed to blocked light sources. If infants can use the shadow assumption to perceive the object’s lightness in shadows, they will also be able to detect unnatural lightness changes in shadows. We compared the infants’ looking times to the unnatural and the natural lightness changes in the shadow when an object (duck) goes through the cast shadow. In Experiment 1, we examined whether infants could detect the unnatural lightness changes of the object’s surface in shadows. We created computer-graphic movies of unnatural and natural lightness changes to the duck’s surface. Our results showed that 7- to 8-month-olds but not 5- to 6-month-olds significantly preferred the movie with the unnatural changes in lightness, indicating that only the older infants could detect these changes. In Experiment 2, we confirmed that the infants’ preference was based on the detection of unnatural lightness changes according to the shadow assumption. The natural and the unnatural lightness changes of Experiment 1 were presented without cast shadows. Under these conditions, neither younger nor older infants showed a significant preference. Taken together, the experiments showed that 7- to 8-month-old infants could detect the unnaturalness of a surface’s lightness changes produced by shadows. In conclusion, our findings suggest that 7- to 8-month-old infants can perceive an object’s lightness in shadows by using an assumption that cast shadows dim the surface of an object. PMID:28296912

  17. Autism Advocacy: A Network Striving for Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Tiina; Ream, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we examine the rise of autism on the policy agenda and the new generation of autism advocacy. We focus especially on interconnections between the rhetoric about autism in the media and the emergence and political effectiveness of Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism advocacy group. We portray how…

  18. Health Advocacy--Counting the Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna; Marama, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Access to, and delivery of, safe and culturally appropriate health services is increasingly important in New Zealand. This paper will focus on counting the costs of health advocacy through the experience of a small non government charitable organisation, the Health Advocates Trust, (HAT) which aimed to provide advocacy services for a wide range of…

  19. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advocacy responsibilities. 1321.13 Section 1321.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES... AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  20. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  1. Advocacy for Development: Effectiveness, Monitoring and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, J.B.; Wessel, van M.G.J.; Hilhorst, D.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of advocacy for development is an emerging field. Many CSOs, donors and evaluators are now involved with advocacy. Questions of how to understand and assess programmes are urgent. This e-book seeks to contribute to practical capacity on this front on the basis of lessons le

  2. Perceptions of climate change and trust in information providers in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Laurie; Aird, Rosemary; van Megen, Kimberley; Miller, Evonne; Sommerfeld, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Disagreement within the global science community about the certainty and causes of climate change has led the general public to question what to believe and whom to trust on matters related to this issue. This paper reports on qualitative research undertaken with Australian residents from two rural areas to explore their perceptions of climate change and trust in information providers. While overall, residents tended to agree that climate change is a reality, perceptions varied in terms of its causes and how best to address it. Politicians, government, and the media were described as untrustworthy sources of information about climate change, with independent scientists being the most trusted. The vested interests of information providers appeared to be a key reason for their distrust. The findings highlight the importance of improved transparency and consultation with the public when communicating information about climate change and related policies.

  3. Farmers Perception and Adaptation to Climate Change: An Estimation of Willingness to Pay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. de-Graft Acquah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses farmers’ perception and adaptation to climate change to enhance policy towards tackling the challenges climate change poses to the farmers in Ghana. With regards to farmers’ perception and methods of adaptation, majority of the farmers perceived increase in temperature and decrease in rainfall pattern. Farmers’ level of adaptation was found to be relatively high with majority of the farmers using changing planting dates, different crop varieties, soil conservation and water harvesting as the major adaptation measures to climate change impacts. However, access to water, high cost of adaptation, lack of information, lack of knowledge on adaptation, insecure property rights, insufficient access to inputs and lack of credits were identified as the major barriers to adaptation. The probit regression estimation results indicated that the probability of willingness to pay for climate change mitigation policies increases with age, years of education and ownership of farm land

  4. Pengembangan Panduan Pelatihan Self Advocacy Siswa SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariadi Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Individu sebagai makhluk sosial mempunyai dorongan untuk berintraksi, dalam interaksi sosial individu memerlukan keterampilan sosial yang baik. Self advocacy sebagai salah satu bagian keterampilan sosial sangat perlu diajarkan kepada siswa. Siswa merupakan individu yang sedang mengalami perubahan pisik, psikis, fase transisi, kebimbangan jati diri dan identitas diri. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian pengembangan panduan pelatihan self advocacy siswa SMP, yang bertujuan meng-hasilkan panduan yang memenuhi akseptabilitas dan efektif meningkatkan self advocacy siswa SMP. Model pengembagan meggunakan model Borg & Gall (1983. Hasil uji ahli dan uji pengguna terhadap panduan telah memenuhi kriteria akseptabilitas, dari hasil pretest dan posttest siswa yang diukur dengan skala self advocacy menunjukkan peningkatan. Kata kunci : pengembangan, panduan pelatihan, self advocacy

  5. Behaviour and climate change : consumer perceptions of responsibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, V.K.; Ponting, C.A.; Peattoe, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the under-researched notion of consumer responsibility, a potentially significant influence on consumer behaviour that marketers and policymakers may be able to harness as they attempt to respond to environmental challenges such as climate change. The paper uses data derived from a commercially motivated survey (n = 1513) to explore domestic consumption behaviours most closely associated with the issue of disruptive climate change. A measure of 'General Environmental Respo...

  6. Evaluation of Teachers’ Perceptions Related to High School Principals’ Behaviors about Change Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali TAŞ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate teacher perceptions related to behaviors of high school principals’management of change and whether there is any difference between these perceptions according to somevariables. The research is a descriptive study based on survey model. The data for the research were obtainedby means of “Change Management Behavior Scale”. The data obtained from 152 high school teachers wereconsidered as convenient for the analysis. Data were analyzed by using frequency, mean, t-test and ANOVAtest. Results showed that according to the perceptions of the teachers, high school principals “sometimes’’realize the behaviors of ‘‘taking risks to carry out the change’’ while they ‘‘usually’’ consider ‘‘the parentsand teachers affecting the change process’���. The teacher perceptions related to the behaviors of high schoolprincipals’ change management didn’t show any significant differences according to teachers’ gender,seniority, branch and type of the school that teachers work at.

  7. The Effects of Climate Change Perceptions on Willingness to Fund the Prevention of Wetland Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Ross G.; Petrolia, Daniel R.; Kim, Tae-Goun

    2010-01-01

    Using contingent valuation, we estimate willingness to pay for prevention of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana, and indentify the factors that influence respondent choice, specifically climate change perceptions. Eighty two percent of respondents were willing to pay for some form of wetland loss prevention.

  8. Risk perception: The social construction of spatial knowledge around climate change-related scenarios in Lima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sara, L.; Jameson, S.; Pfeffer, K.; Baud, I.

    2016-01-01

    Lima's environmental sustainability is threatened by increasing water scarcity, heavy rain events and limited attention for water vulnerability and climate change scenarios. In this paper we examine how knowledge construction and risk perception on water-related disaster risks and vulnerabilities af

  9. Parental perception of child's weight status and subsequent BMIz change: The KOALA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, S.M.P.L.; Gubbels, J.S.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Kremers, S.P.J.; Stafleu, A.; Vries, N.K. de; Thijs, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents often fail to correctly perceive their children's weight status, but no studies have examined the association between parental weight status perception and longitudinal BMIz change (BMI standardized to a reference population) at various ages. We investigated whether parents are a

  10. The essential toxin: The changing perception of selenium in environmental sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades, the perception of selenium has undergone substantial changes. While its toxic effects were recognized causing hair and hoof loss in animals during the 1930s, its essential role in microbial, animal and human metabolism has been recognized later, i.e. with the discovery of se

  11. The Content of Imagined Sounds Changes Visual Motion Perception in the Cross-Bounce Illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christopher C.; Ehrsson, H. Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Can what we imagine hearing change what we see? Whether imagined sensory stimuli are integrated with external sensory stimuli to shape our perception of the world has only recently begun to come under scrutiny. Here, we made use of the cross-bounce illusion in which an auditory stimulus presented at the moment two passing objects meet promotes the perception that the objects bounce off rather than cross by one another to examine whether the content of imagined sound changes visual motion perception in a manner that is consistent with multisensory integration. The results from this study revealed that auditory imagery of a sound with acoustic properties typical of a collision (i.e., damped sound) promoted the bounce-percept, but auditory imagery of the same sound played backwards (i.e., ramped sound) did not. Moreover, the vividness of the participants’ auditory imagery predicted the strength of this imagery-induced illusion. In a separate experiment, we ruled out the possibility that changes in attention (i.e., sensitivity index d′) or response bias (response bias index c) were sufficient to explain this effect. Together, these findings suggest that this imagery-induced multisensory illusion reflects the successful integration of real and imagined cross-modal sensory stimuli, and more generally, that what we imagine hearing can change what we see. PMID:28071707

  12. The changing higher education environment in England: A study of student perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Lecca, Helga

    2015-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University London. The English Higher Education system continues to face many political and organisational changes with respect to funding, fees, student numbers and quality controls. Within this changing landscape, the introduction of up to £9,000 annual tuition fees for Home/EU undergraduates probably has the highest impact on students’ perceptions, their decision-making and, most of all, expectations ...

  13. Public Perception of Climate Change and the New Climate Dice

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    "Climate dice", describing the chance of unusually warm or cool seasons relative to climatology, have become progressively "loaded" in the past 30 years, coincident with rapid global warming. The distribution of seasonal mean temperature anomalies has shifted toward higher temperatures and the range of anomalies has increased. An important change is the emergence of a category of summertime extremely hot outliers, more than three standard deviations (3{\\sigma}) warmer than climatology. This hot extreme, which covered much less than 1% of Earth's surface in the period of climatology, now typically covers about 10% of the land area. It follows that we can state, with a high degree of confidence, that extreme anomalies such as those in Texas and Oklahoma in 2011 and Moscow in 2010 were a consequence of global warming, because their likelihood in the absence of global warming was exceedingly small. We discuss practical implications of this substantial, growing, climate change.

  14. Public Perception of Climate Change and the New Climate Dice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    "Climate dice", describing the chance of unusually warm or cool seasons, have become more and more "loaded" in the past 30 years, coincident with rapid global warming. The distribution of seasonal mean temperature anomalies has shifted toward higher temperatures and the range of anomalies has increased. An important change is the emergence of a category of summertime extremely hot outliers, more than three standard deviations (3 sigma) warmer than the climatology of the 1951-1980 base period. This hot extreme, which covered much less than 1% of Earth's surface during the base period, now typically covers about 10% of the land area. It follows that we can state, with a high degree of confidence, that extreme anomalies such as those in Texas and Oklahoma in 2011 and Moscow in 2010 were a consequence of global warming, because their likelihood in the absence of global warming was exceedingly small. We discuss practical implications of this substantial, growing, climate change.

  15. Perceptions on climate change and its impact on livelihoods in Hwange district, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Nhemachena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated perceptions of rural communities on climate change and its impacts on livelihoods. The research was conducted in the semi-arid Hwange district in Matebelel and North province of Zimbabwe. The perceptions were compared with empirical evidence from climatic studies on trends on temperature and rainfall, and impacts on livelihoods in the country and region. The findings from the current study are generally in agreement with those of other studies that indicate changes in the climate, especially in terms of rainfall. This largely applies to short-term periods; however, for long-term periods it is difficult to accurately relate rural community perceptions to changes in rainfall over time. Despite perceived changes and impacts of climate change on local livelihood activities, mainly agriculture, there are multiple stressors that the communities face which also affect their livelihoods. Further evidence-based research is required to disentangle climate change impacts on livelihoods, including livelihood impacts arising from interactions of climate and non-climatic factors.

  16. Local perceptions of changes in traditional ecological knowledge: a case study from Malekula island, Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Joe; Gavin, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is a critical global resource that may be eroding amid social and environmental change. Here, we present data on local perceptions of TEK change from three communities on Malekula Island in Vanuatu. Utilizing a structured interview (n = 120), we find a common perception of TEK loss. Participants defined two key periods of TEK erosion (roughly 1940-1960 and 1980-present), and noted that TEK decline was driven both external (e.g., church) and internal (e.g., shifting values) processes. Erosion was perceived to more comprehensive in the worldview domain than in aspects of ethnobiological knowledge and practice. These data indicate the perceived fragility of TEK systems and the complexity of TEK change. TEK systems are critical to natural resource management, and data such as these will assist in designing nuanced responses to the ongoing loss of cultural knowledge and practice.

  17. Household perceptions of coastal hazards and climate change in the Central Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combest-Friedman, Chelsea; Christie, Patrick; Miles, Edward

    2012-12-15

    As a tropical archipelagic nation, the Philippines is particularly susceptible to coastal hazards, which are likely to be exacerbated by climate change. To improve coastal hazard management and adaptation planning, it is imperative that climate information be provided at relevant scales and that decision-makers understand the causes and nature of risk in their constituencies. Focusing on a municipality in the Central Philippines, this study examines local meteorological information and explores household perceptions of climate change and coastal hazard risk. First, meteorological data and local perceptions of changing climate conditions are assessed. Perceived changes in climate include an increase in rainfall and rainfall variability, an increase in intensity and frequency of storm events and sea level rise. Second, factors affecting climate change perceptions and perceived risk from coastal hazards are determined through statistical analysis. Factors tested include social status, economic standing, resource dependency and spatial location. Results indicate that perceived risk to coastal hazards is most affected by households' spatial location and resource dependency, rather than socio-economic conditions. However, important differences exist based on the type of hazard and nature of risk being measured. Resource dependency variables are more significant in determining perceived risk from coastal erosion and sea level rise than flood events. Spatial location is most significant in determining households' perceived risk to their household assets, but not perceived risk to their livelihood.

  18. Developmental changes in analytic and holistic processes in face perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Elizabeth Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although infants demonstrate sensitivity to some kinds of perceptual information in faces, many face capacities continue to develop throughout childhood. One debate is the degree to which children perceive faces analytically versus holistically and how these processes undergo developmental change. In the present study, school-aged children and adults performed a perceptual matching task with upright and inverted face and house pairs that varied in similarity of featural or 2nd order configural information. Holistic processing was operationalized as the degree of serial processing when discriminating faces and houses (i.e., increased reaction time, RT, as more features or spacing relations were shared between stimuli. Analytical processing was operationalized as the degree of parallel processing (or no change in reaction time as a function of greater similarity of features or spatial relations. Adults showed the most evidence for holistic processing (most strongly for 2nd order faces and holistic processing was weaker for inverted faces and houses. Younger children (6-8 years, in contrast, showed analytical processing across all experimental manipulations. Older children (9-11 years showed an intermediate pattern with a trend toward holistic processing of 2nd order faces like adults, but parallel processing in other experimental conditions like younger children. These findings indicate that holistic face representations emerge around 10 years of age. In adults both 2nd order and featural information are incorporated into holistic representations, whereas older children only incorporate 2nd order information. Holistic processing was not evident in younger children. Hence, the development of holistic face representations relies on 2nd order processing initially then incorporates featural information by adulthood.

  19. A Neuronal Network Model for Context-Dependence of Pitch Change Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many natural stimuli have perceptual ambiguities that can be cognitively resolved by the surrounding context. In audition, preceding context can bias the perception of speech and non-speech stimuli. Here, we develop a neuronal network model that can account for how context affects the perception of pitch change between a pair of successive complex tones. We focus especially on an ambiguous comparison -- listeners experience opposite percepts (either ascending or descending for an ambiguous tone pair depending on the spectral location of preceding context tones.We developed a recurrent, firing-rate network model, which detects frequency-change-direction of successively played stimuli and successfully accounts for the context-dependent perception demonstrated in behavioral experiments. The model consists of two tonotopically organized, excitatory populations, Eup and Edown, that respond preferentially to ascending or descending stimuli in pitch, respectively. These preferences are generated by an inhibitory population that provides inhibition asymmetric in frequency to the two populations; context dependence arises from slow facilitation of inhibition. We show that contextual influence depends on the spectral distribution of preceding tones and the tuning width of inhibitory neurons. Further, we demonstrate, using phase-space analysis, how the facilitated inhibition from previous stimuli and the waning inhibition from the just-preceding tone shape the competition between the Eup and Edown populations. In sum, our model accounts for contextual influences on the pitch change perception of an ambiguous tone pair by introducing a novel decoding strategy based on direction-selective units. The model’s network architecture and slow facilitating inhibition emerge as predictions of neuronal mechanisms for these perceptual dynamics. Since the model structure does not depend on the specific stimuli, we show that it generalizes to other contextual effects

  20. Community Health Worker Professional Advocacy: Voices of Action from the 2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Samantha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Phillips, David; Haywoord, Catherine; Redondo, Floribella; Bell, Melanie L; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores community health worker (CHW) engagement in professional advocacy. Data from the National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (n = 1661) assessed the relationship between CHW professional advocacy and CHW demographics, and work characteristics. Qualitative data articulated the quality of professional advocacy efforts. Approximately, 30% of CHW respondents advocated for professional advancement or collaborated with other CHWs to advance the workforce. Advocacy was more prevalent among CHWs affiliated with a professional network. CHW advocacy targeted recognition of the field, appropriate training and compensation, and sustainable funding. CHW professional advocacy is imperative to advancement of the field.

  1. Natural versus anthropogenic climate change: Swedish farmers' joint construction of climate perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Therese

    2016-07-01

    While previous research into understandings of climate change has usually examined general public perceptions, this study offers an audience-specific departure point. This article analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that (1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experiences, (2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic and (3) various communication tools contribute to the formation of natural and anthropogenic climate change frames. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understanding of climate change and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  2. Perceptions of climate change in China:The research and policy connection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiHua Zhou; J Scott Hauger; Ning Liu; HuiLing Lu

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change has evolved from a scientific problem into an economic and political problem of worldwide inter-est. National perspectives play a crucial role in addressing climate change. Mutual understanding of perspectives is nec-essary to result in rational policies and a consensus among stakeholders with divergent interests. Conceptual frameworks for understanding the problem of climate change in China, the largest developing country and the largest greenhouse gas emitter, are of great significance to national and international efforts to address the problems of climate change. Chinese perceptions of climate change as a sustainable development problem have recently been in tension with an emerging Western perspective that frames climate change as a security issue. This paper explores Chinese perceptions of climate change as expressed in recent governmental policy statements, public opinion surveys, and academic scholarship with a focus on publications in Chinese-language journals, often unfamiliar in the West. It looks at the relationship between Chinese research and policy and finds that the Chinese policy frame of climate change as a sustainable development problem draws from the body of domestic research and is reflective of the perspectives and multidisciplinary approach of Chinese researchers in areas of climate change.

  3. Family scents: developmental changes in the perception of kin body odor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdenzi, Camille; Schaal, Benoist; Roberts, S Craig

    2010-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that human body odors are involved in adaptive behaviors, such as parental attachment in infants or partner choice in adults. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in body-odor perception around puberty, a period largely ignored for odor-mediated behavioral changes, despite major changes in social needs and in odor emission and perception. Nine families with two children (8 pre-pubertal, aged 7-10, and 10 pubertal, aged 11-18) evaluated body odors of family members and unfamiliar individuals for pleasantness, intensity, and masculinity, and performed a recognition task. The hypothesized emergence of a parent-child mutual aversion for the odor of opposite-sex family members at puberty was not found, contradicting one of the few studies on the topic (Weisfeld et al., J. Exp. Child Psychol. 85:279-295, 2003). However, some developmental changes were observed, including reduced aversion for odor of the same-sex parent, and increased ability of adults, compared to children, to recognize odor of family members. Sex and personality (depressive and aggressive traits) also significantly influenced odor judgments. Further research with larger samples is needed to investigate the poorly explored issue of how olfactory perception of self and family members develops, and how it could correlate with normal reorganizations in social interactions at adolescence.

  4. Victimization, perception of insecurity, and changes in daily routines in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, María Elena; Martínez-Ferrer, Belén; Vera, Alejandro; Bahena, Alejandro; Musitu, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the relationships between victimization, perception of insecurity, and changes in routines. METHODS The 8,170 subjects of both sexes (49.9% women and 50.1% men) aged between 12 and 60 years, selected from a proportional stratified sampling, participated in this study. The measuring instrument was an adaptation of the National Survey on Victimization and Perception of Public Security. Chi-square tests were performed. RESULTS The results show significant differences on victimization and sex regarding perception of insecurity, restrictions on everyday activities, and protection measures. 13.1% of those interviewed claimed to have been victims of a crime in the past 12 months. 52.7% of women considered their municipality as unsafe or very unsafe. In the case of men, this percentage was 58.2%. Female victims reported significant restrictions in everyday activities when compared to non-victims. In relation to men, the percentage of victims with a high restriction of activities was higher in male victims than non-victims. In the group of victimized women, the segment of women who opted for increased measures of protection against crime was larger than expected, while those of non-victims who took less protective measures was lower than expected. These same results were observed in the group of men. CONCLUSIONS The experience of victimization implies a greater perception of insecurity. However, the climate of insecurity is widespread in a large number of citizens. Gender differences in a high-crime environment show the importance of investigating in depth the roles of both genders in the perception of insecurity and changes in routines. PMID:27706373

  5. Measuring perceptions of climate change in northern Alaska: pairing ethnography with cultural consensus analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Carothers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Given current and projected warming trends in the Arctic and the important role played by subsistence hunting and fishing in the life of northern rural communities, it is increasingly important to document local observations of climate change and its impacts on livelihood practices. We describe ethnographic research exploring local observations of climate changes and related impacts on subsistence fisheries in three Iñupiat communities in northwest Alaska and six Athabascan communities in the Yukon River drainage. We found consistent agreement among perceptions concerning a broad range of environmental changes affecting subsistence practices in these communities. These observations of environmental changes are not experienced in isolation but within the context of accompanying social changes that are continually reshaping rural Alaskan communities and subsistence economies. In this paper we reflect on our research approach combining multiple methods of inquiry. Participant observation and semidirected interviews provided the conceptual framework for broadening our focus from climate and environmental change to community residents' understanding of climate change in the context of their holistic human-environment worldview. Cultural consensus analysis allowed us to assess the extent to which perceptions of change are shared among hunters and fishers within and between villages and regions and to identify those phenomena occurring or experienced at smaller scales. Reflecting on this multimethods approach, we highlight important questions that have emerged about how we understand, synthesize, and represent local knowledge, especially as it is used in regulatory or management arenas.

  6. AN EVALUATION OF FARMERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF AND ADAPTATION TO THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary K. Ndambiri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate how farmers in Kyuso District have perceived and adapted to climate change. Data was collected from 246 farmers from six locations sampled out through a multistage and simple random sampling procedure. The Heckman probit model was fitted to the data to avoid sample selection bias since not every farmer who may perceive climate change responds by adapting. The analysis revealed that 94% of farmers in Kyuso District had a perception that climate was changing and as a result, 85% of these farmers had responded by adapting. In this regard, age of the household head, gender, education, farm experience, household size, distance to the nearest market, access to irrigation water, local agro-ecology, on and off farm income, access to information on climate change through extension services, access to credit, changes in temperature and precipitation were found to have significant influence on the probability of farmers to perceive and/or adapt to climate change. With the level of perception to climate change being more than that of adaptation, the study suggests that more policy efforts should be geared towards helping farmers to adapt to climate change

  7. Longitudinal changes in GPs' task perceptions, self-efficacy, barriers and practices of nutrition education and treatment of overweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, F.; Hiddink, G.; Koelen, M.; Binsbergen, J.J. van; Tobi, H.; Woerkum, C van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GPs play a role in prevention by giving nutrition education and advice on overweight. Over the years, GP's tasks and working environment changed. OBJECTIVE: To know how task perceptions, perceptions of own ability and perceived barriers regarding nutrition education and treatment of over

  8. Managing organizational change: Decision’s maker perceptions in the UAE manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okour, Adnan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the common practices of change projects in the manufacturing industry in UAE and the key factors for effective implementation and highlighting the roadblocks of organizational change. The primary data were collected through pre-interview questionnaires and analyzed using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA. The findings revealed that technology change is the change most practiced by the UAE manufacturing industry, then strategy development, TQM driven change, and software development with less emphases on cultural change. The usable data were restively small (n=150. Further research could be done with a larger sample to test the findings. The paper offers rare insight into change management practices in the manufacturing industry in UAE in addition to the initiators’ perception of key factors of effectiveness or the roadblocks of organizational.

  9. FACOTRS TO DETERMINE RISK PERCEPTION OF CLIMATE CHANGE, AND ATTITUDE TOWARD ADAPTATION POLICY OF THE PUBLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Kenshi; Sugimoto, Takuya; Kubota, Hiromi; Hijioka, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Mitsuru

    This study clarifies the factors to determine risk perception of climate change and attitudes toward adaptation policy by analyzing the data collecting from Internet survey to the general public. The results indicate the followings: 1) more than 70% people perceive some sort of risk of climate change, and most people are awaken to wind and flood damage. 2) most people recognize that mitigation policy is much more important than adaptation policy, whereas most people assume to accept adaptation policy as self-reponsibility, 3) the significant factors to determinane risk perception of climate chage and attitude towerd adaptation policy are cognition of benefits on the policy and procedural justice in the policy process in addion to demographics such as gender, experience of disaster, intension of inhabitant.

  10. Invitational rhetoric: Alternative rhetorical strategy for transformation of perception and use of energy in the residential built environment from the Keweenaw to Kerala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindred, Merle Niemi

    This dissertation explores the viability of invitational rhetoric as a mode of advocacy for sustainable energy use in the residential built environment. The theoretical foundations for this study join ecofeminist concepts and commitments with the conditions and resources of invitational rhetoric, developing in particular the rhetorical potency of the concepts of re-sourcement and enfoldment. The methodological approach is autoethnography using narrative reflection and journaling, both adapted to and developed within the autoethnographic project. Through narrative reflection, the author explores her lived experiences in advocating for energy-responsible residential construction in the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan. The analysis reveals the opportunities for cooperative, collaborative advocacy and the struggle against traditional conventions of persuasive advocacy, particularly the centrality of the rhetor. The author also conducted two field trips to India, primarily the state of Kerala. Drawing on autoethnographic journaling, the analysis highlights the importance of sensory relations in lived advocacy and the resonance of everyday Indian culture to invitational principles. Based on field research, the dissertation proposes autoethnography as a critical development in encouraging invitational rhetoric as an alternative mode of effecting change. The invitational force of autoethnography is evidenced in portraying the material advocacy of the built environment itself, specifically the sensual experience of material arrangements and ambience, as well as revealing the corporeality of advocacy, that is, the body as the site of invitational engagement, emotional encounter, and sensory experience. This study concludes that vulnerability of self in autoethnographic work and the vulnerability of rhetoric as invitational constitute the basis for transformation. The dissertation confirms the potential of an ecofeminist invitational advocacy conveyed autoethnographically for

  11. Climate Change, Wildfires and Fir Forests in Greece: Perceptions of Forest Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Mitsopoulos; Yannis Raftoyannis; Dimitrios Bakaloudis

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The potential impact that climate change may have on fire regime in ecosystems that are not fire-dependent emerges from fires that are nowadays spreading over higher altitudes and northern latitudes. The effects of fire occurrence in high elevation forests of Greece became apparent during the last few years when a number of large forest fires burned a significant number of high altitude fir ecosystems. This paper describes a study that investigated perceptions of wildf...

  12. Planning safer suburbs: do changes in the built environment influence residents' perceptions of crime risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Sarah; Wood, Lisa; Christian, Hayley; Knuiman, Matthew; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of evidence has reiterated the negative impacts that crime and perceptions of insecurity can have on the health and wellbeing of local residents. Strategies that reduce residents' perceived crime risk may contribute to improved health outcomes; however interventions require a better understanding of the neighbourhood influences on residents perceptions of crime and safety. We examined the impact of changes in the objective built environment following relocation on changes in residents' perceived crime risk for participants in a longitudinal study of people moving to new neighbourhoods in Perth, Western Australia (n = 1159). They completed a questionnaire before moving to their new neighbourhood, and again 36 months after relocation. Individual-level objective environmental measures were generated at both time points using Geographic Information Systems, focussing on the characteristics that comprise a 'walkable neighbourhood'. Linear regression models examined the influence of objective environmental changes between the two environments on perceived crime risk, with progressive adjustment for other change variables (i.e., perceptions of the physical and social environment, reported crime). We found that increases in the proportion of land allocated to shopping/retail land-uses increased residents' perceived crime risk (β = 11.875, p = 0.001), and this relationship remained constant, despite controlling for other influences on perceived crime risk (β = 9.140, p = 0.004). The findings highlight an important paradox: that the neighbourhood characteristics known to enhance one outcome, such as walking, may negatively impact another. In this instance, the 'strangers' that retail destinations attract to a neighbourhood may be interpreted by locals as a threat to safety. Thus, in areas with more retail destinations, it is vital that other environmental strategies be employed to balance any negative effects that retail may have on residents' perceptions of

  13. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettey, Christina M.; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Cleves, Mario A.; Price, Elvin T.; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), and African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years). Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group. PMID:27148469

  14. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Pettey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN, and African Americans (AAs are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years. Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group.

  15. 议联盟框架视角下我国计划生育政策变迁分析%An Analysis of the Changes in China’s Family Planning Policy From the Perspective of the Advocacy Coalition Framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔开华; 徐菡; 蒋文丽

    2015-01-01

    The Advocacy Coalition Framework,a replacement for policy stage theory,has long been used in analyzing policy changes in western countries. Based on the Advocacy Coalition Framework,this paper analyzes the three phases of the change of China’s family planning policy: the exploration phase when PRC was first founded,1970s when the policy was under formulation and 1980s when the policy was completed and launched. With the analysis we test the practicability of Advocacy Coalition Framework in interpreting China’s public policy change. Although there exist some problems in its interpretation of the change process of China’s family planning policy due to political and social differences,Advocacy Coalition Framework still provides us with a new way to understand policy change.%倡议联盟框架作为对政策阶段论的替代,在西方国家用来分析政策变迁已经有较长的历史。本文紧扣我国计划生育政策变迁这一社会热点问题,在介绍倡议联盟框架基本结构的基础上,分析了我国计划生育政策变迁的三个阶段——新中国成立之初的探索阶段、20世纪70年代的基本形成阶段以及20世纪80年代政策出台和完善阶段的基本情况,并用倡议联盟框架的基本理论探讨和研究我国计划生育政策的变迁过程,检验倡议联盟框架对我国公共政策变迁的解释性和实用性。当然,由于政治和社会环境的差异,倡议联盟框架对我国计划生育政策变迁过程的解释存在一些不足,但是仍然为人们提供了一个理解政策变迁过程的新途径。

  16. Does Perception of Corporate Culture Change in Time? An Empirical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahit Erdem KÖKER

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental values and belief systems in a corporation show themselves as; norms, behaviours, symbols and compose the corporate culture. When corporate culture is undertaken in terms of business management, it is seen that corporations in different fields have studies directed to culture. In studies of education science and studies that cover educational orporations, corporate culture is named as school culture. Due to the reason that schools are educational corporations, they are a subject to studies of corporate culture. Studies directed to school culture cover the subjects such as; components of school culture, its’ dimensions, structural characteristics, importance of leadership, ect. This study is directed to displaying the changes in the perceptions about school culture of Ege University Faculty of Communication students along their studentship, which is a cultural component and a sub-culture of school culture. With this purpose, data have been collected from students for four years with the same question form. These students were in 1st grade during 2009-2010 academical year. While students are in their 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years, it was foreseen that there were going to be meaningful changes in their perceptions about the dimensions of corporate culture. And the direction of change in their perceptions of faculty culture has been detected in their last year.

