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Sample records for advanced reactivity measurement facility-1

  1. Further development of the Dynamic Control Assemblies Worth Measurement Method for Advanced Reactivity Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petenyi, V.; Strmensky, C.; Jagrik, J.; Minarcin, M.; Sarvaic, I.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic control assemblies worth measurement technique is a quick method for validation of predicted control assemblies worth. The dynamic control assemblies worth measurement utilize space-time corrections for the measured out of core ionization chamber readings calculated by DYN 3D computer code. The space-time correction arising from the prompt neutron density redistribution in the measured ionization chamber reading can be directly applied in the advanced reactivity computer. The second correction concerning the difference of spatial distribution of delayed neutrons can be calculated by simulation the measurement procedure by dynamic version of the DYN 3D code. In the paper some results of dynamic control assemblies worth measurement applied for NPP Mochovce are presented (Authors)

  2. Surface reactivity measurements as required for grouping and read-across: An advanced FRAS protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandon, Arnaud; Werle, Kai; Neubauer, Nicole; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2017-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a widely accepted paradigm associated with different adverse outcomes of particulate matter, including nanomaterials. It has frequently been identified in in vitro and in vivo studies and different assays have been developed for this purpose. Here we describe a newly developed multi-dose protocol of the FRAS assay (Ferric Reduction Ability of Serum). The purpose of this SOP is the measurement of the surface reactivity of nanomaterials under physiological conditions. Antioxidative components as present in human blood serum (HBS) serve as reporter molecules. The assay separates the oxidative damage from the read-out of the reporter molecules. The results show significantly enhanced repeatability with better sensitivity towards low reactivity, enabling application of FRAS both to a rough grouping by reactive vs. passive nanomaterials and further to substantiation of read-across by enhanced resolution of the similarity between different nanoforms of the same substance.

  3. Surface reactivity measurements as required for grouping and read-across: An advanced FRAS protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandon, Arnaud; Werle, Kai; Neubauer, Nicole; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a widely accepted paradigm associated with different adverse outcomes of particulate matter, including nanomaterials. It has frequently been identified in in vitro and in vivo studies and different assays have been developed for this purpose. Here we describe a newly developed multi-dose protocol of the FRAS assay (Ferric Reduction Ability of Serum). The purpose of this SOP is the measurement of the surface reactivity of nanomaterials under physiological conditions. Antioxidative components as present in human blood serum (HBS) serve as reporter molecules. The assay separates the oxidative damage from the read-out of the reporter molecules. The results show significantly enhanced repeatability with better sensitivity towards low reactivity, enabling application of FRAS both to a rough grouping by reactive vs. passive nanomaterials and further to substantiation of read-across by enhanced resolution of the similarity between different nanoforms of the same substance. (paper)

  4. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  5. Regarding KUR Reactivity Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Akira; Hasegawa, Kei; Tsuchiyama, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okumura, Ryo; Sano, Tadafumi

    2012-01-01

    This article reported: (1) the outline of the reactivity measurement system of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), (2) the calibration data of control rod, (3) the problems and the countermeasures for range switching of linear output meter. For the laptop PC for the reactivity measurement system, there are four input signals: (1) linear output meter, (2) logarithmic output meter, (3) core temperature gauge, and (4) control rod position. The hardware of reactivity measurement system is controlled with Labview installed on the laptop. Output, reactivity, reactor period, and the change in reactivity due to temperature effect or Xenon effect are internally calculated and displayed in real-time with Labview based on the four signals above. Calculation results are recorded in the form of a spreadsheet. At KUR, the reactor core arrangement was changed, so the control rod was re-calibrated. At this time, calculated and experimental values of reactivity based on the reactivity measurement system were compared, and it was confirmed that the reactivity calculation by Labview was accurate. The range switching of linear output meter in the nuclear instrumentation should automatically change within the laptop, however sometimes this did not function properly in the early stage. It was speculated that undefined percent values during the transition of percent value were included in the calculation and caused calculation errors. The range switching started working properly after fixing this issue. (S.K.)

  6. Initial tank calibration at NUCEF critical facility. 1. Measurement procedure and its result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi; Mineo, Hideaki; Tonoike, Kotaro; Takeshita, Isao; Hoshi, Katsuya; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki.

    1994-07-01

    Initial tank calibrations were carried out prior to hot operation of critical facilities in NUCEF: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, for the purpose of the nuclear material accountancy and control for the facility. Raw calibration data were collected from single run per one tank by measuring differential pressure with dip-tube systems, weight of calibration liquid (demineralized water) poured into the tank, temperature in the tank and so on, without operation of tank ventilation system. Volume and level data were obtained by applying density and buoyancy corrections to the raw data. As a result, the evaluated measurement errors of volume and level were small enough, e.g. within 0.2 lit. and 1.0 mm, respectively, for Pu accountancy tanks. This paper summarizes the above-mentioned measurement procedures, collected data, data correction procedures and evaluated measurement errors. (author)

  7. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 x 10 19 m -2 s -1 is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  8. Definition of reactivity and its measurability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dapu

    1986-01-01

    Reactivity is the fundamental and important physical quantity in the reactor physics. The different kinds of method for defining reactivity are represented, the difference between different definitions of reactivity is indicalted and the conditions under which they have nearly the same measurable value are discussed. It is demonstrated that when the static adjointed neutron density or the neutron importance is selected to be a weight function for generating kinetic parameters used in the neutron kinetic equations, the kinetic reactivity is approximately equal to the static reactivity. Due to the constraint of the normalization condition, the shape function must be so selected that the corresponding amplitude function is proportional to the fundamental mode of neutron density variating with time. Measured reactivity by the kinetic method may vary with the position of detector, owing to the different space distribution of the prompt neutrons density and the delayed neutrons density and the effect of the higher harmonics of the neutron density. Some corresponding correction must be made in order to obtain the real static reactivity

  9. Homogenous and heterogenous advanced oxidation of two commercial reactive dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, I A; Arslan, I; Sacan, M T

    2001-07-01

    Two commercial reactive dyes, the azo dye Reactive Black 5 and the copper phythalocyanine dye Reactive Blue 21, have been treated at a concentration of 75 mg l(-1) by titanium dioxide mediated photocatalytic (TiO2/UV), dark and UV-light assisted Fenton (Fe2+/H2O2) and Fenton-like (Fe3+/H2O2) processes in acidic medium. For the treatment of Reactive Black 5, all investigated advanced oxidation processes were quite effective in terms of colour, COD as well as TOC removal. Moreover, the relative growth inhibition of the azo dye towards the marine algae Dunaliella tertiolecta that was initially 70%, did not exhibit an increase during the studied advanced oxidation reactions and complete detoxification at the end of the treatment period could be achieved for all investigated treatment processes. However, for Reactive Blue 21, abatement in COD and UV-VIS absorbance values was mainly due to the adsorption of the dye on the photocatalyst surface and/or the coagulative effect of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions. Although only a limited fraction of the copper phythalocyanine dye underwent oxidative degradation, 47% of the total copper in the dye was already released after 1 h photocatalytic treatment.

  10. Instructions for applying inverse method for reactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    1988-11-01

    This report is a brief description of the completed method for reactivity measurement. It contains description of the experimental procedure needed instrumentation and computer code IM for determining reactivity. The objective of this instructions manual is to enable experiments and reactivity measurement on any critical system according to the methods adopted at the RB reactor

  11. Measurements of total OH reactivity during PROPHET-AMOS 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickly, P.; Sakowski, J.; Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Sklaveniti, S.; Locoge, N.; Dusanter, S.

    2017-12-01

    As one of the main oxidant in the atmosphere, the hydroxyl radical (OH) initiates the oxidation of volatile organic compounds that can lead to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Understanding both the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to air quality and climate change. Measurements of total OH reactivity can provide an important test of our understanding of the OH radical budget. Recent measurements of total reactivity in many environments have been greater than calculated based on the measured concentration of VOCs, suggesting that important OH sinks in these environments are not well characterized. Measurements of total OH reactivity were performed in a forested environment during the PROPHET - AMOS field campaign (Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemisty, Emissions, and Transport - Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer) using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the Total OH Loss Rate Method (TOHLM). The site is characterized by large emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes and low anthropogenic influence. Measurements of total OH reactivity using these two techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, giving confidence in the measured OH reactivity. In addition, measurements of trace gases (VOCs, NOx, O3) were used to perform a comprehensive apportionment of OH sinks. These measurements are used in a chemical model using the Master Chemical Mechanism to calculate the expected OH reactivity. The results will be compared to previous measurements of total OH reactivity at this site.

  12. INDIAN POINT REACTOR REACTIVITY AND FLUX DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batch, M. L.; Fischer, F. E.

    1963-11-15

    The reactivity of the Indian Point core was measured near zero reactivity at various shim and control rod patterns. Flux distribution measurements were also made, and the results are expressed in terms of power peaking factors and normalized detector response during rod withdrawal. (D.L.C.)

  13. Modelling of power-reactivity coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strmensky, C.; Petenyi, V.; Jagrik, J.; Minarcin, M.; Hascik, R.; Toth, L.

    2005-01-01

    Report describes results of modeling of power-reactivity coefficient analysis on power-level. In paper we calculate values of discrepancies arisen during transient process. These discrepancies can be arisen as result of experiment evaluation and can be caused by disregard of 3D effects on neutron distribution. The results are critically discussed (Authors)

  14. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Measurement and analysis of reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiyu; Hu Yun; Yang Xiaoyan; Fan Zhendong; Zhang Qiang; Zhao Jinkun; Li Zehua

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR was calculated by CITATION program and compared with the results calculated by correlative programs and measured from experiments for temperature effects. It is indicated that the calculation results from CITATION agree well with measured values. The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR is about -4 pcm/℃. The deviation of the measured values between the temperature increasing and decreasing processes is about 11%, which satisfies the experiment acceptance criteria. The measured results can validate the calculation ones by program and can provide important reference data for the safety operation of CEFR and the analysis of the reactivity balance in the reactor refueling situation. (authors)

  16. Measurements of low reactivities using a reactor oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, D.; Petrovic, M.

    1965-12-01

    Most of the methods of measuring reactivity are limited to the region from several hundreds to several thousands of pcm. The present work develops a method of measuring low reactivities from several pcm to about 600 pcm using the ROB-1 reactor oscillator on the RB reactor of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences at Vinca. The accuracy of measurement is better than 1%. Several methods are used to measure low reactivities. The most often used is the method based on measuring the stable reactor period. The bottom limit of this method is about 30 porn /1,2/. For control rod calibration the method of rod oscillation is used /3,4/. This method is confronted with considerable influence of space effects /5/. Reference /6/ reports on a method for measuring the reactivity coefficient at a critical level in liquid-moderated reactors. The method is based on measuring reactor response to the oscillation of the moderator about the critical level. The present work reports on a method of determining the reactivity by measuring the phase shift between the perturbation of the effective multiplication factor and reactor response. With the use of the ROB-1 reactor oscillator, the method allows measurement of the reactivity from several pcm to about 600 pcm with an accuracy of 1% (author)

  17. Measurements of low reactivities using a reactor oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradovic, D; Petrovic, M [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-12-15

    Most of the methods of measuring reactivity are limited to the region from several hundreds to several thousands of pcm. The present work develops a method of measuring low reactivities from several pcm to about 600 pcm using the ROB-1 reactor oscillator on the RB reactor of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences at Vinca. The accuracy of measurement is better than 1%. Several methods are used to measure low reactivities. The most often used is the method based on measuring the stable reactor period. The bottom limit of this method is about 30 porn /1,2/. For control rod calibration the method of rod oscillation is used /3,4/. This method is confronted with considerable influence of space effects /5/. Reference /6/ reports on a method for measuring the reactivity coefficient at a critical level in liquid-moderated reactors. The method is based on measuring reactor response to the oscillation of the moderator about the critical level. The present work reports on a method of determining the reactivity by measuring the phase shift between the perturbation of the effective multiplication factor and reactor response. With the use of the ROB-1 reactor oscillator, the method allows measurement of the reactivity from several pcm to about 600 pcm with an accuracy of 1% (author)

  18. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  19. Advanced Reactive Power Reserve Management Scheme to Enhance LVRT Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanik Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: To increase the utilization of wind power in the power system, grid integration standards have been proposed for the stable integration of large-scale wind power plants. In particular, fault-ride-through capability, especially Low-Voltage-Ride-Through (LVRT, has been emphasized, as it is related to tripping in wind farms. Therefore, this paper proposes the Wind power plant applicable-Effective Reactive power Reserve (Wa-ERPR, which combines both wind power plants and conventional generators at the Point of Interconnection (POI. The reactive power capability of the doubly-fed induction generator wind farm was considered to compute the total Wa-ERPR at the POI with reactive power capability of existing generators. By using the Wa-ERPR management algorithm, in case of a violation of the LVRT standards, the amount of reactive power compensation is computed using the Wa-ERPR management scheme. The proposed scheme calculates the Wa-ERPR and computes the required reactive power, reflecting the change of the system topology pre- and post-contingency, to satisfy the LVRT criterion when LVRT regulation is not satisfied at the POI. The static synchronous compensator (STATCOM with the capacity corresponding to calculated amount of reactive power through the Wa-ERPR management scheme is applied to the POI. Therefore, it is confirmed that the wind power plant satisfies the LVRT criteria by securing the appropriate reactive power at the POI, by applying of the proposed algorithm.

  20. A digital instrument for reactivity measurements in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwaszczewski, S.

    1979-01-01

    An instrument for digital determination of the reactivity in nuclear reactors is described. It is based on the CAMAC standard apparatus, suitable for the use of pulse or current type neutron detectors and operates with prompt response and an output signal proportional to the core neutron flux. The measured data of neutron flux and reactivity can be registered by a digital display unit, an indicator, or, by request of the operator, a paper type punch. The algorithms used for reactivity calculation are considered and the results of numerical studies on those algorithms are discussed. The instrument has been used for determining the reactivity of the control elements in the fast-thermal assembly ANNA and in the research reactor MARIA. Some results of these measurements are given. (author)

  1. Digital instrument for reactivity measurements in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S [Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    1979-07-01

    An instrument for digital determination of the reactivity in nuclear reactors is described. It is based on the CAMAC standard apparatus, suitable for the use of pulse or current type neutron detectors and operates with prompt response and an output signal proportional to the core neutron flux. The measured data of neutron flux and reactivity can be registered by a digital display unit, an indicator, or, by request of the operator, a paper type punch. The algorithms used for reactivity calculation are considered and the results of numerical studies on those algorithms are discussed. The instrument has been used for determining the reactivity of the control elements in the fast-thermal assembly ANNA and in the research reactor MARIA. Some results of these measurements are given.

  2. Measurement of reactivity coefficients for code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuding, Matthias; Loetsch, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the year 2003 measurements in the cold reactor state have been performed at the NPP KKI 2 in order to validate the codes that are used for reactor core calculations and especially for the proof of the shutdown margin that is produced by calculations only. For full power states code verification is quite easy because the calculations can be compared with different measured values, e.g. with the activation values determined by the aeroball system. For cold reactor states, however the data base is smaller, especially for reactor cores that are quite 'inhomogeneous' and have rather high Pu-fiss-and 235 U-contents. At the same time the cold reactor state is important regarding the shutdown margin. For these reasons the measurements mentioned above have been performed in order to check the accuracy of the codes that are used by the operator and by our organization for many years. Basically, boron concentrations and control rod worths for different configurations have been measured. The results of the calculation show a very good agreement with the measured values. Therefore, it can be stated that the operator's as well as our code system is suitable for routine use, e.g. during licensing procedures (Authors)

  3. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    A new design is presented for a gas flow cell for reactive gases at high temperatures. The design features three heated sections that are separated by flow windows. This design avoids the contact of reactive gases with the material of the exchangeable optical windows. A gas cell with this design ......-resolution measurements are presented for the absorption cross-section of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the UV range up to 773 K (500 degrees C)...

  4. Measurement of reactivity effect caused by nonuniform fuel distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Yasushi; Yasui, Hazime; Nishina, Kojiro; Shiroya, Seiji

    1991-01-01

    A reactivity effect due to a spatial variation of nuclear fuel concentration is an important problem in a reprocessing plant. To estimate this reactivity effect theoretically, the ''Goertzel's necessary condition, and th Fuel Importance'' theory have been proposed. In order to verify these theories, we have performed systematic measurements of reactivity effect due to the nonuniformity in the fuel distribution within the Kyoto University Critical Assembly. Neutron flux distribution and Fuel Importance distribution were also determined. A nonuniform assembly whose fuel concentration in the center region was 40% higher than the uniform one was found to have an excess reactivity of 0.3%Δk/k, with the same total uranium mass for which the uniform assembly was just critical. Moreover, its spatial distribution of thermal neutron flux and of Fuel Importance were more flat than those of the uniform assembly, as expected by the Goertzel's condition and the Fuel Importance theory. (Author)

  5. Total OH Reactivity Measurements in the Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praplan, A. P.; Hellén, H.; Hakola, H.; Hatakka, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Atmospheric total OH reactivity (Rtotal) can be measured (Kovacs and Brune, 2001; Sinha et al., 2008) or it can be calculated according to Rtotal = ∑i kOH+X_i [Xi] where kOH+X_i corresponds to the reaction rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with a given compound Xi and [Xi] its concentration. Studies suggest that in some environments a large fraction of missing reactivity, comparing calculated Rtotal with ambient total OH reactivity measurements (Di Carlo et al., 2004; Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). In this study Rtotal has been measured using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008). Levels of the reference compound (pyrrole, C4H5N) are monitored by gas chromatography every 2 minutes and Rtotal is derived from the difference of reactivity between zero and ambient air. RESULTS Around 36 hours of preliminary total OH reactivity data (30 May until 2 June 2015) are presented in Fig. 1. Its range matches previous studies for this site (Nölscher et al., 2012; Sinha et al., 2010) and is similar to values in another pine forest (Nakashima et al., 2014). The setup used during the period presented here has been updated and more recent data will be presented, as well as a comparison with calculated OH reactivity from measured individual species. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by Academy of Finland (Academy Research Fellowship No. 275608). The authors acknowledge Juuso Raine for technical support. REFERENCES Di Carlo et al. (2004). Science 304, 722-725.Hofzumahaus et al. (2009). Science 324, 1702-1704.Kovacs and Brune (2001). J. Atmos. Chem. 39, 105-122.Nakashima et al. (2014). Atmos. Env. 85, 1-8.Nölscher et al. (2012). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 8257-8270.Sinha et al. (2008). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2213-2227.Sinha et al. (2010). Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 6614-6620.

  6. Space dependence of reactivity parameters on reactor dynamic perturbation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletti, R.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1985-01-01

    Practical application of reactor-dynamic perturbation measurements for on-power determination of differential reactivity weight of control rods and power coefficients of reactivity has shown a significant dependence of parameters on the position of outcore detectors. The space dependence of neutron flux signal in the core of a VVER-440-type reactor was measured by means of 60 self-powered neutron detectors. The greatest neutron flux alterations are located close to moved control rods and in height of the perturbation position. By means of computations, detector positions can be found in the core in which the one-point model is almost valid. (author)

  7. Measurement of advanced electromagnetic radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Bajlo, Darko

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of detecting advanced electromagnetic radiation predicted by Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory for the case of incomplete absorption of retarded electromagnetic radiation, pulses in duration of 6 ns to 24 ns, wavelength from 91 cm to 200 cm where supplied to three different transmitting antennas. Detection was done with a λ/20 monopole antenna in the advanced time window at a time 2r/c before the arrival of the center of the retarded pulse. At distances ranging from 430 cm to 18...

  8. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, L.; Siegrist, B.; Vesper, S.

    1997-01-01

    Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months

  9. Evaluating advanced LMR [liquid metal reactor] reactivity feedbacks using SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.; Kennett, R.J.; Cheng, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of the PRISM and SAFR Liquid Metal Reactors with SSC are discussed from a safety and licensing perspective. The PRISM and SAFR reactors with metal fuel are designed for inherent shutdown responses to loss-of-flow and loss-of-heat-sink events. The demonstration of this technology was performed by EBR-II during experiments in April 1986 by ANL (Planchon, et al.). Response to postulated TOPs (control rod withdrawal) are made acceptable largely by reducing reactivity swings, and therefore minimizing the size of possible ractivity insertions. Analyses by DOE and the contractors GE, RI, and ANL take credit for several reactivity feedback mechanisms during transient calculations. These feedbacks include Doppler, sodium density, and thermal expansion of the grid plates, the load pads, the fuel (axial) and the control rod which are now factored into the BNL SSC analyses. The bowing feedback mechanism is not presently modeled in the SSC due to its complexity and subsequent large uncertainty. The analysis is conservative by not taking credit for this negative feedback mechanism. Comparisons of BNL predictions with DOE contractors are provided

  10. Fluxes of chemically reactive species inferred from mean concentration measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galmarini, S.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Duyzer, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of the fluxes of chemically reactive species on the basis of routine measurements of meteorological variables and chemical species. The method takes explicity into account the influence of chemical reactions on the fluxes of the species. As a demonstration

  11. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed

  12. SEG Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert; Laughlin, Darren; Brune, Bob

    2016-10-17

    Significant advancements in the development of sensors to enable rotational seismic measurements have been achieved. Prototypes are available now to support experiments that help validate the utility of rotational seismic measurements.

  13. Advanced configuration of hybrid passive filter for reactive power and harmonic compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, O Fatih; Acikgoz, Hakan; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Harmonics is one of the major power quality problems for power systems. The harmonics can be eliminated by power filters such as passive, active, and hybrid. In this study, a new passive filter configuration has been improved in addition to the existing passive filter configurations. Conventional hybrid passive filters are not successful to compensate rapidly changing reactive power demand. The proposed configure are capable of compensating both harmonics and reactive power at the same time. Simulation results show that performance of reactive power and harmonic compensation with advanced hybrid passive filter is better than conventional hybrid passive filters.

  14. Advanced in-flight measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Nicholas; Jentink, Henk; Kompenhans, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The book presents a synopsis of the main results achieved during the 3 year EU-project "Advanced Inflight Measurement Techniques (AIM)" which applied advanced image based measurement techniques to industrial flight testing. The book is intended to be not only an overview on the AIM activities but also a guide on the application of advanced optical measurement techniques for future flight testing. Furthermore it is a useful guide for engineers in the field of experimental methods and flight testing who face the challenge of a future requirement for the development of highly accurate non-intrusive in-flight measurement techniques.

  15. Oxetanes: Recent Advances in Synthesis, Reactivity, and Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James A; Croft, Rosemary A; Davis, Owen A; Doran, Robert; Morgan, Kate F

    2016-10-12

    The four-membered oxetane ring has been increasingly exploited for its contrasting behaviors: its influence on physicochemical properties as a stable motif in medicinal chemistry and its propensity to undergo ring-opening reactions as a synthetic intermediate. These applications have driven numerous studies into the synthesis of new oxetane derivatives. This review takes an overview of the literature for the synthesis of oxetane derivatives, concentrating on advances in the last five years up to the end of 2015. These methods are clustered by strategies for preparation of the ring and further derivatization of preformed oxetane-containing building blocks. Examples of the use of oxetanes in medicinal chemistry are reported, including a collation of oxetane derivatives appearing in recent patents for medicinal chemistry applications. Finally, examples of oxetane derivatives in ring-opening and ring-expansion reactions are described.

  16. Subcritical reactivity measurement at Angra 1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Renato Yoichi Ribeiro; Miranda, Anselmo Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    In order to speed up the Angra 1 NPP physics tests, this work intends to develop a digital reactivity meter combined with a methodology of the modified Neutron Source Multiplication (NSM) method with correction factors for subcriticality measurements at Angra 1 NPP. In the first part of this work, we have applied the Modified Neutron Source Multiplication (MNSM) Method with fundamental mode extraction, in order to improve the monitoring of the subcriticality at Angra 1 NPP during the criticality approach. In the second part, we developed a preliminary subcritical reactivity meter algorithm based on the point-reactor inverse kinetic model with six delayed neutron groups and external neutron source. The source strength was obtained through the Least Squares Inverse Kinetics Method (LSIKM). (author)

  17. Pulsed neutron method for diffusion, slowing down, and reactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    An outline is given on the principles of the pulsed neutron method for the determination of thermal neutron diffusion parameters, for slowing-down time measurements, and for reactivity determinations. The historical development is sketched from the breakthrough in the middle of the nineteen fifties and the usefulness and limitations of the method are discussed. The importance for the present understanding of neutron slowing-down, thermalization and diffusion are point out. Examples are given of its recent use for e.g. absorption cross section measurements and for the study of the properties of heterogeneous systems

  18. Development and Investigation of Reactivity Measurement Methods in Subcritical Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Johanna

    2005-05-01

    Subcriticality measurements during core loading and in future accelerator driven systems have a clear safety relevance. In this thesis two subcriticality methods are treated: the Feynman-alpha and the source modulation method. The Feynman-alpha method is a technique to determine the reactivity from the relative variance of the detector counts during a measurement period. The period length is varied to get the full time dependence of the variance-to-mean. The corresponding theoretical formula was known only with stationary sources. In this thesis, due to its relevance for novel reactivity measurement methods, the Feynman-alpha formulae for pulsed sources for both the stochastic and the deterministic cases are treated. Formulae neglecting as well as including the delayed neutrons are derived. The formulae neglecting delayed neutrons are experimentally verified with quite good agreement. The second reactivity measurement technique investigated in this thesis is the so-called source modulation technique. The theory of the method was elaborated on the assumption of point kinetics, but in practice the method will be applied by using the signal from a single local neutron detector. Applicability of the method therefore assumes point kinetic behaviour of the core. Hence, first the conditions of the point kinetic behaviour of subcritical cores was investigated. After that the performance of the source modulation technique in the general case as well as and in the limit of exact point kinetic behaviour was examined. We obtained the unexpected result that the method has a finite, non-negligible error even in the limit of point kinetic behaviour, and a substantial error in the operation range of future accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADS). In practice therefore the method needs to be calibrated by some other method for on-line applications.

  19. Development and Investigation of Reactivity Measurement Methods in Subcritical Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Johanna

    2005-05-01

    Subcriticality measurements during core loading and in future accelerator driven systems have a clear safety relevance. In this thesis two subcriticality methods are treated: the Feynman-alpha and the source modulation method. The Feynman-alpha method is a technique to determine the reactivity from the relative variance of the detector counts during a measurement period. The period length is varied to get the full time dependence of the variance-to-mean. The corresponding theoretical formula was known only with stationary sources. In this thesis, due to its relevance for novel reactivity measurement methods, the Feynman-alpha formulae for pulsed sources for both the stochastic and the deterministic cases are treated. Formulae neglecting as well as including the delayed neutrons are derived. The formulae neglecting delayed neutrons are experimentally verified with quite good agreement. The second reactivity measurement technique investigated in this thesis is the so-called source modulation technique. The theory of the method was elaborated on the assumption of point kinetics, but in practice the method will be applied by using the signal from a single local neutron detector. Applicability of the method therefore assumes point kinetic behaviour of the core. Hence, first the conditions of the point kinetic behaviour of subcritical cores was investigated. After that the performance of the source modulation technique in the general case as well as and in the limit of exact point kinetic behaviour was examined. We obtained the unexpected result that the method has a finite, non-negligible error even in the limit of point kinetic behaviour, and a substantial error in the operation range of future accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADS). In practice therefore the method needs to be calibrated by some other method for on-line applications

  20. Skin test reactivity among Danish children measured 15 years apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Porsbjerg, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of secular trends in the prevalence of allergy among children stems in large part from questionnaire surveys, whereas repeated cross-sectional studies using objective markers of atopic sensitization are sparse. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the prevalence of skin prick...... (n = 527) and the second in 2001 (n = 480). Skin test reactivity to nine common aeroallergens was measured at both occasions. RESULTS: The prevalence of positive SPT to at least one allergen decreased from 24.1% in 1986 to 18.9% in 2001, (p = 0.05). We found a declining prevalence of sensitization...

  1. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  2. Device for measuring active, reactive and apparent power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosinski, E.; Wieland, J.

    1982-09-30

    The plan consists of a traditional electrodynamic mechanism for measuring power (IM) supplemented by three switches, two rectifiers, resistor, included in parallel, and phaseshifting throttle included in series with the voltage coil of the IM. This makes it possible by selection to perform three types of measurements: active power of alternating current or power of direct current, only the voltage coils and the IM current are engaged; reactive power, the resistor and the throttle are additionally engaged by the aforementioned method; complete (apparent) power--the current and the voltage are supplied directly to the IM coils, but in contrast to the first case, through rectifiers. The influence of the highest harmonic components of voltage and current which are not significant for industrial measurements can be eliminated in necessary cases using filtering devices.

  3. Advanced ultrasonic technology for natural gas measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    In recent years, due to rising environmental and safety concerns, increasing commodity prices, and operational inefficiencies, a paradigm shift has been taking place with respect to gas measurement. The price of natural gas depends on the location, time of the year, and type of consumer. There is wide uncertainty associated with an orifice meter. This paper presents the use of advanced ultrasonic technology for the measurement of natural gas. For many years, multi-path ultrasonic meters with intelligent sensor technology have been used for gas measurement. This paper gives the various applications of ultrasonic technology along with their advantages and a draws a comparison with orifice meters. From the study it can be concluded that extensive advances in the use of ultrasonic technology for gas measurement have widened the areas of application and that varying frequencies combined with sealed transducer designs make it possible to measure atmospheric and sour gas in custody transfer process control and flaring accurately.

  4. Reactivity measurements using the Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The zero count probability method (also called Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method, after its inventors) is a method for measuring the reactivity in nuclear reactors, being a competitor of the [more well-known in the West] Feynman-alpha Method and the Rossi-alpha Method. The modus operandi of this method is using the detector channels where there was no counting at all in order to calculate reactor parameters. In deep subcriticality few models have been tested and this work tries out the Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method in one of such scenarios: measurements will be made in environments below -3,5 k pcm in the zero-potency water-moderated reactor IPEN/MB-01 which is fuelled by UO{sub 2} enriched by 4.3%. These extremely low reactivity environments are required because the chance of no counts on the detector must be significant: otherwise, the method would demand a large time of acquisition of data. Besides that, the method is very simple and straightforward. One of the advantages of this method is that it needs very little data reduction, since the essential data is directly given by the measuring apparatus. The detection will be in charge of modern BF{sub 3} detectors. It will be assumed that, in these deep subcritical systems, the function K{sub eff} = f(N-Nkp) has a linear portion in its first part, resulting of the decomposition of it in a Taylor series. The value of alpha is related to the reactivity ρ with linear dependency. The results will be compared with recent studies of the two main methods described above. Presented for the first time in the 60's, this tool has seen little use in the west hemisphere. This work shows its use in the measurements of the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01, as well as the code developed for its employment. It will be the first time this method is used in the south hemisphere. (authors)

  5. Measurement of xenon reactivity in the reactor of the nuclear ship 'MUTSU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Gakuhari, Kazuhiko; Okada, Noboru.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of reactivity changes caused by the increase and decrease of xenon concentration in the reactor core of the nuclear ship 'MUTSU' after a change from long-term operation at 70 % to zero power. The change in xenon reactivity was compensated by control-rod movements and the compensated reactivity was measured using a digital reactivity meter. The xenon override peak was recognized five and half hours after the start of power reduction. The equilibrium and peak reactivities of xenon were estimated by reading the initial and peak values of a theoretical curve which was fitted to the measured variation in xenon reactivity. The xenon reactivity results obtained by the present method can be considered to be accurate since no control-rod worth data were used and the measured quantity was the reactivity itself. (author)

  6. Betatron phase advance measurement at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.

    1987-02-01

    There are many reasons to determine the betatron phase advance between two azimuthal positions in a circular accelerator or storage ring. We have measured the betatron phase advance between various pairs of azimuthal points in the SPEAR Storage Ring by two different methods. The first method is to excite a steady state coherent betatron oscillation with a network analyzer. The second method is to excite a free coherent betatron oscillation with an impulse kick, and to digitally sample the transverse position of the beam at the pickup stations. The results of these digital samples are Fourier analyzed with a computer to obtain the phase advance. The second method is discussed, and the experimental results compared to theory

  7. Betatron phase advance measurement at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.

    1987-01-01

    There are many reasons to determine the betatron phase advance between two azimuthal positions in a circular accelerator or storage ring. The authors measured the betatron phase advance between various pairs of azimuthal points in the SPEAR Storage Ring by two different methods. The first method is to excite a steady state coherent betatron oscillation with a network analyzer. The second method is to excite a free coherent betatron oscillation with an impulse kick, and to digitally sample the transverse position of the beam at the pickup stations. The results of these digital samples are Fourier analyzed with a computer to obtain the phase advance. The second method is discussed, and the experimental results compared to theory

  8. The great advances in radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    2002-01-01

    The title of this banquet talk was selected to entertain conferees with recollections of major advances in dosimetry that have stimulated appetites for scientific progress. Recalling over fifty years of use of dosimetric instruments and concepts in the 1950-2000 era leads to an appreciation of many advances in solid state dosimetry, which others here know well and pursue vigorously. This author has been mainly a user, admirer, and interpreter of the fundamental methods of dose measurement. These advances have allowed ease of application in radiation protection and medical physics, for determining current routine and accidental exposures to workers, and for precise radiotherapeutic dose delivery. In more recent years, advances in identifying means of locating selective depositions of energy in various materials are providing ways of retrospectively assessing doses to tissue that were deposited many years ago. These methods also will allow development of quantitative theories of radiation damage once the lesions of interest are identified through further advances in molecular genetics. Yet, reflections on the past fifty years lead to increasing appreciation of the enormous achievements of our predecessors in the 1900-1950 period. Therefore, this presentation emphasises methods used by the author and some of his data interpretations during his 52-year career, with some examination of the earlier origin of some of these methods. (author)

  9. Advances in near-infrared measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Patonay, Gabor

    1991-01-01

    Advances in Near-Infrared Measurements, Volume 1 provides an overview of near-infrared spectroscopy. The book is comprised of six chapters that tackle various areas of near-infrared measurement. Chapter 1 discusses remote monitoring techniques in near-infrared spectroscopy with an emphasis on fiber optics. Chapter 2 covers the applications of fibers using Raman techniques, and Chapter 3 tackles the difficulties associated with near-infrared data analysis. The subsequent chapters present examples of the capabilities of near-infrared spectroscopy from various research groups. The text wi

  10. Measurements and calculation of reactivity in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.S.B.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques and experimentals procedures utilized in the measurement of some nuclear parameters related to reactivity are presented. Measurements of reactivity coefficients, such as void, temperature and power, and control rod worth were made in the IEA-R1 Research Reactor. The techniques used to perform the measurements were: i) stable period (control rod calibration), ii) inverse kinetics (digital reactivity meter), iii) aluminium slab insertion in the fuel element coolant channels (void reactivity), iv) nuclear reactor core temperature changes by means of the changes in the coolant systems of reactor core (isothermal reactivity coefficient) and v) by making perturbation in the core through the control rod motions (power reactivity coefficient and control rod calibration). By using the computer codes HAMMER, HAMMER-TECHNION and CITATION, the experiments realized in the IEA-R1 reactor were simulated. From this simulation, the theoretical reactivity parameters were estimated and compared with the respective experimental results. Furthermore, in the second fuel load of Angra-1 Nuclear Power Station, the IPEN-CNEN/SP digital reactivity - meter were used in the lower power test with the aim to assess the equipment performance. Among several tests, the reacticity-meter were used in parallel with a Westinghouse analogic reativimeter-meter) to measure the heat additiona point, critical boron concentration, control rod calibration, isothermal and moderator reactivity coefficient. These tests, and the results obtained by the digital reactivity-meter are described. The results were compared with those obtained by Westinghouse analogic reactivity meter, showing excellent agreement. (author) [pt

  11. Reactivity worth measurements on the CALIBAN reactor: interpretation of integral experiments for the nuclear data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, B.

    2012-01-01

    The good knowledge of nuclear data, input parameters for the neutron transport calculation codes, is necessary to support the advances of the nuclear industry. The purpose of this work is to bring pertinent information regarding the nuclear data integral validation process. Reactivity worth measurements have been performed on the Caliban reactor, they concern four materials of interest for the nuclear industry: gold, lutetium, plutonium and uranium 238. Experiments which have been conducted in order to improve the characterization of the core are also described and discussed, the latter are necessary to the good interpretation of reactivity worth measurements. The experimental procedures are described with their associated uncertainties, measurements are then compared to numerical results. The methods used in numerical calculations are reported, especially the multigroup cross sections generation for deterministic codes. The modeling of the experiments is presented along with the associated uncertainties. This comparison led to an interpretation concerning the qualification of nuclear data libraries. Discrepancies are reported, discussed and justify the need of such experiments. (author) [fr

  12. MTR fuel element burn-up measurements by the reactivity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, A.; Cuya, T.R.; Ravnik, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel element burn-up was measured by the reactivity method in the 10 MW Peruvian MTR reactor RP-10. The main purpose of the experiment was testing the reactivity method for an MTR reactor as the reactivity method was originally developed for TRIGA reactors. The reactivity worth of each measured fuel element was measured in its original core position in order to measure the burn-up of the fuel elements that were part of the experimental core. The burn-up of each measured fuel element was derived by interpolating its reactivity worth from the reactivity worth of two reference fuel elements of known burn-up, whose reactivity worth was measured in the position of the measured fuel element. The accuracy of the method was improved by separating the reactivity effect of burn-up from the effect of the position in the core. The results of the experiment showed that the modified reactivity method for fuel element burn-up determination could be applied also to MTR reactors. (orig.)

  13. Progress report on the k{sub infinity} measurements of HTGR type lattices with the oscillation technique at zero reactivity; Rapport d'advancement sur les mesures de K {sub infinite} des reseaux du type HTGR avec la technique de l'oscillateur a'reactivite' nulle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1971-01-15

    The principles of measuring k {sub infinity} for a HTGR lattice using the oscillation technique with zero reactivity were already presented at the ''9th reactor physics meeting of countries participating in the Dragon project''. A brief summary of the essential characteristics of the experiment is followed by a status report on present work.

  14. Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives’ allergenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipinda, Itai; Simoyi, Reuben H.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking.

  15. Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives’ allergenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipinda, Itai; Simoyi, Reuben H.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking. PMID:26612505

  16. Analytical estimation of control rod shadowing effect for excess reactivity measurement of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masaaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    1999-01-01

    The fuel addition method is generally used for the excess reactivity measurement of the initial core. The control rod shadowing effect for the excess reactivity measurement has been estimated analytically for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). 3-dimensional whole core analyses were carried out. The movements of control rods in measurements were simulated in the calculation. It was made clear that the value of excess reactivity strongly depend on combinations of measuring control rods and compensating control rods. The differences in excess reactivity between combinations come from the control rod shadowing effect. The shadowing effect is reduced by the use of plural number of measuring and compensating control rods to prevent deep insertion of them into the core. The measured excess reactivity in the experiments is, however, smaller than the estimated value with shadowing effect. (author)

  17. Advances in the MQDT approach of electron/molecular cation reactive collisions: High precision extensive calculations for applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motapon O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the stepwise multichannel quantum defect theory approach of electron/molecular cation reactive collisions have been applied to perform computations of cross sections and rate coefficients for dissociative recombination and electron-impact ro-vibrational transitions of H2+, BeH+ and their deuterated isotopomers. At very low energy, rovibronic interactions play a significant role in the dynamics, whereas at high energy, the dissociative excitation strongly competes with all other reactive processes.

  18. Toxicity Reduction of Reactive Red Dye-238 Using Advanced Oxidation Process by Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyad Al-Anbari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Decolorization of red azo dye (Cibacron Red FN-R from synthetic wastewater has been investigated as a function of solar advanced oxidation process. The photocatalytic activity using ZnO as a photocatalysis has been estimated. Different parameters affected the removal efficiency, including pH of the solution, initial dye concentration and H2O2 concentration were evaluated to find out the optimum value of these parameters. The results proved that the optimal pH value was 8 and the most efficient H2O2 concentration was 100mg/L. Toxicity reduction percent for effluent solution was also monitored to assess the degradation process. This treatment method was able to strongly reduce the color and toxicity of reactive red dye-238 to about (99 and 80 % respectively. It can be concluded, from these experiments, that the using of ZnO as a photocatalysis was exhibited as economical and efficient treatment method to remove reactive red dye-238 from aqueous solution.

  19. Uncertainty Evaluation of Reactivity Coefficients for a large advanced SFR Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamakhem, Wassim; Rimpault, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors are currently being reshaped in order to meet Generation IV goals on economics, safety and reliability, sustainability and proliferation resistance. Recent studies have led to large SFR cores for a 3600 MWth power plants, cores which exhibit interesting features. The designs have had to balance between competing aspects such as sustainability and safety characteristics. Sustainability in neutronic terms is translated into positive breeding gain and safety into rather low Na void reactivity effects. The studies have been done on two SFR concepts using oxide and carbide fuels. The use of the sensitivity theory in the ERANOS determinist code system has been used. Calculations have been performed with different sodium evaluations: JEF2.2, ERALIB-1 and the most recent JEFF3.1 and ENDF/B-VII in order to make a broad comparison. Values for the Na void reactivity effect exhibit differences as large as 14% when using the different sodium libraries. Uncertainties due to nuclear data on the reactivity coefficients were performed with BOLNA variances-covariances data, the Na Void Effect uncertainties are near to 12% at 1σ. Since, the uncertainties are far beyond the target accuracy for a design achieving high performance, two directions are envisaged: the first one is to perform new differential measurements or in a second attempt use integral experiments to improve effectively the nuclear data set and its uncertainties such as performed in the past with ERALIB1. (authors)

  20. Neutron source strength determination for on-line reactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Sluijs, A.R. van der

    1988-01-01

    A method is described to determine the effective neutron source strength in a nuclear reactor, which must be known when calculating the time-varying reactivity from inverse reactor kinetics for a reactor at low power. When for an initially subcritical reactor the reactivity is changed and kept constant after the change, the effective source strength can be determined from a linear regression of reactor power to a function proportional to the emission rate of delayed neutrons, which can be calculated from the reactor power history. In view of the relatively strong noise present in the reactor power signal at low power, a grouping method for the regression is preferred over the least-squares method. Experiments with a reactor simulator with known source strength showed good agreement. Application to actual reactor signals gave consistent and satisfactory results.

  1. Implementation of New Reactivity Measurement System and New Reactor Noise Analysis Equipment in a VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, János; Kiss, Sándor; Lipcsei, Sándor; Horvath, Csaba; Pos, István; Kiss, Gábor

    2010-10-01

    The paper deals with two recently developed, high-precision nuclear measurement systems installed at the VVER-440 units of the Hungarian Paks NPP. Both developments were motivated by the reactor power increase to 108%, and by the planned plant service time extension. The first part describes the RMR start-up reactivity measurement system with advanced services. High-precision picoampere meters were installed at each reactor unit and measured ionization chamber current signals are handled by a portable computer providing data acquisition and online reactivity calculation service. Detailed offline evaluation and analysis of reactor start-up measurements can be performed on the portable unit, too. The second part of the paper describes a new reactor noise diagnostics system using state-of-the-art data acquisition hardware and signal processing methods. Details of the new reactor noise measurement evaluation software are also outlined. Noise diagnostics at Paks NPP is a standard tool for core anomaly detection and for long-term noise trend monitoring. Regular application of these systems is illustrated by real plant data, e.g., results of standard reactivity measurements during a reactor startup session are given. Noise applications are also illustrated by real plant measurements; results of core anomaly detection are presented.

  2. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  3. Measurements in Los Alamos benchmark criticals and the central reactivity discrepancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, W.G.; Hansen, G.E.; Koelling, J.J.; McLaughlin, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements in seven Los Alamos fast critical facilities are described; all are related to elucidating the causes of the central reactivity discrepancy in fast reactors. Specific capabilities of these specialized assemblies permit measurements well-above delayed critical and these confirm the validity of the delayed neutron data used for calibration; there is therefore no reactivity-scale error. Reactivity measurements in these homogeneous assemblies exhibit no discrepancy. It is concluded that nuclear data should not be adjusted to eliminate the discrepancy found in other, heterogeneous assemblies

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Polienko, Yuliya F; Kirilyuk, Igor

    2018-05-20

    Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies. Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress. Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1433-1443.

  5. Direct measurement of NO3 radical reactivity in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, Jonathan; Karu, Einar; Sobanski, Nicolas; Schuladen, Jan; Ehn, Mikael; Schallhart, Simon; Quéléver, Lauriane; Hellen, Heidi; Hakola, Hannele; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Williams, Jonathan; Fischer, Horst; Lelieveld, Jos; Crowley, John N.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first direct measurements of NO3 reactivity (or inverse lifetime, s-1) in the Finnish boreal forest. The data were obtained during the IBAIRN campaign (Influence of Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions on the Reactive Nitrogen budget) which took place in Hyytiälä, Finland during the summer/autumn transition in September 2016. The NO3 reactivity was generally very high with a maximum value of 0.94 s-1 and displayed a strong diel variation with a campaign-averaged nighttime mean value of 0.11 s-1 compared to a daytime value of 0.04 s-1. The highest nighttime NO3 reactivity was accompanied by major depletion of canopy level ozone and was associated with strong temperature inversions and high levels of monoterpenes. The daytime reactivity was sufficiently large that reactions of NO3 with organic trace gases could compete with photolysis and reaction with NO. There was no significant reduction in the measured NO3 reactivity between the beginning and end of the campaign, indicating that any seasonal reduction in canopy emissions of reactive biogenic trace gases was offset by emissions from the forest floor. Observations of biogenic hydrocarbons (BVOCs) suggested a dominant role for monoterpenes in determining the NO3 reactivity. Reactivity not accounted for by in situ measurement of NO and BVOCs was variable across the diel cycle with, on average, ≈ 30 % missing during nighttime and ≈ 60 % missing during the day. Measurement of the NO3 reactivity at various heights (8.5 to 25 m) both above and below the canopy, revealed a strong nighttime, vertical gradient with maximum values closest to the ground. The gradient disappeared during the daytime due to efficient vertical mixing.

  6. Cerebrovascular reactivity in migraineurs as measured by transcranial Doppler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, T.D.; Harpold, G.J. (Alabama Univ., Birmingham, AL (USA). School of Medicine); Troost, B.T. (Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a relatively new diagnostic modality which allows the non-invasive assessment of intracranial circulation. A total of 10 migraine patients were studied and compared to healthy controls without headaches. Migraineurs during the headache-free interval demonstrated excessive cerebrovascular reactivity to CO{sub 2}, evidenced by an increase in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity of 47% {plus minus} 15% compared to 28% {plus minus} 14% in controls. Differences between the two study groups revealed no significant decrease in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with hypocapnia. However, the differences between middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during hyperventilation and CO{sub 2} inhalation were significantly different comparing migraineurs and controls. Instability of the baseline blood flow velocities was also noted in migraineurs during the interictal period. Characteristics which may allow differentiation of migraineurs from other headache populations could possibly be obtained from transcranial Doppler ultrasound flow studies. 24 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cerebrovascular reactivity in migraineurs as measured by transcranial Doppler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, T.D.; Harpold, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a relatively new diagnostic modality which allows the non-invasive assessment of intracranial circulation. A total of 10 migraine patients were studied and compared to healthy controls without headaches. Migraineurs during the headache-free interval demonstrated excessive cerebrovascular reactivity to CO 2 , evidenced by an increase in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity of 47% ± 15% compared to 28% ± 14% in controls. Differences between the two study groups revealed no significant decrease in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with hypocapnia. However, the differences between middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during hyperventilation and CO 2 inhalation were significantly different comparing migraineurs and controls. Instability of the baseline blood flow velocities was also noted in migraineurs during the interictal period. Characteristics which may allow differentiation of migraineurs from other headache populations could possibly be obtained from transcranial Doppler ultrasound flow studies. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  8. pH effect on decolorization of raw textile wastewater polluted with reactive dyes by advanced oxidation with uv/h2o2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racyte, J.; Rimeika, M.; Bruning, H.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of the advanced oxidation process (UV/H2O2) in decolorizing real textile wastewater polluted with commercial reactive dyes - Reactive Yellow 84 and Reactive Red 141 was investigated. All the experiments were performed in a lab-scale reactor with the original high pH of the

  9. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  10. Coolant void reactivity adjustments in advanced CANDU lattices using adjoint sensitivity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assawaroongruengchot, M.; Marleau, G.

    2008-01-01

    Coolant void reactivity (CVR) is an important factor in reactor accident analysis. Here we study the adjustments of CVR at beginning of burnup cycle (BOC) and k eff at end of burnup cycle (EOC) for a 2D Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) lattice using the optimization and adjoint sensitivity techniques. The sensitivity coefficients are evaluated using the perturbation theory based on the integral neutron transport equations. The neutron and flux importance transport solutions are obtained by the method of cyclic characteristics (MOCC). Three sets of parameters for CVR-BOC and k eff -EOC adjustments are studied: (1) Dysprosium density in the central pin with Uranium enrichment in the outer fuel rings, (2) Dysprosium density and Uranium enrichment both in the central pin, and (3) the same parameters as in the first case but the objective is to obtain a negative checkerboard CVR-BOC (CBCVR-BOC). To approximate the EOC sensitivity coefficient, we perform constant-power burnup/depletion calculations using a slightly perturbed nuclear library and the unperturbed neutron fluxes to estimate the variation of nuclide densities at EOC. Our aim is to achieve a desired negative CVR-BOC of -2 mk and k eff -EOC of 0.900 for the first two cases, and a CBCVR-BOC of -2 mk and k eff -EOC of 0.900 for the last case. Sensitivity analyses of CVR and eigenvalue are also included in our study

  11. Coolant void reactivity adjustments in advanced CANDU lattices using adjoint sensitivity technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assawaroongruengchot, M. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, P.O. Box 6079, stn. Centre-ville, Montreal, H3C3A7 (Canada)], E-mail: monchaia@gmail.com; Marleau, G. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, P.O. Box 6079, stn. Centre-ville, Montreal, H3C3A7 (Canada)], E-mail: guy.marleau@polymtl.ca

    2008-03-15

    Coolant void reactivity (CVR) is an important factor in reactor accident analysis. Here we study the adjustments of CVR at beginning of burnup cycle (BOC) and k{sub eff} at end of burnup cycle (EOC) for a 2D Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) lattice using the optimization and adjoint sensitivity techniques. The sensitivity coefficients are evaluated using the perturbation theory based on the integral neutron transport equations. The neutron and flux importance transport solutions are obtained by the method of cyclic characteristics (MOCC). Three sets of parameters for CVR-BOC and k{sub eff}-EOC adjustments are studied: (1) Dysprosium density in the central pin with Uranium enrichment in the outer fuel rings, (2) Dysprosium density and Uranium enrichment both in the central pin, and (3) the same parameters as in the first case but the objective is to obtain a negative checkerboard CVR-BOC (CBCVR-BOC). To approximate the EOC sensitivity coefficient, we perform constant-power burnup/depletion calculations using a slightly perturbed nuclear library and the unperturbed neutron fluxes to estimate the variation of nuclide densities at EOC. Our aim is to achieve a desired negative CVR-BOC of -2 mk and k{sub eff}-EOC of 0.900 for the first two cases, and a CBCVR-BOC of -2 mk and k{sub eff}-EOC of 0.900 for the last case. Sensitivity analyses of CVR and eigenvalue are also included in our study.