  17. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori McDougall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. Methods This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink and of productive power (Shiffman. The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semistructured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG era, the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR advocacy coalitions. Results The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. Conclusion As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions

  18. Perceptions of climate change risk to forest ecosystems and forest-based communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, T.B.; Parkins, J.R.; McFarlane, B.L. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    A study examining the perceptions of researchers and government experts about the risks posed by climate change to forest ecosystems and forest-based communities was presented. The aim of the study was to provide an indication of institutional behaviours, attitudes and perspectives concerning climate change. Data were collected by questionnaires from participants at a climate change and forestry workshop. Perceived risk to forest ecosystems was assessed by means of a subset of scales previously identified as relevant to climate change. Ten scales were selected to assess perceptions of certainty, controllability, predictability, adaptability, and knowledge of climatic change impacts. Each scale was assessed on the basis of a 7 point rating. Another set of 12 scales was used to assess perceived risk to forest-based communities. Eight statements were used to assess general beliefs about climate change. Social influences were assessed according to age, sex, level of education, place of residence and type of employer. Results indicated that forestry experts were concerned about the impacts of climate change and were not opposed to preparation and adaptation strategies. Respondents indicated that the effects of climate change on forests and forest-based communities are not well understood by the general pubic or forest managers. It was suggested that there was a relatively high level of uncertainty about the effects of climate change, particularly with respect to forest-based communities. The results suggested that a greater awareness of climate change risks is needed, as well as more research and monitoring efforts targeted at reducing levels of uncertainty about future impacts at local scales. If communities can begin to diversify their economies and rely on several key economic drivers, they will be better positioned to absorb future climate change impacts. It was concluded that the presence of human agency can have important implications for the future control of

  19. Change in students' perception of profession during nursing education in Turkey: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız Denat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Progress in the nursing is only possible with nursing students who graduate with sufficient information and comprehension about their professions. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate nursing students’ professional perceptions during 4-year undergraduate nursing program and to determine whether changes occur in this time frame Desing and Methods: This study was designed as a longitudinal cohort survey research. Data were collected over a four -year period. The study sample was constituted of 137 undergraduate nursing students attending two Schools of Health located in the western Turkey. In this study, data were collected using the Information Form which was prepared by the investigators and the Perception of Nursing Profession Scale (PNPS. Results: Students’ PNPS mean scores were identified as 85.24±11.66 for Time 1, 86.86±12.37 for Time 2, 86.43±13.39 for Time 3, 86.32±15.12 for Time 4 and 90.76±13.16 for Time 5. No statistically significant differences were found in perception of nursing profession mean scores during nursing education (p>0.05. Statistically meaningful differences were detected among students’ “Professional Qualities” sub scale mean scores (p0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that freshmen students perceived the nursing profession rather positively and that influence continued throughout their education. It was identified that initial positive perceptions of students progressively increased at the end of 2nd and 4th years. It was determined that students positively perceived the professional status of nursing and that the significant perceptions continued throughout their education.

  20. Climate change and apple farming in Indian Himalayas: a study of local perceptions and responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj Basannagari

    Full Text Available Apple farming is an important activity and profession of farmer communities in the Himalayan states of India. At present, the traditional apple farming is under stress due to changes in climate. The present study was undertaken in an Indian Himalayan state, Himachal Pradesh, with the major aim of studying perceptions of farmers on the effects of climate change on apple farming along the altitudinal gradient. Through questionnaire survey, the perceptions of farmers were recorded at low hills (3000 m. At all elevation range the majority of farmers reported that there was increase in atmospheric temperature, and hence at low hills 72% farmers believed that this increase in temperature was responsible for decline in fruit size and so that the quality. Thirty five percent farmers at high hills and 30% at mid hills perceived frost as a major cause for damaging apple farming whereas at low hills 24% farmers perceived hailstorm as the major deterrent for apple farming. The majority of farmers, along the altitude (92% at high hills, 79% at mid hills and 83% at low hills, reported decrease in snowfall. The majority of farmers at low altitude and mid altitude reported decline in apple farming whereas 71% farmers at high hill areas refused decline in apple farming. About 73-83% farmers admitted delay in apple's harvesting period. At mid hills apple scab and at low hills pest attack on apple crops are considered as the indicators of climate change. The change in land use practices was attributed to climate change and in many areas the land under apple farming was replaced for production of coarse grains, seasonal vegetables and other horticulture species. Scientific investigation claiming changes in Indian Himalayan climate corroborates perceptions of farmers, as examined during the present study.

  1. Climate change and apple farming in Indian Himalayas: a study of local perceptions and responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basannagari, Basavaraj; Kala, Chandra Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Apple farming is an important activity and profession of farmer communities in the Himalayan states of India. At present, the traditional apple farming is under stress due to changes in climate. The present study was undertaken in an Indian Himalayan state, Himachal Pradesh, with the major aim of studying perceptions of farmers on the effects of climate change on apple farming along the altitudinal gradient. Through questionnaire survey, the perceptions of farmers were recorded at low hills (3000 m). At all elevation range the majority of farmers reported that there was increase in atmospheric temperature, and hence at low hills 72% farmers believed that this increase in temperature was responsible for decline in fruit size and so that the quality. Thirty five percent farmers at high hills and 30% at mid hills perceived frost as a major cause for damaging apple farming whereas at low hills 24% farmers perceived hailstorm as the major deterrent for apple farming. The majority of farmers, along the altitude (92% at high hills, 79% at mid hills and 83% at low hills), reported decrease in snowfall. The majority of farmers at low altitude and mid altitude reported decline in apple farming whereas 71% farmers at high hill areas refused decline in apple farming. About 73-83% farmers admitted delay in apple's harvesting period. At mid hills apple scab and at low hills pest attack on apple crops are considered as the indicators of climate change. The change in land use practices was attributed to climate change and in many areas the land under apple farming was replaced for production of coarse grains, seasonal vegetables and other horticulture species. Scientific investigation claiming changes in Indian Himalayan climate corroborates perceptions of farmers, as examined during the present study.

  2. Perception of climate change and its impact by smallholders in pastoral/agropastoral systems of Borana, South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debela, Nega; Mohammed, Caroline; Bridle, Kerry; Corkrey, Ross; McNeil, David

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the perception of historic changes in climate and associated impact on local agriculture among smallholders in pastoral/agropastoral systems of Borana in southern Ethiopia. We drew on empirical data obtained from farm household surveys conducted in 5 districts, 20 pastoral/agropastoral associations and 480 farm households. Using this data, this study analyses smallholders' perception of climate change and its associated impact on local agriculture, and the effect of various household and farm attributes on perception. Results suggest that most participants perceived climatic change and its negative impact on agricultural and considered climate change as a salient risk to their future livelihoods and economic development. Different levels of perception were expressed in terms of climate change and the impact on traditional rain-fed agriculture. Age, education level, livestock holding, access to climate information and extension services significantly affected perception levels. Household size, production system, farm and non-farm incomes did not significantly affect perception levels of smallholders. Smallholders attributed climate change to a range of biophysical, deistic and anthropogenic causes. Increased access to agricultural support services, which improves the availability and the quality of relevant climate information will further enhance awareness of climate change within of the rural community and result in better management of climate-induced risks in these vulnerable agricultural systems.

  3. Farmers´ perceptions of climate change and agricultural adaptation strategies in rural Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Ole; Mbow, Cheikh; Reenberg, Anette;

    2009-01-01

    of changes is not so simple. Using focus group interviews and a household survey, this study analyzes the perceptions of climate change and the strategies for coping and adaptation by sedentary farmers in the savanna zone of central Senegal. Households are aware of climate variability and identify wind...... and occasional excess rainfall as the most destructive climate factors. Households attribute poor livestock health, reduced crop yields and a range of other problems to climate factors, especially wind. However, when questions on land use and livelihood change are not asked directly in a climate context......, households and groups assign economic, political, and social rather than climate factors as the main reasons for change. It is concluded that the communities studied have a high awareness of climate issues, but climatic narratives are likely to influence responses when questions mention climate. Change...

  4. Climate change in semi-arid Malawi: Perceptions, adaptation strategies and water governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam K. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and variability are a threat to sustainable agricultural production in semi-arid areas of Malawi. Overdependence on subsistence rain-fed agriculture in these areas calls for the identification of sustainable adaptation strategies. A study was therefore conducted in Chikwawa, a semi-arid district in southern Malawi, to: (1 assess community’s perception of a changing climate against empirical evidence, (2 determine their local adaptive measures, (3 evaluate the potential of irrigated agriculture as an adaptive measure in household food security and (4 challenges over access to available water resources. The study employed focus group discussions and key informant interviews to assess people’s perceptions of climate change and variability and their desired interventions. To validate the people’s perceptions, rainfall and temperature data for the period 1960–2010 were analysed. A participatory complete randomised experimental design in both rain-fed and dry season–irrigated conditions was conducted to assess a maize cropping system that would improve adaptation. The study established persistent declining yields from rain-fed production in part because of perennial rainfall failure. In response, the community has shifted its focus to irrigation as an adaptation strategy, which has in turn triggered water conflicts in the community over the control of the resource. Water legislation however fails to adequately provide for rules governing sharing of water resources between various stakeholders. This article therefore recommends development of an appropriate institutional framework that forms a strong basis for equitable distribution of water for irrigation in areas most vulnerable to extreme climate events – including droughts and floods.Keywords: Food Security; Climate Change and Variability; Rainfall Variability; Irrigation; Water Resources; Governance Crisis

  5. Clinical nurse educators' perceptions of research utilization: barriers and facilitators to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Rosemary J; O'Leary-Kelley, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    Translation of research to practice remains a challenge. The educator, as a role model and change agent, is strategically placed to facilitate staff development and organizational change, thereby helping to close the gap from research to practice. Understanding barriers to research utilization may facilitate the application of evidence-based practice. [corrected] In this study, the BARRIERS scale was used to assess perceptions of research utilization in a convenience sample of 122 clinical nurse educators in California. Greatest barriers were organizational and nurse characteristics, including lack of authority to change, insufficient time, and limited research knowledge and awareness. Educators from Magnet hospitals and educators with advanced degrees perceived the organization as less of a barrier. Strategies to facilitate and implement change are discussed.

  6. Changes in Cosmetics Use during Pregnancy and Risk Perception by Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Cécile; Cabut, Sophie; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic products contain various chemical substances that may be potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptors. Women’s changes in cosmetics use during pregnancy and their risk perception of these products have not been extensively investigated. The main objective of this study was to describe the proportion of pregnant women changing cosmetics use and the proportion of non-pregnant women intending to do so if they became pregnant. The secondary objectives were to compare, among the pregnant women, the proportions of those using cosmetics before and during pregnancy, and to describe among pregnant and non-pregnant women, the risk perception of these products. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a gynaecology clinic and four community pharmacies. One hundred and twenty-eight women (60 non-pregnant and 68 pregnant women) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Cosmetics use was identified for 28 products. The results showed that few women intended to change or had changed cosmetics use during pregnancy. Nail polish was used by fewer pregnant women compared to the period before pregnancy (p < 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the women considered cosmetics use as a risk during pregnancy and 65% would have appreciated advice about these products. Our findings indicate that all perinatal health professionals should be ready to advise women about the benefits and risks of using cosmetics during pregnancy. PMID:27043593

  7. Changes in Cosmetics Use during Pregnancy and Risk Perception by Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Cécile; Cabut, Sophie; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-30

    Cosmetic products contain various chemical substances that may be potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptors. Women's changes in cosmetics use during pregnancy and their risk perception of these products have not been extensively investigated. The main objective of this study was to describe the proportion of pregnant women changing cosmetics use and the proportion of non-pregnant women intending to do so if they became pregnant. The secondary objectives were to compare, among the pregnant women, the proportions of those using cosmetics before and during pregnancy, and to describe among pregnant and non-pregnant women, the risk perception of these products. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a gynaecology clinic and four community pharmacies. One hundred and twenty-eight women (60 non-pregnant and 68 pregnant women) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Cosmetics use was identified for 28 products. The results showed that few women intended to change or had changed cosmetics use during pregnancy. Nail polish was used by fewer pregnant women compared to the period before pregnancy (p cosmetics use as a risk during pregnancy and 65% would have appreciated advice about these products. Our findings indicate that all perinatal health professionals should be ready to advise women about the benefits and risks of using cosmetics during pregnancy.

  8. Changes in quality of life and impact on patients′ perception of esthetics after orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavelu Kavin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study is to determine the changes in quality of life and patient′s perception of esthetic improvement after anterior maxillary osteotomy. Materials and Methods: Our prospective study consisted of 14 patients who had been diagnosed of skeletal orthodontic deformity and underwent anterior maxillary osteotomy, along with orthodontic correction. The quality of life was evaluated using questionnaires based on Oral Health Impact Profile-14 questionnaire (OHIP-14 and a 22-item orthognathic quality of life questionnaire. They were evaluated at baseline pre-surgical, 8 weeks postoperatively, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Results: Our results showed mild improvement in generic health related quality of life immediately following surgery, while condition-specific quality of life and patient′s perception of esthetic improvement were noted only at 24 weeks following anterior maxillary osteotomy. Conclusion: We conclude that anterior maxillary osteotomy had a positive impact on the quality of life. The improvement in patient′s perception of esthetics is seen only 2 months after surgery, while improvements in oral health and function were seen within 2 months following surgery. The acceptance and satisfaction of patient toward surgery was more positive 2 months after surgery.

  9. Teachers' perceptions of effective science, technology, and mathematics professional development and changes in classroom practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriack, Anna Christine

    The purpose of this study is to examine teachers' perceptions of professional development and changes in classroom practice. A proposed conceptual framework for effective professional development that results in changes in classroom practices was developed. Data from two programs that provided professional development to teachers in the areas of technology, mathematics, and science was used to inform the conceptual framework. These two programs were Target Technology in Texas (T3) and Mathematics, Science, and Technology Teacher Preparation Academies (MSTTPA). This dissertation used a multiple article format to explore each program separately, yet the proposed conceptual framework allowed for comparisons to be made between the two programs. The first study investigated teachers' perceptions of technology-related professional development after their districts had received a T3 grant. An online survey was administrated to all teachers to determine their perceptions of technology-related professional development along with technology self-efficacy. Classroom observations were conducted to determine if teachers were implementing technology. The results indicated that teachers did not perceive professional development as being effective and were not implementing technology in their classrooms. Teachers did have high technology self-efficacy and perceived adequate school support, which implies that effective professional development may be a large factor in whether or not teachers implement technology in their classrooms. The second study evaluated participants' perceptions of the effectiveness of mathematics and science professional development offered through a MSTTP academy. Current and former participants completed an online survey which measured their perceptions of academy activities and school environment. Participants also self-reported classroom implementation of technology. Interviews and open-ended survey questions were used to provide further insight into

  10. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  11. Making sense of landscape change: Long-term perceptions among local residents following river restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westling, Emma L.; Surridge, Ben W. J.; Sharp, Liz; Lerner, David N.

    2014-11-01

    Efforts to restore rivers are increasingly concerned with the social implications of landscape change. However, the fundamental issue of how people make sense of local riverine environments in the context of restoration remains poorly understood. Our research examined influences on perception among local residents 14 years after a restoration scheme on the River Dearne in the north of England. Human-landscape relationships emerging from semi-structured interviews with 16 local residents were analysed using an interpretive research framework. Nine recurring factors influenced perception among local residents: scenic beauty; the condition of riparian vegetation and of river channel morphology; opportunities to observe flora and fauna; cleanliness of the riverine environment; access available to the river; connections between the river and the surrounding landscape; disturbance and change in the familiarity of the landscape following restoration. These factors were not solely related to tangible outcomes of the restoration scheme, but were also influenced by history, memories, traditions and practices associated with the river. Critically, these factors also interacted rather than operating in isolation and two idealised perceptual frameworks were developed to map these interactions. Our research contributes to theoretical understanding of the relationships between humans and landscape change, whilst also considering how restoration practice may better reflect these relationships. The importance of a social dimension to the template of possibilities for restoring any given river emerges, underpinning place-based design and implementation of river restoration schemes.

  12. Affine operations plus symmetry yield perception of metric shape with large perspective changes (≥45°): data and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Mats; Lee, Young Lim; Mazanowski, Janusz; Kountouriotis, Georgios K; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2014-02-01

    G. P. Bingham and M. Lind (2008, Large continuous perspective transformations are necessary and sufficient for accurate perception of metric shape, Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 70, pp. 524-540) showed that observers could perceive metric shape, given perspective changes ≥ 45° relative to a principal axis of elliptical cylinders. In this article, we tested (a) arbitrary perspective changes of 45°, (b) whether perception gradually improves with more perspective change, (c) speed of rotation, (d) whether this works with other shapes (asymmetric polyhedrons), (e) different slants, and (f) perspective changes >45°. Experiment 1 compared 45° perspective change away from, versus centered on, a principal axis. Observers adjusted an ellipse to match the cross-section of an elliptical cylinder viewed in a stereo-motion display. Experiment 2 tested whether performance would improve gradually with increases in perspective change, or suddenly with a 45° change. We also tested speed of rotation. Experiment 3 tested (a) asymmetric polyhedrons, (b) perspective change beyond 45°, and (c) the effect of slant. The results showed (a) a particular perspective was not required, (b) judgments only improved with ≥ 45° change, (c) speed was not relevant, (d) it worked with asymmetric polyhedrons, (e) slant was not relevant, and (f) judgments remained accurate beyond 45° of change. A model shows how affine operations, together with a symmetry yielded by 45° perspective change, bootstrap perception of metric shape.

  13. Danish geography teachers' perceptions of their own teaching professionalism according to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel

    2015-01-01

    and natural science are more familiar to teach the sub-subject of weather formation in connection to climatic change, than Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Human Geography and social science. The teachers orientated against Human Geography put emphasis on the more problem......This paper reports from research examining eight Geography teachers’ own perceptions of their teaching professionalism, understood as Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), in relation to the topic of climate change. Apparently, Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Physical Geography......-oriented/discursive aspects of teaching climate change, some of them neglecting parts of the curriculum focused on weather formation. Most of the interviewed Geography teachers emphasize the collegial cooperation with science colleagues e.g. during professional development activities, when reflecting on their own teaching...

  14. 76 FR 69799 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on...

  15. 76 FR 12418 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 14, 2011 through April 29, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  16. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Burden Reduction Project Committee scheduled... cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Audrey...

  17. 75 FR 68403 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment, ideas, and suggestions on...

  18. 76 FR 75951 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and Wednesday.... ] Dated: November 30, 2011. Shawn Collins, Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  19. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  20. Development and Assessment of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Linnemeyer, Rachel M.; Bahner, Angela D.; Misialek, Leah Hanson

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and the initial psychometric evaluation of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale in two studies. In the first study, an exploratory factor analysis (n = 278) revealed a four-factor scale, accounting for 71.4% of the variance, measuring different aspects of social issue advocacy: Political and Social Advocacy,…

  1. Quantitative stability, qualitative change? Changing socio-economic status and value perceptions of Danish volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten; Henriksen, Lars Skov; Qvist, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Changes in both socio-economic and cultural structures of societies are often assumed to have an impact on volunteering. Changing living conditions and changing values can affect both the level and the nature of volunteering. Most Western societies have over the last 30 years or more experienced...... preconditions for volunteering have had an effect on factors that are commonly associated with volunteering. We use survey data from Denmark collected over a period from 1990 to 2008....

  2. Indicators of climate change in Idaho: An assessment framework for coupling biophysical change and social perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is well documented at the global scale, but local and regional changes are not as well understood. Finer, local-to-regional scale information is needed for creating specific, place-based planning and adaption efforts. Here we detail the development of an indicator-focused climate chan...

  3. Dissociation of motor task-induced cortical excitability and pain perception changes in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena S Volz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is evidence that interventions aiming at modulation of the motor cortex activity lead to pain reduction. In order to understand further the role of the motor cortex on pain modulation, we aimed to compare the behavioral (pressure pain threshold and neurophysiological effects (transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS induced cortical excitability across three different motor tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifteen healthy male subjects were enrolled in this randomized, controlled, blinded, cross-over designed study. Three different tasks were tested including motor learning with and without visual feedback, and simple hand movements. Cortical excitability was assessed using single and paired-pulse TMS measures such as resting motor threshold (RMT, motor-evoked potential (MEP, intracortical facilitation (ICF, short intracortical inhibition (SICI, and cortical silent period (CSP. All tasks showed significant reduction in pain perception represented by an increase in pressure pain threshold compared to the control condition (untrained hand. ANOVA indicated a difference among the three tasks regarding motor cortex excitability change. There was a significant increase in motor cortex excitability (as indexed by MEP increase and CSP shortening for the simple hand movements. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although different motor tasks involving motor learning with and without visual feedback and simple hand movements appear to change pain perception similarly, it is likely that the neural mechanisms might not be the same as evidenced by differential effects in motor cortex excitability induced by these tasks. In addition, TMS-indexed motor excitability measures are not likely good markers to index the effects of motor-based tasks on pain perception in healthy subjects as other neural networks besides primary motor cortex might be involved with pain modulation during motor training.

  4. Body image perception and attempts to change weight among female medical students at Mangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessing body image self-perception has used BMI as an indicator of nutritional status. The visual analogue scale is a highly effective instrument for assessing people′s level of dissatisfaction with their body weight while evaluating the perceptual component of body image. Objective: By knowing body mass index of female medical students, to find out their pattern of body image perception and any attempts done to change their weight. Materials and Methods: All the students residing in MBBS ladies hostel were included in this study and a questionnaire regarding body image perception, diet, physical activity and attempts to change weight was instituted. Their responses were collected, tabulated, analyzed and interpreted. Results: Among 147 study subjects, according to BMI, 25(17% were undernourished while 111(75.5% and 11(7.5% were normally nourished and overweight respectively. 35(23.8% of the subjects felt they were lean, 95(64.6% felt they were normal and 17(11.6% felt they were overweight. Regarding image satisfaction, 98(66.7% of them were satisfied with their image and out of 49 who were not satisfied 30 (20.4 % wanted to reduce weight. Skipping meals was practiced by 42 (28.6% of subjects. Conclusion: About 75.5% of the study group were having normal BMI. Most of them perceived their image correctly regarding to their weight. Most of the underweight and all overweight females were not satisfied. Underweight females preferred to gain weight and overweight females preferred to lose weight.

  5. Perceptions of Obvious and Disruptive Climate Change: Community-Based Risk Assessment for Two Native Villages in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Rosales

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work operationalizes the determinants of climate change risk, exposure and vulnerability, through the perceptions held by Native hunters, fishers, and gatherers in Savoonga and Shaktoolik, Alaska. Informed by their skill, experience, and the traditional knowledge of their elders, hunters, fishers, and gatherers in these communities are astute observers of their environment and environmental change. A questionnaire is used to sort and rank their perceptions of the most obvious and disruptive elements of climate change as representations of exposure and vulnerability, respectively. Results represent the relative strength and significance of those perceptions of environmental change. In addition to other changes, storms are among the most obvious and disruptive impacts of climate change to respondents in both communities, while changes to sea ice tend to be more disruptive in Savoonga, a more ice-obligate culture, than Shaktoolik. Changes on the tundra are more obvious in Shaktoolik, but is the least disruptive category of change in both villages. Changes along the coast were both obvious and disruptive, albeit more so in Shaktoolik than Savoonga. The findings suggest that traditional ecological knowledge is a valuable source of information to access perceptions of risk, and develop climate risk management and adaptation plans. The questionnaire design and statistical methodology may be of interest to those working on community-based adaptation and risk assessment projects in high-risk, poor, and marginalized Native communities with small populations.

  6. Perceptions of Socio-Ecological Changes and Their Implications on Changes in Farming Practises and Agricultural Land Uses in the Savannahs of Northeast Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kojo Boateng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the perceptions of local farming households in the savannahs of northeast Ghana about the patterns of ecological and social changes happening around them over the years. It then unpacks how those perceptions are influencing farming practices and agricultural land use changes. Theoretical and empirical understandings of the value of local resource users’ perceptual judgements about changes in their socio-ecological environment and how they respond to those changes have far-reaching implications for design of agricultural development and sustainable land management policies. Consideration of local perceptions offers more informed basis to design and implement agricultural development policies in ways that encourage active local participation, sustainable livelihoods development, and responsiveness to changing conditions. This departs from current conventional implementation systems, which are usually top-down and based on technical and political aspects of agricultural land management, but do not necessarily comprehend processes influencing the agency of local communities in shaping various agricultural land use outcomes.

  7. The history of environmental change and adaptation in eastern Saloum-Senegal—Driving forces and perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbow, Cheikh; Mertz, Ole; Diouf, Awa; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Reenberg, Anette

    2008-12-01

    Environmental change in the Sahel-Sudan zone of West Africa has been a major issue in development debates over the last decades. Using remote sensing based land cover change analysis, archival data, national and international statistical data, and household interviews, we analyze the drivers of environmental change in Eastern Saloum in Central East Senegal as well as the local perceptions of these changes and adaptation. Being part of the ground nut basin, Eastern Saloum has witnessed rapid environmental degradation caused by the conversion of forest and savanna areas to agricultural land during the last 20-30 years and by a combination of decline in precipitation, soil degradation, a diversity of policies with little concern for the environment, fluctuating markets and population pressure. Farmers perceive the environmental change mainly as land degradation and poor soil fertility, though recent extensification of agriculture counters this effect and has led to increased vegetation cover in marginal areas. They identified erratic climate, agricultural policies, insufficient food production and desire to increase income as the main drivers of change in the area. We conclude that while climate variability has influenced environmental change in the area, various types of State interventions in agriculture and global market fluctuations appear to have been the main underlying causes of environmental degradation.

  8. The integration of facial and vocal cues during emotional change perception: EEG markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuhai; Pan, Zhihui; Wang, Ping; Yang, Xiaohong; Liu, Peng; You, Xuqun; Yuan, Jiajin

    2016-07-01

    The ability to detect emotional changes is of primary importance for social living. Though emotional signals are often conveyed by multiple modalities, how emotional changes in vocal and facial modalities integrate into a unified percept has yet to be directly investigated. To address this issue, we asked participants to detect emotional changes delivered by facial, vocal and facial-vocal expressions while behavioral responses and electroencephalogram were recorded. Behavioral results showed that bimodal emotional changes were detected with higher accuracy and shorter response latencies compared with each unimodal condition. Moreover, the detection of emotional change, regardless of modalities, was associated with enhanced amplitudes in the N2 and P3 component, as well as greater theta synchronization. More importantly, the P3 amplitudes and theta synchronization were larger for the bimodal emotional change condition than for the sum of the two unimodal conditions. The superadditive responses in P3 amplitudes and theta synchronization were both positively correlated with the magnitude of the bimodal superadditivity in accuracy. These behavioral and electrophysiological data consistently illustrated an effect of audiovisual integration during the detection of emotional changes, which is most likely mediated by the P3 activity and theta oscillations in brain responses.

  9. Climate change and consequences in the Arctic: perception of climate change by the Nenets people of Vaigach Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Davydov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Arctic climate change is already having a significant impact on the environment, economic activity, and public health. For the northern peoples, traditions and cultural identity are closely related to the natural environment so any change will have consequences for society in several ways.A questionnaire was given to the population on the Vaigach island, the Nenets who rely to a large degree on hunting, fishing and reindeer herding for survival. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted about perception of climate change.Climate change is observed and has already had an impact on daily life according to more than 50% of the respondents. The winter season is now colder and longer and the summer season colder and shorter. A decrease in standard of living was noticeable but few were planning to leave.Climate change has been noticed in the region and it has a negative impact on the standard of living for the Nenets. However, as of yet they do not want to leave as cultural identity is important for their overall well-being.

  10. Hegemonic Masculinity, HIV/AIDS Risk Perception, and Sexual Behavior Change Among Young People in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganle, John Kuumuori

    2016-05-01

    Among the youth in some parts of sub-Saharan Africa, a paradoxical mix of adequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS and high-risk behavior characterizes their daily lives. Based on original qualitative research in Ghana, I explore in this article the ways in which the social construction of masculinity influences youth's responses to behavior change HIV/AIDS prevention interventions. Findings show that although awareness of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the risks of infection is very high among the youth, a combination of hegemonic masculinity and perceptions of personal invulnerability acts to undermine the processes of young people's HIV/AIDS risk construction and appropriate behavioral change. I argue that if HIV/AIDS prevention is to be effective and sustained, school- and community-based initiatives should be developed to provide supportive social spaces in which the construction of masculinity, the identity of young men and women as gendered persons, and perceptions of their vulnerability to HIV/AIDS infection are challenged.

  11. The role of evidence-based media advocacy in the promotion of tobacco control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Ch'uyasonqo H; Carter, Marina I

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses the role of evidence-based media advocacy in the promotion of tobacco control policies. Evidence is a driving force for campaigns seeking to implement a tobacco control policy. An effective campaign is based in evidence that demonstrates why a policy should be implemented, and what the potential benefits are. Media advocacy is the process of disseminating information through the communications media where the aim is to effect action, such as a change of policy, or to alter the public's view of an issue. Discussion focuses on: 1) the importance of, and methods for, collecting and communicating evidence and information to make it clear and usable for legislators, the media, and the public; and 2) the role of earned and paid media in advancing tobacco control issues. The discussion is made within the context of a specific advocacy example; in this case the 2010 campaign to increase the tobacco tax in Mexico.

  12. Effects of a promotor training on local school wellness advocacy capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Eddy A; Ritterman Weintraub, Miranda; Clifton-Hawkins, Nancy; Martinez, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    There is gap between the enactment and implementation of local school wellness policies. Building the capacity of promotores to engage parents in strengthening local school wellness policy implementation is an innovative strategy. This evaluation study examines the effects of 6 hours of promotor advocacy training to improve local school wellness policy implementation. Consistent with psychological empowerment theory, the training and the related toolkit were designed to increase promotores' knowledge and self-efficacy to engage parents in advocating for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Pre-post training questionnaires (n = 74), five posttraining participant focus groups, and four staff member focus groups explored changes in promotor and participating organization capacity. Findings show increased participant self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes to advocate for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Participating organizations reported intention to continue supporting promotor local school wellness policy advocacy. Findings illuminate strategies to strengthen promotor capacity to engage parents in local school wellness policy advocacy.

  13. Households' perception of climate change and human health risks: A community perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Md Aminul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bangladesh has been identified as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world concerning the adverse effects of climate change (CC. However, little is known about the perception of CC from the community, which is important for developing adaptation strategies. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey of respondents from two villages--one from the northern part and the other from the southern part of Bangladesh. A total of 450 households were selected randomly through multistage sampling completed a semi-structure questionnaire. This was supplemented with 12 focus group discussions (FGDs and 15 key informant interviews (KIIs. Results Over 95 percent of the respondents reported that the heat during the summers had increased and 80.2 percent reported that rainfall had decreased, compared to their previous experiences. Approximately 65 percent reported that winters were warmer than in previous years but they still experienced very erratic and severe cold during the winter for about 5-7 days, which restricted their activities with very destructive effect on agricultural production, everyday life and the health of people. FGDs and KIIs also reported that overall winters were warmer. Eighty point two percent, 72.5 percent and 54.7 percent survey respondents perceived that the frequency of water, heat and cold related diseases/health problems, respectively, had increased compared to five to ten years ago. FGDs and KIIs respondents were also reported the same. Conclusions Respondents had clear perceptions about changes in heat, cold and rainfall that had occurred over the last five to ten years. Local perceptions of climate variability (CV included increased heat, overall warmer winters, reduced rainfall and fewer floods. The effects of CV were mostly negative in terms of means of living, human health, agriculture and overall livelihoods. Most local perceptions on CV are consistent with the evidence regarding the

  14. Knowledge and Perceptions of Overweight Employees about Lifestyle-Related Health Benefit Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Linnan, Laura; Finkelstein, Eric A.; Tate, Deborah; Naseer, Carolyn; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated overweight state employees’ perceptions about health insurance benefit changes designed to reduce the scope of health benefits for employees who were obese or smoked. Methods Prior to implementation of health benefit plan changes, 658 overweight [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2] state employees enrolled in a weight loss intervention study were asked about their attitudes and beliefs of the new benefit plan changes. Results Thirty-one percent of employees with a BMI≥40 kg/ m2 were unaware that their current BMI would place them in a higher risk benefit plan. More than half reported that the new benefit change would motivate them to make behavioral changes, but less than half felt confident in making changes. Respondents with a BMI≥40 kg/m2 were more likely to oppose the new changes focused on BMI categories compared to respondents in lower BMI categories (P<0.0001). Current smokers were more likely to oppose the new benefit change focused on tobacco use than former smokers and non-smokers (P<0.01). Limitations Participants represented a sample of employees enrolled in a weight loss study, limiting generalizability to the larger population of state employees. Conclusions Benefit plan changes that require employees who are obese or smoke to pay more for health care may motivate some, but not all, individuals to change their behaviors. Since confidence to lose weight was lowest among those in the highest weight categories, health plan benefit modifications may be required to achieve desired health behavior changes. PMID:21901911

  15. Personal Branding and Employee Advocacy in Finnish Companies : Is Personal Branding and Employee Advocacy beneficial

    OpenAIRE

    Katila, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to determine if companies can benefit from employee advocacy and personal branding; how can they benefit from it and if there are any negative sides to it. The research is limited specifically to Finnish companies. A literature review was conducted to gain an overview of how marketing and branding has evolved until this year and to help understand how employee advocacy and personal branding can be used in companies and to see what benefits and disadvantages...

  16. NASA Family Science Night: Changing perceptions one family at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sara E.; Drobnes, Emilie; Sol Colina-Trujillo, M.; Noel-Storr, Jacob

    2008-12-01

    Parents and families have the greatest influence on children's attitudes towards education and career choices. If students' attitudes towards science, particularly the physical sciences, are not influenced positively by parental/familial attitudes, efforts to improve the quality of content and teaching of these subjects in school may be futile. Research shows that parental involvement increases student achievement outcomes, and family-oriented programs have a direct impact on student performance. Based on this premise, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center started a series of Family Science Nights for middle school students and their families. The program provides a non-threatening venue for families to explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by engaging in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science - making it more practical and approachable for participants of all ages. Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond.

  17. Changing public perceptions of genetically modified foods: Effects of consumer information and direct product experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.

    . In experiment 1, attitude change experiments were conducted with consumers from Denmark, Germany, Italy and the UK (N=1650). Different information strategies were tested against a control group for their ability to change consumers' attitudes and their influence on product choice. Results indicate......Previous research concerning public perception of GM foods indicates that European consumers hold firm negative attitudes to GM foods. These attitudes, however, are not based on risk-benefit evaluations of particular products. Rather, they seem to be a function of general sociopolitical attitudes...... and values. Two policies can be adopted in such a situation: (a) consumers can be actively informed regarding the risks and benefits and (b) consumers can be given the opportunity to evaluate products on the basis of direct experience. The effectiveness of both policies was tested in two experiments...

  18. A Study of Rural Senegalese Attitudes and Perceptions of Their Behavior to Changes in the Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieye, Amadou M.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Semi-structured focus group discussions were employed to capture rural Senegalese attitudes and perceptions of their behavior to changes in the climate and their land use and livelihood strategies. Seven focus groups stratified by gender, ethnicity (Wolof and Peulh) and dominant production system (cultivators and pastoralists) in five villages in semi-arid northern Senegal revealed seven main themes. Rural livelihoods remain predominantly based on rainfall dependant practices, and although cultivators and pastoralists had a clear appreciation of changes in natural resources compared to a perceived more favorable past, few adaptive coping strategies beyond established ones were advocated. The seven themes are discussed in detail and their implications for rural livelihoods under future long term climate predictions discussed with the implications of this study for the development of scenarios of future land cover land use.

  19. The Pain and Ecstasy: Pre-service Teacher Perceptions On Changing Teacher Roles and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Dyer

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Are pre-service teachers really open to change? Are they prepared for the shifts in their roles that are likely to occur over the next few decades? Are they developing a critical consciousness, to better assume leadership roles in educational change? These questions framed this exploration which qualitatively investigated pre-service teachers' perceptions of their role as educators in relation to advanced technologies. Pre-service teachers were asked to respond to a reading identifying (via an open ended think paper assignment what they liked and did not like about the future vision of education offered in the reading. Their responses indicate a strong conflict between the desire to work with motivated, responsible students who are actively engaged in their own learning and their notion of what a teacher should be, based on their own experiences in schools.

  20. Advocacy and political convergence under preference uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Reuben; C. Traxler; F. van Winden

    2015-01-01

    We study the formation of advocacy groups and how they can impact policy outcomes by revealing information about voters׳ preferences to uninformed political candidates. We conduct a laboratory experiment based on a two-candidate spatial electoral competition setting where the policy preferences of v

  1. Educational Expertise, Advocacy, and Media Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Joel R.; Lubienski, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of many advocacy organizations to advance their preferred policies despite conflicting evidence of the effectiveness of these policies raise questions about factors that shape successful policy promotion. While many may like to think that expertise on an issue in question is an essential prerequisite for influence in public policy…

  2. Classroom Advocacy? A Christian Pacifist's Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Christian professors and professors generally, whether teaching at religiously affiliated or secular institutions, face an age-old question: Can one safely use the classroom to advocate one's personal position with regard to controversial issues or not? Positions examined include that of "value-free" science, "value-full" advocacy, and an…

  3. Health care advocacy turns into political activism.

    OpenAIRE

    Spears, T

    1995-01-01

    Some advocacy groups are becoming more willing to engage in political activism. One is the Ontario Lung Association, which has been calling attention to government inaction on air-pollution issues such as controlling smog and improving indoor air quality. These lobbying efforts are supported by some physicians, who believe that environmental factors are behind the increased incidence of respiratory illness.

  4. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  5. Be Proactive with Parent Advocacy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…

  6. The state of advocacy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, G Larry

    2015-12-01

    Non-profit advocacy organizations have been important in raising public awareness, promoting education, and enhancing political activism for issues related to cancer. Grassroots efforts aimed at fund-raising have substantially augmented federal funding for community outreach and research. The objective of this review was to evaluate successful accomplishments of several major non-profit organizations that are focused on cancer. A review of news media, medical literature, and financial records (using GuideStar) was performed to access the organizational structure and productivity of several successful cancer advocacy organizations. Compared to other cancer advocacy groups, the American Cancer Society is the oldest (>100years old) and worth the most with net assets of over $1.25 billion dollars and an annual total revenue of over $900 million dollars. The ACS also has the highest overhead at 41%. Most of the gynecologic cancer advocacy groups are approximately 20years old and have collective total annual revenue of over $17M dollars. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund has been the most successful at raising funds and building net assets to date while maintaining an overhead of higher overhead, spend less on total administration, spend more on fund-raising, have more events (rather than a limited number), and use aggressive social media strategies.

  7. Local Expert Perceptions of Migration as a Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Stojanov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available People have long migrated for many reasons, often with a combination of forced and voluntary reasons combining to push them away from current situations and to pull them towards new situations. Bangladesh is one example where environmental changes have long been amongst the multitude of reasons for migrating, with contemporary climate change suggested as a major impetus towards more migration. This paper examines local expert perceptions of migration as a climate change adaptation strategy for Bangladeshis. Seventeen in-depth interviews were conducted with local experts in Bangladesh and Assam (India on environmental change and migration to understand the perspectives of those with formal education and expert-related jobs who come from the areas being directly affected by Bangladeshi migration. Findings show that local experts consider that migration is used and will be used for climate change adaptation in Bangladesh, but migration is not solely for climate change adaptation, instead interweaving with all other factors influencing migration-related decisions.

  8. A holistic model of advocacy: factors that influence its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsch, Sylvia M; Sternard, Marsha J; Hovarter, Rebecca; Matzke, Vicki

    2004-02-01

    Although advocacy is embraced by nursing as an essential component of holistic philosophy, its scope is often limited in practice. In this article, a research study that examined the use of an expanded definition of advocacy is described. A link to the role of advocacy as a complementary therapy and in relation to facilitating the use of complementary therapies by patients is provided. Fifty-two registered nurses completed a researcher developed advocacy research instrument that assessed the use of moral-ethical, legal, political, spiritual, and substitutive advocacy along with various factors thought to influence the use of advocacy including moral development, perceived assertiveness, and perceived job security. An additional 40 RN-BSN students generated case studies of advocacy enacted in practice that were used as examples of the five categories of advocacy and to support the findings of the survey. Results indicated that moral-ethical advocacy was used more often than the other four categories. Moral stage development had a significant effect on substitutive advocacy but assertiveness and job security were not significant factors influencing any category of advocacy.

  9. Constructing Perceptions of Climate Change: a case study of regional political decision makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, D.

    2012-12-01

    This case study of climate change communications assesses the salient means of communication and the message adopted by regional political decision makers on the German Baltic coast. Realizing that cultural factors and local values (and not simply knowledge) are significant influences in explaining attitudes towards climate change, this analysis draws from the records of regional weather, from scientists with a specific focus on the region, from the political decision makers for that region, and the media message reaching the decision makers, ensuring all elements of the analysis are drawn from the same socioeconomic, geophysical, political and cultural context. This is important as the social dynamics surrounding the trust in science is of critical importance and, as such, all elements of the case study are specifically contained within a common context. If the utility of climate change knowledge is to prompt well conceived adaptation/mitigation strategies then the political decision process, or at least the perceptions shaping it, can best be understood by locating it within the world view of the decision makers involved in the production process. Using the results of two survey questionnaires, one of regional climate scientists and one of regional political decision makers, ten years of local weather records, and a summary of the message from mass media circulation, the discord in perceptions of regional climate change are quantitatively explored. The conclusions drawn from the analysis include, compared to the scientific assessment: The decision makers' perceptions of recent past differ from actual observations. The decision makers' perceptions of the future differ from scientific assessments. The decision makers tend to over estimate the magnitude of regional climate change and its impacts. The decision makers tend to over estimate the sense of immediacy for adaptation measures. The conclusions drawn suggest that in the regional political realm, it is often a

  10. Utilizing Professional Learning Community Concepts and Social Networking for State Advocacy: The Arkansas Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Shelly; Chadwick, Mona; Bangs, David; Holt, Carleton; Longing, Jeff; Duyar, Ibrihim

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of National Council of Professors of Educational Administration (NCPEA) state affiliate, Arkansas Professors of Educational Administration's (ARPEA), activities, accomplishments, and advocacy efforts. Faced with numerous changes being implemented in education in the state, it became imperative for ARPEA's…

  11. Predicting changes in children's self-perceptions of academic competence: a naturalistic examination of evaluative discourse among classmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermatt, Ellen Rydell; Pomerantz, Eva M; Ruble, Diane N; Frey, Karin S; Greulich, Faith Knesz

    2002-11-01

    Classroom discourse was examined as a predictor of changes in children's beliefs about their academic capabilities. Kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students (N = 106) participated in 2 waves of data collection, approximately 1 year apart. During the 1st year of the study, children's verbal interactions with their classmates were observed and recorded. Children rated their self-perceptions of academic competence during the 1st and 2nd years. Analyses revealed that changes over time in children's competence perceptions could be predicted from the types of statements that children made and had directed toward them by classmates. Examining sequences of child and classmate statements proved helpful in explaining the observed changes in children's perceptions of competence.

  12. PERCEPTION, PREPAREDNESS AND SEVERITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE TRIGGERED EVENTS IN BEN TRE PROVINCE, VIETNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang T.H. Le

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Eight provinces, including Ben Tre, located in the Mekong River Delta, are among Vietnam’s most vulnerable areas to climate change (CC triggered events. We conducted a study to identify the impacts of CC on Ben Tre Province coastal communities; to evaluate their knowledge, preparedness, perception of severity; and the effects of CC triggered events on aquaculture. We conducted three focus group discussions and a survey of 300 households. Farmers were aware of changing climatic conditions and pointed out indicators of these changes: (1 Changes in production and culturing patterns, (2 Changes in housing designs, and (3 Construction of dikes to prevent salt water intrusion. About 35, 40 and 26 percent of the total sample said they suffered losses to their aquaculture farms from typhoons, salt intrusion and erosion, respectively. Age, education and previous effects from CC events affected knowledge, preparedness, and severity of CC triggered events. Farmers who were engaged in aquaculture were more likely to be prepared for CC events than those who were not.

  13. Farmers' perceptions of climate change and agricultural adaptation strategies in rural Sahel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Ole; Mbow, Cheikh; Reenberg, Anette; Diouf, Awa

    2009-05-01

    Farmers in the Sahel have always been facing climatic variability at intra- and inter-annual and decadal time scales. While coping and adaptation strategies have traditionally included crop diversification, mobility, livelihood diversification, and migration, singling out climate as a direct driver of changes is not so simple. Using focus group interviews and a household survey, this study analyzes the perceptions of climate change and the strategies for coping and adaptation by sedentary farmers in the savanna zone of central Senegal. Households are aware of climate variability and identify wind and occasional excess rainfall as the most destructive climate factors. Households attribute poor livestock health, reduced crop yields and a range of other problems to climate factors, especially wind. However, when questions on land use and livelihood change are not asked directly in a climate context, households and groups assign economic, political, and social rather than climate factors as the main reasons for change. It is concluded that the communities studied have a high awareness of climate issues, but climatic narratives are likely to influence responses when questions mention climate. Change in land use and livelihood strategies is driven by adaptation to a range of factors of which climate appears not to be the most important. Implications for policy-making on agricultural and economic development will be to focus on providing flexible options rather than specific solutions to uncertain climate.

  14. Farmers' Perceptions of Climate Change and Agricultural Adaptation Strategies in Rural Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Ole; Mbow, Cheikh; Reenberg, Anette; Diouf, Awa

    2009-05-01

    Farmers in the Sahel have always been facing climatic variability at intra- and inter-annual and decadal time scales. While coping and adaptation strategies have traditionally included crop diversification, mobility, livelihood diversification, and migration, singling out climate as a direct driver of changes is not so simple. Using focus group interviews and a household survey, this study analyzes the perceptions of climate change and the strategies for coping and adaptation by sedentary farmers in the savanna zone of central Senegal. Households are aware of climate variability and identify wind and occasional excess rainfall as the most destructive climate factors. Households attribute poor livestock health, reduced crop yields and a range of other problems to climate factors, especially wind. However, when questions on land use and livelihood change are not asked directly in a climate context, households and groups assign economic, political, and social rather than climate factors as the main reasons for change. It is concluded that the communities studied have a high awareness of climate issues, but climatic narratives are likely to influence responses when questions mention climate. Change in land use and livelihood strategies is driven by adaptation to a range of factors of which climate appears not to be the most important. Implications for policy-making on agricultural and economic development will be to focus on providing flexible options rather than specific solutions to uncertain climate.

  15. Community perception on climate change and climate-related disaster preparedness in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Sandholz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decades, Kathmandu Valley in Nepal has been characterized by rapid population growth and related urbanization processes, leading to environmental degradation, pollution and supply bottlenecks in the metropolitan area. Effects of climate change are now putting additional stress on the urban system. In our research in Kathmandu, we carried out community and household surveys to analyze community perception on climate change and climate-related disaster preparedness. For this purpose, three categories of communities, 12 in all, were surveyed and interviewed: Squatter settlements, agricultural villages, and traditional villages. All settlements are located close to main rivers and therefore especially exposed to floods and droughts, and in slope position also to landslides. As a main result, we can conclude that people are generally aware of climate change and its potential consequences, such as climate change-related disasters. However, in their daily lives, climate change does not play a significant role and most communities have not taken any adaptation measures so far.

  16. Has the Traditional Social Perception on Nurses Changed?: attribution of Stereotypes and Gender Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aranda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nursing has traditionally been regarded as a female profession. However, in recent years there has been an increase of men. Despite this change, patriarchy still has a profound influence on how general population, patients and even nursing students perceive this occupation. Taking this background into account, the present research aims to analyze gender stereotype and gender role assignment to male and female nurses. A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 121 participants from three groups: patients, non-patients and nursing students. Gender stereotypes and gender roles assignment were analyzing using two factors: level of social domination orientation, and the group membership. Results showed that the gender stereotypes assignment to male and female nurses displayed some similarities; therefore a less stereotypical perception was observed comparing with other recent research. Moreover, participants low in social dominance orientation indicated a preference to traditional gender roles. Considering the group we found a traditional assignment of gender stereotypes over female and male nurses, even among nursing students. In sum, despite the dynamism of the nurses' social perception, still remains a gender bias that needs to be avoided.

  17. Using virtual reality to augment perception, enhance sensorimotor adaptation, and change our minds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geoffrey Wright

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances that involve human sensorimotor processes can have both intended and unintended effects on the central nervous system (CNS. This mini-review focuses on the use of virtual environments (VE to augment brain functions by enhancing perception, eliciting automatic motor behavior, and inducing sensorimotor adaptation. VE technology is becoming increasingly prevalent in medical rehabilitation, training simulators, gaming, and entertainment. Although these VE applications have often been shown to optimize outcomes, whether it be to speed recovery, reduce training time, or enhance immersion and enjoyment, there are inherent drawbacks to environments that can potentially change sensorimotor calibration. Across numerous VE studies over the years, we have investigated the effects of combining visual and physical motion on perception, motor control, and adaptation. Recent results from our research involving exposure to dynamic passive motion within a visually-depicted VE reveal that short-term exposure to augmented sensorimotor discordance can result in systematic aftereffects that last beyond the exposure period. Whether these adaptations are advantageous or not, remains to be seen. Benefits as well as risks of using VE-driven sensorimotor stimulation to enhance brain processes will be discussed.

  18. Changing attitudes and perceptions of Hispanic men ages 18 to 25 about rape and rape prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Sarah Lynn; Munoz-Rojas, Derby; Gutman, Lauren Samantha; Siman, Matilde Nathalia

    2012-12-01

    This exploratory study was designed to test the effectiveness of Foubert's intervention, The Men's Program, on a sample of 18- to 25-year-old Hispanic men who are not enrolled at a University or College. We explored participants' perceptions of, reactions to, and experience of the program. The information collected will be used to adapt the program to this specific population in order to increase cultural relevancy and specificity and create lasting attitudinal change. Three groups of six-eight Hispanic males (n = 22) were exposed to the intervention program. The Bystander Attitude Scale and the Rape Attitude and Beliefs Scale were administered as pre- and post-test measures. A short focus group was conducted to ask the men about their experience of the intervention. Analysis showed a significant increase in participants' willingness to intervene (p = 0.005) along with a decrease in rape myth acceptance in four of the five subscales (Justice p = 0.03; Status p = 0.004; Tactics p = 0.04; and Gender p = 0.002) after exposure to the intervention. Analysis of focus group material yielded several interesting themes about knowledge of rape, family and culture, perceptions of women, and the program material. This study showed promising change in attitudes about rape beliefs and bystander behaviors in Hispanic males exposed to an educational intervention. Through the information obtained, a cultural adaption from the analysis of the focus group data will be implemented during Phase 2 of the study. The adapted intervention will be tested before, after, and 1- and 3-months post-intervention to test whether the change in attitudes and behaviors are sustainable over time.

  19. Changes of Pain Perception, Autonomic Function, and Endocrine Parameters during Treatment of Anorectic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Karl-Jurgen; Boettger, Silke; Wagner, Gerd; Wilsdorf, Christine; Gerhard, Uwe Jens; Boettger, Michael K.; Blanz, Bernhard; Sauer, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The underlying mechanisms of reduced pain perception in anorexia nervosa (AN) are unknown. To gain more insight into the pathology, the authors investigated pain perception, autonomic function, and endocrine parameters before and during successful treatment of adolescent AN patients. Method: Heat pain perception was assessed in 15…

  20. Impact of Climate Change: Views and Perceptions of Policy Makers on Smallholder Agriculture in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Tetteh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The threat of global climate change has caused intense debate among policy makers as agricultural productivity and food security risks considerable decline due to changes in rainfallpatterns and temperature. Although the impact of climate change on crop yields vary greatly from region to region, smallholder farmers in developing countries who depend solely on rain-fed agriculture are among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups. While the successes in agricultural production in Africa and Ghana over the last decades are heralded, the inequitable distribution of benefits and unsustainable impacts on natural resources are becoming more evident. Many authors have blamed global warming and climate change on the emission of greenhouse gasses however, farming methods and other human activities are also to blame for the emerging change in the climate. Therefore, bringing farming practices and ecosystem services into decision-making in order to make full use of the potential gains from working with the natural environment and the underpinning biophysical processes is imperative. This paper assesses the views and perceptions of Ghanaian policy makers on the impact of climate change on smallholder agricultural productivity in order to sustain agricultural productivity in Ghana. The study used data from a case study conducted by the Environment Policy Action Node Project with sponsorship from the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA in Ghana between 2012 and 2013. An interview guide was used to collect qualitatively data from 35 key policy making institutions/organization in Ghana. One important finding of the paper is that even though Ghana has a climate change policy, most of the policy makers were not aware of the policy document and its contents. The paper however argues that to improve smallholder agricultural productivity in Ghana, a national debate on climate change mitigation and adaptation policies are needed to ensure coherence

  1. Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Furberg

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze–thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.

  2. Perception, attitude and behavior in relation to climate change: A survey among CDC health professionals in Shanxi province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Junni, E-mail: junxinni@163.com [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, Shanxi (China); Hansen, Alana, E-mail: alana.hansen@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Public Health, School of Population Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia); Zhang, Ying, E-mail: ying.zhang@sydney.edu.au [Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Li, Hong [Shanxi Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Taiyuan 030001 Shanxi (China); Liu, Qiyong, E-mail: liuqiyong@icdc.cn [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Diseases Prevention and Control, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Shandong University Climate Change and Health Center, Jinan 250012, Shandong (China); Sun, Yehuan, E-mail: yhsun@sina.com [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, Anhui (China); Bi, Peng, E-mail: peng.bi@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Public Health, School of Population Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Background: A better understanding of public perceptions, attitude and behavior in relation to climate change will provide an important foundation for government's policy-making, service provider's guideline development and the engagement of local communities. The purpose of this study was to assess the perception towards climate change, behavior change, mitigation and adaptation measures issued by the central government among the health professionals in the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in China. Methods: In 2013, a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was undertaken among 314 CDC health professionals in various levels of CDC in Shanxi Province, China. Descriptive analyses were performed. Results: More than two thirds of the respondents believed that climate change has happened at both global and local levels, and climate change would lead to adverse impacts to human beings. Most respondents (74.8%) indicated the emission of greenhouse gases was the cause of climate change, however there was a lack of knowledge about greenhouse gases and their sources. Media was the main source from which respondents obtained the information about climate change. A majority of respondents showed that they were willing to change behavior, but their actions were limited. In terms of mitigation and adaptation measures issued by the Chinese Government, respondents' perception showed inconsistency between strategies and relevant actions. Moreover, although the majority of respondents believed some strategies and measures were extremely important to address climate change, they were still concerned about economic development, energy security, and local environmental protection. Conclusion: There are gaps between perceptions and actions towards climate change among these health professionals. Further efforts need to be made to raise the awareness of climate change among health professionals, and to promote relevant actions to address climate change in

  3. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Change Perceptions Concerning the Satisfaction of Organization Members' Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan COJOCARU

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the innovative use of appreciative inquiry (AI in the organizational environment for changing the perception concerning the satisfaction of its members’ needs. The experiment started from the assumption that organizations are social constructions generated by the interpretations social actors have about this entity and about themselves, being the result of human interactions. The experiment used the appreciative inquiry as form of intervention, run in the four stages of the 4-D cycle. The results of the intervention show that, although appreciative inquiry was directed chiefly towards changing the perceptions concerning the satisfaction of the need for security, the interpretations given by organization members changed with regard to the satisfaction of all needs (security, basic needs, belonging, esteem and self-actualization. The study shows that motivation can be changed through an appreciative approach of events, through their reinterpretation within a process of dialogue and consensus; the reinterpretation of the organization as a text and the application of appreciative inquiry principles results in an organizational reconstruction as a process that can be run in a relatively short period of time. The positive changes of the organizational environment were also a result of the way the organization was researched. The appreciative interviews resulted in individual reinterpretations of organizational contexts, which were negotiated and assumed in the environment of the collectivity. The changes were supported by the organization members’ involvement in building a shared vision, in making a plan in which every person is a voice in the organization, and in developing attachment and ownership in relation to the developed plans.

  4. Farmers' Perceptions of and Adaptations to Changing Climate in the Melamchi Valley of Nepal

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    Nani Maiya Sujakhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of farmers’ perceptions of and adaptations to climate change is important to inform policies addressing the risk of climate change to farmers. This case study explored those issues in the Melamchi Valley of Nepal through a survey of 365 households and focus group discussions in 6 communities using a Community-Based Risk Screening Tool–Adaptation and Livelihoods (CRiSTAL. Analysis of climate trends in the study area for 1979–2009 showed that mean annual temperatures rose by 1.02°C and the frequency of drought increased measurably after 2003. Farmers reported increases in crop pests, hailstorms, landslides, floods, thunderstorms, and erratic precipitation as climate-related hazards affecting agriculture. They responded in a variety of ways including changing farming practices, selling livestock, milk, and eggs, and engaging in daily wage labor and seasonal labor migration. With more efficient support and planning, some of these measures could be adjusted to better meet current and future risks from climate change.

  5. How product trial changes quality perception of four new processed beef products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Faiza; Grunert, Klaus G; Therkildsen, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the quantitative analysis of the change in quality perception of four new processed beef products from pre to post trial phases. Based on the Total Food Quality Model, differences in pre and post-trial phases were measured using repeated measures technique for cue...... ingredients and ways of processing, which were not confirmed during trial. For the other two products, evaluations on key sensory dimensions based on trial exceeded expectations, whereas the other evaluations remained unchanged. Several demographic factors influenced the pattern of results, notably age...... and gender, which may be due to underlying differences in previous experience. The study gives useful insights for testing of new processed meat products before market introduction....

  6. Understanding social-ecological change and transformation through community perceptions of system identity

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    Mark Andrachuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed an empirical approach to consider social-ecological system change and transformation by drawing on resource users' knowledge and perceptions. We applied this approach in the Cau Hai lagoon, a coastal area dominated by small-scale fisheries in central Vietnam. Nine focus groups with more than 70 fishers were used to gather information about key social-ecological system elements and interactions, historical social-ecological dynamics, and possible thresholds between distinct social-ecological system identities. The patterns of change in livelihoods and resource exploitation in the Cau Hai lagoon are similar to those seen in other coastal lagoon and small-scale fishery contexts. Our findings show some promise for the use of local knowledge and the perceptions of resource user communities to understand and characterize social-ecological transformations. Importantly, however, we also demonstrate how social-ecological transformations are complicated processes driven by many factors beyond the control of any singular individual or group. We argue that (1 the occurrence of social-ecological transformations can result in either positive or negative outcomes and (2 that we need to direct our thinking away from drawing tidy conclusions about if and when social-ecological transformations take place. Our research also encourages scholars to carefully consider how we frame the benefits of participatory, community-based governance initiatives. Importantly, we need to examine the ways that governance initiatives will be beneficial for some people and detrimental for others, and we need to be fully aware of locally contested interests and acknowledge competing priorities for fisheries management and human well-being. Community-oriented assessments informed by resilience thinking can help to open up questions about economic, political, cultural, and environmental aspects of undesirable path dependencies and traps.

  7. Plotting Confucian and Disability Rights Paradigms on the Advocacy-Activism Continuum: Experiences of Chinese Parents of Children with Dyslexia in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon-McBrayer, Kim Fong; McBrayer, Philip Allen

    2014-01-01

    This study represents an initial effort to understand the advocacy journey of Chinese parents of children with dyslexia in Hong Kong. Qualitative methods involving individual and group interviews were used to solicit detailed recount and perceptions of the experiences of 25 parents. Findings revealed a largely sequenced three-stage journey of…

  8. Climate Change, Wildfires and Fir Forests in Greece: Perceptions of Forest Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Mitsopoulos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The potential impact that climate change may have on fire regime in ecosystems that are not fire-dependent emerges from fires that are nowadays spreading over higher altitudes and northern latitudes. The effects of fire occurrence in high elevation forests of Greece became apparent during the last few years when a number of large forest fires burned a significant number of high altitude fir ecosystems. This paper describes a study that investigated perceptions of wildfire risk to fir ecosystems of Greece in the context of climate change among a sample of Greek forestry experts by conducting personal interviews. Materials and Methods: A total of 63 forest experts answered the developed survey from 43 different forest management units covering all forestry agencies which manage fir forests in the country. The perceived fire risk and management to fir forest ecosystems was assessed by means of a subset of scales previously identified as relevant to climate change and to all fire management aspects, such as fire prevention, fire suppression and post fire treatments. Results: Increased fire risk was rated as a quite important issue in fir forests during the last few years, while the adapting options to climate change are not implemented mainly due to budget and personnel constrains. According to forest experts, fire prevention in fir forests under climate change should be focused on public awareness and fuel management. Nevertheless, the survey results indicate that there is also a need for specific fire prevention measures such as the type of logging activities and other technical measures. The result of this survey highlighted the need for the establishment of a new firefighting organization and for the better coordination of all involved parties during fire suppression. Conclusions: The findings of the current study can be critically important in determining how forest fire management considerations are incorporated into

  9. Climate change and adverse health events: community perceptions from the Tanahu district of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Mani Bhandari, Parash; Issa, Rita; Neupane, Dinesh; Gurung, Swadesh; Khanal, Vishnu

    2015-03-01

    Nepal is a country economically dependent on climate-sensitive industries. It is highly vulnerable to the environmental, social, economic and health impacts of climate change. The objective of this study is to explore community perceptions of climate variability and human health risks. In this letter, we present a cross sectional study conducted between August 2013 and July 2014 in the Tanahu district of Nepal. Our analysis is based on 258 face-to-face interviews with household heads utilizing structured questionnaires. Over half of the respondents (54.7%) had perceived a change in climate, 53.9% had perceived an increase in temperature in the summer and 49.2% had perceived an increase in rainfall during the rainy season. Half of the respondents perceived an increase in the number of diseases during the summer, 46.5% perceived an increase during the rainy season and 48.8% during winter. Only 8.9% of the respondents felt that the government was doing enough to prevent climate change and its impact on their community. Belonging to the Janajati (indigenous) ethnic group, living in a pakki, super-pakki house and belonging to poor or mid-level income were related to higher odds of perceiving climate variability. Illiterates were less likely to perceive climate variability. Respondents living in a pakki house, super-pakki, or those who were poor were more likely to perceive health risks. Illiterates were less likely to perceive health risks.