  12. Improvements of the reactivity devices modeling for the advanced CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tellier, R.; Marleau, G.; Dahmani, M.; Hebert, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of the ACR TM (Advanced CANDU Reactor), 3D transport calculations are required in order to simulate the reactivity devices located perpendicularly to the fuel channels. The computational scheme that is usually used for CANDU-6 and ACR reactors is based on a simplified supercell geometry in which the fuel clusters and devices are replaced by annuli. Recently, an exact modeling of 3D supercell configurations was introduced within the framework of the ACR calculations. However, with such a model, fine meshing requirements lead to problems that are very demanding in terms of computational resources. In this paper, we present improvements introduced in the ACR context to reduce the cost of the 3D supercell calculations. Two avenues of investigations are reported. First, the introduction of an accelerated characteristics method permits to reduce the computational burden of such calculations involving a large number of regions. In addition, contrarily to CANDU-6 supercell configurations, the ACR 3D geometry is prismatic and consequently a special tracking procedure can be used. This approach introduces no approximation and is significantly faster than the general 3D tracking technique. Thanks to these modifications in the computational procedure, 3D supercell calculations with a level of mesh discretization comparable to 2D cell configurations become affordable for industrial applications

  13. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-09-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes' P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key pointsReactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement templateThe reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive dutiesThe handball specific "true-game" reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance.

  14. RELAP5-3D code validation of RBMK-1500 reactor reactivity measurement transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliatka, Algirdas; Bubelis, Evaldas; Uspuras, Eugenijus

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of transients taking place during the measurements of the void and fast power reactivity coefficients performed at Ignalina NPP. The simulation of these transients was performed using RELAP5-3D code model of RBMK-1500 reactor. At the Ignalina NPP void and fast power reactivity coefficients are measured on a regular basis and, based on the total reactor power, reactivity, control and protection system control rods positions and the main circulation circuit parameter changes during the experiments, the actual values of these reactivity coefficients are determined. Following the simulation of the two above mentioned transients with RELAP5-3D code, a conclusion was made that the obtained calculation results demonstrate reasonable agreement with Ignalina NPP measured data. Behaviors of the separate MCC thermal-hydraulic parameters as well as physical processes are predicted reasonably well to the real processes, occurring in the primary circuit of RBMK-1500 reactor. The calculated reactivity and the total reactor core power behavior in time are also in reasonable agreement with the measured plant data. Despite of the small differences, RELAP5-3D code predicts reactivity and the total reactor core power behavior during the transients in a reasonable manner. Reasonable agreement of the measured and the calculated total reactor power change in time demonstrates the correct modeling of the neutronic processes taking place in RBMK-1500 reactor core

  15. Reactivity change measurements on plutonium-uranium fuel elements in hector experimental techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tattersall, R.B.; Small, V.G.; MacBean, I.J.; Howe, W.D.

    1964-08-01

    The techniques used in making reactivity change measurements on HECTOR are described and discussed. Pile period measurements were used in the majority of oases, though the pile oscillator technique was used occasionally. These two methods are compared. Flux determinations were made in the vicinity of the fuel element samples using manganese foils, and the techniques used are described and an error assessment made. Results of both reactivity change and flux measurements on 1.2 in. diameter uranium and plutonium-uranium alloy fuel elements are presented, these measurements being carried out in a variety of graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 450 deg. C. (author)

  16. Measurement of endotoxin. II. Comparison of reactivities measured by radioimmunoassay and with the limulus test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, H [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-08-01

    Various endotoxins and the ether extracts of grampositive bacteria were measured immunologically by radioimmunoassay and also biologically by the Limulus test. The minimum amount of endotoxin detectable with the Limulus test was in the range from 1 ng/ml to 1 ..mu..g/ml, with the lysate of sensitivity, 100 ng ml (E. coli 0111: B4(B) lipopolysaccharide). On the other hand, by the radioimmunoassay they were estimated in the range of 0.3 to 10 times of dry weight. Endotoxin-like activity was detected in the ether extracts of grampositive bacteria at a minimum concentration between 1 ..mu..g/ml and 100 ..mu..g/ml with the Limulus test. However, most of them were estimated by the radioimmunoassay to be under 1/50 of dry weight. Various substances such as thrombin, thromboplastin, polynosinic-polycytidylic acid, polyadenylic-polyuridylic acid, carrageenan and human colonic mucosal antigen had cross reactivities of various degrees in the minimum concentration from 10 ..mu..g/ml to 10 mg/ml. Compounds such as thrombin and thromboplastin cross-reacting in the Limulus test were scarcely measured by the radioimmunoassay except for polynucleotides. From this study, it has become clear that the radioimmunoassay method is quite specific and accurate for quantitative measurements of endotoxin.

  17. Effective neutron temperature measurements in well moderated reactor by the reactivity coefficient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.; Klinc, T.

    1968-11-01

    The ratio of the reactivity changes of a nuclear reactor produced by successive introduction of two different neutron absorbers in the reactor core, has been measured and information on effective neutron temperature at a particular point obtained. Boron was used as a l/v absorber and cadmium as an absorber sensiti ve to neutron temperature. Effective neutron temperature distribution has been deduced by moving absorbers across the reactor core and observing the corresponding reactivity changes. (author)

  18. Application of reactivity method to MTR fuel burn-up measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, A.; Ravnik, M.; Cuya, R.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel element burn-up has been measured for the first time by reactivity method in a MTR reactor. The measurement was performed in RP-10 reactor of Peruvian Institute for Nuclear Energy (IPEN) in Lima. It is a pool type 10MW material testing reactor using standard 20% enriched uranium plate type fuel elements. A fresh element and an element with well defined burn-up were selected as reference elements. Several elements in the core were selected for burn-up measurement. Each of them was replaced in its original position by both reference elements. Change in excess reactivity was measured using control rod calibration curve. The burn-up reactivity worth of fuel elements was plotted as a function of their calculated burnup. Corrected burn-up values of the measured fuel elements were calculated using the fitting function at experimental reactivity for all elements. Good agreement between measured and calculated burn-up values was observed indicating that the reactivity method can be successfully applied also to MTR fuel element burn-up determination.(author)

  19. The magnet measurement facility for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Doose, C.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.

    1993-01-01

    A magnet measurement facility has been developed to measure the prototype and production magnets for the Advance Photon Source. The measurement facility is semi-automatic in measurement control and data analysis. One dipole system and three rotating coil measurement systems for quadrupole and sextupole magnets and corresponding probe coils are described

  20. Effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and serum lipids in Jordanian adults with advanced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, W; Al Habashneh, R; Khader, Y; Al Bayati, L; Taani, D

    2011-10-01

    Data on whether periodontal therapy affects serum CRP levels are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if nonsurgical periodontal therapy has any effect on CRP and serum lipid levels in patients with advanced periodontitis. Thirty-six systemically healthy patients, ≥ 40 years of age and with advanced periodontitis, were recruited for the study. Patients were randomized consecutively to one of two groups: the treatment group (n = 18) or the control group (n = 18). Treated subjects received nonsurgical periodontal therapy, which included oral hygiene instructions and subgingival scaling and root planing. Systemic levels of inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP) and the lipid profile] were measured at baseline and 3 mo after periodontal therapy. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy in the treatment group resulted in a significant reduction in the serum CRP level. The average CRP level decreased from 2.3 mg/dL at baseline to 1.8 mg/dL (p periodontal therapy. The average reduction (95% confidence interval) in CRP was 0.498 (95% confidence interval = 0.265-0.731). In the treatment group, the reduction in CRP was significantly, linearly and directly correlated with the reduction in the plaque index, the gingival index and the percentage of sites with pocket depth ≥ 7 mm (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.746, 0.425 and 0.621, respectively). Nonsurgical periodontal therapy had no effect on the lipid parameters. This study demonstrated that nonsurgical periodontal therapy results in a significant reduction in the serum CRP level. The effect of this outcome on systemic disease is still unknown. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Small Sample Reactivity Measurements in the RRR/SEG Facility: Reanalysis using TRIPOLI-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmiotti, Guiseppe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This work involved reanalyzing the RRR/SEG integral experiments performed at the Rossendorf facility in Germany throughout the 1970s and 80s. These small sample reactivity worth measurements were carried out using the pile oscillator technique for many different fission products, structural materials, and standards. The coupled fast-thermal system was designed such that the measurements would provide insight into elemental data, specifically the competing effects between neutron capture and scatter. Comparing the measured to calculated reactivity values can then provide adjustment criteria to ultimately improve nuclear data for fast reactor designs. Due to the extremely small reactivity effects measured (typically less than 1 pcm) and the specific heterogeneity of the core, the tool chosen for this analysis was TRIPOLI-4. This code allows for high fidelity 3-dimensional geometric modeling, and the most recent, unreleased version, is capable of exact perturbation theory.

  2. Analysis of void reactivity measurements in full MOX BWR physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshihira; Yamamoto, Toru; Umano, Takuya

    2008-01-01

    In the full MOX BWR physics experiments, FUBILA, four 9x9 test assemblies simulating BWR full MOX assemblies were located in the center of the core. Changing the in-channel moderator condition of the four assemblies from 0% void to 40% and 70% void mock-up, void reactivity was measured using Amplified Source Method (ASM) technique in the subcritical cores, in which three fission chambers were located. ASM correction factors necessary to express the consistency of the detector efficiency between measured core configurations were calculated using collision probability cell calculation and 3D-transport core calculation with the nuclear data library, JENDL-3.3. Measured reactivity worth with ASM correction factor was compared with the calculated results obtained through a diffusion, transport and continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation respectively. It was confirmed that the measured void reactivity worth was reproduced well by calculations. (author)

  3. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF 2 , LiF, ZrF 4 and Li 2 BeF 4 eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large

  4. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF{sub 2}, LiF, ZrF{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large.

  5. Study on Measurement of Advanced Manufacturing: Case by China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    She Jinghuai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article has built a system of China's Advanced Manufacturing measurement indicators. By applying the datum from 2004 to 2013, we estimate the level of development and current status of China’s Advanced Manufacturing (AM, and evaluate the measurement results by establishing Hierarchical Linear Model (HLM. We confirmed that China's Advanced Manufacturing is in the rapid development trend. And due to the difference of initial conditions in Advanced Manufacturing development there is a greater imbalance. In contrast, a region with poor initial condition of has a relatively fast development speed.

  6. Loeb measures in practice recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Cutland, Nigel J

    2000-01-01

    This expanded version of the 1997 European Mathematical Society Lectures given by the author in Helsinki, begins with a self-contained introduction to nonstandard analysis (NSA) and the construction of Loeb Measures, which are rich measures discovered in 1975 by Peter Loeb, using techniques from NSA. Subsequent chapters sketch a range of recent applications of Loeb measures due to the author and his collaborators, in such diverse fields as (stochastic) fluid mechanics, stochastic calculus of variations ("Malliavin" calculus) and the mathematical finance theory. The exposition is designed for a general audience, and no previous knowledge of either NSA or the various fields of applications is assumed.

  7. IASI measurements of reactive trace species in biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-F. Coheur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents observations of a series of short-lived species in biomass burning plumes from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI, launched onboard the MetOp-A platform in October 2006. The strong fires that have occurred in the Mediterranean Basin – and particularly Greece – in August 2007, and those in Southern Siberia and Eastern Mongolia in the early spring of 2008 are selected to support the analyses. We show that the IASI infrared spectra in these fire plumes contain distinctive signatures of ammonia (NH3, ethene (C2H4, methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH in the atmospheric window between 800 and 1200 cm−1, with some noticeable differences between the plumes. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3COOONO2, abbreviated as PAN was also observed with good confidence in some plumes and a tentative assignment of a broadband absorption spectral feature to acetic acid (CH3COOH is made. For several of these species these are the first reported measurements made from space in nadir geometry. The IASI measurements are analyzed for plume height and concentration distributions of NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. The Greek fires are studied in greater detail for the days associated with the largest emissions. In addition to providing information on the spatial extent of the plume, the IASI retrievals allow an estimate of the total mass emissions for NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. Enhancement ratios are calculated for the latter relative to carbon monoxide (CO, giving insight in the chemical processes occurring during the transport, the first day after the emission.

  8. Measurements and calculations of reactivity for the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.S.B.; Maiorino, J.R.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    This work shows a measurement of reactivity parameters, such as integral and diferential control rod worth, local void coefficient, and moderator temperature coefficient for the research reactor IEA-R1. The measured values were compared with those calculated through HAMMER-CITATION codes, having shown good agreement. (author) [pt

  9. Advances in Radiocarbon Measurement of Water Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janovics, R.; Molnar, M.; Major, I. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATO MKI), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Svetlik, I. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Wacker, L. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    In this paper two very different and novel methods for the {sup 14}C measurement of water samples are presented. The first method uses direct absorption into a scintillation cocktail and a following liquid scintillation measurement. Typical sample size is 20-40 L and overall uncertainty is {+-} 2% for modern samples. It is a very cost effective and easy to use method based on a novel and simple static absorption process for the CO{sub 2} extracted from groundwater. The other very sensitive method is based on accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using a gas ion source. With a MICADAS type AMS system we demonstrated that you can routinely measure the {sup 14}C content of 1 mL of water sample with better than 1% precision (for a modern sample). This direct {sup 14}C AMS measurement of water takes less than 20 minutes including sample preparation. (author)

  10. Control Rod Reactivity Measurements in the Aagesta Reactor with the Pulsed Neutron Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoereus, K

    1969-07-01

    An extensive series of control rod measurements was made in the Aagesta reactor during the low power experimental period following the first criticality. This report describes the part of these investigations made with the pulsed neutron method, comprising nearly 300 measurements. The main objective was the determination of control rod reactivity worths for different rods and groups of rods, but some supplementary measurements were also made, e.g. a determination of the prompt neutron decay constant for the delayed critical condition and four different cores. The cores consisted of 20, 32, 68, and 140 fuel elements respectively, and measurements were made at room temperature and with the moderator level close to critical for each core, and for the 140-element core also with full moderator height and at the temperatures 140 deg C and 215 deg C. Both fully and partly inserted control rod groups were investigated. The measurements at critical water level give directly the control rod reactivity worths, whereas those with full water height give the shut-down reactivity. A comparison was made between measured reactivity worths for a number of rod groups and those calculated with the HETERO code. The prompt neutron decay constant at delayed criticality {alpha}{sub 0}={beta}/l, for the full core at 215 deg C was found to be 9.60 {+-} 0.30/sec, corresponding to l = 0.76 {+-} 0.02 msec. The shut-down reactivity with 16 coarse control rods in pos. A-D 22, 40-04, 44, 26 is -5% at 25 deg C and -13% at 215 deg C. The relative error is usually around 8% in the reactivity worths, originating mainly from the higher harmonics content in the measured curves.

  11. Radial core expansion reactivity feedback in advanced LMRs: uncertainties and their effects on inherent safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigeland, R.A.; Moran, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical model for calculating radial core expansion, based on the thermal and elastic bowing of a single subassembly at the core periphery, is used to quantify the effect of uncertainties on this reactivity feedback mechanism. This model has been verified and validated with experimental and numerical results. The impact of these uncertainties on the safety margins in unprotected transients is investigated with SASSYS/SAS4A, which includes this model for calculating the reactivity feedback from radial core expansion. The magnitudes of these uncertainties are not sufficient to preclude the use of radial core expansion reactivity feedback in transient analysis

  12. Advancing Measurement of Patient Safety Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Liane; Gilin, Debra; Tregunno, Deborah; Norton, Peter G; Flemons, Ward; Fleming, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the psychometric and unit of analysis/strength of culture issues in patient safety culture (PSC) measurement. Data Source Two cross-sectional surveys of health care staff in 10 Canadian health care organizations totaling 11,586 respondents. Study Design A cross-validation study of a measure of PSC using survey data gathered using the Modified Stanford PSC survey (MSI-2005 and MSI-2006); a within-group agreement analysis of MSI-2006 data. Extraction Methods Exploratory factor analyses (EFA) of the MSI-05 survey data and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the MSI-06 survey data; Rwg coefficients of homogeneity were calculated for 37 units and six organizations in the MSI-06 data set to examine within-group agreement. Principal Findings The CFA did not yield acceptable levels of fit. EFA and reliability analysis of MSI-06 data suggest two reliable dimensions of PSC: Organization leadership for safety (α=0.88) and Unit leadership for safety (α=0.81). Within-group agreement analysis shows stronger within-unit agreement than within-organization agreement on assessed PSC dimensions. Conclusions The field of PSC measurement has not been able to meet strict requirements for sound measurement using conventional approaches of CFA. Additional work is needed to identify and soundly measure key dimensions of PSC. The field would also benefit from further attention to strength of culture/unit of analysis issues. PMID:18823446

  13. Advanced configuration of hybrid passive filter for reactive power and harmonic compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kececioglu, O. Fatih; Acikgoz, Hakan; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Harmonics is one of the major power quality problems for power systems. The harmonics can be eliminated by power filters such as passive, active, and hybrid. In this study, a new passive filter configuration has been improved in addition to the existing passive filter configurations. Conventional hybrid passive filters are not successful to compensate rapidly changing reactive power demand. The proposed configure are capable of compensating both harmonics and reactive power at the same time. ...

  14. Recent advances in residual stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.; Edwards, L.; Bouchard, P.J.; Buttle, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently residual stresses have been included in structural integrity assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and piping in a very primitive manner due to the lack of reliable residual stress measurement or prediction tools. This situation is changing the capabilities of newly emerging destructive (i.e. the contour method) and non-destructive (i.e. magnetic and high-energy synchrotron X-ray strain mapping) residual stress measurement techniques for evaluating ferritic and austenitic pressure vessel components are contrasted against more well-established methods. These new approaches offer the potential for obtaining area maps of residual stress or strain in welded plants, mock-up components or generic test-pieces. The mapped field may be used directly in structural integrity calculations, or indirectly to validate finite element process/structural models on which safety cases for pressurised nuclear systems are founded. These measurement methods are complementary in terms of application to actual plant, cost effectiveness and measurements in thick sections. In each case an exemplar case study is used to illustrate the method and to highlight its particular capabilities

  15. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  16. Reactivity and neutron emission measurements of highly burnt PWR fuel rod samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.F.; Jatuff, F.; Grimm, P.; Seiler, R.; Brogli, R.; Meier, G.; Berger, H.-D.; Chawla, R.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel rods with burnup values beyond 50 GWd/t are characterised by relatively large amounts of fission products and a high abundance of major and minor actinides. Of particular interest is the change in the reactivity of the fuel as a function of burnup and the capability of modern codes to predict this change. In addition, the neutron emission from burnt fuel has important implications for the design of transport and storage facilities. Measurements have been made of the reactivity effects and the neutron emission rates of highly burnt uranium oxide and mixed oxide fuel rod samples coming from a pressurised water reactor (PWR). The reactivity measurements have been made in a PWR lattice in the PROTEUS zero-energy reactor moderated in turn with: water, a water and heavy water mixture and water containing boron. A combined transport flask and sample changer was used to insert the 400 mm long burnt fuel rod segments into the reactor. Both control rod compensation and reactor period methods were used to determine the reactivities of the samples. For the range of burnup values investigated, an interesting exponential relationship has been found between the neutron emission rate and the measured reactivity

  17. Comparison of OH reactivity measurements in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Novelli, Anna; Rolletter, Michael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Pfannerstill, Eva Y.; Kessel, Stephan; Edtbauer, Achim; Williams, Jonathan; Michoud, Vincent; Dusanter, Sebastien; Locoge, Nadine; Zannoni, Nora; Gros, Valerie; Truong, Francois; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Blocquet, Marion; Coudert, Sebastien; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Thames, Alexander B.; Brune, William H.; Ernest, Cheryl; Harder, Hartwig; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Elste, Thomas; Kubistin, Dagmar; Andres, Stefanie; Bohn, Birger; Hohaus, Thorsten; Holland, Frank; Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Yu, Zhujun; Zou, Qi; Wahner, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radical reactivity (kOH) has been measured for 18 years with different measurement techniques. In order to compare the performances of instruments deployed in the field, two campaigns were conducted performing experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich in October 2015 and April 2016. Chemical conditions were chosen either to be representative of the atmosphere or to test potential limitations of instruments. All types of instruments that are currently used for atmospheric measurements were used in one of the two campaigns. The results of these campaigns demonstrate that OH reactivity can be accurately measured for a wide range of atmospherically relevant chemical conditions (e.g. water vapour, nitrogen oxides, various organic compounds) by all instruments. The precision of the measurements (limit of detection CRM) has a higher limit of detection of 2 s-1 at a time resolution of 10 to 15 min. The performances of the instruments were systematically tested by stepwise increasing, for example, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapour or nitric oxide (NO). In further experiments, mixtures of organic reactants were injected into the chamber to simulate urban and forested environments. Overall, the results show that the instruments are capable of measuring OH reactivity in the presence of CO, alkanes, alkenes and aromatic compounds. The transmission efficiency in Teflon inlet lines could have introduced systematic errors in measurements for low-volatile organic compounds in some instruments. CRM instruments exhibited a larger scatter in the data compared to the other instruments. The largest differences to reference measurements or to calculated reactivity were observed by CRM instruments in the presence of terpenes and oxygenated organic compounds (mixing ratio of OH reactants were up to 10 ppbv). In some of these experiments, only a small fraction of the reactivity is detected. The accuracy of CRM

  18. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  19. Advances in fluid modeling and turbulence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Ninokata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    The context of this book consists of four fields: Environmental Fluid Mechanics; Industrial Fluid Mechanics; Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics; and Turbulence Measurements. Environmental Fluid Mechanics includes free surface flows in channels, rivers, seas, and estuaries. It also discusses wind engineering issues, ocean circulation model and dispersion problems in atmospheric, water and ground water environments. In Industrial Fluid Mechanics, fluid phenomena in energy exchanges, modeling of turbulent two- or multi-phase flows, swirling flows, flows in combustors, variable density flows and reacting flows, flows in turbo-machines, pumps and piping systems, and fluid-structure interaction are discussed. In Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, progress in modeling turbulent flows and heat/mass transfers, computational fluid dynamics/numerical techniques, parallel computing algorithms, applications of chaos/fractal theory in turbulence are reported. In Turbulence Measurements, experimental studies of turbulent flows, experimental and post-processing techniques, quantitative and qualitative flow visualization techniques are discussed. Separate abstracts were presented for 15 of the papers in this issue. The remaining 89 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  20. Experimental study on reactivity measurement in thermal reactor by polarity correlation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hideshi

    1977-11-01

    Experimental study on the polarity correlation method for measuring the reactivity of a thermal reactor, especially the one possessing long prompt neutron lifetime such as graphite on heavy water moderated core, is reported. The techniques of reactor kinetics experiment are briefly reviewed, which are classified in two groups, one characterized by artificial disturbance to a reactor and the other by natural fluctuation inherent in a reactor. The fluctuation phenomena of neutron count rate are explained using F. de Hoffman's stochastic method, and correlation functions for the neutron count rate fluctuation are shown. The experimental results by polarity correlation method applied to the β/l measurements in both graphite-moderated SHE core and light water-moderated JMTRC and JRR-4 cores, and also to the measurement of SHE shut down reactivity margin are presented. The measured values were in good agreement with those by a pulsed neutron method in the reactivity range from critical to -12 dollars. The conditional polarity correlation experiments in SHE at -20 cent and -100 cent are demonstrated. The prompt neutron decay constants agreed with those obtained by the polarity correlation experiments. The results of experiments measuring large negative reactivity of -52 dollars of SHE by pulsed neutron, rod drop and source multiplication methods are given. Also it is concluded that the polarity and conditional polarity correlation methods are sufficiently applicable to noise analysis of a low power thermal reactor with long prompt neutron lifetime. (Nakai, Y.)

  1. Do measures of reactive balance control predict falls in people with stroke returning to the community?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, A; Wong, J S; McIlroy, W E; Biasin, L; Brunton, K; Bayley, M; Inness, E L

    2015-12-01

    To determine if reactive balance control measures predict falls after discharge from stroke rehabilitation. Prospective cohort study. Rehabilitation hospital and community. Independently ambulatory individuals with stroke who were discharged home after inpatient rehabilitation (n=95). Balance and gait measures were obtained from a clinical assessment at discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Measures of reactive balance control were obtained: (1) during quiet standing; (2) when walking; and (3) in response to large postural perturbations. Participants reported falls and activity levels up to 6 months post-discharge. Logistic and Poisson regressions were used to identify measures of reactive balance control that were related to falls post-discharge. Decreased paretic limb contribution to standing balance control [rate ratio 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7 to 1.0; P=0.011], reduced between-limb synchronisation of quiet standing balance control (rate ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.8 to 0.9; Pfall rates when controlling for age, stroke severity, functional balance and daily walking activity. Impaired reactive balance control in standing and walking predicted increased risk of falls post-discharge from stroke rehabilitation. Specifically, measures that revealed the capacity of both limbs to respond to instability were related to increased risk of falls. These results suggest that post-stroke rehabilitation strategies for falls prevention should train responses to instability, and focus on remediating dyscontrol in the more-affected limb. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced, Analytic, Automated (AAA) Measurement of Engagement during Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Sidney; Dieterle, Ed; Duckworth, Angela

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that engagement plays a critical role in learning. Unfortunately, the study of engagement has been stymied by a lack of valid and efficient measures. We introduce the advanced, analytic, and automated (AAA) approach to measure engagement at fine-grained temporal resolutions. The AAA measurement approach is grounded in…

  3. Reactivity and neutron emission measurements of burnt PWR fuel rod samples in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M. F.; Jatuff, F.; Grimm, P.; Seiler, R.; Brogli, R.; Meier, G.; Berger, H. D.; Chawla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the reactivity effects and the neutron emission rates of uranium oxide and mixed oxide burnt fuel samples having a wide range of burnup values and coming from a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). The reactivity measurements have been made in a PWR lattice moderated in turn with: water, a water and heavy water mixture, and water containing boron. An interesting relationship has been found between the neutron emission rate and the measured reactivity. (authors)

  4. Reactivity Measurements On Burnt And Reference Fuel Samples In LWR-PROTEUS Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Jatuff, F.; Grimm, P.; Seiler, R.; Luethi, A.; Van Geemert, R.; Brogli, R.; Chawla, R.; Meier, G.; Berger, H.-D.

    2003-01-01

    During the year 2002, the PROTEUS research reactor was used to make a series of reactivity measurements on Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) burnt fuel samples, and on a series of specially prepared standards. These investigations have been made in two different neutron spectra. In addition, the intrinsic neutron emissions of the burnt fuel samples have been determined. (author)

  5. Comparing dissolved reactive phosphorus measured by DGT with ferrihydrite and titanium dioxide adsorbents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Bennett, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Two adsorbents (Metsorb and ferrihydrite) used in binding layers with the diffusive gradients in a thin film technique were evaluated for the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorous (DRP) in synthetic and natural waters. Possible interferences were investigated with Cl- (up to 1.35molL-1) a...

  6. A model for post-occlusive reactive hyperemia as measured with laser-Doppler perfusion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, FFM; Morales, F; Smit, AJ; Graaff, R

    To facilitate the quantitative analysis of post-occlusive reactive fiyper emia (POR11), measured with laser-Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) on extremities, we present a flow model for the dynamics of the perfusion of the tissue during PORH, based on three parameters: two time constants (tau(1)

  7. Advances in deuterium dioxide concentration measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, Woojung [University of Science & Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Sung Paal, E-mail: nspyim@kaeri.re.kr [University of Science & Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Lim; Park, Hyunmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Rag; Chung, Hongsuk [University of Science & Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheo Kyung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Heavy water (D{sub 2}O) with a high purity level is necessary for nuclear fusion application. • D{sub 2}O purity is analyzed using Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and newly introduced off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). • OA-ICOS has advantages in terms of analysis of D{sub 2}O vapor. • OA-ICOS is expected that it can be used for accurate isotopic analyses in the future. - Abstract: The deuterium–tritium (D–T) reaction has been identified as the most efficient reaction for fusion devices. Deuterium can be obtained by heavy water electrolysis. Heavy water (D{sub 2}O) with a high purity level is necessary for nuclear fusion application. A D{sub 2}O isotopic analysis is thus very important. A system for a heavy water analysis was built and a newly designed isotopic analysis experiment was carried out. We tried to analyze the D{sub 2}O purity using Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and newly introduced off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). We found that the OA-ICOS based on measurement via laser absorption spectroscopy shows very high sensitivity. We ameliorated the sensitivity by an order of magnitude of more than 10{sup 3}–10{sup 5}. We could make the apparatus smaller by employing very tiny diode laser and fiber optics elements of a DFB (Distributed Feedback) type. Consequently, our device has advantages in terms of maintainability and mobility even in a radioactive environment. This new method could be used for an accurate isotopic analysis in the future.

  8. Reactivity III: An Advanced Course in Integrated Organic, Inorganic, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2017-01-01

    Reactivity III is a new course that presents chemical reactions from the domains of organic, inorganic, and biochemistry that are not readily categorized by electrophile-nucleophile interactions. Many of these reactions involve the transfer of a single electron, in either an intermolecular fashion in the case of oxidation/reduction reactions or an…

  9. Micrometeorological measurements of ammonia and total reactive nitrogen exchange over semi-natural peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Schrader, Frederik; Kutsch, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Intensive agriculture generates a substantial atmospheric burden for nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as peatlands when the latter are located in close vicinity to arable sites and animal houses. The exchange of reactive nitrogen compounds between these bog ecosystems and the atmosphere is still not very well understood due to the lack of suitable measurement techniques. With recent advancements in laser spectrometry, we used a quantum cascade laser spectrometer as well as a custom-built total reactive atmospheric nitrogen (ΣNr) converter (TRANC) coupled to a fast-response chemiluminescence detector to measure NH3 and ΣNr concentrations, respectively. The analyzers' high temporal resolution allowed for determination of the respective nitrogen exchange within eddy covariance-based setups. Field campaigns were conducted at a northwestern German peatland site that is surrounded by an area of highly fertilized agricultural land and intensive livestock production (~1 km distance). The field site is part of a natural park with a very small remaining protected zone of less than 2 km x 2 km. Ammonia and ΣNr concentrations were highly variable between 2 to 110 ppb and 10 to 120 ppb, respectively. Peak values coincided with main fertilization periods on the neighboring agricultural land in early spring and fall. The trend in weekly averaged ΣNr concentrations from TRANC measurements was in good agreement with results from KAPS denuder filter systems when the latter were combined with the missing and apparently highly variable NOx contribution. Wind direction and land use in the closer vicinity clearly regulated whether ΣNr concentrations were NH3 or NOx-dominated. Ammonia uptake rates between 40 ng N m-2 s-1 and near-neutral exchange were observed. The cumulative net uptake for the period of investigation was ~700 g N ha-1 resulting in a dry net deposition of ~4 kg N ha-1 when extrapolated to an entire year, whereas KAPS denuder measurements in combination with dry

  10. Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric OH reactivity and trace species within a suburban forest near Tokyo during AQUAS-TAMA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sathiyamurthi; Nagai, Yoshihide; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Yamasaki, Shohei; Shoji, Koki; Ida, Akira; Jones, Charlotte; Tsurumaru, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yuhi; Yoshino, Ayako; Shimada, Kojiro; Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2018-07-01

    Total OH reactivity, which gives the instantaneous loss rate of OH radicals due to reactive species, is an invaluable technique to understand regional air quality, as it gives the overall reactivity of the air mass, the fraction of each trace species reactive to OH, the fraction of missing sinks, O3 formation potential, etc. Total OH reactivity measurement was conducted in a small suburban forest located ∼30 km from Tokyo during the air quality study at field museum TAMA (AQUAS-TAMA) campaign in early autumn 2012 and summer 2013. The average measured OH reactivities during that autumn and summer were 7.4 s-1 and 11.4 s-1, respectively. In summer, isoprene was the major contributor, accounting for 28.2% of the OH reactivity, as a result of enhanced light-dependent biogenic emission, whereas NO2 was major contributor in autumn, accounting for 19.6%, due to the diminished contribution from isoprene as a result of lower solar strength. Higher missing OH reactivity 34% was determined in summer, and linear regression analysis showed that oxygenated VOCs could be the potential candidates for missing OH reactivity. Lower missing OH reactivity 25% was determined in autumn and it was significantly reduced (11%) if the interference of peroxy radicals to the measured OH reactivity were considered.

  11. Measurement of reactivity temperature coefficient by noise method in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.

    1986-07-01

    The temperature reactivity coefficient was estimated on the basis of noise measurements performed in a PWR. The magnitude of the coefficient was evaluated by relating the values of the APSD and CPSD between ex-core neutron detector signals and fuel assembly outlet thermocouple in the low frequency range. Comparison with δρ/δT measurements performed in PWR by standard methods supports the validity of the results. (author)

  12. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  13. Reactivity worth measurement of the control blades of the University of Florida training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero-Leyva, Barbaro

    1997-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in order to measure the reactivity worth of the safety and regulating blades of the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) using the Inverse Kinetics, the Inverse Kinetics-Rod Drop method and the Power Ratio. The reactor's own instrumentation (compensated ion chamber) and an independent counting system (fission chamber) were used. A very smooth exponential decay of the flux was observed after 6s of the beginning of the transients using the reading of the reactor detector. The results of the measurements of the reactivity using both detectors were consistent and in good agreement. The compensated ion chamber showed a very smooth exponential behavior; this suggests that if we could record the power for a small sample time, say 0.1 s from the beginning of the transient, several additional research projects could be accomplished. First, precise intercomparison of the methods could be achieved if the statistics level is acceptable. Second, a precise description of the bouncing of the blades and its effects on the reactivity could be achieved. Finally, the design of a reactivity-meter could be based on such study. (author)

  14. Analysis of rod drop and pulsed source measurements of reactivity in the Winfrith SGHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittain, I.

    1970-05-01

    Reactivity measurements by the rod-drop and pulsed source methods in the Winfrith SGHWR are seriously affected by spatial harmonics. A method of calculation is described which enables the spatial harmonics to be calculated in non-uniform cores in two or three dimensions, and thus allows a much more rigorous analysis of the experimental results than the usual point model. The method is used to analyse all the rod-drop measurements made during commissioning of the Winfrith SGHWR, and to comment on the results of pulsed source measurements. The reactivity worths of banks of ten and twelve shut-down tubes deduced from rod-drop and pulsed source experiments are in satisfactory agreement with each other and also with AIMAZ calculated values. The ability to calculate higher spatial harmonics in nonuniform cores is thought to be new, and may have a wider application to reactor kinetics through the method of Modal Analysis. (author)

  15. Assessing Reactive Strength Measures in Jumping and Hopping Using the Optojump™ System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Healy Robin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the concurrent validity of the Optojump™ system (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy versus a force platform in the estimation of temporal and reactive strength measures. In two separate investigations, twenty physically active males performed double-leg and single-leg drop jumps from a box height of 0.3 m and a 10 s vertical bilateral hopping test. Contact time, flight time and total time (the sum of contact and flight time were concurrently assessed during single and double-leg drop jumps and during hopping. Jump height, the reactive strength index and the reactive strength ratio were also calculated from contact time and flight time. Despite intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs for all variables being close to 1 (ICC > 0.975, a significant overestimation was found in contact time (0.005 ± 0.002 s and underestimations in flight time (0.005 ± 0.003 s, the reactive strength index (0.04 ± 0.02 m·s-1 and the reactive strength ratio (0.07 ± 0.04. Overestimations in contact time and underestimations in flight time were attributed to the physical design of the Optojump™ system as the transmitter and receiver units were positioned 0.003 m above the floor level. The Optojump™ demonstrated excellent overall temporal validity with no differences found between systems for total time. Coaches are advised to be consistent with the instrumentation used to assess athletes, however, in the case of comparison between reactive strength values collected with the Optojump™ and values collected with a force platform, regression equations are provided.

  16. Evaluation of the reactive nitrogen budget of the remote atmosphere in global models using airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L. T.; Strode, S. A.; Fiore, A. M.; Lamarque, J. F.; Prather, M. J.; Thompson, C. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Allen, H.; Blake, D. R.; Crounse, J. D.; Brune, W. H.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, S. R.; Hintsa, E. J.; Huey, L. G.; Kim, M. J.; Moore, F. L.; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) in the background atmosphere are critical precursors for the formation of tropospheric ozone and OH, thereby exerting strong influence on surface air quality, reactive greenhouse gases, and ecosystem health. The impact of NOx on atmospheric composition and climate is sensitive to the relative partitioning of reactive nitrogen between NOx and longer-lived reservoir species of the total reactive nitrogen family (NOy) such as HNO3, HNO4, PAN and organic nitrates (RONO2). Unfortunately, global chemistry-climate models (CCMs) and chemistry-transport models (CTMs) have historically disagreed in their reactive nitrogen budgets outside of polluted continental regions, and we have lacked in situ observations with which to evaluate them. Here, we compare and evaluate the NOy budget of six global models (GEOS-Chem CTM, GFDL AM3 CCM, GISS E2.1 CCM, GMI CTM, NCAR CAM CCM, and UCI CTM) using new observations of total reactive nitrogen and its member species from the NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) mission. ATom has now completed two of its four planned deployments sampling the remote Pacific and Atlantic basins of both hemispheres with a comprehensive suite of measurements for constraining reactive photochemistry. All six models have simulated conditions climatologically similar to the deployments. The GMI and GEOS-Chem CTMs have in addition performed hindcast simulations using the MERRA-2 reanalysis, and have been sampled along the flight tracks. We evaluate the performance of the models relative to the observations, and identify factors contributing to their disparate behavior using known differences in model oxidation mechanisms, heterogeneous loss pathways, lightning and surface emissions, and physical loss processes.

  17. JOYO MK-III performance test. Criticality test, excess reactivity measurement and burn-up coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi; Kitano, Akihiro; Nagasaki, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    The MK-III performance test began in June 2003 to fully characterize the upgraded core and heat transfer system of the experimental fast reactor JOYO. This paper describes the results of the approach to criticality, the excess reactivity evaluation and the burn-up coefficient measurement. In the approach to criticality test, the MK-III core achieved initial criticality at the control rod bank position of 412.8 mm on 14:03 July 2nd, 2003. Because the replacement of the outer two rows of reflector subassemblies with shielding subassemblies reduced the source range monitor signals by a factor of 3 at the same reactor power compared with those in the MK-II core, we measured the change of the monitor's response and determined the count rate 2x10 4 cps.' as an appropriate value judging the zero power criticality. In the excess reactivity evaluation, the zero power excess reactivity at 250degC was 2.99±0.10%Δk/kk' based on the measured critical rod bank position and the measured control rod worths. The predicted value by the JOYO core management code system HESTIA was 3.13±0.16%Δk/kk', showing good agreement with the measured value. The measured excess reactivity was within the safety requirement limit. In the burn-up coefficient measurement, the excess reactivity change versus the reactor burn-up was evaluated. The measurement method adopted was to measure the control rod positions during the rated power operation. A value of -2.12x10 -4 Δk/kk'/MWd was obtained as a measured burn-up coefficient. The value calculated by HESTIA was -2.12x10 -4 Δk/kk'/MWd, and it agreed well with the measured value. All technical safety requirements for MK-III core were satisfied and the calculation accuracy of the core management code system HESTIA was confirmed. (author)

  18. Comparison of OH reactivity measurements in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl (OH radical reactivity (kOH has been measured for 18 years with different measurement techniques. In order to compare the performances of instruments deployed in the field, two campaigns were conducted performing experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich in October 2015 and April 2016. Chemical conditions were chosen either to be representative of the atmosphere or to test potential limitations of instruments. All types of instruments that are currently used for atmospheric measurements were used in one of the two campaigns. The results of these campaigns demonstrate that OH reactivity can be accurately measured for a wide range of atmospherically relevant chemical conditions (e.g. water vapour, nitrogen oxides, various organic compounds by all instruments. The precision of the measurements (limit of detection  < 1 s−1 at a time resolution of 30 s to a few minutes is higher for instruments directly detecting hydroxyl radicals, whereas the indirect comparative reactivity method (CRM has a higher limit of detection of 2 s−1 at a time resolution of 10 to 15 min. The performances of the instruments were systematically tested by stepwise increasing, for example, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO, water vapour or nitric oxide (NO. In further experiments, mixtures of organic reactants were injected into the chamber to simulate urban and forested environments. Overall, the results show that the instruments are capable of measuring OH reactivity in the presence of CO, alkanes, alkenes and aromatic compounds. The transmission efficiency in Teflon inlet lines could have introduced systematic errors in measurements for low-volatile organic compounds in some instruments. CRM instruments exhibited a larger scatter in the data compared to the other instruments. The largest differences to reference measurements or to calculated reactivity were observed by CRM instruments in

  19. Advanced Measuring (Instrumentation Methods for Nuclear Installations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiu-kuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear technology has been widely used in the world. The research of measurement in nuclear installations involves many aspects, such as nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel cycle, safety and security, nuclear accident, after action, analysis, and environmental applications. In last decades, many advanced measuring devices and techniques have been widely applied in nuclear installations. This paper mainly introduces the development of the measuring (instrumentation methods for nuclear installations and the applications of these instruments and methods.

  20. Recursive Pyramid Algorithm-Based Discrete Wavelet Transform for Reactive Power Measurement in Smart Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin K. Atiq

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the active, reactive, and apparent power is one of the most fundamental tasks of smart meters in energy systems. Recently, a number of studies have employed the discrete wavelet transform (DWT for power measurement in smart meters. The most common way to implement DWT is the pyramid algorithm; however, this is not feasible for practical DWT computation because it requires either a log N cascaded filter or O (N word size memory storage for an input signal of the N-point. Both solutions are too expensive for practical applications of smart meters. It is proposed that the recursive pyramid algorithm is more suitable for smart meter implementation because it requires only word size storage of L × Log (N-L, where L is the length of filter. We also investigated the effect of varying different system parameters, such as the sampling rate, dc offset, phase offset, linearity error in current and voltage sensors, analog to digital converter resolution, and number of harmonics in a non-sinusoidal system, on the reactive energy measurement using DWT. The error analysis is depicted in the form of the absolute difference between the measured and the true value of the reactive energy.

  1. Measurements of the Reactivity Properties of the Aagesta Nuclear Power Reactor at Zero Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernander, G

    1967-07-15

    The moderator level and temperature coefficients of reactivity and control rod differential reactivity worths have been determined at zero power by means of period measurements. The moderator level coefficient and the corresponding critical level have been measured for the 32, 68 and 136 fuel assembly cores at room temperature for cores with and without control rods. From these results the worths of control rods have been derived. HETERO calculations give up to 15 % lower values than the experimental results. The cold fresh core has an excess reactivity of 9.0 {+-} 0.2 %. The temperature coefficient and differential control rod worths were measured for the fully loaded core with filled tank in the temperature range between 30 and 210 deg C. Critical positions as a function of temperature were obtained for the corresponding control rod groups. No relevant calculations of the temperature coefficient for comparison with the experimental values have yet been made, but the experimental results together with measured critical control rod positions give good opportunities to check calculational programs. HETERO has been shown in these cases to reproduce differential control rod worths and critical positions fairly well. However, a certain underestimation of the rod effectiveness is quite noticeable. The relative increase in control rod effectiveness with a temperature change from 20 to 220 deg C has been estimated to be 0.29 {+-} 0.06.

  2. Advances in supercell calculation methods and comparison with measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, B [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Baril, R; Hotte, G [Hydro-Quebec, Central Nucleaire Gentilly, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    In the last few years, modelling techniques have been developed in new supercell computer codes. These techniques have been used to model the CANDU reactivity devices. One technique is based on one- and two-dimensional transport calculations with the WIMS-AECL lattice code followed by super homogenization and three-dimensional flux calculations in a modified version of the MULTICELL code. The second technique is based on two- and three-dimensional transport calculations in DRAGON. The code calculates the lattice properties by solving the transport equation in a two-dimensional geometry followed by supercell calculations in three dimensions. These two calculation schemes have been used to calculate the incremental macroscopic properties of CANDU reactivity devices. The supercell size has also been modified to define incremental properties over a larger region. The results show improved agreement between the reactivity worth of zone controllers and adjusters. However, at the same time the agreement between measured and simulated flux distributions deteriorated somewhat. (author)

  3. In-situ high-pressure measurements and detailed numerical predictions of the catalytic reactivity of methane over platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M.; Mantzaras, I.; Schaeren, R.; Bombach, R.; Inauen, A.; Schenker, S.

    2003-03-01

    The catalytic reactivity of methane over platinum at pressures of up to 14 bar was evaluated with in-situ Raman measurements and detailed numerical predictions from two different heterogeneous chemical reaction schemes. The best agreement to the measurements was achieved with Deutschmann's reaction scheme that yielded the correct trend for the pressure dependence of the catalytic reactivity, although in absolute terms the reactivity was overpredicted. The catalytic reactivity was consistently underpredicted at all pressures with the reaction scheme of Vlachos. (author)

  4. Application of the neutron noise technique for measurement of reactivity for subcritical reactor RA-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orso, J; Marenzana, A

    2012-01-01

    Reactor core RA-4 is divided into two parts that come together to start reactor. The reactor with core separate has the largest subcritical condition, this condition is more secure and therefore the reactor shutdown. In this paper measurements are made of the decay constant of the neutron prompt ' P ', using the α-Rossi and α-Feynman methods to calculate the reactivity of the reactor core for different positions. Both techniques are compared and reactivity is obtained for several position of the reactor core using the α-Rossi technical which is obtained a function that gives the reactivity depending on the separation of the core length. Both techniques are verified using a no multiplicative system. Reactivity values for different position of the core obtained by α-Rossi technique are: $[0 cm] = (-11+/-1) dollar, $[3 cm] = (-7+/-1) dollar, $[3.5 cm] (-5.5+/-0.8) dollar, $[4.2 cm] = (-3.8+/-0.3) dollar y $[4.5] = (-3.0+/-0.1) dollar (author)

  5. Measurements of fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity on a commercial AGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telford, A.; Bridge, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been carried out on the commercial AGR at Hikley Point to determine the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, an important safety related parameter. Reactor neutron flux was measured during transients induced by movement of a bank of control rods from one steady position to another. An inverse kinetics analysis was applied to the measured flux to determine the change which occured in core reactivity as the fuel temperature changed. The variation of mean fuel temperature was deduced from the flux transient by means of a nine-plane thermal hydraulics representation of the AGR fuel channel. Results so far obtained confirm the predicted variation of fuel temperature coefficient with butn-up. (author)

  6. Inverse kinetics equations for on line measurement of reactivity using personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratemi, Wajdi; El Gadamsi, Walied; Beleid, Abdul Kariem

    1993-01-01

    Computer with their astonishing speed of calculations along with their easy connection to real systems, are very appropriate for digital measurements of real system variables. In the nuclear industry, such computer application will produce compact control rooms of real power plants, where information and results display can be obtained through push button concept. In our study, we use two personal computers for the purpose of simulation and measurement. One of them is used as a digital simulator to a real reactor, where we effectively simulate the reactor power through a cross talk network. The computed power is passed at certain chosen sampling time to the other computer. The purpose of the other computer is to use the inverse kinetics equations to calculate the reactivity parameter based on the received power and then it performs on line display of the power curve and the reactivity curve using color graphics. In this study, we use the one group version of the inverse kinetics algorithm which can easily be extended to larger group version. The language of programming used in Turbo BASIC, which is very comparable, in terms of efficiency, to FORTRAN language, besides its effective graphics routines. With the use of the extended version of the Inverse Kinetics algorithm, we can effectively apply this techniques of measurement for the purpose of on line display of the reactivity of the Tajoura Research Reactor. (author)

  7. Cerebral Blood Flow and Transcranial Doppler Sonography Measurements of CO(2)-Reactivity in Acute Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinstrup, Peter; Ryding, Erik Hilmer; Asgeirsson, Bogi

    2013-01-01

    measurements and cerebrovascular reactivity to hypocapnia were simultaneously evaluated in 27 patients with acute TBI. Measurements were performed preoperatively during controlled normocapnia and hypocapnia in patients scheduled for hematoma evacuation under general anesthesia. MAIN FINDING AND CONCLUSION...

  8. Measure of manufacturing performance in advanced manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ron, de A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the financial risks as a result of the high investments, decisions concerning investing in advanced manufacturing systems are difficult. The difficulty to decide is gained by the lack of a well-defined measure to support decisions and alarming messages from the industry concerning inverse

  9. Feasibility of direct reactivity measurement in multi-canister overpacks at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    A proposed method for measuring the chemical reaction rate (power) of breached N-Reactor fuel elements with water in a Multi-canister overpack (MCO) based on hydrogen release rate is evaluated. The reaction rate is measured at 50 C in an oxygen free water by applying a vacuum to boil the water and adding a low, measured flow of helium. The ratio of helium to hydrogen is used to infer the reaction rate. A test duration of less than 8 hours was found to provide sufficient accuracy for confidence in the measurement results. A more rigorous treatment of system measurement accuracy, which may yield shorter test durations, should be performed if this reactivity measurement is to be employed

  10. Reactivation of slow-moving landslides by earthquakes, kinematics measurements and mechanical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Pascal; Perfettini, Hugo; Berthier, Etienne; Taipe, Edu; Guillier, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Major earthquakes in mountainous areas often trigger landslides. The impact of earthquakes on slow-moving landslides is however not well constrained due to few co-seismic measurements of landslide motion. We document the first time-series of a landslide reactivation by an earthquake (Mw6.0, distance 20 km), using continuous GPS measurements over the Maca landslide (Peru). Our survey shows a coseismic response of the landslide of about 2 cm, followed by a relaxation period of 5 weeks during which postseismic slip is three times greater than the coseismic displacement itself. Our results confirm the coseismic activation of landslides and provide the first observation of a post seismic displacement. Finally, a multi-temporal survey using images from the very high resolution Pléiades optical satellite, allowed us to detect 9 active slow-moving landslides over the whole valley. Their pattern of motion show they have been reactivated by the same earthquake. We analyze this small but comprehensive database of landslides reactivated by the earthquake. We find that the landslide motion due to the earthquake is function of the shaking intensity, suggesting a friction at the basal interface dependent on the earthquake solicitation. These various observations are consistent with a mechanical model where slip on the landslide basal interface is governed by rate and state friction, analogous to the mechanics of creeping tectonic faults.