  10. Climate Change and Variability: Farmers’ Perception, Experience and Adaptation Strategies in Makueni County, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirina T. Kitinya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of climate change and variability (CCV from the farmer’s perspective is a key to prioritizing measures to address and prepare for its consequences. A survey involving 150 farmers was thus conducted in Makueni County, Kenya to document farmers’; perception, experience and adaptation strategies to CCV. About 86% of farmers perceived CCV as a major challenge with 53% indicating that significant changes in climate would manifest in 10-20 years. Significant changes in rainfall amounts and distribution had occurred over the years and were rated by 60% of farmers as the frequently experienced aspect of CCV. About 33% of farmers had heard of but not used decision support tools (DST to inform their agricultural activities. Workshops and seminars were reported by 67% of farmers as principal sources of information on CCV. Additionally, 50% of farmers relied on traditional knowledge for weather prediction. Only 20% of farmers had alternative strategies; agroforestry and growing drought tolerant crops particularly sorghum and cowpea, to minimize effects of CCV. Another 67% of farmers prioritized; terracing, ridging and water harvesting as adaptation strategies to minimize negative effects of CCV. The farmers were thus aware of CCV and through experience, backed with traditional technical knowledge, had gained prerequisite skills for addressing its negative effects. Nevertheless farmers’ agricultural practices could be improved by use of forecasted weather data and application of DST. Consequently enhancing farmers’ preparedness to tackle challenges posed by CCV.

  11. Advocacy for Education in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Museum education finds itself in the midst of significant changes as both the museum and education fields respond to internal and external challenges that require new approaches. Today, museums recognize that the choice is no longer theirs and that they "must" change to adapt to new economic realities. As museums adapt to new economic realities…

  12. Pride and Prejudice: Racial Contacts Mediating the Change of In-Group and Out-Group Racial Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshmen dataset, this study examined how students' within- and between-group racial contacts mediated the change of in-group and out-group racial perceptions across White, Black, Latino, and Asian students. This study was grounded in intergroup contact theory and employed multi-trait multi-method…

  13. Mothers' and Fathers' Perceptions of Change and Continuity in their Relationships with Young Adult Sons and Daughters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Christine M.; Helms, Heather M.

    2008-01-01

    Guided by contemporary feminist revisions of individual theories on adolescent development, interviews with 142 parent dyads were conducted to better understand the variation in mothers' and fathers' perceptions of changes and continuities in their relationships with their firstborn young adult sons and daughters. A between-families content…

  14. Changing Bilingual Self-Perceptions from Early Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Empirical Evidence from a Mixed-Methods Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    In the emerging tradition of language socialization research, this study examines the changing bilingual self-perceptions of three children, identical twin girls and their older brother, from early adolescence through early adulthood. The children were reared in a predominantly French-speaking home in south Louisiana by French/English bilingual…

  15. Teacher Perceptions of Moving toward Technology Innovation: Does an Enhancing Education through Technology Grant Lead to Innovation and Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Kimberly Brown

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs and perceptions of teachers participating in a project funded by an EETT grant for technology integration, concentrating on factors that reveal how the implementation of the 21st century hardware and staff development might have changed the atmosphere of their classrooms and teaching practices.…

  16. Organisational justice, trust and perceptions of fairness in the implementation of agenda for change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Keren, E-mail: williamsonk2@cardiff.ac.u [Department of Radiography, School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom); Williams, Kristy J. [Radiotherapy Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Background: Agenda for Change (AfC) was introduced to ensure equity of rewards for work of equal value, irrespective of professional background. Radiographer grades were evaluated and matched against job profiles and placed within the relevant pay bands of AfC. Equity theory suggests that individuals will make comparisons between themselves and others with regard to their rewards resulting in justice perceptions which may affect morale and work behaviours. This case study explored the justice perceptions and effect on co-worker relationships of a group of therapeutic radiographers in the process and outcomes of the implementation of AfC within their organisation. Method: An existential phenomenological approach was used and self administered questionnaires utilised for data collection. A sample of band 5-8a therapeutic radiographers from one regional Cancer Centre was questioned. Content analysis was applied to systematically and objectively categorise information into recurring themes. Findings: Open coding identified two main themes which were termed Recognition and Resentment. Data was analysed in terms of organisational justice theory and issues were identified in relation to recognition of extra-role behaviour and trust in those tasked with job matching and decision making. Conclusion: There appeared to be a perceived lack of justice in relation to the implementation of AfC, resulting in a lowering of staff morale and organisational commitment. However, no effect on co-worker relations was reported. Professional values appear to supersede issues of organisational justice, with staff asserting that patient care must override any matter of personal dissatisfaction.

  17. Changes in data sharing and data reuse practices and perceptions among scientists worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenopir, Carol; Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Allard, Suzie; Frame, Mike; Pjesivac, Ivanka; Birch, Ben; Pollock, Danielle; Dorsett, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of data sharing into the research lifecycle is an important part of modern scholarly debate. In this study, the DataONE Usability and Assessment working group addresses two primary goals: To examine the current state of data sharing and reuse perceptions and practices among research scientists as they compare to the 2009/2010 baseline study, and to examine differences in practices and perceptions across age groups, geographic regions, and subject disciplines. We distributed surveys to a multinational sample of scientific researchers at two different time periods (October 2009 to July 2010 and October 2013 to March 2014) to observe current states of data sharing and to see what, if any, changes have occurred in the past 3–4 years. We also looked at differences across age, geographic, and discipline-based groups as they currently exist in the 2013/2014 survey. Results point to increased acceptance of and willingness to engage in data sharing, as well as an increase in actual data sharing behaviors. However, there is also increased perceived risk associated with data sharing, and specific barriers to data sharing persist. There are also differences across age groups, with younger respondents feeling more favorably toward data sharing and reuse, yet making less of their data available than older respondents. Geographic differences exist as well, which can in part be understood in terms of collectivist and individualist cultural differences. An examination of subject disciplines shows that the constraints and enablers of data sharing and reuse manifest differently across disciplines. Implications of these findings include the continued need to build infrastructure that promotes data sharing while recognizing the needs of different research communities. Moving into the future, organizations such as DataONE will continue to assess, monitor, educate, and provide the infrastructure necessary to support such complex grand science challenges.

  18. Age changes in pain perception : A systematic-review and meta-analysis of age effects on pain and tolerance thresholds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lautenbacher, Stefan; Peters, Jan H; Heesen, Michael; Scheel, Jennifer; Kunz, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Demographic changes, with substantial increase in life expectancy, ask for solid knowledge about how pain perception might be altered by aging. Although psychophysical studies on age-related changes in pain perception have been conducted over more than 70 years, meta-analyses are still missing. The

  19. Large perspective changes yield perception of metric shape that allows accurate feedforward reaches-to-grasp and it persists after the optic flow has stopped!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Lim; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2010-08-01

    Lee et al. (Percept Psychophys 70:1032-1046, 2008a) investigated whether visual perception of metric shape could be calibrated when used to guide feedforward reaches-to-grasp. It could not. Seated participants viewed target objects (elliptical cylinders) in normal lighting using stereo vision and free head movements that allowed small (approximately 10 degrees) perspective changes. The authors concluded that poor perception of metric shape was the reason reaches-to-grasp should be visually guided online. However, Bingham and Lind (Percept Psychophys 70:524-540, 2008) showed that large perspective changes (> or =45 degrees) yield good perception of metric shape. So, now we repeated the Lee et al.'s study with the addition of information from large perspective changes. The results were accurate feedforward reaches-to-grasp reflecting accurate perception of both metric shape and metric size. Large perspective changes occur when one locomotes into a workspace in which reaches-to-grasp are subsequently performed. Does the resulting perception of metric shape persist after the large perspective changes have ceased? Experiments 2 and 3 tested reaches-to-grasp with delays (Exp. 2, 5-s delay; Exp. 3, approximately 16-s delay) and multiple objects to be grasped after a single viewing. Perception of metric shape and metric size persisted yielding accurate reaches-to-grasp. We advocate the study of nested actions using a dynamic approach to perception/action.

  20. Changes in Urban Youths' Attitude Towards Science and Perception of a Mobile Science Lab Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jared

    This dissertation examined changes in urban youth's attitude towards science as well as their perception of the informal science education setting and third space opportunity provided by the BioBus, a mobile science lab. Science education researchers have often suggested that informal science education settings provide one possible way to positively influence student attitude towards science and engage marginalized urban youth within the traditional science classroom (Banks et al., 2007; Hofstein & Rosenfeld, 1996; National Research Council, 2009; Schwarz & Stolow, 2006; Stocklmayer, Rennie, & Gilbert, 2010). However, until now, this possibility has not been explored within the setting of a mobile science lab nor examined using a theoretical framework intent on analyzing how affective outcomes may occur. The merits of this analytical stance were evaluated via observation, attitudinal survey, open-response questionnaire, and interview data collected before and after a mobile science lab experience from a combination of 239 students in Grades 6, 8, 9, 11, and 12 from four different schools within a major Northeastern metropolitan area. Findings from this study suggested that urban youth's attitude towards science changed both positively and negatively in statistically significant ways after a BioBus visit and that the experience itself was highly enjoyable. Furthermore, implications for how to construct a third space within the urban science classroom and the merits of utilizing the theoretical framework developed to analyze cultural tensions between urban youth and school science are discussed. Key Words: Attitude towards science, third space, mobile science lab, urban science education.

  1. Changes in taste perception and eating behavior after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Bradley, David; Eagon, J. Christopher; Sullivan, Shelby; Abumrad, Nada A.; Klein, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery causes greater weight loss than laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). We tested the hypothesis that RYGB has weight loss-independent effects on taste perception which influence eating behavior and contribute to the greater weight loss. Design and Methods Subjects were studied before and after ~20% weight loss induced by RYGB (n=17) or LAGB (n=10). We evaluated: taste sensitivity for sweet, salty and savory stimuli; sucrose and monosodium glutamate (MSG) preferences; sweetness palatability; eating behavior; and expression of taste-related genes in biopsies of fungiform papillae. Results Weight loss induced by both procedures caused the same decrease in: preferred sucrose concentration (−12±10%), perceived sweetness of sucrose (−7±5%), cravings for sweets and fast-foods (−22 ±5%), influence of emotions (−27±5%) and external food cues (−30±4%) on eating behavior, and expression of α-gustducin in fungiform papillae (all P-values <0.05). RYGB, but not LAGB, shifted sweetness palatability from pleasant to unpleasant when repetitively tasting sucrose (P=0.05). Neither procedure affected taste detection thresholds or MSG preferences. Conclusions LAGB and RYGB cause similar alterations in eating behaviors, when weight loss is matched. These changes in eating behavior were not associated with changes in taste sensitivity, suggesting other, as yet unknown, mechanisms are involved. PMID:24167016

  2. Patient advocacy in the USA: key communication role functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald R; Tipton, Bryan K

    2007-09-01

    Researchers have long documented the importance of patient advocacy programs as a means of providing customer service in health-care organizations. Yet, while effective communication is often acknowledged as key to effective patient advocacy, knowledge of the specific communication role functions enacted by patient advocates remains limited, as does our understanding of the function of patient advocacy at the organizational level. This qualitative investigation not only provides a typology of communication roles enacted by patient advocates while solving problems on behalf of patients and their family members, but also integrates scholarly research on "boundary-spanning" as a means of theoretically contextualizing the advocacy role at the organizational level.

  3. Risk perception and commitment to reduce global climate change in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Priego, Nuria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An online national survey among the Spanish population (n = 602 was conducted to examine the factors underlying a person’s support for commitments to global climate change reductions. Multiple hierarchical regression analysis was conducted in four steps and a structural equations model was tested. A survey tool designed by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication was applied in order to build scales for the variables introduced in the study. The results show that perceived consumer effectiveness and risk perception are determinant factors of commitment to mitigating global climate change. However, there are differences in the influence that other factors, such as socio-demographics, view of nature and cultural cognition, have on the last predicted variable.Una encuesta online a la población española (n = 602 examina los factores que predicen el apoyo al compromiso con el medio ambiente por parte de los participantes para reducir el cambio climático global. Se realizó una regresión múltiple jerárquica en cuatro pasos y se testó el modelo de ecuaciones estructurales propuesto. En la encuesta se aplicó una herramienta diseñada por el Yale Project on Climate Change Communication con la finalidad de construir escalas para las variables introducidas en el estudio. Los resultados muestran que la efectividad percibida por el consumidor y el riesgo percibido son factores determinantes del apoyo al compromiso para reducir el cambio climático global. No obstante, se encontraron algunas diferencias en cuanto a la influencia de otros factores tales como las variables socio-demográficas, la visión de la naturaleza y la cognición cultural.

  4. Climate change vulnerability, adaptation and risk perceptions at farm level in Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Muhammad; Schilling, Janpeter; Scheffran, Jürgen; Zulfiqar, Farhad

    2016-03-15

    Pakistan is among the countries highly exposed and vulnerable to climate change. The country has experienced many severe floods, droughts and storms over the last decades. However, little research has focused on the investigation of vulnerability and adaptation to climate-related risks in Pakistan. Against this backdrop, this article investigates the farm level risk perceptions and different aspects of vulnerability to climate change including sensitivity and adaptive capacity at farm level in Pakistan. We interviewed a total of 450 farming households through structured questionnaires in three districts of Punjab province of Pakistan. This study identified a number of climate-related risks perceived by farm households such as extreme temperature events, insect attacks, animal diseases and crop pests. Limited water availability, high levels of poverty and a weak role of local government in providing proper infrastructure were the factors that make farmers more sensitive to climate-related risks. Uncertainty or reduction in crop and livestock yields; changed cropping calendars and water shortage were the major adverse impacts of climate-related risks reported by farmers in the study districts. Better crop production was reported as the only positive effect. Further, this study identified a number of farm level adaptation methods employed by farm households that include changes in crop variety, crop types, planting dates and input mix, depending upon the nature of the climate-related risks. Lack of resources, limited information, lack of finances and institutional support were some constraints that limit the adaptive capacity of farm households. This study also reveals a positive role of cooperation and negative role of conflict in the adaptation process. The study suggests to address the constraints to adaptation and to improve farm level cooperation through extended outreach and distribution of institutional services, particularly climate-specific farm advisory

  5. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  6. 75 FR 47348 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  7. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  8. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  9. 76 FR 56879 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  10. 76 FR 10941 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  11. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  12. 75 FR 10864 - Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  13. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  14. 75 FR 4140 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  15. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  16. 75 FR 55404 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  17. 75 FR 7540 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  18. 78 FR 64064 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  19. 75 FR 39333 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  20. 76 FR 17993 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  1. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  2. 75 FR 33893 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  3. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  4. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  5. 76 FR 37196 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  6. 75 FR 62629 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  7. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  8. 76 FR 45005 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  9. 76 FR 2194 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  10. Can environmental conditions affect smallholders' climate change perception? Evidence from an aridity gradient in the Gobi desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueff, Henri

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing interest in smallholders' climate change perception (CCP). Understanding what people perceive in relation to the climate they endure supports national climate change adaptation policy especially relevant to uncertain and resource-scarce environments. Most research so far focused on the accuracy of CCP compared to observed climatic data. However, the potential effect of factors influencing peoples' perceptions remains largely unstudied. This research tests two hypotheses in a desert environment; first, that CCP varies along an aridity gradient, and, second, that respondents are more consistent (answers less far apart) in their CCP when facing more climate shocks, which supports the first hypothesis. A semi-structured survey was conducted among nomadic (Mongolia) (n=180) and semi-nomadic (Inner Mongolia-China) (n=180) herders, to analyse perception along an aridity gradient (proxied by Normalised Difference Vegetation Index) covering an array of climate change issues in the Gobi. Results suggests that environmental conditions have a significant effect on CCP but only in terms of experienced climate shocks. The CCP for other climatic variables (rain, season length) is more diffused and can poorly be predicted by the surrounding environment smallholders live in. Institutional contrasts between China and Mongolia explain marginally differences of perception. Further research is needed to validate these results among smallholders on other environmental gradient types, for examples along altitudinal biome stratification in mountain environments.

  11. Transcultural nursing: facing the challenges of advocacy and diversity/universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K H

    1993-01-01

    This paper is in response to an invitation to address the topic of advocacy and diversity from the perspective of past and present transcultural nursing. With origins in nursing, with its philosophy of active intervention, and in anthropology, where relativism proposes merit in diverse (including non-interventive) approaches to health and illness, transcultural nursing grapples with potential epistemological conflict as it helps shape health care in highly industrialized, multicultural societies and even more varied global contexts. As a developing subdiscipline, transcultural nursing continuously reexamines dialectical relationships between change and preservation and between health care needs and the risk of imposition. Whereas advocacy is viewed as a moral imperative in nursing, diversity (which can be used to argue against acknowledgement of differences and to promote the pretense that everything is the same for everyone) remains better developed conceptually than operationally, while universality too often falls prey to misuse as an argument against acknowledgement of diversity. Within a framework constructed from the juxtaposition of advocacy with diversity/universality (Leininger, 1988c, 1991), this article appraises the accomplishments and challenges of transcultural nursing as it moves into its second quarter century. It is proposed that the future of transcultural nursing should emphasize development of realistic nursing roles that include a confluence of advocacy and diversity/universality and negotiation of responsible social conceptualizations of cultural issues such as "race" and diversity.

  12. Hospital employees' perceptions of fairness and job satisfaction at a time of transformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, Susan; Fisher, Ron; McPhail, Ruth; Rice, John; Eljiz, Kathy; Fitzgerald, Anneke; Gapp, Rod; Marshall, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Objective This study examines the relationships between job satisfaction and organisational justice during a time of transformational change. Methods Data collection occurred immediately before a major regional hospital's move to a greenfield site. Existing measures of job satisfaction and organisational justice were used. Data were analysed (n=316) using descriptive, correlation and regression methods together with interactions between predictor variables. Results Correlation coefficients for satisfaction and organisational justice variables were high and significant at the Pemployee job satisfaction. Interactions between the predictor variables showed that job satisfaction increased as the interactions between the predictor variables increased. Conclusions The finding that even at a time of transformational change staff perceptions of fair treatment will in the main result in high job satisfaction extends the literature in this area. In addition, it was found that increasing rewards for staff who perceive low levels of organisational justice does not increase satisfaction as much as for staff who perceive high levels of fairness. If people feel negative about their role, but feel they are well paid, they probably still have negative feelings overall. What is known about the topic? Despite much research highlighting the importance of job satisfaction and organisational justice in healthcare, no research has examined the influence of transformational change, such as a healthcare organisational relocation, on these factors. What does this paper add? The research adds to academic literature relating to job satisfaction and organisational justice. It highlights the importance of organisational justice in influencing the job satisfaction of staff. What are the implications for practitioners? Financial rewards do not necessarily motivate staff but low rewards do demotivate. Shortages of health professionals are often linked to a lack of job satisfaction, and recruitment

  13. Perception regarding pubertal changes among rural adolescent boys of Haryana: A school based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Chayal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a transition phase through which a child matures into an adult. The physical changes in the human body are from infant to child to adolescence to adult to old age.  All phases of life behave like a coin with both good and bad facets attached to each phase of life. Aims & Objectives:  1. To study perception and awareness regarding pubertal changes among school going adolescent boys. 2. To study the association between education and perceived pubertal problems among study subjects. Material & Methods: The study was conducted among male students of senior secondary schools of community development block Beri in one year. The study universe comprised of students in middle and late adolescence (aged 14-18 years studying in 9th to 12th classes of the senior secondary schools in the area. A total of 1000 male students were selected from these schools which were more than the required sample size of 891. Results: The study found that 42.66% students and a half (50% of students of class 9th & 10th and class 11th & 12th respectively considered that pubertal changes as a normal phenomenon. The majority of students admitted practicing masturbation and felt shy and guilty for practicing masturbation, also students felt fatigued after night emission. Conclusions: The study concludes that adolescent’s sexuality which often causes controversy and concern among adults is least discussed with them during adolescence. The reasons for this may be many, including moral grounds or because of concomitant health risks and threats to wellbeing.

  14. Trajectory Perception and Object Continuity: Effects of Shape and Color Change on 4-Month-Olds' Perception of Object Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J. Gavin; Slater, Alan M.; Mason, Uschi C.; Spring, Jo; Johnson, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that infants use object trajectory continuity as a cue to the constant identity of an object, but results are equivocal regarding the role of object features, with some work suggesting that a change in the appearance of an object does not cue a change in identity. In an experiment involving 72 participants, we…

  15. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  16. Speed and direction changes induce the perception of animacy in 7-month-old infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eTräuble

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A large body of research has documented infants’ ability to classify animate and inanimate objects based on static or dynamic information. It has been shown that infants less than one year of age transfer animacy-specific expectations from dynamic point-light displays to static images. The present study examined whether basic motion cues that typically trigger judgments of perceptual animacy in older children and adults lead 7-month-olds to infer an ambiguous object’s identity from dynamic information. Infants were tested with a novel paradigm that required inferring the animacy status of an ambiguous moving shape. An ambiguous shape emerged from behind a screen and its identity could only be inferred from its motion. Its motion pattern varied distinctively between scenes: it either changed speed and direction in an animate way, or it moved along a straight path at a constant speed (i.e. in an inanimate way. At test, the identity of the shape was revealed and it was either consistent or inconsistent with its motion pattern. Infants looked longer on trials with the inconsistent outcome. We conclude that 7-month-olds’ representations of animates and inanimates include category-specific associations between static and dynamic attributes. Moreover, these associations seem to hold for simple dynamic cues that are considered minimal conditions for animacy perception.

  17. Western Sydney is hot! Community arts and changing perceptions of the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Ho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Can the arts change how we view cities? How can we evaluate the broad social impacts of arts programs, particularly in elusive areas such as the local image of urban communities? This article examines the cultural renaissance of Western Sydney, long considered a crass, working-class cultural wasteland. In the last two decades, the region has experienced a proliferation of new artistic initiatives, and advocates now hail Sydney’s West as the true face of multicultural Australia’s cultural vitality. This article also documents how community arts and development programs have contributed to these shifting perceptions, analysing these contributions in terms of social impact evaluation. It argues that evaluating social impact expands the parameters of conventional evaluation techniques, which typically focus on program-level outputs and outcomes. It presents a case study of a Western Sydney community organisation, Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE, which, for 20 years, has delivered community cultural development and professional development programs for Western Sydney artists. Engaging with historically disadvantaged communities, the organisation has specialised in art forms that have resonated with the region, including hip hop, digital storytelling, and filmmaking, and in the process has played a key role in re-imagining Western Sydney as a cutting edge, multicultural hub of creative vibrancy. Keywords: Western Sydney, community arts, evaluation, social impact

  18. How product trial changes quality perception of four new processed beef products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Faiza; Grunert, Klaus G; Therkildsen, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the quantitative analysis of the change in quality perception of four new processed beef products from pre to post trial phases. Based on the Total Food Quality Model, differences in pre and post-trial phases were measured using repeated measures technique for cue evaluation, quality evaluation and purchase motive fulfillment. For two of the tested products, trial resulted in a decline of the evaluation of cues, quality and purchase motive fulfillment compared to pre-trial expectations. For these products, positive expectations were created by giving information about ingredients and ways of processing, which were not confirmed during trial. For the other two products, evaluations on key sensory dimensions based on trial exceeded expectations, whereas the other evaluations remained unchanged. Several demographic factors influenced the pattern of results, notably age and gender, which may be due to underlying differences in previous experience. The study gives useful insights for testing of new processed meat products before market introduction.

  19. Changes in Women's Attractiveness Perception of Masculine Men's Dances across the Ovulatory Cycle: Preliminary Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Cappelle

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Women's preferences for putative cues of genetic quality in men's voices, faces, bodies, and behavioral displays are stronger during the fertile phase of the ovulatory cycle. Here we show that ovulatory cycle-related changes in women's attractiveness perceptions of male features are also found with dance movements, especially those perceived as highly masculine. Dance movements of 79 British men were recorded with an optical motion-capture system whilst dancing to a basic rhythm. Virtual humanoid characters (avatars were created and converted into 15-second video clips and rated by 37 women on masculinity. Another 23 women judged the attractiveness of the 10 dancers who scored highest and those 10 who scored lowest on masculinity once in days of high fertility and once in days of low fertility of their ovulatory cycle. High-masculine dancers were judged higher on attractiveness around ovulation than on other cycle days, whilst no such perceptual difference was found for low-masculine dancers. We suggest that women may gain fitness benefits from evolved preferences for masculinity cues they obtain from male dance movements.

  20. Public perception of climate change in a period of economic crisis in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Santos-Corrada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analysis is performed to measure Puerto Rican citizens’ perceptions of environmental issues and global climate change (GCC. Puerto Rico (PR is presently facing an economic crisis that began in 2010. In addition, the island has faced many extreme weather events that have greatly impacted the economy, including a dry period that lasted from the beginning of 2014 until the end of 2015 [1]. By replicating a study done in Greece (GR, [2] found that the citizens of PR are more informed about GCC (43% than Greeks (34%. However, only 29% of Puerto Ricans said they knew about the effects of greenhouse gases, as compared to 44% of Greeks. The citizens of PR (67% and GR (91% claim they do not have confidence that their respective governments and agencies will be able to face GCC. In both cases, they have a higher confidence level in environmental organizations than in the scientific community. In PR, 89% of the citizens are concerned about the degradation of natural resources. At 64%, this concern is also significant in the case of GR, although the figure has decreased from previous years. Both countries place more responsibility in the hands of those in government and industry to take action on GCC. That being said, the people of GR have made it known they are willing to perform individual actions as well.

  1. Images of Polar Bears and Penguins, Storms, Deforestation and More - Middle School Students Perceptions of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, S.; Melaas, E. K.; Malmrose, M.; Mullokandov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global change studies aim to foster a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of global change on planet Earth. The study of global change presents a rich domain of inquiry, exploration, and discovery at all grade levels. The main objective of this exploratory study was to assess middle school students' perceptions of global change as part of their participation in the NSF GK12 program called GLACIER (Global Change Initiative - Education and Research) during the academic year 2012-13. The middle schools are located in the Metro Boston area. As part of the program, participating students were asked to draw pictures of their perceptions and ideas on global change. The drawings of 150 children, ages 11 to 13, were qualitatively analyzed. The analysis focused on (a) the type of concepts children chose to convey, (b) the specific context of the global change described (polar bears in floating glaciers), (c) students direct representation of anthropocentric impacts (such as pollution or deforestation), and (d) the match between students concepts and the recent IPCC reports. About 20% of the students focused on the iconic imagery of the melting glaciers and impact on animals such as penguins and polar bears, more than 25% focused on natural disasters (such as storms, sea level changes) while 30% focused on urban problems. These concepts are matched with the recent IPCC report. These results are notable and suggest students in middle schools understand the varied dimensions of global change and the role of human activities in bringing about change. Students' perspectives may help in developing a suitable curriculum using existing science standards to discuss this significant topic in middle school classrooms. In addition, students' drawings illustrate their perception of the coupled human and natural systems.

  2. Forest adjacent households' voices on their perceptions and adaptation strategies to climate change in Kilombero District, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balama, Chelestino; Augustino, Suzana; Eriksen, Siri; Makonda, Fortunatus B S

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a global and local challenge to both sustainable livelihoods and economic development. Tanzania as other countries of the world has been affected. Several studies have been conducted on farmers' perceptions and adaptation to climate change in the country, but little attention has been devoted to forest adjacent households in humid areas. This study assessed this gap through assessing forest adjacent households' voices on perceptions and adaptation strategies to climate change in Kilombero District, Tanzania. Data collection involved key informant interviews, focus group discussions and household questionnaires. Results showed that the majority of households perceived changed climate in terms of temperature increase, unpredictable rainfall, frequent occurrence of floods, increased dry spells during rainy season coupled with decreased water sources and emergence of new pests and diseases. The perceived change in climate has impacted agriculture productivity as the main livelihood source. Different coping and adaptation strategies are employed. These are; crop diversification, changing cropping calendar, adopting modern farming technologies, and increasing reliance on non-timber forest products. These strategies were positively and significantly influenced by socio-economic factors including household size, residence period, land ownership and household income. The study concludes that, there are changes in climatic conditions; and to respond to these climatic changes, forest adjacent households have developed numerous coping and adaptation strategies, which were positively and significantly influenced by some socio-economic factors. The study calls for actual implementation of local climate change policies and strategies in order to enhance adaptive capacity at household level.

  3. Disease Advocacy Organizations Catalyze Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Fontaine Terry

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease advocacy organizations have long played an important role in the continuum from basic science to therapy development in rare disease research. PXE International has sometimes led the field in innovative ways, venturing into specific activities that have traditionally been conducted by scientists. As lay founders, we have engaged in gene discovery, gene patenting, diagnostic development, epidemiological studies, clinical trials and therapy research and development. This article will describe the steps that we took, and the ways in which we have scaled these efforts for the larger community.

  4. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  5. School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Havlik, Stacey Gaenzle; Malott, Krista M.; Jones, SaDohl Goldsmith

    2015-01-01

    Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role…

  6. Speaking up about Advocacy: Findings from a Partnership Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melanie; Bannister, Susan; Davies, Julie; Fleming, Simon; Graham, Claire; Mcmaster, Andrea; Seddon, Angela; Wheldon, Anita; Whittell, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a partnership research project carried out by a research team consisting of people with learning disabilities and people without learning disabilities. The research explored people's understandings of advocacy and identified gaps in advocacy provision for people with learning disabilities and their families. Four focus…

  7. Exploring Nonoffending Caregiver Satisfaction with a Children's Advocacy Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonach, Kathryn; Mabry, J. Beth; Potts-Henry, Candice

    2010-01-01

    This study is a case evaluation research report on one Children's Advocacy Center that provides a coordinated response to allegations of child maltreatment, particularly sexual abuse. The data come from a mailed survey of nonoffending caregivers measuring their satisfaction with services provided through the Children's Advocacy Center. The results…

  8. A Media Advocacy Intervention Linking Health Disparities and Food Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Melanie J.; McIntyre, Lynn; Persaud, Steven A.; Thomas, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Media advocacy is a well-established strategy for transmitting health messages to the public. This paper discusses a media advocacy intervention that raised issues about how the public interprets messages about the negative effects of poverty on population health. In conjunction with the publication of a manuscript illustrating how income-related…

  9. Advocacy for Child Wellness in High-Poverty Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Child wellness needs to be understood holistically so that children and youth from high-poverty environments can succeed in schooling and life. Teachers who foster advocacy in themselves are well equipped to teach students to take ownership of their own well-being. Such advocacy can enrich the classroom curriculum and mitigate the negative effects…

  10. "If I Don't Like the Way I Feel With a Certain Drug, I'll Tell Them.": Older Adults' Experiences With Self-Determination and Health Self-Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiano, Nicole; Whiteman, Karen; Shtompel, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Health self-advocacy is associated with positive health outcomes, though existing research indicates that older adults may be at a disadvantage when self-advocating within the health care and disability support systems. This study examined perceptions of older adults' health self-advocacy behaviors and the context under which they self-advocate for their chronic conditions. The study involved in-depth interviews with 37 older adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities and 9 geriatric case managers in South and Central Florida. Data were systematically analyzed for themes. Thematic findings revealed that concerns over quality of life is the most common motivator for older adults to engage in health self-advocacy and that self-advocacy involves gathering information to prepare for decision-making and confronting providers about the information gathered. The findings suggest that providers may help facilitate self-determination by framing health communication within the context of quality of life.