  11. On the Rod Drop technique in integral reactivity measures in control banks and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study on the effect of shading in neutron detectors, when used in measures of reactivity with the rod drop technique. Shading can be understood as a change in the efficiency of the detectors, when it is given in detected neutrons fission occurred in the reactor, more evident in the detectors closest to the bank being inserted. The method of analysis was based on simulations of reactor IPEN/MB-01, using the code CITATION and MCNP program. In both cases, the results were static, showing Neutronic flows in only two situations: before insertion of the control rod and after insertion. The measure of reactivity in this case was achieved using the expression derived from the source jerk technique. In addition to theoretical study, data from a rod drop experiment conducted in the reactor IPEN/MB-01 were also used. In this case, the reactivity was obtained using inverse kinetic method, since experimental data were set of values that vary with time. In all cases, correction factors for the shadowing effect have been proposed. (author)

  12. Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, A.; Nishi, H.; Suzuki, T.; Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S.

    2012-01-01

    The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

  13. Measurement and analysis of reactivity worth of 237Np sample in cores of TCA and FCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mori, Takamasa; Okajima, Shigeaki; Tani, Kazuhiro; Suzaki, Takenori; Saito, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity worth of 22.87 grams of 237 Np oxide sample was measured and analyzed in seven uranium cores in the Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) and two uranium cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The TCA cores provided a systematic variation in the neutron spectrum between the thermal and resonance energy regions. The FCA cores, XXI and XXV, provided a hard neutron spectrum of the fast reactor and a soft one of the resonance energy region, respectively. Analyses were carried out using the JENDL-3.3 nuclear data library with a Monte Carlo method for the TCA cores and a deterministic method for the FCA cores. The ratios of calculated to experimental (C/E) reactivity worth were between 0.97 and 0.91, and showed no apparent dependence on the neutron spectrum. (author)

  14. Central Reactivity Measurements on Assemblies 1 and 3 of the Fast Reactor FR0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londen, S.O.

    1966-01-01

    The reactivity effects of small samples of various materials have been measured, by the period method at the core centre of Assemblies 1 and 3 of the fast zero power reactor FR0. For some materials the reactivity change as a function of sample size has also been determined experimentally. The core of Assembly 1 consisted only of uranium enriched to 20 % whereas the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with 30 % graphite. The results have been compared with calculated values obtained with a second-order transport-theoretical perturbation model and using differently shielded cross sections depending upon sample size. Qualitative agreement has generally been found, although discrepancies still exist. The spectrum perturbation caused by the experimental arrangement has been analyzed and found to be rather important

  15. Central Reactivity Measurements on Assemblies 1 and 3 of the Fast Reactor FR0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londen, S O

    1966-01-15

    The reactivity effects of small samples of various materials have been measured, by the period method at the core centre of Assemblies 1 and 3 of the fast zero power reactor FR0. For some materials the reactivity change as a function of sample size has also been determined experimentally. The core of Assembly 1 consisted only of uranium enriched to 20 % whereas the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with 30 % graphite. The results have been compared with calculated values obtained with a second-order transport-theoretical perturbation model and using differently shielded cross sections depending upon sample size. Qualitative agreement has generally been found, although discrepancies still exist. The spectrum perturbation caused by the experimental arrangement has been analyzed and found to be rather important.

  16. Strategies for measuring flows of reactive nitrogen at the landscape scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theobald, M.R.; Akkal, N.; Bienkowski, J.

    2011-01-01

    Within a rural landscape there are flows of reactive nitrogen (Nr) through and between the soil, vegetation, atmosphere and hydrological systems as well as transfer as a result of agricultural activities. Measurements of these flows and transfers have generally been limited to individual media (e.......g., hydrological flows) or the interface between two media (e.g., exchange between the soil and the atmosphere). However, the study of flows of Nr at the landscape scale requires a more integrated approach that combines measurement techniques to quantify the flows from one medium to the next. This paper discusses...

  17. Retinal hemodynamic oxygen reactivity assessed by perfusion velocity, blood oximetry and vessel diameter measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the oxygen reactivity of a fundus photographic method of measuring macular perfusion velocity and to integrate macular perfusion velocities with measurements of retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturation. METHODS: Sixteen eyes in 16 healthy volunteers were studied at two...... is a valid method for assessing macular perfusion. Results were consistent with previous observations of hyperoxic blood flow reduction using blue field entoptic and laser Doppler velocimetry. Retinal perfusion seemed to be regulated around individual set points according to blood glucose levels. Multimodal...

  18. Feasibility of reactivity worth measurements by perturbation method with Caliban and Silene experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, Pierre; Authier, Nicolas [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes de Valduc, 21120 Is-Sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-01

    Reactivity worth measurements of material samples put in the central cavities of nuclear reactors allow to test cross section nuclear databases or to extract information about the critical masses of fissile elements. Such experiments have already been completed on the Caliban and Silene experimental reactors operated by the Criticality and Neutronics Research Laboratory of Valduc (CEA, France) using the perturbation measurement technique. Calculations have been performed to prepare future experiments on new materials, such as light elements, structure materials, fission products or actinides. (authors)

  19. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen and greenhouse gases at the NitroEurope core flux measurement sites: Measurement strategy and first data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiba, U.; Drewer, J.; Tang, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    The NitroEurope project aims to improve understanding of the nitrogen (N) cycle at the continental scale and quantify the major fluxes of reactive N by a combination of reactive N measurements and modelling activities. As part of the overall measurement strategy, a network of 13 flux ‘super sites...

  20. Self-reported trait mindfulness and affective reactivity: a motivational approach using multiple psychophysiological measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Cosme

    Full Text Available As a form of attention, mindfulness is qualitatively receptive and non-reactive, and is thought to facilitate adaptive emotional responding. One suggested mechanism is that mindfulness facilitates disengagement from an affective stimulus and thereby decreases affective reactivity. However, mindfulness has been conceptualized as a state, intervention, and trait. Because evidence is mixed as to whether self-reported trait mindfulness decreases affective reactivity, we used a multi-method approach to study the relationship between individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness and electrocortical, electrodermal, electromyographic, and self-reported responses to emotional pictures. Specifically, while participants (N = 51 passively viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, we recorded high-density (128 channels electrocortical, electrodermal, and electromyographic data to the pictures as well as to acoustic startle probes presented during the pictures. Afterwards, participants rated their subjective valence and arousal while viewing the pictures again. If trait mindfulness spontaneously reduces general emotional reactivity, then for individuals reporting high rather than low mindfulness, response differences between emotional and neutral pictures would show relatively decreased early posterior negativity (EPN and late positive potential (LPP amplitudes, decreased skin conductance responses, and decreased subjective ratings for valence and arousal. High mindfulness would also be associated with decreased emotional modulation of startle eyeblink and P3 amplitudes. Although results showed clear effects of emotion on the dependent measures, in general, mindfulness did not moderate these effects. For most measures, effect sizes were small with rather narrow confidence intervals. These data do not support the hypothesis that individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness are related to spontaneous emotional responses

  1. Self-Reported Trait Mindfulness and Affective Reactivity: A Motivational Approach Using Multiple Psychophysiological Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Danielle; Wiens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    As a form of attention, mindfulness is qualitatively receptive and non-reactive, and is thought to facilitate adaptive emotional responding. One suggested mechanism is that mindfulness facilitates disengagement from an affective stimulus and thereby decreases affective reactivity. However, mindfulness has been conceptualized as a state, intervention, and trait. Because evidence is mixed as to whether self-reported trait mindfulness decreases affective reactivity, we used a multi-method approach to study the relationship between individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness and electrocortical, electrodermal, electromyographic, and self-reported responses to emotional pictures. Specifically, while participants (N = 51) passively viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, we recorded high-density (128 channels) electrocortical, electrodermal, and electromyographic data to the pictures as well as to acoustic startle probes presented during the pictures. Afterwards, participants rated their subjective valence and arousal while viewing the pictures again. If trait mindfulness spontaneously reduces general emotional reactivity, then for individuals reporting high rather than low mindfulness, response differences between emotional and neutral pictures would show relatively decreased early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes, decreased skin conductance responses, and decreased subjective ratings for valence and arousal. High mindfulness would also be associated with decreased emotional modulation of startle eyeblink and P3 amplitudes. Although results showed clear effects of emotion on the dependent measures, in general, mindfulness did not moderate these effects. For most measures, effect sizes were small with rather narrow confidence intervals. These data do not support the hypothesis that individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness are related to spontaneous emotional responses during picture

  2. An experimental technique for the direct measurement of N2O5 reactivity on ambient particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Bertram

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experimental approach for the direct measurement of trace gas reactivity on ambient aerosol particles has been developed. The method utilizes a newly designed entrained aerosol flow reactor coupled to a custom-built chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The experimental method is described via application to the measurement of the N2O5 reaction probability, γ (N2O5. Laboratory investigations on well characterized aerosol particles show that measurements of γ (N2O5 observed with this technique are in agreement with previous observations, using conventional flow tube methods, to within ±20% at atmospherically relevant particle surface area concentrations (0–1000 μm2 cm−3. Uncertainty in the measured γ (N2O5 is discussed in the context of fluctuations in potential ambient biases (e.g., temperature, relative humidity and trace gas loadings. Under ambient operating conditions we estimate a single-point uncertainty in γ (N2O5 that ranges between ± (1.3×10-2 + 0.2×γ (N2O5, and ± (1.3×10-3 + 0.2×γ (N2O5 for particle surface area concentrations of 100 to 1000 μm2 cm−3, respectively. Examples from both laboratory investigations and field observations are included alongside discussion of future applications for the reactivity measurement and optimal deployment locations and conditions.

  3. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  4. Advanced oxidation of Reactive Blue 181 solution: a comparison between Fenton and Sono-Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Emine; Karatas, Mustafa

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the decolorization of C.I. Reactive Blue 181 (RB181), an anthraquinone dye, by Ultrasound and Fe(2+) H2O2 processes was investigated. The effects of operating parameters, such as Fe(2+) dosage, H2O2 dosage, pH value, reaction time and temperature were examined. Process optimisation [pH, ferrous ion (Fe(2+)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and reaction time], kinetic studies and their comparison were carried out for both of the processes. The Sono-Fenton process was performed by indirect sonication in an ultrasonic water bath, which was operated at a fixed 35-kHz frequency. The optimum conditions were determined as [Fe(2+)]=30 mg/L, [H2O2]=50 mg/L and pH=3 for the Fenton process and [Fe(2+)]=10 mg/L, [H2O2]=40 mg/L and pH=3 for the Sono-Fenton process. The colour removals were 88% and 93.5% by the Fenton and Sono-Fenton processes, respectively. The highest decolorization was achieved by the Sono-Fenton process because of the production of some oxidising agents as a result of sonication. The paper also discussed kinetic parameters. The decolorization kinetic of RB181 followed pseudo-second-order reaction (Fenton study) and Behnajady kinetics (Sono-Fenton study). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Measuring the relativistic perigee advance with satellite laser ranging

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L; Pavlis, E C

    2002-01-01

    The pericentric advance of a test body by a central mass is one of the classical tests of general relativity. Today, this effect is measured with radar ranging by the perihelion shift of Mercury and other planets in the gravitational field of the Sun, with a relative accuracy of the order of 10 sup - sup 2 -10 sup - sup 3. In this paper, we explore the possibility of a measurement of the pericentric advance in the gravitational field of Earth by analysing the laser-ranged data of some orbiting, or proposed, laser-ranged geodetic satellites. Such a measurement of the perigee advance would place limits on hypothetical, very weak, Yukawa-type components of the gravitational interaction with a finite range of the order of 10 sup 4 km. Thus, we show that, at the present level of knowledge of the orbital perturbations, the relative accuracy, achievable with suitably combined orbital elements of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, is of the order of 10 sup - sup 3. With the corresponding measured value of (2 + 2 gamma - beta)/3, ...

  6. Development of electronic system for reactivity measurement and reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, Claude Emile; Soares, Adalberto Jose

    1996-01-01

    In nuclear power reactors, the neutron detector signal is dependent of the number of fissions and the reactor power level. The detector signal can be divided into two components; a DC component, proportional to the average value and an AC component, which is the fluctuating part superimposed to the DC component. The analysis of the fluctuating part of the signal is called noise analysis and allow us to investigate phenomena occurring within the reactor vessel, such as vibration of fuels elements and coolant density, temperature, pressure and flow changes. On the other hand, the measure of the static DC part allow us to measure the local power density. This paper describes the development of a personal computer based signal conditioning card that, together with a personal computer commercial data acquisition card, can be used for noise analysis measurements and reactivity measurements of signals coming from ionization chambers or SPD's. (author)

  7. Spent fuel measurements. passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and photon signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigenbrodt, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-29

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of a diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear material from peaceful activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. An important IAEA task towards meeting this objective is the ability to accurately and reliably measure spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to verify reactor operating parameters and verify that the fuel has not been removed from reactors or SNF storage facilities. This dissertation analyzes a method to improve the state-of-the-art of nuclear material safeguards measurements using two combined measurement techniques: passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and passive spectral photon measurements.

  8. Recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bency

    2007-01-01

    A short review of recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density is given. First results of the inverse level density parameter - angular momentum correlation in a number of nuclei around Z∼50 shell region at an excitation energy around 0.3 MeV/nucleon are presented. Significant variations observed over and above the expected shell corrections are discussed in context of the emerging trends in microscopic calculations of the nuclear level density. (author)

  9. MEASUREMENTS MADE DURING THE COMMISSIONING OF THE WINDSCALE ADVANCED GAS- COOLED REACTOR (WAGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallie, R R

    1963-06-15

    Some measurements were made on the WAGR fuel in the APEX and HERO facilities in order to derive the loading pattern. The reactor was then loaded, and measurements of the excess reactivity were in good agreement with predictions. Other measurements made were control rod calibrations, reactivity worths of control rods, isothermal temperature coefficient, and pressure drops. (D.L.C.)

  10. TRANC - a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Freibauer, A.

    2012-05-01

    The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr) from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter), which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr) in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO) within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD) for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3-, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal and catalytic

  11. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wolff

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3−, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal

  12. Advances in the Surface Renewal Flux Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapland, T. M.; McElrone, A.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of ecosystem-scale energy and mass fluxes between the planetary surface and the atmosphere is crucial for understanding geophysical processes. Surface renewal is a flux measurement technique based on analyzing the turbulent coherent structures that interact with the surface. It is a less expensive technique because it does not require fast-response velocity measurements, but only a fast-response scalar measurement. It is therefore also a useful tool for the study of the global cycling of trace gases. Currently, surface renewal requires calibration against another flux measurement technique, such as eddy covariance, to account for the linear bias of its measurements. We present two advances in the surface renewal theory and methodology that bring the technique closer to becoming a fully independent flux measurement method. The first advance develops the theory of turbulent coherent structure transport associated with the different scales of coherent structures. A novel method was developed for identifying the scalar change rate within structures at different scales. Our results suggest that for canopies less than one meter in height, the second smallest coherent structure scale dominates the energy and mass flux process. Using the method for resolving the scalar exchange rate of the second smallest coherent structure scale, calibration is unnecessary for surface renewal measurements over short canopies. This study forms the foundation for analysis over more complex surfaces. The second advance is a sensor frequency response correction for measuring the sensible heat flux via surface renewal. Inexpensive fine-wire thermocouples are frequently used to record high frequency temperature data in the surface renewal technique. The sensible heat flux is used in conjunction with net radiation and ground heat flux measurements to determine the latent heat flux as the energy balance residual. The robust thermocouples commonly used in field experiments

  13. Measuring the relativistic perigee advance with satellite laser ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C

    2002-01-01

    The pericentric advance of a test body by a central mass is one of the classical tests of general relativity. Today, this effect is measured with radar ranging by the perihelion shift of Mercury and other planets in the gravitational field of the Sun, with a relative accuracy of the order of 10 -2 -10 -3 . In this paper, we explore the possibility of a measurement of the pericentric advance in the gravitational field of Earth by analysing the laser-ranged data of some orbiting, or proposed, laser-ranged geodetic satellites. Such a measurement of the perigee advance would place limits on hypothetical, very weak, Yukawa-type components of the gravitational interaction with a finite range of the order of 10 4 km. Thus, we show that, at the present level of knowledge of the orbital perturbations, the relative accuracy, achievable with suitably combined orbital elements of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, is of the order of 10 -3 . With the corresponding measured value of (2 + 2γ - β)/3, by using η = 4β - γ - 3 from lunar laser ranging, we could get an estimate of the PPN parameters γ and β with an accuracy of the order of 10 -2 -10 -3 . Nevertheless, these accuracies would be substantially improved in the near future with the new Earth gravity field models by the CHAMP and GRACE missions. The use of the perigee of LARES (LAser RElativity Satellite), with a suitable combination of orbital residuals including also the node and the perigee of LAGEOS II, would also further improve the accuracy of the proposed measurement

  14. Advanced glycation end products delay corneal epithelial wound healing through reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Long; Chen, Hongmei; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Xinyi

    2013-11-01

    Delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds is a serious complication in diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are intimately associated with the diabetic complications and are deleterious to the wound healing process. However, the effect of AGEs on corneal epithelial wound healing has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) on corneal epithelial wound healing and its underlying mechanisms. Our data showed that AGE-BSA significantly increased the generation of intracellular ROS in telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells. However, the generation of intracellular ROS was completely inhibited by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), anti-receptor of AGEs (RAGE) antibodies, or the inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, AGE-BSA increased NADPH oxidase activity and protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, p22phox and Nox4, but anti-RAGE antibodies eliminated these effects. Furthermore, prevention of intracellular ROS generation using NAC or anti-RAGE antibodies rescued AGE-BSA-delayed epithelial wound healing in porcine corneal organ culture. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AGE-BSA impaired corneal epithelial wound healing ex vivo. AGE-BSA increased intracellular ROS generation through NADPH oxidase activation, which accounted for the delayed corneal epithelial wound healing. These results may provide better insights for understanding the mechanism of delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds in diabetes.

  15. Advanced, Analytic, Automated (AAA) Measurement of Engagement During Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Sidney; Dieterle, Ed; Duckworth, Angela

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that engagement plays a critical role in learning. Unfortunately, the study of engagement has been stymied by a lack of valid and efficient measures. We introduce the advanced, analytic, and automated (AAA) approach to measure engagement at fine-grained temporal resolutions. The AAA measurement approach is grounded in embodied theories of cognition and affect, which advocate a close coupling between thought and action. It uses machine-learned computational models to automatically infer mental states associated with engagement (e.g., interest, flow) from machine-readable behavioral and physiological signals (e.g., facial expressions, eye tracking, click-stream data) and from aspects of the environmental context. We present15 case studies that illustrate the potential of the AAA approach for measuring engagement in digital learning environments. We discuss strengths and weaknesses of the AAA approach, concluding that it has significant promise to catalyze engagement research.

  16. Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity at Hinkley Point 'B': 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.A.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity made at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR in 1981 are described. These measurements follow earlier tests reported in e.g. RD/B/N4846 and are part of a series of measurements designed to support theoretical estimates of the change of fuel temperature coefficient as a function of core irradiation. Low and high power measurements were made at a mean core irradiation of 1170GWD. As previously, the measurements at both power levels show agreement with theoretical predictions to within the estimated experimental errors. Recent measurements (mean core irradiation >500GWD) show evidence of a small systematic difference between measured and theoretical values with the experimental values being approximately equal to 0.1mN/ 0 C more positive than the theoretical ones. The measured value of αsub(U) at high power was -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C and the low power value, corrected theoretically to normal operating conditions, was also -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C. (author)

  17. RMR. A new portable Reactivity Measuring System installed at NPP Paks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czibok, T.; Horvath, C.; Bara, P.; Dezsoe, Z.; Laz, J.; Vegh, J.; Pos, I.

    2003-01-01

    The Hungarian Paks NPP is conducting a two year project for upgrading the reactivity measuring system applied during reactor startup experiments. The NPP has decided to replace almost all components of the previous system, only ionisation chambers remain unaltered. Devices for measuring neutron flux by means of ionisation chambers, for data acquisition and for measurement evaluation were completely renewed: new hardware-software components were introduced. Autonomous, high-precision current measuring systems (picoampere meters) are applied at each reactor unit, the converted picoampere signals are handled by a portable processing unit. The portable unit - based on a notebook PC - handles measured signals by using a high-precision A/D converter card, the scan time is 0.10 sec. In addition to handling three ionisation chamber signals the portable unit collects control rod position measurements through a serial line. The portable unit is able to receive additional measured data (e.g. core inlet temperature and boron concentration) from the process computer via local area network. Archiving of all measured and calculated data is performed in a redundant manner: data are stored locally and in the process computer, as well. The new system applies an accurate on-line reactivity calculation algorithm based on the point-kinetic model with 6 delayed neutron groups. Input data (effective delayed neutron fraction and other delayed neutron parameters) to the on-line calculation are taken from the off-line core design calculation. Detailed evaluation and analysis of startup measurements can be performed also on the portable unit. The user interface of the system is tailored to support various startup measurement tasks effectively: measured and calculated data are displayed on trends and on dedicated pictures. A user-friendly trending and listing graphic tool facilitates visualisation of archived data. The paper describes the architecture, data acquisition modules, algorithms and

  18. Importance weighting of local flux measurements to improve reactivity predictions in nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulla, Sandra; Hoh, Siew Sin; Nervo, Marta; Ravetto, Piero [Politecnico di Torino, Dipt. Energia (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    The reactivity monitoring is a key aspect for the safe operation of nuclear reactors, especially for subcritical source-driven systems. Various methods are available for both, off-line and on-line reactivity determination from direct measurements carried out on the reactor. Usually the methods are based on the inverse point kinetic model applied to signals from neutron detectors and results may be severely affected by space and spectral effects. Such effects need to be compensated and correction procedures have to be applied. In this work, a new approach is proposed, by using the full information from different local measurements to generate a global signal through a proper weighting of the signals provided by single neutron detectors. A weighting techique based on the use of the adjoint flux proves to be efficient in improving the prediction capability of inverse techniques. The idea is applied to the recently developed algorithm, named MAρTA, that can be used in both off-line and online modes.

  19. Calculation-measurement comparison for control rods reactivity in RA-3 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, Guillermo; Gomez, Angel

    2002-01-01

    The RA-3 Nuclear Reactor of the Atomic Energy National Commission from Argentina, begun working with high enrichment fuel elements in 1967, and turned to low enrichment by 1990. During 1999 it was found out that several fuel elements had problems, so more than 50 % of them had to be removed from the core. Because of this, it was planned to go from core 93 to core 94 with special care from nuclear safety point of view. Core 94 was preceded by other five, T-1 to T-5, only as transitory ones. The care implied several nuclear parameters measurements: core reactivity excess, calibration of control rods, etc. Calculations were performed afterwards to simulate those measurements using the neutron diffusion code PUMA. The comparison shows a good agreement for more than 80% of the cases with differences lower than 10% in reactivity. The greatest differences were found in the last part of the control rods calibration and a better calculation of cell constants is planned to be done in order to improve the adjustment. (author)

  20. Reactivity of dogs' brain oscillations to visual stimuli measured with non-invasive electroencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miiamaaria V Kujala

    Full Text Available Studying cognition of domestic dogs has gone through a renaissance within the last decades. However, although the behavioral studies of dogs are beginning to be common in the field of animal cognition, the neural events underlying cognition remain unknown. Here, we employed a non-invasive electroencephalography, with adhesive electrodes attached to the top of the skin, to measure brain activity of from 8 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris while they stayed still to observe photos of dog and human faces. Spontaneous oscillatory activity of the dogs, peaking in the sensors over the parieto-occipital cortex, was suppressed statistically significantly during visual task compared with resting activity at the frequency of 15-30 Hz. Moreover, a stimulus-induced low-frequency (~2-6 Hz suppression locked to the stimulus onset was evident at the frontal sensors, possibly reflecting a motor rhythm guiding the exploratory eye movements. The results suggest task-related reactivity of the macroscopic oscillatory activity in the dog brain. To our knowledge, the study is the first to reveal non-invasively measured reactivity of brain electrophysiological oscillations in healthy dogs, and it has been based purely on positive operant conditional training, without the need for movement restriction or medication.

  1. Estimating temperature reactivity coefficients by experimental procedures combined with isothermal temperature coefficient measurements and dynamic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Aoki, Yukinori; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Hanayama, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    A method to evaluate the moderator coefficient (MTC) and the Doppler coefficient through experimental procedures performed during reactor physics tests of PWR power plants is proposed. This method combines isothermal temperature coefficient (ITC) measurement experiments and reactor power transient experiments at low power conditions for dynamic identification. In the dynamic identification, either one of temperature coefficients can be determined in such a way that frequency response characteristics of the reactivity change observed by a digital reactivity meter is reproduced from measured data of neutron count rate and the average coolant temperature. The other unknown coefficient can also be determined by subtracting the coefficient obtained from the dynamic identification from ITC. As the proposed method can directly estimate the Doppler coefficient, the applicability of the conventional core design codes to predict the Doppler coefficient can be verified for new types of fuels such as mixed oxide fuels. The digital simulation study was carried out to show the feasibility of the proposed method. The numerical analysis showed that the MTC and the Doppler coefficient can be estimated accurately and even if there are uncertainties in the parameters of the reactor kinetics model, the accuracies of the estimated values are not seriously impaired. (author)

  2. Neutronic characterization of cylindrical core of minor excess reactivity in the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01 from the measure of neutron flux distribution and its reactivity ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Aredes, Vitor O.G.; Mura, Luiz E.C.; Santos, Diogo F. dos; Silva, Alexandre P. da, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: vitoraredes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    When compared to a rectangular parallelepiped configuration the cylindrical configuration of a nuclear reactor core has a better neutron economy because in this configuration the probability of the neutron leakage is smaller, causing an increase in overall reactivity in the system to the same amount of fuel used. In this work we obtained a critical cylindrical configuration with the control rods 89.50% withdraw from the active region of the IPEN/MB-01 core. This is the cylindrical configuration minimum possible excess of reactivity. Thus we obtained a cylindrical configuration with a diameter of only 28 fuel rods with lowest possible excess of reactivity. For this purpose, 112 peripheral fuel rods are removed from standard reactor core (rectangular parallelepiped of 28x28 fuel rods). In this configuration the excesses of reactivity is approximated 279 pcm. From there, we characterize the neutron field by measuring the spatial distribution of the thermal and epithermal neutron flux for the reactor operating power of 83 watts measured by neutron noise analysis technique and 92.08± 0.07 watts measured by activation technique [10]. The values of thermal and epithermal neutron flux in different directions, axial, radial north-south and radial east-west, are obtained in the asymptotic region of the reactor core, away from the disturbances caused by the reflector and control bar, by irradiating thin gold foils infinitely diluted (1% Au - 99% Al) with and without (bare) cadmium cover. In addition to the distribution of neutron flux, the moderator temperature coefficient, the void coefficient, calibration of the control rods were measured. (author)

  3. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sinha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH. Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor" or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS. Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID. Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques.

    Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60–70 s, sensitivity (LOD 3–6 s−1 and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests it

  4. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C; de Groot, Joris A H; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify...... to a basic signs-and-symptoms prediction model was assessed. Outcome measures were improvement in discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia in primary care and improvement in risk classification, both within the individual studies and across studies. RESULTS: Authors of 8 eligible studies (n...... = 5308) provided their data sets. In all of the data sets, discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia improved after CRP measurement was added to the prediction model (extended model), with a mean improvement in the area under the curve of 0.075 (range 0.02-0.18). In a hypothetical cohort...

  5. Surface Forces Apparatus measurements of interactions between rough and reactive calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadkowiec, Joanna; Javadi, Shaghayegh; Bratvold, Jon Einar; Nilsen, Ola; Røyne, Anja

    2018-05-28

    Nm-range forces acting between calcite surfaces in water affect macroscopic properties of carbonate rocks and calcite-based granular materials, and are significantly influenced by calcite surface recrystallization. We suggest that the repulsive mechanical effects related to nm-scale surface recrystallization of calcite in water could be partially responsible for the observed decrease of cohesion in calcitic rocks saturated with water. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA), we simultaneously followed the calcite reactivity and measured the forces in water in two surface configurations: between two rough calcite surfaces (CC), or between rough calcite and a smooth mica surface (CM). We used nm-scale rough, polycrystalline calcite films prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). We measured only repulsive forces in CC in CaCO 3 -saturated water, which was related to roughness and possibly to repulsive hydration effects. Adhesive or repulsive forces were measured in CM in CaCO 3 -saturated water depending on calcite roughness, and the adhesion was likely enhanced by electrostatic effects. The pull-off adhesive force in CM became stronger with time and this increase was correlated with a decrease of roughness at contacts, which parameter could be estimated from the measured force-distance curves. That suggested a progressive increase of real contact areas between the surfaces, caused by gradual pressure-driven deformation of calcite surface asperities during repeated loading-unloading cycles. Reactivity of calcite was affected by mass transport across nm to µm-thick gaps between the surfaces. Major roughening was observed only for the smoothest calcite films, where gaps between two opposing surfaces were nm-thick over µm-sized areas, and led to force of crystallization that could overcome confining pressures of the order of MPa. Any substantial roughening of calcite caused a significant increase of the repulsive mechanical force contribution.

  6. Advances in measuring ocean salinity with an optical sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menn, M Le; De Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, J L; Grosso, P; Delauney, L; Podeur, C; Brault, P; Guillerme, O

    2011-01-01

    Absolute salinity measurement of seawater has become a key issue in thermodynamic models of the oceans. One of the most direct ways is to measure the seawater refractive index which is related to density and can therefore be related to the absolute salinity. Recent advances in high resolution position sensitive devices enable us to take advantage of small beam deviation measurements using refractometers. This paper assesses the advantages of such technology with respect to the current state-of-the-art technology. In particular, we present the resolution dependence on refractive index variations and derive the limits of such a solution for designing seawater sensors well suited for coastal and deep-sea applications. Particular attention has been paid to investigate the impact of environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, on an optical sensor, and ways to mitigate or compensate them have been suggested here. The sensor has been successfully tested in a pressure tank and in open oceans 2000 m deep

  7. The Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale: Measurement Invariance, Stability, and Validity in Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlotz, Wolff; Yim, Ilona S.; Zoccola, Peggy M.; Jansen, Lars; Schulz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that individual differences in stress reactivity contribute to the risk for stress-related disease. However, the assessment of stress reactivity remains challenging, and there is a relative lack of questionnaires reliably assessing this construct. We here present the Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS), a…

  8. Dynamic Aperture Measurements at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1999-01-01

    A large dynamic aperture for a storage ring is of importance for long lifetimes and a high injection efficiency. Measurements of the dynamic aperture of the third generation synchrotron light source Advanced Light Source (ALS) using beam excitation with kicker magnets are presented. The experiments were done for various accelerator conditions, allowing us to investigate the influence of different working points, chromaticities, insertion devices, etc.. The results are compared both with tracking calculations and a simple model for the dynamic aperture yielding good agreements. This gives us confidence in the predictability of the nonlinear accelerator model. This is especially important for future ALS upgrades as well as new storage ring designs

  9. Long term Suboxone™ emotional reactivity as measured by automatic detection in speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Hill

    Full Text Available Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation's most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states ("true ground emotionality" in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of "true" emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA. Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate "true ground" emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™. We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01, and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction.

  10. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  11. Proactive, Reactive, and Romantic Relational Aggression in Adulthood: Measurement, Predictive Validity, Gender Differences, and Association with Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Ostrov, Jamie M.; Nelson, David A.; Crick, Nicki R.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a recently introduced adult self-report of relational aggression are presented. Specifically, the predictive utility of proactive and reactive peer-directed relational aggression, as well as romantic relational aggression, are explored in a large (N = 1387) study of adults. The measure had adequate reliability and validity and the subscales demonstrated unique predictive abilities for a number of dependent variables. In particular, reactive but not proactive rel...

  12. The influence of spatial effects on the measurement results of reactivity in 'fast disturbances' of core parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, S.V.; Shishkov, L.K.

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of methods for the determination of reactivity revealed an essential influence of spatial effect on the measurement precision. Using of reverse point kinetic equation for reactivity meter is assumed that the average neutron flux weigh with the importance function is known at every moment of the transient. In fact, reactivity meter represent behaviour of the neutron flux only of the part of the core, so measured value of reactivity can differ from really reactivity. Three-dimensional dynamic model of the core allow to evaluate such difference. It is supposed to evaluate correction factor for the neutron flux measured at the place where ion chamber situated with the three-dimensional model NOSTRA of the WWER core. On the basis of such algorithm we propose to build module allowing the influence of spatial effects on the results of the reactivity meter to be eliminated at real time regime. This code will be incorporated into the core monitoring system 'BLOK' (SCORPIO type) which is being developed for the Kola and Rostov NPP. The report illustrates utilization of such algorithm (Authors)

  13. Advanced haptic sensor for measuring human skin conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimi, Daisuke; Okuyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Mami

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a tactile sensor using PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) film as a sensory receptor of the sensor to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of human skin. Tactile sense is the most important sense in the sensation receptor of the human body along with eyesight, and we can examine skin condition quickly using these sense. But, its subjectivity and ambiguity make it difficult to quantify skin conditions. Therefore, development of measurement device which can evaluate skin conditions easily and objectively is demanded by dermatologists, cosmetic industries, and so on. In this paper, an advanced haptic sensor system that can measure multiple information of skin condition in various parts of human body is developed. The applications of the sensor system to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of skin are investigated through two experiments.

  14. Characterisation of advanced windows. Determination of thermal properties by measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duer, K.

    2001-04-01

    This report describes work carried out with the aim of facilitating a full energy performance characterisation of advanced windows and glazings by means of measurements. The energy performance of windows and glazings are characterised by two parameters: The thermal transmittance (U-value) and the total solar energy transmittance (g-value) and methods to determine these two parameters by measurements have been investigated. This process has included the improvement of existing equipment and existing measuring methods as well as the development of new measuring equipment and new methods of measuring and data treatment. Measurements of the thermal transmittance of windows and glazings in a guarded hot box have been investigated. The calibration and measuring procedures for determining the U-values of facade windows were analysed and a suggestion for a new calibration and measuring procedure for determining the U-values of roof windows in a guarded hot box was elaborated. The accuracy of the guarded hot box measurements was examined by comparisons to measurements in a hot-plate device and excellent agreement between the results was obtained. Analysis showed that the expected uncertainty in the U-value measurement is about 5% for a specimen with a U-value of 1.75 W/m{sup 2}K. The U-values of three different windows were measured in two separate round robin tests applying two different calibration procedures. The windows U-values where ranging from 1.1 to 2.5 W/m{sup 2}K and all measured results were within the expected uncertainties of the measurements. On the basis of the investigations on hot box measurements a high degree of confidence in the measurement accuracy and the measuring procedure of the guarded hot box at the Department of Buildings and Energy has been obtained. Indoor g-value measurements in a calorimetric test facility (the METSET) mounted in a solar simulator have been investigated and a number of problems regarding these measurements have been

  15. Analysis of the Techniques for Measuring the Reactivity of Far Sub-Critical Multiplying Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandeplas, P.

    1968-01-01

    The methods of measuring control-rod worth on the basis of reactor response to a periodic excitation source are analysed and it is shown that the ratio of the integrals of the prompt and delayed neutron densities over one period is independent of the shape of the signal used. This ratio will thus be equal to the ratio of the neutron densities in the presence of a time-independent source. The pulsed source, sinusoidal source and source removed methods therefore give identical worth values. Experimentation and numerical analysis show that the ratio of prompt to delayed neutron density, which is a linear combination of successive eigenvalues of the system, is largely dependent on the position of the source. It is demonstrated analytically that with a suitably chosen volume of integration, the contribution of the space harmonics is drastically reduced in the integrals of both the prompt neutron density and the delayed neutron density. Numerical studies show that the ratio of these two integrals is practically equal to the reactivity corresponding to the fundamental static mode and is almost independent of the position of the source. Integration of the neutron densities over a volume can be reduced to an integration along a straight line by a suitable choice of source location. Such an integration can be performed by means of an integral detector, thereby only requiring one measurement. Optimization of the position of the source and of the limits of integration to give the best value for the reactivity can be achieved on the basis of purely experimental criteria. (author) [fr

  16. Front-End Electronics for Verification Measurements: Performance Evaluation and Viability of Advanced Tamper Indicating Measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.; Conrad, R.; Morris, S.; Ramuhalli, P.; Sheen, D.; Schanfein, M.; Ianakiev, K.; Browne, M.; Svoboda, J.

    2015-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended, remotely monitored measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. A collaboration between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is working to advance the IAEA's capabilities in these areas. The first objective of the project is to perform a comprehensive evaluation of a prototype front-end electronics package, as specified by the IAEA and procured from a commercial vendor. This evaluation begins with an assessment against the IAEA's original technical specifications and expands to consider the strengths and limitations over a broad range of important parameters that include: sensor types, cable types, and the spectrum of industrial electromagnetic noise that can degrade signals from remotely located detectors. A second objective of the collaboration is to explore advanced tamper-indicating (TI) measures that could help to address some of the long-standing data authentication challenges with IAEA's unattended systems. The collaboration has defined high-priority tampering scenarios to consider (e.g., replacement of sensor, intrusion into cable), and drafted preliminary requirements for advanced TI measures. The collaborators are performing independent TI investigations of different candidate approaches: active time-domain reflectometry (PNNL), passive noise analysis (INL), and pulse-by-pulse analysis and correction (LANL). The initial investigations focus on scenarios where new TI measures are retrofitted into existing IAEA UMS deployments; subsequent work will consider the integration of advanced TI methods into new IAEA UMS deployments where the detector is separated from the front-end electronics. In this paper, project progress

  17. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  18. Pulsed reactivity measurements of large 235U--Al castings in H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellarin, D.J.; Jarriel, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The safe storage and handling of large 235 U-Al castings at the Savannah River Plant are assured by limiting the number of fuel pieces and their spacing such that the k/sub eff/ calculated by KENO-IV with Hansen-Roach cross sections does not exceed some conservative limit with complete, accidental water immersion. For economic reasons, the conservative limit on the calculated k/sub eff/ is generally chosen as high as possible consistent with an accurate knowledge of the margin of error in the k/sub eff/ calculation. The margin of error for arrays of large, hollow cylinders of highly enriched 235 U-Al alloy fuel in H 2 O is presented. The subcritical reactivities were derived from pulsed neutron measurements. The measurements are extended to castings with 17.39 kg 235 U/m, the pulsed experiments are more accurately analyzed by the αv -1 method, and measurements for both 7-assembly hexagonal and 2 x 3 square pitch lattices are compared with KENO-IV calculations

  19. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionigi, F.; Hansen, O.; Nielsen, M. G.; Chorkendorff, I.; Vesborg, P. C. K.; Pedersen, T.

    2013-01-01

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ∼0.4 and ∼4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented

  20. Quantitative measurements of C-reactive protein using silicon nanowire arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ho Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Min-Ho Lee, Kuk-Nyung Lee, Suk-Won Jung, Won-Hyo Kim, Kyu-Sik Shin, Woo-Kyeong SeongKorea Electronics Technology Institute, Gyeonggi, KoreaAbstract: A silicon nanowire-based sensor for biological application showed highly desirable electrical responses to either pH changes or receptor-ligand interactions such as protein disease markers, viruses, and DNA hybridization. Furthermore, because the silicon nanowire can display results in real-time, it may possess superior characteristics for biosensing than those demonstrated in previously studied methods. However, despite its promising potential and advantages, certain process-related limitations of the device, due to its size and material characteristics, need to be addressed. In this article, we suggest possible solutions. We fabricated silicon nanowire using a top-down and low cost micromachining method, and evaluate the sensing of molecules after transfer and surface modifications. Our newly designed method can be used to attach highly ordered nanowires to various substrates, to form a nanowire array device, which needs to follow a series of repetitive steps in conventional fabrication technology based on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS method. For evaluation, we demonstrated that our newly fabricated silicon nanowire arrays could detect pH changes as well as streptavidin-biotin binding events. As well as the initial proof-of-principle studies, C-reactive protein binding was measured: electrical signals were changed in a linear fashion with the concentration (1 fM to 1 nM in PBS containing 1.37 mM of salts. Finally, to address the effects of Debye length, silicon nanowires coupled with antigen proteins underwent electrical signal changes as the salt concentration changed.Keywords: silicon nanowire array, C-reactive protein, vapor-liquid-solid method

  1. Making a measurable difference in advanced Huntington disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Carol Brown; Rao, Ashwini K

    2017-01-01

    Neurologists' role in the care of people with advanced Huntington disease (HD) (total functional capacity speech and language pathology), behavioral and psychiatric professionals for problem-solving strategies, which must be reviewed with direct care staff before implementation; (3) encourage and support qualitative and quantitative interdisciplinary research studies, and randomized controlled studies of nonpharmacologic interventions; and (4) assist in the development of meaningful measures to further document what works to provide a good quality of life for the patient and family and a comfortable thoughtful approach to a good death. Collaborative models of care depend on: (1) clear communication; (2) ongoing education and support programs; with (3) pharmacologic and rehabilitation interventions, always in the context of respect for the person with HD, a preservation of the individuals' dignity, autonomy, and individual preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced multipoles for accelerator magnets theoretical analysis and their measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Schnizer, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This monograph presents research on the transversal beam dynamics of accelerators and evaluates and describes the respective magnetic field homogeneity.  The widely used cylindrical circular multipoles have disadvantages for elliptical apertures or curved trajectories, and the book also introduces new types of advanced multipole magnets, detailing their application, as well as the numerical data and measurements obtained. The research presented here provides more precise descriptions of the field and better estimates of the beam dynamics. Moreover, the effects of field inhomogeneity can be estimated with higher precision than before. These findings are further elaborated to demonstrate their usefulness for real magnets and accelerator set ups, showing their advantages over cylindrical circular multipoles. The research findings are complemented with data obtained from the new superconducting beam guiding magnet models (SIS100) for the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) project.  Lastly, the book...

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE: Emission measurement techniques for advanced powertrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masayuki

    2000-10-01

    Recent developments in high-efficiency low-emission powertrains require the emission measurement technologies to be able to detect regulated and unregulated compounds with very high sensitivity and a fast response. For example, levels of a variety of nitrogen compounds and sulphur compounds should be analysed in real time in order to develop aftertreatment systems to decrease emission of NOx for the lean burning powertrains. Also, real-time information on the emission of particulate matter for the transient operation of diesel engines and direct injection gasoline engines is invaluable. The present paper reviews newly introduced instrumentation for such emission measurement that is demanded for the developments in advanced powertrain systems. They include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fast response flame ionization detection. In addition, demands and applications of the fuel reformer developments for fuel cell electric vehicles are discussed. Besides the detection methodologies, sample handling techniques for the measurement of concentrations emitted from low emission vehicles for which the concentrations of the pollutants are significantly lower than the concentrations present in ambient air, are also described.

  4. Advanced quantitative measurement methodology in physics education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing

    The ultimate goal of physics education research (PER) is to develop a theoretical framework to understand and improve the learning process. In this journey of discovery, assessment serves as our headlamp and alpenstock. It sometimes detects signals in student mental structures, and sometimes presents the difference between expert understanding and novice understanding. Quantitative assessment is an important area in PER. Developing research-based effective assessment instruments and making meaningful inferences based on these instruments have always been important goals of the PER community. Quantitative studies are often conducted to provide bases for test development and result interpretation. Statistics are frequently used in quantitative studies. The selection of statistical methods and interpretation of the results obtained by these methods shall be connected to the education background. In this connecting process, the issues of educational models are often raised. Many widely used statistical methods do not make assumptions on the mental structure of subjects, nor do they provide explanations tailored to the educational audience. There are also other methods that consider the mental structure and are tailored to provide strong connections between statistics and education. These methods often involve model assumption and parameter estimation, and are complicated mathematically. The dissertation provides a practical view of some advanced quantitative assessment methods. The common feature of these methods is that they all make educational/psychological model assumptions beyond the minimum mathematical model. The purpose of the study is to provide a comparison between these advanced methods and the pure mathematical methods. The comparison is based on the performance of the two types of methods under physics education settings. In particular, the comparison uses both physics content assessments and scientific ability assessments. The dissertation includes three

  5. Measurements and analyses on reactivity effects of absorber rods in a light-water moderated UO2 lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kiyonobu; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Hirose, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Takenori

    1985-03-01

    Reactivity effects and reactivity-interference effects of absorber rods were measured with a cylindrical core aiming to obtain bench-marks for verification of the calculational methods. The core consisted of 2.6 w/o enriched UO 2 fuel rods lattice of which water-to-fuel volume ratio was 1.83. In the experiment, the critical water levels were measured changing neutron absorber content of absorber rods and the distance between two absorber rods in the core center. Monte Calro codes KENO-IV and MULTI-KENO were used to calculate reactivity worthes of absorber rods. The calculational results of effective multiplication factors ranged from 0.978 to 0.999 for the 60 cases of critical cores with inserted absorber rods. The calculational results of absorber worthes agreed to the experimental results within twice of the standerd deviation accompanied with the Monte Calro calculation. (author)

  6. The measurement of subcritical reactivity in nuclear reactors by use of a high frequency sine-wave modulated neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guppy, C.B.

    1964-11-01

    In this report the frequency response characteristics for phase and gain of the fundamental reactor mode of the zero power kinetics are given for various subcritical reactivities in a fast reactor and in a thermal reactor. Results, of a study on harmonic effects based on a small zero energy thermal reactor are presented which demonstrate the importance of spatial harmonic effects. A harmonic theory for thermal reactors is developed. A new method of measuring, subcritical reactivity at moderately high frequencies is suggested which circumvents the harmonic problem. It is shown that at high frequencies there is more sensitivity than at low frequencies and that this could lead to an increased range over which subcritical reactivity can be measured. (author)

  7. Design, manufacture and installation of measuring and control equipments for the advanced thermal prototype reactor 'Fugen'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Shigeo; Kawabata, Yoshinori

    1979-01-01

    The advanced thermal prototype reactor ''Fugen'' attained the criticality on March 20, 1978, and 100% output operation on November 13, 1978. On March 20, 1979, it passed the final inspection, and since then, it has continued the smooth operation up to now. The measuring and control equipments are provided for grasping the operational conditions of the plant and operating it safely and efficiently. At the time of designing, manufacturing and installing the measuring and control equipments for Fugen, it was required to clarify the requirements of the plant design, to secure the sufficient functions, and to improve the operational process, maintainability and the reliability and accuracy of the equipments. Many design guidelines and criteria were decided in order to coordinate the conditions among five manufacturers and give the unified state as one plant. The outline of the instrumentations for neutrons, radiation monitoring and process data, the control systems for reactivity, reactor output, pressure and water supply, the safety protection system, and the process computer are described. Finally, the installations and tests of the measuring and control equipments are explained. The aseismatic capability of the equipments was confirmed. (Kako, I.)

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  9. A high precision method for quantitative measurements of reactive oxygen species in frozen biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Berg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP• with known spin concentration. RESULTS: The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1. The spin concentration of samples stored at -80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. CONCLUSION: The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time.

  10. Measurements of negative reactivity in Masurca and Phenix control rods: Prospects for Superphenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.C.; Petiot, R.; Coulon, P.; Giese, H.; West, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental assessment of the negative reactivity of the control rods in an industrial reactor has recently been the subject of numerous studies conducted in the light of forthcoming startup tests on the core of Superphenix. Representative tests have been carried out both on Phenix and on the Masurca critical mockup, and a test programme for Superphenix has been drawn up. Subcritical measurements (source multiplication technique) have been carried out on Phenix without absolute measurement of a standard. However, a precise relative interpretation using two counters demonstrates good agreement following the correction of spatial effects. The chief value of the rod drop measurements conducted on Masurca was that it provided a means of cross-checking the kinetic method to be validated against a standard source multiplication method. The results demonstrate complete agreement between the two methods. The acceptability of the rod drop method is therefore considered to be established. The programme foreseen for startup of Superphenix and the objectives which have been set are briefly indicated. The calculation methods to be used in respect of the startup tests have been established on the basis of experience gained through interpreting the experiments conducted in the course of the Racine (Masurca) programme. An analysis of these experiments included, among other things, a parametric study that has made it possible to devise a standard calculation method for predicting Superphenix rod worth values. The main feature is a scattering calculation with three energy groups and three dimensions. Two-dimensional scattering and transport calculations are therefore necessary in order to define the corrective factors to be applied to this initial result. The final result of this analysis is thus made equivalent to a 25-energy-group transport calculation with an extremely small spatial mesh

  11. Le Châtelier's conjecture: Measurement of colloidal eigenstresses in chemically reactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhaikal, Muhannad; Ioannidou, Katerina; Petersen, Thomas; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2018-03-01

    Volume changes in chemically reactive materials, such as hydrating cement, play a critical role in many engineering applications that require precise estimates of stress and pressure developments. But a means to determine bulk volume changes in the absence of other deformation mechanisms related to thermal, pressure and load variations, is still missing. Herein, we present such a measuring devise, and a hybrid experimental-theoretical technique that permits the determination of colloidal eigenstresses. Applied to cementitious materials, it is found that bulk volume changes in saturated cement pastes at constant pressure and temperature conditions result from a competition of repulsive and attractive phenomena that originate from the relative distance of the solid particles - much as Henry Louis Le Châtelier, the father of modern cement science, had conjectured in the late 19th century. Precipitation of hydration products in confined spaces entails a repulsion, whereas the concurrent reduction in interparticle distance entails activation of attractive forces in charged colloidal particles. This cross-over from repulsion to attraction can be viewed as a phase transition between a liquid state (below the solid percolation) and the limit packing of hard spheres, separated by an energy barrier that defines the temperature-dependent eigenstress magnitude.

  12. Measuring Empathic Tendencies: Reliability And Validity of the Dutch Version of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim De Corte

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI; Davis, 1980 is a commonly used self-report instrument designed to assess empathic tendencies. The IRI consists of four separate subscales: Perspective Taking (PT, Fantasy (FS, Empathic Concern (EC, and Personal Distress (PD. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Dutch version of the IRI. The IRI was administered to a Dutch sample of 651 normal functioning adults. The factor structure of the IRI was examined by using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. The results of the CFA revealed that there is room for improvement and modification of the original theoretical model. The validity of the IRI was tested using internal criteria (i. e., scale intercorrelations and external criteria (i. e., correlations with subscales of the EQ-i (Bar-On, 1997, the NEO-FFI (Hoekstra, Ormel, & De Fruyt, 1996, Mach-IV (Van Kenhove, Vermeir, & Verniers, 2001, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965, and the WAIS-III (Wechsler, 2000. Overall, the internal consistency, construct validity, and factor structure of scores from the Dutch version of the IRI suggest that it is a useful instrument to measure people's self-reported empathic tendencies.

  13. Titanium dioxide-based DGT technique for in situ measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in fresh and marine waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Bennett, William W.

    2010-01-01

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique for measuring dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in fresh and marine waters is reported. The new method, which uses a commercially available titanium dioxide based adsorbent (Metsorb), was evaluated and compared to the well-established fer...

  14. Oscillator measurements of the reactivity changes resulting from the irradiation of low enrichment particulate fuel in the Dragon reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbidge, B.L.H.; Franklin, B.M.; Small, V.G.

    1983-01-01

    This Report describes a series of experiments carried out as a joint UKAEA/CEA/DRAGON project to determine the reactivity changes of low-enrichment particulate fuel samples following their irradiation in the DRAGON reactor to various levels up to approximately 60,000 MWD/Te. The samples are described, together with the method of measurement of reactivity in the Winfrith reactor HECTOR, which was an extension of the well-known Oscillator Technique to yield simultaneously overall reactivity changes and changes in macroscopic absorption cross-sections. Measurements were carried out at room temperature in two reactor spectra; a thermal spectrum and one typical of an HTR type reactor. The resultant reactivity changes are presented together with the relevant sample burn-ups as determined by #betta#-scanning methods and, in some cases, by rigorous chemical analysis. The results of supporting measurements are also reported, carried out to characterise the neutron spectra in which the oscillator measurements were made and to determine the neutron flux distributions in the HECTOR reactor. (author)

  15. Measurement based analysis of active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind farms and CHPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind turbines and combined heat and power plants. The investigation is based on 15 min average power measurements and load flow calculations in the power system simulation tool PowerFactory...

  16. Advancing nursing leadership: a model for program implementation and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoike, Osei; Stratton, Karen M; Brooks, Beth A; Ohlson, Susan; Storfjell, Judy Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature documenting the need for nurse management education and career development, only recently have professional standards been targeted for this group. Competency standards for nurse leaders repeatedly identify systems-level concepts including finance and budget, communication skills, strategic management, human resources management, change management, and computer technology skills. However, educational initiatives to meet these standards are still at the early stages and most nurse leaders continue to acquire knowledge and experience through "on-the-job" training. This article will illustrate the need for partnerships and collaboration between academia and hospitals to advance nursing leadership to the next century. In addition, a tool to measure the impact of a graduate certificate program in nursing administration on nurse leader competencies is presented. Overall, the certificate program has been successful in multiple ways; it has "graduated" almost 80 nurse leaders, improved participant competence in their role at the systems level, as well as providing an impetus for completion of a graduate degree post program.

  17. Determination of reactivity coefficients from measurable effects of small external perturbations using a bank of Kalman filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, A.

    1990-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a method for the determination of reactivity coefficients in a nuclear power reactor in operation. A method based on Kalman filtering technique and the Magill-Bogler test is proposed for the determination of reactivity coefficients from measured effects of small external perturbation introduced into a steady-state power reactor. Numerical experiments are presented to justify the procedure. A realistic problem is considered: the calculation of the control rod worth. Finally a possible way is given to check the goodness of the estimation. (author) 16 refs.; 4 figs

  18. Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement Techniques for Near Surface Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadel, Daniel R.

    The development of aerodynamic boundary layers on wind turbine blades is an important consideration in their performance. It can be quite challenging to replicate full scale conditions in laboratory experiments, and advanced diagnostics become valuable in providing data not available from traditional means. A new variant of Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) known as cross-correlation DGV is developed to measure boundary layer profiles on a wind turbine blade airfoil in the large scale Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel. The instrument provides mean velocity vectors with reduced sensitivity to external conditions, a velocity measurement range from 0 ms-1 to over 3000 ms-1, and an absolute uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulations with synthetic signals reveal that the processing routine approaches the Cramer-Rao lower bound in optimized conditions. A custom probe-beam technique is implanted to eliminate laser flare for measuring boundary layer profiles on a DU96-W-180 wind turbine airfoil model. Agreement is seen with laser Doppler velocimetry data within the uncertainty estimated for the DGV profile. Lessons learned from the near-wall flow diagnostics development were applied to a novel benchmark model problem incorporating the relevant physical mechanisms of the high amplitude periodic turbulent flow experienced by turbine blades in the field. The model problem is developed for experimentally motivated computational model development. A circular cylinder generates a periodic turbulent wake, in which a NACA 63215b airfoil with a chord Reynolds number Rec = 170,000 is embedded for a reduced frequency k = pi f c/V = 1.53. Measurements are performed with particle image velocimetry on the airfoil suction side and in highly magnified planes within the boundary layer. Outside of the viscous region, the Reynolds stress profile is consistent with the prediction of Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT), confirming that the redistribution of normal stresses is an inviscid effect. The

  19. Development of a Theory-Based Intervention to Increase Clinical Measurement of Reactive Balance in Adults at Risk of Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Brooks, Dina; Gardner, Paula; Janaudis-Ferreira, Tania; McGlynn, Mandy; OʼHoski, Sachi; McEwen, Sara; Salbach, Nancy M; Shaffer, Jennifer; Shing, Paula; Straus, Sharon E; Jaglal, Susan B

    2016-04-01

    Effective balance reactions are essential for avoiding falls, but are not regularly measured by physical therapists. Physical therapists report wanting to improve reactive balance assessment, and theory-based approaches are recommended as the foundation for the development of interventions. This article describes how a behavior change theory for health care providers, the theoretical domains framework (TDF), was used to develop an intervention to increase reactive balance measurement among physical therapists who work in rehabilitation settings and treat adults who are at risk of falls. We employed published recommendations for using the TDF-guided intervention development. We identified what health care provider behavior is in need of change, relevant barriers and facilitators, strategies to address them, and how we would measure behavior change. In this case, identifying strategies required selecting both a reactive balance measure and behavior change techniques. Previous research had determined that physical therapists need to increase reactive balance measurement, and identified barriers and facilitators that corresponded to 8 TDF domains. A published review informed the selection of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Reactive Postural Responses Section) as addressing the barriers and facilitators, and existing research informed the selection of 9 established behavior change techniques corresponding to each identified TDF domain. The TDF framework were incorporated into a 12-month intervention with interactive group sessions, local champions, and health record modifications. Intervention effect can be evaluated using health record abstraction, questionnaires, and qualitative semistructured interviews. Although future research will evaluate the intervention in a controlled study, the process of theory-based intervention development can be applied to other rehabilitation research contexts, maximizing the impact of this work.Video Abstract is available for more

  20. Simultaneous measurements of reactive scalar and velocity in a planar liquid jet with a second-order chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Kouji; Terashima, Osamu [Nagoya University, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya (Japan); Kubo, Takashi [Meijo University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    This paper presents a new experimental approach for simultaneous measurements of velocity and concentration in a turbulent liquid flow with a chemical reaction. For the simultaneous measurements, we developed a combined probe consisting of an I-type hot-film probe and an optical fiber probe based on the light absorption spectrometric method. In a turbulent planar liquid jet with a second-order chemical reaction (A+B{yields}R), streamwise velocity and concentrations of all reactive species are measured by the combined probe. The turbulent mass fluxes of the reactive species are estimated from the simultaneous measurements. The results show that the influence of the chemical reaction on the turbulent mass flux of the reactant species near the jet exit is different from its influence in other regions, and the turbulent mass flux of the product species has a negative value near the jet exit and a positive value in other regions. (orig.)

  1. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design

  2. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design.

  3. Development of advanced materials and devices for nuclear radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadkari, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of technologically important materials are grown in the Crystal Technology Section of the Technical Physics Division, BARC. These crystals find applications as scintillators and dosimeters in nuclear radiation detection/measurements. Scintillator crystals of some advanced materials like cerium doped Gd 3 Ga 3 Al 2 O 12 , Lu 2 SiO 5 , YAIO 3 etc and some conventional materials such as Bi 4 Ge 3 O 12 , CsI:Tl, NaI:Tl, etc have been grown from melts using the Czochralski and Bridgman techniques. Portable gamma-ray spectrometers that work from a USB port of a laptop have been developed using the grown scintillator crystals. In recent years there has been a flurry of research activities on materials containing Li 6 , B 10 , etc that have large capture cross-sections for neutrons to develop solid state detectors for neutrons. For this purpose single crystals of cerium doped Li 6 Y(BO 3 ) 3 and silver doped Li 2 B 4 O 7 have been developed. Optical, thermo-luminescence, photo-luminescence and scintillation properties of these crystals have been investigated with a view to develop detectors and dosimeters. The Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Ag is a tissue equivalent material (Z eff = 7.3 close to 7.4 of tissue) useful in the personal and medical dosimetry applications. As the emission of Ag + lies in the UV region (267 nm), a customized TL measurement set-up has been developed using a solar blind PMT that enabled the measurement of very low doses below 5 μGy and linearity up to 100 Gy. Films of CsI:TI in the 10 nm to 3 μm thickness range were deposited on silicon substrates using the physical vapor deposition technique under vacuum conditions. The deposited films investigated using SEM and AFM revealed a columnar growth behavior with a preferential orientation along <200>. The growth of single crystals from melts, recent efforts in the development of detectors and results of experiments conducted to detect thermal neutrons are described. (author)

  4. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  5. A modernized and versatile startup reactivity measuring system installed at NPP Paks and its application for subcritical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czibok, T.; Dezso, Z.; Horvath, Cs.; Lipcsei, S.; Vegh, J.; Pos, I.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004 the Hungarian Paks NPP completed a project for upgrading the reactivity measuring system applied during reactor startup experiments. Almost all components of the previous system were replaced, only ex-core ionisation chambers remained unaltered. New hardware and software components were introduced for neutron flux signal handling, for data acquisition, as well as for measurement evaluation and data presentation. High-precision picoamper meters were installed at each reactor unit, current signals are handled by a portable signal processing unit. The system applies an accurate on-line reactivity calculation algorithm based on the point-kinetic model with six delayed neutron groups. Detailed off-line evaluation and analysis of startup measurements can be performed on the portable unit, as well. The paper describes the architecture, data acquisition modules, services and man-machine interface of the new system. Functions and results are illustrated with measured data recorded during a startup of Unit 3. In 2003 and 2004 the RMR was installed and tested at all Paks NPP units successfully and now it is in regular use during unit startups. The second part of the paper illustrates an extension of the new system to perform reactivity measurements using the well-known Rossi-α and Feynman-α statistical methods. The modified system was needed to estimate the reactivity of a subcritical system formed by damaged fuel assemblies stored at the fuel service pit of Paks Unit 2. Theoretical background of the applied algorithms is outlined, then results of validation tests and on site measurements are treated. The measurements have shown that the subcriticality of the damaged fuel was sufficiently deep if the high boron concentration in the fuel service pit was maintained

  6. In situ resistance measurements of bronze process Nb-Sn-Cu-Ta multifilamentary composite conductors during reactive diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, K S; Hopkins, S C; Glowacki, B A; Majoros, M; Astill, D

    2004-01-01

    The conditions under which the Nb 3 Sn intermetallic layer is formed by solid-state reactive diffusion processes in bronze process multifilamentary conductors greatly influence the performance of the conductors. By convention, isothermal heat treatment is used and often causes non-uniformity of A15 layers formed across the wire. Therefore, characterization and optimization of the conductor during the reactive diffusion processes is crucial in order to improve the overall conductor's performance. In this paper, a different characterization approach and perhaps an optimization technique is presented, namely in situ resistance measurement by an alternating current (AC) method. By treating the components of such multifilamentary wires as a set of parallel resistors, the resistances of the components may be combined using the usual rules for resistors in parallel. The results show that the resistivity of the entire wire changes significantly during the reactive diffusion processes. The development of the Nb 3 Sn layer in bronze process Nb-Sn-Cu-Ta multifilamentary wires at different stages of the reactive diffusion processes has been monitored using measured resistivity changes, and correlated with results from DTA, ACS, SEM and EDS

  7. Proactive, reactive, and romantic relational aggression in adulthood: measurement, predictive validity, gender differences, and association with Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Ostrov, Jamie M; Nelson, David A; Crick, Nicki R; Coccaro, Emil F

    2010-04-01

    The psychometric properties of a recently introduced adult self-report of relational aggression are presented. Specifically, the predictive utility of proactive and reactive peer-directed relational aggression, as well as romantic relational aggression, are explored in a large (N=1387) study of adults. The measure had adequate reliability and validity and the subscales demonstrated unique predictive abilities for a number of dependent variables. In particular, reactive but not proactive relational aggression was uniquely associated with history of abuse, hostile attribution biases, and feelings of distress regarding relational provocation situations. Reactive relational aggression was also more strongly related to anger and hostility than proactive aggression. In addition, relational aggression in the context of romantic relationships was uniquely related to anger, hostility, impulsivity, history of abuse, hostile attribution biases, and emotional sensitivity to relational provocations, even when controlling for peer-directed relational aggression. Gender differences in overall levels of relational aggression were not observed; however, males were most likely to engage in peer-directed proactive and reactive relational aggression whereas females were most likely to engage in romantic relational aggression. In a second study (N=150), relational aggression was higher in a sample of adults with Intermittent Explosive Disorder than in a sample of healthy controls or psychiatric controls. The findings highlight the importance of assessing subtypes of relational aggression in adult samples. Ways in which this measure may extend research in psychology and psychiatry are discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) technique to subcritical reactivity worth measurements in thermal and fast reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Mellier, F.

    2009-01-01

    The Amplified Source Multiplication (ASM) method and its improved Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method have been widely used in the CEA's EOLE and MASURCA critical facilities over the past decades for the determination of reactivity worths by using fission chambers in subcritical configurations. They have been successfully applied to absorber (single or clusters) worth measurement in both thermal and fast spectra, or for (sodium or water) void reactivity worths. The ASM methodology, which is the basic technique to estimate a reactivity worth, uses relatively simple relationships between count rates of efficient miniature fission chambers located in slightly subcritical reference and perturbed configurations. If this method works quite well for small reactivity variation (a few effective delayed neutron fraction), its raw results needs to be corrected to take into account the flux perturbation in the fission chamber. This is performed by applying to the measurement a correction factor called MSM. Its characteristics is to take into account the local space and energy variation of the spectrum in the fission chamber, through standard perturbation theory applied to neutron transport calculation in the perturbed configuration. The proposed paper describes in details both methodologies, with their associated uncertainties. Applications on absorber cluster worth in the MISTRAL-4 full MOX mock-up core and the last core loaded in MASURCA show the importance of the MSM correction on raw data. (authors)

  9. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 to 9 μ and incidence angles of 12 to 30 0 off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators

  10. Inverse correlation between reactive oxygen species in unwashed semen and sperm motion parameters as measured by a computer-assisted semen analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Teppei; Yumura, Yasushi; Yasuda, Kengo; Sanjo, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between sperm motion parameters obtained by a computer-assisted semen analyzer and levels of reactive oxygen species in unwashed semen. In total, 847 patients, except for azoospermic patients were investigated. At the time of each patient's first consultation, semen parameters were measured using SMAS™ or CellSoft 3000™, and production of reactive oxygen species was measured using a computer-driven LKB Wallac Luminometer 1251 Analyzer. The patients were divided into two groups: reactive oxygen species - positive and negative. The semen parameters within each group were measured using one of the two computer-assisted semen analyzer systems and then compared. Correlations between reactive oxygen species levels and sperm motion parameters in semen from the reactive oxygen species - positive group were also investigated. Reactive oxygen species were detected in semen samples of 282 cases (33.3%). Sperm concentration (P semen damage sperm concentration, motility, and other sperm motion parameters.

  11. Advanced oxidation of a reactive dyebath effluent: comparison of O3, H2O2/UV-C and TiO2/UV-A processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaton, Idil Arslan; Balcioglu, Isil Akmehmet; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2002-03-01

    In the present study the treatment efficiency of different AOPs (O3/OH- H2O2/UV-C and TiO2/UV-A) were compared for the oxidation of simulated reactive dyebath effluent containing a mixture of monochlorotriazine type reactive dyes and various dye auxiliary chemicals at typical concentrations encountered in exhausted reactive dyebath liquors. A525 (color), UV280 (aromaticity) and TOC removal rates were assessed to screen the most appropriate oxidative process in terms of reactive dyebath effluent treatment. Special emphasis was laid on the effect of reaction pH and applied oxidant (O3, H2O2) dose on the observed reaction kinetics. It was established that the investigated AOPs were negatively affected by the Na2CO3 content (= 867 mg/L) which is always present at high concentrations in dychouse effluents since it is applied as a pH buffer and dye fixation agent during the reactive dyeing process. The ozonation reaction exhibited almost instantaneous decolorization kinetics and a reasonable TOC reduction rate. It appeared to be stable under the investigated advanced oxidation conditions and outranked the other studied AOPs based on the above mentioned criteria. Besides, the electrical energy requirements based on the EE/O parameter (the electrical energy required per order of pollutant removal in 1 m3 wastewater) was calculated for the homogenous AOPs in terms of decolorization kinetics. In view of the electrical energy efficiency, ozonation and H2O2/UV-C oxidation at the selected treatment conditions appear to be promising candidates for full-scale dyehouse effluent decolorization.

  12. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability : Reactivity and Number of Days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to

  13. Measurement of the anti reactivity of a control rod of G1, by a slow oscillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, D.; Leroy, J.; Vidal, R.

    1957-01-01

    It is possible to determine the effect of the end of a control rod on the reactivity of the pile by measuring the modulation induced in the neutron flux by the slow oscillation of this control rod. The total effect of the control rod can be deduced, given certain hypothesis and corrections, from the experimental curve giving the effect of the end of the rod as a function of its position. This method has the advantage of permitting the measurement of very large anti reactivities, such as p= 10 -2 for example, which would not be possible by other kinetic methods. Thus the control rod B 3 , in the low position, brings about a reduction in reactivity equal to 1130 p.c.m. ± 30 in the pile charged with 518 fuel elements, on one side only of the slit. We have compared the oscillation method with the classical divergence method, in the fields where the two measurements were possible: a satisfactory agreement was found. We have established that the phase displacement between the oscillation of the rod and the modulation of the flux varied greatly with the position of the rod. This variation cannot be explained on the basis of the dynamic model independent of space; we have attributed it to the influence of spatial harmonics of the flux distribution, and have determined a correction which frees the measurements of this influence. (author) [fr

  14. Validation of commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. OBJECTIVE......: The purpose of the study was to validate a new automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP method (Gentian cCRP). METHODS: Studies of imprecision, accuracy, prozone effect, interference, limit of quantification, and stability under different storage conditions were performed. The new method was compared...... with a human CRP assay previously validated for canine CRP determination. Samples from 40 healthy dogs were analyzed to establish a reference interval. RESULTS: Total imprecision was

  15. Changes in reactivity and in the margins to thermal limits by the inclusion of control rods of advanced type in the Laguna Verde Power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Ramirez, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The obtained results are presented when simulating with CM-PRESTO code the cycle 10 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Central, using two advanced types of control bars, besides the originally loaded ones. The two advanced types, to those that are denominated 1AV and 2AV in this work, are of different design, however both have in some place of the bar, a section with hafnium like neutron absorber material. They thought about three different scenarios, in the first one, used as reference, is simulated the cycle 10 using the original control bars, while in the other two cases the advanced types are used. The values of the reactivity were compared and of some margins to the thermal limits obtained when using the bars of advanced type, with those obtained in the case in that alone they are considered those original bars. It was found that in condition of power both advanced types present bigger absorber power of neutrons that the original bars, being quantified in average this bigger power in 0.22 pcm/notch for the type 1AV and in 0.51 pcm/notch for the type 2AV. The affectation of the margins to the observed thermal limits is minimum. (Author)

  16. Defining Neighborhood Boundaries for Social Measurement: Advancing Social Work Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kirk A.; Hipp, J. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Much of the current neighborhood-based research uses variables aggregated on administrative boundaries such as zip codes, census tracts, and block groups. However, other methods using current technological advances in geographic sciences may broaden our ability to explore the spatial concentration of neighborhood factors affecting individuals and…

  17. Experimental measurement and modelling of reactive species generation in TiO2 nanoparticle photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turolla, Andrea; Piazzoli, Andrea; Budarz, Jeffrey Farner; Wiesner, Mark R; Antonelli, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    The generation of reactive species in titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticle photocatalysis was assessed in a laboratory scale setup, in which P25 Aeroxide TiO 2 suspensions were photoactivated by means of UV-A radiation. Photogenerated holes and hydroxyl radicals were monitored over time by observing their selective reaction with probe compounds, iodide and terephthalic acid, respectively. TiO 2 aggregate size and structure were characterized over the reaction time. Reactive species quenching was then described by a model, accounting for radiative phenomena, TiO 2 nanoparticle aggregation and kinetic reactions. The interaction between iodide and photogenerated holes was influenced by iodide adsorption on TiO 2 surface, described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, whose parameters were studied as a function of TiO 2 concentration and irradiation time. Iodide oxidation was effectively simulated by modelling the reaction volume as a completely stirred two-dimensional domain, in which irradiation phenomena were described by a two-flux model and the steady state for reactive species was assumed. The kinetic parameters for iodide adsorption and oxidation were estimated and successfully validated in a different experimental setup. The same model was adapted to describe the oxidation of terephthalic acid by hydroxyl radicals. The kinetic parameters for terephthalic acid oxidation were estimated and validated, while the issues in investigating the interaction mechanisms among the involved species have been discussed. The sensitivity of operating parameters on model response was assessed and the most relevant parameters were highlighted.

  18. Intercomparison of OH and OH reactivity measurements in a high isoprene and low NO environment during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Dianne; Jeong, Daun; Seco, Roger; Wrangham, Ian; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Brune, William H.; Koss, Abigail; Gilman, Jessica; de Gouw, Joost; Misztal, Pawel; Goldstein, Allen; Baumann, Karsten; Wennberg, Paul O.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Guenther, Alex; Kim, Saewung

    2018-02-01

    We intercompare OH and OH reactivity datasets from two different techniques, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in a high isoprene and low NO environment in a southeastern US forest during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). An LIF instrument measured OH and OH reactivity at the top of a tower, a CIMS instrument measured OH at the top of the tower, and a CIMS based comparative reactivity method (CRM-CIMS) instrument deployed at the base of the tower measured OH reactivity. Averaged diel variations of OH and OH reactivity from these datasets agree within analytical uncertainty and correlations of LIF versus CIMS for OH and OH reactivity have slopes of 0.65 and 0.97, respectively. However, there are systematic differences between the measurement datasets. The CRM-CIMS measurements of OH reactivity were ∼16% lower than those by the LIF technique in the late afternoon. We speculate that it is caused by losses in the sampling line down to the CRM-CIMS instrument. On the other hand, we could not come up with a reasonable explanation for the difference in the LIF and CIMS OH datasets for early morning and late afternoon when OH is below 1 × 106 molecules cm-3. Nonetheless, results of this intercomparison exercise strengthen previous publications from the field site on OH concentrations and atmospheric reactivity.

  19. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material

  20. Analysis of reactivity worths of highly-burnt PWR fuel samples measured in LWR-PROTEUS Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Peter; Murphy, Michael F.; Jatuff, Fabian; Seiler, Rudolf [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    The reactivity loss of PWR fuel with burnup has been determined experimentally by inserting fresh and highly-burnt fuel samples in a PWR test lattice in the framework of the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme. Seven UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR plant with burnups ranging from approx40 to approx120 MWd/kg and four MOX samples with burnups up to approx70 MWd/kg were oscillated in a test region constituted of actual PWR UO{sub 2} fuel rods in the centre of the PROTEUS zero-power experimental facility. The measurements were analyzed using the CASMO-4E fuel assembly code and a cross section library based on the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. The results show close proximity between calculated and measured reactivity effects and no trend for a deterioration of the quality of the prediction at high burnup. The analysis thus demonstrates the high accuracy of the calculation of the reactivity of highly-burnt fuel. (authors)

  1. Application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) Technique to Subcritical Reactivity Worth Measurements in Thermal and Fast Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, Ph.; Mellier, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Amplified Source Multiplication (ASM) method and its improved Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method have been widely used in the CEA's EOLE and MASURCA critical facilities over the past decades for the determination of reactivity worths by using fission chambers in subcritical configurations. The ASM methodology uses relatively simple relationships between count rates of efficient miniature fission chambers located in slightly subcritical reference and perturbed configurations. While this method works quite well for small reactivity variations, the raw results need to be corrected to take into account the flux perturbation at the fission chamber location. This is performed by applying to the measurement a correction factor called MSM. This paper describes in detail both methodologies, with their associated uncertainties. Applications on absorber cluster worth in the MISTRAL-4 full MOX mock-up core and the last core loaded in MASURCA show the importance of the MSM correction on raw ASM data. (authors)

  2. Reactivity and neutron flux measurements in IPEN/MB-01 reactor with B4C burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fer, Nelson Custodio; Moreira, Joao Manoel Losada

    2000-01-01

    Burnable poison rods, made of B 4 C- Al 2 O 3 pellets with 5.01 mg/cm 3 10 B concentration, have been manufactured for a set of experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 zero-power reactor. Several core parameters which are affected by the burnable poisons rods have been measured. The principal results, for the situation in which the burnable poison rods are located near the absorber rods of a control rod, are they cause a 29% rod worth shadowing, a reduction of 39% in the local void coefficient of reactivity, a reduction of 4.8% in the isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity, and a reduction of 9% in the thermal neutron flux in the region where the burnable poison rods are located. These experimental results will be used for the validation of burnable poison calculation methods in the CTMSP. (author)

  3. Advanced Tethersonde for High-Speed Flux Measurements, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flux measurements of trace gases and other quantities, such as latent heat, are of great importance in scientific field research. One typical flux measurement setup...

  4. Magnetic measurements of the injector synchrotron magnets for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Carnegie, D.W.; Doose, C.L.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.; Turner, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic measurement data of the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets for the Advanced Photon Source injector synchrotron are summarized. Magnet design and magnetic measurements of the field strength, field shape, and multipole coefficients are described

  5. Magnetic measurements of the injector synchrotron magnets for the advanced photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Carnegie, D. W.; Doose, C. L.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.; Turner, L. R.

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic measurement data of the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets for the Advanced Photon Source injector synchrotron are summarized. Magnet design and magnetic measurements of the field strength, field shape, and multipole coefficients are described.

  6. Handbook of microwave component measurements with advanced VNA techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsmore, Joel P

    2012-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art coverage for making measurements on RF and Microwave Components, both active and passive. A perfect reference for R&D and Test Engineers, with topics ranging from the best practices for basic measurements, to an in-depth analysis of errors, correction methods, and uncertainty analysis, this book provides everything you need to understand microwave measurements. With primary focus on active and passive measurements using a Vector Network Analyzer, these techniques and analysis are equally applicable to measurements made with Spectrum Analyzers or Noise Figure

  7. Advanced optical measurements for characterizing photophysical properties of single nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Ronen; Davis, Ryan W.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Wheeler, David Roger

    2009-09-01

    Formation of complex nanomaterials would ideally involve single-pot reaction conditions with one reactive site per nanoparticle, resulting in a high yield of incrementally modified or oriented structures. Many studies in nanoparticle functionalization have sought to generate highly uniform nanoparticles with tailorable surface chemistry necessary to produce such conjugates, with limited success. In order to overcome these limitations, we have modified commercially available nanoparticles with multiple potential reaction sites for conjugation with single ssDNAs, proteins, and small unilamellar vesicles. These approaches combined heterobifunctional and biochemical template chemistries with single molecule optical methods for improved control of nanomaterial functionalization. Several interesting analytical results have been achieved by leveraging techniques unique to SNL, and provide multiple paths for future improvements for multiplex nanoparticle synthesis and characterization. Hyperspectral imaging has proven especially useful for assaying substrate immobilized fluorescent particles. In dynamic environments, temporal correlation spectroscopies have been employed for tracking changes in diffusion/hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions, and identifying mobile versus immobile sample fractions at unbounded dilution. Finally, Raman fingerprinting of biological conjugates has been enabled by resonant signal enhancement provided by intimate interactions with nanoparticles and composite nanoshells.

  8. Advances in SSTR techniques for dosimetry and radiation damage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    Solid state track recorders (SSTR) have been applied in the diverse nuclear reactor research. Two recent advances are described which possess outstanding relevance for reactor research, namely the evolvement of SSTR radiation damage monitors and the development of CR-39, a new plastic SSTR of extremely high sensitivity. Results from high fluence irradiations of natural quartz crystal SSTR are used to illustrate the concept of the SSTR radiation damage monitor. Response characteristics of CR-39 are presented with emphasis on the remarkable proton sensitivity of this new SSTR

  9. Integral test of JENDL-3.2 data by re-analysis of sample reactivity measurements at SEG and STEK facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Sample reactivity measurements, which have been performed at the fast-thermal coupled facilities RRR/SEG and STEK, have been re-analyzed using the JNC route for reactor calculation JENDL-3.2 // SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. C/E-values of central reactivity worths (CRW) of FP nuclides, structural materials, and standards are given. (author)

  10. An improvement of source-jerk method for measuring high anti reactivities of reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosevski, T; Spiric, V [Institut za nuklearne nauke ' Boris Kidric' , Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-07-01

    In this paper we modified the well known source jerk method (1) thus obtaining a method for experimental determination of negative reactivities of reactor systems by which, based on the basic idea of the source jerk method, a new experimental procedure and an exact analysis were developed. The analysis and numerical preparation allows direct application of the method to heavy water and graphite systems. Compared with the source jerk method the experimental procedure and the interpretation of results is faster, simpler and more exact (author)

  11. Performance Measurement of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance testing data of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The latest version of the ASC (ASC-E3, to represent the third cycle of engineering model test hardware) is of a design identical to the forthcoming flight convertors. For this generation of hardware, a joint Sunpower and GRC effort was initiated to improve and standardize the test support hardware. After this effort was completed, the first pair of ASC-E3 units was produced by Sunpower and then delivered to GRC in December 2012. GRC has begun operation of these units. This process included performance verification, which examined the data from various tests to validate the convertor performance to the product specification. Other tests included detailed performance mapping that encompassed the wide range of operating conditions that will exist during a mission. These convertors were then transferred to Lockheed Martin for controller checkout testing. The results of this latest convertor performance verification activity are summarized here.

  12. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences I: Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2016-01-01

    intensity measurement program. The approach can measure and store data for a full imaging sequence in 3.8 to 8.2 s per spatial position. Based on Ispta, MI, and probe surface temperature, the method gives the ability to determine whether a sequence is within US FDA limits, or alternatively indicate how......A method for rapid measurement of intensities (Ispta), mechanical index (MI), and probe surface temperature for any ultrasound scanning sequence is presented. It uses the scanner’s sampling capability to give an accurate measurement of the whole imaging sequence for all emissions to yield the true...... measurement system (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Four different sequences have been measured: a fixed focus emission, a duplex sequence containing B-mode and flow emissions, a vector flow sequence with B-mode and flow emissions in 17 directions, and finally a synthetic aperture (SA) duplex flow...

  13. Development of Optics and Detectors for Advanced CMB Polarization Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been essential to the development of modern cosmology. Future observations will provide cosmological...

  14. Nitrosylated hemoglobin levels in human venous erythrocytes correlate with vascular endothelial function measured by digital reactive hyperemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina I Lobysheva

    Full Text Available Impaired nitric oxide (NO-dependent endothelial function is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that erythrocyte levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin (HbNO-heme may reflect vascular endothelial function in vivo. We developed a modified subtraction method using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR spectroscopy to identify the 5-coordinate α-HbNO (HbNO concentration in human erythrocytes and examined its correlation with endothelial function assessed by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT. Changes in digital pulse amplitude were measured by PAT during reactive hyperemia following brachial arterial occlusion in a group of healthy volunteers (50 subjects. Erythrocyte HbNO levels were measured at baseline and at the peak of hyperemia. We digitally subtracted an individual model EPR signal of erythrocyte free radicals from the whole EPR spectrum to unmask and quantitate the HbNO EPR signals.Mean erythrocyte HbNO concentration at baseline was 219+/-12 nmol/L (n = 50. HbNO levels and reactive hyperemia (RH indexes were higher in female (free of contraceptive pills than male subjects. We observed a dynamic increase of HbNO levels in erythrocytes isolated at 1-2 min of post-occlusion hyperemia (120+/-8% of basal levels; post-occlusion HbNO levels were correlated with basal levels. Both basal and post-occlusion HbNO levels were significantly correlated with reactive hyperemia (RH indexes (r = 0.58; P<0.0001 for basal HbNO.The study demonstrates quantitative measurements of 5-coordinate α-HbNO in human venous erythrocytes, its dynamic physiologic regulation and correlation with endothelial function measured by tonometry during hyperemia. This opens the way to further understanding of in vivo determinants of NO bioavailability in human circulation.

  15. Measuring up advances in how we assess reading ability

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatini, John; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2012-01-01

    Sabatini, Albro and O'Reilly believe that in light of federal legislation towards common core standards and assessments, as well as significant national investments in reading and literacy education, it is a critical and opportune time to bring together the research and measurement community to address fundamental issues of measuring reading comprehension, in theory and in practice.

  16. Experimental subcritical reactivity determinations employing APSD measurements with pulse mode detectors in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Lee, Seung Min; Diniz, Ricardo; Jerez, Rogerio

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to determine experimentally the subcritical reactivity levels of several configurations of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor in an approach based on the subcritical kinetic model developed by Gandini and Salvatores. The procedure employs the measurements of the APSD (Auto Power Spectral Density) using pulse mode detectors. The proposed approach is based only on measured quantities such as counting rates and the parameters arising from the least square approach of the APSD. Other difficult quantity such as detector efficiencies is not needed in the method. Several measurements of APSD were performed in varying degrees of sub-criticality (up to around -7000 pcm). The APSD data were least-square fitted to get the prompt decay mode (α). Beside the startup source, an external neutron sources of Am-Be was installed near the core in order to improve neutron count statistics. The final experimental results are of very good quality. The experiment shows clearly that the classical one point kinetic theory cannot describe the measured reactivity. MCNP K eff results were compared to the corresponding experimental results. The agreement was fairly good. (author)

  17. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    This technical report describes the experimental part of a program on thermal radiation properties of reactor materials. A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 μ to 9 μ and incidence angles of 12 0 to 30 0 off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators

  18. Is automated kinetic measurement superior to end-point for advanced oxidation protein product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Osman; Inal, Berrin Bercik; Emre, Turker; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Altunoglu, Esma; Oguz, Gokce; Topkaya, Cigdem; Guvenen, Guvenc

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) was first described as an oxidative protein marker in chronic uremic patients and measured with a semi-automatic end-point method. Subsequently, the kinetic method was introduced for AOPP assay. We aimed to compare these two methods by adapting them to a chemistry analyzer and to investigate the correlation between AOPP and fibrinogen, the key molecule responsible for human plasma AOPP reactivity, microalbumin, and HbA1c in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM II). The effects of EDTA and citrate-anticogulated tubes on these two methods were incorporated into the study. This study included 93 DM II patients (36 women, 57 men) with HbA1c levels > or = 7%, who were admitted to the diabetes and nephrology clinics. The samples were collected in EDTA and in citrate-anticoagulated tubes. Both methods were adapted to a chemistry analyzer and the samples were studied in parallel. In both types of samples, we found a moderate correlation between the kinetic and the endpoint methods (r = 0.611 for citrate-anticoagulated, r = 0.636 for EDTA-anticoagulated, p = 0.0001 for both). We found a moderate correlation between fibrinogen-AOPP and microalbumin-AOPP levels only in the kinetic method (r = 0.644 and 0.520 for citrate-anticoagulated; r = 0.581 and 0.490 for EDTA-anticoagulated, p = 0.0001). We conclude that adaptation of the end-point method to automation is more difficult and it has higher between-run CV% while application of the kinetic method is easier and it may be used in oxidative stress studies.

  19. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum.

  20. Advanced spherical near-field antenna measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    The DTU-ESA facility has since the 1980es provided highly accurate antenna radiation pattern measurements and gain calibration by use of the probe corrected spherical nearfield technique, both for ESA (the European Space Agency) and other customers and continues to do so. Recent years activities...... and research carried out at the facility are presented in the article. Since 2004 several antenna test facility comparison campaigns were carried out between a number of European antenna measurement facilities. The first campaigns laid the foundation for the later comparisons in providing experience...... in the period 2005–2006 following a series of investigatory measurements and facility updates during 2003–2005. Antenna diagnostics by a SWE-to-PWE transformation presents a case where highly accurate antenna measurements and a plane wave back-projection enable antenna diagnostics by examination...

  1. Advances in the measurement of weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Damin; Huang Minzhe.

    1992-01-01

    The state-of-art and general features of instruments for measuring weak magnetic fields (such as the non-directional magnetometer, induced coil magnetometer, proton magnetometer, optical pumping magnetometer, flux-gate magnetometer and superconducting quantum magnetometer) are briefly described. Emphasis is laid on the development of a novel technique used in the flux-gate magnetometer and the liquid nitrogen SQUID. Typical applications of the measuring techniques for weak magnetic fields are given

  2. Concepts and recent advances in generalized information measures and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Andres M

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of the information measure widely known as Shannon entropy, quantifiers based on information theory and concepts such as entropic forms and statistical complexities have proven to be useful in diverse scientific research fields. This book contains introductory tutorials suitable for the general reader, together with chapters dedicated to the basic concepts of the most frequently employed information measures or quantifiers and their recent applications to different areas, including physics, biology, medicine, economics, communication and social sciences. As these quantif

  3. Advanced computational methods for the assessment of reactor core behaviour during reactivity initiated accidents. Final report; Fortschrittliche Rechenmethoden zum Kernverhalten bei Reaktivitaetsstoerfaellen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pautz, A.; Perin, Y.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W.; Seubert, A.; Klein, M.; Gallner, L.; Krzycacz-Hausmann, B.

    2012-05-15

    The document at hand serves as the final report for the reactor safety research project RS1183 ''Advanced Computational Methods for the Assessment of Reactor Core Behavior During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents''. The work performed in the framework of this project was dedicated to the development, validation and application of advanced computational methods for the simulation of transients and accidents of nuclear installations. These simulation tools describe in particular the behavior of the reactor core (with respect to neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and thermal mechanics) at a very high level of detail. The overall goal of this project was the deployment of a modern nuclear computational chain which provides, besides advanced 3D tools for coupled neutronics/ thermal-hydraulics full core calculations, also appropriate tools for the generation of multi-group cross sections and Monte Carlo models for the verification of the individual calculational steps. This computational chain shall primarily be deployed for light water reactors (LWR), but should beyond that also be applicable for innovative reactor concepts. Thus, validation on computational benchmarks and critical experiments was of paramount importance. Finally, appropriate methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were to be integrated into the computational framework, in order to assess and quantify the uncertainties due to insufficient knowledge of data, as well as due to methodological aspects.

  4. Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, Sebastien; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Khaouam, Nader; Charpentier, Danielle; Belair, Manon; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  5. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  6. A comparative study of quantum yield and electrical energy per order (E(Eo)) for advanced oxidative decolourisation of reactive azo dyes by UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, M; Selvam, K; Swaminathan, M

    2007-06-01

    This paper evaluates the quantum yield and electrical energy per order (E(Eo)) efficiency of Reactive Orange 4 (RO4) and Reactive Yellow 14 (RY14) azo dyes by three advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Both dyes were completely decolourised by all these processes. The relative decolourisation efficiencies of these processes were in the following order: Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)/UV>UV/TiO(2)>UV/H(2)O(2). The low efficiency of UV/H(2)O(2) process is mainly due to low UV absorption by hydrogen peroxide at the 365nm. The figure of merit E(Eo) values showed that UV/H(2)O(2) process consumes more electrical energy than the other two processes. The electrical energy consumption is in the following order: UV/H(2)O(2)>UV/TiO(2)>Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)/UV. At low initial dye concentration higher quantum yield was observed in UV/TiO(2) process, whereas in photo-Fenton process higher quantum yield was observed at high initial dye concentration. The structure of dye molecule also influences the quantum yield and E(Eo) value.

  7. A comparative study of quantum yield and electrical energy per order (E Eo) for advanced oxidative decolourisation of reactive azo dyes by UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muruganandham, M.; Selvam, K.; Swaminathan, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the quantum yield and electrical energy per order (E Eo ) efficiency of Reactive Orange 4 (RO4) and Reactive Yellow 14 (RY14) azo dyes by three advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Both dyes were completely decolourised by all these processes. The relative decolourisation efficiencies of these processes were in the following order: Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 /UV > UV/TiO 2 > UV/H 2 O 2 . The low efficiency of UV/H 2 O 2 process is mainly due to low UV absorption by hydrogen peroxide at the 365 nm. The figure of merit E Eo values showed that UV/H 2 O 2 process consumes more electrical energy than the other two processes. The electrical energy consumption is in the following order: UV/H 2 O 2 > UV/TiO 2 > Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 /UV. At low initial dye concentration higher quantum yield was observed in UV/TiO 2 process, whereas in photo-Fenton process higher quantum yield was observed at high initial dye concentration. The structure of dye molecule also influences the quantum yield and E Eo value

  8. Psychometric properties of three measures assessing advanced theory of mind: Evidence from people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Lee, Shih-Chieh; Chiang, Hsin-Yu; Syu, Ya-Cing; Yu, Xiao-Xuan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2017-11-01

    Patients with schizophrenia tend to have deficits in advanced Theory of Mind (ToM). The "Reading the mind in the eyes" test (RMET), the Faux Pas Task, and the Strange Stories are commonly used for assessing advanced ToM. However, most of the psychometric properties of these 3 measures in patients with schizophrenia are unknown. The aims of this study were to validate the psychometric properties of the 3 advanced ToM measures in patients with schizophrenia, including: (1) test-retest reliability; (2) random measurement error; (3) practice effect; (4) concurrent validity; and (5) ecological validity. We recruited 53 patients with schizophrenia, who completed the 3 measures twice, 4 weeks apart. The Revised Social Functioning Scale-Taiwan short version (R-SFST) was completed within 3 days of first session of assessments. We found that the intraclass correlation coefficients of the RMET, Strange Stories, and Faux Pas Task were 0.24, 0.5, and 0.76. All 3 advanced ToM measures had large random measurement error, trivial to small practice effects, poor concurrent validity, and low ecological validity. We recommend that the scores of the 3 advanced ToM measures be interpreted with caution because these measures may not provide reliable and valid results on patients' advanced ToM abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneous reactivity of sea spray particles during the CalNex field campaign: Insight from single particle measurements and correlations with gas phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, C. J.; Riedel, T. P.; Thornton, J. A.; Wagner, N.; Brown, S. S.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Sea spray particles are ubiquitous in marine environments. Heterogeneous reactions between sea spray particles and gas phase pollutants, such as HNO3(g), and N2O5(g), alter particle composition by displacing particulate phase halogens in sea spray and releasing these halogen species into the gas phase; these halogen-containing gas phase species play a significant role in tropospheric ozone production. Measurements of both gas phase and particle phase species on board the R/V Atlantis during the CalNEX 2010 field campaign provided an opportunity to examine the impact of heterogeneous reactivity of marine aerosols along the California coast. During the cruise, coastal measurements were made near the Santa Monica and Port of Los Angeles regions to monitor the chemical processing of marine aerosols. Sea spray particles were analyzed since these particles were the major chloride-containing particles detected. Real-time single particle measurements made using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) revealed the nocturnal processing of sea spray particles through the loss of particulate chloride and a simultaneous gain in particulate nitrate. Gas phase measurements are consistent with the particle phase observations: As N2O5(g) levels rose overnight, the production of ClNO2(g) coincided with the decrease in particulate chloride. These observations provide unique insight into heterogeneous reactivity from both a gas and particle phase perspective. Results from these measurements can be used to better constrain the rate of heterogeneous reactions on sea spray particles.

  10. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  11. Measurement of large asymptotic reactor periods from about 103 to 4.104 sec) to determine reactivity effects of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinevich, F.A.; Evchuk, A.I.; Klimentov, V.B.; Tyzh, A.V.; Churkin, Yu.I.; Yaroshevich, O.I.

    1977-01-01

    All investigation programs on fast reactor physics include measurements of low reactivity values (1-0.01)x10 -5 ΔK/K. An application of the pile oscillator technique for the purpose requires a special critical assembly for an installation of the oscillator. Thus it is of interest to develop relatively simple methods. In particular, one of such methods is the asymptotic period method which is widely used for low reactivity measurements. The description of the method and equipment developed for low reactivity measurements according to the measurements of the steady-state reactor period is presented. The equipment has been tested on the BTS-2 fast-thermal critical assembly. Measurement results on the reactivity effects of small samples in the fast zone centre are given. It is shown that the application of the method of measuring long steady-state periods and developed and tested equipment enables the reactivity of (1+-0.02)x10 -5 ΔK/K to be determined at the critical assembly power of 5 to 10 Wt. The disadvantage of the method presented is the time lost on reaching the steady-state period which results in greater sensitivity of the method to reactivity drifts

  12. Recent advances in high performance poly(lactide: From green plasticization to super-tough materials via (reactive compounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgio eKfoury

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its origin from renewable resources, its biodegradability, and recently, its industrial implementation at low costs, poly(lactide (PLA is considered as one of the most promising ecological, bio-sourced and biodegradable plastic materials to potentially and increasingly replace traditional petroleum derived polymers in many commodity and engineering applications. Beside its relatively high rigidity (high tensile strength and modulus compared with many common thermoplastics such as poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET, high impact poly(styrene (HIPS and poly(propylene (PP, PLA suffers from an inherent brittleness, which can limit its applications especially where mechanical toughness such as plastic deformation at high impact rates or elongation is required. Therefore, the curve plotting stiffness vs. impact resistance and ductility must be shifted to higher values for PLA-based materials, while being preferably fully bio-based and biodegradable upon the application.This review aims to establish a state of the art focused on the recent progresses and preferably economically viable strategies developed in the literature for significantly improve the mechanical performances of PLA. A particular attention is given to plasticization as well as to impact resistance modification of PLA in the case of (reactive blending PLA-based systems.

  13. Recent advances in high performance poly(lactide): From ``green'' plasticization to super-tough materials via (reactive) compounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfoury, Georgio; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Hassouna, Fatima; Odent, Jérémy; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David; Dubois, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Due to its origin from renewable resources, its biodegradability, and recently, its industrial implementation at low costs, poly(lactide) (PLA) is considered as one of the most promising ecological, bio-sourced and biodegradable plastic materials to potentially and increasingly replace traditional petroleum derived polymers in many commodity and engineering applications. Beside its relatively high rigidity (high tensile strength and modulus compared with many common thermoplastics such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), high impact poly(styrene) (HIPS) and poly(propylene) (PP)), PLA suffers from an inherent brittleness, which can limit its applications especially where mechanical toughness such as plastic deformation at high impact rates or elongation is required. Therefore, the curve plotting stiffness vs. impact resistance and ductility must be shifted to higher values for PLA-based materials, while being preferably fully bio-based and biodegradable upon the application. This review aims to establish a state of the art focused on the recent progresses and preferably economically viable strategies developed in the literature for significantly improve the mechanical performances of PLA. A particular attention is given to plasticization as well as to impact resistance modification of PLA in the case of (reactive) blending PLA-based systems.

  14. Diagnostic value of tolerance-related gene expression measured in the recipient alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Gyun; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Jeong, Seong-Hee; Kim, Song-Cheol

    2013-08-01

    The efficient development of tolerance-inducing therapies and safe reduction of immunosuppression should be supported by early diagnosis and prediction of tolerance in transplantation. Using mouse models of donor-specific tolerance to allogeneic skin and islet grafts we tested whether measurement of tolerance-related gene expression in their alloantigen-reactive peripheral T cell fraction efficiently reflected the tolerance status of recipients. We found that Foxp3, Nrn1, and Klrg1 were preferentially expressed in conditions of tolerance compared with rejection or unmanipulated controls if their expression is measured in CD69(+) T cells prepared from coculture of recipient peripheral T cells and donor antigen-presenting cells. The same pattern of gene expression was observed in recipients grafted with either skin or islets, recipients of different genetic origins, and even those taking immunosuppressive drugs. These findings suggest that the expression of tolerance-related genes in the alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction could be used to detect tolerance in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elevated C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminemia measured before resection of colorectal liver metastases predict postoperative survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Teruya, Masanori; Kishiki, Tomokazu; Endo, Daisuke; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Miki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Morita, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have investigated whether the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score measured before resection of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM), can predict postoperative survival. Sixty-three consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for CRLM were investigated. GPS was calculated on the basis of admission data as follows: patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminemia (l) were allocated a GPS score of 2. Patients in whom only one of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a GPS score of 1, and patients with a normal C-reactive protein and albumin were allocated a score of 0. Significant factors concerning survival were the number of liver metastases (p = 0.0044), carcinoembryonic antigen level (p = 0.0191), GPS (p = 0.0029), grade of liver metastasis (p = 0.0033), and the number of lymph node metastases around the primary cancer (p = 0.0087). Multivariate analysis showed the two independent prognostic variables: liver metastases > or =3 (relative risk 2.83) and GPS1/2 (relative risk 3.07). GPS measured before operation and the number of liver metastases may be used as novel predictors of postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent curative resection for CRLM. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  17. Advances in Non-contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Canepari, Stacy; Rogers, Jan. R.