  11. [Perception, knowledge, and use of generic drugs in southern Brazil: what changed from 2002 to 2012?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttier, Marília Cruz; Silveira, Marysabel Pinto Telis; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the perception, knowledge, and use of generic drugs by adults in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, using two cross-sectional population-based studies from 2002 and 2012. Study outcomes were: (a) prevalence of use of generics; (b) generics as a proportion of all medication; (c) users' perceptions of prices and quality; (d) users' knowledge of generics; and (e) strategies for acquisition of medicines. Prevalence of generics use increased from 3.6% (95%CI: 3.0-4.3) to 26.1% (95%CI: 24.5-27.7) in the 10-year period. Perceptions of prices and quality of generics remained stable, identification of characteristics that distinguish generics from other drugs improved (p generics. Between 2002 and 2012 there was an increase in knowledge and use of generics, while perception of lower prices and equivalent quality remained high.

  12. Change in Women's Perceptions of Parental Child Rearing Attitudes in Turkey: A Three Generation Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Leyla

    1989-01-01

    Found significant differences across generations in perceptions of child rearing practices, attitudes, and beliefs. Found a decreasing emphasis on authoritarian control and an increasing emphasis on encouraging independence, open expression, and expression of affect. (PCB)

  13. Development and Validation of an Instrument for Assessing Climate Change Knowledge and Perceptions: The Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Scott L. WALKER; McNeal, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS) was developed to measure knowledge and perceptions of global climate change, while also considering information sources that respondents ‘trust.’ The CSS was drafted using a three-stage approach: development of salient scales, writing individual items, and field testing and analyses. Construct validity and alpha-level reliability was conducted on the 122-item test instrument to produce a refined 84-item CSS.  The field tested C...

  14. Consumer Perceptions of Climate Changes and WTP for Mandatory Implementation of Low Carbon Labels: The Case of South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyeyoung; House, Lisa; KIM, TAE-KYUN

    2014-01-01

    Voluntarily implemented carbon labels have shown that there is a lack of motivation by companies to develop technology to reduce carbon emissions. This study examined consumer values for mandatory carbon labels in South Korea. Considering the altruistic nature of carbon labels, we asked about individuals’ perceptions about the impact of climate change on their personal lives to measure consumer preference for carbon labels. Significant preference for mandatory carbon labels reflected Koreans’...

  15. How Blogging on Earth and Environmental Science Changed One Student's Passion, Perception, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufoe, A.

    2013-12-01

    In 2011, I started a WordPress blog to engage more with my undergraduate education field of study - communications. Starting out with blog posts about social media, this blog's initial goal was to showcase my interest in the media as well as to blog about my first conference attendance and presentations. However, blogging turned into more than that for me. As I was pursuing a minor in Environmental Inquiry and therefore taking more Earth and environmental science classes, I learned that I love to write about environmental issues, particularly about how issues can be addressed and resolved. Because of this shift in my personal and professional interests, I began to blog about global topics such as global water consumption, environmental conservation and arctic sea ice. This change in direction was unprecedented, but helped define my online presence. Over the two years I have been writing my blog, the science posts have been the most successful, with WordPress.com users liking and reading the posts. Readers from all over the globe are brought to my blog from search engines, as shown through the analytics on the WordPress dashboard. However, the impact of my blog on others is challenging to quantify apart from the analytics, because most people do not comment on the posts. Regardless, and most importantly, my blog has changed MY perception of science. Before I started blogging about science topics, I was unaware of how complicated and connected Earth's processes are, including climate change, natural disasters, human actions and pollution. Overall, this blog has been important to me because it helped define my interests academically, leading me to apply and be accepted to a Masters program at the University of Montana starting in August 2013. The program in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism umbrellas over both my training in communications and my love for the environment. Because of my personal growth through my blog, I am also motivated to create

  16. Public Perception of Climate Change and Mitigation Technologies; Percepcion Publica del Cambio Climatico y las Tecnologias de Mitigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, R.; Sala, R.; Oltra, C.

    2007-09-27

    Public perception and understanding of climate change and mitigation policies may have a significant influence on the development of political programs as well as on individual behavioral intentions to address climate change. The study of public attitudes and beliefs about climate change and energy policy may be useful in the design of suitable communication strategies and in the efficient implementation of climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. Based on a survey to the Spanish population, we analyze different issues such as the level of concern towards climate change, the existing knowledge about the contribution of different energy technologies to global warming, the attitudes toward energy technologies and the beliefs about potential adaptation strategies. Comparisons with other countries based on similar public opinion surveys are established to obtain a broader view of policy preferences and attitudes regarding climate change. (Author) 5 refs.

  17. Seeing is Believing? An Examination of Perceptions of Local Weather Conditions and Climate Change Among Residents in the U.S. Gulf Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wanyun; Goidel, Kirby

    2016-11-01

    What role do objective weather conditions play in coastal residents' perceptions of local climate shifts and how do these perceptions affect attitudes toward climate change? While scholars have increasingly investigated the role of weather and climate conditions on climate-related attitudes and behaviors, they typically assume that residents accurately perceive shifts in local climate patterns. We directly test this assumption using the largest and most comprehensive survey of Gulf Coast residents conducted to date supplemented with monthly temperature data from the U.S. Historical Climatology Network and extreme weather events data from National Climatic Data Center. We find objective conditions have limited explanatory power in determining perceptions of local climate patterns. Only the 15- and 19-year hurricane trends and decadal summer temperature trend have some effects on perceptions of these weather conditions, while the decadal trend of total number of extreme weather events and 15- and 19-year winter temperature trends are correlated with belief in climate change. Partisan affiliation, in contrast, plays a powerful role affecting individual perceptions of changing patterns of air temperatures, flooding, droughts, and hurricanes, as well as belief in the existence of climate change and concern for future consequences. At least when it comes to changing local conditions, "seeing is not believing." Political orientations rather than local conditions drive perceptions of local weather conditions and these perceptions-rather than objectively measured weather conditions-influence climate-related attitudes.

  18. How do people's perceptions and climatic disaster experiences influence their daily behaviors regarding adaptation to climate change? - A case study among young generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ying; Wang, Ming; Yousefpour, Rasoul

    2017-03-01

    Adaptation is a commonly applied strategy used to address individual behavior changes, in response to climate change. However, in-depth, evidence-based investigations of the relationships among individual perceptions, climatic disaster experiences, and daily behaviors regarding adaptation to climate change remain to be conducted. We obtained survey data from 488 respondents in southwestern China, a region prone to frequent and severe droughts, to assess factors that influence adaptive behaviors and to identify their pathways. We applied Construal Level Theory (CLT) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to differentiate between respondents' high-level abstract construals and their low-level concrete construals. We analyzed the influences of these two levels of perception, combined with drought experiences on water-saving behaviors. We developed a structural equation model to estimate the correlation coefficients of the latent and observed variables in the structural process linked to the respondents' adaptive behaviors. The results found that a concrete perception of saving water plays a more significant part than an abstract perception of climate change in prompting specific adaptive behaviors. Improving public perceptions of climate change might increase the desirability of adaptation, whereas improving perceptions of water saving might increase the feasibility of implementing adaptive measures. Experience influenced individual behaviors, but that influence was indirect through its effects on perceptions.

  19. Advocacy for Art Education: Beyond Tee-Shirts and Bumper Stickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Bryna; DiCindio, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    Advocacy is not new to art education. Over the years, Goldfarb (1979), Hodsoll (1985), and Erickson and Young (1996) have written about the importance of arts advocacy, but the concept of advocacy has evolved with the times. For example, in the 1970s, arts advocacy was described as a "movement" and brought together art educators,…

  20. 42 CFR 51.31 - Conduct of protection and advocacy activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduct of protection and advocacy activities. 51... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Protection and Advocacy Services § 51.31 Conduct of protection and advocacy activities. (a) Consistent with...

  1. 45 CFR 1386.23 - Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.23 Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System. (a) By January 1 of each year the Protection and Advocacy System shall...

  2. 77 FR 8327 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  3. 78 FR 56269 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  4. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  5. 77 FR 20488 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  6. 78 FR 48231 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  7. 75 FR 62631 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint ] Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, November 23, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  8. 75 FR 33894 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, July 8,...

  9. 77 FR 55526 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  10. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  11. 78 FR 3500 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  12. 76 FR 56880 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, October 27, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  13. 77 FR 67736 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, December 13, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  14. 77 FR 47166 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, September 26, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  15. 75 FR 4141 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, February 23, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  16. 75 FR 18957 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement...

  17. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, August 6 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m....

  18. 77 FR 40410 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, August 22, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  19. 75 FR 47347 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint ] Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, September 28, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  20. 75 FR 18958 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy...

  1. 77 FR 74921 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  2. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  3. 77 FR 5313 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 2 p.m., Eastern Time...

  4. 78 FR 15126 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  5. 76 FR 37197 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, August 25, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  6. 75 FR 55407 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, October 26, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  7. 77 FR 37102 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting ] public... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, July 19, 2012, at 8 a.m....

  8. 75 FR 76522 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, January 25, 2011, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  9. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Monday, July 25,...

  10. 76 FR 2193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Monday, February 24, 2011, at 2 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  11. 77 FR 61054 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  12. 76 FR 45006 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, September 22, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  13. One Science Teacher's Professional Development Experience: A Case Study Exploring Changes in Students' Perceptions of Their Fluency with Innovative Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, Jazlin; Columbus, Russell; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Zhang, Lin; Ebenezer, Devairakkam Luke

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this case-study is to narrate a secondary science teacher's experience of his professional development (PD) education and training in innovative technologies (IT) in the context of engaging students in environmental research projects The sources from which the narrative is derived include (1) the science teacher's reflective reports during three summer institute programs and (2) the science teacher's reflective reports while subsequently engaging students in IT-embedded environmental research projects in his classroom. The science teacher's explanations for changes in students' perception of their IT fluency illuminate his personal narrative. The science teacher attributed his growth and significant changes in students' perceptions of their IT fluency to the following mechanisms: (a) a personal commitment to developing his own and his students' IT abilities in the context of doing environmental research projects, and (b) an increase in class time devoted to science education due to school-time scheduling policy. The study implies that immersive professional development opportunities have the potential to produce significant increases in students' perceptions of their IT fluency.

  14. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health.

  15. CAMPAIGN JOURNALISM ON ROMANIAN TELEVISIONS: TOWARDS A NORMATIVE VIEW OF ADVOCACY IN THE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA DIANA MĂDROANE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advocacy media campaigns, staged by Romanian television channels and focused on changing social policies, have gained increasing visibility in the Romanian public sphere. The article examines models of journalism and normative theories about the role of the press in a democracy in order to carve out a normative position from which this emerging media format can be analysed. It situates media advocacy within the frame of interpretive journalism, aimed both at facilitating democratic debate and citizen participation (civic journalism, and at social reform (radical journalism. The reassessment of media strategies based on emotions and interpretation as mediators of social reality may lead to a positive, ‘optimistic’ view of campaign journalism. However, the advanced commercialisation of the media and the struggles for political representation interfere with and make the task of socially responsible journalism an incredibly challenging one

  16. Minority Women and Advocacy for Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanyika, Shiriki K.; Morssink, Christiaan B.; Nestle, Marion

    2001-01-01

    US minority health issues involve racial/ethnic disparities that affect both women and men. However, women's health advocacy in the United States does not consistently address problems specific to minority women. The underlying evolution and political strength of the women's health and minority health movements differ profoundly. Women of color comprise only one quarter of women's health movement constituents and are, on average, socioeconomically disadvantaged. Potential alliances may be inhibited by vestiges of historical racial and social divisions that detract from feelings of commonality and mutual support. Nevertheless, insufficient attention to minority women's issues undermines the legitimacy of the women's health movement and may prevent important advances that can be achieved only when diversity is fully considered. PMID:11527764

  17. The Impact of Changing Teaching Jobs on Music Teacher Identity, Role, and Perceptions of Role Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lori F.

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized symbolic interaction as a framework to examine the impact of mobility on four veteran elementary general music teachers' identities, roles, and perceptions of role support. Previous research has focused on teacher identity formation among preservice and novice teachers; veteran teachers are less frequently represented in the…

  18. A Window into Mathematical Support: How Parents' Perceptions Change Following Observations of Mathematics Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenskow, Arla; Boyer-Thurgood, Jennifer; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the perceptions of 24 parents of rising 5th-grade students with mathematics learning difficulties as part of a 10-week summer mathematics tutoring experience. During the summer tutoring program, parents observed their children participating in mathematics learning experiences during one-to-one tutoring sessions. At the…

  19. An Examination of Cross Sectional Change in Student's Metaphorical Perceptions towards Heat, Temperature and Energy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Harun

    2016-01-01

    In science teaching, metaphors are important tools for understanding meaningful learning and conceptual formation by the help of daily life language. This study aims to evaluate how the concepts of heat, temperature and energy are perceived by students in secondary school science classes and how the perceptions of these concepts vary in terms of…

  20. Context-dependent changes in functional connectivity of auditory cortices during the perception of object words

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, W.O. van; Dongen, E.V. van; Bekkering, H.; Rüschemeyer, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Embodied theories hold that cognitive concepts are grounded in our sensorimotor systems. Specifically, a number of behavioral and neuroimaging studies have buttressed the idea that language concepts are represented in areas involved in perception and action [Pulvermueller, F. Brain mechanisms linkin

  1. Human perceptions of landscape change: The case of a monodominant forest of Attalea speciosa Mart ex. Spreng (Northeast Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Gabriela M A; Ramos, Marcelo A; Araújo, Elcida L; Baldauf, Cristina; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2016-05-01

    From the perception of human populations, we can assess the changes occurring in certain landscapes and the factors that cause those changes. Such studies have proven helpful in increasing the knowledge of the history of a landscape, recognizing past formations and projecting its future. Our research objective was to determine how a landscape dominated by the palm tree Attalea speciosa, a species of ecological, economic, and cultural importance, has been changing over time by synthesizing and comparing historical documents and local perceptions. This study was conducted in Araripe Environmental Protection Area, Northeast Region, Brazil. To understand local landscape change, we interviewed active harvesters in four communities in which A. speciosa use has been documented. Historical documents were evaluated as a complement to the interview data. According to local informants, areas previously used for cultivation and animal husbandry that were abandoned or decimated by droughts in the region may have fostered the expansion of a monodominant A. speciosa forest. Furthermore, other forms of landscape management resulting from human population growth may also have affected the current and past distribution of this forest.

  2. Perceptions of Climate Change and the Potential for Adaptation in a Rural Community in Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejabaledi A. Rankoana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Perceptions of climate change by rural communities are centered on observations of variations in temperature and rainfall patterns supported by observations and projections on climate alterations in the form of increased temperatures and scarce rainfall by scientists worldwide. The present study documented perceptions of climate variation and the community’s ability to adapt to climate change hazards threatening the production of subsistence crops. Data were collected through interactions with 100 participants. In the study, climate change is explained as variations in temperature and rainfall patterns which resulted in excessive heat, erratic rainfall patterns and drought negatively impacting on subsistence crop production. Community members have the potential to limit the impacts of climate hazards on subsistence crop production. The negative impacts of climate hazards are limited by community members’ indigenous knowledge of rainfall prediction, the seasons, crop diversification and mixed cropping. Mulching and the application of kraal manure improve the soil structure and fertility to reduce crop failure. These adaptation measures are resilient to the negative impact of climate hazards and may be helpful in the development of adaptation policies to assist rural communities vulnerable to climate change hazards.

  3. Impact of Vocal Tract Resonance on the Perception of Voice Quality Changes Caused by Varying Vocal Fold Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorello, Rosario; Zhang, Zhaoyan; Gerratt, Bruce; Kreiman, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Summary Experiments using animal and human larynx models are often conducted without a vocal tract. While it is often assumed that the absence of a vocal tract has only small effects on vocal fold vibration, it is not actually known how sound production and quality are affected. In this study, the validity of using data obtained in the absence of a vocal tract for voice perception studies was investigated. Using a two-layer self-oscillating physical model, three series of voice stimuli were created: one produced with conditions of left-right symmetric vocal fold stiffness, and two with left-right asymmetries in vocal fold body stiffness. Each series included a set of stimuli created with a physical vocal tract, and a second set created without a physical vocal tract. Stimuli were re-synthesized to equalize the mean F0 for each series and normalized for amplitude. Listeners were asked to evaluate the three series in a sort-and-rate task. Multidimensional scaling analysis was applied to examine the perceptual interaction between the voice source and the vocal tract resonances. The results showed that the presence or absence of a vocal tract can significantly affect perception of voice quality changes due to parametric changes in vocal fold properties, except when the parametric changes in vocal fold properties produced an abrupt shift in vocal fold vibratory pattern resulting in a salient quality change. PMID:27134616

  4. The Concept of Advocacy in Nursing: A Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzidis, Evdokia; Jewell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As health care professionals practice as a team, they take on responsibilities that are specific to their roles-responsibilities that are recognized and understood by the team and management as pertaining to their professional domain and expertise. Is advocacy part of the role of the nurse? Members of the nursing profession commonly maintain that it is, but is there a consensus on this issue, both within the profession and among other stakeholders? Is there a clear understanding of the term advocacy, and is this reflected in Codes of Practice and research into practice? An examination of significant documents and reports of empirical research reveals conflicting conceptions and opinions. There is potential for a common definition, but agreements need to be reached on whether advocacy is an essential function of nursing within the management of health care, and if so, what is advocacy's importance, focus, and limits.

  5. Literal and Metaphorical Advocacy: Differentiating the Limited Preparation Speaking Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, C. Thomas, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that a substantive differentiation of extemporaneous and impromptu forensic speaking events is possible and appropriate. Offers suggestions to distinguish the literal argumentative skills inherent to extemporaneous speaking from the metaphorical advocacy ideally inherent in impromptu speaking. (PRA)

  6. Handicapped Infants and Euthanasia: A Challenge to Our Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David

    1985-01-01

    The issue of pediatric euthanasia for handicapped newborns is examined and contrasting viewpoints emphasizing the quality and the sanctity of life are considered. The author asserts that advocacy for handicapped children involves decisions regarding the euthanasia question. (CL)

  7. Emotion-related changes in heart rate and its variability during performance and perception of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hidehiro; Furuya, Shinichi; Obata, Satoshi; Masuko, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated the differential effects of emotions evoked by music on heart rate (HR) and its variability (HRV) during the playing of music on the piano compared to those in persons listening to the same music. Thirteen elite pianists underwent experiments under expressive piano playing, nonexpressive piano playing, expressive listening, and nonexpressive listening conditions. The expressive conditions produced significantly higher levels of HR and low-frequency component of HRV, as well as a lower level of its high-frequency component. A greater modulation of these was also revealed for performance than perception. The findings suggested that musical performance would lead to a greater effect of emotion-related modulation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity than musical perception.

  8. End-user perceptions of a computerized medication system: is there resistance to change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malato, Larry Allen; Kim, Soonhee

    2004-01-01

    Public mandate to control cost, while improving quality of service, leads health care administrators to look to information technology for innovative solutions. This case study of acute care registered nurses in a public hospital focuses on experiences of the end-users of a computerized medication system. Data was obtained by in-depth interviews and observation performed in the clinical setting. Findings fell into five challenging issues to the end-user and health care administration: end-user perceptions of inadequate training, negative experiences of implementation, perceived deficiencies in quality of technology, perceptions of lack of participatory design and a ensuing circumvention of the new system. Emphasis is on the relationship of the findings to the quality of public health care administration.

  9. Perception, experience, and indigenous knowledge of climate change and variability: the case of Accra, a sub-Saharan African city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codjoe, Samuel N.A.; Owusu, George; Burkett, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Several recent international assessments have concluded that climate change has the potential to reverse the modest economic gains achieved in many developing countries over the past decade. The phenomenon of climate change threatens to worsen poverty or burden populations with additional hardships, especially in poor societies with weak infrastructure and economic well-being. The importance of the perceptions, experiences, and knowledge of indigenous peoples has gained prominence in discussions of climate change and adaptation in developing countries and among international development organizations. Efforts to evaluate the role of indigenous knowledge in adaptation planning, however, have largely focused on rural people and their agricultural livelihoods. This paper presents the results of a study that examines perceptions, experiences, and indigenous knowledge relating to climate change and variability in three communities of metropolitan Accra, which is the capital of Ghana. The study design is based on a three-part conceptual framework and interview process involving risk mapping, mental models, and individual stressor cognition. Most of the residents interviewed in the three communities of urban Accra attributed climate change to the combination of deforestation and the burning of firewood and rubbish. None of the residents associated climate change with fossil fuel emissions from developed countries. Numerous potential adaptation strategies were suggested by the residents, many of which have been used effectively during past drought and flood events. Results suggest that ethnic residential clustering as well as strong community bonds in metropolitan Accra have allowed various groups and long-settled communities to engage in the sharing and transmission of knowledge of weather patterns and trends. Understanding and building upon indigenous knowledge may enhance the design, acceptance, and implementation of climate change adaptation strategies in Accra and

  10. In delicate balance: stem cells and spinal cord injury advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Sara; Illes, Judy

    2011-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major focus for stem cell therapy (SCT). However, the science of SCT has not been well matched with an understanding of perspectives of persons with SCI. The online advocacy community is a key source of health information for primary stakeholders and their caregivers. In this study, we sought to characterize the content of SCI advocacy websites with respect to their discussion of SCT and stem cell tourism. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SCI advocacy websites identified through a web search and verified by expert opinion. Two independent researchers coded the information for major themes (e.g., scientific & clinical facts, research & funding, policy, ethics) and valence (positive, negative, balanced, neutral). Of the 40 SCI advocacy websites that met inclusion criteria, 50% (N=20) contained information about SCT. Less than 18% (N=7) contained information on stem cell tourism. There were more than ten times as many statements about SCT with a positive valence (N=67) as with a negative valence (N=6). Ethics-related SCT information comprised 20% (N=37) of the total content; the largest proportion of ethics-related content was devoted to stem cell tourism (80%, N=30 statements). Of those, the majority focused on the risks of stem cell tourism (N=16). Given the still-developing science behind SCT, the presence of cautionary information about stem cell tourism at advocacy sites is ethically appropriate. The absence of stem cell tourism information at the majority of advocacy sites represents a lost educational opportunity.

  11. Information Seeking about Global Climate Change among Adolescents: The Role of Risk Perceptions, Efficacy Beliefs and Parental Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Erin; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Rimal, Rajiv N; Flora, June A; Maibach, Edward W; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change is likely to have significant impacts on public health. Effective communication is critical to informing public decision making and behavior to mitigate climate change. An effective method of audience segmentation, the risk perception attitude (RPA) framework has been previously tested with other health behaviors and classifies people into 4 groups on the basis of their perceptions of risk and beliefs about personal efficacy. The 4 groups - indifference (low risk, weak efficacy), proactive (low risk, strong efficacy), avoidance (high risk, weak efficacy), and responsive (high risk, strong efficacy) - are hypothesized to differ in their self-protective behaviors and in their motivations to seek information. In this paper, we extend the RPA framework in two ways. First, we use it at the household level to determine whether parental classifications into the 4 groups are associated with their teenage children's classification into the same 4 groups. Second, we predict adolescent information-seeking behaviors on the basis of their and their parents' membership in the 4 RPA groups. Results (N = 523 parent-adolescent pairs) indicated that parental membership in the 4 RPA groups was significantly associated with children's membership in the same 4 groups. Furthermore, the RPA framework was a significant predictor of adolescent information-seeking: those in the responsive and avoidance groups sought more information on climate change than the indifference group. Family communication on global warming was positively associated with adolescents' information-seeking. Implications for interventions are discussed.

  12. Assessment of a tool for measuring non-profit advocacy efforts in India, Uganda and Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Tanya; Rajaratnam, Julie Knoll; McOwen, Jordan; Gordis, Deborah J; Bowen, Lisa A; Bernson, Jeff

    2016-03-01

    To improve maternal and child health, the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood (WRA) implemented an innovative policy advocacy project in India, Uganda and Yemen from 2009 to 2011. PATH assisted WRA in designing an approach to measure the short- and long-term results of WRA's advocacy efforts.Expert rating instruments have been widely used since 1970s to track country-level program efforts focusing on family planning, maternal and neonatal health, and HIV/AIDS. This article assesses and establishes the strength and applicability of an expert rating tool, the Maternal Health Policy Score (MHPS), in measuring and guiding a non-profit's advocacy efforts.The tool was assessed using five criteria: validity of results, reproducibility of results, acceptability to respondents, internal consistency and cost. The tool proved effective for measuring improvements in the policy environment at both the national and subnational levels that the non-profit intended to effect and useful for identifying strong and weak policy domains. The results are reproducible, though ensuring fidelity in implementation during different rounds of data collection may be difficult. The acceptability of the tool was high among respondents, and also among users of the information.MHPS provides a quick, low-cost method to measure overall changes in the policy environment, giving advocacy organizations and grant makers timely information to gauge the influence of their work and take corrective action. WRA demonstrated the use of MHPS at multiple points in the project: at the onset of a project to identify and strategize around policy domains that need attention, during and at the end of the project to monitor progress made and redirect efforts.

  13. Farmer perceptions of climate change risk and associated on-farm management strategies in Vermont, northeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Schattman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Little research has been conducted on how agricultural producers in the northeastern United States conceptualize climate-related risk and how these farmers address risk through on-farm management strategies. Two years following Tropical Storm Irene, our team interviewed 15 farmers in order to investigate their perceptions of climate-related risk and how their decision-making was influenced by these perceptions. Our results show that Vermont farmers are concerned with both ecological and economic risk. Subthemes that emerged included geographic, topographic, and hydrological characteristics of farm sites; stability of land tenure; hydrological erosion; pest and disease pressure; market access; household financial stability; and floods. Farmers in our study believed that these risks are not new but that they are significantly intensified by climate change. Farmer responses were heavily focused on adaptation activities, with discussion of climate change mitigation activities notably absent. Psychological distance construal theory and hyperbolic discounting emerged as well-suited frames to explain why farmers reported adaptation activities but not mitigation strategies. Farmers will probably experience an increasing severity of climate-related impacts in the northeast region; therefore, information about climate-related risks coming from farmers’ personal experience should be integrated with forecasting data to help farmers plan effective adaptation strategies.

  14. Lateralization of categorical perception of color changes with color term acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, A.; Drivonikou, G. V.; Clifford, A.; Kay, P; Regier, T.; Davies, I. R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Categorical perception (CP) of color is the faster and more accurate discrimination of two colors from different categories than two colors from the same category, even when same- and different-category chromatic separations are equated. In adults, color CP is lateralized to the left hemisphere (LH), whereas in infants, it is lateralized to the right hemisphere (RH). There is evidence that the LH bias in color CP in adults is due to the influence of color terms in the LH. Here we show that th...

  15. Social justice advocacy in nursing: what is it? How do we get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Siobhan O'Mahony

    2011-01-01

    Social justice advocacy is an expectation of all nurses as expressed in the professional codes that guide nursing practice. Nursing literature reflects this shift in the focus of nursing advocacy, providing insight into the potentials and challenges associated with nursing's evolution toward a broader social justice advocacy model. This article describes the concept of social justice advocacy as currently reflected in professional codes and nursing literature and contrasts this with the individual patient-nurse advocacy model, which continues to dominate in nursing practice today. Challenges associated with movement toward a social justice advocacy model and options for addressing these hurdles are also discussed.

  16. A reappraisal of transport aircraft needs 1985 - 2000: Perceptions of airline management in a changing economic, regulatory, and technological environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, F. A.

    1982-01-01

    Views of the executives of 24 major, national, regional, and commuter airlines concerning the effect of recent regulatory, economic, and technological changes on the roles they see for their airlines, and consequent changes in their plans for acquiring aircraft for the 1985 to 2000 period were surveyed. Differing perceptions on the economic justification for new-technology jets in the context of the carriers' present and projected financial conditions are outlined. After examining the cases for new or intermediate size jets, the study discusses turboprop powered transports, including the carriers' potential interest in an advanced technology, high-speed turboprop or prop-fan. Finally, the implications of foreign competition are examined in terms of each carrier's evaluation of the quality and financial offerings, as well as possible 'Buy American' policy predisposition.

  17. School Leaders' Perceptions of School Counselors as Leaders as Part of the District Leadership Team and Impact on the District Wide Change Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This exploration focuses on school leaders' perceptions of school counselors as leaders and their involvement with district wide change. This study explores school counselor leadership, school counselors' role in district level change, and barriers to school counselor leadership. This is a qualitative study utilizing grounded theory design.…

  18. The Mediating Roles of Internal Context Variables in the Relationship between Distributed Leadership Perceptions and Continuous Change Behaviours of Public School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakci, Yasar; Zayim, Merve; Beycioglu, Kadir; Sincar, Mehmet; Ugurlu, Celal T

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at building a theoretical base for continuous change in education and using this base to test the mediating roles of two key contextual variables, knowledge sharing and trust, in the relationship between the distributed leadership perceptions and continuous change behaviours of teachers. Data were collected from 687 public school…

  19. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  20. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy.

  1. International climate change policies. Interests and perceptions. A comparative study on climate change politics in Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Wurff, R.J.W.