    2009-01-01

    Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300 C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400 C). High-precision machined spheres of the sample are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility, and heated with a laser. The laser is aligned off-center so that the absorbed photons transfer their momentum to the sample, causing it to rotate at up to 250,000+ RPM. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, causing it to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations are compared to finite element models to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the noncontact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test. This method was validated in collaboration with the University of Tennessee for niobium at 1985 C, with agreement within the uncertainty of the conventional measurements. A similar method is being employed on Ultra-High-Temperature ZrB2- SiC composites, which may see application in rocket nozzles and sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles.

  18. Advancing Shannon Entropy for Measuring Diversity in Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rajaram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available From economic inequality and species diversity to power laws and the analysis of multiple trends and trajectories, diversity within systems is a major issue for science. Part of the challenge is measuring it. Shannon entropy H has been used to rethink diversity within probability distributions, based on the notion of information. However, there are two major limitations to Shannon’s approach. First, it cannot be used to compare diversity distributions that have different levels of scale. Second, it cannot be used to compare parts of diversity distributions to the whole. To address these limitations, we introduce a renormalization of probability distributions based on the notion of case-based entropy Cc as a function of the cumulative probability c. Given a probability density p(x, Cc measures the diversity of the distribution up to a cumulative probability of c, by computing the length or support of an equivalent uniform distribution that has the same Shannon information as the conditional distribution of p^c(x up to cumulative probability c. We illustrate the utility of our approach by renormalizing and comparing three well-known energy distributions in physics, namely, the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions for energy of subatomic particles. The comparison shows that Cc is a vast improvement over H as it provides a scale-free comparison of these diversity distributions and also allows for a comparison between parts of these diversity distributions.

  19. Advanced measurements and techniques in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Lacerda, A.H.; Kim, Y.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). High magnetic fields present a unique environment for studying the electronic structure of materials. Two classes of materials were chosen for experiments at the national high Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos: highly correlated electron systems and semiconductors. Magnetotransport and thermodynamic experiments were performed on the renormalized ground states of highly correlated electron systems (such as heavy fermion materials and Kondo insulators) in the presence of magnetic fields that are large enough to disrupt the many-body correlations. A variety of optical measurements in high magnetic fields were performed on semiconductor heterostructures including GaAs/AlGaAs single heterojunctions (HEMT structure), coupled double quantum wells (CDQW), asymmetric coupled double quantum wells (ACDQW), multiple quantum wells and a CdTe single crystal thin film

  20. Reactivity worth measurements on fast burst reactor Caliban - description and interpretation of integral experiments for the validation of nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2012-07-01

    Reactivity perturbation experiments using various materials are being performed on the HEU fast core CALIBAN, an experimental device operated by the CEA VALDUC Criticality and Neutron Transport Research Laboratory. These experiments provide valuable information to contribute to the validation of nuclear data for the materials used in such measurements. This paper presents the results obtained in a first series of measurements performed with Au-197 samples. Experiments which have been conducted in order to improve the characterization of the core are also described and discussed. The experimental results have been compared to numerical calculation using both deterministic and Monte Carlo neutron transport codes with a simplified model of the reactor. This early work led to a methodology which will be applied to the future experiments which will concern other materials of interest. (authors)

  1. Advances in the discontinuous Galerkin method: Hybrid schemes and applications to the reactive infiltration instability in an upwelling compacting mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemenz, Alan R.

    High-order methods are emerging in the scientific computing community as superior alternatives to the classical finite difference, finite volume, and continuous finite element methods. The discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method in particular combines many of the positive features of all of these methods. This thesis presents two projects involving the DG method. First, a Hybrid scheme is presented, which implements DG areas where the solution is considered smooth, while dropping the order of the scheme elsewhere and implementing a finite volume scheme with high-order, non-oscillatory solution reconstructions suitable for unstructured mesh. Two such reconstructions from the ENO class are considered in the Hybrid. Successful numerical results are presented for nonlinear systems of conservation laws in one dimension. Second, the high-order discontinuous Galerkin and Fourier spectral methods are applied to an application modeling three-phase fluid flow through a porous medium, undergoing solid-fluid reaction due to the reactive infiltration instability (RII). This model incorporates a solid upwelling term and an equation to track the abundance of the reacting mineral orthopyroxene (opx). After validating the numerical discretization, results are given that provide new insight into the formation of melt channels in the Earth's mantle. Mantle heterogeneities are observed to be one catalyst for the development of melt channels, and the dissolution of opx produces interesting bifurcations in the melt channels. An alternative formulation is considered where the mass transfer rate relative to velocity is taken to be infinitely large. In this setting, the stiffest terms are removed, greatly reducing the cost of time integration.

  2. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  3. Measurement-Based Performance Evaluation of Advanced MIMO Transceiver Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the methodology and the results of performance investigations on a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO transceiver scheme for frequency-selective radio channels. The method relies on offline simulations and employs real-time MIMO channel sounder measurement data to ensure a realistic channel modeling. Thus it can be classified in between the performance evaluation using some predefined channel models and the evaluation of a prototype hardware in field experiments. New aspects for the simulation setup are discussed, which are frequently ignored when using simpler model-based evaluations. Example simulations are provided for an iterative ("turbo" MIMO equalizer concept. The dependency of the achievable bit error rate performance on the propagation characteristics and on the variation in some system design parameters is shown, whereas the antenna constellation is of particular concern for MIMO systems. Although in many of the considered constellations turbo MIMO equalization appears feasible in real field scenarios, there exist cases with poor performance as well, indicating that in practical applications link adaptation of the transmitter and receiver processing to the environment is necessary.

  4. Method of performing shutdown reactivity measurements in spent nuclear fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Schultz, M.A.; Chang, D.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a device to measure the k/infinity/ of a spent fuel assembly used in light water reactors. A subcritical assembly having a cross configuration is designed to allow measurement of the k/sub //infinity/ of a spent fuel assembly by comparing the change in its multiplication with that of a fuel assembly of known k/infinity/. Calculations have been performed using nucleonic codes to develop polynomial equations that relate the k/infinity/ of the spent fuel assembly to measured data. The measurements involve taking count rates with the spent fuel assembly in the center position of the subcritical assembly, and the measured data are the count rate ratio of the spent fuel assembly over the count rate taken with a fuel assembly of known k/infinity/. The polynomial equations are easy to program on a microcomputer, which, together with the subcritical assembly, form the k/infinity/ meter. 9 refs

  5. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  6. Quantitative reactive modeling and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzinger, Thomas A

    Formal verification aims to improve the quality of software by detecting errors before they do harm. At the basis of formal verification is the logical notion of correctness , which purports to capture whether or not a program behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition of software into correct and incorrect programs falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of software in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria. We therefore propose to introduce quantitative fitness measures for programs, specifically for measuring the function, performance, and robustness of reactive programs such as concurrent processes. This article describes the goals of the ERC Advanced Investigator Project QUAREM. The project aims to build and evaluate a theory of quantitative fitness measures for reactive models. Such a theory must strive to obtain quantitative generalizations of the paradigms that have been success stories in qualitative reactive modeling, such as compositionality, property-preserving abstraction and abstraction refinement, model checking, and synthesis. The theory will be evaluated not only in the context of software and hardware engineering, but also in the context of systems biology. In particular, we will use the quantitative reactive models and fitness measures developed in this project for testing hypotheses about the mechanisms behind data from biological experiments.

  7. Prevalence of advanced adenomas in small and diminutive colon polyps using direct measurement of size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Franklin C; Strum, Williamson B

    2011-08-01

    Most studies reporting polyp size use visual estimates. Determining the prevalence of advanced histology based on direct measurement of polyp size may help guide the management of polyps found at optical colonoscopy (OC) and CT colonography (CTC). We designed a large, prospective study to assess the prevalence of advanced adenomas based on direct measurement of polyp size by a certified pathologists' assistant as reported in the pathology report. Patients between 40 and 89 years of age who presented for screening colonoscopy were included in our study. Advanced adenomas were defined as ≥10 mm or ≥25% villous features, high grade dysplasia or cancer. Polyps were divided by size into three groups: diminutive (≤5 mm), small (6-9 mm) and large (≥10 mm). If more than one adenoma was present, the most advanced was used for analysis. We evaluated 6,905 consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy between January 2005 and December 2006. Of the 4,967 who met the inclusion criteria, the mean age was 58.8 and consisted of 59% women. Overall, 930 (18.7%) had an adenoma; 248 (5%) were advanced adenomas including 8 (0.16%) cancers. Of 89 polyps≥10 mm, 76 (85%) had advanced histology; of 247 polyps 6-9 mm, 67 (27%) were advanced; of 1,025 polyps ≤5 mm, 105 (10%) were advanced. Thus, 172 of 248 (69%) patients with advanced adenomas had small or diminutive adenomas. Our data indicate the majority (69%) of advanced adenomas are advanced adenomas (10%). These findings may help guide the management of sub-centimeter colon polyps found by OC or CTC.

  8. Laser-Based Optical System for Reactive Radical Concentration Measurements in Plasmas and Flames

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fridman, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) funding was used to assemble a multi-purpose optical diagnostic system for in-situ radical concentration measurements in plasma and combustion systems...

  9. The validity and reliability of the my jump 2 app for measuring the reactive strength index and drop jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Tom; Bishop, Chris; Antrobus, Mark; Brazier, Jon

    2018-03-27

    This is the first study to independently assess the concurrent validity and reliability of the My Jump 2 app for measuring drop jump performance. It is also the first to evaluate the app's ability to measure the reactive strength index (RSI). Fourteen male sport science students (age: 29.5 ± 9.9 years) performed three drop jumps from 20 cm and 40 cm (totalling 84 jumps), assessed via a force platform and the My Jump 2 app. Reported metrics included reactive strength index, jump height, ground contact time, and mean power. Measurements from both devices were compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Pearson product moment correlation coefficient (r), Cronbach's alpha (α), coefficient of variation (CV) and BlandAltman plots. Near perfect agreement was seen between devices at 20 cm for RSI (ICC = 0.95) and contact time (ICC = 0.99) and at 40 cm for RSI (ICC = 0.98), jump height (ICC = 0.96) and contact time (ICC = 0.92); with very strong agreement seen at 20 cm for jump height (ICC = 0.80). In comparison with the force plate the app showed good validity for RSI (20 cm: r = 0.94; 40 cm; r = 0.97), jump height (20 cm: r = 0.80; 40 cm; r = 0.96) and contact time (20 cm = 0.96; 40 cm; r = 0.98). The results of the present study show that the My Jump 2 app is a valid and reliable tool for assessing drop jump performance.

  10. Measuring craving: An attempt to connect subjective craving with cue reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteman, W.; Koeter, M.W.J.; Vserheul, R.; Schippers, G.M.; van den Brink, W.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Better insight into craving may contribute to the development of more efficient relapse prevention strategies. Inconsistent findings on the relation between craving and relapse may be due to difficulties in the measurement of craving. These difficulties are accounted for by 3

  11. Measuring craving: an attempt to connect subjective craving with cue reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteman, Wendy; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Vserheul, Roel; Schippers, Gerard M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Better insight into craving may contribute to the development of more efficient relapse prevention strategies. Inconsistent findings on the relation between craving and relapse may be due to difficulties in the measurement of craving. These difficulties are accounted for by 3

  12. Detectability of T Measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer in FDG PET CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sun Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Young Chul; Jeong, Eugene; Kim, Seung Eun; Choe, Jae Gol

    2012-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG PET CT in monitoring response in locally advanced gastric cancer has been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the related factors to detect measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer on FDG PET CT. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer. We defined the measurable diseases when there was visualized tumor of which maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) was higher than 1.35*SUVmax of liver + 2*SD of liver SUV. We evaluated what kinds of factors from the clinicopathologic features were related to identifying measurable diseases. Of 38 patients with advanced gastric cancer, 18 (50%) had measurable tumors on FDG PET CT. Measurable tumors were significantly more frequent in well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (70.5% vs 35.3%, p<0.05), in the tumors located at antrum or angle (66.7% vs 29.4%, p<0.05) and in the elderly group (age of 55 years old or more, 72.0% vs 8.3%, p<0.001) than the others, respectively. By multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis was the only independent predictor for the measurable disease on FDG PET CT. We found that age at diagnosis, as well as histologic types and location of tumors, were the affecting factors to detect measurable disease on FDG PET CT in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our study suggests that elderly patients of age of 55 years old or more can frequently have T measurable disease on FDG PET CT in advanced gastric cancer and FDG PET CT will be helpful to monitor measurable disease

  13. Comparison of CO2 in air versus carbogen for the measurement of cerebrovascular reactivity with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Hannah V; Germuska, Michael; Kelly, Michael E; Bulte, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can give valuable information about existing pathology and the risk of adverse events, such as stroke. A common method of obtaining regional CVR values is by measuring the blood flow response to carbon dioxide (CO2)-enriched air using arterial spin labeling (ASL) or blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Recently, several studies have used carbogen gas (containing only CO2 and oxygen) as an alternative stimulus. A direct comparison was performed between CVR values acquired by ASL and BOLD imaging using stimuli of (1) 5% CO2 in air and (2) 5% CO2 in oxygen (carbogen-5). Although BOLD and ASL CVR values are shown to be correlated for CO2 in air (mean response 0.11±0.03% BOLD, 4.46±1.80% ASL, n=16 hemispheres), this correlation disappears during a carbogen stimulus (0.36±0.06% BOLD, 4.97±1.30% ASL). It is concluded that BOLD imaging should generally not be used in conjunction with a carbogen stimulus when measuring CVR, and that care must be taken when interpreting CVR as measured by ASL, as values obtained from different stimuli (CO2 in air versus carbogen) are not directly comparable.

  14. System for steam-reactivity measurements on fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Oates, M.A.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental system developed to investigate steam-metal reactions important to fusion technology. The system is configured specifically to measure hydrogen generation rates and tritium mobilization rates for irradiated beryllium specimens that are heated and exposed to steam. Results are presented for extensive performance and scoping tests of the system to validate the experimental technique, to determine hydrogen-generation rate detection sensitivity, and to establish appropriate calibration methods. These results include measurements of the hydrogen generation rates for steam interactions with austenitic steel, tungsten and beryllium metal specimens. The results of these scoping tests compare favorably with previous work, and they indicate a significant improvement in hydrogen detection sensitivity over previous approaches. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Measurements and Modelling of Reactive Iodine Oxides in the Coastal MBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najera, J. J.; Bloss, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The release of iodine compounds into the marine atmosphere can affect a number of aspects of atmospheric composition: Iodine species can participate in catalytic ozone destruction cycles, which may be augmented by bromine species; reactions of iodine compounds can perturb the OH:HO2 and NO:NO2 ratios, heterogeneous loss of reservoir compounds such as HOI and INO3 can lead to removal of HOx and NOx, and higher iodine oxides can contribute to the formation and/or growth of aerosol particles. In this work, we focus upon understanding the effect of the spatial distribution of iodine emissions upon local HOx and NOx levels in the immediate vicinity of a coastal sites, using new observations to re-evaluate previous field campaign data. We present an analysis of results from a new instruments which measures point inorganic iodine species concentrations. The technique of resonance fluorescence (RF) is employed for the detection of iodine atoms, and the total photolabile iodine content. Measurements made at Mace Head, Ireland during July-August 2007 and May 2011 are presented. A detailed 1-dimensional photochemical box model is employed in a lagrangian sense to simulate the evolving chemical composition of an air column advected across the coastal margin. The model is compared with the observed iodine species, and then used to explore the transient response of the NOx and HOx families at the Mace Head site to heterogeneous iodine emissions: The transit time between the intertidal iodine emission zone and the shoreline site where previous measurements of HOx, NOx etc. have been made is insufficient for steady-state to become established, although this assumption has been used in earlier model studies of such data. Finally, we consider the limitations in our ability to quantify the impacts of iodine chemistry, which arise from uncertainties in the iodine kinetics and photochemistry - for example, what is the atmospheric lifetime of inorganic iodine ? - and explore their

  16. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)]|[Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  17. Prototype system for phase advance measurements of LHC small beam oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Olexa, J; Brezovic, Z; Gasior, M

    2013-01-01

    Magnet lattice parameters of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are measured by exciting beam transverse oscillations that allow measuring their phase advance using the beam position measurement (BPM) system. However, the BPM system requires millimetre oscillation amplitudes, with which nominal high intensity beams would cause large particle loss, dangerous for the LHC superconducting magnets. Therefore, such measurements cannot be done often, as they require special low intensity beams with important set-up time. After its first long shut-down the LHC will be equipped with new collimators with embedded BPMs, for which a new front-end electronics has been developed. Its main processing channels based on compensated diode detectors are designed for beam orbit measurement with sub-micrometre resolution. It is planned to extend this system by adding dedicated channels optimised for phase advance measurement, allowing continuous LHC optics measurement with much smaller beam excitation. This subsystem will be based o...

  18. Development of the effectiveness measure for an advanced alarm system using signal detection theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.K.; Choi, S.S.; Hong, J.H.; Chang, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    Since many alarms which are activated during major process deviations or accidents in nuclear power plants can result in negative effects for operators, various types of advanced alarm systems that can select important alarms for the identification of process deviation have been developed to reduce the operator's workload. However, the irrelevant selection of important alarms could distract the operator from correct identification of process deviation. Therefore, to evaluate the effectiveness of the advanced alarm system, a tradeoff between the alarm reduction rate (how many alarms are reduced?) and informativeness (how many important alarms that are conducive to identifying process deviation are provided?) of an advanced alarm system should be considered. In this paper, a new measure is proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of an advanced alarm system with regard to the identification of process deviation. Here, the effectiveness measure is the combination of informativeness measure and reduction rate, and the informativeness measure means the information processing capability performed by the advanced alarm system including wrong rejection and wrong acceptance, and it can be calculated using the signal detection theory (SDT). The effectiveness of the prototype alarm system was evaluated using the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario, and the validity of the effectiveness measure was investigated from two types of the operator response, such as the identification accuracy and the operator's preference for the identification of LOCA

  19. Operator’s cognitive, communicative and operative activities based workload measurement of advanced main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Yochan; Jung, Wondea

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An advanced MMIS in the advanced MCR requires new roles and tasks of operators. • A new workload evaluation framework is needed for a new MMIS environment. • This work suggests a new workload measurement approach (COCOA) for an advanced MCR. • COCOA enables 3-dimensional measurement of cognition, communication and operation. • COCOA workload evaluation of the reference plant through simulation was performed. - Abstract: An advanced man–machine interface system (MMIS) with a computer-based procedure system and high-tech control/alarm system is installed in the advanced main control room (MCR) of a nuclear power plant. Accordingly, though the task of the operators has been changed a great deal, owing to a lack of appropriate guidelines on the role allocation or communication method of the operators, operators should follow the operating strategies of conventional MCR and the problem of an unbalanced workload for each operator can be raised. Thus, it is necessary to enhance the operation capability and improve the plant safety by developing guidelines on the role definition and communication of operators in an advanced MCR. To resolve this problem, however, a method for measuring the workload according to the work execution of the operators is needed, but an applicable method is not available. In this research, we propose a COgnitive, Communicative and Operational Activities measurement approach (COCOA) to measure and evaluate the workload of operators in an advanced MCR. This paper presents the taxonomy for additional operation activities of the operators to use the computerized procedures and soft control added to an advanced MCR, which enables an integrated measurement of the operator workload in various dimensions of cognition, communication, and operation. To check the applicability of COCOA, we evaluated the operator workload of an advanced MCR of a reference power plant through simulation training experiments. As a result, the amount

  20. Reactive Processing of Environment Conscious, Biomorphic Ceramics: A Novel and Eco-friendly Route to Advanced Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environment-conscious, biomorphic ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials that can be produced with renewable resources (wood) and wood wastes (wood sawdust). These materials have tailorable properties with numerous potential applications. Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by the infiltration of wood-derived carbonaceous preforms with oxide and silicon based materials. The wood-derived carbonaceous preforms have been shown to be quite useful in producing porous or dense materials with different microstructures and compositions. The microstructure and mechanical properties (flexural strength, fracture toughness, elastic modulus, and compressive strength) of a wide variety of Sic-based ecoceramics have been measured. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches. In this presentation the fabrication approach, microstructure, and thermomechanical properties of a wide variety of Sic-based Ecoceramics will be reported.

  1. Measurements of reactive nitrogen produced by tropical thunderstorms during BIBLE-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Takegawa, N.; Nishi, N.; Kashihara, T.; Kawakami, S.; Kudoh, S.; Blake, D.; Shirai, T.; Liley, B.; Ko, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ogawa, T.

    2007-09-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment phase C (BIBLE-C) aircraft mission was carried out near Darwin, Australia (12°S, 131°E) in December 2000. This was the first aircraft experiment designed to estimate lightning NO production rates in the tropics, where production is considered to be most intense. During the two flights (flights 10 and 13 made on December 9 and 11-12, respectively) enhancements of NOx (NO + NO2) up to 1000 and 1600 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, 10-s data) were observed at altitudes between 11.5 and 14 km. The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) cloud (brightness temperature) data and ground-based lightning measurements by the Global Positioning and Tracking System (GPATS) indicate that there were intensive lightning events over the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria, which took place upstream from our measurement area 10 to 14 h prior to the measurements. For these two flights, air in which NOx exceeded 100 pptv extended over 620 × 140 and 400 × 170 km2 (wind direction × perpendicular direction), respectively, suggesting a significant impact of lightning NO production on NOx levels in the tropics. We estimate the amount of NOx observed between 11.5 and 14 km produced by the thunderstorms to be 3.3 and 1.8 × 1029 NO molecules for flights 10 and 13, respectively. By using the GPATS lightning flash count data, column NO production rates are estimated to be 1.9-4.4 and 21-49 × 1025 NO molecules per single flash for these two flight data sets. In these estimations, it is assumed that the column NO production between 0 and 16 km is greater than the observed values between 11.5 and 14 km by a factor of 3.2, which is derived using results reported by Pickering et al. (1998). There are however large uncertainties in the GPATS lightning data in this study and care must be made when the production rates are referred. Uncertainties in these estimates are discussed. The impact on the ozone production rate is also described.

  2. Measuring modules for the research of compensators of reactive power with voltage stabilization in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasayevsky, Stanislav; Klimash, Stepan; Klimash, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    A set of mathematical modules was developed for evaluation the energy performance in the research of electrical systems and complexes in the MatLab. In the electrotechnical library SimPowerSystems of the MatLab software, there are no measuring modules of energy coefficients characterizing the quality of electricity and the energy efficiency of electrical apparatus. Modules are designed to calculate energy coefficients characterizing the quality of electricity (current distortion and voltage distortion) and energy efficiency indicators (power factor and efficiency) are presented. There are described the methods and principles of building the modules. The detailed schemes of modules built on the elements of the Simulink Library are presented, in this connection, these modules are compatible with mathematical models of electrical systems and complexes in the MatLab. Also there are presented the results of the testing of the developed modules and the results of their verification on the schemes that have analytical expressions of energy indicators.

  3. Reactivity and reaction rate measurements in U--D2O lattices with coaxial fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellarin, D.J.; Morris, B.M.

    1976-12-01

    Integral reaction rate parameters, intracell thermal neutron flux profiles, and material bucklings were measured for D 2 O-moderated uniform lattices in the exponential facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. Two different slightly enriched coaxial uranium fuel assemblies were examined over a wide range of triangular lattice pitches. Integral parameters are reported for inner and outer fuel separately providing data for a more detailed and rigorous comparison with computation than has been previously available. Results are compared with RAHAB calculations using ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Large discrepancies in agreement between calculation and experiment, outside of experimental errors and uncertainties in the input cross sections, probably result from the resonance capture models used by RAHAB

  4. Buckling measurement in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor in cylindrical configuration of minor excess of reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgato, Rafael Turrini; Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Silva, Alexandre F. Povoa da; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work presents the results of experimental Buckling in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor in its cylindrical configuration with 28 fuel rods along its diameter. The IPEN/MB-01 is a zero power reactor designed to operate at a maximum power of 100 watts. It is a versatile nuclear facility, which allows for the simulation of all the characteristics of a nuclear power reactor making it an ideal test bed for this kind of measurement. A mapping of neutron flux inside the reactor is carried out in order to determine the total Buckling of the cylindrical configuration. The reactor was operated for one hour. Then, the activity of the fuel rods is measured by gamma ray spectrometry using a HPGe solid state detector and a suitable rod scanner. Photon energies of 276.6keV from {sup 239}Np (neutron capture (n,?) nuclear reaction) and 293.3keV from {sup 143}Ce (fission (n,f) nuclear reaction on both {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) , are respectively along both axial and radial directions. Other measurements are performed using gold wires and foils along radial and axial directions of the reactor core. The three methods above resulted in a weighted average value of 93.18 ± 8.47 m-2 for the Total Buckling of this cylindrical core configuration with 28 control rods along its diameter with 568 fuel rods and only 271 pcm of excess reactivity. (author)

  5. Measurement of the CNA I's (Atucha I nuclear power plant) control rods reactivity during its commissioning on January 8th, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, R.M.; Gomez, A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements were made on integral and differential calibration of rod 16, fuel racks RG and R3 and extinction reactivity during Atucha I nuclear power plant's commissioning on January 8th., 1990. These were the first physical measurements performed after the first critical nuclear power plant's commissioning. (Author) [es

  6. Phase advance and β function measurements using model-independent analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-xi Wang; Vadim Sajaev; Chih-Yuan Yao

    2003-01-01

    Phase advance and β function are basic lattice functions characterizing the linear properties of an accelerator lattice. Accurate and efficient measurements of these quantities are important for commissioning and operating a machine. For rings with little coupling, we report a new method to measure these lattice functions based on the model-independent analysis technique, which uses beam histories of excited betatron oscillations measured simultaneously at a large number of beam position moni...

  7. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains

  8. C-reactive protein in patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Usefulness in identifying patients most likely to benefit from initial nephrectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroki; Kishida, Takeshi; Miura, Takeshi; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Yao, Masahiro; Shioi, Koichi; Murakami, Takayuki; Takizawa, Akitoshi; Sano, Futoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Mizuno, Nobuhiko; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered a useful serum marker for patients with RCC. However, its clinical utility in advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma (AM-RCC), particularly in deciding whether to perform nephrectomy at the onset, is not well studied. We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with AM-RCC, including 18 patients underwent potentially curative surgery, 111 underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy, and 52 received medical treatment only. CRP cutoff points were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used for survival tests. ROC analysis suggested that grouping patients according to 3 CRP ranges was a rational model. Patients with highly elevated CRP (≥67.0 mg/L) presented remarkably poor prognosis despite treatment (nephrectomy or medical treatment only). Cox regression models demonstrated that risk factors of overall survival for patients who underwent nephrectomy were the CRP ranges defined in this study (≤18.0 mg/L, >18.0 and <67.0 mg/L, and ≥67.0 mg/L), ECOG PS (0, 1, and ≥2), and number of metastatic organ sites (0–1 and ≥2). The retrospective design is a limitation of this study. Our study demonstrated that the serum CRP level is a statistically significant prognostic parameter for patients with AM-RCC. The data also indicated that pretreatment serum CRP level provides useful prognostic information that helps in deciding whether to perform initial nephrectomy for patients with AM-RCC

  9. Advanced glycation end products promote ChREBP expression and cell proliferation in liver cancer cells by increasing reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanbei; Li, Yakui; Zhu, Yemin; Wu, Lifang; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Li, Minle; Ding, WenJin; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the mechanism by which advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote cell proliferation in liver cancer cells.We treated liver cancer HepG2 cells with 200 mg/L AGEs or bovine serum albumin (BSA) and assayed for cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis. We performed real-time PCR and Western blot analysis for RNA and protein levels of carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in AGEs- or BSA-treated HepG2 cells. We analyzed the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells treated with AGEs or BSA.We found that increased S-phase cell percentage and decreased apoptosis contributed to AGEs-induced liver cancer cell proliferation. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that AGEs stimulated RNA and protein levels of ChREBP, a transcription factor promoting glycolysis and maintaining cell proliferation in liver cancer cells. Intriguingly, the level of ROS was higher in AGEs-treated liver cancer cells. Treating liver cancer cells with antioxidant N-acetyl cystein (NAC) partly blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression and cell proliferation.Our results suggest that the AGEs-ROS-ChREBP pathway plays a critical role in promoting ChREBP expression and liver cancer cell proliferation.

  10. Measurements of the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient of KUCA C-Core with a D{sub 2}O tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Byoung Kyu [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Eun Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) is a multi-core type critical assembly consisting of three independent cores in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. The light-water-moderated core (Ccore) is a tank type reactor, and the experiments of the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITRC) of C-core with a D{sub 2}O tank were carried out with the use of six 10 kW heaters and a radiator system in a dump tank, one 10 kW heater in a core tank, and one 5 kW heater in the D{sub 2}O tank. The ITRCs of the C-core with the D{sub 2}O tank immersed in the core tank are considered important to investigate the mechanism of moderation and reflection effects of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O in the core on the evaluation by numerical simulations. The objectives of this paper are to report the ITRC measurements for C-core with D{sub 2}O tank ranging between 26.7 .deg. C and 58.5 .deg. C, and to examine the accuracy of the numerical simulations by the Seoul National University Monte Carlo code, McCARD, through the comparison between measured and calculated results.

  11. Final Report for SERDP Project RC-1649: Advanced Chemical Measurements of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weise, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lincoln, E. N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sams, Robert L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cameron, Melanie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Veres, Patrick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yokelson, Robert J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Urbanski, Shawn [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Profeta, Luisa T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilman, Jessica [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuster, W. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Akagi, Sheryl [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stockwell, Chelsea E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mendoza, Albert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wold, Cyle E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Warneke, Carsten [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); de Gouw, Joost A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burling, Ian R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reardon, James [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schneider, Matthew D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Griffith, David W.T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Roberts, James M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-17

    Objectives: Project RC-1649, “Advanced Chemical Measurement of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns” was undertaken to use advanced instrumental techniques to study in detail the particulate and vapor-phase chemical composition of the smoke that results from prescribed fires used as a land management tool on DoD bases, particularly bases in the southeastern U.S. The statement of need (SON) called for “(1) improving characterization of fuel consumption” and “(2) improving characterization of air emissions under both flaming and smoldering conditions with respect to volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, and reactive gases.” The measurements and fuels were from several bases throughout the southeast (Camp Lejeune, Ft. Benning, and Ft. Jackson) and were carried out in collaboration and conjunction with projects 1647 (models) and 1648 (particulates, SW bases). Technical Approach: We used an approach that featured developing techniques for measuring biomass burning emission species in both the laboratory and field and developing infrared (IR) spectroscopy in particular. Using IR spectroscopy and other methods, we developed emission factors (EF, g of effluent per kg of fuel burned) for dozens of chemical species for several common southeastern fuel types. The major measurement campaigns were laboratory studies at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory (FSL) as well as field campaigns at Camp Lejeune, NC, Ft. Jackson, SC, and in conjunction with 1648 at Vandenberg AFB, and Ft. Huachuca. Comparisons and fusions of laboratory and field data were also carried out, using laboratory fuels from the same bases. Results: The project enabled new technologies and furthered basic science, mostly in the area of infrared spectroscopy, a broadband method well suited to biomass burn studies. Advances in hardware, software and supporting reference data realized a nearly 20x improvement in sensitivity and now provide quantitative IR spectra for potential detection of ~60 new

  12. Development of BNL Heat Transfer Facility 1: flashing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, W.J.; Klein, J.H.; Zimmer, G.A.; Abuaf, N.; Jones, O.C. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A major area of interest to reactor safety technology is the prediction of actual vapor generation rates under conditions of thermal nonequilibrium as would be encountered during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a light water reactor. In support of the development of advanced codes dealing with LOCA induced flashing, analytical models of the nonequilibrium vapor generation processes of interest have been formulated, and an experimental facility has been constructed to provide data to verify these models. This facility is known as BNL Heat Transfer Facility. The experimental facility consists of a flow loop, test section and the data acquisition and analysis system. The main portion of the flow loop is constructed from three inch nominal (7.6 cm) stainless steel pipe. High purity water is circulated through the loop using a centrifugal pump rated 1500 l/min at 600 kPa. Very close and stable control of all loop parameters is required since flashing is sensitive to very small changes in such parameters as flow rate, subcooling, and pressure

  13. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, J [comp.

    1998-09-01

    In the last few years, tremendous advances in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow have been accomplished by the applications of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. The detailed measurements gave new insight to the true nature of local mechanisms of interfacial transfer between phases, interfacial structure and two-phase flow turbulent transfers. These new developments indicate that more accurate and reliable two-phase flow models can be obtained, if focused experiments are designed and performed by utilizing this advanced instrumentation. The purpose of this Specialist Meeting on Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement Techniques was to review the recent instrumentation developments and the relation between thermal-hydraulic codes and instrumentation capabilities. Four specific objectives were identified for this meeting: bring together international experts on instrumentation, experiments, and modeling; review recent developments in multiphase flow instrumentation; discuss the relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities, and discuss future directions for instrumentation development, modeling, and experiments.

  14. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.

    1998-09-01

    In the last few years, tremendous advances in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow have been accomplished by the applications of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. The detailed measurements gave new insight to the true nature of local mechanisms of interfacial transfer between phases, interfacial structure and two-phase flow turbulent transfers. These new developments indicate that more accurate and reliable two-phase flow models can be obtained, if focused experiments are designed and performed by utilizing this advanced instrumentation. The purpose of this Specialist Meeting on Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement Techniques was to review the recent instrumentation developments and the relation between thermal-hydraulic codes and instrumentation capabilities. Four specific objectives were identified for this meeting: bring together international experts on instrumentation, experiments, and modeling; review recent developments in multiphase flow instrumentation; discuss the relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities, and discuss future directions for instrumentation development, modeling, and experiments

  15. Evaluation of the accuracy of thermal dissociation CRDS and LIF techniques for atmospheric measurement of reactive nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Caroline C.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Veres, Patrick R.; Eilerman, Scott J.; Brock, Charles A.; Decker, Zachary C. J.; Zarzana, Kyle J.; Dube, William P.; Wild, Robert J.; Wooldridge, Paul J.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Brown, Steven S.

    2017-05-01

    The sum of all reactive nitrogen species (NOy) includes NOx (NO2 + NO) and all of its oxidized forms, and the accurate detection of NOy is critical to understanding atmospheric nitrogen chemistry. Thermal dissociation (TD) inlets, which convert NOy to NO2 followed by NO2 detection, are frequently used in conjunction with techniques such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) to measure total NOy when set at > 600 °C or speciated NOy when set at intermediate temperatures. We report the conversion efficiency of known amounts of several representative NOy species to NO2 in our TD-CRDS instrument, under a variety of experimental conditions. We find that the conversion efficiency of HNO3 is highly sensitive to the flow rate and the residence time through the TD inlet as well as the presence of other species that may be present during ambient sampling, such as ozone (O3). Conversion of HNO3 at 400 °C, nominally the set point used to selectively convert organic nitrates, can range from 2 to 6 % and may represent an interference in measurement of organic nitrates under some conditions. The conversion efficiency is strongly dependent on the operating characteristics of individual quartz ovens and should be well calibrated prior to use in field sampling. We demonstrate quantitative conversion of both gas-phase N2O5 and particulate ammonium nitrate in the TD inlet at 650 °C, which is the temperature normally used for conversion of HNO3. N2O5 has two thermal dissociation steps, one at low temperature representing dissociation to NO2 and NO3 and one at high temperature representing dissociation of NO3, which produces exclusively NO2 and not NO. We also find a significant interference from partial conversion (5-10 %) of NH3 to NO at 650 °C in the presence of representative (50 ppbv) levels of O3 in dry zero air. Although this interference appears to be suppressed when sampling ambient air, we nevertheless recommend regular

  16. Development of a nuclear emergency preparedness support system. MEASURES and its advanced edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Shigehiro; Watanabe, Osami; Adachi, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new nuclear emergency preparedness support system for a micro scale area, called the advanced edition of MEASURES. The system simulates atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material quickly and accurately, using an airflow database and a dispersion model. It takes less than 15 minutes for 12-hour simulation, on a personal computer. The user can operate the system by GUI. (author)

  17. A New Computerised Advanced Theory of Mind Measure for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The ATOMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Renae B.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the ability of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to attribute mental states to characters in a new computerised, advanced theory of mind measure: The Animated Theory of Mind Inventory for Children (ATOMIC). Results showed that children with AS matched on IQ, verbal comprehension, age and gender performed equivalently on…

  18. Advances in Children's Rights and Children's Well-Being Measurement: Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosher, Hanita; Jiang, Xu; Ben-Arieh, Asher; Huebner, E. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have brought important changes to the profession of school psychology, influenced by larger social, scientific, and political trends. These trends include the emergence of children's rights agenda and advances in children's well-being measurement. During these years, a growing public attention and commitment to the notion of…

  19. Computation, measurement and analysis of the reactivity-to-power-transfer-function for the sodium cooled nuclear power plant KNK I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, P.; Mitzel, F.

    1977-02-01

    The Reactivity-to-Power-Transfer-Function for the sodium cooled nuclear power plant KNK I (Kompakte Natriumgekuehlte Kernenergieanlage) has been measured and compared with theoretical results. The measurements have been performed with the help of pseudostochastic reactivity perturbations. The transfer function has been determined by computing the auto- and cross-power-spectral-densities for the reactivity- and neutron flux signals. The agreement between the experimental and theoretical transfer function could be improved by adjusting the reactivity coefficients. The applications of these measurements with respect to reactor diagnosis and malfunction detection are discussed. For this purpose the accuracy of the measured transfer function is of great importance. Therefore an extensive error analysis has been performed. It turned out, that the inherent instability of the reactor without control system and the feedback by the primary coolant system were the reasons for comparatively big systematical errors. The conditions have been derived under which these types of errors can be considerably reduced. The conclusions can also be applied to analogical measurements at fast sodium cooled reactors. Because of their inherent stability the systematical errors will be reduced. (orig.) [de

  20. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  1. Computer-Mediated Communication Preferences and Individual Differences in Neurocognitive Measures of Emotional Attention Capture, Reactivity and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkirk, Sarah; Luehring-Jones, Peter; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) to engage socially has become increasingly prevalent, yet few studies examined individual differences that may shed light on implications of CMC for adjustment. The current study examined neurocognitive individual differences associated with preferences to use technology in relation to social-emotional outcomes. In Study 1 (N =91), a self-report measure, the Social Media Communication Questionnaire (SMCQ), was evaluated as an assessment of preferences for communicating positive and negative emotions on a scale ranging from purely via CMC to purely face-to-face. In Study 2, SMCQ preferences were examined in relation to event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with early emotional attention capture and reactivity (the frontal N1) and later sustained emotional processing and regulation [the late positive potential (LPP)]. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded while 22 participants passively viewed emotional and neutral pictures and completed an emotion regulation task with instructions to increase, decrease or maintain their emotional responses. A greater preference for CMC was associated with reduced size of and satisfaction with social support, greater early (N1) attention capture by emotional stimuli, and reduced LPP amplitudes to unpleasant stimuli in the increase emotion regulatory task. These findings are discussed in the context of possible emotion- and social-regulatory functions of CMC. PMID:26613269

  2. Investigation of space-energy effects in the reactivity measurement by neutron noise with excore detectors in a reflected LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescano, V.H.; Behringer, K.

    1982-01-01

    Practical application of the zero-crossing correlation method for measuring slightly-subcritical reactivities in a swimming-pool reactor required the use of detector locations in the reflector zone near to the core boundary. Experimental investigations of neutron-noise cross-power spectra showed significant deviations from the point-reactor model at higher frequencies (> 100 Hz). Nevertheless, the use of the point-reactor model was found to be a useful approach in the analysis of the zero-crossing correlation method, yielding results which agreed well with those obtained from the rod-drop method. The theoretical part of the work is concerned with a space-dependent model calculation in two-group diffusion theory to support the experimental findings. The model calculation can explain the trends observed in the neutron-noise spectra as well as the applicability of the point-reactor model to the zero-crossing correlation method. To obtain better insight, the calculations have been extended to neutron-noise spectra when one or both detectors are located in the core zone. In the case of a large core and widely-spaced detectors, with at least one detector in the core zone, a sink frequency appears in the spectra. This effect is well known in coupled-core kinetics. (author)

  3. Reliability and validity of advanced theory-of-mind measures in middle childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Elizabeth O; Homer, Bruce D

    2017-09-01

    Although theory-of-mind (ToM) development is well documented for early childhood, there is increasing research investigating changes in ToM reasoning in middle childhood and adolescence. However, the psychometric properties of most advanced ToM measures for use with older children and adolescents have not been firmly established. We report on the reliability and validity of widely used, conventional measures of advanced ToM with this age group. Notable issues with both reliability and validity of several of the measures were evident in the findings. With regard to construct validity, results do not reveal a clear empirical commonality between tasks, and, after accounting for comprehension, developmental trends were evident in only one of the tasks investigated. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Second-order false belief tasks have acceptable internal consistency. The Eyes Test has poor internal consistency. Validity of advanced theory-of-mind tasks is often based on the ability to distinguish clinical from typical groups. What does this study add? This study examines internal consistency across six widely used advanced theory-of-mind tasks. It investigates validity of tasks based on comprehension of items by typically developing individuals. It further assesses construct validity, or commonality between tasks. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Description of a Reactivity Measuring Apparatus; Description d'un Type d'Appareil de Mesure de la Reactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deiss, M.; Uberschlag, J. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)

    1966-06-15

    Measurement of the reactor period, or doubling time, normally provides the reactor control technician with sufficient data on the behaviour of the installation. The physicist engaged on determining physical parameters cannot be satisfied with these measurements, the concepts of which take no account of the nature of the nuclear fission phenomenon. Normally the physicist must therefore convert period measurement, which has to be carried out over a sufficiently long time in order to eliminate the disturbing transient terms, and to transform this quantity, by means of Nordheim curves, into a reactivity value. This procedure is long and laborious. It therefore seemed desirable to design a type of apparatus capable of evaluating directly and instantaneously the excess multiplication constant {delta}k on the basis of the changes in a physical quantity N assumed to be proportional to the neutron flux prevailing in the reactor core. The coefficient {delta}k is practically coincident with the reactivity near to criticality. This type of apparatus can therefore resolve the relationship which is the inverse of that defined by the system of differential equations with reference to the reactor, by considering the simplified case of a ''point'' reactor in the one-group theory. The application of analog computation techniques leads to the utilization of a Pagels-type network arranged either as an input impedance or as a feed-back impedance of an operational amplifier. This latter structure brings about the inversion of the mathematical operator defining the function of the reactor, and has been adopted for the production of the two apparatuses described. It makes it possible to adapt to the latter the qualities inherent in servo systems and particularly the filtering action of high frequency noise. The output unit of these various types of instrument consists of a divider extracting the term {delta}k from the product N{delta}k supplied by the first stage of the apparatus. The two

  5. Moderating ratio parameter evaluation for different materials by means of Monte Carlo calculations and reactivity direct measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio, A.; Cagnazzo, M.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Salvini, A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine moderating properties of different materials (water, graphite, perfluoropolyethers), in particular the slowing down power (SDP) and the moderating ratio (MR), defined as SDP =ξΣ S and MR=ξΣ S /Σ A , where Σ S and Σ A represent the macroscopic scattering and absorption cross section, respectively, and ξ is the average logarithmic energy loss per collision. Slowing-down power indicates how rapidly a neutron will slow down in the material, but it does not fully explain the effectiveness of the material as a moderator. In fact, a material can slow down neutrons with high efficiency because of its big Σ S , but it can be a poor moderator because with high probability it also absorbs neutrons. Thus, the most complete measure of the effectiveness of a moderator is the moderating ratio parameter which takes into account also the absorption effects: the bigger is the moderating ratio values, the more effectively the material performs as a moderator. The first part of the work consisted in the comparison between the SDP and MR parameter evaluated for different materials by means of Monte Carlo simulations and by means of calculations based on their definition formula (they are developed from knowledge of material composition and of microscopic cross section σ i (derived from literature)). It was found that this comparison showed a good agreement with errors less than 10 %. Thus the Monte Carlo code seems to be a good support for the calculation of the moderating parameters, particularly useful when the materials are compounds of many elements. The second part of the work was dedicated to correlate the materials' MR values with the measured variation of reactivity induced by the insertion of the materials in the core of TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia. This is possible by definition of a new parameter for the measure. This parameter, named S, depends on the total weight of the sample inserted in the reactor core

  6. Proceedings of the symposium on advanced measurement techniques and instrumentation: abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, Y.B.; Kushwaha, M.; Somkuwar, S.P.; Ajayakumar, S.; Sampathkumar, R.

    2011-01-01

    In order to consolidate the existing knowledge base and further to focus on the future directions of the field of advanced measurement techniques and instrumentation, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre has organized a three-day symposium on 'Advanced Measurement Techniques and Instrumentation' at Multi Purpose Hall, Training School Hostel, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai during February 02-04, 2011. The symposium is aimed at providing a forum to discuss the emerging trends and challenges ahead in the important area of measurement science and technology. This is a unique symposium, which brings together scientists and engineers from all disciplines and provides them a platform for close interaction to exchange ideas, methodologies and expertise, which is extremely important for synergic growth of this field. The symposium consists of 27 talks, which include keynote address, plenary and invited talks, and 63 contributory papers. The abstracts of these papers are brought to you in this volume. Readers may observe that the scientific programme of the symposium covers a wide ranging issues including advanced scientific concepts in measurements, instrumentation strategies, mathematical techniques and development of devices for applications in fundamental physics, astrophysics, fusion plasmas, nuclear reactors, accelerators, environment, chemical and biological sciences, and national security. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Advanced density profile reflectometry; the state-of-the-art and measurement prospects for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, E. J.

    2006-10-01

    Dramatic progress in millimeter-wave technology has allowed the realization of a key goal for ITER diagnostics, the routine measurement of the plasma density profile from millimeter-wave radar (reflectometry) measurements. In reflectometry, the measured round-trip group delay of a probe beam reflected from a plasma cutoff is used to infer the density distribution in the plasma. Reflectometer systems implemented by UCLA on a number of devices employ frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW), ultrawide-bandwidth, high-resolution radar systems. One such system on DIII-D has routinely demonstrated measurements of the density profile over a range of electron density of 0-6.4x10^19,m-3, with ˜25 μs time and ˜4 mm radial resolution, meeting key ITER requirements. This progress in performance was made possible by multiple advances in the areas of millimeter-wave technology, novel measurement techniques, and improved understanding, including: (i) fast sweep, solid-state, wide bandwidth sources and power amplifiers, (ii) dual polarization measurements to expand the density range, (iii) adaptive radar-based data analysis with parallel processing on a Unix cluster, (iv) high memory depth data acquisition, and (v) advances in full wave code modeling. The benefits of advanced system performance will be illustrated using measurements from a wide range of phenomena, including ELM and fast-ion driven mode dynamics, L-H transition studies and plasma-wall interaction. The measurement capabilities demonstrated by these systems provide a design basis for the development of the main ITER profile reflectometer system. This talk will explore the extent to which these reflectometer system designs, results and experience can be translated to ITER, and will identify what new studies and experimental tests are essential.

  8. Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Hall, R.A.; Lancaster, D.B.; Young, E.H.; Gavin, P.H.; Robertson, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ''Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,'' are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard

  9. BN600 reactivity definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltyshev, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1980, the fast BN600 reactor with sodium coolant has been operated at Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant. The periodic monitoring of the reactivity modifications should be implemented in compliance with the standards and regulations applied in nuclear power engineering. The reactivity measurements are carried out in order to confirm the basic neutronic features of a BN600 reactor. The reactivity measurements are aimed to justify that nuclear safety is provided in course of the in-reactor installation of the experimental core components. Two reactivity meters are to be used on BN600 operation: 1. Digital on-line reactivity calculated under stationary reactor operation on power (approximation of the point-wise kinetics is applied). 2. Second reactivity meter used to define the reactor control rod operating components efficiency under reactor startup and take account of the changing efficiency of the sensor, however, this is more time-consumptive than the on-line reactivity meter. The application of two reactivity meters allows for the monitoring of the reactor reactivity under every operating mode. (authors)

  10. A digital real-time reactivity meter for PFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, D.

    1975-08-01

    A digital reactivity meter has been prpduced which is believed to constitute a significant advance over others reported in the literature. The main advantage of this system is its versatility which is brought about by the high degree of interactive operator control which is provided. The reactivity and power are continuously displayed in both graphical and alpha-numeric form on a TV-type of display unit. Data output is by means of an incremental graph plotter, a typewriter, or a high speed paper tape punch. The system has been extensively tested on the Prototype Fast Reactor at Dounreay and is now the standard reactivity measuring method for reactor experiments there. (author)

  11. Airborne measurements of reactive organic trace gases in the atmosphere - with a focus on PTR-MS measurements onboard NASA's flying laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Schiller, Sven Arne; Feil, Stefan; Hanel, Gernot; Jordan, Alfons; Mutschlechner, Paul; Crawford, James H.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Millet, Dylan

    2017-04-01

    Reactive organic gases (ROGs) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry as they affect the rates of ozone production, particle formation and growth, and oxidant consumption. Measurements of ROGs are analytically challenging because of their large variety and low concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere, and because they are easily affected by measurement artefacts. On aircraft, ROGs are typically measured by canister sampling followed by off-line analysis in the laboratory, fast online gas chromatography or online chemical ionization mass spectrometry. In this work, we will briefly sum up the state-of-the-art in this field before focusing on proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and its deployment onboard NASA's airborne science laboratories. We will show how airborne PTR-MS was successfully used in NASA missions for characterizing emissions of ROGs from point sources, for following the photochemical evolution of ROGs in a biomass burning plume, for determining biosphere-atmosphere fluxes of selected ROGs and for validating satellite data. We will also present the airborne PTR-MS instrument in its most recent evolution which includes a radiofrequency ion funnel and ion guide combined with a compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer and discuss its superior performance characteristics. The development of the airborne PTR-MS instrument was supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (bmvit) through the Austrian Space Applications Programme (ASAP) of the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) (grants #833451, #847967). This work was also partly supported by NASA under grant #NNX14AP89G.

  12. Agricultural support measures of advanced countries and food insecurity in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Many developing nations, especially the least developed countries, are subjected to recurrent spells of food insecurity. In order to understand food insecurity in these countries it is necessary to consider not only immediate or trigger-causes of food crises, but also its underlying or systemic causes. This paper argues that the agricultural support measures of advanced countries may act as a systemic cause for food insecurity in developing countries. While the import of subsidized foods by d...

  13. An Assessment of Wind Plant Complex Flows Using Advanced Doppler Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, W. S.; Schroeder, J.; Hirth, B.; Duncan, J.; Guynes, J.

    2015-12-01

    As installed wind energy capacity continues to steadily increase, the need for comprehensive measurements of wind plant complex flows to further reduce the cost of wind energy has been well advertised by the industry as a whole. Such measurements serve diverse perspectives including resource assessment, turbine inflow and power curve validation, wake and wind plant layout model verification, operations and maintenance, and the development of future advanced wind plant control schemes. While various measurement devices have been matured for wind energy applications (e.g. meteorological towers, LIDAR, SODAR), this presentation will focus on the use of advanced Doppler radar systems to observe the complex wind flows within and surrounding wind plants. Advanced Doppler radars can provide the combined advantage of a large analysis footprint (tens of square kilometers) with rapid data analysis updates (a few seconds to one minute) using both single- and dual-Doppler data collection methods. This presentation demonstrates the utility of measurements collected by the Texas Tech University Ka-band (TTUKa) radars to identify complex wind flows occurring within and nearby operational wind plants, and provide reliable forecasts of wind speeds and directions at given locations (i.e. turbine or instrumented tower sites) 45+ seconds in advance. Radar-derived wind maps reveal commonly observed features such as turbine wakes and turbine-to-turbine interaction, high momentum wind speed channels between turbine wakes, turbine array edge effects, transient boundary layer flow structures (such as wind streaks, frontal boundaries, etc.), and the impact of local terrain. Operational turbine or instrumented tower data are merged with the radar analysis to link the observed complex flow features to turbine and wind plant performance.

  14. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burton, Patrick D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  15. Methods for measuring the spectral reflectivity of advanced materials at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salikhov, T.P.; Kan, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    For investigation in the domain of advanced materials as well as for new technologies there is an urgent need for knowledge of the spectral reflectivity of the materials specially at high temperatures. However the methods available are mostly intended for measuring the model materials with specular or diffuse reflection surface. This is not quite correct since advanced materials have mixed specular diffuse reflection surfaces. New methods for reflectivity measurements of materials in the visible, near and middle infrared range at high temperature, regardless of surface texture, have been developed. The advantages of the methods proposed are as flows: (a) the facility of performing the reflectivity measurements for materials with mixed specular diffuse reflectance; (b) wide spectral range 0,38-8 micro m; (c) wide temperature range 300-3000 K; (d) high accuracy and rapid measurements. The methods are based on the following principals (i) Diffuse irradiation of the sample surface and the use of Helkholtz reciprocity principle to determine the directional hemispherical reflectivity ii) Pulse polychromatic probing of the sample by additional light source. The first principle excludes the influence of the angular reflection distribution of sample surface on data obtained. The second principle gives the possibility of simultaneous measurements of the reflectivity. The second principle gives the possibility of simultaneous measurements of the reflectivity in wide spectral range. On the basis of these principles for high temperature reflectometers have been developed and discussed here. (author)

  16. Measurement of longitudinal and rayleigh wave velocities by advanced one-sided technique in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Song, Won Joon; Popovics, J. S.; Achenbach, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    A new procedure for the advanced one-sided measurement of longitudinal wave and surface wave velocities in concrete is presented in this paper. Stress waves are generated in a consistent fashion with a DC solenoid. Two piezoelectric accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a specimen as receivers. Stress waves propagate along the surface of the specimen and are detected by the receivers. In order to reduce the large incoherent noise levels of the signals, signals are collected and manipulated by a computer program for each velocity measurement. For a known distance between the two receivers and using the measured flight times, the velocities of the longitudinal wave and the surface wave are measured. The velocities of the longitudinal wave determined by this method are compared with those measured by conventional methods on concrete, PMMA and steel.

  17. Assessing adaptability and reactive scope: Introducing a new measure and illustrating its use through a case study of environmental stress in forest-living baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLarnon, A M; Sommer, V; Goffe, A S; Higham, J P; Lodge, E; Tkaczynski, P; Ross, C

    2015-05-01

    In order to maintain regulatory processes, animals are expected to be adapted to the range of environmental stressors usually encountered in their environmental niche. The available capacity of their stress responses is termed their reactive scope, which is utilised to a greater or lesser extent to deal with different stressors. Typically, non-invasive hormone assessment is used to measure the physiological stress responses of wild animals, but, for methodological reasons, such measurements are not directly comparable across studies, limiting interpretation. To overcome this constraint, we propose a new measure of the relative strength of stress responses, 'demonstrated reactive scope', and illustrate its use in a study of ecological correlates (climate, food availability) of faecal glucocorticoid (fGC) levels in two forest-living troops of baboons. Results suggest the wild-feeding troop experiences both thermoregulatory and nutritional stress, while the crop-raiding troop experiences only thermoregulatory stress. This difference, together with the crop-raiding troop's lower overall physiological stress levels and lower demonstrated fGC reactive scope, may reflect nutritional stress-buffering in this troop. The relatively high demonstrated fGC reactive scope levels of both troops compared with other baboons and primate species, may reflect their extreme habitat, on the edge of the geographic range for baboons. Demonstrated reactive scope provides a means of gauging the relative strengths of stress responses of individuals, populations, or species under different conditions, enhancing the interpretive capacity of non-invasive studies of stress hormone levels in wild populations, e.g. in terms of animals' adaptive flexibility, the magnitude of their response to anthropogenic change, or the severity of impact of environmental conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measured performance of 12 demonstation projects - IEA Task 13 "advanced solar low energy buildings"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Poel, Bart

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from measurements and experiences gained from interviews on 12 advanced solar low energy houses designed and built as part of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme – Task 13. Three years after the IEA Task 13 formally ended, the results were collected...... climate conditions are compared and differences explained. Special innovative installations and systems are de-scribed and evaluated. In general the measured energy consumption was higher than the expected values due to user influence and unforeseen technical problems but still an energy saving of 60...

  19. Advances in measuring techniques for turbine cooling test rigs - Status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Instrumentation development pertaining to turbine cooling research has resulted in the design and testing of several new systems. Pressure measurements on rotating components are being made with a rotating system incorporating ten miniature transducers and a slip-ring assembly. The system has been tested successfully up to speeds of 9000 rpm. An advanced system development combining pressure transducer and thermocouple signals is also underway. Thermocouple measurements on rotating components are transferred off the shaft by a 72-channel rotating data system. Thermocouple data channels are electronically processed on board and then removed from the shaft in the form of a digital serial train by one winding of a rotary transformer.

  20. Taking Poseidon's Measure from Space: Advances in our Understanding of the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    In many ways the ocean defines our planet and makes it livable. It provides marine resources and ecosystem services that are critical to a sustainable society. Today we understand that there is a growing need to predict, manage, and adapt to changes on our planet - changes that occur not only in the atmosphere but also in the ocean. Over the last 40 years remarkable advances in measuring key ocean quantities have been made - through the development of new satellite technologies and successful missions as well as through in-situ observing systems enabled by advances in robotics, communications, navigation, and sensors. Ocean science (and atmospheric science) is a science of numbers, imaging, and numerical models. Predictability of the ocean is tied to the scale of variability in space and time. Satellite observations have spectacularly showed us the incredible structure and variability of the ocean. It has been the combination of satellites and in-situ sensors that have allowed us to advance understanding and prediction. This presentation will highlight some of the key scientific advances that have been enabled by satellites.

  1. Reactivity and recovery from different types of work measured by catecholamines and cortisol : a systematic literature overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, J.K; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Meijman, T.F.; van der Beek, A.J.

    Objectives-To review occupational health, laboratory, and sports Literature on neuroendocrine reactivity and recovery from mental, combined mental and physical, or physical tasks. Methods-A systematic literature search was performed in eight databases. Studies with catecholamines or cortisol as

  2. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing

    1996-02-01

    The importance and the usual methods of reactivity measurement in a nuclear reactor are presented. Emphasis is put upon the calculation principle, software and hardware components, main specifications, application, as well as the features of the digital reactivity meter. The test results of operation in various reactors shown that the meter possess the following features: high accuracy, short response time, low output noise, high resolution, wide measuring range, simple and flexible to operate, high stability and reliability. In addition, the reactivity meter can save the measuring data automatically and have a perfect capability of self-verifying. It not only meet the requirement of the reactivity measurement in nuclear power plant, but also can be applied to various types of reactors. (1 tab.)

  3. Efficacy and toxicity in brain tumor treatment - quantitative Measurements using advanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Søren

    2016-01-01

    From the clinical introduction in the 1980s, MRI has grown to become an indispensable brain imaging modality, mainly due to its excellent ability to visualize soft tissues. Morphologically, T1- and T2-weighted brain tumor MRI have been part of routine diagnostic radiology for more than two decades...... with the introduction of magnets with higher field strength. Ongoing technical development has enabled a change from semiquantitative measurements to a true quantitative approach. This step is expected to have a great impact on the treatment of brain tumor patients in the future. The aim of this Ph.D. dissertation...... was to explore how different advanced MRI techniques could contribute to a higher degree of individualized treatment of brain tumor patients. The thesis is based on three studies in which advanced MRI is used to evaluate the possible role of fMRI in presurgical planning, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI...

  4. Validation of an advanced analytical procedure applied to the measurement of environmental radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Vuong, Le Quang; Ho, Phan Long; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Tao, Chau Van

    2018-04-01

    In this work, an advanced analytical procedure was applied to calculate radioactivity in spiked water samples in a close geometry gamma spectroscopy. It included MCNP-CP code in order to calculate the coincidence summing correction factor (CSF). The CSF results were validated by a deterministic method using ETNA code for both p-type HPGe detectors. It showed that a good agreement for both codes. Finally, the validity of the developed procedure was confirmed by a proficiency test to calculate the activities of various radionuclides. The results of the radioactivity measurement with both detectors using the advanced analytical procedure were received the ''Accepted'' statuses following the proficiency test. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced distillation curve measurements for corrosive fluids: Application to two crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Starkey Ott; Beverly L. Smith; Thomas J. Bruno [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Division

    2008-10-15

    We have recently introduced several important improvements in the measurement of distillation curves for complex fluids. The modifications include a composition-explicit data channel for each distillate fraction (for both qualitative and quantitative analysis) and corrosivity assessment of each distillate fraction. The composition-explicit information is achieved with a new sampling approach that allows precise qualitative as well as quantitative analyses of each fraction, on the fly. We have applied the new method to a variety of fluids, including simple n-alkanes, rocket propellant, gasoline, jet fuels, and a hydrocarbon fluid made corrosive with dissolved hydrogen sulfide. In the current contribution, we present the application of the advanced distillation curve method to two samples of crude oil. A primary motivation behind the work is to precisely measure the distillation curves of these oils using our advanced distillation apparatus; these low uncertainty measurements of true thermodynamic state points can be used for equation of state development and differentiation of crude oil samples. Then, the information content of each distillation was extended much further by use of the composition-explicit data channel: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), infrared spectrophotometry (IR), gas chromatography with sulfur chemiluminescence detection (GC-SCD), and the copper strip corrosion test (CSCT) were used for each distillate volume fraction sampled. Consequently, for each volume fraction of crude oil distillate sampled, we can address the composition, quantitate the total sulfur content, and measure the corrosivity. 39 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Development of an instrument to measure self-efficacy in caregivers of people with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Anna; Krishnasamy, Meinir; Schofield, Penelope

    2013-06-01

    Informal caregivers of people with advanced cancer experience many negative impacts as a result of their role. There is a lack of suitable measures specifically designed to assess their experience. This study aimed to develop a new measure to assess self-efficacy in caregivers of people with advanced cancer. The development and testing of the new measure consisted of four separate, sequential phases: generation of issues, development of issues into items, pilot testing and field testing. In the generation of issues, 17 caregivers were interviewed to generate data. These data were analysed to generate codes, which were then systematically developed into items to construct the instrument. The instrument was pilot tested with 14 health professionals and five caregivers. It was then administered to a large sample for field testing to establish the psychometric properties, with established measures including the Brief Cope and the Family Appraisals for Caregiving Questionnaire for Palliative Care. Ninety-four caregivers completed the questionnaire booklet to establish the factor structure, reliability and validity. The factor analysis resulted in a 21-item, four-factor instrument, with the subscales being termed Resilience, Self-Maintenance, Emotional Connectivity and Instrumental Caregiving. The test-retest reliability and internal consistency were both excellent, ranging from 0.73 to 0.85 and 0.81 to 0.94, respectively. Six convergent and divergent hypotheses were made, and five were supported. This study has developed a new instrument to assess self-efficacy in caregivers of people with advanced cancer. The result is a four-factor, 21-item instrument with demonstrated reliability and validity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Results of Koo measurements of HTGR lattice by oscillated zero reactivity technique using the AGIP-NUCLEARE RB-2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, F; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P. L.; Ghilardotti, G.; Giuliani, C.

    1974-10-15

    This paper describes k-infinity measurements conducted using an assembly of loose HTGR coated particles in the BR-2 reactor by means of null reactivity oscillating method comparing the effect of poisoned and unpoisoned lattices like tests performed in the Physical Constants Test Reactor (PCTR) at Hanford. The RB-2 reactor was the property of the Italian firm AGIP NUCLEARE and operated at the Montecuccolino Center in Bologna.

  8. Obtainment of the subcritical reactivity by mean of measurement of APSD and CPSD employing pulse mode detectors in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new experimental approach to determine the reactivity levels of subcritical systems. The method employs the subcritical kinetic model developed by Gandini and Salvatores and it is based only on measured quantities such as counting rates of the detectors employed in the experiments and the parameters arising from the least squares fitting of the APSD (Auto Power Spectral Density) and CPSD (Cross Power Spectral Density). Detector efficiencies, quantity required in other procedures such as Neutron Source Multiplication (NSM) method, are not needed in the proposed method. The only hypothesis made in the method was the independence of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron generation time to the subcriticality level of the system. The proposed method was applied to measure the reactivity of several subcritical configurations of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. Measurements of APSD and CPSD were performed in several degrees of subcriticality (up to around -7000 pcm). The spectral densities data were least squares fitted to get the prompt decay mode (α) and other quantities. Beside the startup source of the facility, an external neutron source of Am-Be was installed near the core in order to improve neutron counting statistics. The final experimental results are of good quality. The proposed experimental method shows clearly that the classical point kinetic theory cannot describe the measured reactivity. Instead, the reactivity inferred from this model follows closely the subcriticality index (ζ) for the source arrangements in the experiment. The agreement of the MCNP5 and GPT-TORT results, both with ENDF/B-VII.0 as the basic nuclear data library, when compared to the corresponding experimental ones was also good. (author)

  9. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described

  10. Performance of an Advanced Stirling Convertor Based on Heat Flux Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dcott D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two highefficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower, Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center. The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot-end and cold-end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given heat input. It is difficult to measure heat input to Stirling convertors due to the complex geometries of the hot components, temperature limits of sensor materials, and invasive integration of sensors. A thin-film heat flux sensor was used to directly measure heat input to an ASC. The effort succeeded in designing and fabricating unique sensors, which were integrated into a Stirling convertor ground test and exposed to test temperatures exceeding 700 C in air for 10,000 hr. Sensor measurements were used to calculate thermal efficiency for ASC-E (Engineering Unit) #1 and #4. The post-disassembly condition of the sensors is also discussed.

  11. Reversal of Long-Term Trends in Ethane Identified from the Global Atmosphere Watch Reactive Gases Measurement Network

    OpenAIRE

    Helmig, Detlev; Buchmann, Brigitte; Carpenter, Lucy; Claude, Anja; Emmons, Louisa; Flocke, Frank; Franco, Bruno; Galbally, Ian; Hannigan, James; Hueber, Jacques; Koide, Hiroshi; Lewis, Alastair; Masarie, Ken; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Montzka, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gases play an important role in climate and air pollution issues. They control the self-cleansing capability of the troposphere, contribute to air pollution and acid deposition, regulate the lifetimes and provide tracers for deciphering sources and sinks for greenhouse gases. Within GAW, the focus is placed on long-term, high-quality observations of ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). More than 100 stati...

  12. Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder in School-Aged Foster Children - A Confirmatory Approach to Dimensional Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Stine; Breivik, Kyrre; Heiervang, Einar; Havik, Toril; Havik, Odd E.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factor structure and external correlates of the constructs Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder (DSED) from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The following were addressed: First, do our data support the DSM-5 conceptualization of RAD/DSED as two separate constructs? Second, are RAD and DSED distinct from other well-established dimensions of child psychopathology? Third, what are the ...

  13. Cerebral blood volume reactivity to hypercapnia measured with 11C-labelled carboxyhemoglobin and positron emission tomography. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Iwao; Uemera, Kazuo; Murakami, Matsutaro; Shishido, Fumio; Tomura, Noriaki

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present study to examine the regionality of the CBV reactivity to changes in PaCO2 employing 11C-labelled carboxyhemoglobin and positron emission tomography (PET). The study was caried out using sequential scans obtained by PET followinng a single administration by the 11CO inhalation method during which activation of either hypercapnia or hypocapnia was induced in the subject. 7 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Advancing implementation science through measure development and evaluation: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara C; Weiner, Bryan J; Stanick, Cameo; Fischer, Sarah M

    2015-07-22

    Significant gaps related to measurement issues are among the most critical barriers to advancing implementation science. Three issues motivated the study aims: (a) the lack of stakeholder involvement in defining pragmatic measure qualities; (b) the dearth of measures, particularly for implementation outcomes; and (c) unknown psychometric and pragmatic strength of existing measures. Aim 1: Establish a stakeholder-driven operationalization of pragmatic measures and develop reliable, valid rating criteria for assessing the construct. Aim 2: Develop reliable, valid, and pragmatic measures of three critical implementation outcomes, acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility. Aim 3: Identify Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research and Implementation Outcome Framework-linked measures that demonstrate both psychometric and pragmatic strength. For Aim 1, we will conduct (a) interviews with stakeholder panelists (N = 7) and complete a literature review to populate pragmatic measure construct criteria, (b) Q-sort activities (N = 20) to clarify the internal structure of the definition, (c) Delphi activities (N = 20) to achieve consensus on the dimension priorities, (d) test-retest and inter-rater reliability assessments of the emergent rating system, and (e) known-groups validity testing of the top three prioritized pragmatic criteria. For Aim 2, our systematic development process involves domain delineation, item generation, substantive validity assessment, structural validity assessment, reliability assessment, and predictive validity assessment. We will also assess discriminant validity, known-groups validity, structural invariance, sensitivity to change, and other pragmatic features. For Aim 3, we will refine our established evidence-based assessment (EBA) criteria, extract the relevant data from the literature, rate each measure using the EBA criteria, and summarize the data. The study outputs of each aim are expected to have a positive impact

  15. Measuring and Advancing Experimental Design Ability in an Introductory Course without Altering Existing Lab Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Shanks

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introductory biology courses provide an important opportunity to prepare students for future courses, yet existing cookbook labs, although important in their own way, fail to provide many of the advantages of semester-long research experiences. Engaging, authentic research experiences aid biology students in meeting many learning goals. Therefore, overlaying a research experience onto the existing lab structure allows faculty to overcome barriers involving curricular change. Here we propose a working model for this overlay design in an introductory biology course and detail a means to conduct this lab with minimal increases in student and faculty workloads. Furthermore, we conducted exploratory factor analysis of the Experimental Design Ability Test (EDAT and uncovered two latent factors which provide valid means to assess this overlay model’s ability to increase advanced experimental design abilities. In a pre-test/post-test design, we demonstrate significant increases in both basic and advanced experimental design abilities in an experimental and comparison group. We measured significantly higher gains in advanced experimental design understanding in students in the experimental group. We believe this overlay model and EDAT factor analysis contribute a novel means to conduct and assess the effectiveness of authentic research experiences in an introductory course without major changes to the course curriculum and with minimal increases in faculty and student workloads.

  16. Measurement of reactivity in ADS reactors considering an exponential decay after an interruption in the external proton source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrice Junior, Edson; Gonçalves, Alessandro C., E-mail: ejunior@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The online monitoring of reactivity in ADS reactors is of paramount importance for the operations of such systems. This work is dedicated to the prediction of reactivity from a decay of the neutron population after a pulse from the external source. For that, a pulse from an external source in an ADS reactor was simulated with Serpent Reactor Physics code. From the data obtained, it was possible to make an adjustment, based on a combination of exponentials. The coefficient of the exponential for the dominating term of the sum of exponentials is compared to the simplified solution of the neutron diffusion equation, thus obtaining the reactivity. The method used for the adjustment has the advantage of not requiring data that is equally spaced, and of being easily programmable, waiving the use of specific software for linear adjustments. The preliminary results of the research showed a 750 pcm deviation in relation to the value found of -3,630 pcm obtained through point kinetics, and as a result should be the object of further study. (author)

  17. Measurement of reactivity in ADS reactors considering an exponential decay after an interruption in the external proton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrice Junior, Edson; Gonçalves, Alessandro C.

    2017-01-01

    The online monitoring of reactivity in ADS reactors is of paramount importance for the operations of such systems. This work is dedicated to the prediction of reactivity from a decay of the neutron population after a pulse from the external source. For that, a pulse from an external source in an ADS reactor was simulated with Serpent Reactor Physics code. From the data obtained, it was possible to make an adjustment, based on a combination of exponentials. The coefficient of the exponential for the dominating term of the sum of exponentials is compared to the simplified solution of the neutron diffusion equation, thus obtaining the reactivity. The method used for the adjustment has the advantage of not requiring data that is equally spaced, and of being easily programmable, waiving the use of specific software for linear adjustments. The preliminary results of the research showed a 750 pcm deviation in relation to the value found of -3,630 pcm obtained through point kinetics, and as a result should be the object of further study. (author)

  18. RF radiation measurement for the Advanced Photon Source (AS) personnel safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.J.; Kim, J.; Otocki, R.; Zhou, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) booster and storage ring RF system consists of five 1-MW klystrons, four 5-cell cavities, and sixteen single-cell cavities. The RF power is distributed through many hundreds of feet of WR2300 waveguide with H-hybrids and circulators. In order to protect personnel from the danger of RF radiation due to loose flanges or other openings in the waveguide system, three detector systems were implemented: an RF radiation detector, a waveguide pressure switch, and a Radiax aperture detector (RAD). This paper describes RF radiation measurements on the WR 2300 waveguide system

  19. Advances in hydrocarbons spill remediation in Barreal-Belen: proposed measures for the protection of aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Fallas, Luis Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The advances accomplished with regard to hydrocarbons spill remediation, through 2009 are shown and the costs made in the process are listed. In the Central Valley have been located about 160 gas stations on major aquifers at risk of contamination, in light of the case of hydrocarbons spill happened in Barreal-Belen in 2004, discovered by chance during the inspection to a nearby well. The study instruments of the vulnerability to contamination of aquifers are analyzed. A proposal of measures is presented, which should be taken to ensure control over the risk of further spillage and for proper management of waters. (author) [es

  20. Comparing three different approaches to the measurement of needs concerning fatigue in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulla Riis; Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify patients having fatigue, it is necessary to assess the patients fatigue systematically. This study investigates three different approaches to the assessment of needs concerning fatigue in patients with advanced cancer and addresses the following questions. METHODS: In a cross......-sectional nationwide survey, patients were asked about their needs concerning fatigue in three different ways: Fatigue intensity was measured with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire, fatigue burden (the extent fatigue was a problem) and fatigue felt need...

  1. Getting ready to use control: Advances in the measurement of young children's use of proactive control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Doebel

    Full Text Available A key developmental transition in executive function is in the temporal dynamics of its engagement: children shift from reactively calling to mind task-relevant information as needed, to being able to proactively maintain information across time in anticipation of upcoming demands. This transition is important for understanding individual differences and developmental changes in executive function; however, methods targeting its assessment are limited. We tested the possibility that Track-It, a paradigm developed to measure selective sustained attention, also indexes proactive control. In this task children must track a target shape as it moves unpredictably among moving distractors, and identify where it disappears, which may require proactively maintaining information about the target or goal. In two experiments (5-6 year-olds, Ns = 33, 64, children's performance on Track-It predicted proactive control across two established paradigms. These findings suggest Track-It measures proactive control in children. Theoretical possibilities regarding how proactive control and selective sustained attention may be related are also discussed.

  2. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ha-Duong; Mukhopadhyay, Biswaijit; Ehrmann, Oswin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-08-18

    In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a "one-sensor-one-packaging_technology" concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a "floating-concept", capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load) with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO). A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane) transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process). A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not "floating" but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA.

  3. Advanced Liquid-Free, Piezoresistive, SOI-Based Pressure Sensors for Measurements in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Duong Ngo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present and discuss two innovative liquid-free SOI sensors for pressure measurements in harsh environments. The sensors are capable of measuring pressures at high temperatures. In both concepts media separation is realized using a steel membrane. The two concepts represent two different strategies for packaging of devices for use in harsh environments and at high temperatures. The first one is a “one-sensor-one-packaging_technology” concept. The second one uses a standard flip-chip bonding technique. The first sensor is a “floating-concept”, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 400 °C (constant load with an accuracy of 0.25% Full Scale Output (FSO. A push rod (mounted onto the steel membrane transfers the applied pressure directly to the center-boss membrane of the SOI-chip, which is placed on a ceramic carrier. The chip membrane is realized by Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE or Bosch Process. A novel propertied chip housing employing a sliding sensor chip that is fixed during packaging by mechanical preloading via the push rod is used, thereby avoiding chip movement, and ensuring optimal push rod load transmission. The second sensor can be used up to 350 °C. The SOI chips consists of a beam with an integrated centre-boss with was realized using KOH structuring and DRIE. The SOI chip is not “floating” but bonded by using flip-chip technology. The fabricated SOI sensor chip has a bridge resistance of 3250 Ω. The realized sensor chip has a sensitivity of 18 mV/µm measured using a bridge current of 1 mA.

  4. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-01-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  5. Final Report for SERDP Project RC-1649: Advanced Chemical Measurements of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.J. Johnson; R.J. Yokelson; S.K. Akagi; I.R. Burling; D.R. Weise; S.P. Urbanski; C.E. Stockwell; J. Reardon; E.N. Lincoln; L.T.M. Profeta; A. Mendoza; M.D.W. Schneider; R.L. Sams; S.D. Williams; C.E. Wold; D.W.T. Griffith; M. Cameron; J.B. Gilman; C. Warneke; J.M. Roberts; P. Veres; W.C. Kuster; J de Gouw

    2014-01-01

    Project RC-1649, "Advanced Chemical Measurement of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns" was undertaken to use advanced instrumental techniques to study in detail the particulate and vapor-phase chemical composition of the smoke that results from prescribed fires used as a land management tool on DoD bases, particularly bases in the southeastern U.S. The statement...

  6. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Shun-lai; Sun, Li; Niu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model

  7. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Shun-lai, E-mail: shawn@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Sun, Li [Manufacturing Process Research, General Motors China Science Lab, No. 56, Jinwan Road, Shanghai (China); Niu, Chao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model.

  8. Advanced Nuclear Measurements - Sensitivity Analysis Emerging Safeguards, Problems and Proliferation Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    During the past year this component of the Advanced Nuclear Measurements LDRD-DR has focused on emerging safeguards problems and proliferation risk by investigating problems in two domains. The first is related to the analysis, quantification, and characterization of existing inventories of fissile materials, in particular, the minor actinides (MA) formed in the commercial fuel cycle. Understanding material forms and quantities helps identify and define future measurement problems, instrument requirements, and assists in prioritizing safeguards technology development. The second problem (dissertation research) has focused on the development of a theoretical foundation for sensor array anomaly detection. Remote and unattended monitoring or verification of safeguards activities is becoming a necessity due to domestic and international budgetary constraints. However, the ability to assess the trustworthiness of a sensor array has not been investigated. This research is developing an anomaly detection methodology to assess the sensor array

  9. The Development of Advanced Processing and Analysis Algorithms for Improved Neutron Multiplicity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santi, P.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Ianakiev, K.; Iliev, M.; Swinhoe, M.; Croft, S.; Worrall, L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most distinctive and informative signatures of special nuclear materials is the emission of correlated neutrons from either spontaneous or induced fission. Because the emission of correlated neutrons is a unique and unmistakable signature of nuclear materials, the ability to effectively detect, process, and analyze these emissions will continue to play a vital role in the non-proliferation, safeguards, and security missions. While currently deployed neutron measurement techniques based on 3He proportional counter technology, such as neutron coincidence and multiplicity counters currently used by the International Atomic Energy Agency, have proven to be effective over the past several decades for a wide range of measurement needs, a number of technical and practical limitations exist in continuing to apply this technique to future measurement needs. In many cases, those limitations exist within the algorithms that are used to process and analyze the detected signals from these counters that were initially developed approximately 20 years ago based on the technology and computing power that was available at that time. Over the past three years, an effort has been undertaken to address the general shortcomings in these algorithms by developing new algorithms that are based on fundamental physics principles that should lead to the development of more sensitive neutron non-destructive assay instrumentation. Through this effort, a number of advancements have been made in correcting incoming data for electronic dead time, connecting the two main types of analysis techniques used to quantify the data (Shift register analysis and Feynman variance to mean analysis), and in the underlying physical model, known as the point model, that is used to interpret the data in terms of the characteristic properties of the item being measured. The current status of the testing and evaluation of these advancements in correlated neutron analysis techniques will be discussed

  10. Measuring job satisfaction of advanced nurse practitioners and advanced midwife practitioners in the Republic of Ireland: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Anne Paula; Corry, Margarita; Moser, Debra K

    2015-01-01

    To describe the level of job satisfaction of advanced nurse practitioners (ANP) and advanced midwife practitioners in the Republic of Ireland (RoI). Job satisfaction is related to productivity, performance, turnover and health, and thus is a challenge for nursing and healthcare organisations. Job satisfaction data were collected from 47 ANPs using the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale. High levels of global job satisfaction were reported. All ANPs reported satisfaction with autonomy, sense of accomplishment, challenge, social interaction and status in the organisation. Lower levels of job satisfaction were attributed to the amount of involvement in research (55%), opportunities to receive compensation for services provided outside normal working hours (55%), the amount (44%) and the quality of administrative support (51%), and the opportunity to negotiate bonuses and resources in return for productivity (36%). Advanced nurse practitioners in RoI have high levels of job satisfaction with areas relating to clinical practice but are dissatisfied with areas that lead to empowerment within organisations. Efforts to improve the negotiating and leadership skills of ANPs may improve job satisfaction. Enhancing inter-professional collegial relationships and improving managerial recognition of the role within nursing are key areas to be targeted to promote job satisfaction of ANPs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Automated tune measurements in the Advanced Light Source storage ring using a LabVIEW application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.A.; Chin, M.; Kim, C.H.; Nishimura, H.

    1994-06-01

    Horizontal and vertical betatron tunes and the synchrotron tune are measured frequently during storage ring commissioning. The measurements are tedious and subject to human errors. Automating this kind of repetitive measurement is underway using LabVIEW for Windows, a software application supplied by National Instruments Corporation, that provides acquisition, graphing, and analysis of data as well as instrument control through the General Purpose Interface Bus (GPIB). We have added LabVIEW access to the Advanced Light Source (ALS) data base and control system. LabVIEW is a fast and efficient tool for accelerator commissioning and beam physics studies. Hardware used to perform tune measurements include a tracking generator (or a white noise generator), strip line electrodes for external ''citation of the beam, button monitors, and a spectrum analyzer. All three tunes are displayed simultaneously on the spectrum analyzer. Our program automatically identifies three tunes by applying and analyzing small variations and reports the results. This routine can be encapsulated in other applications, for instance, in a chromaticity measurement and correction program

  12. Initial time-resolved particle beam profile measurements at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    The commissioning of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring began in early 1995. Characterization of the stored particle beam properties involved time-resolved transverse and longitudinal profile measurements using optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) monitors. Early results include the observation of the beam on a single turn, measurements of the transverse beam sizes after damping using a 100 μs integration time (σ x ∼ 150 ± 25 μm, σ γ ∼ 65 ± 25 μm, depending on vertical coupling), and measurement of the bunch length (σ τ ∼ 25 to 55 ps, depending on the charge per bunch). The results are consistent with specifications and predictions based on the 8.2 nm-rad natural emittance, the calculated lattice parameters, and vertical coupling less than 10%. The novel, single-element focusing mirror for the photon transport line and the dual-sweep streak camera techniques which allow turn-by-turn measurements will also be presented. The latter measurements are believed to be the first of their kind on a storage ring in the USA

  13. Stress Reactivity in Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrman, Philip R; Hall, Martica; Barilla, Holly; Buysse, Daniel; Perlis, Michael; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Ross, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) are more reactive to stress than good sleepers (GS). PI and GS (n = 20 per group), matched on gender and age, completed three nights of polysomnography. On the stress night, participants received a mild electric shock and were told they could receive additional shocks during the night. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of cortisol and alpha amylase along with self-report and visual analog scales (VAS). There was very little evidence of increased stress on the stress night, compared to the baseline night. There was also no evidence of greater stress reactivity in the PI group for any sleep or for salivary measures. In the GS group, stress reactivity measured by VAS scales was positively associated with an increase in sleep latency in the experimental night on exploratory analyses. Individuals with PI did not show greater stress reactivity compared to GS.

  14. The Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom): Comparing the Chemical Climatology of Reactive Species and Air Parcels from Measurements and Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, M. J.; Flynn, C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kim, M. J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Hanisco, T. F.; Diskin, G. S.; Daube, B. C.; Commane, R.; McKain, K.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, S.; Steenrod, S.; Strahan, S. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Murray, L. T.; Mao, J.; Shindell, D. T.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) is building a photochemical climatology of the remote troposphere based on objective sampling and profiling transects over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. These statistics provide direct tests of chemistry-climate models. The choice of species focuses on those controlling primary reactivity (a.k.a. oxidative state) of the troposphere, specifically chemical tendencies of O3 and CH4. These key species include, inter alia, O3, CH4, CO, C2H6, other alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, NOx, HNO3, HO2NO2, PAN, other organic nitrates, H2O, HCHO, H2O2, CH3OOH. Three of the four ATom deployments are now complete, and data from the first two (ATom-1 & -2) have been released as of this talk (see espoarchive.nasa.gov/archive/browse/atom). The statistical distributions of key species are presented as 1D and 2D probability densities (PDs) and we focus here on the tropical and mid-latitude regions of the Pacific during ATom-1 (Aug) and -2 (Feb). PDs are computed from ATom observations and 6 global chemistry models over the tropospheric depth (0-12 km) and longitudinal extent of the observations. All data are weighted to achieve equal mass-weighting by latitude regimes to account for spatial sampling biases. The models are used to calculate the reactivity in each ATom air parcel. Reweighting parcels with loss of CH4 or production of O3, for example, allows us to identify which air parcels are most influential, including assessment of the importance of fine pollution layers in the most remote troposphere. Another photochemical climatology developed from ATom, and used to test models, includes the effect of clouds on photolysis rates. The PDs and reactivity-weighted PDs reveal important seasonal differences and similarities between the two campaigns and also show which species may be most important in controlling reactivities. They clearly identify some very specific failings in the modeled climatologies and help us evaluate the chemical

  15. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  16. Chemical Modeling of the Reactivity of Short-Lived Greenhouse Gases: A Model Inter-Comparison Prescribing a Well-Measured, Remote Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.; Flynn, Clare M.; Zhu, Xin; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Strode, Sarah A.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Correa, Gustavo; Murray, Lee T.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2018-01-01

    We develop a new protocol for merging in situ measurements with 3-D model simulations of atmospheric chemistry with the goal of integrating over the data to identify the most reactive air parcels in terms of tropospheric production and loss of the greenhouse gases ozone and methane. Presupposing that we can accurately measure atmospheric composition, we examine whether models constrained by such measurements agree on the chemical budgets for ozone and methane. In applying our technique to a synthetic data stream of 14,880 parcels along 180W, we are able to isolate the performance of the photochemical modules operating within their global chemistry-climate and chemistry-transport models, removing the effects of modules controlling tracer transport, emissions, and scavenging. Differences in reactivity across models are driven only by the chemical mechanism and the diurnal cycle of photolysis rates, which are driven in turn by temperature, water vapor, solar zenith angle, clouds, and possibly aerosols and overhead ozone, which are calculated in each model. We evaluate six global models and identify their differences and similarities in simulating the chemistry through a range of innovative diagnostics. All models agree that the more highly reactive parcels dominate the chemistry (e.g., the hottest 10% of parcels control 25-30% of the total reactivities), but do not fully agree on which parcels comprise the top 10%. Distinct differences in specific features occur, including the regions of maximum ozone production and methane loss, as well as in the relationship between photolysis and these reactivities. Unique, possibly aberrant, features are identified for each model, providing a benchmark for photochemical module development. Among the 6 models tested here, 3 are almost indistinguishable based on the inherent variability caused by clouds, and thus we identify 4, effectively distinct, chemical models. Based on this work, we suggest that water vapor differences in

  17. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2017-07-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (P a CO 2 ) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R 2  = 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  18. Recent advances in hardware and software are to improve spent fuel measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, P.; Beddingfield, D.H.; Lestone, J.P.; Pelowitz, D.G.; Bytchkov, M.; Starovich, Z.; Harizanov, I.; Luna-Vellejo, J.; Lavender, C.

    2001-01-01

    Vast quantities of spent fuel are available for safeguard measurements, primarily in Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) of the former Soviet Union. This spent fuel, much of which consists of long-cooling-time material, is going to become less unique in the world safeguards arena as reprocessing projects or permanent repositories continue to be delayed or postponed. The long cooling time of many of the spent fuel assemblies being prepared for intermediate term storage in the CIS countries promotes the possibility of increased accuracy in spent fuel assays. This improvement is made possible through the process of decay of the Curium isotopes and of fission products. An important point to consider for the future that could advance safeguards measurements for reverification and inspection would be to determine what safeguards requirements should be imposed upon this 'new' class of spent fuel, Improvements in measurement capability will obviously affect the safeguards requirements. What most significantly enables this progress in spent fuel measurements is the improvement in computer processing power and software enhancements leading to user-friendly Graphical User Interfaces (GUT's). The software used for these projects significantly reduces the IAEA inspector's time expenditure for both learning and operating computer and data acquisition systems, At the same time, by standardizing the spent fuel measurements, it is possible to increase reproducibility and reliability of the measurement data. Hardware systems will be described which take advantage of the increased computer control available to enable more complex measurement scenarios. A specific example of this is the active regulation of a spent fuel neutron coincident counter's 3 He tubes high voltage, and subsequent scaling of measurement results to maintain a calibration for direct assay of the plutonium content of Fast Breeder Reactor spent fuel. The plutonium content has been successfully determined for

  19. Statistical metrology - measurement and modeling of variation for advanced process development and design rule generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boning, Duane S.; Chung, James E.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced process technology will require more detailed understanding and tighter control of variation in devices and interconnects. The purpose of statistical metrology is to provide methods to measure and characterize variation, to model systematic and random components of that variation, and to understand the impact of variation on both yield and performance of advanced circuits. Of particular concern are spatial or pattern-dependencies within individual chips; such systematic variation within the chip can have a much larger impact on performance than wafer-level random variation. Statistical metrology methods will play an important role in the creation of design rules for advanced technologies. For example, a key issue in multilayer interconnect is the uniformity of interlevel dielectric (ILD) thickness within the chip. For the case of ILD thickness, we describe phases of statistical metrology development and application to understanding and modeling thickness variation arising from chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP). These phases include screening experiments including design of test structures and test masks to gather electrical or optical data, techniques for statistical decomposition and analysis of the data, and approaches to calibrating empirical and physical variation models. These models can be integrated with circuit CAD tools to evaluate different process integration or design rule strategies. One focus for the generation of interconnect design rules are guidelines for the use of 'dummy fill' or 'metal fill' to improve the uniformity of underlying metal density and thus improve the uniformity of oxide thickness within the die. Trade-offs that can be evaluated via statistical metrology include the improvements to uniformity possible versus the effect of increased capacitance due to additional metal

  20. Advanced measurement and analysis of surface textures produced by micro-machining processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordatchev, Evgueni V; Hafiz, Abdullah M K

    2014-01-01

    Surface texture of a part or a product has significant effects on its functionality, physical-mechanical properties and visual appearance. In particular for miniature products, the implication of surface quality becomes critical owing to the presence of geometrical features with micro/nano-scale dimensions. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of surface texture are carried out predominantly by profile parameters, which are often insufficient to address the contribution of constituent spatial components with varied amplitudes and wavelengths. In this context, this article presents a novel approach for advanced measurement and analysis of profile average roughness (R a ) and its spatial distribution at different wavelength intervals. The applicability of the proposed approach was verified for three different surface topographies prepared by grinding, laser micro-polishing and micro-milling processes. From the measurement and analysis results, R a (λ) spatial distribution was found to be an effective measure of revealing the contributions of various spatial components within specific wavelength intervals towards formation of the entire surface profile. In addition, the approach was extended to the measurement and analysis of areal average roughness S a (λ) spatial distribution within different wavelength intervals. Besides, the proposed method was demonstrated to be a useful technique in developing a functional correlation between a manufacturing process and its corresponding surface profile. (paper)

  1. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley A. Judd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain.

  2. Accuracy and initial clinical experience with measurement software (advanced vessel analysis) in three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toshi; Hirohata, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the clinical benefits of three dimensional (3D) imaging, such as 3D-CTA and 3D-DSA, in cerebro-vascular disease have been widely recognized. Software for quantitative analysis of vascular structure in 3D imaging (advanced vessel analysis: AVA) has been developed. We evaluated AVA with both phantom studies and a few clinical cases. In spiral and curvy aluminum tube phantom studies, the accuracy of diameter measurements was good in 3D images produced from data set generated by multi-detector row CT or rotational angiography. The measurement error was less than 0.03 mm on aluminum tube phantoms that were 3 mm and 5 mm in diameter. In the clinical studies, the differences of carotid artery diameter measurements between 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA was less than 0.3 mm in. The measurement of length, diameter and angle by AVA should provide useful information for planning surgical and endovascular treatments of cerebro-vascular disease. (author)

  3. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured

  4. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Lesley A; Jackson, Brian E; Fonteno, William C

    2015-07-03

    The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics) has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain.

  5. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.; Nehrir, A. R.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 MeasurementsJoel F. Campbell1, Bing Lin1, Michael D. Obland1, Zhaoyan Liu1, Susan Kooi2, Tai-Fang Fan2, Amin R. Nehrir1, Byron Meadows1, Edward V. Browell31NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 2SSAI, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 3STARSS-II Affiliate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 AbstractGlobal and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America project are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the ASCENDS and ACT-America science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new sub-meter hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. These techniques are used in a new data processing

  6. Synchronisation of the LHC Betatron Coupling and Phase Advance Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M

    2014-01-01

    The new LHC Diode ORbit and OScillation (DOROS) system will provide beam position readings with submicrometre resolution and at the same time will be able to perform measurements of local betatron coupling and beam phase advance with micrometre beam excitation. The oscillation sub-system employs gain-controlled RF amplifiers, shared with the orbit system, and followed by dedicated diode detectors to demodulate the beam oscillation signals into the kHz frequency range, subsequently digitized by multi-channel 24-bit ADCs. The digital signals are processed in each front-end with an FPGA and the results of reduced throughput are sent using an Ethernet protocol to a common concentrator, together with the orbit data. The phase advance calculation between multiple Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) requires that all DOROS front-ends have a common phase reference. This paper presents methods used to generate such a reference and to maintain a stable synchronous sampling on all system front-ends. The performance of the DOR...

  7. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  8. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  9. Resolution and drift measurements on the Advanced Photon Source beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.

    1994-01-01

    The resolution and long-term drift of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) electronics were measured using the charged particle beams in the ESRF storage ring with various beam current and configurations (single bunch, 8 and 16 equally spaced bunches, and 1/3-fill). The energy of the stored electrons was 6 GeV. The integrated BPM electronics system as used for this work is capable of measuring the beam position on a turn-by-turn basis, which can be accumulated for N turns (N = 2 n , n = 1, 2, ... , 11). Estimation of the BPM resolution apart from the low-frequency beam motion was made by measuring the standard deviation in the measured beam position with different Ns. The analysis of the results indicates a BPM resolution of 18/√ N [μm] for the APS storage ring, which is equivalent to 0.07 μm/√Hz. For the miniature insertion device BPM with 2.8 times higher sensitivity, the resolution will be 0.02 μm/√Hz. The long-term drift of the BPM electronics independent of the actual beam motion was measured at 2 μm/hr, which settled after approximately 1.5 hours. This drift can be attributed mainly to the temperature effect. Comparison of the results with the laboratory measurements shows good agreement. Implication of the BPM resolution limit on the proposed global and local beam position feedback systems for the APS storage ring will also be discussed

  10. Resolution and drift measurements on the advanced photon source beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.

    1995-01-01

    The resolution and long-term drift of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) electronics were measured using the charged particle beams in the ESRF storage ring with various beam current and configurations (single bunch, 8 and 16 equally spaced bunches, and 1/3-fill). The energy of the stored electrons was 6 GeV. The integrated BPM electronics system as used for this work is capable of measuring the beam position on a turn-by-turn basis, which can be accumulated for N turns (N=2 n , n=1,2,...,11) . Estimation of the BPM resolution apart from the low-frequency beam motion was made by measuring the standard deviation in the measured beam position with different Ns. The analysis of the results indicates a BPM resolution of 18/√N [μm] for the APS storage ring, which is equivalent to 0.07 μm/√Hz. For the miniature insertion device BPM with 2.8 times higher sensitivity, the resolution will be 0.02 μm/√Hz. The long-term drift of the BPM electronics independent of the actual beam motion was measured at 2 μm/hr, which settled after approximately 1.5 hours. This drift can be attributed mainly to the temperature effect. Comparison of the results with the laboratory measurements shows good agreement. Implication of the BPM resolution limit on the proposed global and local beam position feedback systems for the APS storage ring will also be discussed. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Measurement and reactive burn modeling of the shock to detonation transition for the HMX based explosive LX-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. D.; Ma, Xia; Clements, B. E.; Gibson, L. L.; Gustavsen, R. L.

    2017-06-01

    Gas-gun driven plate-impact techniques were used to study the shock to detonation transition in LX-14 (95.5 weight % HMX, 4.5 weight % estane binder). The transition was recorded using embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. Initial shock pressures, P, ranged from 2.5 to 8 GPa and the resulting distances to detonation, xD, were in the range 1.9 to 14 mm. Numerical simulations using the SURF reactive burn scheme coupled with a linear US -up / Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for the reactant and a JWL equation of state for the products, match the experimental data well. Comparison of simulation with experiment as well as the ``best fit'' parameter set for the simulations is presented.

  12. RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Low, Raymond; Plate, David; Portmann, Gregory; Robin, David; Scarvie, Tomas; Stupakov, Gennady; Weber, Jonah; Zolotorev, Max

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years

  13. Advanced power cycling test for power module with on-line on-state VCE measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Ui-min; Trintis, Ionut; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    module. The proposed concept can perform various stress conditions which is valid in a real mission profile and it is using a real power converter application with small loss. The concept of the proposed test setup is first presented. Then, the on-line on-state collector-emitter voltage VCE measurement......Recent research has made an effort to improve the reliability of power electronic systems to comply with more stringent constraints on cost, safety, predicted lifetime and availability in many applications. For this, studies about failure mechanisms of power electronic components and lifetime...... estimation of power semiconductor devices and capacitors have been done. Accelerated power cycling test is one of the common tests to assess the power device module and develop the lifetime model considering the physics of failure. In this paper, a new advanced power cycling test setup is proposed for power...

  14. TFTR alpha extraction and measurement: Development and testing of advanced alpha detectors: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehring, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced alpha-particle detectors made of heavy elements were investigated as alternatives to silicon surface-barrier detectors for the ''foil-neutralization technique'' of alpha-particle diagnostics in fusion reactors with high neutron backgrounds. From an extensive literature review, it was decided that HgI 2 would make a more suitable detector for alpha-particle diagnostics than other heavy element detectors such as CdTe. Thus, HgI 2 detectors were designed and fabricated. Experimental tests were performed to determine detector characteristics and detector responses to alpha particles. Radiation noise measurements were also performed using the North Carolina State University PULSTAR nuclear reactor for both the HgI 2 detectors and commercial Si(Au) surface barrier detectors. 15 refs., 1 fig

  15. PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT AND THE ENVIRONMENT SYMPOSIUM: Measurement and mitigation of reactive nitrogen species from swine and poultry production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, W; Capelari, M

    2017-05-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) species include oxides of nitrogen [N; nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and nitrous oxide (NO)], anions (nitrate and nitrite), and amine derivatives [ammonia (NH), ammonium salts and urea]. Of the different Nr species, air emissions from swine and poultry facilities are predominantly NH followed by NO. Excreta emissions are NH, ammonium ions, and urea with trace amounts of nitrate and nitrite. Farm systems and practices that handle manure as a wet product without pH modification favor almost exclusive NH production. Systems and practices associated with dry manure handling and bedded systems emit more NH than NO. Results from a turkey grow-out study estimated that just under 1% of consumed N was emitted as NO from housing, compared with just under 11% emitted as NH. Despite generally less NO emissions from animal housing compared with crop field emissions, NO emissions from housing are often greater than estimated. Lagoon systems emit more NO than either slurry or deep pit swine systems. Deep pit swine buildings emit only one-third the NO that is emitted from deep bedded swine systems. Laying hen, broiler chicken, and turkey buildings emit over 4 times as much NO as swine housing, on a weight-adjusted basis. Critical control points for mitigation center on: 1) reducing the amount of N excreted and, therefore, excreted N available for loss to air or water during housing, manure storage, or following land application of manures; 2) capturing excreted N to prevent release of N-containing compounds to air, water, or soil resources; or 3) conversion or treatment of N-containing compounds to non-reactive N gas.