    1997-06-26

    In Chapter 1 the differences in the climate change policy positions of Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States, are discussed against the background of a brief introduction in the scientific and international political aspects of climate change. Chapter 2 will present the theoretical framework of the study, starting with an overview of basic approaches in International Relations (IR) and their usefulness for the analysis of international environmental politics. Subsequently, some relevant IR and non-IR theories will be discussed in detail, distinguishing into state-oriented approaches (realism, regime analysis); multiple level approaches (two-level games; environmental interest profiles); and transnational approaches (Regulation School, Amsterdam School, Cultural Analysis, and Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS)). It is concluded that an interest-oriented approach (focusing on `objective` interests) and a perception-oriented approach (focusing on environmental views) need to be combined to explain international environmental politics. In chapter 3 this theoretical framework is made operational and a methodology for the research is presented. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with the interest-oriented approach, explaining the climate change policy positions of Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States in terms of `objective` interests. More specifically, in chapter 4 present constellations of climate change interests in these countries will be compared. Next, since climate change is a long term issue, chapter 5 focuses on structural change that will shape future climate change interests. It is expected that present nor future `objective` interests will offer an adequate explanation for the observed differences in climate change policy positions. In the Chapters 6 and 7 the perception-oriented approach is presented, explaining the differences in climate change policy positions of Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States in terms of cross

  2. Stages of behavioral change and positive perception of the environment towards physical activity among urban park users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Petroski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to identify the stages of behavioral change (SBC towards physical activity (PA among users of urban parks, to determine the association between socio-demographic and economic variables of users of urban parks in relation to physical activity (PA, and to analyze environmental indicators of the park perceived positively for PA. A total of 218 users of an urban park, who filled out a questionnaire regarding socio-demographic data, SBC and perception of the existing environment, participated in the study. The most prevalent SBC were maintenance (56.6% and action (21.1%. Most park users (78.7% presented an active behavior (maintenance + action towards PA, with this behavior being prevalent among middle-aged individuals (p<0.05. The beauty and geographic location of the park, technological and architectonic factors, some normative policies (public services to the users’ disposition, and values and attitudes were perceived positively for PA, regardless of whether the users regularly performed PA or not. The study suggests that most public park users present an active behavior towards PA, especially middle-aged individuals. In addition, the perception of environmental indicators is positive among physically inactive and active park users, irrespective of SBC.

  3. Climate variability and change or multiple stressors? Farmer perceptions regarding threats to livelihoods in Zimbabwe and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubaya, Chipo Plaxedes; Njuki, Jemimah; Mutsvangwa, Eness Paidamoyo; Mugabe, Francis Temba; Nanja, Durton

    2012-07-15

    Climate variability is set to increase, characterised by extreme conditions in Africa. Southern Africa will likely get drier and experience more extreme weather conditions, particularly droughts and floods. However, while climate risks are acknowledged to be a serious threat to smallholder farmers' livelihoods, these risks do not exist in isolation, but rather, compound a multiplicity of stressors. It was important for this study to understand farmer perceptions regarding the role of climate risks within a complex and multifarious set of risks to farmers' livelihoods. This study used both qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate farmers' perceptions regarding threats to livelihoods in southern Zambia and south-western Zimbabwe. While farmers report changes in local climatic conditions consistent with climate variability, there is a problem in assigning contribution of climate variability and other factors to observed negative impacts on the agricultural and socio-economic system. Furthermore, while there is a multiplicity of stressors that confront farmers, climate variability remains the most critical and exacerbate livelihood insecurity for those farmers with higher levels of vulnerability to these stressors.

  4. The "sowing of concrete": Peri-urban smallholder perceptions of rural-urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Policy makers concerned with the peri-urban interface find their greatest challenges in the rapid urban growth of developing mountain regions, since limitations caused by relief and altitude often lead to an increased competition between rural and urban land use at the valley floors. In this context, little attention has been paid to the affected agriculturalists' perceptions of peri-urban growth-important information required for the realization of sustainable land use planning. How is the process of rural-urban land change perceived and assessed by peri-urban smallholder communities? Which are the major difficulties to be overcome? By what means are the affected people reacting and how are these adaptation strategies linked with the ongoing landscape transformations of the hinterland? By using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano, an emerging Peruvian mountain city, it is shown that rural-urban land change is intensively discussed within peri-urban smallholder groups. Although urbanization also leads to infrastructure investments by public institutions-an advantage perceived throughout the study area-the negative impacts of rural-urban land use change prevail. The perceptions' analysis reveals that the decrease of fertile and irrigated agricultural land at the quechua valley floor is especially considered to threaten subsistence, food and income security. In order to compensate the loss of production capacities, many smallholders try to expand or intensify their land use at the suni altitudinal belt: an agro-ecological zone characterized by steep and nonirrigated slopes that can actually not be used for the year-round production of crops previously cultivated at the quechua zone.

  5. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed.

  6. Network Connectedness, Sense of Community, and Risk Perception of Climate Change Professionals in the Pacific Islands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlew, L. K.; Keener, V. W.; Finucane, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Pacific Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (Pacific RISA) Program conducted social network analysis research of climate change professionals (broadly defined) who are from or work in Hawaii and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) region. This study is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Pacific Islands Climate Science Center (PICSC) to address an identified need for a resource that quantifies the region's collaborative network of climate change professionals, and that supports the further development of cross-regional and inter-sectoral collaborations for future research and adaptation activities. A survey was distributed to nearly 1,200 people who are from and/or work in climate change related fields in the region. The Part One Survey questions (not confidential) created a preferential attachment network by listing major players in Hawaii and the USAPI, with additional open fields to identify important contacts in the greater professional network. Participants (n=340) identified 975 network contacts and frequency of communications (weekly, monthly, seasonally, yearly, at least once ever). Part Two Survey questions (confidential, n=302) explored climate change risk perceptions, Psychological Sense of Community (PSOC), sense of control over climate change impacts, sense of responsibility to act, policy beliefs and preferences regarding climate change actions, concern and optimism scales about specific impacts, and demographic information. Graphical representations of the professional network are being developed for release in September 2013 as a free online tool to promote and assist collaboration building among climate professionals in the region. The graphs are partitioned according to network 'hubs' (high centrality), participant location, and profession to clearly identify network strengths and opportunities for future collaborations across spatial and professional boundaries. For additional

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Patient Self-Advocacy Scale: The Persian Version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghayegh Vahdat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in science and technology and the changes in lifestyle have changed the concept of health in terms of etiology and mortality. The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the original Patient Self-Advocacy Scale for use with an Iranian population. Methods: In the current study, 50 chronic patients between the ages of 25 and 75 were selected as samples. This study was conducted in May 2013 at Bou Ali Sina Hospital in Sari. The translation process and cultural adaptation of the Patient Self-Advocacy Scale were conducted. The face validity and content validity of the instrument were formally verified by analyzing the feedback of patients and health professionals. In order to evaluate questionnaire’s reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated for each item and each domain; and the Cronbach’s alpha was calculated for the entire instruments and each domain. Results: Of the 50 patients participating in the study, 36% were male and 64% were female. The mean age of the patients was 42.5. To comply with the Iranian culture and the study target population, slight changes were applied to the process of translation and validation. In the present study, intraclass correlation coefficient for each item was 0.8-1, which demonstrates excellent reliability of the questionnaire. The Cronbach’s alpha value was 0.75 for overall scale. Conclusion: The Persian version of Patient Self-Advocacy Scale was valid and reliable. Hence, it can be used by public health researchers and health system policy makers for programming and offering patient-oriented health services based on patients’ comments, needs, and preferences.

  8. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge.

  9. Rising temperatures and dwindling water supplies? Perception of climate change among residents of the Spanish Mediterranean tourist coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Hug; Saurí, David; Olcina, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the results of a survey on the perception of climate change in the 14 "tourist zones" (as defined by the Spanish Statistical Institute, INE) that stretch from the French border to Gibraltar alongside the Spanish Mediterranean coast, including the Balearic Islands. Our sample consisted of 1,014 telephone interviews stratified according to the number of tourists staying in each zone. Respondents showed concern for the likely impacts of climate change on jobs and thought that climate change would reduce the economic activity of their areas. Responses were also pessimistic regarding future water availability but agreed with the development of alternative sources such as desalination and water re-use. Household size, educational levels, and employment tended to be the most significant statistical explanatory factors regarding attitudes toward climate change. Respondents in larger households (a variable not tested in the literature as far as we know), respondents with higher education, and respondents working for a wage tended to express more concerns than the rest.

  10. Educating for advocacy: recommendations for professional preparation and development based on a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, Susan M; Galer-Unti, Regina A; Tappe, Marlene K

    2009-01-01

    An electronic survey was used to conduct a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty to determine the extent to which advocacy instruction is present in undergraduate and graduate curricula in health education and to identify faculty members' needs and capacity to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy. An analysis of the results reveals that most undergraduate and graduate health education programs include advocacy instruction. Although faculty believe advocacy and instruction related to advocacy are important, many lack advocacy-related professional preparation and development experiences and do not participate in advocacy-related training initiatives and advocacy activities. There is wide variability in faculty confidence in their competence to provide advocacy instruction. Partnerships among professional organizations, health education practitioners, university faculty, individuals engaged in policy advocacy initiatives, and policy makers are needed to enhance the capacity of university faculty to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy.

  11. Public Perception of Climate Change: The Importance of Knowledge and Cultural Worldviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Visschers, Vivianne H M; Siegrist, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The importance of knowledge for lay people's climate change concerns has been questioned in recent years, as it had been suggested that cultural values are stronger predictors of concern about climate change than knowledge. Studies that simultaneously measured knowledge related to climate change and cultural values have, however, been missing. We conducted a mail survey in the German-speaking part of Switzerland (N = 1,065). Results suggested that cultural worldviews and climate-related knowledge were significantly related with people's concern about climate change. Also, cultural worldviews and climate-relevant knowledge appeared important for people's willingness to change behaviors and to accept climate change policies. In addition, different types of knowledge were found to have different impacts on people's concern about climate change, their willingness to change behaviors, and their acceptance of policies about climate change. Specifically, causal knowledge significantly increased concern about climate change and willingness to support climate-friendly policies. We therefore concluded that risk communication should focus on causal knowledge, provided this knowledge does not threaten cultural values.

  12. Political activity for physical activity: health advocacy for active transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosalina; Murdoch, Linda; Reeder, Anthony I; Amun, Qa-t-a

    2011-05-29

    Effective health advocacy is a priority for efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Local councils are an important audience for this advocacy. The aim of the current study was to describe features of advocacy for active transport via submissions to city council annual plans in New Zealand, and the impact of an information sheet to encourage the health sector to be involved in this process. Written submissions to city council's annual consultation process were requested for 16 city councils over the period of three years (2007/08, 2008/09, and 2009/10). Submissions were reviewed and categories of responses were created. An advocacy information sheet encouraging health sector participation and summarising some of the evidence-base related to physical activity, active transport and health was released just prior to the 2009/10 submission time. Over the period of the study, city councils received 47,392 submissions, 17% of which were related to active transport. Most submissions came from city residents, with a small proportion (2%) from the health sector. The largest category of submissions was in support of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, design and maintenance of facilities and additional features to support use of these transport modes. Health arguments featured prominently in justifications for active transport initiatives, including concerns about injury risk, obesity, physical inactivity, personal safety and facilities for people with disabilities. There was evidence that the information sheet was utilised by some health sector submitters (12.5%), providing tentative support for initiatives of this nature. In conclusion, the study provides novel information about the current nature of health advocacy for active transport and informs future advocacy efforts about areas for emphasis, such as health benefits of active transport, and potential alliances with other sectors such as environmental sustainability, transport and urban

  13. [Intercultural nursing: analysis of changes in the perception of relational problems with foreign patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Duilio F; Isernia, Ilaria; Buzzetti, Serena

    2013-01-01

    Today's society is highly impacted by immigration, as well as healthcare system. It is becoming increasingly common and frequent to establish relationships with patients with different cultural backgrounds. The aim of this study is analyzing Italian nurses' perception of the relational dynamics with foreign patients, to determine its evolution, and to identify the variables which can affect the quality of care. The study is both qualitative and quantitative with descriptive aim, using a questionnaire that assesses the theoretical-practical level of preparation, both perceptive and effective, of nurses when assisting foreign patients. To evaluate the emotional and experiential impact of the relationship with foreign patients, the difficulties encountered while establishing such relationship, and the resolution strategies - both effective and potential. The sample, composed of 101 Italian nurses employed at SanRaffaele Hospital in 6 specific Operational Units, resulted in a total of 91 returned questionnaires during the period May-June 2011. The data was analyzed through statistical instruments and compared to the results of a similar study done in 2004. The experience of intercultural nursing is seen by the sample as interesting and rewarding. The vast majority of nurses have positive responses. The more frequent issues are those connected with communication with foreign patients, and those connected with the increase workload due the presence of foreign patients. Nurses responded to difficulties more with human skills than with specific abilities, and tend to delegate the problem to the Cultural Mediation service. This new issue has a very high impact on nurses. The emerged difficulties have not decreased over time, this due to the lack of a proper policy within health care facilities in recent years, with the exception of a little improvement on the academic education. However the current academic education does not provide solutions useful in the everyday routing

  14. The Nature, Correlates, and Conditions of Parental Advocacy in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Although parents often advocate for the best educational services for their children with disabilities, few studies examine parents' advocacy activities; identify parent-school relationship, parent, and student correlates of advocacy; or describe the conditions of advocacy. Responding to a national, web-based survey, 1087 parents of students with…

  15. 45 CFR 1386.20 - Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.20 Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency. (a) The designating official must designate the State official or public...

  16. 45 CFR 1386.21 - Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.21 Section 1386.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.21 Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) In order for a State to receive...

  17. 42 CFR 51.7 - Eligibility for protection and advocacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility for protection and advocacy services... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.7 Eligibility for protection and advocacy services. In accordance with section...

  18. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  19. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? 381.1 Section 381.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual...

  20. 75 FR 11999 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  1. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  2. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  3. 75 FR 25316 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  4. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  5. 76 FR 10945 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  6. 75 FR 39332 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  7. 75 FR 7542 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  8. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  9. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  10. 76 FR 17996 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  11. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  12. 78 FR 36303 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  13. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  14. 77 FR 30591 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee. AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  15. 77 FR 21156 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  16. 76 FR 22168 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  17. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  18. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  19. 78 FR 28945 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  20. 75 FR 25316 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  1. Anatomy of Advocacy: A Case Study of the White House Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth; Kimmel, Sue; Dickinson, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Little research has been conducted examining advocacy efforts in the school library field despite the fact that program advocate is a prominent role for school librarians. One element of advocacy is the engagement in political initiatives that may affect school library programs. This case study investigates the effectiveness of one advocacy effort…

  2. Perceptions of practitioners: managing marine protected areas for climate change resilience

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is impacting upon global marine ecosystems and ocean wide changes in ecosystem properties are expected to continue. Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been implemented as a conservation tool throughout the world, primarily as a measure to reduce local impacts, but their usefulness and effectiveness is strongly related to climate change. MPAs may have a role in mitigation through effects on carbon sequestration, affect interactions between climatic effects and other drivers and ...

  3. Knowledge as a driver of public perceptions about climate change reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Visschers, Vivianne H. M.; Siegrist, Michael; Arvai, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    It is intuitive to assume that concern about climate change should be preceded by knowledge about its effects. However, recent research suggests that knowledge about climate change has only a limited effect on shaping concern about climate change. Our view is that this counterintuitive finding is a function of how knowledge is typically measured in studies about climate change. We find that if it is measured in a domain-specific and multidimensional way, knowledge is indeed an important driver of concern about climate change--even when we control for human values. Likewise, different dimensions of knowledge play different roles in shaping concern about climate change. To illustrate these findings, we present the results from a survey deployed across six culturally and politically diverse countries. Higher levels of knowledge about the causes of climate change were related to a heightened concern. However, higher levels of knowledge about the physical characteristics of climate change had either a negative or no significant effect on concern. Efforts aimed at improving public knowledge about climate change are therefore not the lost cause that some researchers claim they may be.

  4. Governance Values in the Climate Change Regime: Stakeholder Perceptions of REDD+ Legitimacy at the National Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Cadman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of two national-level studies of REDD+ governance values in Nepal and Papua New Guinea (PNG, using a hierarchical framework of principles, criteria, and indicators (PC&I, with evaluation at the indicator level. The research was conducted by means of an online survey to determine general perspectives on the governance quality of REDD+, as well as stakeholder workshops, in which participants were asked to rank indicators on the basis of perceived national significance. In the online survey, respondents in both countries identified inclusiveness and resources as the highest and lowest scoring governance values, while inclusiveness, resources, accountability, and transparency, were given priority, although their relative importance differed between countries given national circumstances. The reasons for the commonalities and differences of perceptions between these countries are discussed. The findings suggest that while a generic set of governance values may be usefully applied for determining the institutional legitimacy of REDD+, their relative importance is different. This leads to the conclusion that it may not be appropriate to use a simplified approach to REDD+ governance, focusing for example on safeguards, given different national priorities and contexts.

  5. Perceptions of Change in Teaching Styles during a One-to-One Laptop Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Karl Russell

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to provide solid quantitative data demonstrating how teachers are perceived to change in a one-to-one laptop environment, both as a whole and by subject area, during a laptop initiative that includes significant investments in professional development. The main research question is "Do teachers change their…

  6. Can a Syllabus Change Impact on Students' Perceptions of Science? Fragmented and Cohesive Conceptions of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manjula Devi; Stewart, Chris; Wilson, Rachel; Gokalp, Muhammed Sait

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, the literature paid attention to students' conceptions of the nature of disciplines. This study aimed to investigate how students' cohesive and fragment conceptions of physics changed with a major change in senior high school physics syllabus. We obtained measures of conceptions of physics by utilizing a 20-item questionnaire…

  7. Psychological Impact of a Nuclear Power Plant: Changing Perceptions of Community and Neighborhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey, Joseph B.

    1986-01-01

    Examines change in attitude toward community and descriptions of neighborhood environments of 217 residents of rural host community for a nuclear power plant. Finds negative attitude change and less positive descriptions of neighborhoods. Discusses implications for community psychology and preventive intervention. (LFL)

  8. Environmental change in the mid-Boteti area of north-central Botswana: Biophysical processes and human perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringrose, Susan; Chanda, Raban; Nkambwe, Musisi; Sefe, Francis

    1996-05-01

    Increased interest in environmental change issues has led researchers to consider more integrated approaches to change dynamics. This paper examines change in terms of land degradation in north-central Botswana from both biophysical and human perspectives. Although seasonal and periodic droughts were prevalent, analysis of rainfall data over the past 70 years revealed no downward trend. However, indicators of declining productivity such as soil erosion, loss of vegetation cover, and a declining groundwater table were amply evident. The GIS analysis of remotely sensed data has shown that complete vegetation recovery after drought is not taking place, particularly in the south-central part of the study area. These areas contained the highest human and livestock population densities. The local people acknowledged facing increasing resource depletion and indicated drought as the main cause. Pressures on available resources, particularly during drought periods, appeared to have impeded the regenerative capacity of the natural vegetation cover, thereby inducing land degradation. This situation may not easily be rectified because of widespread poverty and inappropriate local perceptions of the solutions. Both of these hinder the adoption of sustainable land management.

  9. Farmers’ Perceptions about Adaptation Practices to Climate Change and Barriers to Adaptation: A Micro-Level Study in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Ndamani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the farmer-perceived importance of adaptation practices to climate change and examined the barriers that impede adaptation. Perceptions about causes and effects of long-term changes in climatic variables were also investigated. A total of 100 farmer-households were randomly selected from four communities in the Lawra district of Ghana. Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions (FGDs. The results showed that 87% of respondents perceived a decrease in rainfall amount, while 82% perceived an increase in temperature over the past 10 years. The study revealed that adaptation was largely in response to dry spells and droughts (93.2% rather than floods. About 67% of respondents have adjusted their farming activities in response to climate change. Empirical results of the weighted average index analysis showed that farmers ranked improved crop varieties and irrigation as the most important adaptation measures. It also revealed that farmers lacked the capacity to implement the highly ranked adaptation practices. The problem confrontation index analysis showed that unpredictable weather, high cost of farm inputs, limited access to weather information, and lack of water resources were the most critical barriers to adaptation. This analysis of adaptation practices and constraints at farmer level will help facilitate government policy formulation and implementation.

  10. Public Perception of Climate Change in a Period of Economic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papoulis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study surveys the opinion of the residents of the Athens area in Greece on a wide range of issues related to climate change, such as their environmental consciousness and awareness and their willingness to take action against climate change. This study is performed at a time of a severe economic crisis in Greece. Based on a questionnaire, this study examines the general trends reported on various environmental issues, more particularly concerning climate change. The main results are that Greek citizens are aware of the problems of environmental and of climate change and also believe that the environmental quality of Greece is quite poor. They believe they are fairly well informed about climate change. However, the current economic crisis in Greece has reversed the progress made in the past concerning the awareness of climate change. Also, the citizens have very low confidence in the public authorities and the big enterprises to deal with climate change, while they have high level of trust in scientific and environmental organizations. They agree with public actions, but are against individual actions to protect the environment as they consider the main stakeholders (state, industry to be mainly responsible for environmental degradation.

  11. Stimulation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex changes subjective evaluation of percepts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Ching Chiang

    Full Text Available Nelson and Narens have proposed a metacognition model that dissociates the objective processing of information (object-level and the subjective evaluation of the performance (i.e., the metalevel. Neurophysiological evidence also indicates that the prefrontal cortices (PFC are the brain areas which perform the metalevel function [1]-[3]. A corresponding neural mechanism of Nelson and Narens's model, called dynamic filtering theory [4], [5], indicates that object-level processing is distributed in the posterior cortices and regulated by the prefrontal cortices with a filtering or gating mechanism to select appropriate signals and suppress inappropriate signals and noise. Based on this model, a hypothesis can be developed that, in the case of uncertainty or overloading of object-level processing, the prefrontal cortices will become more active in order to modulate signals and noise. This hypothesis is supported by a recent fMRI study [6] showing that the PFC (Brodmann area 9, BA9 was activated when subjects were overloaded in a bimodal attentional task, compared to a unimodal task. Here, we report a study showing that applying repetitive transmagnetic stimulation (rTMS over the BA9 in order to interfere with its functional activity resulted in significant increas in guessed responses, compared to three other control conditions (i.e., no-TMS, sham TMS on BA9, and rTMS on Cz. The results are compatible with the dynamic filtering theory and suggest that a malfunction of the PFC would weaken the quality of meta-cognitive percepts and increase the number of guessed responses.

  12. The Impact of changed organizational structures- on middle managers' perception of strategy and people management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mona Toft; Madsen, Henning

    Much research on organizational change and middle management has emphasized the idea of flatter more performance- and customer focused organizations, in which middle managers’ main responsibilities concern elements of organizational change and development such as strategy involvement, and managing...... managers reported that the amount of managerial levels had actually been reduced in the last three years. Secondly, middle managers who had experienced such a reduction perceived aspects of strategy and organizational development as more important. Thirdly, such a reduction did not introduce significant...

  13. Community Theories of Change: Linking Environmental Justice to Sustainability through Stakeholder Perceptions in Milwaukee (WI, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Kaitlyn; Cutts, Bethany; Greenlee, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Environmental justice and sustainability are compatible lenses, yet action toward equity is often missing from urban sustainability initiatives. This study aims to assess the cohesion of these frameworks in practice. To do this, we parse individuals’ theories of change, or how they identify and propose to resolve environmental injustices in the pursuit of sustainability. We posit that these theories of change are comprised of three main components: (1) perceived environmental benefits and burdens; (2) the causal pathways of environmental and social injustice; and (3) visions for positive change. Drawing from 35 stakeholder interviews in Milwaukee (WI, USA) we examine individual and institutional perspectives on environmental and social change and their links to the production of injustice. Our findings reveal that participants do not distinguish between environmental and social injustices. Instead, both social and environmental factors are implicated in injustice. Furthermore, we identify two mental maps for how social and economic change reproduce injustice. These findings suggest the need to reorient how urban injustice is considered and make efforts to acknowledge how a diversity of operational theories of change could either be divisive or could bring environmental justice and sustainability initiatives together. PMID:27706068

  14. Relating farmer's perceptions of climate change risk to adaptation behaviour in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Juhász-Horváth, Linda; Harrison, Paula A; Pintér, László; Rounsevell, Mark D A

    2016-10-28

    Understanding how farmers perceive climate change risks and how this affects their willingness to adopt adaptation practices is critical for developing effective climate change response strategies for the agricultural sector. This study examines (i) the perceptual relationships between farmers' awareness of climate change phenomena, beliefs in climate change risks and actual adaptation behaviour, and (ii) how these relationships may be modified by farm-level antecedents related to human, social, financial capitals and farm characteristics. An extensive household survey was designed to investigate the current pattern of adaptation strategies and collect data on these perceptual variables and their potential antecedents from private landowners in Veszprém and Tolna counties, Hungary. Path analysis was used to explore the causal connections between variables. We found that belief in the risk of climate change was heightened by an increased awareness of directly observable climate change phenomena (i.e. water shortages and extreme weather events). The awareness of extreme weather events was a significant driver of adaptation behaviour. Farmers' actual adaptation behaviour was primarily driven by financial motives and managerial considerations (i.e. the aim of improving profit and product sales; gaining farm ownership and the amount of land managed; and, the existence of a successor), and stimulated by an innovative personality and the availability of information from socio-agricultural networks. These results enrich the empirical evidence in support of improving understanding of farmer decision-making processes, which is critical in developing well-targeted adaptation policies.

  15. Community Theories of Change: Linking Environmental Justice to Sustainability through Stakeholder Perceptions in Milwaukee (WI, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlyn Hornik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental justice and sustainability are compatible lenses, yet action toward equity is often missing from urban sustainability initiatives. This study aims to assess the cohesion of these frameworks in practice. To do this, we parse individuals’ theories of change, or how they identify and propose to resolve environmental injustices in the pursuit of sustainability. We posit that these theories of change are comprised of three main components: (1 perceived environmental benefits and burdens; (2 the causal pathways of environmental and social injustice; and (3 visions for positive change. Drawing from 35 stakeholder interviews in Milwaukee (WI, USA we examine individual and institutional perspectives on environmental and social change and their links to the production of injustice. Our findings reveal that participants do not distinguish between environmental and social injustices. Instead, both social and environmental factors are implicated in injustice. Furthermore, we identify two mental maps for how social and economic change reproduce injustice. These findings suggest the need to reorient how urban injustice is considered and make efforts to acknowledge how a diversity of operational theories of change could either be divisive or could bring environmental justice and sustainability initiatives together.

  16. Positive Changes in Perceptions and Selections of Healthful Foods by College Students after a Short-Term Point-of-Selection Intervention at a Dining Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sharon; Duncan, Diana Poovey; Null, Dawn Bloyd; Roth, Sara Long; Gill, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Determine the effects of a short-term, multi-faceted, point-of-selection intervention on college students' perceptions and selection of 10 targeted healthful foods in a university dining hall and changes in their self-reported overall eating behaviors. Participants: 104 college students, (age 18-23) completed pre-I and post-I surveys.…

  17. Institutional perceptions, adaptive capacity and climate change response in a post-conflict country: a case study from Central African Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, H.C.P.; Smit, B.; Somorin, O.A.; Sonwa, D.J.; Ngana, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Central African Republic (CAR) faces increased vulnerability to climate change because it is a low-income country with low adaptive capacity; a situation that is exacerbated by recent civil conflict. This research analysed the perceptions of decision-makers within, and the response of diverse na

  18. Changes in Learning Process Caused by the Implementation of ICT in Education in Estonian In-Service and Pre-Service Teachers Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luik, Piret; Kukemelk, Hasso

    2008-01-01

    The current paper reports on a qualitative study examining in-service and pre-service teachers perceptions about changes in the learning process caused by the involvement of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) in Estonian schools. Based on five in-service and five pre-service teachers' interviews, findings indicate some positive, some…

  19. English as An“International Language”in China:Changes in Percep-tions and Attitudes in College English teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅怡

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the influence of EIL and changes in perceptions and attitudes towards Chinese college English teaching. It further urges educators that they should redefine their roles through the perspective of intercultural education and cul-tivate a critical thinking to keep a balance between the target culture and local culture.

  20. Hope in the Face of Climate Change: Associations with Environmental Engagement and Student Perceptions of Teachers' Emotion Communication Style and Future Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Is hope concerning climate change related to environmental engagement, or is it rather associated with unrealistic optimism and inactivity? This study on Swedish high school students identified two kinds of hope: constructive hope and hope based on denial. Constructive hope was positively associated with engagement and a perception that teachers…

  1. The importance of employee participation and perceptions of changes in procedures in a teamworking intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, Raymond

    2012-04-01

    The powerful positive results of implementing teamwork are not always achieved. It has been suggested that attempts to implement theories regarding teamwork do not always lead to those theories being put into practice, and as a result positive outcomes are not always found. The participation of employees in the development and implementation of an intervention may help to ensure that changes take place. In this longitudinal study (N = 583) of teamwork implementation in Denmark we examined the links between pre-intervention working conditions and well-being, levels of participation in planning and implementation, employees' reports of changes in procedures, and intervention outcomes. Pre-intervention levels of autonomy and job satisfaction predicted the degree of employee participation in the planning and implementation of the intervention. Pre-intervention well-being and social support were linked directly to the degree to which employees reported changes in existing work practices concerning teamwork. In addition, participation and changes in work procedures were significantly associated with post-intervention autonomy, social support and well-being. The results indicate that employee participation in intervention processes is crucial in what appears to be an important association with perceived changes in procedures and, therefore, in intervention outcomes.

  2. How do the media affect public perception of climate change and geohazards? An Italian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquaré, Federico A.; Oppizzi, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    This paper uses a combination of a qualitative approach and a quantitative, software-based approach to explore the Italian print media construction of climate change and geohazards between 2007 and 2010. We have broken down our analysis in two sections: the first one deals with the coverage of climate change; the second one focuses on the media representation of hydrogeological hazards and extreme events in Italy. Our software-based, qualitative and quantitative analysis of 1253 storylines from two major Italian broadsheets (the La Repubblica and the Corriere della Sera) has enabled us to assess the presence of typical journalistic frames such as conflict and dramatization, as well as newly-introduced ones such as "prevention vs damages", and "weather vs climate". Our results show that the two newspapers appear to have different "agendas" that might have different impacts on their own readerships: the La Repubblica has been on the forefront of forging a broad public consensus on the need for actions aimed at tackling climate change, whereas the Corriere della Sera has gradually built a journalistic agenda aimed at minimizing the urgency of the climate change problem. As regards the media's representation of hydrogeological hazards, we have confirmed what assessed by previous research, i.e. that Italian journalists still prefer to focus on damages rather than prevention; on a better note, the tendency of the Italian press to confuse weather with climate, blaming climate change for extreme rainfalls causing landslides and floods, has decreased in the last four years.

  3. Newspaper Advocacy Advertising: A Medium for Discussing Public Issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Eugene H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Content analysis of 288 advocacy ads in the "Washington Post" and 373 in the "New York Times" showed that (1) for-profit organizations place such ads more frequently, although nonprofit groups are increasing their use; (2) 3 organizations placed a quarter of all the ads; (3) economic and social welfare issues predominated; and (4) primary…

  4. Critical Literacy as Policy and Advocacy: Lessons from Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Raúl Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This article, the first column for this issue's Policy and Advocacy department, features a discussion about a recent experience in a graduate program in Medellín, Colombia introducing students to critical literacy. Graduate students used ideas from critical literacy to engage in an in-depth analysis of textbooks they had used in their…

  5. 75 FR 9028 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... improving IRS service and customer satisfaction. The TAP serves as an advisory body to the Secretary of the... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are inviting individuals to help improve...

  6. 77 FR 13390 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... improving IRS service and customer satisfaction. The TAP serves as an advisory body to the Secretary of the... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are inviting individuals to help improve...

  7. Latina/o School Principals: Identity, Leadership and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Hernandez, Frank; Mendez-Morse, Sylvia; Byrne-Jimenez, Monica

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to further define and inform about the influence of Latina/o principals in schools as an alternative to traditional forms of leadership. The principals' Latina/o identity, their leadership styles and advocacy towards the improvement of student achievement were examined. This research focused on three questions: (a) How did…

  8. Critical Literacy as Policy and Advocacy: Lessons from Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Raúl Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This article, the first column for this issue's Policy and Advocacy department, features a discussion about a recent experience in a graduate program in Medellín, Colombia introducing students to critical literacy. Graduate students used ideas from critical literacy to engage in an in-depth analysis of textbooks they had used in their practice.…

  9. Perceptions of forest experts on climate change and fire management in European Mediterranean forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftoyannis Y

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has already increased fire risk in Mediterranean forests. Adaptation options related to forest fires and climate change include measures related to fuel management, fire fighting and infrastructure, as well as public awareness. The importance of each of these measures was evaluated in six Mediterranean countries in a study initiated within the COST Action FP0703 “Expected Climate Change and Options for European Silviculture”. A questionnaire survey was used to document the views of foresters and forest scientists. Country differences were observed and adaptation measures related to fire fighting efficiency and public awareness were valued as more important than fuel management. Results were discussed in the light of a critical review of adaptive fire management measures with special reference to European Mediterranean countries.

  10. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenby Marieah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycling and walking advocates were identified from the local contact list of Cycling Advocates Network and Living Streets Aotearoa. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with cycle and walking advocates from throughout New Zealand. Advocates also nominated a suitable council officer at their local City council to be interviewed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and categories of responses for each of the questions created. Results Several processes were used by advocates to engage with council staff, including formal council submissions, meetings, stakeholder forums and partnership in running community events promoting active transport. Several other agencies were identified as being influential for active transport, some as potential coalition partners and others as potential adversaries. Barriers to improving conditions for active transport included a lack of funding, a lack of will-power among either council staff or councillors, limited council staff capacity (time or training and a culture of providing infrastructure for motor vehicles instead of people. Several suggestions were made about how the health sector could contribute to advocacy efforts, including encouraging political commitment, engaging the media, communicating the potential health benefits of active transport to the general public and being role models in terms of personal travel mode choice and having workplaces that support participation in active transport

  11. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Oser, Sean M; Close, Kelly L; Liu, Nancy F; Hood, Korey K; Anderson, Barbara J

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes.

  12. Teachers' Perceptions on the Changes in the Curriculum and Exit Examinations for Biology and Human Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Mirko; Won, Mihye; Treagust, David F.

    2013-01-01

    In the age of educational accountability, national and statewide measures are assumed to secure and improve the educational quality. However, educators often wonder how much a new accountability measure may improve the actual teaching and learning practices when the agents of change (teachers) are not active participants of such educational…

  13. Climate change or variable weather: Rethinking Danish homeowners' perceptions of floods and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Nina; Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2015-01-01

    prevent the residents in Lolland from experiencing many of the changes that are already occurring and, at the same time, give them a feeling of being able to control the water to the extent that it is prevented from flooding their homes, both now and in the future. The combination of these two theoretical...

  14. Climate change perception: A case study of Bardiya National Park (BNP, Thakurdwara, Bardiya, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Bam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an account of Climate change trends and their implications in Thakurdwara V.D.C. located at buffer zone of Bardiya National Park, Nepal. This study has adopted place based community vulnerability assessment approach which is based on participatory case studies. Primary data were collected through focused group discussion, household survey and interview where as climatological analysis was done with data obtained from Department of Hydrology and Meteorology (DHM. Trend Analysis of DHM data and survey result has clearly spelled that the study area has experienced changes over precipitation and temperature pattern. In case of Rani Jaruwa Nursery and Gulariya stations, which are near to the study area, precipitation is decreasing at the rate of 1.006 mm/yr and 0.315 mm/yr respectively. Whereas the temperature in both of Rani jaruwa Nursery station and Chisapani station is increasing at the rate of 0.004oC per year and 0.067oC per year respectively. Natural disasters, water scarcity, decrease in food production, change in vegetation composition and adverse health impacts are the major risks identified by the community. Therefore, our further action should be to formulate appropriate adaptation strategies and strengthen the community to better cope climate change.

  15. North Carolina Tobacco Farmers' Changing Perceptions of Tobacco Control and Tobacco Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crankshaw, Erik C.; Beach, Robert H.; Austin, W. David; Altman, David G.; Jones, Alison Snow

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine tobacco farmers' attitudes toward tobacco control, public health, and tobacco manufacturers in order to determine the extent to which rapidly changing economic conditions have influenced North Carolina tobacco farmer attitudes in ways that may provide tobacco control advocates with new opportunities to promote tobacco control…

  16. Teacher Development: A Look at Changes in Teacher Perceptions Across Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ronald D.

    Data obtained through Western Kentucky University's Teacher Preparation Evaluation Program were analyzed to identify changes in teachers' perceived problems, concerns, and classroom behavior over a six-year period. Data were collected from teachers at four points: during the student teaching experience, and near the end of the first, third, and…

  17. Local Perceptions of Climate Variability and Change in Tropical Forests of Papua, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Boissière

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available People everywhere experience changes and events that impact their lives. Knowing how they perceive, react, and adapt to climatic changes and events is helpful in developing strategies to support adaptation to climate change. Mamberamo in Papua, Indonesia, is a sparsely populated watershed of 7.8 million hectares possessing rich tropical forests. Our study compares scientific and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK on climate, and analyzes how local people in Mamberamo perceive and react to climatic variations. We compared meteorological data for the region with local views gathered through focus group discussions and interviews in six villages. We explored the local significance of seasonality, climate variability, and climate change. Mamberamo is subject to strikingly low levels of climatic variation; nonetheless local people highlighted certain problematic climate-related events such as floods and droughts. As our results illustrate, the implications vary markedly among villages. People currently consider climate variation to have little impact on their livelihoods when contrasted with other factors, e.g., logging, mining, infrastructure development, and political decentralization. Nonetheless, increased salinity of water supplies, crop loss due to floods, and reduced hunting success are concerns in specific villages. To gain local engagement, adaptation strategies should initially focus on factors that local people already judge important. Based on our results we demonstrate that TEK, and an assessment of local needs and concerns, provide practical insights for the development and promotion of locally relevant adaptation strategies. These insights offer a foundation for further engagement.

  18. Changes in the sensory perception of 'Hass' avocado during fruit maturation and ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avocado flavor improves dramatically during maturation and also changes as a result of ripening, but prior research had focused almost entirely on alterations in oil content as a means of explaining the differences in flavor. Other factors beyond just oil content are likely involved that act to alt...

  19. Ethics and public perception of climate change: exploring the Christian voices in the US public debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardekker, J.A.; Petersen, A.C.; van der Sluijs, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Climate change raises many questions with strong moral and ethical dimensions that are important to address in climate-policy formation and international negotiations. Particularly in the United States, the public discussion of these dimensions is strongly influenced by religious groups and leaders.

  20. Climate Change Adaptation in Dutch Municipalities: Risk Perception and Institutional Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Maya M.; Otto-Zimmermann, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    This contribution presents case studies of nine Dutch municipalities. Interview-based data show that the drivers of local climate adaptation in these cases are determined more by local contextual factors than by past experience with flooding or an expected increase of climate change risk. The presen

  1. Patients' Perceptions of Joint Replacement Care in a Changing Healthcare System: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Fiona; Bremner, Samantha; Katz, Joel; Watt-Watson, Judy; Kennedy, Deborah; Sawhney, Mona; McCartney, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ontario has introduced strategies over the past decade to reduce wait times and length of stay and improve access to physiotherapy for orthopaedic and other patients. The aim of this study is to explore patients' experiences of joint replacement care during a significant system change in their care setting.

  2. Cognitive Abilities Explaining Age-Related Changes in Time Perception of Short and Long Durations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelanti, Pierre S.; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated how the development of cognitive abilities explains the age-related changes in temporal judgment over short and long duration ranges from 0.5 to 30 s. Children (5- and 9-year-olds) as well as adults were given a temporal bisection task with four different duration ranges: a duration range shorter than 1 s, two…

  3. Changing medical students’ perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorie M. Colbert-Getz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey. We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254 for 2013 and 52% (179 for 2014. Students’ overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (P<0.001. There was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981 and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956. We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years.

  4. Visual perception changes and optical stability after intracorneal ring segment implantation: comparison between 3 months and 1 year after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paranhos JFS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Juliane de Freitas Santos Paranhos, Marcos Pereira Ávila, Augusto Paranhos Jr, Paulo SchorFederal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilPurpose: To prospectively evaluate intracorneal ring segment (ICRS implantation on quality of life (QoL of patients with keratoconus changes and identify factors responsible.Methods: Sixty-nine eyes of 42 keratoconus patients were implanted with the Keraring (Mediphacos, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, refraction, and steep keratometry were analyzed 3 months and 1 year after surgery. All patients self-administered the National Eye Institute Refractive Error Quality of life instrument at 2 time points: after having worn best correction for at least 30 days since evaluation (mean 4 months after surgery and 1 year after surgery. To analyze if the use of the appropriate correction at 1 year follow up had any impact on visual acuity and V-QoL, patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (appropriate correction and B (not appropriate correction.Results: After 1 year, QoL changes related to scales ‘clarity of vision’, ‘near vision’, and ‘far vision’. Keratometric values, sphere, and spherical equivalent did not differ significantly between 3 months and 1 year postoperative. Cylinder increase was statistically but not clinically significant. Binocular BCVA did not change 1 year after surgery in group A and showed a clinically significant impairment in group B. A year after surgery, 18 patients did not use correction suggested by a physician 3 months after surgery. QoL was not statistically different 1 year after surgery between group A and group B.Conclusion: Our findings show that the way keratoconic patients see is difficult to analyze using only quantitative and 1-visit metrics. They highlight the importance of patients’ self perception and performing longitudinal analysis to consider neural compensation to optical changes from surgery.Keywords: keratoconus, cornea

  5. Mapping future changes in livelihood security and environmental sustainability based on perceptions of small farmers in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio H. Diniz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deforestation is a widely recognized problem in the Brazilian Amazon. Small farmers play a key role in this process in that they earn their livelihood by ranching and farming. Many studies have addressed the link between deforestation and livelihood strategies adopted by small farmers. Most have focused on advanced monitoring systems, simulation models, and GIS approaches to analyze the interaction of both dimensions, i.e., livelihoods and forest cover change. Although the current toolbox of methods has proved successful in increasing our understanding of these interactions, the models and approaches employed do not consider small farmers' perspectives. On the assumption that local small farmers are agents of land-cover change, understanding how they perceive their own situation is essential to elucidate their actions. Our objective is to explore future changes in livelihood security and environmental sustainability as envisaged by local small farmers in the Brazilian Amazon. Previous livelihood cluster analysis of small farmers located in southeast Pará was integrated with fuzzy cognitive mapping to determine present perceptions and to explore future changes, using global scenarios downscaled to the local situation. Overall, system description differs only on details; all results indicate a strong trade-off between livelihood security and environmental sustainability in all livelihood systems, as identified by the small farmers. However, fundamentally different outcomes are obtained from the future analysis, depending on the livelihood strategy cluster. Achieving win-win outcomes does not necessarily imply a positive scenario, especially if small farmers are dependent on income transfers from the government to provide their livelihood.

  6. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    As the world's most rapidly growing source of energy, wind power has vast potential for mitigating climate change and advancing global environmental sustainability. Yet, the challenges facing wind energy remain both complex and substantial. Two such challenges are: 1) wildlife impacts; and 2) perceived negative effects on tourism. This dissertation examines these challenges in a multi-paper format, and also investigates the role that climate change perceptions play in garnering public support for wind power. The first paper assesses optimal approaches for addressing wind power's wildlife impacts. Comparative analysis reveals that avian mortality from turbines ranks far behind avian mortality from a number of other anthropogenic sources. Additionally, although bats have recently emerged as more vulnerable to wind turbines than birds, they are generally less federally protected. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects over 800 bird species, regardless of their threatened or endangered status. Moreover, it criminalizes the incidental take of birds without a permit and simultaneously grants no permits for such incidental take, thereby creating a legal conundrum for the wind industry. An examination of the legislative and case history of the MBTA, however, reveals that wind operators are not likely to be prosecuted for incidental take if they cooperate with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and take reasonable steps to reduce siting and operational impacts. Furthermore, this study's analysis reveals modest wildlife impacts from wind power, in comparison with numerous other energy sources. Scientific-research, legal, and policy recommendations are provided to update the present legal and regulatory regime under the MBTA and to minimize avian and bat impacts. For instance, FWS should: establish comprehensive federal guidelines for wind facility siting, permitting, monitoring, and mitigation; and promulgate regulations under the MBTA for the issuance of

  7. Perception-based analysis of climate change effect on forest-based livelihood: The case of Vhembe District in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Chidiebere Ofoegbu; Paxie W. Chirwa; Joseph Francis; Folarannmi D. Babalola

    2016-01-01

    Forests are vulnerable to climate change and are also major sources of livelihood for many rural households in Africa. This study examines rural people’s perceptions of climate change impacts on forest-based livelihoods using rural communities of Vhembe District in South Africa as a case study. The study was based on the principles of perceived impact-based assessment, and sustainable livelihoods framework. Using the stratified proportionate random sampling procedure in combination with weigh...

  8. Negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increases pain perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Osumi

    Full Text Available Changing the visual body appearance by use of as virtual reality system, funny mirror, or binocular glasses has been reported to be helpful in rehabilitation of pain. However, there are interindividual differences in the analgesic effect of changing the visual body image. We hypothesized that a negative body image associated with changing the visual body appearance causes interindividual differences in the analgesic effect although the relationship between the visual body appearance and analgesic effect has not been clarified. We investigated whether a negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increased pain. Twenty-five healthy individuals participated in this study. To evoke a negative body image, we applied the method of rubber hand illusion. We created an "injured rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with pain, a "hairy rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with embarrassment, and a "twisted rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with deviation from the concept of normality. We also created a "normal rubber hand" as a control. The pain threshold was measured while the participant observed the rubber hand using a device that measured pain caused by thermal stimuli. Body ownership experiences were elicited by observation of the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand as well as the normal rubber hand. Participants felt more unpleasantness by observing the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand than the normal rubber hand and twisted rubber hand (p<0.001. The pain threshold was lower under the injured rubber hand condition than with the other conditions (p<0.001. We conclude that a negative body appearance associated with pain can increase pain sensitivity.

  9. Negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increases pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osumi, Michihiro; Imai, Ryota; Ueta, Kozo; Nobusako, Satoshi; Morioka, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Changing the visual body appearance by use of as virtual reality system, funny mirror, or binocular glasses has been reported to be helpful in rehabilitation of pain. However, there are interindividual differences in the analgesic effect of changing the visual body image. We hypothesized that a negative body image associated with changing the visual body appearance causes interindividual differences in the analgesic effect although the relationship between the visual body appearance and analgesic effect has not been clarified. We investigated whether a negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increased pain. Twenty-five healthy individuals participated in this study. To evoke a negative body image, we applied the method of rubber hand illusion. We created an "injured rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with pain, a "hairy rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with embarrassment, and a "twisted rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with deviation from the concept of normality. We also created a "normal rubber hand" as a control. The pain threshold was measured while the participant observed the rubber hand using a device that measured pain caused by thermal stimuli. Body ownership experiences were elicited by observation of the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand as well as the normal rubber hand. Participants felt more unpleasantness by observing the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand than the normal rubber hand and twisted rubber hand (ppain threshold was lower under the injured rubber hand condition than with the other conditions (pnegative body appearance associated with pain can increase pain sensitivity.

  10. Animal perception of seasonal thresholds: changes in elephant movement in relation to rainfall patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Birkett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of temporal thresholds or shifts in animal movement informs ecologists of changes in an animal's behaviour, which contributes to an understanding of species' responses in different environments. In African savannas, rainfall, temperature and primary productivity influence the movements of large herbivores and drive changes at different scales. Here, we developed a novel approach to define seasonal shifts in movement behaviour by examining the movements of a highly mobile herbivore (elephant; Loxodonta africana, in relation to local and regional rainfall patterns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used speed to determine movement changes of between 8 and 14 GPS-collared elephant cows, grouped into five spatial clusters, in Kruger National Park, South Africa. To detect broad-scale patterns of movement, we ran a three-year daily time-series model for each individual (2007-2009. Piecewise regression models provided the best fit for elephant movement, which exhibited a segmented, waveform pattern over time. Major breakpoints in speed occurred at the end of the dry and wet seasons of each year. During the dry season, female elephant are constrained by limited forage and thus the distances they cover are shorter and less variable. Despite the inter-annual variability of rainfall, speed breakpoints were strongly correlated with both local and regional rainfall breakpoints across all three years. Thus, at a multi-year scale, rainfall patterns significantly affect the movements of elephant. The variability of both speed and rainfall breakpoints across different years highlights the need for an objective definition of seasonal boundaries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By using objective criteria to determine behavioural shifts, we identified a biologically meaningful indicator of major changes in animal behaviour in different years. We recommend the use of such criteria, from an animal's perspective, for delineating seasons or

  11. Investigation of depth dependent changes in cerebral haemodynamics during face perception in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasi, A [Biomedical Optics Research Lab, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Fox, S [Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Henry Wellcome Building, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Everdell, N [Biomedical Optics Research Lab, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Volein, A [Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Henry Wellcome Building, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Tucker, L [Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Henry Wellcome Building, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Csibra, G [Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Henry Wellcome Building, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Gibson, A P [Biomedical Optics Research Lab, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hebden, J C [Biomedical Optics Research Lab, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Johnson, M H [Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Henry Wellcome Building, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Elwell, C E [Biomedical Optics Research Lab, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-07

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has been used to record oxygenation changes in the visual cortex of 4 month old infants. Our in-house topography system, with 30 channels and 3 different source-detector separations, recorded changes in the concentration of oxy-, deoxy- and total haemoglobin (HbO{sub 2}, HHb and HbT) in response to visual stimuli (face, scrambled visual noise and cartoons as rest). The aim of this work was to demonstrate the capability of the system to spatially localize functional activation and study the possibility of depth discrimination in the haemodynamic response. The group data show both face stimulation and visual noise stimulation induced significant increases in HbO{sub 2} from rest, but the increase in HbO{sub 2} with face stimulation was not significantly different from that seen with visual noise stimulation. The face stimuli induced increases in HbO{sub 2} were spread across a greater area across all depths than visual noise induced changes. In results from a single subject there was a significant increase of HbO{sub 2} in the inferior area of the visual cortex in response to both types of stimuli, and a larger number of channels (source-detector pairs) showed HbO{sub 2} increase to face stimuli, especially at the greatest depth. Activation maps were obtained using 3D reconstruction methods on multi source-detector separation optical topography data.

  12. The Perception and Valuation of the Risks of Climate Change. A Rational and Behavioral Blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viscusi, W.K. [Cogan Professor of Law and Economics, Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zeckhauser, R.J. [Ramsey Professor of Political Economy, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Over 250 respondents - graduate students in law and public policy - assessed the risks of climate change and valued climate-change mitigation policies. Many aspects of their behavior were consistent with rational behavior. For example, respondents successfully estimated distributions of temperature increases in Boston by 2100. The median value of best estimates was 1-3 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition, people with higher risk estimates, whether for temperature or related risks (e.g., hurricane intensities) offered more to avoid warming. Median willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid global warming was $0.50/gallon, and 3% of income. And important scope tests (e.g., respondents paid more for bigger accomplishments) were passed. However, significant behavioral propensities also emerged. For example, accessibility of neutral information on global warming boosted risk estimates. Warming projections correlated with estimates for unrelated risks, such as earthquakes and heart attacks. The implied WTP for avoidance was much greater when asked as a percent of income than as a gas tax, a percent thinking bias. Home team betting showed itself; individuals predicting a Bush victory predicted smaller temperature increases. In the climate-change arena, behavioral decision tendencies are like a fun-house mirror: They magnify some estimates and shrink others, but the contours of rational decision remain recognizable.

  13. Geoengineering, climate change scepticism and the 'moral hazard' argument: an experimental study of UK public perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corner, Adam; Pidgeon, Nick

    2014-12-28

    Many commentators have expressed concerns that researching and/or developing geoengineering technologies may undermine support for existing climate policies-the so-called moral hazard argument. This argument plays a central role in policy debates about geoengineering. However, there has not yet been a systematic investigation of how members of the public view the moral hazard argument, or whether it impacts on people's beliefs about geoengineering and climate change. In this paper, we describe an online experiment with a representative sample of the UK public, in which participants read one of two arguments (either endorsing or rejecting the idea that geoengineering poses a moral hazard). The argument endorsing the idea of geoengineering as a moral hazard was perceived as more convincing overall. However, people with more sceptical views and those who endorsed 'self-enhancing' values were more likely to agree that the prospect of geoengineering would reduce their motivation to make changes in their own behaviour in response to climate change. The findings suggest that geoengineering is likely to pose a moral hazard for some people more than others, and the implications for engaging the public are discussed.

  14. Environmental non-government organizations' perceptions of geologic sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Ray, Isha; Farrell, Alexander E [Energy and Resources Group, 310 Barrows Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: gwongpar@berkeley.edu, E-mail: isharay@berkeley.edu, E-mail: aef@berkeley.edu

    2008-04-15

    Environmental non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have been influential in shaping public perceptions of environmental problems, their causes and potential solutions. Over the last decade, carbon capture and storage (CCS) has emerged as a potentially important technological response to climate change. In this paper we investigate how leading US NGOs perceive geologic sequestration, a potentially controversial part of CCS. We examine how and why their perceptions and strategies might differ, and if and how they plan to shape public perceptions of geologic sequestration. We approach these questions through semi-structured interviews with representatives from a range of NGOs, supplemented by content analysis of their documents. We find that while all the NGOs are committed to combating climate change, their views on CCS as a mitigation strategy vary considerably. We find that these views are correlated with NGOs' histories of activism and advocacy, as well as with their sources of funding. Overall, most of these NGOs accept the necessity of geologic sequestration, while only a small fraction do not.

  15. Using Models to Teach about Climate Change: A look at NGSS Expectations and Teacher Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, M. B.; Stanier, C. O.; Forbes, C.; Park, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards have been updated from the previous version of the standards with some much needed emphasis on topics in climate and climate change. In particular, the standards have focused on K-12 students learning about science models, which is extremely important when discussing climate change. The NGSS suggest that students be able to 1) develop and use science models (not just use them to explain a concept) because this is how scientists actually use models during the scientific process; and 2) understand systems and system models across all science concepts and all age levels because it leads to further understanding about a more complex natural system (like climate change). To summarize, the NGSS expects that K-12 students should develop and use system models across disciplines and age groups in a way that is similar to how scientists use them in practice, which is to make predictions about unanswered questions. Research indicates that students who learn about science content using an approach that aligns more authentically with the way real science inquiry is done have a better understanding of the content, better understanding of the nature of science, improved critical thinking skills, and improved problem solving skills. Research also indicates that most teachers are aware of this method to teach science content, but sometimes have trouble implementing it into the classroom effectively for many reasons. If accepted, this presentation will share an approach to incorporate modeling into the classroom effectively as well as report the results from a study that qualitatively look at three teacher's perspectives on using models in the classroom while teaching units about climate change, in order to identify how/why teachers struggle to teach about models involved in content related to climate change. Preliminary results indicate that the teachers in this study view models as an effective way to explain a concept to their students, but

  16. Perceptions of the Information Search Process in Libraries: A Study of Changes from High School through College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlthau, Carol Collier

    1988-01-01

    Describes a longitudinal study of students' perceptions of the information search process in libraries over a four-year period from high school through college. The discussion covers the cognitive theory on which the study was based, a model of the search process, and how closely students' perceptions matched the model. (26 references) (Author/CLB)

  17. Cross-cultural perception and power dynamics across changing organizational and national contexts : Curaçao and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijes, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    In this article we study the role of power and power differences in cross-cultural perception. We do so by way of exploratory case studies in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the police in the Netherlands and Curacao. We demonstrate how cross-cultural perception between two specific ethnic gro

  18. Changing (S)Expectations: How Gender Fair Job Descriptions Impact Children's Perceptions and Interest regarding Traditionally Male Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervecken, Dries; Hannover, Bettina; Wolter, Ilka

    2013-01-01

    Children's occupational interests and their perceptions of the divergent occupational successes of women and men reflect cultural gender norms. Since language is a vehicle for transporting gender cues and gender norms, we tested the premise that children's perceptions of stereotypically male jobs can be influenced by the linguistic form used to…

  19. Communication and perception of uncertainty via graphics in disciplinary and interdisciplinary climate change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Bettina C.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    Besides written and spoken language, graphical displays play an important role in communicating scientific findings or explaining scientific methods, both within one and between various disciplines. Uncertainties and probabilities are generally difficult to communicate, especially via graphics. Graphics including uncertainty sometimes need detailed written or oral descriptions to be understood. "Good" graphics should ease scientific communication, especially amongst different disciplines. One key objective of the Doctoral Programme "Climate Change: Uncertainties, Thresholds and Coping Strategies" (http://dk-climate-change.uni-graz.at/en/), located at the University of Graz, is to reach a better understanding of climate change uncertainties by bridging research in multiple disciplines, including physical climate sciences, geosciences, systems and sustainability sciences, environmental economics, and climate ethics. This asks for efforts into the formulation of a "common language", not only as to words, but also as to graphics. The focus of this work is on two topics: (1) What different kinds of uncertainties (e.g., data uncertainty, model uncertainty) are included in the graphics of the recent IPCC reports of all three working groups (WGs) and in what ways do uncertainties get illustrated? (2) How are these graphically displayed uncertainties perceived by researchers of a similar research discipline and from researchers of different disciplines than the authors of the graphics? To answer the first question, the IPCC graphics including uncertainties are grouped and analyzed with respect to different kinds of uncertainties to filter out most of the commonly used types of displays. The graphics will also be analyzed with respect to their WG origin, as we assume that graphics from researchers rooted in, e.g., physical climate sciences and geosciences (mainly IPCC WG 1) differ from those of researchers rooted in, e.g., economics or system sciences (mainly WG 3). In a

  20. EMU, the changing role of public debt and the revival of sovereign credit risk perception

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Kai Daniel; Schmidt, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Using annual data for 21 OECD countries we provide evidence of remarkable mispricing of sovereign bonds for the so-called GIIPS countries before the start of the financial crisis. Our results also qualify the view of pronounced overpricing in the crisis. In detail, we find: (i) Since the 1980s the role of public debt for the pricing of government bonds has changed twice: First-time in the aftermath of the signing of the Maastricht treaty, and again with the wake-up call due to the onset of th...

  1. The impact of an intensive yearlong staff development program on science teachers' perceptions of pedagogical change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueni, Joneen A. Stone

    The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding of how teachers perceive their implementation of pedagogical change during and after their involvement in a yearlong staff development project in the Rice Model Lab (RML). The following questions were used to guide the inquiry: (1) How do participants of the RML describe their involvement with pedagogical change? (2) How do participants of the RML perceive their ability to handle a different pedagogical approach to classroom instruction? (3) How do participants describe their usage of different pedagogical approaches once they leave the RML and return to their own classrooms? The RML is a joint venture between Rice University and the Houston Independent School District. Annually, eight middle school science teachers spend a year's sabbatical in the RML engaged in learning about educational research and pedagogy. The teachers have opportunities to prepare and teach lessons to one class using their new knowledge and skills. Operational for seven years, the RML was chosen as the context and provided the fifteen participants. Participants chosen included previous and current RML program members with varying amounts of teaching experience. This inquiry was an ethnographic study in which the participants responded to open-ended questions about their experiences with pedagogical change. Data, collected during the 1997--1998 school year, included formal and informal interviews; portfolio and reflective journal entries; and observations of group interactions during meetings, social events, workshops, and activities at the RML. The collected data were analyzed by the qualitative procedures of unitization and constant comparative methods to reveal categories of similarity. The categories of collaboration, learner-centered instruction, grounding in classroom practice, feelings of stress, time, support, and increased content knowledge emerged from the analysis of unitized data. The emergent categories interlocked with

  2. STUDENTS‘ PERCEPTIONS OF CHANGE READINESS OF A TURKISH EDUCATION FACULTY REGARDING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study investigated the degree of involvement in new teaching and learning methods by the academic staff of a large privileged Turkish state university, and revealed that faculties of education and open education were better in terms of change readiness than other faculties. The current study builds on that study, and investigates the involvement of the institution and teaching staff in technology integration from observers’ perspectives through administering a personal information form and a 31-item Likert questionnaire to 475 senior students of the Faculty of Education. Findings revealed that what were reported by instructors in the previous study seem somewhat different from what is being reported by their students in the current study. More specifically, students found their instructors and the infrastructure of the faculty quite inadequate in terms of the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT within classroom settings. Implications and suggestions regarding the integration process are provided.

  3. Managing meaning for strategic change: the role of perception and meaning congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Wesley A

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a qualitative study of the cultural and strategic changes being made by a mid-sized hospital in the southwestern United States. The purpose of the paper is twofold. First, the paper examines the methods used by strategic managers in this hospital to manage meaning and create congruent interpretations of culture and strategy throughout the organization. This paper takes a social construction, interpretive position that culture and strategy are created through human interaction and involve shared meaning systems and interpretive schemes that individuals use to interpret and make sense of their world. Second, the study examines the effectiveness of the methods used by hospital management by examining perceptual similarities and differences among top leadership and other organizational members. This paper takes the position that perceptual and meaning congruence are necessary for the successful implementation of strategy that is given in a top-down fashion.

  4. Local Farmers' Perceptions of Climate Change and Local Adaptive Strategies: A Case Study from the Middle Yarlung Zangbo River Valley, Tibet, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Tang, Ya; Luo, Han; Di, Baofeng; Zhang, Liyun

    2013-10-01

    Climate change affects the productivity of agricultural ecosystems. Farmers cope with climate change based on their perceptions of changing climate patterns. Using a case study from the Middle Yarlung Zangbo River Valley, we present a new research framework that uses questionnaire and interview methods to compare local farmers' perceptions of climate change with the adaptive farming strategies they adopt. Most farmers in the valley believed that temperatures had increased in the last 30 years but did not note any changes in precipitation. Most farmers also reported sowing and harvesting hulless barley 10-15 days earlier than they were 20 years ago. In addition, farmers observed that plants were flowering and river ice was melting earlier in the season, but they did not perceive changes in plant germination, herbaceous vegetation growth, or other spring seasonal events. Most farmers noticed an extended fall season signified by delays in the freezing of rivers and an extended growing season for grassland vegetation. The study results showed that agricultural practices in the study area are still traditional; that is, local farmers' perceptions of climate change and their strategies to mitigate its impacts were based on indigenous knowledge and their own experiences. Adaptive strategies included adjusting planting and harvesting dates, changing crop species, and improving irrigation infrastructure. However, the farmers' decisions could not be fully attributed to their concerns about climate change. Local farming systems exhibit high adaptability to climate variability. Additionally, off-farm income has reduced the dependence of the farmers on agriculture, and an agricultural subsidy from the Chinese Central Government has mitigated the farmers' vulnerability. Nevertheless, it remains necessary for local farmers to build a system of adaptive climate change strategies that combines traditional experience and indigenous knowledge with scientific research and government

  5. Contextualising change through a common strategy: Lecturers' perceptions and key role in supporting academic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindelan, Paz; Martin, Ana

    2014-05-01

    European universities are currently going through a process of change in order to meet the common goals set for higher education by the European Commission. They are revising their educational models to adjust them to the guidelines of the "Bologna Process" and are devising an institutional strategy for its implementation. In practical terms, this means aligning former national degrees and diplomas to standard European Bachelor and Masters degrees and PhD doctorates, by creating acknowledged professional qualification benchmarks that also include adjusted course lengths and contents. This process, in the end, mostly affects academic staff members who have a fundamental role to play in carrying out the pedagogical reforms on the teaching front. Besides presenting a commentary on the institutional approach of one particular technical university in Spain, the purpose of this paper is to propose, from the authors' point of view as lecturers, a strategy which has the potential to create a favourable atmosphere for carrying out such a reform. The article's main objective is to highlight a series of action points which may serve to reinforce and advance the main institutional strategy by relying on the powerful influence of its academic staff members.

  6. Exploring intergenerational changes in perceptions of gender roles and sexuality among Indigenous women in Oaxaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karver, Tahilin S; Sorhaindo, Annik; Wilson, Kate S; Contreras, Xipatl

    2016-08-01

    The south of Mexico has traditionally faced disproportionate social, health and economic disadvantage relative to the rest of the country, due in part to lower levels of economic and human development, and barriers faced by Indigenous populations. The state of Oaxaca, in particular, has one of the highest proportions of Indigenous people and consistently displays high rates of maternal mortality, sexually transmitted infections and teenage pregnancy. This study examines how social values and norms surrounding sexuality have changed between two generations of women living in Indigenous communities in Oaxaca. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 19 women from two generational cohorts in 12 communities. Comparison views of these two cohorts suggest that cultural gender norms continue to govern how women express and experience their sexuality. In particular, feelings of shame and fear permeate the expression of sexuality, virginity continues be a determinant of a woman's worth and motherhood remains the key attribute to womanhood. Evidence points to a transformation of norms, and access to information and services related to sexual health is increasing. Nonetheless, there is still a need for culturally appropriate sex education programmes focused on female empowerment, increased access to sexual health services, and a reduction in the stigma surrounding women's expressions of sexuality.

  7. True colors - changing perceptions of hydrological processes at a hillslope prone to slide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P.; Strouhal, L.; Pool, S.; Seibert, J.

    2012-04-01

    This study determined the dominant runoff formation processes of a pre-alpine hillslope prone to slide. The experimental grassland/pasture plot (10 m x 10 m) is located in the northern front range of the Swiss Alps on a WNW facing hillslope (30-35°, 1100 m asl, 2000 mm annual precipitation). More than 20 landslides were registered in the vicinity of the experimental plot during a heavy rainfall event in August 2005. A shallow gley (Ah-Go-Gr) overlies a weathered marlstone and conglomerate (sub-alpine Molasse). We monitored groundwater with a network of 10 groundwater wells, two drainages in 0.25 and 1.0 m depth, and volumetric water content using TDR-probes at four profiles at various depths. Our monitoring data indicates that even during relatively dry periods soil moisture is saturated for all TDR's with exception of the 0.25 m level. The groundwater wells and the drainages respond quickly to storm events above a threshold of 10-15 mm precipitation. In summer/fall 2011 we conducted two sprinkling experiments with variable rainfall intensities using natural lake water (experiment I) and artificially deuterium-enriched water (experiment II). During both sprinkling experiments we conducted fluorescein line-tracer injections to evaluate surface and subsurface flow velocities and tracer recovery for the different horizons. We performed NaCl pulse injections into the sprinkling water when changing rainfall intensities to monitor sub-surface flow velocities with 2-D electrical resistance tomography, and tracer break through/ recovery for the different horizons. Saturation overland flow occurred only at high rainfall intensities above 20-25 mm/h. The sprinkling experiment data exhibit a quick tracer break through after 30-60 min, illustrating the efficient drainage of the high infiltration capacity of vertical macropores linked to lateral soil pipes in the deeper soil horizons. Thus we considered subsurface stormflow as the dominant runoff formation process. To gain

  8. Glacier Retreat in the Southern Peruvian Andes: Climate Change, Environmental Impacts, Human Perception and Social Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlove, B.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents results from recent environmental and anthropological research near glacierized areas in the department of Cusco, Peru, home to the well-known Quelccaya Ice Cap and to the peak of Ausangate (6384 m). Glaciers in the region are in negative mass balance, losing volume and area, with upslope movement of the glacier fronts. Somewhat paradoxically, flows in many streams close to the glaciers are reduced, particularly in the dry season, due to a shift in the seasonal distribution of melting, to increased evaporation and to increased percolation into newly-exposed sands and gravels. Associated with this reduction in flow is a desiccation of some anthropogenic and natural wetlands, reducing the availability of dry season forage to wild (vicuna) and domesticated (alpaca, llama) ruminants. Interviews and ethnographic observations with local populations of Quechua-speaking herders at elevations of 4500-5200 meters provide detailed comments on these changes. They have an extensive vocabulary of terms for glacial features associated with retreat. They link this treat with environmental factors (higher temperatures, greater winds that deposit dust on lower portions of glaciers) and with religious factors (divine punishment for human wrong-doing, failure of humans to respect mountain spirits). They describe a variety of economic and extra-economic impacts of this retreat on different spatial, social and temporal scales. Though they face other issues as well (threats of pollution from new mining projects, inadequacy of government services), glacier retreat is their principal concern. Many herders express extreme distress over this unprecedented threat to their livelihoods and communities, though a few propose responses - out-migration, the formation of an association of neighboring communities, development of irrigation works - that could serve as adaptations.

  9. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B Firszt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants, less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and three and nine months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction, degree and type

  10. To assess the effects of nutritional intervention based on advocacy approach on malnutrition status among school-aged children in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Joulaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was carried out to assess the effects of community nutrition intervention based on advocacy approach on malnutrition status among school-aged children in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: This case-control nutritional intervention has been done between 2008 and 2009 on 2897 primary and secondary school boys and girls (7-13 years old based on advocacy approach in Shiraz, Iran. The project provided nutritious snacks in public schools over a 2-year period along with advocacy oriented actions in order to implement and promote nutritional intervention. For evaluation of effectiveness of the intervention growth monitoring indices of pre- and post-intervention were statistically compared. Results: The frequency of subjects with body mass index lower than 5% decreased significantly after intervention among girls (P = 0.02. However, there were no significant changes among boys or total population. The mean of all anthropometric indices changed significantly after intervention both among girls and boys as well as in total population. The pre- and post-test education assessment in both groups showed that the student′s average knowledge score has been significantly increased from 12.5 ± 3.2 to 16.8 ± 4.3 (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential success and scalability of school feeding programs in Iran. Community nutrition intervention based on the advocacy process model is effective on reducing the prevalence of underweight specifically among female school aged children.

  11. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O'Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health.

  12. Nursing Actions in practicing inpatient advocacy in a Burn Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Carniato Dalle Nogario

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVEUnderstanding nursing actions in the practice of inpatient advocacy in a burn unit.METHODA single and descriptive case study, carried out with nurses working in a referral burn center in southern Brazil. Data were collected through focus group technique, between February and March 2014, in three meetings. Data was analysed through discursive textual analysis.RESULTSThree emerging categories were identified, namely: (1 instructing the patient; (2 protecting the patient; and (3 ensuring the quality of care.CONCLUSIONSThis study identified that the nurses investigated exercised patient advocacy and that the recognition of their actions is an advance for the profession, contributing to the autonomy of nurses and the effectiveness of patients' rights and social justice.

  13. Patient advocacy groups: Need and opportunity in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing number of corporate hospitals, healthcare related issues, research trials and undue attention by media in India, there is a need to focus more on patient′s rights and protection. In India, multiple agencies like regulatory bodies, scientific review committees, ethics committees, NGOs, etc. work toward patient rights and protection. However, these agencies are inadequate to cater to the general issues related to patient′s rights. There′s a need to have a separate group of people who provide advocacy to the patient, or simply, a patient advocacy group which will work explicitly in these areas to increase transparency and credibility of healthcare system in India. This group will provide special attention to patient care and protection of rights from the planning stage rather than at the troubleshooting stage.

  14. The Social Work Reinvestment Initiative: advocacy and social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Elizabeth Peffer; McMillin, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    In 2006, NASW launched the Social Work Reinvestment Initiative by granting each state chapter $15,000 in seed money to address the most pressing social work needs in the state. This article describes how NASW-SD, with 246 members, launched an epic campaign that resulted in the establishment of the only MSW program in South Dakota. Using historical research methods, this article demonstrates the power of social work advocacy when members unify in pursuit of a common goal and describes how the social workers rallied to educate policymakers and the public on the value of social work and its delivery of necessary social services at all levels and in all fields of practice. The research highlights an uphill battle of advocacy and the skillful planning and implementation of a campaign to secure state funding to establish the first MSW program in the state, at the beginning of the most difficult economic recession since the Great Depression.

  15. Navy Family Advocacy Program. Appendix. Analysis of Central Registry Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    2/76) 2 Suspected Abuzso/Malect/Sexua1 Assault an ae2404 65.) "Suspected Abuso /Neglect/ Sexual Assault and Rape Report" 2226 60.5 NAVMED 6320/15A...ANALYSIS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT REPORTS ........... 50 HAPTER V: SUMAY ANALYSIS Or rAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM REPORTS . 56 APPENDIX...cont’d)I PAGE CHAPTER IV: SEXUAL ASSAULT TV-1 Fore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 IV-2 Type of Maltreatment ............... 53 IV-3

  16. Rivalry of Advocacy Coalitions in the Czech Pension Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potůček Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic, as many other countries of Central and Eastern Europe, faced and is still facing a pension-reform challenge. The diversification of pension pillars led to the massive displacements of participant contributions from the public PAYG pension pillars to the newly constructed private, defined-contribution, fully-funded pillars. In the Czech Republic, the adoption of the relevant law was preceded by serious political conflict between supporters and opponents of this step (both among different political actors and among professionals. In an analysis of the conflict we critically apply the Advocacy Coalition Framework. We work mainly with the analysis of policy documents, public statements of the individual actors and an analysis of voting on the relevant law in both chambers of the Czech Parliament towards the identification of the crystallization process of two clear-cut coalitions between actors from both sides of the spectrum. The Advocacy Coalition Framework in exploring the dynamics of the public-policy process proved to be able to explain situations where there is sharp political conflict. Through the lens of the devil-shift of both camps (advocacy coalitions with different beliefs, each fell into extreme positions within the coalition to affirm the correctness of their arguments and positions.

  17. Green governance - one solution for two problems? : climate change and economic shocks ; risk perceptions and coping strategies in China, India and Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This collection of papers is based on an international workshop held in the summer of 2009 at the University of Duisburg-Essen. It brings together different perceptions regarding China, India and Bangladesh as they face the risks and crises of climate change and economic shocks like the recent global financial crisis. The papers reflect assumptions concerning the concept of Risk Society and discuss the extent to which Sustainable Development and the rather new concepts of Green Governance, Gr...

  18. Relationship between Stereoscopic Vision, Visual Perception, and Microstructure Changes of Corpus Callosum and Occipital White Matter in the 4-Year-Old Very Low Birth Weight Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemko Kwinta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the relationship between stereoscopic vision, visual perception, and microstructure of the corpus callosum (CC and occipital white matter, 61 children born with a mean birth weight of 1024 g (SD 270 g were subjected to detailed ophthalmologic evaluation, Developmental Test of Visual Perception (DTVP-3, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI at the age of 4. Results. Abnormal stereoscopic vision was detected in 16 children. Children with abnormal stereoscopic vision had smaller CC (CC length: 53±6 mm versus 61±4 mm; p<0.01; estimated CC area: 314±106 mm2 versus 446±79 mm2; p<0.01 and lower fractional anisotropy (FA values in CC (FA value of rostrum/genu: 0.7±0.09 versus 0.79±0.07; p<0.01; FA value of CC body: 0.74±0.13 versus 0.82±0.09; p=0.03. We found a significant correlation between DTVP-3 scores, CC size, and FA values in rostrum and body. This correlation was unrelated to retinopathy of prematurity. Conclusions. Visual perceptive dysfunction in ex-preterm children without major sequelae of prematurity depends on more subtle changes in the brain microstructure, including CC. Role of interhemispheric connections in visual perception might be more complex than previously anticipated.

  19. Subjective perception of radioactivity. No change post successful treatment with radioiodine; Strahlen bleiben boese. Keine Aenderung der subjektiven Konzepte von Radioaktivitaet nach erfolgreicher Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Mueller, S.P.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2009-07-01

    We assess the attitude of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity before and after radioiodine therapy by means of a cultural-anthropological approach. We evaluate in patient interviews how their subjective attitude towards radioactivity as an abstract term and towards radioactivity in the medical context on the basis of their personal experiences with radionuclide therapy. 29 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (17 women, 12 men, 35-79 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed prior to and 22-27 month post radioiodine therapy in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1: positive, 5: negative) to quantify their perception of radioactivity. The personal perception of radioactivity as an abstract term does not change significantly (p = 0.15) before and after radioiodine therapy. This perception is linked to mostly negative impressions of radiactivity. However, patients become more positive when assessing the value of radioactivity as part of their therapy regimen. Thus, we observe a significant increase in percepted value of radioactivity post radioiodine therapy (p = 0.03). Patients continue to view radioactivity as something negative despite treatment success following radioiodine therapy. Our results provide useful information for patient information by the nuclear medicine physician prior to a radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  20. Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Wellbeing of Women Who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivas, C

    2016-01-01

    had considerable clinical heterogeneity in relation to staff delivering advocacy; setting (community, shelter, antenatal, healthcare; advocacy intensity (from 30 minutes to 80 hours; and abuse severity. Three trials evaluated advocacy within multi-component interventions. Eleven measured some form of abuse (eight scales, six assessed quality of life (three scales, and six measured depression (three scales. Countries and ethnic groups varied (one or more minority ethnic groups in the USA or UK, and local populations in Hong Kong and Peru. Setting was associated with intensity and duration of advocacy. Risk of bias was high in five studies, moderate in five, and low in three. The quality of evidence (considering multiple factors such as risk of bias, study size, missing data was moderate to low for brief advocacy and very low for intensive advocacy. Incidence of abuse Physical abuse Moderate quality pooled data from two healthcare studies (moderate risk of bias and one community study (low risk of bias, all with 12-month follow-up data, showed no effect on physical abuse for brief (< 12 hours advocacy interventions (standardised mean difference (SMD 0.00, 95% confidence interval (CI - 0.17 to 0.16; n = 558. One antenatal study (low risk of bias showed an association between brief advocacy and reduced minor physical abuse at one year (mean difference (MD change - 1.00, 95% CI - 1.82 to - 0.18; n = 110. An antenatal, multi-component study showed a greater likelihood of physical abuse ending (odds ratio (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.75 immediately after advocacy (number needed to treat (NNT = 8; we cannot exclude impact from other components. Low to very low quality evidence from two intensive advocacy trials (12 hours plus duration showed reduced severe physical abuse in women leaving a shelter at 24 months (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.77; NNT = 8, but not at 12 or 36 months. Sexual abuse Meta-analysis of two studies (n = 239 showed no effect of advocacy on sexual abuse (SMD

  1. Promoting Sex and Reproductive Health Education among Adolescent Should Place Emphasis on Advocacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-liang LIU; Jin WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To make a exploration of the function of advocacy in the promotion of sex and reproductive health education for adolescents.Methods The advocacy played a key role on the promotion of adolescent sex and reproductive education by taking "International cooperation project to promote Chinese youth reproductive health "(YRH project) as example.Results The successful experience of YRH project indicated advocacy's important function in the promotion of sex and reproductive health education for adolescents.Conclusion Advocacy is a crucial element in promoting adolescent sex and reproductive health education.

  2. Advocacy Priorities and Strategies for ASAHP: A Survey of the ASAHP Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Donna; Demo, David H; Devine, Nancy; Butler, Andrew; Saladin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) recently established a strategic goal to increase advocacy efforts. The purpose of this study was to identify advocacy priorities and preferred advocacy strategies among the ASAHP membership. A brief Advocacy Priorities and Strategies Survey was sent to 234 ASAHP members included in the ASAHP email list using an online survey software. Forty-eight members (20%) completed the survey. Data were analyzed using the online survey software and response frequency counts. ASAHP members identified the following federal advocacy priorities: 1) support for students entering allied health professions, 2) support for faculty seeking higher degrees to enhance quality of education in allied health programs, 3) support for higher education institutions to increase capacity of professional programs to address projected allied health workforce needs identified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and 4) support for research funding from federal agencies for allied health. The need for education regarding allied health professions to enhance advocacy efforts was also reported. Preferred advocacy strategies included scheduling ASAHP conferences in Washington, DC, to facilitate trips to Capitol Hill and visiting legislators in home states. Members also indicated a need to participate in advocacy training to enhance their advocacy skills.

  3. Changing Perceptions of Marriage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    IN a Beijing hospital a group of young women from Heze, Shandong Province, work as temporary employees. When the Beijing No. 1 Hospital Attached to Beijing Medical Sciences University was recruiting oddjob helpers in their hometown, these young rural women grasped the opportunity.

  4. Family Day Care Zoning Advocacy Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Carol; And Others

    Designed to help family day care providers and the agencies that support them reform local zoning laws that make it difficult or impossible to legally care for children in their homes, this guide outlines the process of obtaining a use permit, changing local laws, and strategizing for the passage of state legislation that preempts local laws. A…

  5. Library Advocacy Now! Library Advocate's Handbook. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    Libraries are one of the world's greatest assets. Changes in the political, social, and economic climate in the U.S. mean that people cannot take public access to information for granted. Intense competition for public, private, and institutional dollars makes it more crucial than ever that policymakers understand that libraries--public, school,…

  6. Sleep deprivation influences diurnal variation of human time perception with prefrontal activity change: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Soshi

    Full Text Available Human short-time perception shows diurnal variation. In general, short-time perception fluctuates in parallel with circadian clock parameters, while diurnal variation seems to be modulated by sleep deprivation per se. Functional imaging studies have reported that short-time perception recruits a neural network that includes subcortical structures, as well as cortical areas involving the prefrontal cortex (PFC. It has also been reported that the PFC is vulnerable to sleep deprivation, which has an influence on various cognitive functions. The present study is aimed at elucidating the influence of PFC vulnerability to sleep deprivation on short-time perception, using the optical imaging technique of functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Eighteen participants performed 10-s time production tasks before (at 21:00 and after (at 09:00 experimental nights both in sleep-controlled and sleep-deprived conditions in a 4-day laboratory-based crossover study. Compared to the sleep-controlled condition, one-night sleep deprivation induced a significant reduction in the produced time simultaneous with an increased hemodynamic response in the left PFC at 09:00. These results suggest that activation of the left PFC, which possibly reflects functional compensation under a sleep-deprived condition, is associated with alteration of short-time perception.

  7. Heat waves and climate change: applying the health belief model to identify predictors of risk perception and adaptive behaviours in adelaide, australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akompab, Derick A; Bi, Peng; Williams, Susan; Grant, Janet; Walker, Iain A; Augoustinos, Martha

    2013-05-29

    Heat waves are considered a health risk and they are likely to increase in frequency, intensity and duration as a consequence of climate change. The effects of heat waves on human health could be reduced if individuals recognise the risks and adopt healthy behaviours during a heat wave. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of risk perception using a heat wave scenario and identify the constructs of the health belief model that could predict adaptive behaviours during a heat wave. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the summer of 2012 among a sample of persons aged between 30 to 69 years in Adelaide. Participants' perceptions were assessed using the health belief model as a conceptual frame. Their knowledge about heat waves and adaptive behaviours during heat waves was also assessed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the predictors of risk perception to a heat wave scenario and adaptive behaviours during a heat wave. Of the 267 participants, about half (50.9%) had a high risk perception to heat waves while 82.8% had good adaptive behaviours during a heat wave. Multivariate models found that age was a significant predictor of risk perception. In addition, participants who were married (OR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07-0.62), who earned a gross annual household income of ≥$60,000 (OR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.17-0.94) and without a fan (OR = 0.29; 95% CI, 0.11-0.79) were less likely to have a high risk perception to heat waves. Those who were living with others (OR = 2.87; 95% CI, 1.19-6.90) were more likely to have a high risk perception to heat waves. On the other hand, participants with a high perceived benefit (OR = 2.14; 95% CI, 1.00-4.58), a high "cues to action" (OR = 3.71; 95% CI, 1.63-8.43), who had additional training or education after high school (OR = 2.65; 95% CI, 1.25-5.58) and who earned a gross annual household income of ≥$60,000 (OR = 2.66; 95% CI, 1.07-6.56) were more likely to have good adaptive behaviours

  8. Heat Waves and Climate Change: Applying the Health Belief Model to Identify Predictors of Risk Perception and Adaptive Behaviours in Adelaide, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Augoustinos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat waves are considered a health risk and they are likely to increase in frequency, intensity and duration as a consequence of climate change. The effects of heat waves on human health could be reduced if individuals recognise the risks and adopt healthy behaviours during a heat wave. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of risk perception using a heat wave scenario and identify the constructs of the health belief model that could predict adaptive behaviours during a heat wave. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the summer of 2012 among a sample of persons aged between 30 to 69 years in Adelaide. Participants’ perceptions were assessed using the health belief model as a conceptual frame. Their knowledge about heat waves and adaptive behaviours during heat waves was also assessed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the predictors of risk perception to a heat wave scenario and adaptive behaviours during a heat wave. Of the 267 participants, about half (50.9% had a high risk perception to heat waves while 82.8% had good adaptive behaviours during a heat wave. Multivariate models found that age was a significant predictor of risk perception. In addition, participants who were married (OR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07–0.62, who earned a gross annual household income of ≥$60,000 (OR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.17–0.94 and without a fan (OR = 0.29; 95% CI, 0.11–0.79 were less likely to have a high risk perception to heat waves. Those who were living with others (OR = 2.87; 95% CI, 1.19–6.90 were more likely to have a high risk perception to heat waves. On the other hand, participants with a high perceived benefit (OR = 2.14; 95% CI, 1.00–4.58, a high “cues to action” (OR = 3.71; 95% CI, 1.63–8.43, who had additional training or education after high school (OR = 2.65; 95% CI, 1.25–5.58 and who earned a gross annual household income of ≥$60,000 (OR = 2.66; 95% CI, 1.07–6.56 were more likely to

  9. Science Film: An Aperture into Science Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The current funding environment for scientific research necessitates a change in how we foster support for the endeavor. Federal spending is not likely to grow unless constituents--APS members--help communicate the value of science to members of Congress and the public in a compelling and individual way. The event explores how popular film with science-based plots can help physicists communicate the value of science to members of Congress and an increasingly diverse electorate.

  10. The change in weight perception of weight status among the overweight: comparison of NHANES III (1988–1994 and 1999–2004 NHANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starke-Reed Pamela

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study seeks to determine whether perception of weight status among the overweight has changed with the increasing overweight/obesity prevalence. Methods The perception of weight status was compared between overweight participants (BMI between 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 from NHANES III (1988–1994 and overweight participants from NHANES 1999–2004. Perception of weight status was assessed by asking participants to classify their weight as about the right weight, underweight or overweight. Comparisons were made across age groups, genders, race/ethnicities and various income levels. Results Fewer overweight people during the NHANES 1999–2004 survey perceived themselves as overweight when compared to overweight people during the NHANES III survey. The change in distortion between the survey periods was greatest among persons with lower income, males and African-Americans. Conclusion The increase in overweight/obesity between the survey years (NHANES III and NHANES 1999–2004 has been accompanied with fewer overweight people perceiving themselves as overweight.

  11. Changes in Perceptions of the Internet’s Influence on Marketing in South Africa since the Late-1990s

    OpenAIRE

    K.L. Sharp; Bevan-Dye, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports on a study that compared senior marketers’ perceptions of the Internet’s influence on marketing in South Africa in 1997 with their perceptions nearly two decades later in 2011. In South Africa, the predicted value of the Internet economy is expected to rise from R59 billion at the end of 2013 to R100 billion in 2016, thereby accounting for 2.5% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). A cross-industry survey of the marketing practitioners at the Johannesburg St...

  12. Student Advocacy and Research Regarding Employability with Women in an Addiction Recovery Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Privott Ph.D., OTR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a course project that allowed senior undergraduate occupational science students the opportunity to experience advocacy and leadership roles as they prepared to transition to entry-level occupational therapy programs. The students coordinated an on-site employment fair for women residents of one Alcoholics Anonymous-based substance abuse recovery center in Kentucky. This ultimately led to a preliminary qualitative program evaluation study of the participants’ perceptions of employability after participating in the fair. Following a semi-structured interview protocol, nine participants were interviewed by student investigators immediately following the fair. The resulting data were compared within and across transcripts, and coded for emergent themes within an Alcoholics Anonymous framework. The results indicated that the women considered both the students and employers to be advocates; also, the fair was seen as a practical resource for recovery. The women exited the fair poised to pursue diverse work opportunities they previously thought unobtainable. This article supports occupational therapy education efforts to promote research experiences and has implications for future occupational therapy practice in the domain of work.

  13. Evaluation of resident attitudes and self-reported competencies in health advocacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fok Mark C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CanMEDS Health Advocate role, one of seven roles mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Canada, pertains to a physician's responsibility to use their expertise and influence to advance the wellbeing of patients, communities, and populations. We conducted our study to examine resident attitudes and self-reported competencies related to health advocacy, due to limited information in the literature on this topic. Methods We conducted a pilot experience with seven internal medicine residents participating in a community health promotion event. The residents provided narrative feedback after the event and the information was used to generate items for a health advocacy survey. Face validity was established by having the same residents review the survey. Content validity was established by inviting an expert physician panel to review the survey. The refined survey was then distributed to a cohort of core Internal Medicine residents electronically after attendance at an academic retreat teaching residents about advocacy through didactic sessions. Results The survey was completed by 76 residents with a response rate of 68%. The majority agreed to accept an advocacy role for societal health needs beyond caring for individual patients. Most confirmed their ability to identify health determinants and reaffirmed the inherent requirements for health advocacy. While involvement in health advocacy was common during high school and undergraduate studies, 76% of residents reported no current engagement in advocacy activity, and 36% were undecided if they would engage in advocacy during their remaining time as residents, fellows or staff. The common barriers reported were insufficient time, rest and stress. Conclusions Medical residents endorsed the role of health advocate and reported proficiency in determining the medical and bio-psychosocial determinants of individuals and communities. Few residents, however, were

  14. Professional advocacy: linking Virginia's story to public policy-making theory, learning from the past and applying it to our future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Melody K

    2012-05-01

    Too often the nursing profession has been shortsighted regarding its ability to educate legislators and the public on the value of the nurse and the need for policy change. This has stagnated the profession's agenda setting, influence, and position. Virginia nurses, however, rose to the challenge a few years ago. They addressed the nursing faculty shortage by introducing legislation to improve faculty salaries and promote nursing education. They fully defined their problem, formed a unified coalition to develop a solution, and found the political environment favorable for policy change. Their advocacy success story can lend guidance and encouragement for advocacy for the profession. Linking their successful road to policy change to the B. B. Longest (2010) public policy-making framework provides a roadmap for future success.

  15. From hiking through farmland to farming in a leisure landscape: changing social perceptions of the European landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, A.E.; Pedroli, B.; Luginbühl, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The idea that landscape has been created by human activities on a biophysical basis allows for clear cause-effect reasoning. However, landscape planning and management practice learns that it is impossible to neglect the social perception of landscape, i.e. the ways people think about nature and lan

  16. Time will tell: changes in risk perception and the processing of risk information about the Y2K-risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuttschreuter, M.; Gutteling, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A field study was performed on the perceived risks related to the Y2K-problem. Two cross-sectional surveys were executed to study whether risk perception regarding the Y2K-problem, the perceived societal and personal capabilities to mitigate the risks, the attitude toward computers and the attitude

  17. "You Must Know Where You Come From": South African Youths' Perceptions of Religion in Time of Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittian, Aerika S.; Lewin, Nina; Norris, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined South African youths' perceptions of religion during a period of social and economic transition. In-depth interviews were conducted with 55 Black South African youth (age 18) living in the Johannesburg-Soweto metropolitan area. Data were analyzed in a manner consistent with grounded theory methodology and structural…

  18. Why Is Statistics Perceived as Difficult and Can Practice during Training Change Perceptions? Insights from a Prospective Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Olivia; Leavy, Aisling; Hannigan, Ailish

    2014-01-01

    An investigation into prospective mathematics/statistics teachers' (n = 134) conceptual understanding of statistics and attitudes to statistics carried out at the University of Limerick revealed an overall positive attitude to statistics but a perception that it can be a difficult subject, in particular that it requires a great deal of discipline…

  19. The Dialectical Relationship between Place and Space in Education: How the Internet Is Changing Our Perceptions of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Michael; Burbidge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In this essay Michael Glassman and Jonathan Burbidge explore the idea of a dialectical relationship between the traditional place(s) of teaching/learning settings and the challenges to our perceptions created by the new spaces of the Internet. The authors examine this topic in the context of a three-stage evolution of humans' relationship…

  20. Advocacy in the Western Hemisphere Region: some FPA success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D J

    1996-01-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation's Vision 2000 Strategic Plan has emphasized advocacy and the training of family planning associations (FPAs) in the Western Hemisphere region. During the summer of 1995 training programs in advocacy leadership management were sponsored for six FPAs in the Bahamas, Suriname, Belize, Colombia, Honduras, and Brazil. At the Western Hemisphere Regional Council Meeting in September 1995 awards were presented to FPAs for media outstanding projects. These FPAs used outreach to the community to promote the goals of Vision 2000. The Bahamas FPA won the Rosa Cisneros Award for articles published in a magazine that is distributed in primary and secondary schools and deals with the activities, achievements, and opinions of students. Issues include: love, relationships, responsibility, and teen pregnancy. A weekly television talk show also addresses the issues facing youth including education, music, community work, sexuality, pregnancy, and the relationship between teenagers and adults. The Family Planning Association of Honduras was also nominated for the award for a radio show on the health of mothers and children, the problems of adolescents, and FP. The newspaper Tiempo received the award for feature articles on social issues and FP. In 1994 the Association distributed thousands of booklets on contraceptives as well as fliers on vasectomy, female sterilization, oral contraceptives, IUDs, condoms, responsible parenthood, high-risk pregnancy, vaginal cytology, and cervical cancer. Similar posters were placed in hospitals and health centers, in 1997 FP posts, and 400 commercial outlets. The Family Planning Association of Suriname also carried out an impressive advocacy program during the period of 1968-93 with the goals of establishing a balance between population growth and the available resources to achieve well-being with regard to education, health care, nutrition, and housing.