  16. Serum adipokines, adipose tissue measurements and metabolic parameters in patients with advanced radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Eric; Michel, Fabrice; Béreau, Matthieu; Dehecq, Barbara; Gaugler, Béatrice; Wendling, Daniel; Grandclément, Emilie; Saas, Philippe; Dumoulin, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    We conducted the present study to evaluate the serum levels of adipokines (leptin, total and high molecular adiponectin, resistin), a marker of cartilage breakdown (C2C), and ghrelin together with body composition in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty patients and 50 sex-matched healthy subjects (HS) were evaluated. Knee OA was scored according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade. Body composition parameters including lean mass and measurements of fat mass (total fat, adiposity, fat in the android and gynoid regions, visceral fat and trunk/legs fat ratio) were obtained using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Most of the recruited patients (88%) had advanced knee OA with KL grade 3 or 4. The patients had higher body mass index than HS (p < 0.0001). Serum leptin, high molecular adiponectin, resistin and ghrelin levels did not differ between patients and HS. Total adiponectin was higher in women with OA compared to women from the HS group (p = 0.004). Total fat mass, adiposity and measurements of central adiposity (fat in the android region, trunk/lower limbs fat ratio and visceral fat) were increased in patients with knee OA (all p < 0.05). Total adiponectin was borderline associated with the severity of OA. Our results show that total adiponectin is significantly increased in women with advanced knee OA. Independently of gender, patients with severe knee OA were characterized by a significant excess of fat with a distribution toward the visceral region. This abnormal body composition may contribute to the cardiometabolic profile that is described in patients with knee OA.

  17. Measurement of K-27, an oxime-type cholinesterase reactivator by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection from different biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, Melinda; Kalász, Huba; Petroianu, George A; Laufer, Rudolf; Kuca, Kamil; Tekes, Kornélia

    2007-08-17

    K-27 is a bisquaternary asymmetric pyridinium aldoxime-type cholinesterase reactivator of use in the treatment of poisoning with organophosphorous esterase inhibitors. A sensitive, simple and reliable reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method with electrochemical detection was developed for the measurement of K-27 concentrations in rat brain, cerebrospinal fluid, serum and urine samples. Male Wistar rats were treated intramuscularly with K-27 and the samples were collected 60 min later. Separation was carried out on an octadecyl silica stationary phase and a disodium phosphate solution (pH 3.7) containing citric acid, octane sulphonic acid and acetonitrile served as mobile phase. Measurements were carried out at 30 degrees C at E(ox) 0.65 V. The calibration curve was linear through the range of 10-250 ng/mL. Accuracy, precision and the limit of detection calculated were satisfactory according to internationally accepted criteria. Limit of quantitation was 10 ng/mL. The method developed is reliable and sensitive enough for monitoring K-27 levels from different biological samples including as little as 10 microL of cerebrospinal fluid. The method--with slight modification in the composition of the mobile phase--can be used to measure a wide range of other related pyridinium aldoxime-type cholinesterase reactivators.

  18. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, Robert G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Technical Challenge and Demonstration of Advanced Solution Monitoring and Measurement System (ASMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, A.; Mukai, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Hosoma, T.; Yoshimoto, K.; Tamura, T.; Iwamoto, T.

    2010-01-01

    JNFL and JAEA have collaboratively started to develop an Advanced Solution Measurement and monitoring System (ASMS) as a part of technical challenge intended for next generation safeguards NDA equipment. After we completed feasibility study by using small detectors, the second stage of ASMS has installed into PCDF tank located in a cell, and then tested and calibrated by Pu nitrate solution experimentally. There was no experience measuring around 50kg Pu inventory directly, so it was very challenging work. The conventional SMMS (Solution Monitoring and Measurement System) that is composed of precision manometers acquires density, level and temperature of solution, so that the sampling and analysis are essential to obtain the nuclear material amount in the tank. The SMMS has two weak points on verification and monitoring of the nuclear material flow and inventory; (1) Direct measurement of the inventory cannot be done, (2) Solution rework and reagent adjustment operation in actual plant will make miss-interpretation on the monitoring evaluation. The purpose of ASMS development is to establish quantitative plutonium mass measurement technique directly by NDA of high concentrated pure plutonium nitrate solution and monitoring capability for solution transfers in a process. The merits of ASMS are considered below; (1) Provide direct Pu measurement and continuous monitoring capability, (2) Eliminate sampling and analysis at IIV, (3) Reduce unmeasured inventory. The target of the measurement uncertainty of ASMS is set less than 6% (1sigma) which is equivalent to meet the detection level of the partial defect at IIV by NDA. Known-alpha coincidence counting technique is applied to the ASMS, which is similar to the NDAs for MOX powder as a principle measurement technique. Especially, three following points are key techniques to establish ASMS. (1) Pre-determination of plutonium isotopic composition because it impacts alpha and rho-zero values to obtain multiplication

  20. A simple mechanism for measuring and adjusting distraction forces during maxillary advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Suzuki, Boonsiva

    2009-10-01

    Direct measurement of distraction forces on the craniofacial skeleton has never been reported. The present report describes the development of a method of assessing and adjusting traction forces applied through maxillary distraction osteogenesis. A simple mechanism to measure and adjust tension force during maxillary distraction osteogenesis was developed and connected bilaterally to the traction screws of a rigid external distraction device. Measurements were carried out before and after activation using a Shimpo (Nidec-Shimpo America Corporation, Itasca, IL) force gauge in 4 patients (2 with unilateral cleft lip and/or palate, 1 with bilateral cleft lip and palate, and 1 with noncleft) during the distraction process. Activation was performed twice a day at a rate of 1 mm/day. The average maximum force applied throughout the distraction period was 42.5 N (range 16.4 to 65.3 N), with increments, after activation, averaging 10.5 N (range 7.9 to 15.7 N). In patients with unilateral cleft lip and/or palate, distraction forces on the larger segment were 65.1% higher than on the lesser segment. A differential pattern of forces was also observed in the patients with asymmetric noncleft. However, the differential forces between lateral segments were not observed in the patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate. During the activation period, distraction forces progressively increased, whereas the amount of maxillary movement decreased. Pain and discomfort were reported with high forces. Through this mechanism, direct measurement and adjustment of distraction forces during maxillary advancement was possible. The unbalanced pattern of forces observed in patients with cleft suggests the necessity of individual adjustments for controlling pain and clinical symptoms. Accordingly, assessment of distraction forces during maxillary distraction osteogenesis is extremely helpful in understanding the biomechanics of the distraction process.

  1. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Y

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yanni Hao,1 Verena Wolfram,2 Jennifer Cook2 1Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2Adelphi Values, Bollington, UK Background: Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods: Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases, online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center, and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results: A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D. Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG, time trade-off (TTO, and visual analog scale (VAS, were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G, and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C; most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex

  2. Optical modeling and polarization calibration for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Brian; Austermann, Jason; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeff; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    array of detectors for Advanced ACTPol, the next generation upgrade to ACTPol, will be deployed in 2016. We plan to continue using both techniques and compare them to astrophysical source measurements for the Advanced ACTPol polarization calibration.

  3. Advancing Health Literacy Measurement: A Pathway to Better Health and Health System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The concept of health literacy initially emerged and continues to gain strength as an approach to improving health status and the performance of health systems. Numerous studies clearly link low levels of education, literacy, and health literacy with poor health, poor health care utilization, increased barriers to care, and early death. However, theoretical understandings and methods of measuring the complex social construct of health literacy have experienced a continual evolution that remains incomplete. As a result, the seemingly most-cited definition of health literacy proposed in the now-decade-old Institute of Medicine report on health literacy is long overdue for updating. Such an effort should engage a broad and diverse set of health literacy researchers, practitioners, and members of the public in creating a definition that can earn broad consensus through validation testing in a rigorous scientific approach. That effort also could produce the basis for a new universally applicable measure of health literacy. Funders, health systems, and policymakers should reconsider their timid approach to health literacy. Although the field and corresponding evidence base are not perfect, health literacy—especially when combined with a focus on prevention and integrative health—is one of the most promising approaches to advancing public health. PMID:25491583

  4. Metopic synostosis: Measuring intracranial volume change following fronto-orbital advancement using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Steinmacher, Sahra; Bächli, Heidi; Somlo, Elek; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Engel, Michael

    2015-06-01

    There is still disagreement regarding the intracranial volumes of patients with metopic synostosis compared with healthy patients. This study aimed to compare the intracranial volume of children with metopic synostosis before and after surgery to an age- and sex-matched control cohort using three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry. Eighteen boys with metopic synostosis were operated on using standardized fronto-orbital advancement. Frontal, posterior and total intracranial volumes were measured exactly 1 day pre-operatively and 10 days post-operatively, using 3D photogrammetry. To establish an age- and sex-matched control group, the 3D photogrammetric data of 634 healthy boys between the ages of 3 and 13 months were analyzed. Mean age at surgery was 9 months (SD 1.7). Prior to surgery, boys with metopic synostosis showed significantly reduced frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with the reference group, but similar posterior volumes. After surgery, frontal and total intracranial volumes did not differ statistically from the control group. As children with metopic synostosis showed significantly smaller frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with an age- and sex-matched control group, corrective surgery should aim to achieve volume expansion. Furthermore, 3D photogrammetry provides a valuable alternative to CT scans in the measurement of intracranial volume in children with metopic synostosis, which significantly reduces the amount of radiation exposure to the growing brain. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. X-ray beam size measurements on the Advanced Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.; Chambers, F.W.; Lauer, E.J.; Slaughter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam size has been determined on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) by intercepting the beam with a target and measuring the resulting x-ray intensity as a function of time as the target is moved through the beam. Several types of targets have been used. One is a tantalum rod which extends completely across the drift chamber. Another is a tungsten powder filled carbon crucible. Both of these probes are moved from shot to shot so that the x-ray signal intensity varies with probe position. A third is a larger tantalum disk which is inserted on beam axis to allow determining beam size on a one shot basis. The x-ray signals are detected with an MCP photomultiplier tube located at 90 0 to the beamline. It is sufficiently shielded to reject background x-rays and neutrons. The signals were digitized, recorded and later unfolded to produce plots of x-ray intensity versus probe position for several times during the pulse. The presumption that the x-ray intensity is proportional to beam current density is checked computationally. Details of the probe construction and PMT shielding, as well as sample measurements are given

  6. Initial measurements of beam breakup instability in the advanced test accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.T.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of beam breakup (BBU) instability performed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) up to the end of February 1984. The main objective was to produce a high current usable electron beam at the ATA output. A well-known instability is BBU which arises from the accelerator cavity modes interacting with the electron beam. The dominant mode is TM130 at a frequency of approximately 785 MHz. It couples most strongly to the beam motion and has been observed to grow in the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA), which has only eight accelerator cavities. ATA has one hundred and seventy cavities and therefore the growth of BBU is expected to be more severe. In this paper, BBU measurements are reported for ATA with beam currents of 4 to 7 kA. Analysis showed that the growth of the instability with propagation distance was as expected for the lower currents. However, the high current data showed an apparent higher growth rate than expected. An explanation for this anomaly is given in terms of a ''corkscrew'' excitation. The injector BBU noise level for a field emission brush cathode was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for a cold plasma discharge cathode. These injector rf amplitudes agree very well with values obtained using the method of differenced Btheta loops

  7. EDITORIAL: Advances in Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments for Production Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Gao, Yongsheng; Krystek, Michael

    2008-08-01

    . Neuschaefer-Rube et al, also from PTB, present procedures and standards to test tactile and optical microsensors and micro-computed tomography systems, which are similar to the established tests for classical coordinate measuring machines and assess local and global sensor characteristics. The last three papers are related to micro/nano-metrology and intelligent instrumentation. Jiang et al from Tohoku University describe the fabrication of piezoresistive nanocantilevers for ultra-sensitive force detection by using spin-out diffusion, EB lithography and FAB etching, respectively. Y-C Liu et al from National Taiwan University develop an economical and highly sensitive optical accelerometer using a commercial optical pickup head. Michihata et al from Osaka University experimentally investigate the positioning sensing property and accuracy of a laser trapping probe for a nano-coordinate measuring machine. As guest editors, we believe that this special feature presents the newest information on advances in measurement technology and intelligent instruments from basic research to applied systems for Production Engineering. We would like to thank all the authors for their great contributions to this special feature and the referees for their careful reviews of the papers. We would also like to express our thanks and appreciation to Professor P Hauptmann, Editor-in-Chief of MST, for his kind offer to publish selected ISMTII 2007 papers in MST, and to the publishing staff of MST for their dedicated efforts that have made this special feature possible.

  8. Measurements of the fast ion distribution during neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron heating in ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Kwon, M.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; England, A.C.; Gossett, J.M.; Horton, L.D.; Isler, R.C.; Lyon, J.F.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Rayburn, T.M.; Shepard, T.D.; Bell, G.L.; Fowler, R.H.; Morris, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    A neutral particle analyzer (NPA) with horizontal and vertical scanning capability has been used to make initial measurements of the fast ion distribution during neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron heating (ICH) on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). These measurements are presented and compared with the results of modeling codes that predict the analyzer signals during these heating processes. 6 refs., 5 figs

  9. Dose Measurements of Bremsstrahlung-Produced Neutrons at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, P.K.; Pisharody, M.; Semones, E.

    1998-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung is generated in the storage rings of the synchrotron radiation facilities by the radiative interaction of the circulating particle beam with both the residual gas molecules and storage ring components. These bremsstrahlung photons, having an energy range of zero to the maximum energy of the particle beam, interact with beamline components like beam stops and collimators generating photoneutrons of varying energies. There are three main processes by which photoneutrons may be produced by the high energy bremsstrahlung photons: giant nuclear dipole resonance and decay (10 MeV γ γ γ > 140 MeV). The giant resonance neutrons are emitted almost isotropically and have an average energy of about 2 MeV. High energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) emitted from the quasi-deuteron decay and intranuclear cascade are peaked in the forward direction. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where bremsstrahlung energy can be as high as 7 GeV, production of photoneutrons in varying yields is possible from all of the above three processes. The bremsstrahlung produced along a typical 15.38-m straight path of the insertion device (ID) beamline of the APS has been measured and analyzed in previous studies. High-Z materials constituting the beamline components, such as collimators and beam stops, can produce photoneutrons upon interaction with these bremsstrahlung photons. The 1/E nature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum and the fact that the photoneutron production cross section is comparatively larger in the energy region 10 MeV γ 3 detector, as well as a very sensitive pressurized 3 He detector, is used for neutron dose measurements. The dose equivalent rates, normalized to bremsstrahlung power, beam current, and storage ring vacuum, are measured for various targets. This report details the experimental setup,

  10. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which...... may lead to a biased estimation of risk. Using four cohorts from CHANCES which had repeated measures in participants 50 years and older, multivariate time-dependent Cox proportional hazards was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) to examine the relationship between......, they may participate in distinct/independent pathways. Accounting for independent changes in risk factors over time may be crucial for unveiling their effects on mortality and disease morbidity....

  11. Investigating the Effect of Inflammation on Atrial Fibrillation Occurrence by Measuring Highly Sensitive C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Hassanzadeh Delui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmias that cardiologists and internists encounter. The goal of this article is to clarify an overview of the evidence linking inflammation to AF existence, which may highlight the effect of some pharmacological agents that have genuine potential to reduce the clinical burden of AF by modulating inflammatory pathways. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 50 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF with different etiologies and 50 patients with sinus rhythm and similar bases were selected. Sampling for highly sensitive c-reactive (hs-CRP was done on the patients presenting with AF to the Ghaem hospital between October 2006 and June 2007. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62 years with maximum of 90 and minimum of 36 and standard deviation of 13.80. The most frequent age group was 71-80years. Fifty-four percent of patients were male and 46% were female. Mean serum hs-CRP levels in AF patients with hypertension (HTN ,Ischemic heart disease(IHD, Valvular heart disease (VHD, HTN+IHD and hyperthyroidism were 8.10, 9.40, 8.68, 10.16 and 5.98 mg/Lit; respectively. There was significant difference between hs-CRP levels in hypertensive patients in the two groups (P=0.010. Similar results were observed in IHD patients, VHD patients and HTN+IHD patients in two groups (P=0.015, P=0.037, P=0.000. Conclusion: In addition to some risk factors like baseline cardiac diseases, aging, thyrotoxicosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and cardiac surgery, there also appears to be consistent links between hs-CRP, a marker of inflammation, and the pathogenesis of AF. Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmias that cardiologists and internists encounter. The goal of this article is to clarify an overview of the evidence linking inflammation to AF existence, which may highlight the effect of some pharmacological agents that have genuine potential to

  12. Application of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes with a boron-doped diamond anode to degrade acidic solutions of Reactive Blue 15 (Turqueoise Blue) dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, Aline Maria Sales; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Degradation of Reactive Blue 15 solution at pH 3.0 by electrochemical oxidation, electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton. • Hard destruction of the dye and its products by BDD(·OH) and much more rapidly by ·OH. • 94% mineralization by the most powerful photoelectro-Fenton at 66.7 mA cm"−"2, with acetic acid accumulation. • 25 aromatics and heteroaromatics, 30 hydroxylated derivatives and 4 carboxylic acids as products. • Release of Cl"−, SO_4"2"− and pre-eminently NO_3"− during dye mineralization. - Abstract: The degradation of the copper-phthalocyanine dye Reactive Blue 15 dye in sulfate medium has been comparatively studied by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H_2O_2 (EO-H_2O_2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Experiments with 100 cm"3 solutions of 0.203 mmol dm"−"3 dye were performed with a stirred tank reactor containing a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode for continuous H_2O_2 production. Experimental conditions of pH 3.0 and 0.50 mmol dm"−"3 Fe"2"+ as catalyst were found optimal for the EF process by the predominant oxidation with hydroxyl radicals formed in the bulk from Fenton’s reaction between added Fe"2"+ and generated H_2O_2. The kinetics of Reactive Blue 15 abatement was followed by reversed-phase HPLC and always obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. The decolorization rate in EO-H_2O_2 was much lower than dye decay due to the formation of large quantities of colored intermediates under the action of hydroxyl radicals generated at the BDD anode from water oxidation. In contrast, the color and dye removals were much more rapid in EF and PEF by the most efficient oxidation of hydroxyl radicals produced from Fenton’s reaction. PEF was the most powerful treatment owing to the photolytic action of UVA irradiation, yielding 94% mineralization after 360 min at 66.7 mA cm"−"2. The effect of current density over the performance of all methods was examined. LC

  13. Investigating the Effect of Inflammation on Atrial Fibrillation Occurrence by Measuring Highly Sensitive C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Hassanzadeh Delui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmias that cardiologists and internists encounter. The goal of this article is to clarify an overview of the evidence linking inflammation to AF existence, which may highlight the effect of some pharmacological agents that have genuine potential to reduce the clinical burden of AF by modulating inflammatory pathways. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 50 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF with different etiologies and 50 patients with sinus rhythm and similar bases were selected. Sampling for highly sensitive c-reactive (hs-CRP was done on the patients presenting with AF to the Ghaem hospital between October 2006 and June 2007. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62 years with maximum of 90 and minimum of 36 and standard deviation of 13.80. The most frequent age group was 71-80years. Fifty-four percent of patients were male and 46% were female. Mean serum hs-CRP levels in AF patients with hypertension (HTN ,Ischemic heart disease(IHD, Valvular heart disease (VHD, HTN+IHD and hyperthyroidism were 8.10, 9.40, 8.68, 10.16 and 5.98 mg/Lit; respectively. There was significant difference between hs-CRP levels in hypertensive patients in the two groups (P=0.010. Similar results were observed in IHD patients, VHD patients and HTN+IHD patients in two groups (P=0.015, P=0.037, P=0.000. Conclusion: In addition to some risk factors like baseline cardiac diseases, aging, thyrotoxicosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and cardiac surgery, there also appears to be consistent links between hs-CRP, a marker of inflammation, and the pathogenesis of AF.

  14. [Reactive collisions of high-temperature systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The object of this research is to study reactivity at superthermal collision energies using a fast neutral beam that is generated by photodetachment. Systems scheduled for initial study include basic oxygen-hydrogen reactions. Unfortunately, we can not yet report realization of this goal, but during this funding period we have made advances that are anticipated to lead to successful measurements during the next year. The parameters described below refer to the model system O + H 2 → OH + H. The basic design involves the collision of fast neutrals, created by photodetachment of the corresponding negative molecular ion, with a stable reactant gas in a collision cell. Products are detected by ionization and mass analysis. We are equipped to study rotational effects on reactivity by comparing results for rotational levels J = 0 and 1 of H 2 . Highlights during the funding period are given in this report

  15. OECD/CSNI specialist meeting on advanced instrumentation and measurements techniques: summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This specialist meeting on Advanced Instrumentation and Measurements Techniques was held in Santa Barbara (USA) in 1997 and attracted some 70 participants in ten technical sessions and a session of the round table discussions, with a total of 41 papers. It was intended to bring together the international experts in multi-phase flow instrumentation, experiment and modeling to review the state-of-the-art of the two-phase flow instrumentation methods and to discuss the relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities. The following topics were included: Modeling needs and future direction for improved constitutive relations, interfacial area transport equation, and multi-dimensional two-fluid model formulation; local instrumentation developments for void fraction, interfacial area, phase velocities, turbulence, entrainment, particle size, thermal non-equilibrium, shear stress, nucleation, condensation and boiling; global instrumentation developments for void fraction, mass flow, two-phase level, non-condensable concentration, flow regimes, low flow and break flow; relation between modeling needs and instrumentation capabilities, future directions for experiments focused on modeling needs and for instrumentation developments

  16. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging enable quantitative measurement of laterally heterogeneous coatings of nanoscale thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raegen, Adam; Reiter, Kyle; Clarke, Anthony; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    The Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) phenomenon is routinely exploited to qualitatively probe changes to the optical properties of nanoscale coatings on thin metallic surfaces, for use in probes and sensors. Unfortunately, extracting truly quantitative information is usually limited to a select few cases - uniform absorption/desorption of small biomolecules and films, in which a continuous ``slab'' model is a good approximation. We present advancements in the SPR technique that expand the number of cases for which the technique can provide meaningful results. Use of a custom, angle-scanning SPR imaging system, together with a refined data analysis method, allow for quantitative kinetic measurements of laterally heterogeneous systems. We first demonstrate the directionally heterogeneous nature of the SPR phenomenon using a directionally ordered sample, then show how this allows for the calculation of the average coverage of a heterogeneous sample. Finally, the degradation of cellulose microfibrils and bundles of microfibrils due to the action of cellulolytic enzymes will be presented as an excellent example of the capabilities of the SPR imaging system.

  17. Requirements and Technology Advances for Global Wind Measurement with a Coherent Lidar: A Shrinking Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, G. David

    2007-01-01

    Early concepts to globally measure vertical profiles of vector horizontal wind from space planned on an orbit height of 525 km, a single pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system to cover the full troposphere, and a continuously rotating telescope/scanner that mandated a vertical line of sight wind profile from each laser shot. Under these conditions system studies found that laser pulse energies of approximately 20 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate with a rotating telescope diameter of approximately 1.5 m was required. Further requirements to use solid state laser technology and an eyesafe wavelength led to the relatively new 2-micron solid state laser. With demonstrated pulse energies near 20 mJ at 5 Hz, and no demonstration of a rotating telescope maintaining diffraction limited performance in space, the technology gap between requirements and demonstration was formidable. Fortunately the involved scientists and engineers set out to reduce the gap, and through a combination of clever ideas and technology advances over the last 15 years, they have succeeded. This paper will detail the gap reducing factors and will present the current status.

  18. Is structured observation a valid technique to measure handwashing behavior? Use of acceleration sensors embedded in soap to assess reactivity to structured observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Pavani K; Halder, Amal K; Granger, Stewart P; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W; Luby, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3-10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0-18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior.

  19. Is Structured Observation a Valid Technique to Measure Handwashing Behavior? Use of Acceleration Sensors Embedded in Soap to Assess Reactivity to Structured Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Pavani K.; Halder, Amal K.; Granger, Stewart P.; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M. Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W.; Luby, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3–10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0–18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior. PMID:21036840

  20. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  1. Multi-axial load application and DIC measurement of advanced composite beam deformation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berggreen C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For the validation of a new beam element formulation, a wide set of experimental data consisting of deformation patterns obtained for a number of specially designed composite beam elements, have been obtained. The composite materials applied in the beams consist of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with specially designed layup configurations promoting advanced coupling behavior. Furthermore, the beams are designed with different cross-section shapes. The data obtained from the experiments are also used in order to improve the general understanding related to practical implementation of mechanisms of elastic couplings due to anisotropic properties of composite materials. The knowledge gained from these experiments is therefore essential in order to facilitate an implementation of passive control in future large wind turbine blades. A test setup based on a four-column MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a maximum capacity of 100 kN was developed, see Figure 1. The setup allows installing and testing beams of different cross-sections applying load cases such as axial extension, shear force bending, pure bending in two principal directions as well as pure torsion, see Figure 2. In order to apply multi-axial loading, a load application system consisting of three hydraulic actuators were mounted in two planes using multi-axial servo-hydraulic control. The actuator setup consists of the main actuator on the servo-hydraulic test machine working in the vertical axis (depicted on Figure 1 placed at the testing machine crosshead and used for application of vertical forces to the specimens. Two extra actuators are placed in a horizontal plane on the T-slot table of the test machine in different positions in order to apply loading at the tip of the specimen in various configurations. In order to precisely characterize the global as well as surface deformations of the beam specimens tested, a combination of different measurement systems were used during

  2. Precision, accuracy, cross reactivity and comparability of serum indices measurement on Abbott Architect c8000, Beckman Coulter AU5800 and Roche Cobas 6000 c501 clinical chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Gabaj, Nora; Miler, Marijana; Vrtarić, Alen; Hemar, Marina; Filipi, Petra; Kocijančić, Marija; Šupak Smolčić, Vesna; Ćelap, Ivana; Šimundić, Ana-Maria

    2018-04-25

    The aim of our study was to perform verification of serum indices on three clinical chemistry platforms. This study was done on three analyzers: Abbott Architect c8000, Beckman Coulter AU5800 (BC) and Roche Cobas 6000 c501. The following analytical specifications were verified: precision (two patient samples), accuracy (sample with the highest concentration of interferent was serially diluted and measured values compared to theoretical values), comparability (120 patients samples) and cross reactivity (samples with increasing concentrations of interferent were divided in two aliquots and remaining interferents were added in each aliquot. Measurements were done before and after adding interferents). Best results for precision were obtained for the H index (0.72%-2.08%). Accuracy for the H index was acceptable for Cobas and BC, while on Architect, deviations in the high concentration range were observed (y=0.02 [0.01-0.07]+1.07 [1.06-1.08]x). All three analyzers showed acceptable results in evaluating accuracy of L index and unacceptable results for I index. The H index was comparable between BC and both, Architect (Cohen's κ [95% CI]=0.795 [0.692-0.898]) and Roche (Cohen's κ [95% CI]=0.825 [0.729-0.922]), while Roche and Architect were not comparable. The I index was not comparable between all analyzer combinations, while the L index was only comparable between Abbott and BC. Cross reactivity analysis mostly showed that serum indices measurement is affected when a combination of interferences is present. There is heterogeneity between analyzers in the hemolysis, icteria, lipemia (HIL) quality performance. Verification of serum indices in routine work is necessary to establish analytical specifications.

  3. Measuring the impact of the advanced practitioner role: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Lillian; Swift, Juliette

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to illuminate difficulties in evaluating the advanced practitioner role and to offer a practical solution. The advanced practice role has been part of the workforce strategy in the Northwest of England since 2005. However capturing hard evidence of the impact of this role has been problematic. Current restrictions on resources require the provision of evidence of the value of roles and services. Critical analysis of literature has identified challenges in evaluating the advanced practice role. The case study design takes account of current policy initiatives, notably QIPP. There is no common approach to evaluating the role of advanced practitioners. The case study has the potential to be a useful tool to organise evidence of the impact of advanced practitioner roles. Advanced practitioners need to have appropriate knowledge and skills to provide evidence of the impact of their role. There is potential for this work to be applied to other roles across the NHS. Managers need to work in partnership with workforce planners and educationalists to support advanced practitioners to utilise their skills in methods of providing evidence that they do work of value. Clear strategic direction for advanced practitioners is advised as part of the workforce strategy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in water with polyquaternary ammonium salt as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zhang, Meng-Han; Gu, Jia-Li; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jian-Rong

    2014-12-17

    Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) sampler with a polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) aqueous solution as a binding phase and a dialysis membrane as a diffusive phase (PQAS DGT) was developed for the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in water. The performance of PQAS DGT was not dependent upon pH 3-10 and ionic strength from 1 × 10(-4) to 1 mol L(-1). The effective binding capacity of PQAS DGT containing 2.0 mL of 0.050 mol L(-1) PQAS solution was estimated as 9.9 μg cm(-2). The measurement of DRP in a synthetic solution by PQAS DGT over a 48 h deployment period demonstrated high consistency with the concentration of DRP in the synthetic solution measured directly by the ammonium molybdate spectrophotometric method. Field deployments of PQAS DGT samplers allowed for accurate measurement of the DRP concentration in situ. The advantages of PQAS DGT include no requirement of the elution steps and direct concentration measurements of the binding phase.

  5. Broad frequency band full field measurements for advanced applications: Point-wise comparisons between optical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    The progress of optical systems gives nowadays at disposal on lightweight structures complex dynamic measurements and modal tests, each with its own advantages, drawbacks and preferred usage domains. It is thus more easy than before to obtain highly spatially defined vibration patterns for many applications in vibration engineering, testing and general product development. The potential of three completely different technologies is here benchmarked on a common test rig and advanced applications. SLDV, dynamic ESPI and hi-speed DIC are here first deployed in a complex and unique test on the estimation of FRFs with high spatial accuracy from a thin vibrating plate. The latter exhibits a broad band dynamics and high modal density in the common frequency domain where the techniques can find an operative intersection. A peculiar point-wise comparison is here addressed by means of discrete geometry transforms to put all the three technologies on trial at each physical point of the surface. Full field measurement technologies cannot estimate only displacement fields on a refined grid, but can exploit the spatial consistency of the results through neighbouring locations by means of numerical differentiation operators in the spatial domain to obtain rotational degrees of freedom and superficial dynamic strain distributions, with enhanced quality, compared to other technologies in literature. Approaching the task with the aid of superior quality receptance maps from the three different full field gears, this work calculates and compares rotational and dynamic strain FRFs. Dynamic stress FRFs can be modelled directly from the latter, by means of a constitutive model, avoiding the costly and time-consuming steps of building and tuning a numerical dynamic model of a flexible component or a structure in real life conditions. Once dynamic stress FRFs are obtained, spectral fatigue approaches can try to predict the life of a component in many excitation conditions. Different

  6. Recent advances in high performance poly(lactide): from “green” plasticization to super-tough materials via (reactive) compounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfoury, Georgio; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Hassouna, Fatima; Odent, Jérémy; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David; Dubois, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Due to its origin from renewable resources, its biodegradability, and recently, its industrial implementation at low costs, poly(lactide) (PLA) is considered as one of the most promising ecological, bio-sourced and biodegradable plastic materials to potentially and increasingly replace traditional petroleum derived polymers in many commodity and engineering applications. Beside its relatively high rigidity [high tensile strength and modulus compared with many common thermoplastics such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), high impact poly(styrene) (HIPS) and poly(propylene) (PP)], PLA suffers from an inherent brittleness, which can limit its applications especially where mechanical toughness such as plastic deformation at high impact rates or elongation is required. Therefore, the curve plotting stiffness vs. impact resistance and ductility must be shifted to higher values for PLA-based materials, while being preferably fully bio-based and biodegradable upon the application. This review aims to establish a state of the art focused on the recent progresses and preferably economically viable strategies developed in the literature for significantly improve the mechanical performances of PLA. A particular attention is given to plasticization as well as to impact resistance modification of PLA in the case of (reactive) blending PLA-based systems. PMID:24790960

  7. Comparative study of oxidation of dye-Reactive Black B by different advanced oxidation processes: Fenton, electro-Fenton and photo-Fenton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yaohui; Huang Yifong; Chang Poshun; Chen Chuhyung

    2008-01-01

    This study makes a comparison between photo-Fenton and a novel electro-Fenton called Fered-Fenton to study the mineralization of 10,000 mg/L of dye-Reactive Black B (RBB) aqueous solution, which was chosen as the model dye contaminant. Results indicate that the traditional Fenton process only yields 70% mineralization. This result can be improved by using Fered-Fenton to yield 93% mineralization resulting from the action of ferrous ion regenerated on the cathode. Furthermore, photo-Fenton allows a fast and more complete destruction of dye solutions and as a result of the action of ferrous ion regenerated by UV irradiation yields more than 98% mineralization. In all treatments, the RBB is rapidly decayed to some carboxylic acid intermediates. The major intermediates found are formic acid and oxalic acid. This study finds that formic acid can be completely mineralized by photo-Fenton, but its destruction is problematic using the Fenton method. Oxalic acid is much more difficult to treat than other organic acids. It could get further mineralization with the use of the Fered-Fenton process

  8. Study of the reactivity of pure minerals in presence of CO2 at the supercritical state. Measurement of the portlandite carbonation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnault, O.

    2008-04-01

    The efficiency on the long term of CO 2 geological storage will rely on trapping mechanisms and good sealing properties of the cap rock and the eventual access wells. A series of experiments has been devised to observe and quantify the reactivity of portlandite with supercritical CO 2 . The portlandite has been chosen as a key component of calcium-rich cement for its interest in borehole cement degradation. Initial carbonation rates have been measured under different conditions: pressure 160 bar, temperatures 80, 120, and 200 C and with various amount of water. SEM observations show that the reacting fluid state (absence or presence of liquid phase) controls strongly the carbonation behaviour and the reaction path. A specific geochemical model has been developed in order to account for the particular conditions of our experiments. These results (portlandite carbonation rate and water-poor geochemical system modelling techniques) should be useful to simulate well-bore cement degradation. (author)

  9. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK, methacrolein (MACR and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD, China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS. Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s−1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03 × 106 cm−3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30–40% (median larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv and

  10. Analysis of the accuracy of certain methods used for measuring very low reactivities; Analyse de la precision de certaines methodes de mesure de tres basses reactivites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valat, J; Stern, T E

    1964-07-01

    The rapid measurement of anti-reactivities, in particular very low ones (i.e. a few tens of {beta}) appears to be an interesting method for the automatic start-up a reactor and its optimisation. With this in view, the present report explores the various methods studied essentially from the point of view of the time required for making the measurement with a given statistical accuracy, especially as far as very low activities are concerned. The statistical analysis is applied in turn to: the methods for the natural background noise (auto-correlation and spectral density); the sinusoidal excitation methods for the reactivity or the source, with synchronous detection ; the periodic source excitation method using pulsed neutrons. Finally, the statistical analysis leads to the suggestion of a new method of source excitation using neutronic random square waves combined with an intercorrelation between the random excitation and the resulting output. (authors) [French] La mesure rapide des antireactivites, en particulier celle des tres basses (soit quelques dizaines de {beta}), apparait comme une voie interessante pour le demarrage automatique d'un reacteur et son optimalisation. Dans cette optique, le present rapport explore diverses methodes etudiees essentiellement sous l'angle de la duree de mesure necessaire a une precision relative statistique donnee, plus particulierement en ce qui concerne les tres basses reactivites. L'analyse statistique porte successivement sur: les methodes du bruit de fond naturel (autocorrelation et densite spectrale); les methodes d'excitation sinusoidale de reactivite ou de source, avec detection synchrone; la methode d'excitation periodique de source par neutrons pulses. Enfin l'analyse statistique amene a proposer une methode nouvelle d'excitation de source par creneaux neutroniques aleatoires alliee a une intercorrelation entre l'excitation aleatoire et la sortie resultante. (auteurs)

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering and spectral measurements of advanced cold moderator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, H.; Prager, M.; Nuenighoff, K.; Pohl, C.; Kuhs, W.F.

    2004-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering with emphasis on energetically low lying modes as well as cold neutron leakage measurements have been performed on four prospective advanced cold moderator materials. Employing the time-of-flight instrument SV29 at the Juelich FRJ-2 reactor, spectra have been obtained from synthetic methane clathrate, tetrahydro-furane (THF) clathrate, 1,3,5-trimethyl-benzene (mesitylene) and light water ice at several temperatures between 2 K and 70 K. Clearly separated excitations at energy transfers of ±1 meV, +2 meV and +3 meV have been observed with synthetic methane clathrate. In mesitylene a wealth of low lying excitations have been observed. In the quenched phase we found lines at 4.7, 7.2, 9.6, 13.6, 15.4, 18.4, 19.0, 23.0, 29.5 and 34.3 meV, respectively. In the annealed phase, we observed significant shifts with the majority of lines. The lowest lying lines now are located at 7.0, 8.5 and 10.5 meV, respectively. In hexagonal ice at T=2 K up to now unreported low lying energy levels were found at energy transfers of 1.8 meV and 2.8 meV. An additional line at about 10 meV could be detected in THF clathrate. Mesitylene, synthetic methane clathrate and water ice, all at T=20 K, have been tested as moderators at the Juelich spallation mock-up JESSICA. The expected gain in neutron leakage current at energies around 2 meV as compared to conventional liquid hydrogen moderators has been observed for methane clathrate and mesitylene. (orig.)

  12. Time-resolved ion flux and impedance measurements for process characterization in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lundin, D.; Čada, Martin; Hubička, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2016), 1-10, č. článku 041305. ISSN 0734-2101 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00863S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 608800 - HIPPOCAMP Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : radiofrequency current * voltage measurements * energy-distributions * sheath voltages * deposition * density * hysteresis * discharges * films * technology Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.374, year: 2016

  13. OH reactivity and potential SOA yields from volatile organic compounds and other trace gases measured in controlled laboratory biomass burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. B. Gilman; C. Warneke; W. C. Kuster; P. D. Goldan; P. R. Veres; J. M. Roberts; J. A. de Gouw; I. R. Burling; R. J. Yokelson

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of instruments were used to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases (e.g., CO, CH4, NO2, etc.) emitted from controlled burns of various fuel types common to the Southeastern and Southwestern United States. These laboratory-based measurements were conducted in February 2009 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fire...

  14. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copie, M.; Valantic, B.

    1978-01-01

    Digital reactivity meters (DRM) are mostly used as measuring instruments, e.g. for calibration of control rods, and there are only a few cases of their incorporation into the control systems of the reactors. To move in this direction there is more development work needed. First of all, fast algorithms are needed for inverse kinetics equations to relieve the computer for more important tasks of reactor model solving in real time. The next problem, currently under investigation, is the incorporation of the reactor thermal-hydraulic model into the DRM so that it can be used in the power range. Such an extension of DHM allows presentation not only of the instantaneous reactivity of the system, but also the inserted reactivity can be estimated from the temperature reactivity feed-backs. One of the applications of this concept is the anomalous digital reactivity monitor (ADRN) as part of the reactor protection system. As a solution of the first problem, a fast algorithm for solving the inverse kinetics equations has been implemented in the off-line program RODCAL on CDC 1700 computer and tested for its accuracy by performing different control rod calibrations on the reactor TRIGA

  15. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections for the Advanced Neutron Source against the FOEHN critical experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The FOEHN critical experiments were analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. Eleven critical configurations were evaluated using the KENO, DORT, and VENTURE neutronics codes. Eigenvalue and power density profiles were computed and show very good agreement with measured values

  16. Advanced glycation end products, measured in skin, vs. HbA1c in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banser, Alena; Naafs, Jolanda C.; Hoorweg-Nijman, Jantine J. G.; van de Garde, Ewoudt M. W.; van der Vorst, Marja M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectiveAdvanced glycation end products (AGEs) are considered major contributors to microvascular and macrovascular complications in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. AGEs can be measured non-invasively with skin autofluorescence (sAF). The primary aim was to determine sAF

  17. Cooperative advanced Driver assistance Systems - Technological measures for data privacy compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Hubert; Schnieder, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) will contribute to road traffic safety: Critical situations will be detected, the driver alerted and control of the vehicle interfered with automatically. However, the introduction of such driver assistance systems presupposes that data privacy issues have already been solved in advance. A necessary condition for the driver to accept and trust new Driver assistance systems is that his/her personal and personally identifiable data will be t...

  18. Tunnel Face Stability and the Effectiveness of Advance Drainage Measures in Water-Bearing Ground of Non-uniform Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Sara; Anagnostou, Georg

    2018-01-01

    Non-uniform permeability may result in complex hydraulic head fields with potentially very high hydraulic gradients close to the tunnel face, which may be adverse for stability depending on the ground strength. Pore pressure relief by drainage measures in advance of the tunnel excavation improves stability, but the effectiveness of drainage boreholes may be low in the case of alternating aquifers and aquitards. This paper analyses the effects of hydraulic heterogeneity and advance drainage quantitatively by means of limit equilibrium computations that take account of the seepage forces acting upon the ground in the vicinity the tunnel face. The piezometric field is determined numerically by means of steady-state, three-dimensional seepage flow analyses considering the heterogeneous structure of the ground and a typical advance drainage scheme consisting of six axial boreholes drilled from the tunnel face. A suite of stability analyses was carried out covering a wide range of heterogeneity scales. The computational results show the effect of the orientation, thickness, location, number and permeability ratio of aquifers and aquitards and provide valuable indications about potentially critical situations, the effectiveness of advance drainage and the adequate arrangement of drainage boreholes. The paper shows that hydraulic heterogeneity results in highly variable face behaviour, even if the shear strength of the ground is constant along the alignment, but ground behaviour is considerably less variable in the presence of advance drainage measures.

  19. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  20. Spatially-Resolved Ion Trajectory Measurements During Cl2 Reactive Ion Beam Etching and Ar Ion Beam Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vawter, G. Allen; Woodworth, Joseph R.; Zubrzycki, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    The angle of ion incidence at the etched wafer location during RIBE and IBE using Cl 2 , Ar and O 2 ion beams has been characterized using an ion energy and angle analyzer. Effects of beam current and accelerator grid bias on beam divergence and the spatial uniformity of the spread of incident angles are measured. It is observed that increased total beam current can lead to reduced current density at the sample stage due to enhanced beam divergence at high currents. Results are related to preferred etch system design for uniform high-aspect-ratio etching across semiconductor wafers

  1. Impact of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses on Quality Measures: The Missouri Quality Initiative Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Popejoy, Lori; Vogelsmeier, Amy; Galambos, Colleen; Alexander, Greg; Flesner, Marcia; Murray, Cathy; Crecelius, Charles; Ge, Bin; Petroski, Gregory

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the impact of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) on the quality measure (QM) scores of the 16 participating nursing homes of the Missouri Quality Initiative (MOQI) intervention. The MOQI was one of 7 program sites in the US, with specific interventions unique to each site tested for the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services Innovations Center. While the goals of the MOQI for long-stay nursing home residents did not specifically include improvement of the QM scores, it was anticipated that improvement most likely would occur. Primary goals of the MOQI were to reduce the frequency of avoidable hospital admissions and readmissions; improve resident health outcomes; improve the process of transitioning between inpatient hospitals and nursing facilities; and reduce overall healthcare spending without restricting access to care or choice of providers. A 2-group comparison analysis was conducted using statewide QMs; a matched comparison group was selected from facilities in the same counties as the intervention homes, similar baseline QM scores, similar size and ownership. MOQI nursing homes each had an APRN embedded full-time to improve care and help the facility achieve MOQI goals. Part of their clinical work with residents and staff was to focus on quality improvement strategies with potential to influence healthcare outcomes. Trajectories of QM scores for the MOQI intervention nursing homes and matched comparison group homes were tested with nonparametric tests to examine for change in the desired direction between the 2 groups from baseline to 36 months. A composite QM score for each facility was constructed, and baseline to 36-month average change scores were examined using nonparametric tests. Then, adjusting for baseline, a repeated measures analysis using analysis of covariance as conducted. Composite QM scores of the APRN intervention group were significantly better (P = .025) than the comparison group

  2. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafleur, Adrienne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seya, Michio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolind, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  3. Development of an advanced Two-Micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide and water vapor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles; Remus, Ruben; Taylor, Bryant D.; Wong, Teh-Hwa; Reithmaier, Karl; Lee, Jane; Ismail, Syed; Davis, Kenneth J.

    2018-04-01

    An advanced airborne triple-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA Langley Research Center that targets both carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) measurements simultaneously and independently. This lidar is an upgrade to the successfully demonstrated CO2 2-μm double-pulse IPDA. Upgrades include high-energy, highrepetition rate 2-μm triple-pulse laser transmitter, innovative wavelength control and advanced HgCdTe (MCT) electron-initiated avalanche photodiode detection system. Ground testing and airborne validation plans are presented.

  4. Reactive oxygen species-based measurement of the dependence of the Coulomb nanoradiator effect on proton energy and atomic Z value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Jeon, Jae-Kun; Han, Sung-Mi; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2017-11-01

    The Coulomb nanoradiator (CNR) effect produces the dose enhancement effects from high-Z nanoparticles under irradiation with a high-energy ion beam. To gain insight into the radiation dose and biological significance of the CNR effect, the enhancement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from iron oxide or gold NPs (IONs or AuNPs, respectively) in water was investigated using traversing proton beams. The dependence of nanoradiator-enhanced ROS production on the atomic Z value and proton energy was investigated. Two biologically important ROS species were measured using fluorescent probes specific to •OH or [Formula: see text] in a series of water phantoms containing either AuNPs or IONs under irradiation with a 45- or 100-MeV proton beam. The enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) and superoxide anions ([Formula: see text]) was determined to be caused by the dependence on the NP concentration and proton energy. The proton-induced Au or iron oxide nanoradiators exhibited different ROS enhancement rates depending on the proton energy, suggesting that the CNR radiation varied. The curve of the superoxide anion production from the Au-nanoradiator showed strong non-linearity, unlike the linear behavior observed for hydroxyl radical production and the X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator. In addition, the 45-MeV proton-induced Au nanoradiator exhibited an ROS enhancement ratio of 8.54/1.50 ([Formula: see text] / •OH), similar to that of the 100-KeV X-ray photoelectric Au nanoradiator (7.68/1.46). The ROS-based detection of the CNR effect revealed its dependence on the proton beam energy, dose and atomic Z value and provided insight into the low-linear energy transfer (LET) CNR radiation, suggesting that these factors may influence the therapeutic efficacy via chemical reactivities, transport behaviors, and intracellular oxidative stress.

  5. Backup passive reactivity shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurko, Yu.M.; Kuznetsov, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The paper reviews self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs) for liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Principles of operation are described, advantages and drawbacks analyzed, and prospects for application in advanced fast reactors examined. Ways to improve reactor self-protection via reactivity feedback amplification and related problems are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 12 figs

  6. Backup passive reactivity shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurko, Yu M; Kuznetsov, L A [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    The paper reviews self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs) for liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Principles of operation are described, advantages and drawbacks analyzed, and prospects for application in advanced fast reactors examined. Ways to improve reactor self-protection via reactivity feedback amplification and related problems are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 12 figs.

  7. Land Surface Microwave Emissivities Derived from AMSR-E and MODIS Measurements with Advanced Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Galantowicz, John F.; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A microwave emissivity database has been developed with data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and with ancillary land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua spacecraft. The primary intended application of the database is to provide surface emissivity constraints in atmospheric and surface property retrieval or assimilation. An additional application is to serve as a dynamic indicator of land surface properties relevant to climate change monitoring. The precision of the emissivity data is estimated to be significantly better than in prior databases from other sensors due to the precise collocation with high-quality MODIS LST data and due to the quality control features of our data analysis system. The accuracy of the emissivities in deserts and semi-arid regions is enhanced by applying, in those regions, a version of the emissivity retrieval algorithm that accounts for the penetration of microwave radiation through dry soil with diurnally varying vertical temperature gradients. These results suggest that this penetration effect is more widespread and more significant to interpretation of passive microwave measurements than had been previously established. Emissivity coverage in areas where persistent cloudiness interferes with the availability of MODIS LST data is achieved using a classification-based method to spread emissivity data from less-cloudy areas that have similar microwave surface properties. Evaluations and analyses of the emissivity products over homogeneous snow-free areas are presented, including application to retrieval of soil temperature profiles. Spatial inhomogeneities are the largest in the vicinity of large water bodies due to the large water/land emissivity contrast and give rise to large apparent temporal variability in the retrieved emissivities when satellite footprint locations vary over time. This issue will be dealt with in the future by

  8. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified within the journal articles. Most

  9. Development of a three dimensional homogeneous calculation model for the BFS-62 critical experiment. Preparation of adjusted equivalent measured values for sodium void reactivity values. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manturov, G.; Semenov, M.; Seregin, A.; Lykova, L.

    2004-01-01

    The BFS-62 critical experiments are currently used as 'benchmark' for verification of IPPE codes and nuclear data, which have been used in the study of loading a significant amount of Pu in fast reactors. The BFS-62 experiments have been performed at BFS-2 critical facility of IPPE (Obninsk). The experimental program has been arranged in such a way that the effect of replacement of uranium dioxied blanket by the steel reflector as well as the effect of replacing UOX by MOX on the main characteristics of the reactor model was studied. Wide experimental program, including measurements of the criticality-keff, spectral indices, radial and axial fission rate distributions, control rod mock-up worth, sodium void reactivity effect SVRE and some other important nuclear physics parameters, was fulfilled in the core. Series of 4 BFS-62 critical assemblies have been designed for studying the changes in BN-600 reactor physics from existing state to hybrid core. All the assemblies are modeling the reactor state prior to refueling, i.e. with all control rod mock-ups withdrawn from the core. The following items are chosen for the analysis in this report: Description of the critical assembly BFS-62-3A as the 3rd assembly in a series of 4 BFS critical assemblies studying BN-600 reactor with MOX-UOX hybrid zone and steel reflector; Development of a 3D homogeneous calculation model for the BFS-62-3A critical experiment as the mock-up of BN-600 reactor with hybrid zone and steel reflector; Evaluation of measured nuclear physics parameters keff and SVRE (sodium void reactivity effect); Preparation of adjusted equivalent measured values for keff and SVRE. Main series of calculations are performed using 3D HEX-Z diffusion code TRIGEX in 26 groups, with the ABBN-93 cross-section set. In addition, precise calculations are made, in 299 groups and Ps-approximation in scattering, by Monte-Carlo code MMKKENO and discrete ordinate code TWODANT. All calculations are based on the common system

  10. Cognitive Load Theory: Advances in Research on Worked Examples, Animations, and Cognitive Load Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A.J.M. van Gog (Tamara); G.W.C. Paas (Fred); J. Sweller (John)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe contributions to this special issue document some recent advances of cognitive load theory, and are based on contributions to the Third International Cognitive Load Theory Conference (2009), Heerlen, The Netherlands. The contributions focus on developments in example-based learning,

  11. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  12. A National Initiative to Advance School Mental Health Performance Measurement in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Elizabeth Halsted; Stephan, Sharon Hoover; Lever, Nancy; Ereshefsky, Sabrina; Mosby, Amanda; Bohnenkamp, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Standardized health performance measurement has increasingly become an imperative for assuring quality standards in national health care systems. As compared to somatic health performance measures, behavioral health performance measures are less developed. There currently is no national standardized performance measurement system for monitoring…

  13. Recent Advances in the Measurement of Arsenic, Cadmium, and Mercury in Rice and Other Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Brian; Punshon, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Trace element analysis of foods is of increasing importance because of raised consumer awareness and the need to evaluate and establish regulatory guidelines for toxic trace metals and metalloids. This paper reviews recent advances in the analysis of trace elements in food, including challenges, state-of-the art methods, and use of spatially resolved techniques for localizing the distribution of As and Hg within rice grains. Total elemental analysis of foods is relatively well-established but...

  14. Advancing land-terminating ice margin in North Greenland - characteristics, evolution, and first field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J. F.; Prinz, R.; Abermann, J.

    2017-12-01

    More than 40% of the ice sheet in North Greenland terminate on land, however the characteristics of this ice margin and response to a changing climate have so far received little attention. While land-terminating ice cliffs are a feature commonly found and studied in other regions, detailed investigations in Greenland were only carried out more than six decades ago in the Thule area (Red Rock, Northwest Greenland). These studies showed a continuous advance at one location over multiple years, while the local mass balance was reported negative. The purpose of our study is to revisit the location previously studied and extend the analysis to the complete Northern ice margin employing newly available high-resolution digital terrain models (Arctic DEM). First results show that the advance at Red Rock is indeed long-term, continuing unabated today at rates of up to several meter per year. Similar magnitudes were found for large other stretches along the ice margin. With our study we aim to show (a) the main characteristics of the land-terminating ice margin in Northern Greenland, namely its slope and aspect distribution and comparison to spatial datasets of flow velocity and mass balance and (b) to provide further explanations of physical processes driving the advance. We have therefore mapped the complete ice margin and present the first results of this analysis. First field work provides new data on energy fluxes and ice temperatures at the Red Rock site as well as high resolution DEMs obtained with the use of UAVs.

  15. Novel Semi-Direct OH Reactivity (kOH) Measurements by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry during a Chamber Instrument Comparison Campaign and Continuous Ambient Air Sampling at a Central European GAW Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J.; Kubistin, D.; Elste, T.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Claude, A.; Englert, J.; Holla, R.; Fuchs, H.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Novelli, A.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Rohrer, F.; Yu, Z.; Bohn, B.; Williams, J.; Pfannerstill, E.; Edtbauer, A.; Kluepfel, T.

    2016-12-01

    Total OH reactivity (kOH) has been recognized as a useful measure to gauge the potential atmospheric oxidation capacity and a few different in-situ measurement techniques have been developed over the last 15 years. Here results are presented from a novel semi-direct method developed by the German Weather Service (DWD) utilizing a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). Recently in April 2016, the CIMS system participated in a half-blind kOH instrument comparison campaign at the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ) SAPHIR chamber. Experiments provided controlled conditions with a range of different VOC mixtures and varying NOx levels, representing environments dominated by biogenic or urban emissions. Alongside CIMS, kOH was also measured by systems using the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the pump-probe technique with OH detection. The intercomparison revealed a good performance of CIMS at lower OH reactivities (0-15 s-1), a range for which the instrumental set up was optimized. Limitations of the CIMS system consist of an upper limit for kOH detection and the need for applying a chemical correction function as a result of instrument-internal HOx recycling. Findings and instrument parameters obtained from the FZJ SAPHIR campaign and flow tube experiments are then applied to ambient air kOH measurements at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (MOHp), Germany. The CIMS instrument is used there for long-term measurements of OH, H2SO4, ROx and kOH. Here, we show ambient air kOH measurements, interpreted in conjunction with volatile organic compounds (VOC) and inorganic trace gases also measured at the GAW station Hohenpeissenberg. These observations provide a unique dataset to investigate turnover rates and seasonal cycles of reactive trace gases, i.e. sources that make up total OH reactivity in this central European, rural setting.

  16. SU-E-T-607: Performance Quantification of the Nine Detectors Used for Dosimetry Measurements in Advanced Radiation Therapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M; Stathakis, S; Jurkovic, I; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify performance of the nine detectors used for dosimetry measurements in advanced radiation therapy treatments. Methods: The 6 MV beam was utilized for measurements of the field sizes with the lack of lateral charge particle equilibrium. For dose fidelity aspect, energy dependence was studied by measuring PDD and profiles at different depths. The volume effect and its influence on the measured dose profiles have been observed by measuring detector’s response function. Output factor measurements with respect to change in energy spectrum have been performed and collected data has been analyzed. The linearity of the measurements with the dose delivered has been evaluated and relevant comparisons were done. Results: The measured values of the output factors with respect to change in energy spectrum indicated presence of the energy dependence. The detectors with active volume size ≤ 0.3 mm3 maximum deviation from the mean is 5.6% for the field size 0.5 x 0.5 cm2 while detectors with active volume size > 0.3 mm3 have maximum deviation from the mean 7.1%. Linearity with dose at highest dose rate examined for diode detectors showed maximum deviation of 4% while ion chambers showed maximum deviation of 2.2%. Dose profiles showed energy dependence at shallow depths (surface to dmax) influenced by low energy particles with 12 % maximum deviation from the mean for 5 mm2 field size. In relation to Monte Carlo calculation, the detector’s response function σ values were between (0.42±0.25) mm and (1.2±0.25) mm. Conclusion: All the detectors are appropriate for the dosimetry measurements in advanced radiation therapy treatments. The choice of the detectors has to be determined by the application and the scope of the measurements in respect to energy dependence and ability to accurately resolve dose profiles as well as to it’s intrinsic characteristics

  17. Measurement and modeling of out-of-field doses from various advanced post-mastectomy radiotherapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Heins, David; Zhao, Xiaodong; Sanders, Mary; Zhang, Rui

    2017-12-01

    More and more advanced radiotherapy techniques have been adopted for post-mastectomy radiotherapies (PMRT). Patient dose reconstruction is challenging for these advanced techniques because they increase the low out-of-field dose area while the accuracy of out-of-field dose calculations by current commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) is poor. We aim to measure and model the out-of-field radiation doses from various advanced PMRT techniques. PMRT treatment plans for an anthropomorphic phantom were generated, including volumetric modulated arc therapy with standard and flattening-filter-free photon beams, mixed beam therapy, 4-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and tomotherapy. We measured doses in the phantom where the TPS calculated doses were lower than 5% of the prescription dose using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The TLD measurements were corrected by two additional energy correction factors, namely out-of-beam out-of-field (OBOF) correction factor K OBOF and in-beam out-of-field (IBOF) correction factor K IBOF, which were determined by separate measurements using an ion chamber and TLD. A simple analytical model was developed to predict out-of-field dose as a function of distance from the field edge for each PMRT technique. The root mean square discrepancies between measured and calculated out-of-field doses were within 0.66 cGy Gy-1 for all techniques. The IBOF doses were highly scattered and should be evaluated case by case. One can easily combine the measured out-of-field dose here with the in-field dose calculated by the local TPS to reconstruct organ doses for a specific PMRT patient if the same treatment apparatus and technique were used.

  18. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  19. Investigation of space-energy effects in the reactivity measurement by neutron noise with ex-core detectors in a reflected LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescano, V.H.; Behringer, K.

    1981-11-01

    Practical application of the zero-crossing correlation method for measuring slightly subcritical reactivities in a swimming pool reactor required the use of detector locations in the reflector zone near to the core boundary. Experimental investigations of neutron-noise cross-power spectra showed significant deviations from the point reactor model at higher frequencies (> 100 Hz). Nevertheless, the use of the point reactor model was found to be an useful approach in the analysis of the zero-crossing correlation method yielding results which agreed well with those obtained from the rod-drop method. The theoretical part of the work is concerned with a space-dependent model calculation in two-group diffusion theory to support the experimental findings. The model calculation can explain the trends observed in the neutron-noise spectra as well as the applicability of the point reactor model to the zero-crossing correlation method. To obtain better insight, the calculations have been extended to neutron-noise spectra when one or both detectors are located in the core zone. In the case of a large core and widely spaced detectors, with at least one detector in the core zone, a sink frequency appears in the spectra. This effect is well-known in coupled-core kinetics. (Auth.)

  20. Introducing process analytical technology (PAT) in filamentous cultivation process development: comparison of advanced online sensors for biomass measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Nanna Petersen; Stocks, Stuart M.; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2011-01-01

    cultivation data, such as the carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) and the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Prediction models for the biomass concentrations were estimated on the basis of the individual sensors and on combinations of the sensors. The results showed that the more advanced sensors based on MWF...... and scanning DE spectroscopy did not offer any advantages over the simpler sensors based on dual frequency DE spectroscopy, turbidity, and CER measurements for prediction of biomass concentration. By combining CER, DE spectroscopy, and turbidity measurements, the prediction error was reduced to 1.5 g...

  1. Advanced measurement systems based on digital processing techniques for superconducting LHC magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Alessandro; Cennamo, Felice

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator aimed at exploring deeper into matter than ever before, is currently being constructed at CERN. Beam optics of the LHC, requires stringent control of the field quality of about 8400 superconducting magnets, including 1232 main dipoles and 360 main quadrupoles to assure the correct machine operation. The measurement challenges are various: accuracy on the field strength measurement up to 50 ppm, harmonics in the ppm range, measurement equipment robustness, low measurement times to characterize fast field phenomena. New magnetic measurement systems, principally based on analog solutions, have been developed at CERN to achieve these goals. This work proposes the introduction of digital technologies to improve measurement performance of three systems, aimed at different measurement target and characterized by different accuracy levels. The high accuracy measurement systems, based on rotating coils, exhibit high performance in static magnetic field. With vary...

  2. Exchange of information by the introduction of the advanced measurement and control systems; Utveksling av informasjon ved innfoering av AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-05-15

    Data from the advanced measurement and control systems (in Norwegian: AMS) can provide significant new impacts to society, given that the relevant information from the systems made available to customers, utilities, power suppliers and any providers of other services. There are three types of information that is important: quality-assured data, raw data and general information. Quality assured data should be collected and sent out automatically weekly to third parties (power suppliers and independent providers of services) as soon as possible after they are assured, in a handy format. Raw data, ie current consumption (instant values), should be made available for electricity suppliers and independent third parties by sending the meter to the local receiver, or via measuring system. Raw data and functionality for control may also be useful for the network owner and / or system operator. The measurement system should be used to control if possible. Customers must be given access to raw data, either via the display, PC, TV or similar. If the system opens to control through measuring system, third parties should also be given the right to send the signal through the company's computer system. The advanced measurement and control systems can also provide the ability to send customer information, including so-called statutory information (prices, disconnection, etc.). In this context it should be considered whether it might be appropriate to offer customers the display or software to receive information. (AG)

  3. In-flight Quality and Accuracy of Attitude Measurements from the CHAMP Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz

    2005-01-01

    The German geo-observations satellite CHAMP carries highly accurate vector instruments. The orientation of these relative to the inertial reference frame is obtained using star trackers. These advanced stellar compasses (ASC) are fully autonomous units, which provide, in real time, the absolute...... attitude with accuracy in the arc second range. In order to investigate the in-flight accuracy of the ASC, the terminology to characterize noise and biases is introduced. Relative instrument accuracy (RIA) and absolute instrument accuracy (AIA) can in principle be determined in-flight. However problems...

  4. Measurement of the sound absorption coefficient for an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the basics of the acoustic properties of materials. The impedance tube-standing wave method is applied to study the normal absorption coefficient of acoustics insulators. The setup includes a tube, a speaker, a microphone, a digital function generator and an oscilloscope, material available in an undergraduate laboratory. Results of the change of the absorption coefficient with the frequency, the sample thickness and the sample density are analysed and compared with those obtained with a commercial system.

  5. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro Exposure Tool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 (micro)m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features

  6. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would

  7. Measuring death-related anxiety in advanced cancer: preliminary psychometrics of the Death and Dying Distress Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Christopher; Hales, Sarah; Zimmermann, Camilla; Gagliese, Lucia; Rydall, Anne; Rodin, Gary

    2011-10-01

    The alleviation of distress associated with death and dying is a central goal of palliative care, despite the lack of routine measurement of this outcome. In this study, we introduce the Death and Dying Distress Scale (DADDS), a new, brief measure we have developed to assess death-related anxiety in advanced cancer and other palliative populations. We describe its preliminary psychometrics based on a sample of 33 patients with advanced or metastatic cancer. The DADDS broadly captures distress about the loss of time and opportunity, the process of death and dying, and its impact on others. The initial version of the scale has a one-factor structure and good internal reliability. Dying and death-related distress was positively associated with depression and negatively associated with spiritual, emotional, physical, and functional well-being, providing early evidence of construct validity. This distress was relatively common, with 45% of the sample scoring in the upper reaches of the scale, suggesting that the DADDS may be a relevant outcome for palliative intervention. We conclude by presenting a revised 15-item version of the scale for further study in advanced cancer and other palliative populations.

  8. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalls, F.J.

    1978-03-01

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10 -9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  9. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Talk: Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave and Optical Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Eugene

    2010-03-01

    The quest to detect Gravitational Waves resulted in a number of important developments in the fields of oscillator frequency stabilization and precision noise measurements. This was due to the realization of similarities between the principles of high sensitivity measurements of weak mechanical forces and phase/amplitude fluctuations of microwave signals. In both cases interferometric carrier suppression and low-noise amplification of the residual noise sidebands were the main factors behind significant improvements in the resolution of spectral measurements. In particular, microwave frequency discriminators with almost thermal noise limited sensitivity were constructed leading to microwave oscillators with more than 25dB lower phase noise than the previous state-of-the-art. High power solid-state microwave amplifiers offered further opportunity of oscillator phase noise reduction due to the increased energy stored in the high-Q resonator of the frequency discriminator. High power microwave oscillators with the phase noise spectral density close to -160dBc/Hz at 1kHz Fourier frequency have been recently demonstrated. The principles of interferometric signal processing have been applied to the study of noise phenomena in microwave components which were considered to be ``noise free''. This resulted in the first experimental evidence of phase fluctuations in microwave circulators. More efficient use of signal power enabled construction of the ``power recycled'' interferometers with spectral resolution of -200dBc/Hz at 1kHz Fourier frequency. This has been lately superseded by an order of magnitude with a waveguide interferometer due to its higher power recycling factor. A number of opto-electronic measurement systems were developed to characterize the fidelity of frequency transfer from the optical to the microwave domain. This included a new type of a phase detector capable of measuring phase fluctuations of the weak microwave signals extracted from the demodulated

  10. Present art of reactivity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Masafumi; Matsuura, Shojiro

    1977-01-01

    Experimental techniques for reactivity determination of a reactor have been one of the long standing subjects in reactor physics. Recently, such a requirement was proposed by the reactor designers and operators that the values of reactivity should be measured more accurately. This is because importance is emphasized for the role of reactivity to the performance of reactor safety, economics and operability. Motivated by the requirement, some remarkable progresses are being made for the improvement of the experimental techniques. Then, the present review summarizes the research activities on this subject, identifies several reactor physics problems to be overcome, and makes mention of the future targets. (auth.)

  11. The reactivity meter and core reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discussed in depth the point kinetic equations and the characteristics of the point kinetic reactivity meter, particularly for large negative reactivities. From a given input signal representing the neutron flux seen by a detector, the meter computes a value of reactivity in dollars (ρ/β), based on inverse point kinetics. The prompt jump point of view is emphasised. (Author)

  12. Repeated measurements of NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, troponin T or C-reactive protein do not predict future allograft rejection in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battes, Linda C; Caliskan, Kadir; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Constantinescu, Alina A; Robertus, Jan L; Akkerhuis, Martijn; Manintveld, Olivier C; Boersma, Eric; Kardys, Isabella

    2015-03-01

    Studies on the prognostic value of serial biomarker assays for future occurrence of allograft rejection (AR) are scarce. We examined whether repeated measurements of NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), troponin T (TropT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict AR. From 2005 to 2010, 77 consecutive heart transplantation (HTx) recipients were included. The NT-proBNP, TropT, and CRP were measured at 16 ± 4 (mean ± standard deviation) consecutive routine endomyocardial biopsy surveillance visits during the first year of follow-up. Allograft rejection was defined as International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) grade 2R or higher at endomyocardial biopsy. Joint modeling was used to assess the association between repeated biomarker measurements and occurrence of future AR. Joint modeling accounts for dependence among repeated observations in individual patients. The mean age of the patients at HTx was 49 ± 9.2 years, and 68% were men. During the first year of follow-up, 1,136 biopsies and concurrent blood samples were obtained, and 56 patients (73%) experienced at least one episode of AR. All biomarkers were elevated directly after HTx and achieved steady-state after ∼ 12 weeks, both in patients with or without AR. No associations were present between the repeated measurements of NT-proBNP, TropT, or CRP and AR both early (weeks 0-12) and late (weeks 13-52) in the course after HTx (hazard ratios for weeks 13-52: 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.68), 0.67 (0.27-1.69), and 1.44 (0.90-2.30), respectively, per ln[unit]). Combining the three biomarkers in one model also rendered null results. The temporal evolution of NT-proBNP, TropT, and CRP before AR did not predict occurrence of acute AR both in the early and late course of the first year after HTx.

  13. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure?s (PROMs) Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    OpenAIRE

    Croudace, Tim; Brazier, John; Gutacker, Nils; Street, Andrew; Robotham, Dan; Waterman, Samantha; Rose, Diana; Satkunanathan, Safarina; Wykes, Til; Nasr, Nasrin; Enderby, Pamela; Carlton, Jill; Rowen, Donna; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til W...

  14. A potpourri of impedance measurements at the advanced photon source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereno, N.S.; Chae, Y.C.; Harkay, K.C.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Milton, S.V.; Yang, B.X.

    1997-01-01

    Machine coupling impedances were determined in the APS storage ring from measurements of the bunch length, synchronous phase, and synchrotron and betatron tunes vs single-bunch current. The transverse measurements were performed for various numbers of small gap insertion device (ID) chambers installed in the ring. The transverse impedance is determined from measurements of the transverse tunes and bunch length as a function of single-bunch current. The shift in the synchrotron tune was measured as a function of bunch current from which the total cavity impedance was extracted. The loss factor was determined by measuring the relative synchronous phase as a function of bunch current. The longitudinal resistive impedance is calculated using the loss factor dependence on the bunch length. From these results, the authors can estimate what the impedance would be for a full set of ID chambers

  15. In Situ Local Measurement of Austenite Mechanical Stability and Transformation Behavior in Third-Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Farha, Fadi; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Hector, Louis G.; Thomas, Grant; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-05-01

    Austenite mechanical stability, i.e., retained austenite volume fraction (RAVF) variation with strain, and transformation behavior were investigated for two third-generation advanced high-strength steels (3GAHSS) under quasi-static uniaxial tension: a 1200 grade, two-phase medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel, and a 980 grade, three-phase TRIP steel produced with a quenching and partitioning heat treatment. The medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel deforms inhomogeneously via propagative instabilities (Lüders and Portevin Le Châtelier-like bands), while the 980 grade TRIP steel deforms homogenously up to necking. The dramatically different deformation behaviors of these steels required the development of a new in situ experimental technique that couples volumetric synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement of RAVF with surface strain measurement using stereo digital image correlation over the beam impingement area. Measurement results with the new technique are compared to those from a more conventional approach wherein strains are measured over the entire gage region, while RAVF measurement is the same as that in the new technique. A determination is made as to the appropriateness of the different measurement techniques in measuring the transformation behaviors for steels with homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation behaviors. Extension of the new in situ technique to the measurement of austenite transformation under different deformation modes and to higher strain rates is discussed.

  16. Data Mining and Statistics Methods for Advanced Training Course Quality Measurement: Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galchenko Maxim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced training courses in the energetics field is a very important part of human reliability growth. In the words of S.E. Magid, chief of Technical Educational systems in Energy Technologies, UNESCO department: “The number of forced outages due to failures of equipment on the power stations -30 %. The share of operational personnel fault in these infringements makes considerable size (to 15%. As a whole in the Russian Open Society ‘United Power Systems’ the infringements percentage because of the personnel from infringements total makes 2%. At the same time, on power stations this quantity makes 18%. In power supply systems of Siberia the relative quantity of infringements because of the personnel reaches 50%.” [1].

  17. Development of an alternating integrator for magnetic measurements for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D. M., E-mail: dmliu@live.cn; Zhao, W. Z.; He, Y. G.; Chen, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Wan, B. N.; Shen, B.; Huang, J.; Liu, H. Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance integrator is one of the key electronic devices for reliably controlling plasma in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for long pulse operation. We once designed an integrator system of real-time drift compensation, which has a low integration drift. However, it is not feasible for really continuous operations due to capacitive leakage error and nonlinearity error. To solve the above-mentioned problems, this paper presents a new alternating integrator. In the new integrator, the integrator system of real-time drift compensation is adopted as one integral cell while two such integral cells work alternately. To achieve the alternate function, a Field Programmable Gate Array built in the digitizer is utilized. The performance test shows that the developed integrator with the integration time constant of 20 ms has a low integration drift (<15 mV) for 1000 s.

  18. Advanced laboratory for testing plasma thrusters and Hall thruster measurement campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma engines are used for space propulsion as an alternative to chemical thrusters. Due to the high exhaust velocity of the propellant, they are more efficient for long-distance interplanetary space missions than their conventional counterparts. An advanced laboratory of plasma space propulsion (PlaNS at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM specializes in designing and testing various electric propulsion devices. Inside of a special vacuum chamber with three performance pumps, an environment similar to the one that prevails in space is created. An innovative Micro Pulsed Plasma Thruster (LμPPT with liquid propellant was built at the laboratory. Now it is used to test the second prototype of Hall effect thruster (HET operating on krypton propellant. Meantime, an improved prototype of krypton Hall thruster is constructed.

  19. Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Polarization calibration analysis for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Brian; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. Achieving first light in 2013, ACTPol is entering its third observation season. Advanced ACTPol is a next generation upgrade for ACTPol, with additional frequencies, polarization modulation, and new detector arrays, that will begin in 2016. I will first present an overview of the two projects and then focus on describing the methods used for polarization angle calibration of the ACTPol detectors. These methods utilize polarization ray tracing in the optical design software CODEV together with detector positions determined from planet observations and represent a critical input for mapping the polarization of the CMB.

  20. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Rubin, D. M.

    2012-06-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  1. Advanced platform for the in-plane ZT measurement of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linseis, V.; Völklein, F.; Reith, H.; Nielsch, K.; Woias, P.

    2018-01-01

    The characterization of nanostructured samples with at least one restricted dimension like thin films or nanowires is challenging, but important to understand their structure and transport mechanism, and to improve current industrial products and production processes. We report on the 2nd generation of a measurement chip, which allows for a simplified sample preparation process, and the measurement of samples deposited from the liquid phase using techniques like spin coating and drop casting. The new design enables us to apply much higher temperature gradients for the Seebeck coefficient measurement in a shorter time, without influencing the sample holder's temperature distribution. Furthermore, a two membrane correction method for the 3ω thermal conductivity measurement will be presented, which takes the heat loss due to radiation into account and increases the accuracy of the measurement results significantly. Errors caused by different sample compositions, varying sample geometries, and different heat profiles are avoided with the presented measurement method. As a showcase study displaying the validity and accuracy of our platform, we present temperature-dependent measurements of the thermoelectric properties of an 84 nm Bi87Sb13 thin film and a 15 μm PEDOT:PSS thin film.

  2. Advanced oxidation of acid and reactive dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslan-Alaton, I.; Gursoy, B.H.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    M) for 10:hsp sp="0.25" min Fenton treatment at pH 3, resulting in reduced chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon removal efficiencies; only acetate was detected as a stable dye oxidation end product. During anaerobic digestion, 100, 29% and no inhibition in methane production was observed...

  3. Advances in nonlinear analysis via the concept of measure of noncompactness

    CERN Document Server

    Jleli, Mohamed; Mursaleen, Mohammad; Samet, Bessem; Vetro, Calogero

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive treatment of the theory of measures of noncompactness. It discusses various applications of the theory of measures of noncompactness, in particular, by addressing the results and methods of fixed-point theory. The concept of a measure of noncompactness is very useful for the mathematical community working in nonlinear analysis. Both these theories are especially useful in investigations connected with differential equations, integral equations, functional integral equations and optimization theory. Thus, one of the book’s central goals is to collect and present sufficient conditions for the solvability of such equations. The results are established in miscellaneous function spaces, and particular attention is paid to fractional calculus.

  4. Advances in the development of an imaging device for plaque measurement in the area of the carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ličev, Lačezar; Krumnikl, Michal; Škuta, Jaromír; Babiuch, Marek; Farana, Radim

    2014-03-04

    This paper describes the advances in the development and subsequent testing of an imaging device for three-dimensional ultrasound measurement of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery. The embolization from the atherosclerotic carotid plaque is one of the most common causes of ischemic stroke and, therefore, we consider the measurement of the plaque as extremely important. The paper describes the proposed hardware for enhancing the standard ultrasonic probe to provide a possibility of accurate probe positioning and synchronization with the cardiac activity, allowing the precise plaque measurements that were impossible with the standard equipment. The synchronization signal is derived from the output signal of the patient monitor (electrocardiogram (ECG)), processed by a microcontroller-based system, generating the control commands for the linear motion moving the probe. The controlling algorithm synchronizes the movement with the ECG waveform to obtain clear images not disturbed by the heart activity.

  5. Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: Rooftop Unit Measurement and Verification (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-09-01

    This document provides facility managers and building owners an introduction to measurement and verification (M&V) methods to estimate energy and cost savings of rooftop units replacement or retrofit projects to estimate paybacks or to justify future projects.

  6. Measuring the impacts of social media on advancing public transit : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This project is a collaboration between Portland State University (PSU) and the Center for Infrastructure Transportation & Environment (CITE) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute seeking to develop performance measures for assessing the impacts of soc...

  7. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 5 of 6: Phase Measurement of Galvanneal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristopher Burnett; Ronald Guel; James R. Philips; L. Lowry; Beverly Tai

    1999-05-31

    Augmentation of the internal software of a commercial X-ray fluorescence gauge is shown to enable the instrument to extend its continuous on-line real-time measurements of a galvanneal coating's total elemental content to encompass similar measurements of the relative thickness of the coating's three principal metallurgical phases. The mathematical structure of this software augmentation is derived from the theory of neural networks. The performance of the augmented gauge is validated by comparing the gauge implied real-time phase distribution with the phase distribution independently measured off-line on between the gauge and laboratory measurements and to suggest preferred approaches to be followed in future application of the augmented gauge.

  8. Travel time data collection for measurement of advanced traveler information systems accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this white paper is to recommend an approach to measuring ATIS travel time accuracy so that ITS planners might have the data they need to make cost effective decisions regarding deployment of surveillance technologies to support ATIS...

  9. Pembrolizumab reactivates pulmonary granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdi Al-dliw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoid like reaction is a well-known entity that occurs as a consequence to several malignancies or their therapies. Immunotherapy has gained a lot of interest in the past few years and has recently gained approval as first line therapy in multiple advanced stage malignancies. Pneumonitis has been described as complication of such therapy. Granulomatous inflammation has been only rarely reported subsequent to immunotherapy. We describe a case of granulomatous inflammation reactivation affecting the lungs in a patient previously exposed to Pembrolizumab and have evidence of a distant granulomatous infection. We discuss potential mechanisms of the inflammation and assert the importance of immunosuppression in controlling the dis-inhibited immune system.

  10. Recent advances in measurement and dietary mitigation of enteric methane emissions in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kumar Patra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emission, which is mainly produced during normal fermentation of feeds by the rumen microorganisms, represents a major contributor to the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Several enteric CH4 mitigation technologies have been explored recently. A number of new techniques have also been developed and existing techniques have been improved in order to evaluate CH4 mitigation technologies and prepare an inventory of GHG emissions precisely. The aim of this review is to discuss different CH4 measuring and mitigation technologies, which have been recently developed. Respiration chamber technique is still considered as a gold standard technique due to its greater precision and reproducibility in CH4 measurements. With the adoption of recent recommendations for improving the technique, the SF6 method can be used with a high level of precision similar to the chamber technique. Short-term measurement techniques of CH4 measurements generally invite considerable within- and between animal variations. Among the short-term measuring techniques, Greenfeed and methane hood systems are likely more suitable for evaluation of CH4 mitigation studies, if measurements could be obtained at different times of the day relative to the diurnal cycle of the CH4 production. Carbon dioxide and CH4 ratio, sniffer and other short-term breath analysis techniques are more suitable for on farm screening of large number of animals to generate the data of low CH4 producing animals for genetic selection purposes. Different indirect measuring techniques are also investigated in recent years. Several new dietary CH4 mitigation technologies have been explored, but only a few of them are practical and cost-effective. Future research should be directed towards both the medium- and long-term mitigation strategies, which could be utilized on farms to accomplish substantial reductions of CH4 emissions and to profitably reduce carbon footprint of livestock production systems. This

  11. Recent Advances in Measurement and Dietary Mitigation of Enteric Methane Emissions in Ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amlan K

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emission, which is mainly produced during normal fermentation of feeds by the rumen microorganisms, represents a major contributor to the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Several enteric CH4 mitigation technologies have been explored recently. A number of new techniques have also been developed and existing techniques have been improved in order to evaluate CH4 mitigation technologies and prepare an inventory of GHG emissions precisely. The aim of this review is to discuss different CH4 measuring and mitigation technologies, which have been recently developed. Respiration chamber technique is still considered as a gold standard technique due to its greater precision and reproducibility in CH4 measurements. With the adoption of recent recommendations for improving the technique, the SF6 method can be used with a high level of precision similar to the chamber technique. Short-term measurement techniques of CH4 measurements generally invite considerable within- and between-animal variations. Among the short-term measuring techniques, Greenfeed and methane hood systems are likely more suitable for evaluation of CH4 mitigation studies, if measurements could be obtained at different times of the day relative to the diurnal cycle of the CH4 production. Carbon dioxide and CH4 ratio, sniffer, and other short-term breath analysis techniques are more suitable for on farm screening of large number of animals to generate the data of low CH4-producing animals for genetic selection purposes. Different indirect measuring techniques are also investigated in recent years. Several new dietary CH4 mitigation technologies have been explored, but only a few of them are practical and cost-effective. Future research should be directed toward both the medium- and long-term mitigation strategies, which could be utilized on farms to accomplish substantial reductions of CH4 emissions and to profitably reduce carbon footprint of livestock production systems. This review presents

  12. Driving Pressure Influence in Voltage Maps Measurement Process Using Advanced Pneumatic Mapping Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kukucka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our paper deals with the method of the voltage-impedance map measurement process as a method useful for the electric mapping of human skin. The area of research extends from the basic research to its practical application in acupuncture skin mapping and acupuncture point localization and visualization. The problem of sufficient skin coverage and electrical contact with measuring electrodes is solved by the conventional mechanical telescopic electrodes and by the pneumatic matrix electrode probe. A 2D or 3D voltage-impedance map of skin is an output of the measuring, interpretation and evaluation process. New pneumatic construction of measuring probe was implemented to achieve a better coverage of specified skin area and get a reduced force range of the touching electrodes allowing the steady contact of the skin-electrode. A skin contact is related to the driving pressure of touching electrodes. Our paper offers experimentally measured results, voltage maps of skin on specific areas, selected measured and described acupuncture points and their applications in electro-acupuncture.

  13. Measurement of Distraction Force in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients During Le Fort I Maxillary Advancement With Rigid External Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hiromi; Ogawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Keiichi; Baba, Yoshiyuki; Moriyama, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a mainstream surgical technique for patients who have severe maxillary hypoplasia associated with craniofacial syndromes and cleft-related deformities. However, limited information about the biomechanical aspects of maxillary DO is available limiting broad utilization and improvements to the procedure. The objective of this study was to analyze force levels during the active distraction process and to investigate the relationship between distraction force and maxillary movement during Le Fort I maxillary DO using a rigid external distraction (RED) system. Microtension gauges were integrated into the distraction wires on each side of the RED system. Six patients with cleft lip and palate aged 12.8 to 23.5 years underwent strain gauge measurements during maxillary advancement with DO using an RED system. Lateral cephalograms were taken to measure maxillary horizontal, vertical, and linear movements after DO. The average linear maxillary movement was 11.2 mm (range 8.5-15.9 mm). The applied forces ranged from 13.4 to 26.8 N. The distance of maxillary movement was proportional to the distraction force. The measurement of distraction forces during DO provides important information with which to establish appropriate protocols. Patients requiring more advancement may require more distraction force. However, other factors such as scarring, patient anatomy, surgical freedom of the osteotomized maxilla, and the like, may affect the required force during DO with the RED system.

  14. Recent advancements in nuclear analytical techniques for measurement of radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puranik, V.D.; Jha, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of environmental system is of crucial importance and a challenge to all those who are interested in the condition, behavior and control of our environment. It is a challenge because of the complexity of the environment system, and its analysis requires a great deal of sophistication. By environmental analysis, we mean the holistic study of an environmental system, its components, parts, inter and intra relationships, and its interactions within its surroundings. The common feature of radionuclide measurement is the detection and measurement of nuclear radiation and/or characteristics X-rays. Two basic situations are included, i.e.. the use of external and internal radiation. Internal radiation is emitted by sample itself or a radioactive isotope of an element in the sample which may be originally present, added or produced by natural process of activation. External radiation is produced external to the sample, and interacts with it by absorption, scattering and capture effects. Generally changes in external radiation caused by sample interaction are measured. Both qualitative and quantitative measurements can be made, the later being more commonly used. Basis of all quantitative measurements is the direct proportionality between the amount of substance in the sample and the intensity of the measured radiation. In most cases, there are relative or comparative measurements. Qualitative measurements are also made in which nuclides are identified on the basis of half life nature and the energy of the emitted radiation. The various nuclear methods available can be classified into two major groups, viz, direct and indirect methods. Direct methods are the direct measurement of the radionuclide in an environmental sample, for example, 137 Cs in sediment and 238 U in soil. The largest group of indirect methods for measurement of environmental samples is comprised of activation used for environmental trace pollutants. Discoveries of radioactivity and X

  15. Advances in simultaneous atmospheric profile and cloud parameter regression based retrieval from high-spectral resolution radiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Smith, William L.; Smith, Nadia

    2013-06-01

    The dual-regression (DR) method retrieves information about the Earth surface and vertical atmospheric conditions from measurements made by any high-spectral resolution infrared sounder in space. The retrieved information includes temperature and atmospheric gases (such as water vapor, ozone, and carbon species) as well as surface and cloud top parameters. The algorithm was designed to produce a high-quality product with low latency and has been demonstrated to yield accurate results in real-time environments. The speed of the retrieval is achieved through linear regression, while accuracy is achieved through a series of classification schemes and decision-making steps. These steps are necessary to account for the nonlinearity of hyperspectral retrievals. In this work, we detail the key steps that have been developed in the DR method to advance accuracy in the retrieval of nonlinear parameters, specifically cloud top pressure. The steps and their impact on retrieval results are discussed in-depth and illustrated through relevant case studies. In addition to discussing and demonstrating advances made in addressing nonlinearity in a linear geophysical retrieval method, advances toward multi-instrument geophysical analysis by applying the DR to three different operational sounders in polar orbit are also noted. For any area on the globe, the DR method achieves consistent accuracy and precision, making it potentially very valuable to both the meteorological and environmental user communities.

  16. A new kind high-reliability digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Feng; Jiang Zongbing

    2001-01-01

    The paper introduces a new kind of high-reliability Digital Reactivity Meter developed by the DRM developing group in designing department of Nuclear Power Institute of China. The meter has two independent measure channels, which can be set as either master-slave structure or working independently. This structure will ensure that the meter can continually fulfill its online measure task under the condition of single failure with it. It provides a solution for the conflict between nuclear station's extreme demand in DRM's reliability and instability of computer's business software platform. The instrument reaches both advance and reliability by covering a lot of kinds of complex functions in data process and display

  17. Measure and integration an advanced course in basic procedures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    König, Heinz

    1997-01-01

    This book sets out to restructure certain fundamentals in measure and integration theory, and thus to fee the theory from some notorious drawbacks. It centers around the ubiquitous task of producing appropriate contents and measures from more primitive data, in order to extend elementary contents and to represent elementary integrals. This task has not been met with adequate unified means so far. The traditional main tools, the Carathéodory and Daniell-Stone theorems, are too restrictive and had to be supplemented by other ad-hoc procedures. Around 1970 a new approach emerged, based on the notion of regularity, which in traditional measure theory is linked to topology. The present book develops the new approach into a systematic theory. The theory unifies the entire context and is much more powerful than the former means. It has striking implications all over measure theory and beyond. Thus it extends the Riesz representation theorem in terms of Randon measures from locally compact to arbitrary Hausdorff top...

  18. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  19. Recent Advances in Low-Level Nuclear Measurements at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, C.; Lamadie, F.; Le Goaller, C.

    2009-01-01

    For several years the CEA has been performing nuclear measurements at different stages of decommissioning projects. The characterization tools initially developed for high-level radioactive waste analysis must be adapted to a new area of application: low-level measurements. Recent technical improvements in gamma imaging, gamma spectrometry detectors, and data analysis make it possible to provide relevant radiological data for waste management, as well as to develop robust and optimized decommissioning scenarios from the initial dose rate mapping to the final declared activity. These techniques have been implemented at various nuclear sites for both trial measurement campaigns and expert investigations to localize residual contamination, to identify the radioelements and to provide an accurate estimate of the declarable activity. Different types of measurements and devices have been used: gamma cameras, coded aperture techniques, alpha imaging prototypes, gamma spectrometry detectors (CdZnTe, HPGe, NaI, and LaBr 3 ), dose rate cartography, and calculation codes (Mercure, MCNP, etc.), all of which provide complementary data for radioactive waste categorization. This paper describes the latest developments and methods deployed on decommissioning projects focusing on low-level in situ applications. Waste drum characterization and in situ glove box measurements are discussed and the technologies and performance of gamma imaging systems, gamma spectrometry detectors, calculation codes and software are described. The paper concludes with a review of future developments and tests necessary for these applications. (authors)

  20. A review of soft-tissue sarcomas: translation of biological advances into treatment measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang NT

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ngoc T Hoang,* Luis A Acevedo,* Michael J Mann, Bhairavi Tolani Thoracic Oncology Program, Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Soft-tissue sarcomas are rare malignant tumors arising from connective tissues and have an overall incidence of about five per 100,000 per year. While this diverse family of malignancies comprises over 100 histological subtypes and many molecular aberrations are prevalent within specific sarcomas, very few are therapeutically targeted. Instead of utilizing molecular signatures, first-line sarcoma treatment options are still limited to traditional surgery and chemotherapy, and many of the latter remain largely ineffective and are plagued by disease resistance. Currently, the mechanism of sarcoma oncogenesis remains largely unknown, thus necessitating a better understanding of pathogenesis. Although substantial progress has not occurred with molecularly targeted therapies over the past 30 years, increased knowledge about sarcoma biology could lead to new and more effective treatment strategies to move the field forward. Here, we discuss biological advances in the core molecular determinants in some of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas – liposarcoma, angiosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, and synovial sarcoma – with an emphasis on emerging genomic and molecular pathway targets and immunotherapeutic treatment strategies to combat this confounding disease. Keywords: sarcoma, molecular pathways, immunotherapy, genomics

  1. Identification of a B cell-dependent subpopulation of multiple sclerosis by measurements of brain-reactive B cells in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pommerschein, Giovanna; Barth, Stefanie K; Hohmann, Christopher; Milles, Bianca; Sammer, Fabian W; Duffy, Cathrina E; Wunsch, Marie; Rovituso, Damiano M; Schroeter, Michael; Addicks, Klaus; Kaiser, Claudia C; Lehmann, Paul V

    2014-01-01

    B cells are increasingly coming into play in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), MS, other non-inflammatory neurological, inflammatory neurological or autoimmune diseases, and healthy donors for their B cell reactivity to CNS antigen using the enzyme-linked immunospot technique (ELISPOT) after 96 h of polyclonal stimulation. Our data show that nine of 15 patients with CIS (60.0%) and 53 of 67 patients with definite MS (79.1%) displayed CNS-reactive B cells, compared to none of the control donors. The presence of CNS-reactive B cells in the blood of the majority of patients with MS or at risk to develop MS along with their absence in control subjects suggests that they might be indicative of a B cell-dependent subpopulation of the disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Measuring Uranium Decay Rates for Advancement of Nuclear Forensics and Geochronology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons-Davis, Tashi [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    Radioisotopic dating techniques are highly valuable tools for understanding the history of physical and chemical processes in materials related to planetary sciences and nuclear forensics, and rely on accurate knowledge of decay constants and their uncertainties. The decay constants of U-238 and U-235 are particularly important to Earth science, and often the measured values with lowest reported uncertainties are applied, although they have not been independently verified with similar precision. New direct measurements of the decay constants of U-238, Th-234, U-235, and U-234 were completed, using a range of analytical approaches. An overarching goal of the project was to ensure the quality of results, including metrological traceability to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. This report presents preliminary results of these experiments, as a few final measurements and calculations are still in progress.

  3. Beam profile measurements on the advanced test accelerator using optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Y.P.; Kalibjian, R.; Cornish, J.P.; Kallman, J.S.; Donnelly, D.

    1986-01-01

    Beam current density profiles of ATA have been measured both spatially and temporally using a number of diagnostics. An extremely important technique involves measuring optical emissions from either a target foil inserted into the beam path or gas atoms and molecules excited by beam electrons. This paper describes the detection of the optical emission. A 2-D gated television camera with a single or dual micro-channel-plate (MCP) detector for high gain provides excellent spatial and temporal resolution. Measurements are routinely made with resolutions of 1 mm and 5 ns respectively. The optical line of sight allows splitting part of the signal to a streak camera or photometer for even higher time resolution

  4. Sea sand for reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.; Ordonez R, E.; Ordonez R, En.

    2002-01-01

    Some phosphates have the property to suck in radioactive metals in solution, what it is taken in advance to make reactive barriers which are placed in the nuclear waste repositories. In an effort for contributing to the study of this type of materials, it has been obtained the zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ) and the alpha zirconium hydrogen phosphate (Zr(HPO 4 ) 2H 2 O) starting from sea sand in an easy and economic way. (Author)

  5. ADVANCED 3D LASER MICROSCOPY FOR MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYSIS OF VITRIFIED BONDED ABRASIVE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOJCIECH KAPLONEK

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In many applications, when a precise non-contact assessment of an abrasive tools’ surface is required, alternative measurement methods are often used. Their use offers numerous advantages (referential method as they introduce new qualities into routinely realized measurements. Over the past few years there has been a dynamic increase in the interest for using new types of classical confocal microscopy. These new types are often defined as 3D laser microscopy. This paper presents select aspects of one such method’s application – confocal laser scanning microscopy – for diagnostic analysis of abrasive tools. In addition this paper also looks at the basis for operation, the origins and the development of this measurement technique.The experimental part of this paper presents the select results of tests carried out on grinding wheel active surfaces with sintered microcrystalline corundum grains SG™ bound with glass-crystalline bond. The 3D laser measuring microscopes LEXT OLS3100 and LEXT OLS4000 by Olympus were used in the experiments. Analysis of the obtained measurement data was carried out in dedicated OLS 5.0.9 and OLS4100 2.1 programs, supported by specialist TalyMap Platinum 5.0 software. The realized experiments confirmed the possibility of using the offered measurement method. This concerns both the assessment of grinding wheel active surfaces and their defects, as well as the internal structures of the tools (grain-bond connections. The method presented is an interesting alternative to the typical methods used in the diagnostics of abrasive tools.

  6. Assessment of the wish to hasten death in patients with advanced disease: A systematic review of measurement instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido-Pérez, Mercedes; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Porta-Sales, Josep; Balaguer, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Patients with advanced conditions may present a wish to hasten death. Assessing this wish is complex due to the nature of the phenomenon and the difficulty of conceptualising it. To identify and analyse existing instruments for assessing the wish to hasten death and to rate their reported psychometric properties. Systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of validation studies and the measurement properties of the instrument described. The CINAHL, PsycINFO, Pubmed and Web of Science databases were searched from inception to November 2015. A total of 50 articles involving assessment of the wish to hasten death were included. Eight concerned instrument validation and were evaluated using COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments criteria. They reported data for between two and seven measurement properties, with ratings between fair and excellent. Of the seven instruments identified, the Desire for Death Rating Scale or the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death feature in 48 of the 50 articles. The Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death is the most widely used and is the instrument whose psychometric properties have been most often analysed. Versions of the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death are available in five languages other than the original English. This systematic review has analysed existing instruments for assessing the wish to hasten death. It has also explored the methodological quality of studies that have examined the measurement properties of these instruments and offers ratings of the reported properties. These results will be useful to clinicians and researchers with an interest in a phenomenon of considerable relevance to advanced patients.

  7. Prospects for Dark Matter Measurements with the Advanced Gamma Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, James

    2009-05-01

    AGIS, a concept for a future gamma-ray observatory consisting of an array of 50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, would provide a powerful new tool for determining the nature of dark matter and its role in structure formation in the universe. The advent of more sensitive direct detection experiments, the launch of Fermi and the startup of the LHC make the near future an exciting time for dark matter searches. Indirect measurements of cosmic-ray electrons may already provide a hint of dark matter in our local halo. However, gamma-ray measurements will provide the only means for mapping the dark matter in the halo of our galaxy and other galaxies. In addition, the spectrum of gamma-rays (either direct annihilation to lines or continuum emission from other annihilation channels) will be imprinted with the mass of the dark matter particle, and the particular annihilation channels providing key measurements needed to identify the dark matter particle. While current gamma-ray instruments fall short of the generic sensitivity required to measure the dark matter signal from any sources other than the (confused) region around the Galactic center, we show that the planned AGIS array will have the angular resolution, energy resolution, low threshold energy and large effective area required to detect emission from dark matter annihilation in Galactic substructure or nearby Dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  8. Effect of Control Mode and Test Rate on the Measured Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of control mode and test rate on the measured fracture toughness of ceramics were evaluated by using chevron-notched flexure specimens in accordance with ASTM C1421. The use of stroke control gave consistent results with about 2% (statistically insignificant) variation in measured fracture toughness for a very wide range of rates (0.005 to 0.5 mm/min). Use of strain or crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) control gave approx. 5% (statistically significant) variation over a very wide range of rates (1 to 80 µm/m/s), with the measurements being a function of rate. However, the rate effect was eliminated by use of dry nitrogen, implying a stress corrosion effect rather than a stability effect. With the use of a nitrogen environment during strain controlled tests, fracture toughness values were within about 1% over a wide range of rates (1 to 80 micons/m/s). CMOD or strain control did allow stable crack extension well past maximum force, and thus is preferred for energy calculations. The effort is being used to confirm recommendations in ASTM Test Method C1421 on fracture toughness measurement.

  9. Cognitive load measurement as a means to advance cognitive load theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paas, F.; Tuovinen, J.E.; Tabbers, H.; van Gerven, P.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses cognitive load measurement techniques with regard to their contribution to cognitive load theory (CLT). CLT is concerned with the design of instructional methods that efficiently use people's limited cognitive processing capacity to apply acquired knowledge and skills to new

  10. Assessment of treatment response in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using advanced magnetic resonance imaging measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven C.; Heba, Elhamy; Bettencourt, Ricki; Lin, Grace Y.; Valasek, Mark A.; Lunde, Ottar; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.; Loomba, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging derived measures of liver fat and volume are emerging as accurate, non-invasive imaging biomarkers in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Little is known about these measures in relation to histology longitudinally. Aims This study examines this relationship between MRI-derived proton-density fat-fraction (PDFF), total liver volume (TLV), total liver fat index (TLFI), vs. histology in a NASH trial. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 50 patients with biopsy-proven NASH randomized to oral ezetimibe 10mg daily (n=25) vs. placebo (n=25). Baseline and post-treatment anthropometrics, biochemical profiling, MRI, and biopsies were obtained. Results Baseline mean PDFF correlated strongly with TLFI (Spearman’s ρ=0.94, n=45, PMRI-PDFF vs. TLV indicates that 10% reduction in MRI-PDFF predicts 257 mL reduction in TLV. Conclusions MRI-PDFF and TLV strongly correlated with TLFI. Decreases in steatosis were associated with an improvement in hepatomegaly. Lower values of these measures reflect lower histologic-steatosis grades. MRI-derived measures of liver fat and volume may be used as dynamic and more responsive imaging biomarkers in a NASH trial than histology. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01766713. PMID:28116801

  11. Advanced Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Low Level Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amendable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methy-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. All of the ions with potential to serve as parent ions in a tandem mass spectrometry experiment were found to yield parent-to-product conversion efficiencies greater than 75%. The flexibility afforded to the ion trap by use of tailored wave-forms applied to the end-caps allows parallel monitoring schemes to be devised that provide many of the advantages of tandem mass spectrometry without major loss in measurement rate. A large loss in measurement rate would ordinarily result from the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry experiments carried out in series for a large number of targeted components. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of

  12. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-02

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  13. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boas, J.F.; Hargrave, N.J.; Huntley, R.B.; Kotler, L.H.; Webb, D.V.; Wise, K.N. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields