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Sample records for advanced high strength

  1. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the car body has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties. (Author) 48 refs.

  2. Advanced Ultra high Strength Bainitic Steels

    OpenAIRE

    García Caballero, Francisca; García Mateo, Carlos; Capdevila, Carlos; García de Andrés, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The addition of about 2 wt.% of silicon to steel enables the production of a distinctive microstructure consisting of a mixture of bainitic ferrite, carbon-enriched retained austenite, and some martensite. With careful design, impressive combinations of strength and toughness have been reported for high-silicon bainitic steels. More recently, it has been demonstrated experimentally that models based on phase transformation theory can be applied successfully to the design of carbide-free baini...

  3. Development of high strength high toughness third generation advanced high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martis, Codrick John

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS's) are emerging as very important engineering materials for structural applications. These steels have high specific strength and thus will contribute significantly to weight reduction in automotive and other structural component. In this investigation two such low carbon low alloy steels (LCLA) with high silicon content (1.6-2wt %) has been developed. These two steel alloys were subjected to single step and two step austempering in the temperature range of 260-399°C to obtain desired microstructures and mechanical properties. Austempering heat treatment was carried out for 2 hours in a molten salt bath. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography. Quantitative analysis was carried out by image analysis technique. The effect of austempering temperature on the mechanical properties of these two alloys was examined. The influence of microstructures on the mechanical properties of alloys was also studied. Austempering heat treatment resulted in fine carbide free bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite microstructure in the samples austempered above Ms temperature, whereas tempered martensite and austenite microstructure was obtained in samples austempered below Ms temperature. Yield strength, tensile strength and fracture toughness were found to increase as the austempering temperature decreases, whereas ductility increases as the austempering temperature increases. Tensile strength in the range of 1276MPa -1658 MPa and the fracture toughness in the range of 80-141MPa√m were obtained in these two steels. Volume fractions of different phases present and their lath sizes are related to the mechanical properties. Austempered samples consisting of mixed microstructure of bainitic ferrite and tempered martensite phases resulted in the exceptional combination of strength and toughness.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  6. Advanced High Strength Steel in Auto Industry: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Baluch

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The world’s most common alloy, steel, is the material of choice when it comes to making products as diverse as oil rigs to cars and planes to skyscrapers, simply because of its functionality, adaptability, machine-ability and strength. Newly developed grades of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS significantly outperform competing materials for current and future automotive applications. This is a direct result of steel’s performance flexibility, as well as of its many benefits including low cost, weight reduction capability, safety attributes, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and superior recyclability. To improve crash worthiness and fuel economy, the automotive industry is, increasingly, using AHSS. Today, and in the future, automotive manufacturers must reduce the overall weight of their cars. The most cost-efficient way to do this is with AHSS. However, there are several parameters that decide which of the AHSS types to be used; the most important parameters are derived from the geometrical form of the component and the selection of forming and blanking methods. This paper describes the different types of AHSS, highlights their advantages for use in auto metal stampings, and discusses about the new challenges faced by stampers, particularly those serving the automotive industry.

  7. Characterization of hydrogen embrittlement in automotive advanced high strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, O.; Veith, S.; Goebel, T. [BMW Group, Muenchen (Germany); Loidl, M.

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen embrittlement is the limiting factor when it comes to the utilization of advanced highest strength steels in a car body frame. Steels with a tensile strength of greater than 1000 MPa are deemed to be susceptible to hydrogen induced delayed fracture and therefore are not yet widely used. To characterize the deleterious effects of hydrogen embrittlement in advanced highest strength steels the slow strain rate testing in gaseous hydrogen atmosphere is a suitable method for investigating the effect of hydrogen on the materials ductility. Additionally the hydrogen content after slow strain rate testing was measured by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy. By using this technique it is possible to differentiate between diffusible and trapped hydrogen. Diffusible hydrogen may interact with dislocations and therefore changes the fracture behaviour of metals. This was also documented by analysing the fracture surface of the tensile specimen by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The investigations yield a comprehensive view on the susceptibility towards hydrogen induced cracking and allow a comparative view among different steel grades. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Advanced Gear Alloys for Ultra High Strength Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tony; Krantz, Timothy; Sebastian, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Single tooth bending fatigue (STBF) test data of UHS Ferrium C61 and C64 alloys are presented in comparison with historical test data of conventional gear steels (9310 and Pyrowear 53) with comparable statistical analysis methods. Pitting and scoring tests of C61 and C64 are works in progress. Boeing statistical analysis of STBF test data for the four gear steels (C61, C64, 9310 and Pyrowear 53) indicates that the UHS grades exhibit increases in fatigue strength in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) regime. In the high cycle fatigue (HCF) regime, the UHS steels exhibit better mean fatigue strength endurance limit behavior (particularly as compared to Pyrowear 53). However, due to considerable scatter in the UHS test data, the anticipated overall benefits of the UHS grades in bending fatigue have not been fully demonstrated. Based on all the test data and on Boeing s analysis, C61 has been selected by Boeing as the gear steel for the final ERDS demonstrator test gearboxes. In terms of potential follow-up work, detailed physics-based, micromechanical analysis and modeling of the fatigue data would allow for a better understanding of the causes of the experimental scatter, and of the transition from high-stress LCF (surface-dominated) to low-stress HCF (subsurface-dominated) fatigue failure. Additional STBF test data and failure analysis work, particularly in the HCF regime and around the endurance limit stress, could allow for better statistical confidence and could reduce the observed effects of experimental test scatter. Finally, the need for further optimization of the residual compressive stress profiles of the UHS steels (resulting from carburization and peening) is noted, particularly for the case of the higher hardness C64 material.

  9. Application technologies for effective utilization of advanced high strength steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, application of high strength steel sheets for automobiles has increased in order to meet a demand of light weighting of automobiles to reduce a carbon footprint while satisfying collision safety. The formability of steel sheets generally decreases with the increase in strength. Fracture and wrinkles tend to occur easily during forming. The springback phenomenon is also one of the issues which we should cope with, because it makes it difficult to obtain the desired shape after forming. Advanced high strength steel sheets with high formability have been developed in order to overcome these issues, and at the same time application technologies have been developed for their effective utilization. These sheets are normally used for cold forming. As a different type of forming, hot forming technique has been developed in order to produce parts with ultra high strength. In this report, technologies developed at NSSMC in this field will be introduced

  10. Formability Analysis of Diode-Laser-Welded Tailored Blanks of Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, S. K.; Baltazar Hernandez, V. H.; Kuntz, M. L.; Zhou, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Currently, advances due to tailored blanking can be enhanced by the development of new grades of advanced high-strength steels (HSSs), for the further weight reduction and structural improvement of automotive components. In the present work, diode laser welds of three different grades of advanced high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel sheets (with tensile strengths of 980, 800, and 450 MPa) to high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) material were fabricated by applying the proper welding parameters. Formability in terms of Hecker’s limiting dome height (LDH), the strain distribution on the hemispherical dome surface, the weld line movement during deformation, and the load-bearing capacity during the stretch forming of these different laser-welded blanks were compared. Finite element (FE) analysis of the LDH tests of both the parent metals and laser-welded blanks was done using the commercially available software package LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA); the results compared well with the experimental data. It was also found that the LDH was not affected by the soft zone or weld zone properties; it decreased, however, with an increase in a nondimensional parameter, the “strength ratio” (SR). The weld line movement during stretch forming is an indication of nonuniform deformation resulting in a decrease in the LDH. In all the dissimilar weldments, fracture took place on the HSLA side, but the fracture location shifted to near the weld line (at the pole) in tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) of a higher strength ratio.

  11. Properties of Galvanized and Galvannealed Advanced High Strength Hot Rolled Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.Y. Guertsman; E. Essadiqi; S. Dionne; O. Dremmailova; R. Bouchard; B. Voyzelle; J. McDermid; R. Fourmentin

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop the coating process information to achieve good quality coatings on 3 advanced high strength hot rolled steels while retaining target mechanical properties, (ii) to obtain precise knowledge of the behavior of these steels in the various forming operations and (iii) to establish accurate user property data in the coated conditions. Three steel substrates (HSLA, DP, TRIP) with compositions providing yield strengths in the range of 400-620 MPa were selected. Only HSLA steel was found to be suitable for galnaizing and galvannealing in the hot rolled condition.

  12. Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in Ti-modified advanced high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Winzer, N.; Rott, O; Thiessen, R.; Thomas, I.; Mraczek, K.; Hoche, T.; Wright, L; Mrovec, M.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Ti on hydrogen diffusion and trapping in various advanced high strength steels was investigated. Electrochemical hydrogen permeation tests were performed on various model steels, with and without Ti, with benchmark tests performed using a commercial steel variant. The hydrogen trapping parameters for each steel were determined by fitting the permeation curves with a finite element model based on the McNabb and Foster equations using least squares minimisation. The influence o...

  13. Nanocrystalline Advanced High Strength Steel Produced by Cold Rolling and Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2016-05-01

    An advanced high strength steel of composition Fe-0.11C-2.46Si-11.5Mn-0.38Al-0.029N (wt pct) was produced with a yield strength of 790 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1300 MPa, and a total elongation of 28 pct. Conventional processing of hot-band steel by cold rolling and annealing at 873 K (600 °C) was used to produce a nanocrystalline structure with an average grain diameter 112 ± 25 nm (68 pct confidence level). Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were utilized to characterize the nanocrystalline steel, which consisted of γ-austenite, ɛ-martensite, and α-ferrite.

  14. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel.

  15. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel

  16. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model

  17. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Shun-lai, E-mail: shawn@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Sun, Li [Manufacturing Process Research, General Motors China Science Lab, No. 56, Jinwan Road, Shanghai (China); Niu, Chao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model.

  18. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  19. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades

  20. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  1. Strain Rate and Temperature Effects on the Formability and Damage of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, S.; Thompson, A.; Salisbury, C.; Worswick, M.; van Riemsdijk, I.; Mayer, R.

    2008-06-01

    In order to understand the crashworthiness and formability of advance high-strength steels, the effects of strain rate and temperature on the constitutive response of DP 600 and DP 780 steel tubes were investigated and compared with commercial drawing quality (DQ) and high strength low alloy (HSLA) 350 steel tubes. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at quasi-static (QS) (0.003 and 0.1 s-1), intermediate (30 and 100 s-1), and high (500, 1000, and 1500 s-1) strain rates using an Instron, instrumented falling weight impact tester and tensile split Hopkinson bar (TSHB) apparatus, respectively. Elevated temperature tests at 150 °C and 300 °C were also conducted at high strain rates. Following testing, metallography and microscopy techniques were used for material and damage characterization. The results obtained show that the steels studied exhibit a positive strain rate sensitivity. Compared to DQ and HSLA 350, the DP steels were found to have less formability at QS rates but enhanced formability at higher strain rates. A decrease in strength and ductility was measured with increasing temperature for the DP steels, indicating a reduction in energy adsorption due to adiabatic heating during a crash event.

  2. A New Perspective on Fatigue Performance of Advanced High- Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Chiang, Dr. John [Ford Motor Company; Kuo, Dr. Min [MIttal Steel; Jiang, Cindy [AET Integration, Inc; Sang, Yan [AET Integration, Inc

    2008-01-01

    Weld fatigue performance is a critical aspect for application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) in automotive body structures. A comparative study has been conducted to evaluate the fatigue life of AHSS welds. The material studied included seven AHSS of various strength levels - DP 600, DP 780, DP 980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron and fully hardened boron steels. Two conventional steels, HSLA 590 and DR 210, were also included for baseline comparison. Lap fillet welds were made on 2-mm nominal thick sheets by the gas metal arc welding process (GMAW). Fatigue test was conducted under a number of stress levels to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. It was found that, unlike in the static and impact loading conditions, the fatigue performance of AHSS is not influenced by the HAZ softening in AHSS. There are appreciable differences in the fatigue lives among different AHSS. Changes in weld parameters can influence the fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of these of higher strength AHSS. A model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. The validity of the model is benchmarked with the experimental results. This model is capable to capture the effects of weld geometry and weld microstructure and strength on the fatigue performance experimentally observed. The theoretical basis and application of the newly developed fatigue modeling methodology will be discussed.

  3. Microstructure and fatigue performance of butt-welded joints in advanced high-strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a comparative analysis of the high-cycle fatigue behaviors of butt weld joints in advanced high-strength steels with different strength levels and weld bead geometry. Welded joints were made using a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process on dual-phase steels (DP440 and DP590) and martensitic steel (MS) with tensile strengths of 440, 590, and 1500 MPa, respectively. The microstructures with the lowest hardness were found at the base metal, the sub-critical heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the fusion zone for DP440, DP590, and MS weldments, respectively. Fatigue failure of specimens without weld beads occurred at the points of lowest hardness, and fatigue life exhibited the order MS>DP590>DP440, similar to the order of lowest hardness values in each weldment. However, the introduction of high weld beads resulted in very short, similar fatigue lives for all welded joints and fracture occurred at weld toe due to the overwhelming stress concentration effect. A transition from geometry-governed fracture toward microstructure-governed fracture was investigated by varying weld bead heights

  4. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  5. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  6. High-temperature strength characterization of advanced 9Cr-ODS ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, which are the most promising candidate materials for advanced fast reactor fuel elements, have exceptional creep strength at 973 K. The superior creep property of 9Cr-ODS ferritic steels is ascribed to the formation of a nonequilibrium phase, designated as the residual ferrite. The yield strength of the residual ferrite itself has been determined to be as high as 1360 MPa at room temperature from nanoindentation measurements. The creep strength is also enhanced by minimizing the number of packet boundaries induced by the martensitic phase transformation. The creep strain occurs at a lower stress than that necessary for the deformation of the intragrain regions, which are strengthened by an interaction between nanosize oxide particles and dislocations; this occurs by sliding at weaker regions such as at the grain boundaries and packet boundaries. It is found that 9Cr-ODS ferritic steels behave as fiber composite materials comprising the harder residual ferrite and the softer tempered martensite.

  7. Edge cracking mechanism in two dual-phase advanced high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the manufacturing issues restricting the applications of advanced high-strength steels is edge cracking during forming. Computer simulations using the conventional forming limit curve (FLC) as a failure criterion often fail to predict edge cracking. A new failure criterion is needed to assess the edge stretchability in simulations and applications, subsequently understanding the fracture mechanism in the microstructural scale is a prerequisite. In this study, the edge fracture mechanisms of two selected dual-phase steels (designated as DP980 and IBF980) with identical chemistry but different edge cracking behaviors are studied by controlled edge tension tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the edge cracking behaviors are essentially fractures propagated from pre-existing microcracks introduced by the shearing process. The dominant edge fracture mechanism is decohesion between the martensite and ferrite phases. This study employs the interfacial strength between ferrite and martensite as an index to predict the material edge cracking resistance. The interfacial strength is calculated to be 1070 MPa for IBF980 and 854 MPa for DP980 using void-nucleation models. This result indicates that IBF980 has a higher resistance to edge cracking and subsequently a higher local formability, which is consistent with the higher hole expansion ratio values observed. Refining the martensite particle size and minimizing banded martensite structures are effective approaches to increase the local formability

  8. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. → Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. → Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. → Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. → Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s-1. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of boron segregation towards

  9. Segregation Behaviour of Third Generation Advanced High-Strength Mn-Al Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grajcar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the macro- and microsegregation of alloying elements in the new-developed Mn-Al TRIP steels, which belong to the third generation of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS used in the automotive industry. The segregation behaviour both in the as-cast state and after hot forging was assessed in the macro scale by OES and by EDS measurements in different structural constituents. The structural investigations were carried out using light and scanning electron microscopy. A special attention was paid to the effect of Nb microaddition on the structure and the segregation of alloying elements. The tendency of Mn and Al to macrosegregation was found. It is difficult to remove in Nb-free steels. Microsegregation of Mn and Al between austenite and ferritic structural constituents can be removed.

  10. Hybrid laser/arc welding of advanced high strength steel in different butt joint configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Feasibility of joining thick steel by HLAW process was studied. • Design of butt joint configurations satisfied ballistic test requirement. • Heat input and microstructure were changed by groove geometry. - Abstract: An experimental procedure was developed to join thick advanced high strength steel plates by using the hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) process, for different butt joint configurations. The geometry of the weld groove was optimized according to the requirements of ballistic test, where the length of the softened heat affected zone should be less than 15.9 mm from the weld centerline. The cross-section of the welds was examined by microhardness test. The microstructure of welds was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and an optical microscope for further analysis of the microstructure of fusion zone and heat affected zone. It was demonstrated that by changing the geometry of groove, and increasing the stand-off distance between the laser beam and the tip of wire in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) it is possible to reduce the width of the heat affected zone and softened area while the microhardness stays within the acceptable range. It was shown that double Y-groove shape can provide the optimum condition for the stability of arc and laser. The dimensional changes of the groove geometry provided substantial impact on the amount of heat input, causing the fluctuations in the hardness of the weld as a result of phase transformation and grain size. The on-line monitoring of HLAW of the advanced high strength steel indicated the arc and laser were stable during the welding process. It was shown that less plasma plume was formed in the case where the laser was leading the arc in the HLAW, causing higher stability of the molten pool in comparison to the case where the arc was leading

  11. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection. PMID:23404132

  12. Design and development of precipitate strengthened advanced high strength steel for automotive application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringent safety and pollution control norms forces the car industry to use higher strength steels in different components of an automobile. However, high strength steels typically possess less formability which makes forming operations difficult. Thus developing high strength steel, with better formability for automotive application, is a challenge for all the steel companies those are working to solve in different ways. In the present work, a new approach, from designing of steel composition to finalizing the process parameters, to develop high strength steel (minimum 1000 MPa UTS) with high elongation (minimum 15%) will be discussed in details. High elongation of this steel is expected to make the forming operation easier without compromising with the strength.

  13. Pore formation and its mitigation during hybrid laser/arc welding of advanced high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Possible mechanisms of pores formation in HLAW of AHSS were studied. • Mitigation approaches for removing pores in AHSS welds were introduced. • Dx in HLAW and laser welding assisted with hot wire were alleviating pores. - Abstract: The possible mechanisms of the pores formation and their mitigation during the hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) were investigated. Influence of three variables (stand-off distance between the laser and the arc of gas metal arc welding (GMAW), heat input and side shielding gas) in the HLAW for reducing the presence of pores in the weld area was studied. The optimum condition of the welds prepared by the HLAW was compared with the welds made by the laser welding assisted with hot wire. The vision monitoring of the welding processes was performed by a charged coupled device (CCD) camera and mechanical properties of the welds were evaluated by a high energy impact test and microhardness measurement. The joints were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The results showed that the optimum stand-off distance between the laser and the tip of wire in the HLAW and laser welding assisted with a hot wire were the most effective approaches for avoiding the pore formation. The fracture surface of the welds was mostly dominated by a brittle fracture with the presence of two types of pores, indicating that there were two mechanisms for the generation of pores in the weld area

  14. Experimental investigation on electroplastic effect of DP980 advanced high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Huanyang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, 200030 Shanghai (China); Dong, Xianghuai, E-mail: dongxh@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, 200030 Shanghai (China); Liu, Kai; Ai, Zhenqiu; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, 200030 Shanghai (China); Chen, Fei [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham (United Kingdom); Wang, Jianfeng [General Motor China Science Lab, No. 56 Jinwan Road, 201206 Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-18

    This paper investigated the influence of the electric pulses on the flow behavior and plasticity of the advanced high strength steel (AHSS) Dual Phase, DP980. In order to isolate the thermal effect of the electric pulses, two kinds of uniaxial tensile tests at the same testing temperature were carried out: (1) isothermal tensile test carried out in an environment cabinet and (2) electrically-assisted isothermal tensile test. The stress–strain curves were recorded and compared. The results indicate that at the same testing temperature, the stress–strain curves obtained by test (1) are generally lower than curves deserved by test (2). It demonstrates that electric pulses can not reduce the flow stress when compared with the case that without electric pulse which is contrary to the traditional electroplastic effect. Another result is that when the testing temperature is not more than 573 K, the stress–strain curves obtained by both tests are higher than the tension curve in room temperature and the cases are opposite when testing temperature is more than 573 K. In addition, the elongation improvement is not observed as well in the stress–strain curves. The difference between the two tests when compared the cross section shrinkage rate and the fracture elongation rate is not obvious. From another aspect to study the athermal effect of the electric pulse, tests with only varying the peak current density or pulse frequency at the same testing temperature were conducted. The results once again show that no evident difference between the stress–strain curves. It confirms that no athermal effect exists in DP980. However, with temperature elevated to 473 K, the material is strengthened and then weakened as temperature exceeds 473 K. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was adopted to better understand the observed phenomena. The results show that the decomposion of the martensite and the thermal effect are the main reason that attributes to the strength

  15. Experimental investigation on electroplastic effect of DP980 advanced high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigated the influence of the electric pulses on the flow behavior and plasticity of the advanced high strength steel (AHSS) Dual Phase, DP980. In order to isolate the thermal effect of the electric pulses, two kinds of uniaxial tensile tests at the same testing temperature were carried out: (1) isothermal tensile test carried out in an environment cabinet and (2) electrically-assisted isothermal tensile test. The stress–strain curves were recorded and compared. The results indicate that at the same testing temperature, the stress–strain curves obtained by test (1) are generally lower than curves deserved by test (2). It demonstrates that electric pulses can not reduce the flow stress when compared with the case that without electric pulse which is contrary to the traditional electroplastic effect. Another result is that when the testing temperature is not more than 573 K, the stress–strain curves obtained by both tests are higher than the tension curve in room temperature and the cases are opposite when testing temperature is more than 573 K. In addition, the elongation improvement is not observed as well in the stress–strain curves. The difference between the two tests when compared the cross section shrinkage rate and the fracture elongation rate is not obvious. From another aspect to study the athermal effect of the electric pulse, tests with only varying the peak current density or pulse frequency at the same testing temperature were conducted. The results once again show that no evident difference between the stress–strain curves. It confirms that no athermal effect exists in DP980. However, with temperature elevated to 473 K, the material is strengthened and then weakened as temperature exceeds 473 K. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was adopted to better understand the observed phenomena. The results show that the decomposion of the martensite and the thermal effect are the main reason that attributes to the strength

  16. Three-Sheet Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Zhang, W.;

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry has introduced the three-layer weld configuration, which represents new challenges compared to normal two-sheet lap welds. The process is further complicated by introducing high-strength steels in the joint. The present article investigates the weldability of thin, low...

  17. The Effect of Alloying on Mechanical Properties of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kučerová L.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quenching and partitioning process with incorporated incremental deformation was optimized for six high strength steels with various contents of carbon (0.4-0.6%, manganese (0.6-1.2, silicon (2-2.6% and chromium (0.8-1.3%. The optimization was gradually done for each steel with respect to the final microstructures and properties. The effect of cooling rate, quenching and partitioning temperature on microstructure development was further investigated. Interesting combinations of mechanical properties were obtained, with tensile strength in the region of 1600-2400 MPa and ductility of 6-20%.

  18. Development of Advanced High Strength Steel for Improved Vehicle Safety, Fuel Efficiency and CO2 Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Singhai, Mrigandra; Desai, Rahul; Sam, Srimanta; Patra, Pradip Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Global warming and green house gas emissions are the major issues worldwide and their impacts are clearly visible as a record high temperatures, rising sea, and severe `flooding and droughts'. Motor vehicles considered as a major contributor on global warming due to its green house gas emissions. Hence, the automobile industries are under tremendous pressure from government and society to reduce green house gas emission to maximum possible extent. In present work, Dual Phase steel with boron as microalloying is manufactured using thermo-mechanical treatment during hot rolling. Dual phase steel with boron microalloying improved strength by near about 200 MPa than dual phase steel without boron. The boron added dual phase steel can be used for manufacturing stronger and a lighter vehicle which is expected to perform positively on green house gas emissions. The corrosion resistance behavior is also improved with boron addition which would further increase the life cycle of the vehicle even under corrosive atmosphere.

  19. Testing new tribo-systems for sheet metal forming of advanced high strength steels and stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Ceron, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    Testing of new tribo-systems in sheet metal forming has become an important issue due to new legislation, which forces industry to replace current, hazardous lubricants. The present paper summarizes the work done in a recent PhD project at the Technical University of Denmark on the development of a...... methodology for off-line testing of new tribo-systems for advanced high strength steels and stainless steels. The methodology is presented and applied to an industrial case, where different tribo-systems are tested. A universal sheet tribotester has been developed, which can run automatically repetitive...

  20. Precipitate characterisation of an advanced high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel using atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timokhina, I.B. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Ilana.Timokhina@eng.monash.edu.au; Hodgson, P.D. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic 3217 (Australia); Ringer, S.P. [Australia Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Zheng, R.K. [Australia Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Pereloma, E.V. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2007-04-15

    The microstructure of an advanced high-strength low-alloy steel containing nanoscale Ti{sub 0.98}Mo{sub 0.02}C{sub 0.6} carbides formed along {gamma}/{alpha} interface was characterised using atom probe tomography. The average radius of particles was 2 {+-} 0.5 nm. In addition, the formation of C{sub 19}Cr{sub 7}Mo{sub 24} particles with average radius of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 nm was also observed.

  1. Effect of microstructure on the fracture response of advanced high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark David

    The effect of constituent hardness on formability performance for higher-strength dual phase (DP) steels was evaluated. A commercially-produced DP steel with 1080 MPa ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was processed to create eight additional constituent hardness conditions by tempering and cold-rolling, processes that primarily affected constituent hardness properties. Using nanoindentation, ferrite and martensite hardness values for the nine conditions of the DP steel (as-received, four as-tempered, four temper cold-rolled) provided a range of hardness values to evaluate formability performance. Formability performance for the nine steel conditions was evaluated using tensile and hole expansion testing. A decrease in martensite/ferrite hardness ratio corresponded to an increase in hole expansion ratio (HER), and an increase in yield strength (YS). A lower hardness ratio (increased similarity of ferrite and martensite hardness) was interpreted to increase strain-sharing between ferrite and martensite, which suppressed plastic strain localization to higher stresses for the case of YS, and to higher formability limits for the case of HER. A lower hardness ratio corresponded to a decrease in work-hardening, and was interpreted to be caused by the suppression of strain localization in ferrite. Multiple studies from literature correlated HER to tensile properties, and the nine steel conditions produced consistent trends with the data reported in each study, confirming the experimental HER and tensile properties obtained in the current study are consistent with literature. The microstructural response to plastic deformation was evaluated using two DP steels with equivalent UTS and different hardness ratios. Nanoindentation analyses on tensile specimens deformed to the UTS revealed a greater increase in ferrite hardness for the higher hardness ratio steel, interpreted to be caused by the greater amount of work hardening. EBSD crystallographic orientation maps for the two DP

  2. Strength, fracture, and fatigue behavior of advanced high-temperature intermetallics reinforced with ductile phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboyejo, W. O.; Rao, K. T. Venkateswara; Sastry, S. M. L.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1993-03-01

    The results of recent studies on the fatigue and fracture behavior of extruded Ti-48A1 + 20 vol pct TiNb and hot-isostatically pressed (“hipped”) MoSi2 + 20 vol pct Nb are presented (compositions in atomic percent unless stated otherwise). The effects of ductile phase reinforcement of Ti-48A1 and MoSi2 on the micromechanisms of fracture under monotonie and cyclic loading are elucidated. Micromechanics models are applied to the prediction of crack-tip shielding components, and the effects of temperature on tensile/compressive/flexure strengths are discussed. Ductile phase toughening under monotonie loading conditions is shown to be associated with lower fatigue crack growth resistance. The lower fatigue resistance is attributed to the absence of crack-tip shielding, higher crack opening displacements, and the effects of inelastic strains that are developed in ductile phase-reinforced composites under cyclic loading conditions.

  3. Strength, fracture, and fatigue behavior of advanced high-temperature intermetallics reinforced with ductile phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of recent studies on the fatigue and fracture behavior of extruded Ti-48Al + 20 vol pct TiNb and hot-isostatically pressed ('hipped') MoSi2 + 20 vol pct Nb are presented (compositions in atomic percent unless stated otherwise). The effects of ductile phase reinforcement of Ti-48Al and MoSi2 on the micromechanisms of fracture under monotonic and cyclic loading are elucidated. Micromechanics models are applied to the prediction of crack-tip shielding components, and the effects of temperature on tensile/compressive/flexure strengths are discussed. Ductile phase toughening under monotonic loading conditions is shown to be associated with lower fatigue crack growth resistance. The lower fatigue resistance is attributed to the absence of crack-tip shielding, higher crack opening displacements, and the effects of inelastic strains that are developed in ductile phase-reinforced composites under cyclic loading conditions

  4. Strength, fracture, and fatigue behavior of advanced high-temperature intermetallics reinforced with ductile phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboyejo, W.O. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Sastry, S.M.L. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The results of recent studies on the fatigue and fracture behavior of extruded Ti-48Al + 20 vol pct TiNb and hot-isostatically pressed ('hipped') MoSi[sub 2] + 20 vol pct Nb are presented (compositions in atomic percent unless stated otherwise). The effects of ductile phase reinforcement of Ti-48Al and MoSi[sub 2] on the micromechanisms of fracture under monotonic and cyclic loading are elucidated. Micromechanics models are applied to the prediction of crack-tip shielding components, and the effects of temperature on tensile/compressive/flexure strengths are discussed. Ductile phase toughening under monotonic loading conditions is shown to be associated with lower fatigue crack growth resistance. The lower fatigue resistance is attributed to the absence of crack-tip shielding, higher crack opening displacements, and the effects of inelastic strains that are developed in ductile phase-reinforced composites under cyclic loading conditions.

  5. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  6. Tailoring of oxide morphology and crystallinity on advanced high-strength steel surfaces prior hot-dip galvanizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Surface oxides formed on two different kind of advanced high strength steel grades during annealing were investigated. • By adjusting the oxidation potential of the annealing atmosphere surface oxides characteristics can be changed. • The surface oxides were characterized by SEM, TEM and XPS. • It is not only the chemical composition of the oxides influencing their morphology and structure. • The oxidation potential of the annealing atmosphere is found to have a significant impact on crystallinity of surface oxides. - Abstract: Annealing of advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades often results in surfaces being fully covered by oxides due to alloying elements which diffuse to the steel surface during annealing and which are oxidized there by residual oxygen from the furnace atmosphere. However, these surface oxides tend to significantly hamper the hot-dip galvanizability and are therefore repeatedly under investigation with respect to their morphology and chemical composition for an optimization of the overall galvanizing performance. In the present work two different kinds of AHSS grades are analysed in detail by scanning electron microscopy as well as by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the formed surface oxides, clearly revealing that it is not only the chemical composition of the oxides influencing their morphology and structure: the oxidation potential of the annealing atmosphere is found to have a significant impact on the surface oxide characteristics, namely the degree of crystallinity, as well. Consequently, these findings can be used to improve the galvanizability of a steel grade by changing the surface oxide morphology

  7. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  8. Electro-hydraulic forming of advanced high-strength steels: Deformation and microstructural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, Aashish; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Edwards, Danny J.; Smith, Mark T.; Davies, Richard W.

    2012-06-08

    This conference manuscript describes mechanical and microstructural characterization of steel sheets that were deformed via the electro-hydraulic forming technique. The manuscripts shows the importance of the experimental technique developed at PNNL in the sense that the deformation history information enabled by this technique is not obtainable through existing conventional approaches. Additionally, strain-rate effects on texture development during sheet-forming at high-rates are described. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is now possible to correlate deformation history with microstructural development during high-rate forming, a capability that is unique to PNNL.

  9. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  10. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  11. Three Important Advances in Engineering Strength Theories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuMaohong; FanWen; MitustoshiYoshimine

    2003-01-01

    There are there great advances in the research on engineering strength theories in the latter half of the 20th Century. The first advance was the devel-opment of strength theory from the single-shear strength theory including the Tresca yield criterion and Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion to theoctahe-dral-shear strength theory; the second one was that from the octahedral-shear strength theory to the twin-shear strength theory; and the third wasthe theories from the single criteria to the unifiedstrength theory. These three advances are summa-rized in this paper. It is interesting and useful for re-searchers to choose an appropriate failure criterion in studying the strength of materials and struc-tures, for engineers to correctly use it and for stu-dents to understand strength theory.

  12. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  13. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  14. Two-surface plasticity Model and Its Application to Spring-back Simulation of Automotive Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taejoon; Seok, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    A two-surface isotropic-kinematic hardening law was developed based on a two-surface plasticity model previously proposed by Lee et al., (2007, Int. J. Plast. 23, 1189-1212). In order to properly represent the Bauschinger and transient behaviors as well as permanent softening during reverse loading with various pre-strains, both the inner yield surface and the outer bounding surface expand (isotropic hardening) and translate (kinematic hardening) in this two-surface model. As for the permanent softening, both the isotropic hardening and the kinematic hardening evolution of the outer bounding surface were modified by introducing softening parameters. The numerical formulation was also developed based on the incremental plasticity theory and the developed constitutive law was implemented into the commercial finite element program, ABAQUS/Explicit and ABAQUS/Standard using the user-defined material subroutines. In this work, a dual phase (DP) steel was considered as an advanced high strength steel sheet and uni-axial tension tests and uni-axial tension-compression-tension tests were performed for the characterization of the material property. For a validation purpose, the developed two-surface plasticity model was applied to the 2-D draw bending test proposed as a benchmark problem of the NUMISHEET 2011 conference and successfully validated with experiments.

  15. Hybrid laser/arc welding of advanced high strength steel to aluminum alloy by using structural transition insert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A concept welding procedure was presented for joining dissimilar alloys. • Controlling of temperature improved mechanical properties. • Microstructure analysis showed presence of tempered martensite. • Optimum stand-off distance caused stability of molten pool. - Abstract: The present investigation is related to the development of the welding procedure of the hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) in joining thick dissimilar materials. The HLAW was applied to join aluminum alloy (AA6061) to an advanced high strength steel (AHSS) where an explosively welded transition joint, TRICLAD®, was used as an intermediate structural insert between the thick plates of the aluminum alloy and AHSS. The welds were characterized by an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), tensile test, charged coupled device (CCD) camera, and microhardness measurement. The groove angle was optimized for the welding process based on the allowed amount of heat input along the TRICLAD® interface generated by an explosive welding. The weld was fractured in the heat affected zone of the aluminum side in the tensile test. The microhardness was shown that the temperature variation caused minor softening in the heat affected zone satisfying the requirement that the width of the softened heat affected zone in the steel side falls within 15.9 mm far away from the weld centerline. The microstructure analysis showed the presence of tempered martensite at the vicinity of the weld area, which it was a cause of softening in the heat affected zone

  16. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  17. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11–14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  18. Modeling of the hot flow behavior of advanced ultra-high strength steels (A-UHSS) microalloyed with boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research work, modeling of the hot flow behavior was carried out in a low carbon advanced ultra-high strength steels (A-UHSS) microalloyed with different amounts of boron (14, 33, 82, 126 and 214 ppm). For this purpose, experimental stress–strain data of uniaxial hot-compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (1223, 1273, 1323 and 1373 K (950, 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C)) and strain rates (10−3, 10−2 and 10−1 s−1) were used. The stress–strain relationships as a function of temperature and strain rate were successfully described on the basis of the approach proposed by Estrin, Mecking, and Bergström, together with the classical Avrami equation and the conventional hyperbolic sine function. The analysis of the modeling parameters of the hot flow curves shows that boron additions to A-UHSS play a major role in softening mechanisms rather than on hardening. The peak stress (σp) and steady-state stress (σss) values show a decreasing trend with increasing boron content, which indicates that boron additions promote a solid solution softening effect additional to that produced by DRX. The time for 50% recrystallization (t50%) tends to increase with boron additions, revealing that boron additions cause a delay of the DRX kinetics during hot deformation. Similarly, the presence of boron in the steel decreases the apparent activation energy for recrystallization (Qt), indicating that boron additions accelerate the onset of DRX. The constitutive equations developed in this way provided an excellent description of the experimental hot flow curves

  19. Modeling of the hot flow behavior of advanced ultra-high strength steels (A-UHSS) microalloyed with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía, I., E-mail: imejia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio “U”, Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Altamirano, G.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio “U”, Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Cabrera, J.M. [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB – Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Av. de las Bases de Manresa, 1, 08240 Manresa (Spain)

    2014-07-29

    In this research work, modeling of the hot flow behavior was carried out in a low carbon advanced ultra-high strength steels (A-UHSS) microalloyed with different amounts of boron (14, 33, 82, 126 and 214 ppm). For this purpose, experimental stress–strain data of uniaxial hot-compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (1223, 1273, 1323 and 1373 K (950, 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C)) and strain rates (10{sup −3}, 10{sup −2} and 10{sup −1} s{sup −1}) were used. The stress–strain relationships as a function of temperature and strain rate were successfully described on the basis of the approach proposed by Estrin, Mecking, and Bergström, together with the classical Avrami equation and the conventional hyperbolic sine function. The analysis of the modeling parameters of the hot flow curves shows that boron additions to A-UHSS play a major role in softening mechanisms rather than on hardening. The peak stress (σ{sub p}) and steady-state stress (σ{sub ss}) values show a decreasing trend with increasing boron content, which indicates that boron additions promote a solid solution softening effect additional to that produced by DRX. The time for 50% recrystallization (t{sub 50%}) tends to increase with boron additions, revealing that boron additions cause a delay of the DRX kinetics during hot deformation. Similarly, the presence of boron in the steel decreases the apparent activation energy for recrystallization (Q{sub t}), indicating that boron additions accelerate the onset of DRX. The constitutive equations developed in this way provided an excellent description of the experimental hot flow curves.

  20. Effect of formation and state of interface on joint strength in friction stir spot welding for advanced high strength steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Koichi; Matsushita, Muneo; Ikeda, Rinsei; Oi, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    The tensile shear strength and cross tension strength of friction stir spot welded joints were evaluated in the cases of lap joints of 270 N/mm2 grade and 980 N/mm2 grade cold rolled steel sheets with respect to the stir zone area, hardness distribution, and interface condition between the sheets. The results suggested that both the tensile shear strength and cross tension strength were based on the stir zone area and its hardness in both grades of steel. The "hook" shape of the interface also affected the joint strength. However, the joining that occurred across the interfaces had a significant influence on the value of the joint strength in the case of the 270 N/mm2 grade steel.

  1. In-service materials support for safety critical applications – A case study of a high strength Ti-alloy using advanced experimental and modelling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugg, D. [Rolls-Royce plc, Derby (United Kingdom); Britton, T.B., E-mail: b.britton@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gong, J.; Wilkinson, A.J.; Bagot, P.A.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces motivations and suitability for using advanced characterisation techniques to study industrially relevant materials, such as titanium alloys for the aerospace industry. These advanced research tools each provide unique information in fundamental research, and by designing appropriate datum studies and modelling support they can be combined with powerful effect to tackle ‘real world’ engineering issues. We demonstrate the use of orientation-corrected nanoindentation, micro-cantilever bend testing and 3D atom probe tomography to investigate a high strength, dual phase engineering alloy (Ti–6Al–4V) with a surface gradient of interstitials.

  2. Comparison of fracture properties in SA508 Gr.3 and Gr.4N high strength low alloy steels for advanced pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power systems are moving to a larger capacity or smaller modular type. In any either case, advanced pressure vessel materials with high strength and toughness are definitely needed for an optimization of the design and construction, as well as the long-term operation. In this paper, two candidate materials, both of which are within the current ASME specifications of SA508 steel forging, are compared from the view point of fracture resistance properties for a nuclear pressure vessel steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1, Cl.2, and Gr.4N steels were also characterized. The predominant microstructure of SA508 Gr.4N model alloy is tempered martensite, while SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1 and Cl.2 steels show a tempered upper bainitic structure. SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy showed the best strength and transition behavior among the three types of SA508 steel. SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel has good strength and fracture toughness, but there is a decrease in the upper-self energy. The fracture resistance and fatigue crack growth rate of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 and Gr.4N steels were comparable to those of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1 steel. In terms of mechanical properties, SA508 Gr.4N steel is a fascinating material for the pressure vessel application although it still needs verification on the aging behavior such as the irradiation embrittlement resistance

  3. Forming characteristics and application of advanced high strength steel%先进高强度钢板的冲压成形特性及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋浩民; 陈新平; 石磊; 陈庆欣; 陈军; 李淑慧

    2009-01-01

    文章在研究高强度钢板成形特性、回弹特性以及拉毛特性的基础上,深入探讨了先进高强度钢板冲压过程的变形特征.研究结果表明,与传统HSLA钢板相比,DP钢和TRIP钢具有较好的应变均化能力,和较高的成形性,有利于提高零件的使用强度.钢种特性和材料参数对回弹影响显著,使先进高强度钢板尺寸精度控制难度加大.当钢板强度升高时,高强度钢板表现出更易产生拉毛的趋势.%The forming characteristics of advanced high strength steel are studied in this paper based on the experimental study and simulation of formability, springback and galling. It is shown that compared to conventional HSLA steel, DP steel and TRIP steel have relatively higher ability to ensure the strain distribution much evener and obtain much higher formability, which will improve the part strengths remarkably. The steel grade and material mechanical parameters have obvious effect on the spring-back, which will increase the difficulty to control the dimension precision of high strength steel. With the increase of steel strength, the galling defects are much easier to occur.

  4. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  5. 先进高强度钢的断裂失效准则研究%STUDY OF FAILURE CRITERION OF ADVANCED HIGH STRENGTH STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂良进; 高付海; 范子杰

    2012-01-01

    The advanced high strength steel (AHSS) realizes the outstanding advantage of strength by transforming its internal different phases. It has become one of the hottest materials for current automotive lightweight researches. However, compared with traditional deep-drawing steels, the widespread use of AHSS in auto-industry is hampered due to its poor ductility,which leads to frequent occurrences of failure in the mode of fracture during the process of stamping. Therefore,the fracture prediction of AHSS becomes one of the focuses of current researchers. The dual phase (DP) steel can be seen as the representative of AHSS. In this paper,the fracture criteria of DP steel under different stress states are investigated by combining experimental and numerical analysis and an appropriate failure criterion is attempted to be established for predicting its fracture behavior.%先进高强度钢(AHSS)是通过相变获得高强度的应用前景最好的汽车轻量化材料.与传统深拉钢相比,AHSS韧性相对较低,在冲压成形过程中容易发生断裂,阻碍了它在汽车上的广泛应用,因而AHSS的断裂失效研究成为当前国内外研究的热点.论文以AHSS的代表钢种双相钢(DP)为研究对象,通过试验与数值计算相结合的方法研究其在不同三轴应力状态下的失效特性,尝试寻找一个适用于它的失效准则,用于其断裂失效的预测.

  6. Ultra high strength in steel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Parameswaran

    1962-07-01

    Full Text Available Very high strength levels in steel, not obtained by conventional methods of hardening by quenching and low temperature tempering, are obtained by mew hardening techniques involving the thermal-mechanical treatment of metastable austenite.The earlier attempts on such hardening techniques and the development of new processes such as 'Ausforming' investigated in the Ford Motor Company Research Laboratories and ''Maraging'' developed and patented by the International Nickel Company (MondLimited, are briefly reviewed here.

  7. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  8. Strength of advanced ceramic laminated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlup, Zdeněk; Bermejo, R.; Hadraba, Hynek; Malíková, L.; Ševeček, O.; Danzer, R.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    Brno : Ústav fyziky materiálů AV ČR, v. v. i., 2015 - (Dlouhý, A.; Kunz, L.). s. 42-42 ISBN 978-80-87434-07-9. [ICSMA-17 International Conference on the Strength of Materials /17./. 09.08.2015-14.08.2015, Brno] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Strength * Laminates * Ceramics Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  9. Progress on Research of Advanced High-Strength Steel for Automobile%先进高强度汽车用钢的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑花

    2016-01-01

    随着全社会对节约能源,保护环境意识的不断提高,轻量化已成为当今汽车工业的一个重要课题。钢铁材料是目前乃至今后很长一段时间内最适合汽车制造的材料,为了满足汽车工业发展的需求,各汽车制造商和钢铁公司都加快了向高强度钢方向的发展。文中对国内外各种高强度钢的研究以及应用现状进行了简述,并对未来汽车用高强度钢的研究方向进行了预测。%With the continuous improvement of the energy and environmental requirements, lightweight has become an important topic for today's automotive industry. Steel is the most suitable material for the manufacture of automobile in the present and future. In order to meet the needs of the developing automobile industry, car manufacturers and steel companies are accelerating to develop high-strength steel. This article introduces the application of all kinds of high-strength steel at home and abroad, and points out the direction of the future high-strength steel for automobile.

  10. High-Strength, Superelastic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Malcolm; Noebe, Ronald; Dellacorte, Christopher; Bigelow, Glen; Thomas, Fransua

    2013-01-01

    can be used in the heat treatment process, less energy will be consumed, and there will be less dimensional distortion and quench cracking. This results in fewer scrap parts, less material waste from large amounts of material removal, and fewer machining steps to rework parts that are out of specification. This material has a combination of properties that have been previously unobtainable. The material has a Young s modulus of approximately 95 GPa (about half that of conventional steels), moderate density (10 to 15% lower than conventional steels), excellent corrosion resistance, and high hardness (58 to 62 HRC). These properties make this material uniquely suited for advanced bearings.

  11. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, P.; Bellingeri, S.; Massimino, F.; Baldissin, D.; Battezzati, L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  12. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  13. High-Strength Glass Fibers and Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausrath, Robert L.; Longobardo, Anthony V.

    High-strength glass fibers play a crucial role in composite applications requiring combinations of strength, modulus, and high-temperature stability. Compositions in the high-strength glass group include S-glass and R-glass, which are used for applications requiring physical properties that cannot be satisfied by conventional E-glass. Additional compositions are also available for specialized applications requiring extreme performance in any one area. The main competition for high-strength glasses in the marketplace comes from carbon and polymer fibers. Ultimately, the product of choice is based on a compromise between cost and performance and will vary depending on the application.

  14. Effect of microstructure on fatigue behavior of advanced high strength steels produced by quenching and partitioning and the role of retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the significant body of research on mechanical properties of quenched and partitioned (Q&P) steels, their fatigue behavior has not been investigated. This work focuses on the effect of microstructure on high cycle fatigue of Q&P steels and microstructural evolution during cyclic loading. It is demonstrated that increased content of retained austenite (RA) improves fatigue limit of Q&P steels that is related to delay of crack propagation due to austenite–martensite phase transformation. Increasing stress amplitude promotes austenite–martensite phase transformation during cycling loading. It is shown that size and crystallographic orientation of RA are the main factors determining its stability, whereas its shape and spatial distribution do not seem to affect it significantly. Fatigue crack initiation during fatigue testing with high stress amplitudes occurs by intergranular cracking, whereas transgranular cracking controls fatigue crack initiation during cycling loading with lower stress amplitudes. Transgranular crack propagation dominates in the second stage of fatigue at all stress amplitudes. The final stage of fatigue is also not affected by the stress amplitude. It is suggested that fatigue life of Q&P steels can be enhanced via improvement of strength of grain/interphase boundaries

  15. Transient heating effect on high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study shows some differences in the properties and the behaviour at high temperature of two concretes (ordinary and high strength) made with the same calcareous aggregates. During heating tests at 1 C min-1, cylindrical samples of diameter 160 x 320 mm of high strength concrete, more dense, may explode in a critical temperature zone between 250 and 300 C. Differences in behaviour between OC and HSC appeared at high temperatures: there were disparities especially in thermo-hydric transfer, porosity and thermal stability. The dense microstructure of high strength concrete was found to slow up the escape of vaporized water. (orig.)

  16. High-strength, low-alloy steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M S

    1980-05-23

    High-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels have nearly the same composition as plain carbon steels. However, they are up to twice as strong and their greater load-bearing capacity allows engineering use in lighter sections. Their high strength is derived from a combination of grain refinement; precipitation strengthening due to minor additions of vanadium, niobium, or titanium; and modifications of manufacturing processes, such as controlled rolling and controlled cooling of otherwise essentially plain carbon steel. HSLA steels are less formable than lower strength steels, but dualphase steels, which evolved from HSLA steels, have ferrite-martensite microstructures and better formability than HSLA steels of similar strength. This improved formability has substantially increased the utilization potential of high-strength steels in the manufacture of complex components. This article reviews the development of HSLA and dual-phase steels and discusses the effects of variations in microstructure and chemistry on their mechanical properties. PMID:17772810

  17. MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF HIGHLY POROUS CERAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, IC; SANTEN, A; HOEKSTRA, HD; DEHOSSON, JTM; Born, I.C. van den

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical strength of highly porous ceramics in terms of the Weibull and Duxbury-Leath distributions. More than 1000 side-crushing strength tests on silica-catalyst carriers of various particle sizes have been performed in series. Within a series, preparation conditions we

  18. An evaluation of creep rupture strength of advanced austenitic stainless steel (PNC1520)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced austenitic stainless steel (15Cr-20Ni-2.5Mo-0.25Ti-0.1Nb: PNC1520 ) was developed to improve swelling resistance and the high temperature creep rupture strength far beyond the modified 316 stainless steel (PNC316) . Material strength standards and physical properties of PNC1520 was established in 1992 . In this study, design creep rupture strength and creep rupture strength coefficient were evaluated using the revised in-reactor creep rupture data . Following results were obtained. (1) The correlation of design creep rupture strength of PNC1520 was made by means of evaluating all data of PNC1520 and PNC316 . (2) The correlation of in-reactor creep rupture strength of PNC1520 was made. Following correlation was proposed to evaluate the in-reactor creep rupture strength, in stead of previous method which used creep rupture strength coefficient. SR*=Min (SR, SR*Na, SR*irr.) where, SR*: In-reactor Creep Rupture Strength (MPa), SR: Design Creep Rupture Strength (MPa), SR*Na: Creep Rupture Strength in Sodium(MPa), SR*irr.: Creep Rupture Strength under Irradiation(MPa). (author)

  19. Laser Welding of High Strength Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    S960 and S700 are two types of high strength low alloy steels (minimum yield strengths at 960 MPa and 700 MPa, respectively) developed recently by Tata Steel. These steels are typically used in heavy lifting equipment. This research examines the feasibility and characteristics of single pass autogenous laser welding (ALW), multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) of 8 mm thick S960 and 13 mm thick S700 high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels and compared the characteristics of the welds...

  20. Hydrogen degradation of high-strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ćwiek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to evaluate susceptibility of high-strength steels and welded joints to hydrogen degradation and to establish applicable mechanism of their hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen delayed cracking.Design/methodology/approach: High-strength quenched and tempered steel grade S690Q and its welded joints have been used. Structural low-alloy steel 34CrAlNi7-10 with various plasma nitrided layers was evaluated. Susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of steel, welded joints, ...

  1. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  2. Outsourced High-strength Steel Purchasing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kefei

    2010-01-01

    The thesis was based on Sichuan Sunkun Equipment Corp outsourcing its high-strength steel plate purchasing activity to Sichuan Topcen Logistics Corp. The reason for this was that high-strength steel plates are in short supply in the market and Sunkun is not an expert in purchasing. It brings a series of problem to Sunkun and enforces Sunkun to outsource the purchasing activity to Topcen. The goal of the thesis was to analyze the existing system and optimize it. According to the theory of ...

  3. Ductility of high strength reinforced concrete columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experimental research of 48 reinforced concrete columns using high strength and normal strength concrete under monotonic and cyclic loading, the factors which affect the ductility, such as the concrete strength, axial load ratio, stirrup volume ratio, etc., are analyzed. It can be concluded that the axial load ratio is the most important factor that affects the ductility. The axial load ratio limits and relative stirrup volume ratio limits were proposed under the condition of limited ductility (μΔ≥3). The experiments also show that the relationship between the stirrup ratio and axial load ratio is not linear if the axial load ratio is high, which is different from the finding of previous research. In the design, a simplified bilinear relationship can be adopted which agrees well with the experimental results. (orig.)

  4. Strength Regularity and Failure Criterion of High-Strength High-Performance Concrete under Multiaxial Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhen-jun; SONG Yu-pu

    2008-01-01

    Multiaxial compression tests were performed on 100 mm × 100 mm × 100 nun high-strength high-performance concrete (HSHPC) cubes and normal strength concrete (NSC) cubes. The failure modes of specimens were presented, the static compressive strengths in principal directions were measured, the influence of the stress ratios was analyzed. The experimental results show that the ultimate strengths for HSHPC and NSC under multiaxial compression are greater than the uniaxial compressive strengths at all stress ratios, and the multiaxial strength is dependent on the brittleness and stiffness of concrete, the stress state and the stress ratios. In addition, the Kupfer-Gerstle and Ottosen's failure criteria for plain HSHPC and NSC under multiaxial compressive loading were modified.

  5. Recent Progress in High Strength Low Carbon Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrník J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced High Strength (AHS steels, among them especially Dual Phase (DP steels, Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP steels, Complex Phase (CP steels, Partially Martensite (PM steels, feature promising results in the field. Their extraordinary mechanical properties can be tailored and adjusted by alloying and processing. The introduction of steels with a microstructure consisting at least of two different components has led to the enlargement of the strength level without a deterioration of ductility. Furthermore, the development of ultra fine-grained AHS steels and their service performance are reviewed and new techniques are introduced. Various projects have been devoted to develop new materials for flat and long steel products for structural applications. The main stream line is High Strength, in order to match the weight lightening requirements that concern the whole class of load bearing structures and/or steel components and one of the most investigated topics is grain refinement.

  6. Super High Strength Steel for automotive applications

    OpenAIRE

    CONFENTE, Mario; SCHNEIDER, Emmanuel; BOMONT, Olivier; LESCALIER, Christophe; BOMONT-ARZUR, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Intensive weight savings and out-sizing programs are developed in automotive industry and lead to increase the mechanical properties of the material of the automotive parts. ArcelorMittal has developed specific steel grades known as Super High Strength Steels which are designed for both high ductility and toughness and fatigue resistance. This paper investigates machinability for a drilling operation using an experimental methodology. One of the materials is a new low bainitic steel grade. Ex...

  7. Behaviour of high strength steel moment joints

    OpenAIRE

    Girão Coelho, A.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The design of joints to European standard EN 1993 within the semi-continuous/partially restrained philosophy is restricted to steel grades up to S460. With the recent development of high performance steels, the need for these restrictions should be revisited. The semicontinuous joint modelling can be adopted as long as the joint develops rotation capacity and behaves ductile. The research summarized in this paper focuses on moment joints with components made from high strength steel S460, S69...

  8. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  9. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  10. High-Strength Bolt Corrosion Fatigue Life Model and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui-li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life.

  11. Hydrogen degradation of high-strength steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to evaluate susceptibility of high-strength steels and welded joints to hydrogen degradation and to establish applicable mechanism of their hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen delayed cracking.Design/methodology/approach: High-strength quenched and tempered steel grade S690Q and its welded joints have been used. Structural low-alloy steel 34CrAlNi7-10 with various plasma nitrided layers was evaluated. Susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of steel, welded joints, and nitrided layers was evaluated using monotonically increasing load. Slow strain rate test (SSRT was carried out in hydrogen generating environments. Susceptibility to hydrogen delayed cracking was evaluated under constant load in artificial sea water. Fractographic examinations with the use of a scanning electron microscope (SEM were performed to establish suitable mechanism of hydrogen-enhanced cracking.Findings: Tested high-strength steel and its welded joints are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement when evaluated with the use of SSRT. The loss of plasticity is higher for welded joints then for the base metal. Tested steel and welded joints reveal high resistance to hydrogen degradation under constant load. Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers for hydrogen entry into structural steel.Research limitations/implications: There has been no possibility to perform direct observations of exact mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking so far. Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of increased plasticity of a nitrided layer with absorbed hydrogen.Practical implications: Tested steel and its welded joints could be safely utilized within elastic range of stress in hydrogen generating environments, and constructions under cathodic protection provided that overprotection does not take place.Originality/value: Hydrogen-Enhanced Localized Plasticity (HELP model is a more applicable mechanism of hydrogen degradation than the others

  12. Microcracking and durability of high strength concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durability of 28 days compressive strength concrete of 20 to 120 MPa has been studied. The ability of concrete to transport aggressive agents has been determined for four properties: the air permeability, the chloride diffusivity, the water absorption and the carbonation. A chloride migration test for high and very high strength concrete (HSC and VHSC) has been built. The relationship between transport properties and the compressive strength after one and 28 days of humid curing has always the same shape: transport decreases when strength increases. However, transport properties often vary in the ordinary concrete field. Beyond, the domain is much more limited. The relationship between transport properties and strength valid for ordinary concrete can not be simply extrapolated for HSC and VHSC. To determine the part of microcracking of HSC and VHSC, concrete behaviour stored in two mediums has been studied: the ones shaming the storing condition of concrete in auto-desiccation, the others reproducing the storing conditions of concrete in desiccation. Auto-desiccation (measuring relative humidity at balance) and desiccation (measuring mass losses) have been showed. Microcracks and shrinkage strains have been measured. It has been showed that auto-desiccation microcracks proving in HSC or VHSC don't question the durability. Microcracks, as for permeability, do not develop between 28 days and one year. On the contrary, desiccation microcracks observed in HSC and VHSC, increase with transport properties between 28 days and 1.5 year. Thus, a bulk concrete is always more durable than a cover concrete. At last, the good influence of increase of curing of 1 to 28 days on the transport of all concretes has been emphasized. (author)

  13. Hydrogen degradation of high strength weldable steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is presentation of hydrogen degradation issue of high strength steels andespecially their welded joints. Establishing of applicable mechanisms of hydrogen-enhanced cracking was theaim of performed research.Design/methodology/approach: High strength quenched and tempered steels grade S690Q were used. Weldedjoints were prepared with typical technology used in shipyards. Susceptibility to hydrogen degradation in seawater under cathodic polarization was evaluated with the use of mechanical tests. Various kinds of loads wereapplied, i.e. monotonically increasing static, constant, and cyclic. Appropriate measures of hydrogen degradationwere chosen and analyzed. Mechanisms of hydrogen degradation were detected and established on the basis ofscanning electron microscopy (SEM observation of fracture samples surface.Findings: Tested high strength steels and their welded joints are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement whenevaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT. On contrary, these steels and welded joints have high resistance tohydrogen delayed cracking under a constant load test. Significant reduction of a fatigue life time due to hydrogenabsorption has been observed during severe low-cycle fatigue tests.Research limitations/implications: There is no possibility to perform direct observation of exact hydrogenassistedcracking mechanisms in massive samples. Valid hydrogen-enhanced cracking model could be onlydeducted from degradation evidences like plasticity loss and fracture modes.Practical implications: Tested quenched and tempered S690Q steel grades could be safely utilized for marinewelded constructions under cathodic polarization. Hydrogen-assisted cracking should not occur unless a hugeoverprotection and plastic deformation take place.Originality/value: Hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP model is the most applicable mechanism ofhydrogen degradation for weldable steels with yield strength up to 1000 MPa.

  14. Laser welding of advanced high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Essam Ahmed Ali

    2011-01-01

    This research work focuses on characterization of CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) of dual phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel sheets based on experimental, numerical simulation and statistical modeling approaches. The experimental work aimed to investigate the welding induced-microstructures, hardness, tensile properties and formability limit of laser welding butt joints of DP/DP, TRIP/TRIP and DP/TRIP steel sheets under different welding speeds. The effects of shieldin...

  15. Realization of commercial high strength HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEPA-filter media though having excellent particle removal efficiencies, remain characterized as rather brittle, fragile and weak materials. As a result, undesired structural damage followed by significant losses in filtration efficiency can easily occur in handling, transport, and even normal operation of filter units. In recent years extensive investigations into the structural limits of HEPA filters in dry air and under extended exposure to high humidity airflow have been carried out. In the course of this work the failure modes and the underlying failure mechanisms were thoroughly studied. On the basis of the information obtained, considerable improvements in the structural strength of HEPA filters could be achieved. As verified by removal efficiency tests, differential pressures up to 56kPa in dry air and 15kPa after extended operation under fog conditions were proven to be sustainable without mechanical damage to the filter medium. In cooperation with three major European filter manufacturers the know-how gained has been transferred into practical application through development of commercially available high-strength filter units. Three new KWU (Siemens-Kraftwerksunion) nuclear power plants in Germany have already been fully equipped with HEPA filters of this improved design. The German licensing authorities are now considering modifications of their requirement specifications to reflect the increased strength of the new filter units

  16. Dynamic behavior of high strength armor steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic properties of the armor steels Mars 190, Mars 240 and Mars 300 have been determined for strain rates 10-3 s-16 s-1. The planar plate impact technique in combination with a VISAR has been used for high strain rate testing (dε/dt>104 s-1). The dynamic properties Hugoniot-elastic-limit, spall strength, shock velocity-particle velocity-relation and stress-strain-relation will be presented. Tests at intermediate strain rates 102 s-13 have been performed using Taylor tests and a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure-Bar (SHPB) setup providing information about strain rate sensitivity, strain hardening and dynamic strength. In addition to the determination of the dynamic properties, the influence of the loading process on the microstructure and the fracture mechanisms have been determined using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (orig.)

  17. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile ductility due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications despite their excellent corrosion properties. With regard to the ductility problem, alloy development efforts have produced significant improvements, with ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa being reported. Likewise, initial improvements in creep resistance have been realized through small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr.

  18. Experimental research of the bending springback property on advanced high strength steel%先进高强度钢板弯曲类回弹特性的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊; 肖华; 陈军; 全广; 谢坚强

    2009-01-01

    随着先进高强钢板在汽车及航天航空领域的广泛应用,回弹导致的成形精度问题日益突出.为了获取先进高强钢的弯曲回弹特性,通过采用U形件回弹模型,针对600 MPa级别的3种典型高强钢(DP钢、TRIP钢、HSLA钢)进行了回弹试验研究.实验结果表明:在相同变形条件下,TRIP钢弯曲回弹最大,DP钢次之,HSLA的弯曲回弹最小;不同工艺条件、不同材料性能参数对弯曲回弹呈单调的影响规律,而润滑条件对弯曲回弹的影响趋势并未出现一致性规律.%To investigate the problem of springback of advanced high strength steel ( AHSS) , which has been used widely in automobile and aviation industry, a great deal of physical tests were carried out based on the U-shape springback model to research the springback properties of three kinds of typical steel with the tensile strength of 600 MPa (DP, TRIP and HSLA). Experimental results show that the springback of TRIP steel is the maximum, while that of DP steel is the minimum under the same bending condition. Different process settings and material parameters have monotonic influence on bending spingback respectively. But the influence of different lubricating status on bending spingback does not exhibit the consistency.

  19. New structural high strength rationally alloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New developments in high strength structural steels are reported. Properties and perspective fields of application are described for the following materials: austenitic chromium steels with ultra equilibrium nitrogen content, steels with nitrogen martensite structure, microalloyed ferritic-pearlitic steels with decreased concentrations of Mn and Ni, high ductility heat resisting steels, nonmagnetic chromium free Mn-Ni-Cu-V-C steels and iron powder alloys with superhard carbon phases. Steel 02Kh12G14N4YuM is recommended to be used for parts and assemblies of nuclear power plants

  20. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; Marrero-Santos, Y.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile density due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications, despite their excellent corrosion properties. Improvements in room temperature tensile ductility have been realized mainly through alloying effects, changes in thermomechanical processing to control microstructure, and by control of the specimen`s surface condition. Ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa have been reported. In terms of creep-rupture strength, small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr have produced significant improvements, but at the expense of weldability and room-temperature tensile ductility. Recently an alloy containing these additions, designated FA-180, was shown to exhibit a creep-rupture life of over 2000 h after a heat treatment of 1 h at 1150{degrees}C. This study presents the results of creep-rupture tests at various test temperatures and stresses and discusses the results as part of our effort to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved with heat treatment at 1150{degrees}C.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  2. Corner strength enhancement of high strength cold-formed steel at normal room and elevated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju CHEN; Wei-liang JIN

    2008-01-01

    In this study,the suitability of current design methods for the 0.2% proof yield strength of the comer regions for high strength cold-formed steel at norrnal room temperature was investigated.The current standard predictions are generally accurate for outer comer specimen but conservative for inner comer specimen.Based on the experimental results,an analytical model to predict the comer strength of high strength cold-formed steel at normal room temperature was also proposed.The comparison indicated that the proposed model predicted well the comer strength of high strength cold-formed steel not only at normal room temperature but also at elevated temperatures.It is shown that the predictions obtained from the proposed model agree well with the test results.Generally the comer strength enhancement of high strength cold-formed steel decreases when the temperature increases.

  3. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  4. High strength air-dried aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  5. Strength analysis of laser welded lap joint for ultra high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young Cheol; Kim, Cheol Hee; Cho, Young Tae; Jung, Yoon Gyo

    2013-12-01

    Several industries including the automotive industry have recently applied the process of welding high strength steel. High strength steel is steel that is harder than normal high strength steel, making it much stronger and stiffer. HSS can be formed in pieces that can be up to 10 to 15 percent thinner than normal steel without sacrificing strength, which enables weight reduction and improved fuel economy. Furthermore, HSS can be formed into complex shapes that can be welded into structural areas. This study is based on previous experiments and is aimed at establishing the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel. Research on the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel is conducted by using Solid Works, a program that analyzes the stress of a virtual model. In conclusion, we found that the stress distribution is changed depending on the shape of welded lap joint. In addition, the Influence of the stress distribution on welded high strength steel can be used to standard for high energy welding of high strength steel, and we can also predict the region in welded high strength steel that may cracked.

  6. Advanced experimental techniques for measuring oscillator strengths of vacuum ultraviolet lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced experimental techniques for measuring oscillator strengths of atomic and ionic transitions in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) are described. A VUV time-resolved laser-induced-fluorescence experiment for radiative lifetime measurements on atoms and ions in a beam is operational. Recent work on VUV transitions of Si I and B I is described. These lifetimes provide the essential absolute normalization for converting relative oscillator strengths to absolute transition probabilities. Emission measurements of branching fractions at VUV and longer wavelengths are proposed. A large echelle spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector array will be used. This experiment will provide the sensitivity, resolving power, and data handling capability required for extensive high quality emission branching fraction measurements. We further propose to use absorption measurements on hollow cathode discharges to determine relative absorption oscillator strengths. A demonstration of a new technique for absorption spectroscopy on glow discharges is reported. The new technique provides the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data handling capability required for extensive high quality absorption measurements. Relative absorption and emission oscillator strengths will be least-square adjusted using the bowtie method and normalized with accurate radiative lifetimes. (orig.)

  7. High Breakdown Strength, Multilayer Ceramics for Compact Pulsed Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, B.; Huebner, W.; Krogh, M.L.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Pate, R.C.; Rinehart, L.F.; Schultz, B.C.; Zhang, S.C.

    1999-07-20

    Advanced ceramics are being developed for use in large area, high voltage devices in order to achieve high specific energy densities (>10 6 J/m 3 ) and physical size reduction. Initial materials based on slip cast TiO2 exhibited a high bulk breakdown strength (BDS >300 kV/cm) and high permittivity with low dispersion (e�100). However, strong area and thickness dependencies were noted. To increase the BDS, multilayer dielectric compositions are being developed based on glass/TiO2 composites. The addition of glass increases the density (�99.8% theoretical), forms a continuous grain boundary phase, and also allows the use of high temperature processes to change the physical shape of the dielectric. The permittivity can also be manipulated since the volume fraction and connectivity of the glassy phase can be readily shifted. Results from this study on bulk breakdown of TiO2 multilayer structures with an area of 2cm 2 and 0.1cm thickness have measured 650 kV/cm. Furthermore, a strong dependence of breakdown strength and permittivity has been observed and correlated with microstructure and the glass composition. This paper presents the interactive effects of manipulation of these variables.

  8. Strength Modeling of High-Strength Concrete with Hybrid Fibre Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ravichandran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The low tensile strength and limited ductility, the unavoidable deficiency, of concrete can be overcome by the addition of fibres. High strength concrete (HSC of 60 MPa containing hybrid fibres, combination of steel and polyolefin fibres, at different volume fraction of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% were compared in terms of compressive, splitting tensile strength and flexural properties with HSC containing no fibres. Test results showed that the fibres when used in hybrid form could result in enhanced flexural toughness compared to steel fibre reinforced concrete [HSFRC]. The compressive strength of the fibre-reinforced concrete reached maximum at 1.5% volume fractions and the splitting tensile strength and modulus of rupture improved with increasing volume fraction. Strength models were established to predict the compressive and splitting tensile strength and modulus of rupture of the fibre-reinforced concrete. The models give prediction matching the measurements.

  9. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  10. Structural application of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The operation of rocket engine turbine pumps is limited by the temperature restrictions of metallic components used in the systems. Mechanical strength and stability of these metallic components decrease drastically at elevated temperatures. Ceramic materials that retain high strength at high temperatures appear to be a feasible alternate material for use in the hot end of the turbopumps. This project identified and defined the processing parameters that affected the properties of Si3N4, one of candidate ceramic materials. Apparatus was assembled and put into operation to hot press Si3N4 powders into bulk material for in house evaluation. A work statement was completed to seek outside contract services to design, manufacture, and evaluate Si3N4 components in the service environments that exists in SSME turbopumps.

  11. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  12. 信息动态%Size Effect on Strength of Ultra-high Strength Concrete RPC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)is a new kind of ultra-high strength cement based composite with excellent mechanics performance and durability. In order to make RPC used in structural engineering effectively,size effect on strength of the ultra high strength concrete RPC specimen is experimental studied and the mechanism is analyzed in this paper. Test results show that if the 4 cm cube compressive strength is the control strength,conversion coefficients of 10 em cube compressive strength at 150 MPa and 200 MPa grade are 0.81 and 0.76 respectively; conversion coefficients of 10 cm× 10 cm× 30 cm prism compressive strength at 150 MPa and 200 MPa grade are 0.71 and 0. 63 respectively; the size effect conversion coefficient tends to decrease with the increase of control strength, the larger the specimen size, the lower the compressive strength. RPC is a typical brittle material. It extends instability quickly after cracking;damage concentrated in the local area,and therefore appears higher size effect.

  13. Development of a high strength high toughness ausferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ausferritic steel with high strength and exceptionally high fracture toughness has been developed. This steel has been synthesized integrating concepts from Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI) technology. The influence of the austempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of this steel at room temperature and ambient atmosphere has been examined. The effect of microstructure on the plane strain fracture toughness and on the magnetic, electrical, and thermal properties was also investigated. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile specimens prepared from the low alloy medium carbon steel with high silicon content were initially austenitized at 927 deg. C for 2 h and then subsequently austempered at several temperatures between 260 deg. C (500 F) and 400 deg. C (750 F) to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography. A combination of exceptionally high yield strength (1336 MPa) and a high fracture of toughness of 116 MPa√m (a value comparable to maraging steel) was obtained in this steel after austempering at 316 deg. C (600 F) for 2 h. Potential applications of this steel include the inexpensive fabrication of armored plates and components requiring high reliability and durability.

  14. Dynamic Behavior of High Strength Armor Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Nahme, H.; Lach, E.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the armor steels Mars 190, Mars 240 and Mars 300 have been determined for strain rates 10-3s-1 104s-1). The dynamic properties Hugoniot-elastic-limit, spall strength, shock velocity-particle verlocity-relation and stress-strain-relation will be presented. Tests at intermediate strain rates 102 s-1 < dε/dt < n 103 have been performed usin...

  15. Weldability and Strength Recovery of NUCu-140 Advanced Naval Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Jason T.

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper-precipitation strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom-probe tomography (APT) analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT. The experimental naval steel known as NUCu-140 and an established naval steel HSLA-100 were subjected to stress-relief cracking (SRC) and hot-ductility testing to assess their relative cracking susceptibilities during the welding process and post weld heat treatment. NUCu-140 exhibited a longer time-to-failure (TTF) and a lower temperature of minimum TTF during SRC testing when compared to HSLA-100, indicating better resistance to SRC for the NUCu-140 steel. The

  16. Mechanical behavior of high strength ceramic fibers at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tressler, R. E.; Pysher, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of commercially available and developmental ceramic fibers, both oxide and nonoxide, has been experimentally studied at expected use temperatures. In addition, these properties have been compared to results from the literature. Tensile strengths were measured for three SiC-based and three oxide ceramic fibers for temperatures from 25 C to 1400 C. The SiC-based fibers were stronger but less stiff than the oxide fibers at room temperature and retained more of both strength and stiffness to high temperatures. Extensive creep and creep-rupture experiments have been performed on those fibers from this group which had the best strengths above 1200 C in both single filament tests and tests of fiber bundles. The creep rates for the oxides are on the order of two orders of magnitude faster than the polymer derived nonoxide fibers. The most creep resistant filaments available are single crystal c-axis sapphire filaments. Large diameter CVD fabricated SiC fibers are the most creep and rupture resistant nonoxide polycrystalline fibers tested to date.

  17. Study on Strength Development of High Strength Concrete Containing Fly ash and Silica fume

    OpenAIRE

    A R Hariharan,; A S Santhi,; G Mohan Ganesh

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation carried out to evaluate the compressive strength of High Strength Concrete. High Strength Concrete is made by partial replacement of cement by fly ash (FA) and silica fume (SF). In this study the Class C fly ash used in various proportions 30%, 40% and 50% and that of silica fume by 6% and 10% by weight of cement. The mix proportions of concrete had a constant water binder ratio of 0.4 and super plasticizer was added based on th...

  18. Performance of High-Strength Concrete Using Palm Oil Fuel Ash as Partial Cement Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. Swaroopa Rani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The advancement in material technology has led to development of concrete with higher strengths. Presence of high cementitious materials contents in high strength concrete mixes increases heat of hydration that causes higher shrinkage and leading it to potential of cracking. However, use of supplementary cementitious materials leads to control in heat of hydration which further avoids higher shrinkage. Materials such as fly ash, silica fume, metakaolin and ground granulated blast furnace slag are largely been used as supplementary cementitious materials in High strength concrete mixes. In the present study use of palm oil fuel ash (POFA as partial cement replacement in high strength concrete mixes is evaluated with an experimental study. High strength concrete mix of M60 grade is taken as a reference and the compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength where performed for 7, 28 and 56 days and analyzed it with results for partial replacement mixes of POFA 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% & 25%. It has been observed that concrete with 15% replacement of POFA gave the highest strength.

  19. Correlation between compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of high strength concrete incorporating chopped basalt fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Nasir; Fadhilnuruddin, Muhd; Elshekh, Ali Elheber Ahmed; Fathi, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), is considered as the most important test for non-destructive techniques that are used to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of high strength concrete (HSC). The relationship between the compressive strength of HSC containing chopped basalt fibre stands (CBSF) and UPV was investigated. The concrete specimens were prepared using a different ratio of CBSF as internal strengthening materials. The compressive strength measurements were conducted at the sample ages of 3, 7, 28, 56 and 90 days; whilst, the ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured at 28 days. The result of HSC's compressive strength with the chopped basalt fibre did not show any improvement; instead, it was decreased. The UPV of the chopped basalt fibre reinforced concrete has been found to be less than that of the control mix for each addition ratio of the basalt fibre. A relationship plot is gained between the cube compressive strength for HSC and UPV with various amounts of chopped basalt fibres.

  20. Relationship between tensile strength and porosity for high porosity metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘培生; 付超; 李铁藩; 师昌绪

    1999-01-01

    An analysis model has been established according to the structure feature of high porosity metals, and the mathematical relationship between the tensile strength and porosity for this material has been derived from the model. Moreover, the corresponding theoretical formula has been proved good to reflect the variation law of tensile strength with porosity for high porosity metals by the example experiment on nickel foam.

  1. Cold worked high alloy ultra-high strength steels with aged martensite structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. Krztoń

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study on structure-property relations of heavily cold worked and aged martensite in two high-alloy structural steels was presented. The aim was to understand properties of the sheet products better and thus extend applications of the newly developed cobalt-free maraging and precipitation hardening stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: Mechanical tests were performed on cold rolled and aged specimens. Microstructures were analyzed using TEM and SEM. The crystallographic texture was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction and ADC method.Findings: In the process of cold working and ageing both high alloy steels studied could develop yield strength in excess of 1600 MPa. The main strengthening mechanism was precipitation hardening, while work hardening contribution to the strength was very limited. Overaging commences after prolonged treatment above 500ºC, and in both steels could be related to reverted austenite. The texture developed by cold working was the one known as rolling texture type.Research limitations/implications: In this study the advantage is taken of the high strength that is developed by cold working followed by ageing. Further research is needed for the sheet or strip produced by cold working and annealed before fabrication.Practical implications: The properties of the high alloy steels studied make them suitable for advanced sheet applications, e.g. as an airborne structural equipment. After welding, strength of the precipitation hardening steels could be largely restored by ageing, because their strength does not rely on strain hardening.Originality/value: Analysis of the cold worked properties, microstructure and texture, allowed for better understanding of the microstructure-property relationships in the low strain hardening high alloy sheet steels. The results obtained are of practical value for the development, production and manufacture of the ultra-high strength sheet steels.

  2. Strength Modeling of High-Strength Concrete with Hybrid Fibre Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ravichandran; K. Suguna; P. N. Ragunath

    2009-01-01

    The low tensile strength and limited ductility, the unavoidable deficiency, of concrete can be overcome by the addition of fibres. High strength concrete (HSC) of 60 MPa containing hybrid fibres, combination of steel and polyolefin fibres, at different volume fraction of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% were compared in terms of compressive, splitting tensile strength and flexural properties with HSC containing no fibres. Test results showed that the fibres when used in hybrid form could result in enha...

  3. Challenges in Resistance Welding of Ultra High Strength Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Tolf, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the use of Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) in vehicle bodystructures is important for reducing weight and cutting CO2 emissions. This thesis investigates challenges in resistance welding that can be a barrier to implementing UHSS as a replacement for low strength steels in vehicle structures. Empirical research has been performed to offer new approaches for improved joint strength and to increase knowledge on cracking mechanisms in resistance projection welding and resistance spo...

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement of extra high-strength weldable steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen embrittlement of extra high strength weldable steel has been evaluated. The quenched and tempered 17HMBVA steel grade with minimum yield strength 690 MPa, and its submerged arc welded joint were examined. Slow strain rate tests were performed in artificial sea-water under various cathodic current densities. Relative values of fracture energy, time to failure, elongation, reduction in area, and tensile strength were chosen as a measures of hydrogen degradation (author)

  5. Shear strength behavior of high strength fibrous reinforced concrete deep beams (HSFRCDB) without stirrups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this investigation the shear strength behaviour of high strength fibrous reinforced concrete deep beams (HSFRCDB) without shear reinforcement have been studied. For this purpose eight reinforced high strength concrete deep beams were tested to study the effect of the parameters (shear span to depth ratio (a/d) and volume fraction of steel fibers (Vf)) . The analysis of test results shows that the ultimate shear stress decreases with increasing a/d, while it increases with increasing the amount of steel fibers. Based on data from literature, an equation was proposed for predicting the ultimate shear stress of reinforced concrete deep beams without shear reinforcement. The proposed equation was compared with codes of practice (Aci, Bs Canadian and New Zealand) and other investigators, the codes and equation proposed by researchers underestimate the shear strength of reinforced concrete deep beams.(author). 40 refs., 16 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Processing of a new high strength high toughness steel with duplex microstructure (Ferrite + Austenite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► This new steel has exceptional combination of high strength and fracture toughness. ► Austempering treatment resulted in a very fine scale bainitic ferrite microstructure. ► As the austempering temperature increases yield strength and toughness decreases. ► Maximum fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m is obtained after austempering at 371 °C. ► A relationship between fracture toughness and the parameter σy(XγCγ)1/2 was observed. - Abstract: In this investigation a new third generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) has been developed. This steel was synthesized by austempering of a low carbon and low alloy steel with high silicon content. The influence of austempering temperature on the microstructure and the mechanical properties including the fracture toughness of this steel was also examined. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from a low carbon low alloy steel and were initially austenitized at 927 °C for 2 h and then austempered in the temperature range between 371 °C and 399 °C to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography. Test results show that the austempering heat treatment has resulted in a microstructure consisting of very fine scale bainitic ferrite and austenite. A combination of very high tensile strength of 1388 MPa and fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m was obtained after austempering at 371 °C

  7. ANALYTICAL DEPENDENCES OF STRENGTH, DEFORMATION, FORCE AND ENERGY PARAMETERS OF HIGH STRENGTH CONCRETE AT HEATING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Leonovich; D. A. Litvinovsky

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents experimental results of mechanical high strength concrete (HSC) properties at high temperature. The obtained results specify an increasing of strength and destruction energy of samples at temperature from 20 °С to 300 °С. The positive influence of high temperature (up to 400 °C) on concrete mechanical properties with w/c ratio less than 0.3 has been proved in the paper. The paper has experimentally proved that usage of a mineralogical additive as «silica fume» in high stren...

  8. Increasing Lean Mass and Strength: A Comparison of High Frequency Strength Training to Lower Frequency Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMAS, MICHAEL H.; BURNS, STEVE P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect strength training frequency has on improvements in lean mass and strength. Participants were 7 women and 12 men, age (χ̄= 34.64 years ± 6.91 years), with strength training experience, training age (χ̄= 51.16 months ± 39.02 months). Participants were assigned to one of two groups to equal baseline group demographics. High frequency training group (HFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist, 3 times per week, exercising with 3 sets per muscle group per session (3 total body workouts). Low frequency training group (LFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist one time per week, completing all 9 sets during that one workout. LFT consisted of a routine split over three days: 1) pectoralis, deltoids, and triceps; 2) upper back and biceps; 3) quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and abdominals. Following eight weeks of training, HFT increased lean mass by 1.06 kg ± 1.78 kg, (1.9%), and LFT increased lean mass by .99 kg ± 1.31 kg, (2.0%). HFT strength improvements on the chest press was 9.07 kg ± 6.33 kg, (11%), and hack squat 20.16 kg ± 11.59 kg, (21%). LFT strength improvements on chest press was 5.80kg ± 4.26 kg, (7.0%), and hack squat 21.83 kg ± 11.17 kg, (24 %). No mean differences between groups were significant. These results suggest that HFT and LFT of equal set totals result in similar improvements in lean mass and strength, following 8 weeks of strength training.

  9. Rheological properties, loss of workability and strength development of high-strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, E. -M

    2002-01-01

    The successful production of high-strength concrete which meets the desired strength and durability is dependent on optimising its rheological (or flow) properties and reducing its loss of workability during the transportation, placing and compaction stages. The research presented in this thesis aimed to: 1. Determine whether mix stability and compactability can be adequately described by the two Bingham parameters of yield value and plastic viscosity. 2. Reduce the uncertai...

  10. High-strength shielding hydrate concrete with chemical additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strength and deformation properties of high-strength shielding concretes type 500 and higher on the basis of serpentinite filler with special chemical and plasticized additions after setting under water and heat treatment are investigated. The opportunity of concrete utilization at the temperature up to 673 K is established

  11. Evaluation of High Temperature Strength and Emissivity of Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, J. S.; Jang, C. H.; Kim, M. W.; Kwon, J. H.; Seo, S. G.; Jeon, H. Y.; Kim, K. H. [Kumoh National Institute Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of present study is to develop basic reference physical property data and evaluation techniques for selection and qualification of VHTR graphite core components. Properties and evaluation techniques examined in the present study include: - High Temperature Strength of Nuclear Graphite - Diametral Compressive Strength of Nuclear Graphite - Ultrasonic evaluation techniques - Emissivity - Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)

  12. Hydrogen re-embrittlement susceptibility of ultra high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa-Gordon, Douglas J.

    2005-01-01

    300M ultra high strength steel has been widely used for over forty years as a structural material in aerospace applications where a high strength is required. These parts are generally protected from corrosion by electroplated cadmium sacrificial coatings. However, there are concerns over this coating material due to its high toxicity and alternative coatings including Zinc-14%Nickel and SermeTel®1140/962 have been considered. It is known that applying electrodeposited coati...

  13. Confined High Strength Concrete Columns: An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jagannathan Saravanan; Suguna, K; P. N. Raghunath

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: An experimental study on GFRP confined high strength concrete columns has been carried out with a view to evaluate its performances under uni-axial compression in terms of load and deformation capacity. Approach: High strength concrete columns strengthened with different configuration and stiffness of GFRP wraps were tested under axial compression until failure. Their response evaluated at different load levels. Results: The test results clearly indicated GFRP wrapped high ...

  14. Confined High Strength Concrete Columns: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannathan Saravanan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: An experimental study on GFRP confined high strength concrete columns has been carried out with a view to evaluate its performances under uni-axial compression in terms of load and deformation capacity. Approach: High strength concrete columns strengthened with different configuration and stiffness of GFRP wraps were tested under axial compression until failure. Their response evaluated at different load levels. Results: The test results clearly indicated GFRP wrapped high strength concrete columns exhibit enhances performance. Conclusion: The study concluded that the three GFRP materials attempted UDC GFRP provided the maximum benefit with respect to load and deformation.

  15. Fatigue strength of truss girders made of very high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, R.J.M.; Kolstein, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    An effective application of Very High Strength Steel (VHSS) in civil engineering structures is expected in stiff, truss like structures, typically made of Circular Hollow Sections (CHS). Use of castings in combination with CHS could be promising for the design of highly fatigue resistant joints. Cas

  16. Double network hydrogel with high mechanical strength:Performance, progress and future perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN YongMei; DONG Kun; LIU ZhenQi; XU Feng

    2012-01-01

    With high water content (~90 wt%) and significantly improved mechanical strength (~MPa),double network (DN) hydrogels have emerged as promising biomaterials with widespread applications in biomedicine.In recent years,DN hydrogels with extremely high mechanical strength have achieved great advance,and scientists have designed a series of natural and biomimetic DN hydrogels with novel functions including low friction,low wear,mechanical anisotropy and cell compatibility.These advances have also led to new design of biocompatible DN hydrogels for regeneration of tissues such as cartilage.In this paper,we reviewed the strategies of designing high-strength DN hydrogel and analyzed the factors that affect DN hydrogel properties.We also discussed the challenges and future development of the DN hydrogel in view of its potential as biomaterials for their biomedical applications.

  17. Autogenous Shrinkage of High Strength Lightweight Aggregate Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Qingjun; TIAN Yaogang; WANG Fazhou; ZHANG Feng; HU Shuguang

    2005-01-01

    The characteristic of autogenous shrinkage ( AS ) and its effect on high strength lightweight aggregate concrete (HSLAC) were studied. The experimental results show that the main shrinkage of high strength concrete is AS and the amount of cement can affect the AS of HSLAC remarkably. At the early stage the AS of HSLAC is lower than that of high strength normal concrete, but it has a large growth at the later stage. The AS of high strength normal concrete becomes stable at 90d age, but HSLAC still has a high AS growth. It is found that adjusting the volume rate of lightweight aggregate, mixing with a proper dosage of fly ash and raising the water saturation degree of lightweight aggregate can markedly reduce the AS rate of HSLAC.

  18. Behaviour of high strength steel moment joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girão Coelho, A.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The design of joints to European standard EN 1993 within the semi-continuous/partially restrained philosophy is restricted to steel grades up to S460. With the recent development of high performance steels, the need for these restrictions should be revisited. The semicontinuous joint modelling can b

  19. Strength advance design of boiler components for DSS operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Tsuyoshi; Tsuta, Toshio; Yamaji, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Teiichi (Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe, (Japan))

    1989-08-20

    The thermal power plants in the future are expected to operate under such medium loads as LNG, petroleum and coal burning. As a result, frequent start-ups at night (DSS operation) and week-end stops (WSS operation), etc. are conducted: sliding pressure operation system is adopted to reduce the thermal stress at the turbine and to improve the plant efficiency at partial load operation; this causes a rapid temperture change which gives rise to big thermal stress at various points of the boiler causing wide fatigue damage at the center of the stress. Simultneously, the creep damage at high temperature progresses by time. In order to attain sufficient life for the planned operation mode at the design of various boiler points, improvements have been conducted at internal bore edge of a thick cylinder, shape of the fin end piece, furnace/horizontal flue corner part and the attached metal pieces for enhancing the reliability. 1 ref., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. High temperature strength of hastelloy x welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of high temperature structures such as ASME Code N-47, the high temperature strength characteristics of welded joints become the problem. Also, the design of the welded parts in high temperature structures in the present state is according to the standard in which the bimetallic behavior of welded parts is not considered, accordingly, it is much problematic. In this paper, the high temperature strength characteristics of Hastelloy X welded joints are described, and the problems in the present design are pointed out, moreover, some comment is given to the evaluation of high temperature strength for the future. In the ASME Code, Case N-47, the strength of welded joints is required to be the same as that of parent metals. Therefore, the data on the high temperature strength of welded joints must be collected. The results of tensile test at room temperature, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 deg C on the parent metal and EB and TIG welded joints of Hastelloy X are shown. Also, the characteristics of mono-axial creep rupture, internal pressure creep rupture, and high temperature, low cycle fatigue are reported. The lowering of strength in the tension, creep and fatigue of welded joints must be examined and evaluated in view of the combined behavior of parent metals and weld metals. (Kako, I.)

  1. High strength bolt failure analysis and integrity assessment. Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated failures have occurred in high strength bolting used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) component support applications. The U.S. nuclear industry component support bolting failure experience is described in this paper, focusing on materials specified intentionally as ''ultra-high-strength'' (minimum specified yield strength greater than 1034 MPa). The analysis and investigation of fabrication-induced problems with a bolt made from Carpenter Technology Alloy ''Custom 455'', (ASTM A 564 XM-16) a proprietary materials, are detailed, and the measures taken to assure integrity of these bolts during operation are discussed. Lessons learned to preclude future problems are presented as conclusions

  2. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications

  3. Adhesion between high-strength concrete, epoxy resin and CFRP

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de; Krzywon, Rafal; Camões, Aires; Gorski, M.; Dawczynski, Szymon

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the adhesion between high-strength concrete, epoxy resin and CFRP. The adhesion of the high-strength concrete was compared with the same property measured in conventional concrete. Shear tests were made to test adhesion from concretes to epoxy resin. Flexural tests were used to evaluate the adhesion between concretes, epoxy and CFRP. The effect of temperature was also evaluated. For ordinary temperatures (20 ºC) the results showed a better flexural performance o...

  4. Reduction of Postfire Properties of High-Strength Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Neno Torić; Ivica Boko; Bernardin Peroš

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of behaviour of high-strength concrete at high temperature. Reduction of the mechanical properties of concrete was determined starting from the period when the concrete specimens were heated to the maximum temperature and cooled down to ambient temperature and the additional 96 hours after the initial cooling of the specimens. The study includes determination of compressive strength, dynamic and secant modulus of elasticity, and stress-strain curves o...

  5. Evaluation of hydrogen degradation of high-strength weldable steels

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ćwiek; J. Michalska-Ćwiek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of a high-strength steel and welded joints to hydrogen degradation and establishing of applicable mechanism of their hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen delayed cracking.Design/methodology/approach: High-strength quenched and tempered steel grade S690Q and its welded joints have been used. Susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of steel and welded joints has been evaluated using monotonically increasing load. Slow strain rate test (SSRT...

  6. Increased strength of concrete subject to high loading rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of this work various problems are discussed which occur in connection with concrete under high tensile loading rates (e.g. when a plane crashes on a nuclear power plant very high loads occur which act only for a very short time). Particularly the causes for the already frequently noticed increases in strength with increasing loading rates are investigated and also the question whether this increased strength can be taken into account when dimensioning a construction. (MM)

  7. Ultra high strength beta titanium alloy for fasteners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high strength titanium alloy has been developed primarily intended for fastener applications. While Ti-6Al-4V is used extensively as a fastener alloy in the aerospace industry, its shear strength allowable is limited to 655 MPa (95 ksi). For higher shear strength requirements, various steels or nickel-based alloys are used (up to 860 MPa (125 ksi)), but with the attendant density penalty. This new alloy is intended to provide the 860 MPa shear strength at roughly a 40% weight savings. After screening various alloy systems, the optimum chemistry has been selected as follows: Ti-6.0V-6.2Mo-5.7Fe-3Al. In light of its 125 ksi shear strength goal, the alloy has been designated TIMETAL reg-sign 125

  8. A room temperature cured low dielectric hyperbranched epoxy adhesive with high mechanical strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bibekananda De; Niranjan Karak

    2014-05-01

    A low dielectric constant hyperbranched epoxy thermoset with excellent adhesive and mechanical strength is the demand for advanced electronics and engineering applications. The present investigation provided a room temperature, curable hyperbranched epoxy, obtained by an A2 + B3 polycondensation reaction. The synthesized hyperbranched epoxy was cured by a combined hardener system consisting of a commercial poly(amido-amine) and a first generation aliphatic poly(amido-amine) dendrimer (PAD) prepared by Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and aliphatic amines. The thermoset exhibited high mechanical strength, excellent adhesive strength, low dielectric constant, good thermal stability and excellent weather resistance along with very good moisture resistance. The results showed the influence of the amount of PAD on the performance of the thermoset. Thus, the study revealed that the combined poly(amido-amine) cured hyperbranched epoxy has high potential in advanced electrical packaging and microelectronic devices.

  9. Titanium cholla : lightweight, high-strength structures for aerospace applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, Clinton J.; Voth, Thomas Eugene; Taggart, David G. (University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI); Gill, David Dennis; Robbins, Joshua H.; Dewhurst, Peter (University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI)

    2007-10-01

    Aerospace designers seek lightweight, high-strength structures to lower launch weight while creating structures that are capable of withstanding launch loadings. Most 'light-weighting' is done through an expensive, time-consuming, iterative method requiring experience and a repeated design/test/redesign sequence until an adequate solution is obtained. Little successful work has been done in the application of generalized 3D optimization due to the difficulty of analytical solutions, the large computational requirements of computerized solutions, and the inability to manufacture many optimized structures with conventional machining processes. The Titanium Cholla LDRD team set out to create generalized 3D optimization routines, a set of analytically optimized 3D structures for testing the solutions, and a method of manufacturing these complex optimized structures. The team developed two new computer optimization solutions: Advanced Topological Optimization (ATO) and FlexFEM, an optimization package utilizing the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) software for stress analysis. The team also developed several new analytically defined classes of optimized structures. Finally, the team developed a 3D capability for the Laser Engineered Net Shaping{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) additive manufacturing process including process planning for 3D optimized structures. This report gives individual examples as well as one generalized example showing the optimized solutions and an optimized metal part.

  10. Effect of Curing Temperature Histories on the Compressive Strength Development of High-Strength Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Keun-Hyeok Yang; Jae-Sung Mun; Myung-Sug Cho

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relative strength-maturity relationship of high-strength concrete (HSC) specifically developed for nuclear facility structures while considering the economic efficiency and durability of the concrete. Two types of mixture proportions with water-to-binder ratios of 0.4 and 0.28 were tested under different temperature histories including (1) isothermal curing conditions of 5°C, 20°C, and 40°C and (2) terraced temperature histories of 20°C for an initial age of individual...

  11. Effect of Curing Temperature Histories on the Compressive Strength Development of High-Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Hyeok Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relative strength-maturity relationship of high-strength concrete (HSC specifically developed for nuclear facility structures while considering the economic efficiency and durability of the concrete. Two types of mixture proportions with water-to-binder ratios of 0.4 and 0.28 were tested under different temperature histories including (1 isothermal curing conditions of 5°C, 20°C, and 40°C and (2 terraced temperature histories of 20°C for an initial age of individual 1, 3, or 7 days and a constant temperature of 5°C for the subsequent ages. On the basis of the test results, the traditional maturity function of an equivalent age was modified to consider the offset maturity and the insignificance of subsequent curing temperature after an age of 3 days on later strength of concrete. To determine the key parameters in the maturity function, the setting behavior, apparent activation energy, and rate constant of the prepared mixtures were also measured. This study reveals that the compressive strength development of HSC cured at the reference temperature for an early age of 3 days is insignificantly affected by the subsequent curing temperature histories. The proposed maturity approach with the modified equivalent age accurately predicts the strength development of HSC.

  12. Evaluation of shear strength of high-strength concrete beams without stirrups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a comparative analysis on shear behavior of high-strength concrete beams using various international design approaches like AC [1], Canadian [2], AASHTO [3], European Code [4] and method proposed by Zararis [5] is presented. Twenty-seven reinforced concrete beams without web reinforcement were tested under three point loading. In addition, 95 other similar beams having similar cross sectional dimensions, concrete strength and loading conditions are analyzed [6-8]. The shear span-to-depth ratio ranged from 1 to 6 and longitudinal reinforcement ratio from 0.35% to 1.94%. Based on the analysis of total of 122 similar beams, it is observed that shear strength and failure mode depends upon shear span and longitudinal reinforcement ratio. For values of a/d ratio less than 2.5, the experimental shear strength was found greater than that predicted as per different shear design approaches; however for slender beams having a/d ranging from 2.5 to 6, the predicted shear capacity was found greater. It was noted that ACI 318-02 [1] predicts shear strength more accurately for values of tensile steel ratio greater than 1%, whereas design approach proposed by Zararis [5] is more appropriate to be used where tensile steel ratio is less than 1%. (author)

  13. TRIAXIAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF ULTRA HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Sovják

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to describe the strength of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC under triaxial compression. The main goal is to find a trend in the triaxial compressive strength development under various values of confinement pressure. The importance of triaxial tests lies in the spatial loading of the sample, which simulates the real loading of the material in the structure better than conventional uniaxial strength tests. In addition, the authors describe a formulation process for UHPC that has been developed without using heat treatment, pressure or a special mixer. Only ordinary materials available commercially in the Czech Republic were utilized throughout the material design process.

  14. High temperature strength of hastelloy XR electron beam weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for the electron beam welded joints of Hastelloy XR, which is the heat resistant alloy for high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the tensile, creep rupture and low cycle fatigue characteristics at high temperature of the weld metal were determined, and compared with the parent material. As the result, it was found that the strength of the welded joint can be treated as nearly the same as that of the parent metal up to 900 deg C, while at 1000 deg C, the tensile strength and creep rupture strength become lower than those of the parent material, therefore the enough strength-design consideration is indispensable for the application at 1000 deg C. (Kako, I.)

  15. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  16. Reduction of hydrogen embrittlement on Electrogalvanized Ultra High Strength Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Haglund, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-high strength steels is known to be susceptible for hydrogen embrittlement at very low concentrations of hydrogen. In this thesis three methods to prevent or reduce the hydrogen embrittlement in martensitic steel, with tensile strength of 1500 MPa, were studied. First, a barrier layer of aluminium designed to prevent hydrogen to enter the steel, which were deposited by vacuum evaporation. Second, a decarburization process of the steels surface designed to mitigate the induced stresses f...

  17. High-strength cellular ceramic composites with 3D microarchitecture

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Jens; Hengsbach, Stefan; Tesari, Iwiza; Schwaiger, Ruth; Kraft, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    It has been a long-standing effort to create materials with low density but high strength. Technical foams are very light, but compared with bulk materials, their strength is quite low because of their random structure. Natural lightweight materials, such as bone, are cellular solids with optimized architecture. They are structured hierarchically and actually consist of nanometer-size building blocks, providing a benefit from mechanical size effects. In this paper, we demonstrate that materia...

  18. ADVANCE IN HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE FILLED SQUARE STEEL TUBULAR STRUCTURE WITH INNER CFRP CIRCULAR TUBE%内置CFRP圆管的方钢管高强混凝土结构研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李帼昌; 张春雨; 于洪平

    2012-01-01

    该文进行了内置CFRP圆管的方钢管高强混凝土结构的轴压短柱、轴压中长柱、轴压长柱、纯弯构件、单向偏压短柱、单向偏压中长柱、双向偏压短柱、双向偏压中长柱的试验研究和有限元模拟,分析了内置CFRP圆管的方钢管高强混凝土结构各类基本构件的受力全过程以及破坏模式,并提出了用于计算该结构各类基本构件的承载力以及变形的计算公式.在试验研究和数值模拟的基础上,将此种新型组合结构构件的力学性能与方钢管混凝土构件的力学性能进行了比较分析.%Plentiful experiment researches and the finite element analysis are performed on short and slender columns under axial compression beams, short columns and slender columns under eccentric compression, short columns and slender columns of high-strength concrete filled square steel tube with inner CFRP circular tube under bi-axial eccentric compression. The failure mode and the mechanism of all kinds of members in an entire process are analyzed. And a simplified formula calculating the bearing capacity for each member is proposed. On the basis of above, the comparison between this new composite structure and a traditional concrete filled square steel tubular structure is done.

  19. Influence of irradiation on high-strength graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure efficiency of the graphite elements of the construction of the masonry of reactors, the graphite must possess high radiation stability, strength, and heat resistance. In this connection, the physical properties of graphites based on uncalcined petroleum coke with a binder - high-temperature hard coal pitch - the amount of which reaches 40% are considered in this paper

  20. El strength function at high spin and excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently giant dipole resonance-like concentration of the dipole strength function in nuclei was observed at both high excitation energies and high spins. This observation raises the possibility of obtaining new information on the shape of rapidly rotating heated nuclei. Recent experimental results on this subject are reviewed

  1. Strength-toughness requirements for thick walled high pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strength and toughness requirements of materials for use in high pressure vessels has been the subject of some discussion in the meetings of the Materials Task Group of the Special Working Group High Pressure Vessels. A fracture mechanics analysis has been performed to theoretically establish the required toughness for a high pressure vessel. This paper reports that the analysis performed is based on the validity requirement for plane strain fracture of fracture toughness test specimens. This is that at the fracture event, the crack length, uncracked ligament, and vessel length must each be greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone size for brittle fracture to occur. For high pressure piping applications, the limiting physical dimension is the uncracked ligament, as it can be assumed that the other dimensions are always greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone. To perform the fracture mechanics analysis several parameters must be known: these include vessel dimensions, material strength, degree of autofrettage, and design pressure. Results of the analysis show, remarkably, that the effects of radius ratio, pressure and degree of autofrettage can be ignored when establishing strength and toughness requirements for code purposes. The only parameters that enter into the calculation are yield strength, toughness and vessel thickness. The final results can easily be represented as a graph of yield strength against toughness on which several curves, one for each vessel thickness, are plotted

  2. Investigations on the impact strength of constructional high-strength Weldox steel at lowered temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ozgowicz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the results of investigations concerning the impact strength of thick steel plates at lowered temperature obtained by industrial smelting of micro-alloyed steel of the type S1100QL (Weldox 1100 and S1300QL (Weldox 1300 with a yield strength of 1100-1300 MPa.Design/methodology/approach: The main methods used for these researches were the impact test Charpy V at lower temperatures, and metallographic observations. The tested samples at lower temperature have also been analyzed fractographically.Findings: The influence of the chemical composition and technology of production on the structure and mechanical properties of the investigated kinds of steels have been determined, as well as their ductility temperature of transition into the brittle state.Research limitations/implications: A large dispersion of intermetallic precipitated phases restricted considerably the possibility of their metallographic identification. This latter one will be done in the next stage of basic investigations.Practical implications: A wide range of practical applications of Weldox 1100 and Weldox 1300 sheet plates is warranted by both their high impact strength, especially at lower temperatures, and lower ductility transition temperature.Originality/value: It has been found that the degree of refinement of the martensitic structure and dispersion of secondary precipitations, mainly carbides and niobium nitrocarbides affect considerably the change of the impact strength within the investigated range of temperature from ambient temperature to minus 150°C.

  3. Shock characterization of an ultra-high strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzar, B.; Pontiroli, C.; Buzaud, E.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the design of protective structures may imply ultra-high performance concretes. These materials present a compressive strength 5 times higher than standard concretes. However, few reliable data on the shock response of such materials are available in the literature. Thus, a characterization of an ultra-high strength concrete has been conducted by means of hydrostatic and triaxial tests in the quasi-static regime, and plate impact experiments for shock response. Data have been gathered up to 6 GPa and a simple modelling approach has been applied to get a reliable representation of the shock compression of this concrete.

  4. Optimum high temperature strength of two-dimensional nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Monclús

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature nanoindentation was used to reveal nano-layer size effects on the hardness of two-dimensional metallic nanocomposites. We report the existence of a critical layer thickness at which strength achieves optimal thermal stability. Transmission electron microscopy and theoretical bicrystal calculations show that this optimum arises due to a transition from thermally activated glide within the layers to dislocation transmission across the layers. We demonstrate experimentally that the atomic-scale properties of the interfaces profoundly affect this critical transition. The strong implications are that interfaces can be tuned to achieve an optimum in high temperature strength in layered nanocomposite structures.

  5. Optimum high temperature strength of two-dimensional nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature nanoindentation was used to reveal nano-layer size effects on the hardness of two-dimensional metallic nanocomposites. We report the existence of a critical layer thickness at which strength achieves optimal thermal stability. Transmission electron microscopy and theoretical bicrystal calculations show that this optimum arises due to a transition from thermally activated glide within the layers to dislocation transmission across the layers. We demonstrate experimentally that the atomic-scale properties of the interfaces profoundly affect this critical transition. The strong implications are that interfaces can be tuned to achieve an optimum in high temperature strength in layered nanocomposite structures

  6. Optimum high temperature strength of two-dimensional nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monclús, M. A.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M., E-mail: jon.molina@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Zheng, S. J.; Mayeur, J. R.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Mara, N. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Polcar, T. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Llorca, J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Department of Materials Science, Polytechnic University of Madrid, E. T. S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    High-temperature nanoindentation was used to reveal nano-layer size effects on the hardness of two-dimensional metallic nanocomposites. We report the existence of a critical layer thickness at which strength achieves optimal thermal stability. Transmission electron microscopy and theoretical bicrystal calculations show that this optimum arises due to a transition from thermally activated glide within the layers to dislocation transmission across the layers. We demonstrate experimentally that the atomic-scale properties of the interfaces profoundly affect this critical transition. The strong implications are that interfaces can be tuned to achieve an optimum in high temperature strength in layered nanocomposite structures.

  7. Shrinkage of polypropylene fibre reinforced high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Zajec, Matija

    2012-01-01

    In this diploma paper we deal with the analysis of high strength concrete, micro-reinforced with polypropylene fibers. We used four different lengths of polypropylene fibers: 6mm, 12 mm, 18 mm and 30 mm. The share of fibers in each concrete mixture is 0.5 % of the total volume. With high strength concretes autogenous shrinkage is very intensive, so the first day we measured it electronically with dial gauges. Later we measured the shrinking with a mobile displacement transducer. We measured a...

  8. Reduction of the Early Autogenous Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Saje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a laboratory investigation on the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete, and the possibilities of its reduction, are presented. Such concrete demonstrates significant autogenous shrinkage, which should, however, be limited in the early stages of its development in order to prevent the occurrence of cracks and/or drop in the load-carrying capacity of concrete structures. The following possibilities for reducing autogenous shrinkage were investigated: the use of low-heat cement, a shrinkage-reducing admixture, steel fibres, premoistened polypropylene fibres, and presoaked lightweight aggregate. In the case of the use of presoaked natural lightweight aggregate, with a fraction from 2 to 4 mm, the early autogenous shrinkage of one-day-old high strength concrete decreased by about 90%, with no change to the concrete's compressive strength in comparison with that of the reference concrete.

  9. Modified master curve of ultra high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical Master Curve approach covers the ferritic steels with a yield strength range of 275 MPa–825 MPa. The ultra high strength steel S960 QC is out of this range, and it does not follow the formula determined in the ASTM E1921-05 Standard. In this paper, the results of the research program are presented, and a new Master-like curve is derived. The new curve preserves the basic features of the classical Master Curve; it simply widens the family of Master Curves. - Highlights: ► Fracture toughness of the S960 QC steel was analyzed at the ductile–cleavage transition region. ► The S960 QC steel does not follow the classical Master Curve equation. ► No thickness effect on fracture toughness was observed in the thicknesses range tested. ► New Master Curve for the ultra high strength steel was determined.

  10. High strength beta titanium alloys: New design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel approach for development of high strength and ductile beta titanium alloys was proposed and successfully applied. The microstructure of the designed alloys is fully composed of a bcc β-Ti phase exhibiting dendritic morphology. The new Ti68.8Nb13.6Cr5.1Co6Al6.5 (at%) alloy (BETAtough alloy) exhibits a maximum tensile strength of 1290±50 MPa along with 21±3% of fracture strain. The specific energy absorption value upon mechanical deformation of the BETAtough alloy exceeds that of Ti-based metallic glass composites and commercial high strength Ti-based alloys. The deformation behavior of the new alloys was correlated with their microstructure by means of in-situ studies of the microstructure evolution upon tensile loading in a scanning electron microscope

  11. Study on the ductility of high strength reinforced concrete columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experimental research of 48 reinforced concrete columns with high strength and normal strength concrete under monotonic and cyclic loading, the factors which affect the ductility such as the concrete strength, axial load ratio, stirrup ratio, etc. are analysed. It can be concluded that the axial load ratio is the most important factor that affects ductility. The axial load ratio limits and relative stirrups ratio limits were proposed under the condition of limited ductility (μΔ≥3). The experiments also show that the relationship between stirrup ratio and axial load ratio is not linear if the axial load ratio is high, which is different from previous researches. In the design, a simplified bilinear relationship can be adopted which agrees well the experimental results. (author)

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS AND STRENGTH STUDY IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the past half century China has developed and formed her own system of high temperature materials for power, automobile and aero-engine industries in the temperature range from 550 ℃ to 1 100 ℃. These high temperature materials include heat-resisting steels, iron-base, nickel-iron-base and nickel-base superalloys. Some achievements in high temperature strength study, new technologies and new alloy development are also discussed.

  13. High strength hot rolled and aged microalloyed 5%Ni steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Lis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper was to give information about low temperature strength and impact CharpyVtoughness of low carbon microalloyed 5%Ni bainitic steel after thermomechanical rolling (TMR orthermomechanical controlled processing (TMCP and ageing at different temperatures: 580°C/2 h, 640°C/1hand 680°C/1h.Design/methodology/approach: The tensile strength tests were performed at -196, -60 and 20°C and Charpy Vsamples were broken at -100, -80, -60, -40, -20 and 20°C temperatures. The tensile strength TS, yield strengthYS, elongation A5 and reduction of area RA were established from tensile experiments. After TMCP 16 mm steelplate had YS = 730MPa, TS = 950 MPa, A5 = 22,5% and RA = 61% and impact energy > 50 J at -196°C.Findings: The best combination of mechanical properties; yield strength and Charpy V toughness was achieved forsteel after TMR and ageing 580°C/ 2h; YS = 800MPa, TS = 900 MPa, A5 = 22.5%, at -1000C KVmin.= 110 J.Research limitations/implications: The precise methodology for retained austenite identification and itsamount content determination in the investigated microstructures is still metallographic problem which needsto be resolved.Practical implications: The best combination of yield strength and Charpy V toughness was achieved for steelafter TMR and ageing 580°C/ 2h. At liquid nitrogen temperature ultrahigh strength properties were: YS = 1140MPa, TS = 1280 MPa, A5 = 26%, RA = 55% and KV 122 J at -100°C.Originality/value: The detailed microstructure examination of the steel with optical and mainly scanningtransmission electron microscopy was needed to explain its good properties at very low temperature. TRIP effectwas observed due to the presence of highly alloyed retained austenite in the microstructure. That type of steelmay be used for contemporary military and structural applications working at low temperatures.

  14. Fracture Energy of High-Strength Concrete in Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Henrik; Brincker, Rune

    Compression tests are usually carried out in load control. This implies the termination of the test at the peak point of the load-displacement curve, while the fracture under these conditions becomes unstable at the descending branch of the load displacement relation. However, the descending bran...... experimental method has been used to investigate the influence of boundary conditions, loading rate, size effects and the influence of the strength on the fracture energy of high-strength concrete over the range 70 MPa to 150 MPa, expressed in nominal values....

  15. REVIEW AND PROSPECT OF HIGH STRENGTH LOW ALLOY TRIP STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Li; P. Wollants; Y.L. He; B.C. De Cooman; X.C. Wei; Z.Y. Xu

    2003-01-01

    Research status of high strength low alloy TRIP (transformation induced plasticity)steels for automobile structural parts is briefly described. Composition and microstructure factors especially the morphology, size and volume fraction of retained austenite,which largely influence the strength and ductility of the steel, are reviewed and discussed one after another. Modelling of the inter-critical annealing and martempering processes as well as the designing of the TRIP steel aided by commercial software are introduced. Some special aspects of the dynamic mechanical properties of TRIP steel are firstly reported.

  16. Polymer matrix nanocomposites for high strength and high stiffness applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used as nanofillers in polymer matrix nanocomposites due to their remarkable properties. The CNTs containing nanocomposites showed improvement in electrical, mechanical, optical and structural properties. In this study CNTs were incorporated into glass reinforced polypropylene to improve its thermo-mechanical and electrical properties. Radiation crosslinking was performed to further circumvent the properties of nanocomposites. Structural changes and physical interaction between polypropylene and CNTs was investigated by XRD and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Impedance spectroscopy was also performed to scrutinize the effect of CNTs on electrical properties. To enhance the dispersion of CNTs, vinyl triethoxy silane (VTES) was added and CNTs were also chemically modified using sulphuric and nitric acid. XRD and FTIR spectra revealed the presence of CNTs as well as modification in the structure of nanocomposites. In addition the XRD analysis showed the reduction in the crystallinity of nanocomposites with radiation dose. Nanocomposite showed improvement in mechanical properties compared with the neat polymer. By adding 015 wt% CNTs in glass reinforced PP increase in tensile strength and elastic modulus was 8% and 64% respectively. 26% and 8% increment in elastic modulus was also observed for 0.5 and 0.75 wt% CNTs addition in glass reinforced polypropylene. Moreover 33% and 32% increase in tensile strength was observed at 25 kGy absorbed dose containing 0.5 and 0.75 wt% CNTs respectively. Irradiation also improved the mechanical properties of fiber glass reinforced polypropylene. 65% and 45% increment in tensile strength has been observed at 25 and 50 kGy absorbed dose respectively. Impedance spectroscopy has revealed that conductivity of glass reinforced polypropylene has been increased from 3.15x10/sup -6/ to 5.98x10/sup -6/ by adding 0.75wt% CNTs in it. (author)

  17. High Strength Silicon Carbide Foams and Their Deformation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) foams with a continuously connected open-cell structure were prepared and characterized for their mechanical performance. The apparent densities of SiC foams were controlled between about 0.4 and 1.3 g/cm3, with corresponding compressive strengths ranging from about 13 to 60 MPa and flexural strengths from about 8 to 30 MPa. Compressive testing of the SiC foams yielded stress-strain curves with only one linear-elastic region, which is different from those reported on ceramic foams in literature. This can possibly be attributed to the existence of filaments with fine, dense and high strength microstructures. The SiC and the filaments respond homogeneously to applied loading.

  18. The development of Ti-alloyed high strength microalloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microalloy steels are generally Nb, V, or Nb, V, Ti composite microalloyed. Because of the high price of niobium and vanadium, the development of titanium microalloyed steels is a very interesting subject. In this study, steels with different Ti contents were refined and forged. Tensile tests were conducted and microstructures of samples were analyzed. Fine precipitates were observed using a transmission electron microscope. The results show that nanoscale Ti precipitates is the main factor enhancing strength of steels. The strength of steels increases with the Ti content. The optimum content range of titanium is between 0.04 and 0.10 wt.% while below 0.04 wt.% and higher than 0.10 wt.%, Ti has little effect on the strength of steels.

  19. Hydrogen Effects on Austenitic Stainless Steels and High-Strength Carbon Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Todoshchenko, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The resistance to hydrogen embrittlement is an important factor in the development of new steel grades for a variety of applications. The thesis describes investigations on hydrogen effects on two classes of steels - austenitic stainless steels and advanced high-strength carbon steels. Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in metastable austenitic stainless steels are studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). This method, together with the mathematical modeling of the processes of hy...

  20. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of a high strength steel X80

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Isabelle; BRIOTTET Laurent; Lemoine, P.; Andrieu, Eric; Blanc, Christine; Odemer, Grégory

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility of a high strength steel grade (X80). The respective implication of different hydrogen populations, i.e. adsorbed, dissolved in interstitial sites, trapped on dislocations and/or microstructural elements on the associated embrittlement mechanisms has been addressed through mechanical testing in high pressure of hydrogen gas at room temperature. Tensile tests at various strain rates and hydrogen pressures have been carried...

  1. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  2. Effect of excess oxygen concentration on high-temperature strength of ODS martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) martensitic steel (9CrODS steel) has been identified as an attractive candidate for advanced fast reactor (FR) fuel cladding tube because of its superior high-temperature strength and radiation resistance. Our recent research revealed that high-temperature strength of different lots of the cladding tubes is inconsistent each other, even though the same manufacturing process was applied to these tubes. This inconsistency leads to a serious problem that high-strength 9CrODS steel cladding tubes can not be manufactured reliably and consistently. In this report, a microstructure control technique to consistently and reliably manufacture high-strength 9CrODS steel cladding tubes is examined based on a series of derived data concerning effect of excess oxygen concentration on high temperature strength and microstructure of 9CrODS steel. The results are summarized as follows. (1) It was revealed that high strength 9CrODS steel cladding can be reliably and consistently manufactured by appropriately controlling excess oxygen and titanium concentrations for elongated grains having ultra-fine oxide particle dispersion to remain in matrix. The elongated grain would be residual α-ferrite grain which remained untransformed during hot-extrusion process, considering the ferrite former elements (tungsten and chromium) are concentrated in the grain. (2) Fluctuation of excess oxygen concentration was shown to reduce by applying ultra-high purity Ar gas (99.9999 wt% Ar) to mechanical alloying (MA) atmosphere. Excess oxygen concentration can be controlled by mixing appropriate amount of Fe2Y powder and Fe2O3 powder. (3) Creep strength of 9CrODS steel was shown to linearly increase with increasing hardness. Therefore creep strength of cladding tube should be estimated by measuring Vickers hardness of mother tube. (4) Creep strength was shown to significantly degrade by elevating hot-extrusion temperature from 1150degC to 1200degC. Lower hot

  3. Mechanical properties of high-strength concrete subjected to high temperature by stressed test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gyu-Yong KIM; Young-Sun KIM; Tae-Gyu LEE

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the effects of high temperature on compressive strength and elastic modulus of high strength concrete were experimentally investigated. The present study is aimed to study the effect of elevated temperatures ranging from 20 ℃ to 700 ℃ on the material mechanical properties of high-strength concrete of 40, 60 and 80 Mpa grade. During the strength test, the specimens are subjected to a 25% of ultimate compressive strength at room temperature and sustained during heating, and when the target temperature is reached, the specimens are loaded to failure. The tests were conducted at various temperatures (20-700 ℃) for concretes made with W/B ratios of 46%, 32% and 25%, respectively. The results show that the relative values of compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease with increasing compressive strength grade of specimen.

  4. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  5. High-strength shape memory steels alloyed with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si systems was observed, increasing attention has been paid to iron based shape memory alloys due to their great technological potential. Properties of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys have been improved by alloying with Cr, Ni, Co and C. A significant improvement on shape memory, mechanical and corrosion properties is attained by introducing nitrogen in Fe-Mn-Si based systems. By increasing the nitrogen content, strength of the matrix increases and the stacking fault energy decreases, which promote the formation of stress induced martensite and decrease permanent slip. The present authors have shown that nitrogen alloyed shape memory steels exhibit recoverable strains of 2.5--4.2% and recovery stresses of 330 MPa. In some cases, stresses over 700 MPa were attained at room temperature after cooling a constrained sample. Yield strengths of these steels can be as high as 1,100 MPa and tensile strengths over 1,500 MPa with elongations of 30%. In the present study, effect of nitrogen alloying on shape memory and mechanical properties of Fe-Mn-Si, Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni and Fe-Mn-Cr-Ni-V alloys is studied. Nitrogen alloying is shown to exhibit a beneficial effect on shape memory properties and strength of these steels

  6. Degradation of permeability resistance of high strength concrete after combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LI; Hongtao KAO; Chunxiang QIAN

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the remaining durability of con-crete materials after combustion, the permeability of high strength concrete (HSC) after combustion was studied. The transport behavior of chloride ion, water and air in concrete after combustion and the effect of temperature, strength grade, and aggregation on the permeability of HSC after combustion are investigated by chloride ion permeability coefficient (Dc), water permeability coef-ficient (Dw) and air permeability coefficient (Da). The experiment results show that all three permeability coeffi-cients commendably reflect changes of permeability. The permeability coefficient increases with the evaluation tem-perature. After the same temperature, the permeability coefficient of HSC is lower than that of normal strength concrete (NSC). However, the degree of degradation of permeability coefficient of HSC is greater than that of NSC. The permeability resistance of HSC containing limestone is better than that of HSC containing basalt. Combining changes of compressive strength and per-meability, the remaining durability of concrete materials after combustion is appropriately evaluated.

  7. Creep and Shrinkage of High Strength Concretes: an Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice Martins Toralles carbonari

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The creep and shrinkage behaviour of high strength silica fume concretes is significantly different from that of conventional concretes. In order to represent the proper time-dependent response of the material in structural analysis and design, these aspects should be adequately quantified. This paper discusses an experimental setup that is able to determine the creep and shrinkage of concrete from the time of placing. It also compares different gages that can be used for measuring the strains. The method is applied to five different concretes in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. The phenomena that are quantified can be classified as basic shrinkage, drying shrinkage, basic creep and drying creep. The relative importance of these mechanisms in high strength concrete will also be presented.

  8. Hydrogen Re-Embrittlement of Aerospace grade High Strength Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, R.; Colombo, C.; De Sanctis, M.; G. Lovicu

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen Re-Embrittlement on anodically coated high strength steels is a relevant risk for aerospace structures due to the possibility of hydrogen uptake during the operative life of the components. AISI 4340 and Maraging 250 unnotched tensile specimens were subjected to SSRT in order to evaluate the influence of test environment on time to failure. Fracture surfaces were examined by SEM analysis to evaluate the degree of embrittlement and to correlate it with hydrogen diffusivity of the tes...

  9. Hydrogen Re-Embrittlement of Aerospace grade High Strength Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Valentini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen Re-Embrittlement on anodically coated high strength steels is a relevant risk for aerospace structures due to the possibility of hydrogen uptake during the operative life of the components. AISI 4340 and Maraging 250 unnotched tensile specimens were subjected to SSRT in order to evaluate the influence of test environment on time to failure. Fracture surfaces were examined by SEM analysis to evaluate the degree of embrittlement and to correlate it with hydrogen diffusivity of the tested steels.

  10. Reduction of the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Saje, Drago

    2016-01-01

    he results of a laboratory investigation on the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete, and the possibilities of its reduction, are presented. Such concrete demonstrates signiicant autogenous shrinkage, which should, however, be limited in the early stages of its development in order to prevent the occurrence of cracks and/or drop in the load-carrying capacity of concrete structures.he following possibilities for reducing autogenous shrinkagewere investigated: the use of low-hea...

  11. Reduction of the Early Autogenous Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Drago Saje

    2015-01-01

    The results of a laboratory investigation on the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete, and the possibilities of its reduction, are presented. Such concrete demonstrates significant autogenous shrinkage, which should, however, be limited in the early stages of its development in order to prevent the occurrence of cracks and/or drop in the load-carrying capacity of concrete structures. The following possibilities for reducing autogenous shrinkage were investigated: the use of lo...

  12. Advanced high temperature heat flux sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, W.; Hobart, H. F.; Strange, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    To fully characterize advanced high temperature heat flux sensors, calibration and testing is required at full engine temperature. This required the development of unique high temperature heat flux test facilities. These facilities were developed, are in place, and are being used for advanced heat flux sensor development.

  13. High Strength Concrete Columns under Axial Compression Load: Hybrid Confinement Efficiency of High Strength Transverse Reinforcement and Steel Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Wisena Perceka; Wen-Cheng Liao; Yo-de Wang

    2016-01-01

    Addition of steel fibers to high strength concrete (HSC) improves its post-peak behavior and energy absorbing capability, which can be described well in term of toughness. This paper attempts to obtain both analytically and experimentally the efficiency of steel fibers in HSC columns with hybrid confinement of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. Toughness ratio (TR) to quantify the confinement efficiency of HSC columns with hybrid confinement is proposed through a regression analysis b...

  14. Freezing and Thawing Durability of Very High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Hamoush

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The newly developed Very High Strength Concrete (VHSC, having compressive strengths of 29 ksi and flexural strengths of 6 ksi, represents a breakthrough in concrete technology. Study to further enhance the properties of this new concrete is continuing. Approach: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of exposing Very High Strength Concrete (VHSC specimens to rapid freeze/thaw cycles. Twenty one specimens were tested according to the Standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials ASTM C215, ASTM C666 and ASTM C78. Results: One hundred freeze/thaw cycles were performed on the VHSC specimens. Change in specimen’s dimensions and material’s properties were recorded at zero, forty, seventy and one hundred cycles. Dimensions and properties considered were: dimension of cross section, length, weight, Dynamic Moduli, Poisson’s Ratio, durability factor and Modulus of Rupture. Conclusion/Recommendations: The test results indicated that VHSC is good freeze-thaw resistance (durability factor > 85% and can avoid freeze/thaw damage. Freeze- thaw cycling did not significantly affect VHSC specimens’ cross sectional dimensions, length, or Poisson’s Ratio. However, there was a decrease in the specimens’ weight with the increase in number of freeze/thaw cycles, but the decrease was very slim indicating little or no deterioration has occur. Moreover, the fine voids exist in VHSC greatly lower the freezing point of any trapped water, making the material less susceptible to Freeze- Thaw damage.

  15. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind's most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  16. Metallurgical basis for the development of high nitrogen, high toughness, high strength austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainless steels containing 1 wt.-% of nitrogen are a new group of materials with interesting properties. They show a very good combination of high strength and high toughness and also a high corrosion resistance. The addition of 1 wt.-% nitrogen increases the yield strength by about 500 MPa. The fracture toughness remains at level of 500 MPa√m. The corrosion resistance of these steels is indicated by the pitting resistance equivalent PRE = %Cr + 3.3%Mo + 20%N. All these properties make the group of high nitrogen steels interesting for technical applications. Therefore it is necessary to find a way for their economical production. This has become possible through melting at atmospheric pressure, which does not need any sophisticated and expensive equipment. The limitation of the nitrogen pressure in the air, at a level of 0.8atm, requires the optimization of the alloy composition in order to reach very high nitrogen contents of 1% or even more in the melt. Strength, toughness and corrosion resistance depend on the chemical composition as well as on the stability of the microstructure. Thus the microstructure of this steels had to be newly examined because of the high contents of several elements like nitrogen, chromium, molybdenum and especially manganese. High contents of manganese and nitrogen increase the stability of the austenitic structure. Furthermore the influence of nitrogen on the formation of sigma-phase has been described. Increasing contents of nitrogen shift the formation of sigma-phase to higher temperatures. Sigma-phase has a detrimental influence on the workability of these steels like forging or hot extruding. High nitrogen contents change the fracture behavior of austenitic Cr-Mn stainless steels. They result in a low temperature embrittlement that has been described by an empirical equation. It is now possible to design new steels by giving attention to their properties such as strength, toughness, structure, corrosion resistance and

  17. Evaluation of hydrogen degradation of high-strength weldable steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of a high-strength steel and welded joints to hydrogen degradation and establishing of applicable mechanism of their hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen delayed cracking.Design/methodology/approach: High-strength quenched and tempered steel grade S690Q and its welded joints have been used. Susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of steel and welded joints has been evaluated using monotonically increasing load. Slow strain rate test (SSRT was carried out in hydrogen generating environment, i.e. artificial sea water under cathodic polarization. Susceptibility to hydrogen delayed cracking has been evaluated under constant load in artificial sea water under cathodic polarization. Fractographic examinations with the use of scanning electron microscope (SEM were performed to establish suitable mechanism of hydrogen-enhanced cracking.Findings: Tested high-strength steels and its welded joints are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement when evaluated with the use of SSRT. The loss of plasticity is higher for welded joints then for the base metal. Tested steels and welded joints reveal high resistance to hydrogen degradation under constant load.Research limitations/implications: Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of crack initiation.Practical implications: Tested steel and its welded joints could be safely utilized in marine constructions under cathodic protection provided that overprotection does not take place. Tested steel could be safely utilized within elastic range of stress in hydrogen generating environments.Originality/value: Hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP model is more applicable mechanism of hydrogen degradation for tested steel and its welded joints under monotonically increasing load in seawater environment. Under the critical load and hydrogen concentration notched samples premature failed and hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity (HELP model

  18. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic–martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferritic–martensitic (F–M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F–M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N and T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N and T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 °C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  19. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Hoelzer, David T [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Klueh, Ronald L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  20. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep saline formations and oil and gas reservoirs often contain concentrated brine solutions of ionic strength greater than 1 (I > 1 M). Geochemical modeling, involving high ionic strength brines, is a challenge. In the original TOUGHREACT code (Xu et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2006), activity coefficients of charged aqueous species are computed using an extended Debye-Huckel (DH) equation and parameters derived by Helgeson et al. (1981). The DH model can deal with ionic strengths from dilute to moderately saline water (up to 6 molal for an NaCl-dominant solution). The equations implemented for the DH model are presented in Appendix A. During the course of the Yucca Mountain project, a Pitzer ion-interaction model was implemented into TOUGHREACT. This allows the application of this simulator to problems involving much more concentrated aqueous solutions, such as those involving geochemical processes in and around high-level nuclear waste repositories where fluid evaporation and/or boiling is expected to occur (Zhang et al., 2007). The Pitzer ion-interaction model, which we refer to as the Pitzer virial approach, and associated ion-interaction parameters have been applied successfully to study non-ideal concentrated aqueous solutions. The formulation of the Pitzer model is presented in Appendix B; detailed information can be founded in Zhang et al. (2007). For CO2 geological sequestration, the Pitzer ion-interaction model for highly concentrated brines was incorporated into TOUGHREACT/ECO2N, then was tested and compared with a previously implemented extended Debye-Hueckel (DH) ion activity model. The comparison was made through a batch geochemical system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation

  1. Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

  2. Modelling of tension stiffening for normal and high strength concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Bo; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    substantial contribution to the stiffness, a phenomenon which is generally referred to as tension stiffening. The present paper describes a new theory of tension stiffening. It is based on a simple physical model for pure tension, which works with three different stages of crack generation. In a simplified...... form the model is extended to apply to biaxial stress fields as well. To determine the biaxial stress field, the theorem of minimum complementary elastic energy is used. The theory has been compared with tests on rods, disks, and beams of both normal and high strength concrete, and very good results...

  3. Localized bending fatigue behavior of high-strength steel monostrands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan; Fischer, Gregor; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2012-01-01

    strain distribution in the strand and helps in identifying potential failure mechanisms along the strand and at the wedge location. Initial analysis of the deformations shows that the bending fatigue behavior of the monostrand may be controlled either by local bending deformations or by relative......In this paper, the localized bending fatigue behavior of pretensioned high strength steel monostrands is investigated. Furthermore, a new methodology using an optical photogrammetry system, which can quantify surface deformations on the strand is presented. The system allows measurement of the...

  4. Fatigue Life of High-Strength Steel Offshore Tubular Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Ingomar; Agerskov, Henning; Lopez Martinez, Luis

    1996-01-01

    In the present investigation, the fatigue life of tubular joints in offshore steel structures is studied. Two test series on full-scale tubular joints have been carried through. One series was on joints in conventional offshore structural steel, and the other series was on joints in high-strength......In the present investigation, the fatigue life of tubular joints in offshore steel structures is studied. Two test series on full-scale tubular joints have been carried through. One series was on joints in conventional offshore structural steel, and the other series was on joints in high...... from Ø 324-610 mm tubes, and the joints were loaded in in-plane bending. Both fatigue tests under constant amplitude loading and tests with a stochastic loading that is realistic in relation to offshore structures, are included in the investigation.A comparison between constant amplitude and variable...... amplitude fatigue test results showed shorter fatigue lives in variable amplitude loading than should be expected from the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula. Furthermore, the fatigue tests on high-strength steel tubular joints showed slightly longer fatigue lives than those obtained in...

  5. High Temperature Strength of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clauer, A.H.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    constant (except for the material with the lowest oxide content). The high temperature values of the modulus-corrected yield stresses are approximately two-thirds of the low temperature value. During high temperature creep, there is a definite indication of a threshold stress. This threshold stress is......The tensile flow stress of coarse-grained dispersion strengthened Al-Al2O3 materials were measured as a function of temperature (77–873 K) and volume fraction (0.19-0.92 vol.%) of aluminium oxide. For the same material, the creep strength was determined as a function of temperature in the range 573......–873 K. The modulus-corrected yield stress (0.01 offset) is found to be temperature independent at low temperature (195–472 K). Between 473 and 573 K, the yield stress starts to decrease with increasing temperature. At high temperatures (573–873 K), the modulus-corrected yield stress is approximately...

  6. High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools discusses the fundamentals and advances in high performance grinding processes, and provides a complete overview of newly-developing areas in the field. Topics covered are grinding tool formulation and structure, grinding wheel design and conditioning and applications using high performance grinding wheels. Also included are heat treatment strategies for grinding tools, using grinding tools for high speed applications, laser-based and diamond dressing techniques, high-efficiency deep grinding, VIPER grinding, and new grinding wheels.

  7. Advances in high voltage engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, A

    2005-01-01

    This book addresses the very latest research and development issues in high voltage technology and is intended as a reference source for researchers and students in the field, specifically covering developments throughout the past decade. This unique blend of expert authors and comprehensive subject coverage means that this book is ideally suited as a reference source for engineers and academics in the field for years to come.

  8. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  9. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, Mathias; Keuser, Manfred; Solomos, George; Peroni, Marco; Larcher, Martin; Esteban, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  10. Modeling of Compressive Strength for Self-Consolidating High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Safiuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling is a very useful method for the performance prediction of concrete. Most of the models available in literature are related to the compressive strength because it is a major mechanical property used in concrete design. Many attempts were taken to develop suitable mathematical models for the prediction of compressive strength of different concretes, but not for self-consolidating high-strength concrete (SCHSC containing palm oil fuel ash (POFA. The present study has used artificial neural networks (ANN to predict the compressive strength of SCHSC incorporating POFA. The ANN model has been developed and validated in this research using the mix proportioning and experimental strength data of 20 different SCHSC mixes. Seventy percent (70% of the data were used to carry out the training of the ANN model. The remaining 30% of the data were used for testing the model. The training of the ANN model was stopped when the root mean square error (RMSE and the percentage of good patterns was 0.001 and ≈100%, respectively. The predicted compressive strength values obtained from the trained ANN model were much closer to the experimental values of compressive strength. The coefficient of determination (R2 for the relationship between the predicted and experimental compressive strengths was 0.9486, which shows the higher degree of accuracy of the network pattern. Furthermore, the predicted compressive strength was found very close to the experimental compressive strength during the testing process of the ANN model. The absolute and percentage relative errors in the testing process were significantly low with a mean value of 1.74 MPa and 3.13%, respectively, which indicated that the compressive strength of SCHSC including POFA can be efficiently predicted by the ANN.

  11. Investigations on the impact strength of constructional high-strength Weldox steel at lowered temperature

    OpenAIRE

    W. Ozgowicz; E. Kalinowska-Ozgowicz

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents the results of investigations concerning the impact strength of thick steel plates at lowered temperature obtained by industrial smelting of micro-alloyed steel of the type S1100QL (Weldox 1100) and S1300QL (Weldox 1300) with a yield strength of 1100-1300 MPa.Design/methodology/approach: The main methods used for these researches were the impact test Charpy V at lower temperatures, and metallographic observations. The tested samples at lower temperature have also b...

  12. Research on Stress and Strength of High Strength Reinforced Concrete Drilling Shaft Lining in Thick Top Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Zhi-shu; CHANG Hua; RONG Chuan-xin

    2007-01-01

    High strength reinforced concrete drilling shaft linings have been adopted to solve the difficult problem of supporting coal drilling shafts penetrating through thick top soils. Through model experiments the stress and strength of such shaft linings are studied. The test results indicate that the load bearing capacity of the shaft lining is very high and that the main factors affecting the load bearing capacity are the concrete strength, the ratio of lining thickness to inner radius and the reinforcement ratio. Based on the limit equilibrium conditions and the strength theory of concrete under multi-axial compressive stressed state, a formula for calculating the load-bearing capacity of a high strength reinforced concrete shaft lining was obtained. Because the concrete in a shaft lining is in a multi-axial compressive stress state the compressive strength increases to a great extent compared to uni-axial loading. Based on experiment a formula for the gain factor in compressive strength was obtained: it can be used in the structural design of the shaft lining. These results have provided a basis for sound engineering practice when designing this kind of shaft lining structure.

  13. Advances in high temperature chemistry 1

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 1 describes the complexities and special and changing characteristics of high temperature chemistry. After providing a brief definition of high temperature chemistry, this nine-chapter book goes on describing the experiments and calculations of diatomic transition metal molecules, as well as the advances in applied wave mechanics that may contribute to an understanding of the bonding, structure, and spectra of the molecules of high temperature interest. The next chapter provides a summary of gaseous ternary compounds of the alkali metals used in

  14. Toughening mechanisms of a high-strength acicular ferrite steel heavy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi-Qiang; Bao, Yan-Ping; Xia, Zheng-Hai; Luo, Deng; Guo, Ai-Min; Wu, Kai-Ming

    2010-10-01

    An ultra-low carbon acicular ferrite steel heavy plate was obtained with an advanced thermo-mechanical control process-relaxed precipitation controlled transformation (TMCP-RPC) at Xiangtan Steel, Valin Group. The heavy plate has a tensile strength of approximately 600 MPa with a lower yield ratio. The impact toughness of the heavy plate achieves 280 J at -40°C. The fine-grained mixed microstructures of the heavy plate mainly consist of acicular ferrite, granular bainite, and polygonal ferrite. The high strength and excellent toughness of the heavy plate are attributed to the formation of acicular ferrite microstructure. The prevention of blocks of martensite/retained austenite (M/A) and the higher cleanness are also responsible for the superior toughness.

  15. Accelerated Creep Testing of High Strength Aramid Webbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Stnfield, Clarence E.; Valverde, Omar

    2012-01-01

    A series of preliminary accelerated creep tests were performed on four variants of 12K and 24K lbf rated Vectran webbing to help develop an accelerated creep test methodology and analysis capability for high strength aramid webbings. The variants included pristine, aged, folded and stitched samples. This class of webbings is used in the restraint layer of habitable, inflatable space structures, for which the lifetime properties are currently not well characterized. The Stepped Isothermal Method was used to accelerate the creep life of the webbings and a novel stereo photogrammetry system was used to measure the full-field strains. A custom MATLAB code is described, and used to reduce the strain data to produce master creep curves for the test samples. Initial results show good correlation between replicates; however, it is clear that a larger number of samples are needed to build confidence in the consistency of the results. It is noted that local fiber breaks affect the creep response in a similar manner to increasing the load, thus raising the creep rate and reducing the time to creep failure. The stitched webbings produced the highest variance between replicates, due to the combination of higher local stresses and thread-on-fiber damage. Large variability in the strength of the webbings is also shown to have an impact on the range of predicted creep life.

  16. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  17. Reliability of Strength Testing using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and Free Weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kirk L.; Loehr, James A.; Laughlin, Mitzi A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) was developed for use on the International Space Station as a countermeasure against muscle atrophy and decreased strength. This investigation examined the reliability of one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing using ARED and traditional free weight (FW) exercise. Methods: Six males (180.8 +/- 4.3 cm, 83.6 +/- 6.4 kg, 36 +/- 8 y, mean +/- SD) who had not engaged in resistive exercise for at least six months volunteered to participate in this project. Subjects completed four 1RM testing sessions each for FW and ARED (eight total sessions) using a balanced, randomized, crossover design. All testing using one device was completed before progressing to the other. During each session, 1RM was measured for the squat, heel raise, and deadlift exercises. Generalizability (G) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each exercise on each device and were used to predict the number of sessions needed to obtain a reliable 1RM measurement (G . 0.90). Interclass reliability coefficients and Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) also were calculated for the highest 1RM value (1RM9sub peak)) obtained for each exercise on each device to quantify 1RM relationships between devices.

  18. Effects of aluminum contents on high-temperature strength of 9Cr-ODS martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The 9Cr-oxide dispersion strengthened (9Cr-ODS) steel is a prospective material for fusion reactor blanket as well as fuel cladding tube of advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). In ODS steels, aluminum (Al) contamination is known to degrade the extent of oxide dispersion strengthening and provide considerable deterioration of high-temperature strength, while Al is often used for improvement of corrosion resistance. This study investigates the effects of Al addition on high temperature strength of the 9CrODS steel with a view to displaying the quantitative correlation between Al concentration and mechanical property and showing the threshold Al concentration to keep satisfactory strength. The 9Cr-ODS steel bars with different Al concentration from 0.03 to 0.15 wt% were produced by mechanical alloying and a subsequent hot-extrusion at 1,423 K, where Fe- 9wt%Cr-2W-0.2Ti-0.35Y2O3 was chosen for basic chemical composition. Elemental powders and yttria powders were used as raw material powders for the MA. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed at temperatures from R.T. to 1,073 K with load parallel to extrusion direction. Microstructures were characterized by field-emission type transmission electron microscope (TEM) and optical microscope. Aluminum addition over 0.05 wt% has apparently degraded the tensile strength. TEM observation indicated that size of nano-sized oxide particles coarsens with increasing Al concentration. Although Al is a strong ferrite-forming element, its addition has unexpectedly decreased the fraction of ferrite phase that is considered to improve high-temperature strength of the 9Cr-ODS steel. In the presentation, role of Al in mechanical property of the 9Cr-ODS steel will be discussed from the viewpoint of oxide particle distribution and type of matrix phase. (authors)

  19. Thermal Transport in High-Strength Polymethacrylimide (PMI) Foam Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Zheng, X. H.; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W.; Yang, S. Y.; Hu, A. J.; Wang, L. L.; Li, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal transport in high-strength polymethacrylimide (PMI) foam insulations is described, with special emphasis on the density and temperature effects on the thermal transport performance. Measurements of the effective thermal conductivity are performed by a freestanding sensor-based 3ω method. A linear relationship between the density and the effective thermal conductivity is observed. Based on the analysis of the foam insulation morphological structures and the corresponding geometrical cell model, the quantitative contribution of the solid conductivity and the gas conductivity as well as the radiative conductivity to the total effective thermal conductivity as a function of the density and temperature is calculated. The agreement between the curves of the results from the developed model and experimental data indicate the model can be used for PMI foam insulating performance optimization.

  20. Corrosion fatigue behavior of high strength brass in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S.; Kassem, M.A.; Ramadan, R.M.; El-Zeky, M.A. [Suez Canal Univ., Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (Egypt)

    2000-07-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of British Standard high strength brass, CZ 127 has been studied in various environments, 3.5%NaC1 solution and 3.5%NaC1 containing 1000ppm ammonia by applying the reverse bending technique, strain-controlled cyclic, at 67 cycles/min. Characteristics of the produced alloy were studied using differential thermal analysis with applying its results in heat treating of the alloy; metallographic examinations; hardness measurements; X-ray; and electrochemical behavior of the unstressed alloy. CZ 127 was fatigued at three different conditions, solution treated, peak aged, and over aged at a fixed strain amplitude, 0.03 5. Solution treated alloy gave the best fatigue properties in all environments tested among the other materials. Results of the alloy studied were compared with that obtained of 70/30 {alpha}-brass. Fracture surface of the fatigued alloy was examined using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX. (author)

  1. Low velocity impact behaviour of ultra high strength concrete panels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smitha Gopinath; R Ayashwarya; V Ramesh Kumar; Prabhat Ranjan Prem; A Rama Chandra Murthy; C K Madheswaran; R Nagesh Iyer

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation carried out on Ultra High Strength Concrete (UHSC) panels subjected to low velocity projectile impact to assess impact resistance. UHSC panel of size 350 × 350 mm and thickness 15 mm is studied under drop weight impact loading for three different pre-determined drop heights ranging from 100 mm to 300 mm. The response of UHSC panel in terms of acceleration vs time is obtained experimentally. Numerical model has been developed to simulate the impact behaviour of UHSC panel. The Brittle cracking model is used to simulate the behaviour of UHSC panel under impact loading and to perform parametric studies by varying the volume fraction of steel fibres.

  2. Fatigue crack Behaviour in a High Strength Tool Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Carstensen, Jesper V.; Brøndsted, Povl;

    2002-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on fatigue crack initiation and crack growth of a hardened and tempered high speed steel was investigated. The evolution of fatigue cracks was followed in four point bending at room temperature. It was found that a carbide damage zone exists above a threshold load...... value of maximally 80% of the yield strength of the steel. The size of this carbide damage zone increases with increasing load amplitude, and the zone is apparently associated with crack nucleation. On fatigue crack propagation plastic deformation of the matrix occurs in a radius of approximately 4...... microns in front of the fatigue crack tip, which is comparable with the relevant mean free carbide spacing....

  3. High-energy Born collision strengths for optically forbidden transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collision strengths for optically forbidden transitions in positive ions excited by electron impact tend to finite limits as the energy of the colliding electron becomes infinitely great. This statement applies to theoretical data obtained by means of approximations which ignore relativistic effects. The high-energy limiting values are given by the Born approximation, which Bethe showed can be reduced to a closed expression requiring integration over momentum transfer and the radial distance of the atomic orbital. In the appendix we describe an accurate numerical procedure for evaluating this double integral and also show how to perform the Racah algebra which arises when mixed configurations are used to describe the target. We make applications to several isoelectronic sequences taking configuration interaction into account. (author)

  4. Effect of heat treatment on high strength aluminium silicon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the mechanical properties of domestically manufactured motor cycle pistons, the modification of structure by heat treatment has been studied. Pistons were subjected to different heat treatment cycles and optimum parameters were determined. Optical microscopic techniques and mechanical testing have been employed to study the effect of heat treatment o the microstructure and mechanical properties. A comparison of the properties of the domestically manufactured and imported pistons has also been made. Aluminum Silicon based alloys have been widely used for the production of automobile pistons due to their promising features like low coefficient of thermal expansion, high strength and favorable tribological characteristics. These properties can be further modified by alloying and heat treatment. (author)

  5. Low cycle fatigue behavior of high strength gun steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoqiu Wang; Han Dong; Qi Wang; Changgang Fan

    2004-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of two high strength steels, with nominal chemical compositions (mass fraction, %)of 0.40C-1.5Cr-3Ni-0.4Mo-0.2V (PCrNi3MoV) and 0.25C-3Cr-3Mo-0.8Ni-0.1Nb (25Cr3Mo3NiNb), was investigated by using the smooth bar specimens subjected to strained-controlled push-pull loading. It is found that both steels show cyclic softening, but 25Cr3Mo3NiNb steel has a lower tendency to cyclic softening. 25Cr3Mo3NiNb steel has higher fatigue ductility, and its transition fatigue life is almost three times that of PCrNi3MoV. 25Cr3Mo3NiNb steel also shows higher LCF life either at a given total strain amplitude above 0.5% or at any given plastic strain amplitude, despite its lower monotonic tensile strength than that of PCrNi3MoV.It also means that 25Cr3Mo3NiNb steel can endure higher total strain amplitude and plastic strain amplitude at a given number of reversals to failure within 104. 25Cr3Mo3NiNb steel is expected to be a good gun steel with high LCF properties because only several thousand firings are required for gun barrel in most cases.

  6. Design of a low-alloy high-strength and high-toughness martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-jun; Ren, Xue-ping; Yang, Wen-chao; Zang, Yue

    2013-08-01

    To develop a high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel with high strength and high toughness, a series of martensitic steels were studied through alloying with various elements and thermodynamic simulation. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the designed steel were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing and Charpy impact test. The results show that cementite exists between 500°C and 700°C, M7C3 exits below 720°C, and they are much lower than the austenitizing temperature of the designed steel. Furthermore, the Ti(C,N) precipitate exists until 1280°C, which refines the microstructure and increases the strength and toughness. The optimal alloying components are 0.19% C, 1.19% Si, 2.83% Mn, 1.24% Ni, and 0.049% Ti; the tensile strength and the V notch impact toughness of the designed steel are more than 1500 MPa and 100 J, respectively.

  7. Strength Behavior of High Strength R/C Columns under Biaxial Bending-Shear and Varying Axial Load

    OpenAIRE

    MIZOGUCHI, Mitsuo; Arakawa, Takashi; ARAI, Yasuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Twelve short square R/C columns using high-strength concrete were tested to examine the effects of biaxial bending-shear force and varying axial load on the shear and flexural strength behavior. The columns were cyclically deflected either along their transverse principal axis to produce uniaxial bending-shear or along their diagonal to produce biaxial bending-shear. For columns failing in flexure, the experimental results were found to be in close agreement with the computed values given by ...

  8. Fracture strength of glass chips for high-pressure microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin; Hjort, Klas; Klintberg, Lena

    2016-09-01

    High-pressure microfluidics exposes new areas in chemistry. In this paper, the reliability of transparent borosilicate glass chips is investigated. Two designs of circular cavities are used for fracture strength tests, either 1.6 mm wide with rounded corners to the fluid inlets, or 2.0 mm wide with sharp inlet corners. Two kinds of tests are done, either short-term, e.g. pressurization to fracture at room temperature, or long-term, with fracture at constant pressurization for up to one week, in the temperature region 11–125 °C. The speed of crack fronts is measured using a high-speed camera. Results show fracture stresses in the range of 129 and 254 MPa for short-term measurements. Long-term measurements conclude the presences of a temperature and stress dependent delayed fracture. For a reliability of one week at 11–38 °C, a pressure limit is found at the lower end of the short-term measurements, or 15% lower than the average. At 80 °C, this pressure limit is 45% lower. Crack speeds are measured to be 10‑5 m s‑1 during short-term fracture. These measurements are comparable with estimations based on slow crack growth and show that the growth affects the reliability of glass chips. This effect is strongly affected by high temperatures, thus lowers the operating window of high-pressure glass microfluidic devices.

  9. Behaviour of High Strength Steel Endplate Connections in Fire and after Fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiang, X.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to reveal more information and understanding on behaviour and failure mechanisms of high strength steel endplate connections (combining high strength steel endplates with either mild steel or high strength steel beams and columns in endplate connections) in fire and after

  10. Rational Mix Design Approach for High Strength Concrete Using Sand with very High Fineness Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan W. Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Production of concrete is always deal with inconsistency. Sources of variation like materials from different geographical basis, mix design method, fineness of aggregates and so on will attribute to different level of achievement of the concrete. Even though researcher had verified that higher fineness modulus of sand would yield better performance for the concrete, but so far there have been scarce amount of paper reported on the mix design method adopting high fineness modulus of sand. Approach: This study discussed the revolution of design mix proportion towards achieving high strength with considerably cement content using local availably constituent materials. A total of 15 mixes was casted till to the high strength at more than 65 MPa was achieved. The compressive strength and workability of each mixes were presented. The method of mixture proportioning was begun with British Department Of Environment (DOE method. Then, rational design method of achieving high strength concrete was developed. Results: At the end of experimental program, it was found that DOE method was not suitable to apply in designing high strength concrete. 12% was the optimum level of replacement of the total binder content by silica fume. Further increase of total binder content without adjustment to the amount of aggregate content has decreased the strength achievement of the concrete. Very coarse fine aggregate with fineness modulus 3.98 increased the compressive strength of the concrete in large extent. The increased of superplasticiser from 2.0% to 2.5% has decreased the compressive strength of the concrete. Conclusion: The rational mix design approach was developed. A Grade 70 concrete can be produced with moderate level of cement content by this approach.

  11. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of a high strength steel X80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility of a high strength steel grade (X80). The respective implication of different hydrogen populations, i.e. adsorbed, dissolved in interstitial sites, trapped on dislocations and/or microstructural elements on the associated embrittlement mechanisms has been addressed through mechanical testing in high pressure of hydrogen gas at room temperature. Tensile tests at various strain rates and hydrogen pressures have been carried out. Moreover, changes of gas (hydrogen or nitrogen) during loading have been imposed in order to get critical experiments able to discriminate among the potential hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms already proposed in the literature. The results of these tests have shown that hydrogen induces several kind of damages including de-cohesion along ferrite/pearlite interfaces and microcracks initiations on the specimens external surface. It is shown that de-cohesion is not critical under the loading paths used in the present study. On the contrary, it appears that the external microcracks initiation, followed by a quasi-cleavage fracture, is responsible for the premature failure of the material in high pressure of hydrogen gas. These experimental results have been further discussed by modeling hydrogen diffusion in order to identify hydrogen populations (adsorbed, diffusible or trapped) involved in HE. It was then demonstrated that adsorbed and near surface diffusible hydrogen are mainly responsible for embrittlement. (authors)

  12. Anomalous softening of yield strength in tantalum at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Qiumin, E-mail: j-qm@163.com; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Ji-an; Bi, Yan; Liu, Lei; Liu, Shenggang; Zhang, Yi; Geng, Huayun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-02-07

    The pressure dependence of the yield strength of tantalum was investigated experimentally up to 101 GPa at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell. A yield strength softening is observed between 52 and 84 GPa, whereas a normal trend is observed below 52 GPa and above 84 GPa. The onset pressure of the softening is in agreement with previous results obtained by the pressure gradient method and shock wave experiments. This unusual strength softening in tantalum is not related with structural transformation, preferred orientation, or material damage. Our measurements indicate that microscopic deviatoric strain is the major reason for the observed strength softening in tantalum.

  13. Effects of high and low volume of strength training on muscle strength, muscle volume and lipid profile in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Silva Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lipid profile are considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, especially in postmenopausal woman who have been associated with age-related loss of muscle mass. The beneficial role of aerobic exercise in the prevention of CVD has been well documented. However, the effect of strength training has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of lipoprotein levels after 12 weeks of different volumes of strength training and its correlation with strength and muscle volume in postmenopausal women. The participants were randomized into three groups: low volume (LVST; n = 12, 1 set and high volume of strength training (HVST; n = 11, 3 sets, or control group (n = 12. Training groups performed 12 weeks of supervised strength exercises, 15 maximum repetitions, five times a week, 20 minutes for LVST and 40 minutes for HVST for each training session. Measurements included body composition, strength and muscle volume, as well as blood analysis (glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein pre- and post-training. The HVST and LVST improved the one-repetition maximum knee extension strength (p < 0.001, maximal dynamic strength (p < 0.001, and muscle volume (p = 0.048. Post-training triglyceride was lower in HVST when compared to LVST and the control group (p = 0.047. Even though they present the same neuromuscular and morphological adaptations in postmenopausal women, the HVST is more effective than LVST in improving the lipid profile of postmenopausal woman, and can be considered as an ideal program of intervention to reverse changes in lipid metabolism commonly found in this group.

  14. Technical Note: Filler and superplasticizer usage on high strength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sümer, M.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of filler (rock-dust usage on high strength concrete have been investigated through lab experiments and some results have been obtained. The experiments involved three series of concrete with different cement proportions of 375 kg/m3, 400 kg/m3, and 425 kg/m3. For each series of concrete, three different groups of samples have been prepared, the first one being the reference concrete which contained 0% chemical admixture and 0% filler, the second one contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 0% filler and finally the last group contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 5% filler to the weight of cement used. The chemical admixture used was a type of Super plasticizer with a brand name of “DARACEM 190”, and the cement used was Ordinary Portland Cement of target compressive strength 42.5 N/mm2, obtained from Nuh Cement Plant. For each batch, Slump Tests and Unit Weight Tests were performed. For each stage and group, two 15 cm cubic samples have been tested for Compressive Strength after being cured in water at 20 ± 2 °C for ages of 3 days, 7 days, 28 and 60 days. The total number of samples was 72. As a result, filler usage was found to reduce the porosity of Concrete, increase the Unit Weight of Concrete, increase the need for water and improve the Compressive Strength Properties of Concrete.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la utilización de un “filler” (polvo mineral en el comportamiento del hormigón de altas prestaciones. Para ello, se realizan ensayos de laboratorio en los que se emplean tres series de hormigón, cada una con una dosificación de cemento distinta, de 375, 400 y 425 kg/m3. Se preparan tres grupos de probetas de cada serie, el primero o de referencia con 0% de aditivo químico y 0% de “filler”, el segundo con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y 0% de “filler” y el tercero con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y un 5% de “filler” en peso del cemento. Como aditivo se

  15. Effects of GFF Bands on Normal and High Strength Concrete Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    J. Jayaprakash; Abdul Aziz Abdul Samad; Noridah Mohamad; Choong, K.K.; M.J. Megat Azmi; H.A.B. Badorul

    2010-01-01

    This paper exemplifies the effects of externally confined Glass Fibre Fabric (GFF) bands on normal and high strength concrete cylinders. Twelve normal and high strength concrete cylinders were cast and tested in the laboratory environment under axial compression to failure. The experimental results show that the degree of confinement of discrete GFF confined high strength concrete cylinders was significantly better than normal strength concrete cylinders with GFF bands, however...

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE APPLICATION OF HIGH STRENGTH FIBER REINFORCED MORTAR TO PRESTRESSED CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Michihiro; Mori, Takuya; Ohyama, Hiroaki; Seki, Hiroshi

    In order to study the application of high strength fiber reinforced mortar which has design compressive strength 120N/mm2 to prestressed concrete structures, the authors carried out material tests, bending tests and shear tests of prestressed concrete beam specimens. From the material tests, we obtained material properties for the design of prestressed concrete structures such as compressive strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus, coefficient of creep, dry shrinkage and so on. The results of the bending tests and the shear tests of prestressed concrete beam specimen shows that experimental flexural strength and shear strength of prestressed concrete beam using high strength fiber reinforced mortar exceeds strength calculated by traditional design method. It is confirmed that high strength fiber reinforced mortar can be applied to prestressed concrete structures.

  17. High-strength nanocellulose-talc hybrid barrier films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Henrikki; Ezekiel, Ngesa; Sliz, Rafal; Ohenoja, Katja; Sirviö, Juho Antti; Berglund, Lars; Hormi, Osmo; Niinimäki, Jouko

    2013-12-26

    Hybrid organic-inorganic films mimicking natural nacre-like composite structures were fabricated from cellulose nanofibers obtained from sequential periodate-chlorite oxidation treatment and talc platelets, using a simple vacuum-filtration method. As a pretreatment, commercial talc aggregates were individualized into well-dispersed talc platelets using a wet stirred media mill with high-shear conditions to promote the homogeneity and mechanical characteristics of hybrids. The nanofiber-talc hybrids, which had talc contents from 1 to 50 wt %, were all flexible in bending, and possessed tensile strength and Young's modulus values up to 211 ± 3 MPa and 12 ± 1 GPa, respectively, the values being remarkably higher than those reported previously for nanofibrillated cellulose-talc films. Because of the lamellar and well-organized structure of hybrids in which the talc platelets were evenly embedded, they possessed a small pore size and good oxygen barrier properties, as indicated by the preliminary results. The talc platelets decreased the moisture adsorption of highly talc-loaded hybrids, although they still exhibited hydrophilic surface characteristics in terms of contact angles. PMID:24215630

  18. Microstructure of high strength niobium-containing pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)]. E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu; Hartmann, J. [Mittal Steel, Indiana Harbor Works, 3001 Dickey Road, East Chicago, IN 46312 (United States); Jansto, S.G. [Reference Metals, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The paper describes the microstructural constituents in a industrially processed Nb-microalloyed pipeline steel having yield strength of {approx}620 MPa. The microstructure of base, heat affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal of the fabricated steel pipe was examined by optical and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure of thermomechanically processed pipeline steel primarily consisted of non-equiaxed ferrite of mixed morphologies with small fraction of degenerated pearlite. The microstructure contained high dislocation density, sub-boundaries and dislocation substructures. The HAZ was characterized by a combination of fine and coarse grained polygonal ferrite structure with high density of dislocations and fine cementite particles. In the weld metal, the constituents of complex ferrite were low temperature transformation products formed during continuous cooling such as quasi-polygonal or massive ferrite, acicular ferrite, bainitic ferrite and dispersion of coarse and fine cementite particles in the ferrite matrix. The precipitates in the investigated pipeline steel were of duplex type containing either Nb and Ti or Ti and Mo, even though the steel contained low concentration of titanium. Precipitates of different morphology and size range were observed and include rectangular ({approx}100-130 nm), cuboidal/spherical ({approx}20-100 nm), fine ({approx}10-20 nm) and very fine (<10 nm). They were MC type of carbides.

  19. Microstructure of high strength niobium-containing pipeline steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the microstructural constituents in a industrially processed Nb-microalloyed pipeline steel having yield strength of ∼620 MPa. The microstructure of base, heat affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal of the fabricated steel pipe was examined by optical and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure of thermomechanically processed pipeline steel primarily consisted of non-equiaxed ferrite of mixed morphologies with small fraction of degenerated pearlite. The microstructure contained high dislocation density, sub-boundaries and dislocation substructures. The HAZ was characterized by a combination of fine and coarse grained polygonal ferrite structure with high density of dislocations and fine cementite particles. In the weld metal, the constituents of complex ferrite were low temperature transformation products formed during continuous cooling such as quasi-polygonal or massive ferrite, acicular ferrite, bainitic ferrite and dispersion of coarse and fine cementite particles in the ferrite matrix. The precipitates in the investigated pipeline steel were of duplex type containing either Nb and Ti or Ti and Mo, even though the steel contained low concentration of titanium. Precipitates of different morphology and size range were observed and include rectangular (∼100-130 nm), cuboidal/spherical (∼20-100 nm), fine (∼10-20 nm) and very fine (<10 nm). They were MC type of carbides

  20. Weldability of high strength aluminium-scandium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia possesses a significant percentage of the world reserves of the ores required for the production of light alloys such as aluminium, magnesium and titanium. However, most of these minerals deposits are exported for processing, losing the potential of value adding benefits. Scandium has been known for some time to possess excellent grain refining properties when alloyed with aluminium. Although this adds considerable benefits to the mechanical properties of these alloys, it has not been fully exploited due to the high cost of producing the scandium metal. Deposits of scandium containing ore have recently been identified in Australia that are far more accessible than other deposits throughout the world. CSIRO Manufacturing Science and Technology had initiated a research project to investigate the effect of scandium and other grain refining additions on the properties of selected aluminium alloys in order to develop the market and maximise the potential benefits from Australian resources. The major objective of the project is to develop high strength aluminum alloys that exhibit good processing characteristics, particularly good weldability

  1. High Strength Lightweight Nanocomposite from Domestic Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masturi, Swardhani, Anggi Puspita; Sustini, Euis; Bukit, Minsyahril; Mora, Khairurrijal, Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2010-10-01

    The issue of waste problems needs innovative efforts to solve. One of them is solid waste utilization as nanocomposite using polyurethane (PU) polymer as matrix. Beside using solid waste as filler, nanosilica is also added to improve the material strength of composite-produced. These materials were mixed by simple mixing with variative compositions, and then hot-pressed at 30 MPa and 100° C for 30 minutes. From compressive strength test, it was found that composite with composition 2:8 of PU and solid waste has optimum compressive strength, i.e. 160 MPa. Into this optimum composition, nanosilica then is added to improve the compressive strength and found that at composition 1:40:160 of nanosilica, PU and solid waste, the composite has optimum compressive strength 200 MPa, or increases 25% of that without nanosilica. The composite-produced is also lightweight material with the density is 0.69 g/cm.

  2. Residual stresses in high strengths steel tubes for large scale infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a green star rating system was introduced in Australia to promote sustainability in the construction industry (Green Building Council of Australia, 2009). Steel and concrete are the two most widely used construction materials. Sustainability in civil engineering construction can be achieved by using high strength steels as well as high strength concrete. High strength quenched and tempered (QT) and Very High Strength Steels (VHS) and high strength concrete with reduced amounts of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) can be adopted. This project will therefore consider the behaviour of concrete filled steel columns using higher strength steels with higher strength concrete incorporating low percentages of OPQ. The characterisation of residual stresses in high strength steel is important in understanding the buckling strength of concrete filled columns. Previous research on local and post-local buckling has been addressed for mild structural steel by Uy (2000) and Uy (2001) and these approaches will be augmented by using high strength steel and high strength concrete. In this paper preliminary measurements of residual stresses on the Kowari strain scanner at ANSTO, within the high strength steel joints will be discussed and future research plans will be presented.

  3. Subcritical crack growth and long-term strength in rock and high-strength and ultra low-permeability concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-strength and ultra low-permeability concrete (HSULPC) is a strong candidate for a radioactive waste package containing transuranic radionuclides (TRU waste) for geological disposal. The information and knowledge of the time-dependent fracturing of HSULPC and surrounding rock mass are essential to assess the long-term stability of such underground repositories. Here we measured crack velocity in andesite and HSULPC both in air and water to examine slow crack growth (subcritical crack growth) by Double-Torsion method. In air, the crack velocity in andesite increased when the temperature increased. On the other hand, the temperature had little effect on the crack velocity in HSULPC in air. In water, the crack velocity increased when the temperature was higher for both andesite and HSULPC. By using the experimental results of subcritical crack growth, the long-term strength was estimated based on the model of a single crack subjected to tension in an infinite plate. It was shown that the long-term strength of HSULPC was higher than that of andesite. When the temperature increased, the long-term strength of andesite both in air and water and that of HSULPC in water decreased. The long-term strength in water was smaller than that in air for both materials. It is concluded that water remarkably affects subcritical crack growth and the long-term strength in these materials. (author)

  4. RESEARCH ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF NEWLY-DEVELOPED HIGH STRENGTH AND HIGH ELONGATION STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Chen; X. Chen; A.M. Guo; D.X. Luo; B.F. Xu; Z.X. Yuan; P.H. Li; S.K. Pu; S.B. Zhou

    2003-01-01

    The different chemical composition of silicon and manganese as well as different re-tained austenite fraction ranged from 4% to 10% of the high strength and high elon-gation steels were studied in the paper. The dislocations and carbon concentrationin retained austenite were observed by a transmission electron microscope and anelectric probe analyzer, respectively. The experimental results showed that silicon andmanganese are two fundamental alloying elements to stabilize austenite effectively butretaining austenite in different mechanisms. Meanwhile, the cooling processing playedan important role in controlling the fraction of retained austenite of the hot-rolledhigh strength and high plasticity steels.

  5. High-strength alloy with resistance to hydrogen-environment embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    Alloy is precipitation-hardened, high-strength, and low-thermal-expansion materials. It is iron-based and contains nickel and chromium at lower levels than high-strength alloys. It is readily welded and brazed and has good oxidation resistance. Tests indicated there was no reduction of notched or smooth strength.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ORGANIC-MINERAL MODIFIERS TO OBTAIN HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE WITH SHRINKAGE COMPENSATED

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen The Vinh The Vinh; Nguyen Dinh Trinh Dinh Trinh; Bazhenov Yuri Mihajlovich

    2012-01-01

    The results of the development of organic-mineral modifiers to the increasing component for high-strength concrete. The effect of modifiers designed for mobility, strength and shrinkage of cement paste.

  7. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies for high resolution HLA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereb, Nezih; Kim, Hwa Ran; Ryu, Jaejun; Yang, Soo Young

    2015-12-01

    This communication describes our experience in large-scale G group-level high resolution HLA typing using three different DNA sequencing platforms - ABI 3730 xl, Illumina MiSeq and PacBio RS II. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, so-called next generation sequencing (NGS), have brought breakthroughs in deciphering the genetic information in all living species at a large scale and at an affordable level. The NGS DNA indexing system allows sequencing multiple genes for large number of individuals in a single run. Our laboratory has adopted and used these technologies for HLA molecular testing services. We found that each sequencing technology has its own strengths and weaknesses, and their sequencing performances complement each other. HLA genes are highly complex and genotyping them is quite challenging. Using these three sequencing platforms, we were able to meet all requirements for G group-level high resolution and high volume HLA typing. PMID:26423536

  8. High strength nitrogen removal from nightsoil and piggery wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, E; Eum, Y; Gil, K I; Oa, S W

    2004-01-01

    Nightsoil and piggery wastes generally present high strength organics and nitrogen. This study evaluated the nitrogen removal characteristics with the existing and modified nightsoil and piggery waste treatment plants. The existing conventional plants showed 20 to 40% nitrogen removal, but the modification with SBR or MLE process could remove effectively both nitrogen and organics with the minimum COD/TN and alkalinity/TN ratios of 6 and 3.6, respectively. Nitrite nitrification and denitrification rates obtainable at higher nitrogen loads were faster than the rates of nitrate nitrification and denitrification resulting in less reactor volume requirement. However, the higher nitrogen loads increased the organic loads resulting in the reactor temperature inhibiting nitrification. Thus, a combined treatment with anaerobic digestion with the adjustment of influent bypass rates was proposed to reduce the reactor temperature and the external carbon requirement. The biological treatment could discharge about 1,100 mg/L soluble COD and 50 mg/L soluble nitrogen, respectively. PMID:15137412

  9. Anomolous Fatigue Crack Growth Phenomena in High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of a fatigue crack through a material is the result of a complex interaction between the applied loading, component geometry, three-dimensional constraint, load history, environment, material microstructure and several other factors. Previous studies have developed experimental and computational methods to relate the fatigue crack growth rate to many of the above conditions, with the intent of discovering some fundamental material response, i.e. crack growth rate as a function of something. Currently, the technical community uses the stress intensity factor solution as a simplistic means to relate fatigue crack growth rate to loading, geometry and all other variables. The stress intensity factor solution is a very simple linear-elastic representation of the continuum mechanics portion of crack growth. In this paper, the authors present fatigue crack growth rate data for two different high strength steel alloys generated using standard methods. The steels exhibit behaviour that appears unexplainable, compared to an aluminium alloy presented as a baseline for comparison, using the stress intensity factor solution.

  10. A new generation of ultra high strength steel pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years an increased demand for natural gas can be observed. Ultra high-strength pipelines with higher operating pressures and/or reduced wall thickness are a means to reduce transmission costs. Motivated by reduced investment costs (overcharge a few billion of dollars), tend towards the development of a new grade of pipeline steel with microalloying element for example Nb, that potentially lowers the total cost of long-distance gas pipelines by 5 - 15%. New long distance pipelines have budgets in excess of several billion dollars. This paper describes mechanical properties of new generation of pipelines steel with higher content of niobium and the influence the welding thermal cycles on the microstructure and brittle fracture resistance. The resistance to cold cracking has also been determined. It was found that the new steel has close properties to API X70 grade steels, but is cheaper in manufacturing and installation. The steel has been covered by the amended EN 10028-5 standard and proper modifications will also be made in other European standards. (author)

  11. Dynamic ductile tearing in high strength pipeline steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivalin, F.; Iung, T.; Di Fant, M. [IRSID, Maizieres-les-Metz (France); Pineau, A. [Centre des Materiaux P.M. Fourt, Evry (France)

    1996-12-31

    The study of rapid ductile crack propagation and crack arrest is a central point if one wants to reach a higher safety level in pipelines. Correlations between Charpy tests and full scale burst tests proved to be unsuccessful in predicting pipe burst for recent high strength steels. This paper presents an experiment which allows to test large SENT specimens under dynamic loading, and to characterize steel resistance against rapid ductile crack propagation by a classical energetic parameter, called the crack propagation energy, R, proposed by Turner. The R parameter proved to be characteristic of the rapid crack propagation in the material, for a given specimen and loading configuration. Failure of the specimen under dynamic conditions occurs by shearing fracture which is the same as in a full scale burst test. An example is given for an X65 ferritic-pearlitic steel loaded under static and dynamic conditions. A fracture mode transition is shown following the loading rate. From a metallurgical point of view, shearing fracture occurs by nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids, as for classical ductile fracture.

  12. High-strength concrete and the design of power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the literature, the design of high-strength concrete structures and the suitability of high-strength concrete for the power plant structures have been studied. Concerning the behavior of structures, a basic difference between the high-strength concrete and the traditional one is that the ductility of the high-strength concrete is smaller. In the design, the non-linear stress-strain relationship of the high-strength concrete has to be taken into account. The use of the high-strength concrete is economical if the strength of the material can be utilized. In the long term, the good durability and wear resistance of the high-strength concrete increases the economy of the material. Because of the low permeability of the high-strength concrete, it is a potential material in the safety-related structures of nuclear power plants. The study discovered no particular power plant structure which would always be economical to design of high-strength concrete. However, the high-strength concrete was found to be a competitive material in general

  13. Low-noise, high-strength, spiral-bevel gears for helicopter transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Henry, Zachary S.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements in spiral-bevel gear design were investigated to support the Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program. Program objectives were to reduce weight by 25 percent, reduce noise by 10 dB, and increase life to 5000 hr mean-time-between-removal. To help meet these goals, advanced-design spiral-bevel gears were tested in an OH-58D helicopter transmission using the NASA 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Three different gear designs tested included: (1) the current design of the OH-58D transmission except gear material X-53 instead of AISI 9310; (2) a higher-strength design the same as the current but with a full fillet radius to reduce gear tooth bending stress (and thus, weight); and (3) a lower-noise design the same as the high-strength but with modified tooth geometry to reduce transmission error and noise. Noise, vibration, and tooth strain tests were performed and significant gear stress and noise reductions were achieved.

  14. Performance of High Strength POFA Concrete in Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ismail

    2010-03-01

    disposing palm oil fuel ash, a by-product of palm oil mill since many years ago. The discovery made by researchers of Universiti Teknologi Malaysia last century in revealing the potential of this finely ground waste as a partial cement replacement in normal concrete has stem efforts towards studying the possibility of using it in high strength concrete production. This paper illustrates the durability aspect of high strength concrete produced using POFA of different fineness when exposed to acidic environment. Two POFA concrete mixes with different fineness termed (POFA 45 and POFA 10 at 20% replacement level by weight of cement and an OPC concrete mix functioning as control specimen termed Po was considered in this study. All the specimens were subjected to water curing for 28 days before immersed in the hydrochloric solution having pH 2 for 1800 hours. The progressive deterioration was evaluated through mass changing of the specimens, visual inspection and relative compressive strength determinations. Conclusively, the study found that increase in the POFA fineness enhances the resistance of high strength POFA concrete towards acid attack.

  15. Ultrafine Structure and High Strength in Cold-Rolled Martensite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Morito, S.; Hansen, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    testing. At low to medium strains, lath martensite transforms into a cell block structure composed of cell block boundaries and cell boundaries with only a negligible change in strength. At medium to large strains, cell block structures in all samples refine with increasing strain and the hardening rate...... is constant (stage IV). A strong effect of the initial structure is observed on both the structural refinement and the strength increase. This effect is largest in lath martensite and smallest in unalloyed ferrite. No saturation in structural refinement and strength is observed. The discussion covers...... the transformation of lath martensite into a cell block structure at low to medium strains where the driving force is suggested to be a decrease in the dislocation line energy. Medium to large strain-hardening mechanisms are discussed together with structure-strength relationships assuming additive...

  16. Scaling Exponent and Fluctuation Strength in High Energy Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lian Shou Liu; Yuan Fang Wei; Lianshou, Liu; Jinghua, Fu; Yuanfang, Wu

    1998-01-01

    The information on dynamical fluctuations that can be extracted from the anomalous scaling observed recently in hadron-hadron collision experiments is discussed in some detail. A parameter ``effective fluctuation strength'' is proposed to estimate the strength of dynamical fluctuations. The method for extracting its value from the experimentally observed quantities is given. Some examples for the application of this method to real experimental data are presented.

  17. Process for the preparation of a high freeness beaten low lignin pulp with high strength

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for the preparation of a high freeness beaten low lignin pulp with a high strength. More particularly, the present invention relates to a process for the preparation of a high freeness beaten low lignin pulp that is produced from a pulp with a low lignin content, wherein said pulp with a low lignin content is subjected to a beating process under relatively high compression forces and relatively low shear forces

  18. Advanced high performance solid wall blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  19. Strength of plasma sprayed turbine-blade coatings using an advanced spallation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an application of the spall technique for studying the strength, homogeneity, and adhesion of plasma sprayed coatings on a metal substrate. We used a flyer plate impact and a pulsed high-power proton beam to generate short, intense pressure pulses. To study adhesion it is necessary to provide a spall fracture at the interface. This was realized due to the bell-shaped power profile in the ion beam cross section. As a result, the spall fracture inside the samples occurred in tests with the ion beam, at different distances from the surface, including the interface between the coating and the substrate. Using a line-imaging laser-Doppler velocimeter, we were able to measure the free surface velocity histories for a range of load parameters in each experiment. The results of the measurements demonstrate the great influence of annealing on the homogeneity and strength of the coating and a lesser influence of the substrate temperature at coating on the adhesion. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  20. Effects of Fe203 Nanoparticles on Water Permeability and Strength Assessments of High Strength Self-Compacting Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Khoshakhlagh; All Nazar; Gholarnreza Khala

    2012-01-01

    In this work, compressive, flexural and split tensile strength together with coefficient of water absorption of high performance self-compacting concrete containing different amount of Fe2Os nanoparticles have been investigated. The strength and the water permeability of the specimens have been improved by adding Fe2Os nanoparticles in the cement paste up to 4.0 wt%. Fe203 nanoparticle as a foreign nucleation site could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH)2 amount especially at the early age of hydration and hence increase the strength of the specimens. In addition, Fe203 nanoparticles are able to act as nanofillers and recover the pore structure of the specimens by decreasing harmful pores to improve the water permeability. Several empirical relations have been presented to predict the flexural and the split tensile strength of the specimens by means of the corresponding compressive strength at a certain age of curing. Accelerated peak appearance in conduction calorimetry tests, more weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis and more rapid appearance of peaks related to hydrated products in X-ray diffraction results indicate that Fe203 nanoparticles up to 4 wt% could improve the mechanical and the physical properties of the specimens.

  1. High-cycle Fatigue Fracture Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijun HUI; Yihong NIE; Han DONG; Yuqing WENG; Chunxu WANG

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue fracture behavior of four ultrahigh strength steels with different melting processes and therefore different inclusion sizes were studied by using a rotating bar two-point bending fatigue machine in the high-cycle regime up to 107 cycles of loading. The fracture surfaces were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). It was found that the size of inclusion has significant effect on the fatigue behavior.For AISI 4340 steel in which the inclusion size is smaller than 5.5 μm, all the fatigue cracks except one did not initiated from inclusion but from specimen surface and conventional S-N curve exists. For 65Si2MnWE and Aermet 100 steels in which the average inclusion sizes are 12.2 and 14.9 μm, respectively, fatigue cracks initiated from inclusions at lower stress amplitudes and stepwise S-N curves were observed. The S-N curvedisplays a continuous decline and fatigue failures originated from large oxide inclusion for 60Si2CrVA steel in which the average inclusion size is 44.4 μm. In the case of internal inclusion-induced fractures at cycles beyond about 1×106 for 65Si2MnWE and 60Si2CrVA steels, inclusion was always found inside the fish-eye and a granular bright facet (GBF) was observed in the vicinity around the inclusion. The GBF sizes increasewith increasing the number of cycles to failure Nf in the long-life regime. The values of stress intensity factor range at crack initiation site for the GBF are almost constant with Nf, and are almost equal to that for the surface inclusion and the internal inclusion at cycles lower than about 1×106. Neither fish-eye nor GBF was observed for Aermet 100 steel in the present study.

  2. EFFECT OF CARBON CONTENT ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF HIGH STRENGTH AND HIGH ELONGATION STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Chen; X.Chen; 等

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of new kind of hot-rolled high strength and high elongation steels with retained austenite were studied by discussing the in-fluence of different carbon content.The research results indicate that carbon content has a significant effect on retaining austenite and consequently resulting in high elon-gation.Besides,new findings about relationship between carbon content and retained austenite as well as properties were discussed in the paper.

  3. Springback Prediction and Compensation for a High Strength Steel Side Impact Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction of formability for sheet metal pressings has advanced to a high state of confidence in recent years. The major challenge is now to predict springback and, moreover, to assist in the design of tooling to correctly compensate for springback. This is particularly the case for materials now being routinely considered for automotive production, such as aluminium and ultra high strength steels, which are prone to greater degrees of springback than traditional mild steels. This paper presents a case study based on the tool design for an ultra high strength steel side impact beam. The forming and springback simulations, carried out using eta/DYNAFORM (based on the LS-DYNA solver), are reported and compared to measurements from the prototype panels. The analysis parameters used in the simulation are presented, and the sensitivity of the results to variation in physical properties is also reviewed. The process of compensating the tools based on the analysis prediction is described; finally, an automated springback compensation method is also applied and the results compared with the final tool design

  4. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm3 that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  5. Compliance of high strength commercial glass to mechanical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the mechanical susceptibility of hiah-strength commercial glasses, the glass surface inclination to damage and defects accumulation has been investigated. The data are presented characterizing changes in the defectiveness and to microimpact shock effects on their surfaces. The glasses of various composition are differentiated due to their capability to accumulate defects and strength lose, with the constant energy of impact shock a distinct relation between the glass defectiveness and their structural parameters is observed. The stability of glasses with differently hardened (modifyied) surface against damage has been studied. It was found reasonable from studies to use various polymeric films as protective coatings for low-faulty glass surface

  6. High breakdown-strength composites from liquid silicone rubbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin; Yu, Liyun;

    2014-01-01

    available fillers (an anatase TiO2, a core–shell TiO2-SiO2 and a CaCu3Ti4O12 filler) are evaluated with respect to dielectric permittivity, elasticity (Young’s modulus) and electrical breakdown strength. Film formation properties are also evaluated. The best-performing formulations are those with anatase Ti......O2 nanoparticles, where the highest relative dielectric permittivity of 5.6 is obtained, and with STX801, a core–shell morphology TiO2-SiO2 filler from Evonik, where the highest breakdown strength of 173 V μm−1 is obtained....

  7. Experiments and fracture modeling of high-strength pipelines for high and low stress triaxialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.; Kofiani, K.; Nonn, A.; Wierzbicki, T.; Kalwa, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides results from a comprehensive study on mechanical characterization of high-strength pipeline steel, grade X100 using experimental and numerical methods. The material was characterized for anisotropic plasticity, fracture initiation for various states of stress, (pre-cracked) fract

  8. Phase stability and high temperature strength of low activation high manganese stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the present study is to investigate the microstructural phase stability and high temperature strength of high manganese-chromium stainless steels, because the substitution of Mn for Ni in ferrous materials achieve a reduced level of long-term radioactivity and high Mn-Cr austenitic steels are considered to be candidate alloys of reduced activation structural materials for fusion reactor. Since, for high Cr(about 15%Cr)-Fe-Mn ternary alloys, σ-phase is found to be easily formed in δ-phase during high temperature aging treatments, γ-phase stability is an important factor for restraining σ-phase formation and the irradiation embrittlement. γ-phase stability was discussed with Ni equivalent value. For the improvement of high temperature strength, the combined addition of W and V to Cr-Mn-C-N alloys was very effective. Such high strength properties were ascribed to a high number density of very small precipitates and to the enhancement effect of vanadium addition for the precipitates of M23C6 type carbide. (author)

  9. Interfacial (Fiber-matrix) Properties of High-strength Mortar (150 MPa) from Fiber Pullout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1996-01-01

     The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial......-strength DSP mortar has significantly improved interfacial properties compared to ordinary strength mortar. These results are important in the understanding of the role of steel fibers in improving the tensile properties of high-strength, brittle, cement-matrix composites....

  10. Ductility and resistance of bolted connections in structures made of high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Može, Primož

    2008-01-01

    Structural steel grades with yield strength higher than 420 MPa are considered as high strength steels. They undoubtedly have lower ductility than mild steels in terms of engineering measures of ductility, such as ultimate-to-yield strength ratio, uniform strain and elongation at fracture. A typical values for high strength steels are: ultimate-to-yield strength ratio fu/fy = 1,05, uniform strain εu = 0,05 and elongation after fracture εfr = 15%. The problem is that inelastic behaviour is hid...

  11. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s−1. The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  12. Manufacturing of High-Strength and High-Ductility Pearlitic Steel Wires Using Noncircular Drawing Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hyun Moo; Joo, Ho Seon; Im, Yong-Taek [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sun Kwang [KITECH, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Son, Il-Heon; Bae, Chul Min [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    In this study, a noncircular drawing (NCD) sequence for manufacturing high-strength and high-ductility pearlitic steel wires was investigated. Multipass NCD was conducted up to the 12th pass at room temperature with two processing routes (defined as the NCDA and NCDB), and compared with the wire drawing (WD). During the torsion test, delamination fracture in the drawn wire was observed in the 10th pass of the WD whereas it was not observed until the 12th pass of the NCDB. From X-ray diffraction, the circular texture component that increases the likelihood of delamination fracture of the drawn wire was rarely observed in the NCDB. Thus, the improved ability of the multipass NCDB to manufacture high-strength pearlitic steel wires with high torsional ductility compared to the WD (by reducing the likelihood of delamination fracture) was demonstrated.

  13. Manufacturing of High-Strength and High-Ductility Pearlitic Steel Wires Using Noncircular Drawing Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a noncircular drawing (NCD) sequence for manufacturing high-strength and high-ductility pearlitic steel wires was investigated. Multipass NCD was conducted up to the 12th pass at room temperature with two processing routes (defined as the NCDA and NCDB), and compared with the wire drawing (WD). During the torsion test, delamination fracture in the drawn wire was observed in the 10th pass of the WD whereas it was not observed until the 12th pass of the NCDB. From X-ray diffraction, the circular texture component that increases the likelihood of delamination fracture of the drawn wire was rarely observed in the NCDB. Thus, the improved ability of the multipass NCDB to manufacture high-strength pearlitic steel wires with high torsional ductility compared to the WD (by reducing the likelihood of delamination fracture) was demonstrated

  14. Influences of Short Discrete Fibers in High Strength Concrete with Very Coarse Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyuddin Ramli; Kwan W. Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: High Strength Concrete (HSC) normally content high cementitous amount and low water binder ratio. However, these would cause substantial volume changes to the concrete and therefore affected the strength development. In addition, the brittleness of HSC was increased when silica fume used as partial cement replacement to achieve high strength. Approach: This study discussed the effects of incorporated short discrete Coconut Fibers (CF), Barchip Fibers ...

  15. Uniaxial strength and deformation of HTR concrete at high temperature up to 600 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the safety analysis of the HTR-reactor as well as the development of the HTR-heating reactor have revealed the urgent need of data on the mechanical behavior of concrete beyond the design accidents (abnormal service, basis accidents), during which the concrete may be subjected to more severe conditions, e.g., higher temperatures and simultaneous high mechanical stress. Therefore a series of tests with HTR-concrete made with Rhine gravel and basalt aggregates have been performed. The specimens were heated under sustained uniaxial stress of 15 N/mm2 or unloaded up to temperatures of 400, 500 and 600 degrees C where they were loaded up to rupture to get information concerning strength, modulus of elasticity, transient creep and thermal expansion. This paper reports briefly the main experimental results, and the observed mechanical behavior is discussed with regard to the microstructural changes of the concrete phases during thermal exposure

  16. Effects of moisture in the air on characteristics of strength in high strength spheroidal graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of humidity on the strength characteristics in high strength spheroidal graphite cast iron with two phases, which is ferrite and pearlite. Three spheroidal graphite cast irons (FCD400(FDI), FCD500(FPDI.82) and FCD600(FPDI.55)) were used as specimens. In addition, heat treatment (Normalizing) was conducted in FCD500 (PDI). Tensile test conforming to JIS was carried out using these resultant four materials in air and water. The specimen used was of the 14A type. The relationship between tensile strength and area ratio of brittle fracture was investigated. Fatigue crack propagation test conforming to ASTM was also carried out using these materials. Stress ratio R was 0.1, and the specimen used was of the 1CT type with a thickness of 12.5 mm. The test was carried out at room temperature and three kinds of humidity: 0, 40 and 80%. The relationship between the characteristics of fatigue crack propagation and crack closure generated on the fracture surface was investigated. Though tensile strength in FDI and FPDI.82 was not influenced by water brittlement, strength in PDI and FPDI.55, which included pearlite, was decreased by water brittlement. This phenomenon may mainly be caused by the amount of parlite in the matrix. The threshold stress intensity factor range ΔKth of all materials increased with increasing humidity. Crack closure was investigated in all materials. It seemed to become marked with increasing humidity. In the low ΔKeff region of all materials (except FPDI.55, 80%), the fatigue crack propagation rate was almost the same because of oxide-induced crack closure of the ferrite included in the matrix. In the high ΔKeff region of FPDI and PDI, the rate was not the same. The acceleration was investigated because of effect of a phenomenon similar to the water embrittlement of pearlite included in the matrix. (author)

  17. Application of cold drawn lamellar microstructure for developing ultra-high strength wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Composite materials having lamellar structure are known to have a good combination of high strength and ductility. They are widely used in the fields of automobiles, civil engineering and construction, machines and many other industries. An application of lamellar microstructure for developing ultra-high strength steel wires was studied and discussed. Based on the experimental results,the relationships between the strength increase and microstructure development during the cold wire drawing were studied to reveal the strengthening mechanism. As cold drawing proceeds, the wire strength extremely increases, the microstructure changes from large single crystal lamellar structure to very fine polycrystalline lamellar one which has nano-sized grains, high dislocation density and amorphous regions. From the results obtained, it is concluded that heavy cold drawing technique is an effective method for lamellar composite to get high strength wires. Furthermore, formation process of the best microstructure for producing the ultra-high strength wires was also discussed.

  18. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  19. High-strength and high-RRR Al-Ni alloy for aluminum-stabilized superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, K; Sakamoto, H; Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y

    2000-01-01

    The precipitation type aluminum alloys have excellent performance as the increasing rate in electric resistivity with additives in the precipitation state is considerably low, compared to that of the aluminum alloy with additives in the solid-solution state. It is possible to enhance the mechanical strength without remarkable degradation in residual resistivity ratio (RRR) by increasing content of selected additive elements. Nickel is the suitable additive element because it has very low solubility in aluminum and low increasing rate in electric resistivity, and furthermore, nickel and aluminum form intermetallic compounds which effectively resist the motion of dislocations. First, Al-0.1wt%Ni alloy was developed for the ATLAS thin superconducting solenoid. This alloy achieved high yield strength of 79 MPa (R.T.) and 117 MPa (4.2 K) with high RRR of 490 after cold working of 21% in area reduction. These highly balanced properties could not be achieved with previously developed solid-solution aluminum alloys. ...

  20. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  1. Identification of Weld Residual Stresses Using Diffraction Methods and their Effect on Fatigue Strength of High Strength Steels Welds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mráz, Ľ.; Karlsson, L.; Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav

    Vol. 768-769. Stafa-Zurich : Trans Tech Publications, 2014 - (Kurz, S.; Mittemeijer, E.; Scholtes, B.), s. 668-674 ISSN 0255-5476. [9th International Conference on Residual Stresses 9 (ICRS 9). Garmisch-Partenkirchen (DE), 07.10.2012-09.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : residual stress * welds * neutron diffraction * X-ray diffraction * high strength steels Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    The great flexibility of ground-penetrating radar has led to consider worldwide this instrument as an effective and efficient geophysical tool in several fields of application. As far as pavement engineering is concerned, ground-penetrating radar is employed in a wide range of applications, including physical and geometrical evaluation of road pavements. Conversely, the mechanical characterization of pavements is generally inferred through traditional (e.g., plate bearing test method) or advanced non-destructive techniques (e.g., falling weight deflectometer). Nevertheless, measurements performed using these methods, inevitably turn out to be both much more time-consuming and low-significant whether compared with ground-penetrating radar's potentials. In such a framework, a mechanical evaluation directly coming from electromagnetic inspections could represent a real breakthrough in the field of road assets management. With this purpose, a ground-penetrating radar system with 600 MHz and 1600 MHz center frequencies of investigation and ground-coupled antennas was employed to survey a 4m×30m flexible pavement test site. The test area was marked by a regular grid mesh of 836 nodes, respectively spaced by a distance of 0.40 m alongside the horizontal and vertical axes. At each node, the elastic modulus was measured using a light falling weight deflectometer. Data processing has provided to reconstruct a 3-D matrix of amplitudes for the surveyed area, considering a depth of around 300 mm, in accord to the influence domain of the light falling weight deflectometer. On the other hand, deflectometric data were employed for both calibration and validation of a semi-empirical model by relating the amplitude of signal reflections through the media along fixed depths within the depth domain considered, and the Young's modulus of the pavement at the evaluated point. This statistically-based model is aimed at continuously taking into account alongside the depth of investigation

  3. Durability Index Performance of High Strength Concretes Made Based on Different Standard Portland Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen O. Ekolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A consortium of three durability index test methods consisting of oxygen permeability, sorptivity and chloride conductivity were used to evaluate the potential influence of four (4 common SANS 10197 cements on strength and durability of concrete. Twenty four (24 concrete mixtures of water-cement ratios (w/c's = 0.4, 0.5, 0.65 were cast using the cement types CEM I 42.5N, CEM II/A-M (V-L 42.5N, CEM IV/B 32.5R and CEM II/A-V 52.5N. The concretes investigated fall in the range of normal strength, medium strength and high strength concretes. It was found that the marked differences in oxygen permeability and sorptivity results observed at normal and medium strengths tended to vanish at high concrete strengths. Also, the durability effects attributed to use of different cement types appear to diminish at high strengths. Cements of low strength and/or that contained no extenders (CEM 32.5R, CEM I 42.5N showed greater sensitivity to sorptivity, relative to other cement types. Results also show that while concrete resistance to chlorides generally improves with increase in strength, adequately high chloride resistance may not be achieved based on high strength alone, and appropriate incorporation of extenders may be necessary.

  4. Mechanical properties and microstructure of an α+β titanium alloy with high strength and fracture toughness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yang; HUI Songxiao; YE Wenjun; XIONG Baiqing

    2009-01-01

    The Ti-Al-Sn-Zr-Cr-Mo-V-Si (Ti-62A) alloy, an alpha-beta alloy with high strength and fracture toughness, is currently used as an advanced structural material in aerospace and non-aerospace applications. Thermo-mechanical processes can be used to optimize the relationship be-twcen its strength and fracture toughness. A Ti-62A alloy bar can be machined through a transus β-forged plus α+β solution treated and aged specimen with a lamellar alpha microstructure. The effects of heat treatment on the mechanical properties were discussed. Heat treatment provided a practical balance of strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance. A comparison of the Ti-62A alloy with the Ti-62222S alloy under the same thermo-mechanical processing conditions showed that their properties are at the same level.

  5. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar

  6. Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Baliga, B Jayant

    2012-01-01

    Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts describes devices utilized in power transmission and distribution equipment, and for very high power motor control in electric trains and steel-mills. Since these devices must be capable of supporting more than 5000-volts in the blocking mode, this books covers operation of devices rated at 5,000-V, 10,000-V and 20,000-V. Advanced concepts (the MCT, the BRT, and the EST) that enable MOS-gated control of power thyristor structures are described and analyzed in detail. In addition, detailed analyses of the silicon IGBT, as well as the silicon carbide MOSFET and IGBT, are provided for comparison purposes. Throughout the book, analytical models are generated to give a better understanding of the physics of operation for all the structures. This book provides readers with: The first comprehensive treatment of high voltage (over 5000-volts) power devices suitable for the power distribution, traction, and motor-control markets;  Analytical formulations for all the device ...

  7. Advanced high frequency partial discharge measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karady, George G.

    1994-01-01

    This report explains the Advanced Partial Discharge Measuring System in ASU's High Voltage Laboratory and presents some of the results obtained using the setup. While in operation an insulation is subjected to wide ranging temperature and voltage stresses. Hence, it is necessary to study the effect of temperature on the behavior of partial discharges in an insulation. The setup described in this report can be used to test samples at temperatures ranging from -50 C to 200 C. The aim of conducting the tests described herein is to be able to predict the behavior of an insulation under different operating conditions in addition to being able to predict the possibility of failure.

  8. Development of 30Cr06A, a high strength cast steel and its welding ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO You-jin

    2008-01-01

    High performance hydraulic supports have a high requirement in strength, toughness and welding ability of socket ma- terial. Targeting this problem, we analyzed the properties of the high strength socket material 30Cr06, used in high performance hydraulic supports both at home and abroad and developed a new kind of high strength cast steel 30Cr06A, by making use of an orthogonal experiment, which provided the design conditions for its optimal composition. The result shows that the strength and toughness of the newly developed high strength cast steel 30Cr06A is much better than that of 30Cr06. Theoretical calculations, mechanical property tests and hardness distribution tests of welded joints were carried out for a study of the welding ability of the new material, which is proved to be very good. Therefore, this 30Cr06A material has been successfully used in the socket of high performance hydraulic support.

  9. Use of condensed silica fume for making high-strength, self-consolidating concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, AKH

    2000-01-01

    A high concrete strength can be achieved by lowering the water/binder ratio and a high workability by adding a higher dosage of superplasticizer. However, a high-performance concrete with both high strength and high workability cannot be produced by just these means because lowering the water/binder ratio leads to lower workability and there is a limit to the increase in workability that can be attained by adding superplasticizer. To produce a high-strength, high-workability concrete, the con...

  10. Early-Age Strength of Ultra-High Performance Concrete in Various Curing Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jong-Sup Park; Young Jin Kim; Jeong-Rae Cho; Se-Jin Jeon

    2015-01-01

    The strength of Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) can be sensitively affected by the curing method used. However, in contrast to the precast plant production of UHPC where a standard high-temperature steam curing is available, an optimum curing condition is rarely realized with cast-in-place UHPC. Therefore, the trend of the compressive strength development of UHPC was experimentally investigated in this study, with a focus on early-age strength by assuming the various curing conditions ...

  11. Fibrous reinforcing system to increase the shear resistance of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, S. P. F.; Barros, Joaquim A. O.; Lourenço, Lúcio

    2007-01-01

    The available research has evidenced that discrete steel fibers can increase significantly the shear resistance of High Strength Concrete (HSC) structural elements when High Strength Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HSFRC) is designed in such way that fiber reinforcing mechanisms are optimized. In general, the increase of the concrete compressive strength is associated to an increase of its compactness, resulting benefits in terms of durability, but a strong concern emerges related to ...

  12. Impact of internal water reservoirs and steel fibres content on shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Udir, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Due to its low water/cement ratio, high-strength concrete has a more pronounced early-age autogenous shrinkage. This thesis studies how to mitigate that by means of pre-soaked lightweight aggregate, various fractions and steel fibers. In the experimental part of the study, we measured the autogenous and total shrinkage of high-strength concrete, and used the results to calculate the contribution of drying shrinkage. We also measured the compressive strength of hardened concrete mixtures, and ...

  13. Deformation behavior of a high strength multiphase steel at macro- and micro-scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced high strength steels via quenching and partitioning (Q and P) process are a mainstream trend in modern steel research. This work contributes to a better understanding of their local mechanical properties and local deformation behavior at the micro-scale in relation to their local microstructure. A low alloyed steel was subjected to Q and P heat treatments leading to the formation of complex multiphase microstructures. Nanoindentation tests were performed to measure nanohardness of individual phases and to generate 2D maps showing nanohardness distribution on the surface of the material. To study local in-plane plastic strain distribution during deformation, in situ tensile tests were carried out using the digital image correlation technique. Significant partitioning of plastic strain between phase microconstituents during tensile deformation is shown. The effect of the microstructure on the mechanical behavior of the Q and P processed steel is analyzed. The local plastic deformation behavior of individual phases is discussed with respect to their strength and their spatial orientation

  14. Production of high strength pipe steels by the CSP{sup R} thin slab technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reip, C.P.; Hennig, W.; Kempken, J.; Hagmann, R. [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Compact Strip Production (CSP) thin-slab technology is a highly productive process for the cost-effective production of steel grades with an advanced range of properties in terms of inner quality of the hot strip, its surface formation and the associated technological characteristics. Extensive development work in the past 15 years has optimized the process technology which in turn has expanded the range of steels that can be produced. This paper described the ongoing development work regarding the production of higher-strength, microalloyed pipe steels. The resulting hot strip, due to the associated thickness and the potential pipe diameters, is well suited for HFI-welded pipes. Strength levels of up to grade API X80 can now be realized based on ferrite-pearlite and on very fine-grained, ferrite-bainite hot strip microstructures. This study showed that an 8 mm thick hot strip produced in a CSP plant has very good toughness at temperatures down to -60 degrees C. The material is also suitable for use in sour-gas pipelines according to results of hydrogen-induced cracking tests. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Deformation behavior of a high strength multiphase steel at macro- and micro-scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego-Calderón, I. de, E-mail: irenedediego.calderon@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, Calle Eric Kandel 2, Getafe 28906, Madrid (Spain); Santofimia, M.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Molina-Aldareguia, J.M.; Monclús, M.A.; Sabirov, I. [IMDEA Materials Institute, Calle Eric Kandel 2, Getafe 28906, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-12

    Advanced high strength steels via quenching and partitioning (Q and P) process are a mainstream trend in modern steel research. This work contributes to a better understanding of their local mechanical properties and local deformation behavior at the micro-scale in relation to their local microstructure. A low alloyed steel was subjected to Q and P heat treatments leading to the formation of complex multiphase microstructures. Nanoindentation tests were performed to measure nanohardness of individual phases and to generate 2D maps showing nanohardness distribution on the surface of the material. To study local in-plane plastic strain distribution during deformation, in situ tensile tests were carried out using the digital image correlation technique. Significant partitioning of plastic strain between phase microconstituents during tensile deformation is shown. The effect of the microstructure on the mechanical behavior of the Q and P processed steel is analyzed. The local plastic deformation behavior of individual phases is discussed with respect to their strength and their spatial orientation.

  16. Longitudinal differences of the PMSE strength at high Arctic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Singer, Werner; Swarnalingam, Nimalan; Maik Wissing, Jan; Meek, Chris; Manson, Allan H.; Drummond, James; Hocking, Wayne K.

    2010-05-01

    Observations of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) obtained by the ALWIN VHF radar, located in Andenes, Norway (69°N, 16°E) and by the Resolute Bay VHF radar, located in Nunavut, Canada (75°N, 95°W), are characterized by differences in occurrence rate and PMSE strengths, with generally lower levels at Resolute Bay. Even though both radars are well calibrated, the effect of the different radar hardware, especially the antenna systems, on the observations still causes concerns if comparisons of results from both sites are presented. Now, PMSE observations with identical radar hardware and identical analysis software are possible using the recently installed SKiYMET meteor radar at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) and the SKiYMET meteor radar at Andenes. Eureka is located in the same longitudinal sector as Resolute Bay, but 5 degrees north of the site, the Andenes SKiYMET radar is co-located with the ALWIN VHF radar. Both SKiYMET radars are calibrated using cosmic sky noise variations. A 4-week measurement campaign was performed during July in 2008, with both the Andenes and Eureka meteor radars running in a special mode designed for PMSE studies. Lower levels of PMSE strength were found at Eureka, confirming the earlier observations at Resolute Bay obtained by VHF radar. The observations are discussed in relation to dynamics, thermal conditions, and ionization. Strong indications exist that the observed differences of PMSE strength are related to the different levels of ionisation due to precipitating particles in the auroral oval and inside the polar cap. Global maps of precipitating energetic electrons (energy band: 6.5 keV-9.46 keV) and energetic protons (energy band 80 keV-240 keV) derived from POES satellites clearly indicate that Eureka and Resolute Bay are always inside the polar cap where, under geomagnetically quiet conditions, ionisation due to particle precipitation is missing.

  17. Preparation for Retarding and High Early Strength Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhijian; FENG Hao; WANG Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to determine optimum dosage of mixing concrete containing plasticizers and lfy ash, consistent with desirable structural grade concrete properties. Factorial tests were also conducted to investigate the four main factors: water-cementing materials ratio, water content, content of superplasticizers (SP) and fly ash content. It was found that the requirement for setting time played the dominant role in shrinkage and anti-cracking, and lfy ash played a critical role in workability and reducing heat of hydration but showed insigniifcant effects on slump, early strength and initial setting time of concrete.

  18. Tough hybrid ceramic-based material with high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes a tough and strong hybrid ceramic material consisting of platelet-like zirconium compounds and metal. A mixture of boron carbide and excess zirconium powder was heated to 1900 °C using a liquid-phase reaction sintering technique to produce a platelet-like ZrB2-based hybrid ceramic bonded by a thin zirconium layer. The platelet-like ZrB2 grains were randomly present in the as-sintered hybrid ceramic. Relative to non-hybrid ceramics, the fracture toughness and flexural strength of the hybrid ceramic increased by approximately 2-fold.

  19. High Shear Deformation to Produce High Strength and Energy Absorption in Mg Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Li, Dongsheng; Garmestani, Hamid; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2014-02-01

    Magnesium alloys have the potential to reduce the mass of transportation systems however to fully realize the benefits it must be usable in more applications including those that require higher strength and ductility. It has been known that fine grain size in Mg alloys leads to high strength and ductility. However, the challenge is how to achieve this optimal microstructure in a cost effective way. This work has shown that by using optimized high shear deformation and second phase particles of Mg2Si and MgxZnZry the energy absorption of the extrusions can exceed that of AA6061. The extrusion process under development described in this presentation appears to be scalable and cost effective. In addition to process development a novel modeling approach to understand the roles of strain and state-of-strain on particle fracture and grain size control has been developed

  20. Microstructure and high-temperature strength of high Cr ODS tempered martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    11-12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) tempered martensitic steels underwent manufacturing tests and their ferritic–martensitic duplex structures were quantitatively evaluated by three methods: high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), and metallography. It was demonstrated that excessive formation of residual-α ferrite, due to increasing Cr content, could be suppressed by appropriately controlling the concentration of the ferrite-forming and austenite-forming elements on the basis of the parameter “chemical driving force of α to γ reverse transformation. 11Cr-ODS steel containing a small portion of residual-α ferrite was successfully manufactured. In the as-received condition, this 11Cr-ODS steel was shown to have satisfactory creep strength and ductility, both as high as those of the 9Cr-ODS steel, while its 0.2% proof strength at 973 K was lower than in the 9Cr-ODS steel

  1. Effect of Hybrid Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid H. Hussein, Saeed K. Rejeb Hayder T. Abd

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, high strength concrete of 75 MPa compressive strength was investigated. The experimental program was designed to study the effect of fibers and hybrid fibers (steel and polypropylene fibers on the fresh (workability and wet density and hardened properties (compressive strength, splitting strength, flexural strength and dry density of high strength concrete. Results show that decreases in slump flow of all concrete mixtures containing steel, polypropylene and hybrid fibers compared with control mix (0% fiber. Hybrid high strength concrete with steel and polypropylene fibers showed superior compressive, splitting, flexural strengths over the others concrete without or with single fibers content. The test results indicate that the maximum increase in compressive and flexural strengths are obtains with the hybridization ratio (70%steel + 30% polypropylene and were equal to 14.54% and 23.34% respectively, compared with the control mix. While, the maximum increase in splitting tensile strength with (100% steel fiber + 0 polypropylene is 21.19%. 

  2. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  3. High strength fibre reinforced concrete: static and fatigue behaviour in bending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lappa, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a number of high strength and ultra high strength steel fibre concretes have been developed. Since these materials seem very suitable for structures that might be prone to fatigue failure, such as bridge decks, the understanding of the static and fatigue bending behaviour is vital. In orde

  4. Manufacturing of complex high strength components out of high nitrogen steels at industrial level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hannes NONEDER; Marion MERKLEIN

    2012-01-01

    High performance components,e.g.,fasteners,nowadays are usually made out of cold forged and heat treated steels like steel 1.5525 (20MnB4).To overcome the problems of heat treatment,e.g.,low surface quality,new workpiece materials for cold forging should be found to achieve the needlessness of heat treatment after cold forging.One possible material is given by high nitrogen steels like steel 1.3815 (X8CrMnN19-19).Due to the high strain hardening of these materials the process and tool design for an industrial batch process are challenging and should be conducted by FE-simulation.The numerical results show that,high strength tool materials,like PM-steels or cemented carbides,in most cases,are inevitable.Additionally to the selection of suitable tool materials,the tool layout should be developed further to achieve a high loadability of the tools.The FE-models,used for process and tool design,are validated with respect to the materials' flow and occurring forming force to assure a proper design process.Also the comparison of strength of components made out of steel 1.5525 in quenched and tempered conditions and steel 1.3815 in strain hardened condition is done.The results show that the component made of steel 1.3815 has a significantly higher strength than the component made of steel 1.5525.This shows that by the use of high nitrogen steels a high performance component can be manufactured by cold forging.

  5. High Temperature Wear of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, C.

    2005-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that advanced ceramics would exhibit favorable high te- friction and wear properties because of their high hot hardness and low achievable surface roughness welding observed in metals does not occur in ceramics. More recent tribological studies of many nitride, carbide, oxide and composite ceramics, however, have revealed that ceramics often exhibit high friction and wear in non-lubricated, high temperature sliding contacts. A summary is given to measure friction and wear factor coefficients for a variety of ceramics from self mated ceramic pin-on-disk tests at temperatures from 25 to up to 1200 C. Observed steady state friction coefficients range from about 0.5 to 1.0 or above. Wear factor coefficients are also very high and range from about to 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -2) cubic millimeters per N-m. By comparison, oil lubricated steel sliding results in friction coefficients of 0.1 or less and wear factors less than 10(exp -9) cubic millimeters per N-m.

  6. Characterization of mechanical strengths for simulated high-level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste forms have been developed and characterized at PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) to immobilize high-level liquid waste generated from the reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel. Mechanical strength tests were executed on simulated solidified high-level waste forms which were borosilicate glass and diopside glass-ceramic. Commercial glass was tested for comparison. Measured strengths were three-point bending strength, uniaxial compressive strength, impact strength by falling weight method, and Vickers hardness. Fracture toughness and fracture surface energy were also measured by both notch-beam and indentation technique. The results show that mechanical strengths of waste glass form are similar and that the glass ceramic form has the higher fracture toughness. (author)

  7. The influence of processing on the cryogenic mechanical properties of high strength high manganese stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the influence of the hot rolling condition and cold rolling on the mechanical properties of a nitrogen-strengthened high manganese steel of nominal composition 18Mn-5Ni-16Cr-0.02C-0.22N. The results show that grain refinement by low temperature hot rolling raises the strength of the alloy but decreases the toughness rapidly. Cold rolling at room temperature is an effective way to raise the strength without rapid deterioration of the toughness. Changing the hot rolling condition did not affect the fatigue crack growth rates, but the decrease in the fatigue crack growth rates was observed for cold rolled plates. This improvement in fatigue resistance might be attributed to the improvement of ductility through the suppression of the formation of the epsilon phase

  8. Unitarity Corrections and High Field Strengths in High Energy Hard Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri V. Kovchegov(Ohio State U.); Mueller, A. H.; Wallon, Samuel

    1997-01-01

    Unitarity corrections to the BFKL description of high energy hard scattering are viewed in large $N_c$ QCD in light-cone quantization. In a center of mass frame unitarity corrections to high energy hard scattering are manifestly perturbatively calculable and unrelated to questions of parton saturation. In a frame where one of the hadrons is initially at rest unitarity corrections are related to parton saturation effects and involve potential strengths $A_\\mu \\sim 1/g.$ In such a frame we desc...

  9. Elevated-temperature properties of one long-life high-strength gun steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoqiu Wang; Han Dong; Qi Wang

    2004-01-01

    The hardness, tensile strength and impact toughness of one quenched and tempered steel with nominal composition of Fe0.25C-3.0Cr-3.0Mo-0.6Ni-0.1Nb (mass fraction) both at room temperature and at elevated temperatures were investigated in order to develop high-strength steel for long-life gun barrel use. It is found that the steel has lower decrease rate of tensile strength at elevated temperature in comparison with the commonly used G4335V high-strength gun steel, which contains higher Ni and lower Cr and Mo contents. The high elevated-temperature strength of the steel is attributed to the strong secondary hardening effect and high tempering softening resistance caused by the tempering precipitation of fine Mo-rich M2C carbides in the α-Fe matrix. The experimental steel is not susceptible to secondary hardening embrittlement, meanwhile, its room-temperature impact energy is much higher than the normal requirement of impact toughness for high strength gun steels. Therefore, the steel is suitable for production of long-life high-strength gun barrels with the combination of superior elevated-temperature strength and good impact toughness.

  10. High temperature strength of ceramic moulds applied in the investment casting method

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kolczyk; Zych, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic casting moulds strength is an important factor, which influences the quality and properties of castings being produced by the investment casting method. It is especially important during mould pouring with liquid metal. Studies allowing determining the casting mould strength at high temperatures, that means at the ones at which the moulds are poured, are not numerous. None generally accepted (normalized) method for the assessment of such strength exists in practice. The new method of ...

  11. Experimental Study of Confined Low-, Medium- and High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Concentric Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Antonius; Iswandi Imran

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study of 23 low-, medium- and high-strength concrete columns is presented in this paper. Square-confined concrete columns without longitudinal reinforcement were designed, and tested under concentric axial compression. The columns were made of concrete with a compressive strength ranging between 30 MPa and 70 MPa. The test parameters in the study are concrete compressive strengths and confining steel properties, i.e. spacing, volumetric ratios and configurations. The effects o...

  12. High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels: Visokotrdna malolegirana (HSLA) konstrukcijska jekla:

    OpenAIRE

    Skobir Balantič, Danijela Anica

    2011-01-01

    Micro-alloyed, high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels are important structural materials and contain small amounts of alloying elements, such as niobium, titanium, vanadium, and aluminium, which enhance the strength through the formation of stable carbides, nitrides or carbonitrides and have an effect on the hardenability. Such steels contain less than 0.1 % of the alloying additions, used individually or in combination. Yield strength increments of two or three times that of plain carbon-man...

  13. Technique of creation of high-strength composite coverings on the ironbasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article authors present the results of their own investigationson technique of creation of high-strength composite coverings on the ironbasis. They offer fundamentally new conception of creation of high-strengthcomposite coverings on the iron basis

  14. Failure analysis of high strength pipeline with single and multiple corrosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study failure of high strength pipelines with single corrosion. • We give regression equations for failure pressure prediction. • We propose assessment procedure for pipelines with multiple corrosions. - Abstract: Corrosion will compromise safety operation of oil and gas pipelines, accurate determination of failure pressure finds importance in residual strength assessment and corrosion allowance design of onshore and offshore pipelines. This paper investigates failure pressure of high strength pipeline with single and multiple corrosions using nonlinear finite element analysis. On the basis of developed regression equations for failure pressure prediction of high strength pipeline with single corrosion, the paper proposes an assessment procedure for predicting failure pressure of high strength pipeline with multiple corrosions. Furthermore, failure pressures predicted by proposed solutions are compared with experimental results and various assessment methods available in literature, where accuracy and versatility are demonstrated

  15. Advanced High-Definition Video Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, William

    2007-01-01

    A product line of high-definition color video cameras, now under development, offers a superior combination of desirable characteristics, including high frame rates, high resolutions, low power consumption, and compactness. Several of the cameras feature a 3,840 2,160-pixel format with progressive scanning at 30 frames per second. The power consumption of one of these cameras is about 25 W. The size of the camera, excluding the lens assembly, is 2 by 5 by 7 in. (about 5.1 by 12.7 by 17.8 cm). The aforementioned desirable characteristics are attained at relatively low cost, largely by utilizing digital processing in advanced field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to perform all of the many functions (for example, color balance and contrast adjustments) of a professional color video camera. The processing is programmed in VHDL so that application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) can be fabricated directly from the program. ["VHDL" signifies VHSIC Hardware Description Language C, a computing language used by the United States Department of Defense for describing, designing, and simulating very-high-speed integrated circuits (VHSICs).] The image-sensor and FPGA clock frequencies in these cameras have generally been much higher than those used in video cameras designed and manufactured elsewhere. Frequently, the outputs of these cameras are converted to other video-camera formats by use of pre- and post-filters.

  16. Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor. Part 1; Advanced Modeling and Strength Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, C. G.; Chen, Tzi-Kang; Baker, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the structural response and strength of tile-reinforced components of the Composite Armored Vehicle are presented. The analyses are based on specialized finite element techniques that properly account for the effects of the interaction between the armor tiles, the surrounding elastomers, and the glass-epoxy sublaminates. To validate the analytical predictions, tests were conducted with panels subjected to three-point bending loads. The sequence of progressive failure events for the laminates is described. This paper describes the results of Part 1 of a study of the response and strength of tile-reinforced composite armor.

  17. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Carla [Applied Sciences, Inc., Cedarville, OH (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  18. Creep strength and microstructure in 23Cr-45Ni-7W Alloy (HR6W) and Ni-base superalloys for advanced USC boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semba, Hiroyuki; Okada, Hirokazu; Yonemura, Mitsuharu; Igarashi, Masaaki [Sumitomo metal Industries, Ltd., Hyogo (Japan). Corporate Research and Development Labs.

    2008-07-01

    Establishment of materials technologies on piping and tubing for advanced ultra super critical (A-USC) plants operated at steam temperatures above 700 C is a critical issue to achieve its hard target. 23Cr-45Ni-7W alloy (HR6W) has been developed in Japan, originally as a high strength tubing material for 650 C USC boilers. In order to clarify the capability of HR6W as a material applied to A-USC plants, creep strength and microstructure of HR6W were investigated in comparison with {gamma}'-strengthened Alloy 617 and other Ni-base superalloys, such as Alloy 263. It has been revealed that the amount of added W is intimately correlated with precipitation amount of Laves phase and thus it is a crucial factor controlling creep strength. Stability of long term creep strength and superior creep rupture ductility have been proved by creep rupture tests at 650-800 C up to 60000h. The 10{sup 5}h extrapolated creep rupture strengths are estimated to be 88MPa at 700 C and 64MPa at 750 C. Microstructural stability closely related with long term creep strength and toughness has also been confirmed by microstructural observations after creep tests and aging. Creep rupture strength of Alloy 617 has been found to be much higher than that of HR6W at 700 and 750 C, while comparable at 800 C. A thermodynamic calculation along with microstructural observation indicates that the amount of Laves phase in HR6W gradually decreases with increasing temperature, while that of {gamma}' in Alloy 617 rapidly decreases with increasing temperature and {gamma}' almost dissolves at 800 C. This may lead to an abrupt drop in creep strength of Alloy 617 above 750 C. Alloy 263, in which more {gamma}' precipitates than Alloy 617, shows much higher creep strength. However, it is suggested that inhomogeneous creep deformation is enhanced compared with HR6W and Alloy 617. Capability of HR6W as a material for A-USC plants was discussed in terms of creep properties, microstructural stability and other

  19. Advances in High Energy Materials (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. R. Nair

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Research and development efforts for realizing higher performance levels of high energy materials (HEMs are continued unabated all over the globe. Of late, it is becoming increasingly necessary to ensure that such materials are also eco-friendly. This has provided thrust to research in the area of force multiplying HEMs and compounds free from pollution causing components. Enhancement of the performance necessitates introduction of strained structure or increase in oxygen balance to achieve near stoichiometry. The search for environment friendly molecules is focused on chlorine free propellant compositions and lead free primary explosives. Energetic polymers offer added advantage of partitioning of energy and thus not necessitating the concentration of only solid components (HEMs and metal fuels in the formulations, to achieve higher performance, thereby leading to improvement in energetics without adversely affecting the processability and mechanical properties. During recent times, research in the area of insensitive explosives has received impetus particularly with the signature of STANAG. This paper gives a review of the all-round advances in the areas of HEMs encompassing oxidizers, high-energy dense materials, insensitive high-energy materials, polymers and plasticizers. Selected formulations based on these materials are also included.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.137-151, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.327

  20. Hot isostatically pressed manufacture of high strength MERL 76 disk and seal shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using MERL 76, an advanced high strength direct hot isostatic pressed powder metallurgy superalloy, as a full scale component in a high technology, long life, commercial turbine engine were demonstrated. The component was a JT9D first stage turbine disk. The JT9D disk rim temperature capability was increased by at least 22 C and the weight of JT9D high pressure turbine rotating components was reduced by at least 35 pounds by replacement of forged Superwaspaloy components with hot isostatic pressed (HIP) MERL 76 components. The process control plan and acceptance criteria for manufacture of MERL 76 HIP consolidated components were generated. Disk components were manufactured for spin/burst rig test, experimental engine tests, and design data generation, which established lower design properties including tensile, stress-rupture, 0.2% creep and notched (Kt = 2.5) low cycle fatigue properties, Sonntag, fatigue crack propagation, and low cycle fatigue crack threshold data. Direct HIP MERL 76, when compared to conventionally forged Superwaspaloy, is demonstrated to be superior in mechanical properties, increased rim temperature capability, reduced component weight, and reduced material cost by at least 30% based on 1980 costs.

  1. Hybrid laser-gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of high strength steel gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Ian D.; Norfolk, Mark I. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid Laser/arc welding process (HLAW) can complete 5G welds, assure weld soundness, material properties, and an acceptable geometric profile. Combining new lasers and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) has led to important innovations in the HLAW process, increasing travel speed for successful root pass welding. High power Yb fiber lasers allow a 10 kW laser to be built the size of a refrigerator, allowing portability for use on the pipeline right-of-way. The objective was to develop and apply an innovative HLAW system for mechanized welding of high strength, high integrity, pipelines and develop 5G welding procedures for X80 and X100 pipe, including mechanical testing to API 1104. A cost-matched JIP developed a prototype HLAW head based on a commercially available bug and band system (CRC-Evans P450). Under the US Department of Transportation (DOT) project, the subject of this paper, the system was used to advance pipeline girth welding productivity. External hybrid root pass welding achieved full penetration welds with a 4-mm root at a travel speed of 2.3-m/min. Welds were made 'double down' using laser powers up to 10 kW and travel speeds up to 3-m/min. The final objective of the project was to demonstrate the hybrid LBW/GMAW system under simulated field conditions. (author)

  2. Evaluation of high strength, high conductivity CuNiBe alloys for fusion energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties for several different heats and thermomechanical treatment conditions of precipitation strengthened Hycon 3HP™ CuNiBe (Cu-2%Ni-0.35%Be in wt.%) have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500 °C for longitudinal and long transverse orientations. The room temperature electrical conductivity has also been measured for several heats, and the precipitate microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The CuNiBe alloys exhibit very good combination of strength and conductivity at room temperature, with yield strengths of 630-725 MPa and electrical conductivities of 65-72% International Annealed Copper Standard (IACS). The strength remained relatively high at all test temperatures, with yield strengths of 420-520 MPa at 500 °C. However, low levels of ductility (products. Considering also previously published fracture toughness data, this indicates that CuNiBe alloys have irradiated tensile and electrical properties comparable or superior to CuCrZr and oxide dispersion strengthened copper at temperatures <250 °C, and may be an attractive candidate for certain low-temperature fusion energy structural applications. Conversely, CuNiBe may not be preferred at intermediate temperatures of 250-500 °C due to the poor ductility and fracture toughness of CuNiBe alloys at temperatures ⩾250 °C. The potential deformation mechanisms responsible for the transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture are discussed. The possible implications for other precipitation-hardened alloys such as nickel based superalloys are briefly discussed.

  3. Surrogate Modeling of High-Fidelity Fracture Simulations for Real-Time Residual Strength Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Ashley D.; Priest, Amanda R.; Veilleux, Michael G.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    A surrogate model methodology is described for predicting in real time the residual strength of flight structures with discrete-source damage. Starting with design of experiment, an artificial neural network is developed that takes as input discrete-source damage parameters and outputs a prediction of the structural residual strength. Target residual strength values used to train the artificial neural network are derived from 3D finite element-based fracture simulations. A residual strength test of a metallic, integrally-stiffened panel is simulated to show that crack growth and residual strength are determined more accurately in discrete-source damage cases by using an elastic-plastic fracture framework rather than a linear-elastic fracture mechanics-based method. Improving accuracy of the residual strength training data would, in turn, improve accuracy of the surrogate model. When combined, the surrogate model methodology and high-fidelity fracture simulation framework provide useful tools for adaptive flight technology.

  4. Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

  5. Survey of High School Football Team Strength and Conditioning Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Finamore, Leonard V.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the level of preseason conditioning and health maintenance for high school football players in Massachusetts. In July 1988, data were obtained through a survey of high school football coaches regarding players' conditioning programs and injury rates. A total of 286 surveys were distributed to public, private, and parochial schools that have interscholastic football programs. Of these, 182 correctly completed surveys were collected for a 64% return rate. Although many high ...

  6. Enhanced long-term strength and durability of shotcrete with high-strength C12A7 mineral-based accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the performance of shotcrete using high strength C12A7 mineral-based accelerator that has been developed to improve the durability and long-term strength. Rebound, compressive strength and flexural strength were tested in the field. Test result showed that existing C12A7 mineral-based accelerator exhibits better early strength than the high-strength C12A7 mineral-based accelerator until the early age, but high-strength C12A7 mineral-based accelerator shows about 29% higher at the long-term age of 28 days. Microstructural analysis such as scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption method was evaluated to analyze long-term strength development mechanism of high strength C12A7 mineral-based accelerator. As analysis result, it had more dense structure due to the reaction product by adding material that used to enhanced strength. It had better resistance performance in chloride ion penetration, freezing–thawing and carbonation than shotcrete that used existing C12A7 mineral-based accelerator

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of High-strength Drill Pipe in Sour Gas Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi; LI Jing; ZENG Dezhi; HU Junying; HOU Duo; ZHANG Liehui; SHI Taihe

    2014-01-01

    In high sour gas reservoir drilling process, it happens occasionally that high-strength drill pipe suffers brittle fracture failure due to stress corrosion cracking, and poses serious hazard to drilling safety. To solve this problem, this paper studied the stress corrosion cracking mechanism and influencing factors of high-strength drill pipe in sour environment with hydrogen permeation experiments and tensile tests. We simulated practical conditions in laboratory and evaluated the stress corrosion cracking performance of the high-strength drill pipe under conditions of high stress level. For the problems occurring in use of high-strength drill pipe on site, the paper proposed a technical measure for slower stress corrosion cracking.

  8. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division

  9. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2005-03-15

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division.

  10. Achieving combined high strength and high conductivity in re-processed Cu-Cr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Olofinjanaa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Precipitation hardening by nano-sized precipitates had proven to be the most adequate way to achieve the optimum combination for strength and conductivity in copper based alloys. However, precipitation strengthened Cu- alloys are limited to very dilute concentration thereby limiting the volume proportion hardening precipitates. In this work, we report the investigation of the reprocessing of higher Cr concentration Cu- based alloys via rapid solidification.Design/methodology/approach: The ingot alloys with Cr content up to 10 wt.% were prepared via semi-chilling of small rods before been cast into ribbon using chill block melt spinner. Thermal aging studies followed by conductivity and microhardness tests were performed to follow the HSHC properties.Findings: It is found that the rapid solidification in the as-cast ribbon imposed combined solution extension and ultra-refinement of Cr rich phases. X-ray diffraction evidences suggest that the solid solution extension was up to 6wt%Cr. Lattice parameters determined confirmed the many folds extension of solid solution of Cr in Cu. Thermal aging studies of the cast ribbons indicated that peak aging treatments occurred in about twenty minutes. Peak aged hardness ranged from about 200 to well over 300Hv. The maximum peak aged hardness of 380Hv was obtained for alloy containing 6wt.%Cr but with conductivity of about 50%IACS. The best combined strength/conductivity was obtained for 4wt.%Cr alloy with hardness of 350HV and conductivity of 80% IACS. The high strengths observed are attributed to the increased volume proportion of semi-coherent Cr rich nano-sized precipitates that evolved from the supersaturated solid solution of Cu-Cr that was achieved from the high cooling rates imposed by the ribbon casting processResearch limitations/implications: The rapid overaging of the high Cr concentration Cu-Cr alloy is still a cause for concern in optimising the process for reaching peak HSHC properties

  11. Finite Element Model for the Behavior of Partially Restrained High Strength Web Angle Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Taufik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the behavior of Partially Restrained (PR connections with high strength steel through the use of Finite Element (FE modeling. The connection model is such that double web angles are represented by radiused corner section shell elements. The full interaction between the angle and the beam and/or column is simulated by the contact element.The analysis of the moment- rotation relationship and behavior characteristics of the connection with high strength steel are compared and discussed. It is established that the contact elements and strength enhancements of the corner regions employed in this model are important parameters for accurate predictions of Double Web Angle (DWA connection behavior with cold-formed high strength steel. The proposed connection FE model is capable making highly accurate predictions about the ultimate load capacity and the plastic strain pattern. The model presented provides excellent results for significantly increasing the connection capacity as a result of employing a higher strength steel section. A power model expression was proposed to predict the ultimate moment and initial stiffness of the high strength DWA connection. A reasonable prediction was obtained for high strength PR connection.

  12. Preparation and properties of high-strength recycled concrete in cold areas

    OpenAIRE

    Haitao, Y.; Shizhu, T.

    2015-01-01

    Concrete waste was processed into recycled coarse aggregate (RCA), subsequently used to prepare high-strength (> 50 MPa) recycled concrete. The resulting material was tested for mechanical performance (ULS). The recycled concrete was prepared to the required design strength by adjusting the water/cement ratio. Concrete containing 0, 20, 50, 80 and 100% recycled aggregate was prepared and studied for workability, deformability and durability. The ultimate aim of the study was to prepare high-s...

  13. Connections in Precast Buildings using Ultra High-Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1995-01-01

    Ultra high-strength concrete adds new dimensions to the design of concrete structures. It is a brittle material but introducing fibres into the matrix changes the material into a highly ductile material. Furthermore, the fibre reinforcement increases the anchorage of traditional reinforcement bars...... and the fire resistance. Such a fibre reinforced ultra high-strength material has been used to develop a simple joint solution between slab elements in a column - slab building system....

  14. Spalling behaviour of nano SiO2 high strength concrete at elevated temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Shah A.H.; Sharma U.K.; Roy Danie A.B.; Bhargava P

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of high strength concrete exposed to high temperature and incorporating Nano SiO2 and Micro SiO2 is presented. An experimental programme was developed and carried out which involved testing of Nano SiO2 and Micro SiO2 incorporated high strength concrete specimens exposed to temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800 °C. Maximum spalling was noted in Micro + Nano silica specimens. However, the maximum strength loss and temperature induced cracking was noticed in Nano silic...

  15. The Investigation of Laser Lap Welding Process on High-Strength Galvanized Steel Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Shiquan Zhou; Yi Zhao; Zhenguo Peng; Fangjie Ren

    2011-01-01

    The development of automobile steel was analyzed in this paper; it is pointed out that high-strength galvanized steel will be widely used in the car body structure. By analyzing welding problems about the dual phase (DP) series of high-strength galvanized steel, the importance of laser welding was concerned. Finally, laser lap welding process technology of high-strength galvanized steel was studied; the results show that the lap weld with welding process smooth and spatter-free as well as bea...

  16. Spalling behaviour of nano SiO2 high strength concrete at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah A.H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of high strength concrete exposed to high temperature and incorporating Nano SiO2 and Micro SiO2 is presented. An experimental programme was developed and carried out which involved testing of Nano SiO2 and Micro SiO2 incorporated high strength concrete specimens exposed to temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800 °C. Maximum spalling was noted in Micro + Nano silica specimens. However, the maximum strength loss and temperature induced cracking was noticed in Nano silica specimens.

  17. The test device for heat friction coefficient of high strength steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Zhifu; Ma Mingtu; Ma Fangwu; Guo Yihui; Song Leifeng; Yao Zaiqi

    2012-01-01

    Using high strength steel and ultra-high strength steel in hot stamping and automobile parts is one of the most important ways of the automobile lightweight, which is the development trend of automobiles currently. In this paper, the development of test device for heat friction coefficient by high strength steel can provide important technical parame- ters for hot stamping process, making the right selection of equipment types, mold design, technology optimization, and research and development of lubrication medium of press forming. At the same time, the experiments indicate that the instrument has not only accurate test result but also good repeatability.

  18. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

    2003-04-21

    A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

  19. Lightweight, High Strength Nano-Composite Magnesium for Radiators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Terves will develop processing routes to produce high thermal conductivity magnesium composites for use in heat transfer applications such as...

  20. High-strength, high-fracture toughness submerged-arc weld for arctic line pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the development of a high-strength, high-fracture toughness double submerged-arc weld for X-70 arctic grade line pipe is documented. The weld was made with a two-wire DC/AC tandem setup at a speed of 27.5 mm/s (65 in./min.). A fused, semi-neutral, fine grained (32 x 200) flux was used. The resulting weld metal microstructure was at least 95% acicular ferrite. The weld had excellent fracture toughness with not less than 60 joules at -600C and 50% FATT at -500C. The formation of acicular ferrite was interpreted as the result of suppression of proeutectoid ferrite owing to the high molybdenum content of the wire and the presence of TiO2 inclusions. The properties were consistently achieved during the manufacture of spirally welded pipes 1067 mm 0.D x 14 mm W.T

  1. Improvement of high temperature strength and low temperature toughness of high manganese-chromium austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Mn-Cr austenitic steels are still considered to be an important high temperature structural material from the point of view of fast-induced radioactivity decay (FIRD) and non-magneticity. The objective of the present study is to investigate the mechanical properties of 12% Cr-15% Mn austenitic stainless steels and to compare these properties with those of the reference materials of JPCAs and JFMS, which are being investigated for the development of fusion reactor structural materials in Japan. The effects of the alloying elements V, Ti, Ta, etc. were investigated to determine the improvement of mechanical properties. Tiny precipitates of VN and Ti(C, N) raised the high-temperature strength considerably. Content of 0.1 to 0.2% C, however, formed very coarse precipitates of M23C6 type carbide on the grain boundaries, which deteriorated low temperature toughness inducing intergranular fracture. Microstructural evolution during long-term aging was also investigated. ((orig.))

  2. Corrosion Fatigue of High-Strength Titanium Alloys Under Different Stress Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragetti, Sergio; Villa, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    Ti-6Al-4V is the most widely used high strength-to-mass ratio titanium alloy for advanced engineering components. Its adoption in the aerospace, maritime, automotive, and biomedical sectors is encouraged when highly stressed components with severe fatigue loading are designed. The extents of its applications expose the alloy to several aggressive environments, which can compromise its brilliant mechanical characteristics, leading to potentially catastrophic failures. Ti-6Al-4V stress-corrosion cracking and corrosion-fatigue sensitivity has been known since the material testing for pressurized tanks for Apollo missions, although detailed investigations on the effects of harsh environment in terms of maximum stress reduction have been not carried out until recent times. In the current work, recent experimental results from the authors' research group are presented, quantifying the effects of aggressive environments on Ti-6Al-4V under fatigue loading in terms of maximum stress reduction. R = 0.1 axial fatigue results in laboratory air, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, and CH3OH methanol solution at different concentrations are obtained for mild notched specimens ( K t = 1.18) at 2e5 cycles. R = 0.1 tests are also conducted in laboratory air, inert environment, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution for smooth, mild and sharp notched specimens, with K t ranging from 1 to 18.65, highlighting the environmental effects for the different load conditions induced by the specimen geometry.

  3. Metallurgical aspects of heavy wall - high strength seamless pipes for deep water applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tivelli, M. [Tenaris, Campana (Argentina); Cumino, G. [Tenaris, Dalmine, BG, (Italy); Izquierdo, A. [Tenaris, Veracruz (Mexico); Anelli, E.; Schimo, A. di [Centro Sviluppo Materiali SpA, Rome (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    The metallurgical design of X65/X70 grade weldable steel flowlines and risers, with a wall thickness greater than 35 mm for deep water, was performed throughout metallurgical modeling, laboratory tests, pilot and industrial trials and advanced metallographic examinations. The role of micro-precipitates in controlling austenite grain growth and the effect of prior austenite grain size (PAGS) and alloying additions on phase transformation during quenching were investigated. The target microstructure in the as-quenched condition was identified as a matrix of refined bainite and low-C martensite with small, well dispersed, islands of MA constituent. This is achieved through fine AGS and very effective quenching. Complex aggregates of high (packets) and low-angle (cells) units and precipitation hardening resulted after tempering. Small packets lead to better low temperature toughness. An optimized chemistry, with proper combination of elements such as Ni, Cr, Mo, Nb and V, and suitable quenching and tempering conditions were identified for pipes of wall thickness up to 42 mm. Addition of 0.20-0.25% Cr produces further improvement in strength, without reducing toughness. Seamless pipes produced by this metallurgical design exhibited suitable mechanical properties at room and high temperature (130 deg C), hardness values lower than 248 HV{sub 10}, and good CTOD values up to - 40 deg C of both base metal and HAZ. (author)

  4. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmore, M.F. (AFRL/MNMW, Eglin AFB, FL); Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  5. Removal of sulfate from high-strength wastewater by crystallisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Stephan; Clarke, William P; Keller, Jurg; Batstone, Damien J

    2009-02-01

    Sulfate causes considerable problems in anaerobic digesters, related to generation of sulfides, loss of electrons (and hence methane), and contamination of gas streams. Removal of sulfides is generally expensive, and still results in methane losses. In this paper, we evaluate the use of precipitation for low-cost sulfate removal, in highly contaminated streams (>1 gS L(-1)). The main precipitate assessed is calcium sulfate (gypsum), though the formation of complex precipitates such as jarosite and ettringite to remove residual sulfate is also evaluated. The four main concerns in contaminated wastewater are:- high solubility, caused by high ion activity and ion pairing; slow kinetics; inhibition of nucleation; and poisoning of crystals by impurities, rendering product unsuitable for reuse as seed. These concerns were addressed through batch experiments on a landfill wastewater with a similar composition to other sulfate rich industrial wastewaters (high levels of organic and inorganic contaminants). Crystallisation rates were rapid and comparable to what is observed by others for pure solutions (2-5 h). The kinetics of crystallisation showed a 2nd order dependence on supersaturation, which have implications for crystalliser design, as discussed in the paper. No spontaneous nucleation was observed (seed was required). Seed poisoning did not occur, and product crystals were as effective as pure seed. Solubility was increased by an order of magnitude compared to a pure solution (2.6x10(-3) M2 vs. 0.22x10(-3) M2). As evaluated using equilibrium modelling, this was caused equally by non-specific ion activity, and specific ion pairing. Jarosite and ettringite could not be formed at reasonable pH and temperature levels. Given the lack of complex precipitates, and relatively high solubility, gypsum crystallisation cannot practically be used to remove sulfate to very low levels, and gas-sulfide treatment will likely still be required. It can however, be used for low

  6. The Effects of Steel Fibre on the Mechanical Strength and Durability of Steel Fibre Reinforced High Strength Concrete (SFRHSC Subjected to Normal and Hygrothermal Curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velayutham G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental investigation into the mechanical strength and durability of steel fibre high strength concrete (SFHSC. In the experimental investigation, the properties of the steel fibre high strength concrete were assessed through two types of curing regimes, the normal water curing and the hygrothermal curing treatment, with the results of the tests being taken at 7 days and 7 days + 24 hours. The steel fibres were added at volume fractions of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0% and 3.0%. The tests that were performed for the mechanical strength and durability were the compressive and flexural strength test, the modulus of elasticity test, the ultrasonic pulse velocity test, the water absorption test, the air permeability test and the porosity test. The compressive and flexural strength of the steel fibre high strength concrete reached their maximum of 70.7 MPa and 11.45 MPa, respectively during normal curing for the 3.0% volume fraction of steel fibre. The experimental results of this study indicate that the inclusion of steel fibres enhances the mechanical strength of high strength concrete cured in normal water curing as compared to the hygrothermal curing treatment.

  7. Experimental investigation on tensile strength of butt welded joint post high temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Pingzhou; Chen Jianfeng; Zhao Wentao

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the laws of variation on tensile strength of butt welded joint post high temperatures, the wide plate tension tests for butt welded joint were conducted after cooling down from different high temperatures. The tests indicate that specimens appear ductile fracture at the steel plate during the tension tests after cooling down. The maximum temperatures undergone and the cooling pattern are major factors influencing tensile strength of butt welded joint post high temperatures. The tensile strength mostly reduces by 8% within 900℃. Based on the experimental results, the paper proposes the calculation formulas of tensile strength of butt welded joint post high temperatures. The conclusions of the paper supply references for evaluation damage and feinforcement of steel structure post fire.

  8. A calculation method of cracking moment for the high strength concrete beams under pure torsion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metin Husem; Ertekin Oztekin; Selim Pul

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a method is given to calculate cracking moments of high strength reinforced concrete beams under the effect of pure torsion. To determine the method, both elastic and plastic theories were used. In this method, dimensions of beam cross-section were considered besides stirrup and longitudinal reinforcements. Two plain high strength concrete (without reinforcement) and eight high strength reinforced concrete beams which have two different cross-sections (150 × 250 mm and 150 × 300 mm) were produced to examine the validity of the proposed method. The predictions of the proposed approach for the calculation of the cracking moment of beams under pure torsion were compared with the experimental and the analytical results of previous studies. From these comparisons it is concluded that the predictions of the proposed equations for the cracking moment of plain and reinforced high strength concrete beams under pure torsion are closer to the experimental data compared to the analytical results of previous theories.

  9. Investigation of Phosphate Cement-based Binder with Super High Early Strength for Repair of Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnesium phosphate cement-based binder (MPB) for repair of concrete was prepared by proportionally mixing over burned MgO powder (M) with NHH2PO4 powder (P) and set modifying admixtures. It is characteristic by excellent properties such as rapid setting,high strength and high bond strength to old concrete.. The study is focused on the key factors influencing the setting time and strength of MPB, the bond property of MPB to old concrete and the kinetic feature of the hydration of MPB.

  10. Numerical modelling of the strength of highly porous aerated autoclaved concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenider, T.; Greil, P. [Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Materials Science; Schober, G. [Hebel AG, Fuerstenfeldbruck (Germany). Materialtechnische Entwicklung

    1998-12-31

    Highly porous building materials like aerated autoclaved concrete are characterized by low thermal conductivity and high mechanical strength, which both strongly depend on porosity. The influence of porosity distribution on the compressive strength of aerated autoclaved concrete was investigated by using finite element analysis and multiaxial Weibull theory. Calculations of failure probability of microstructures with ordered as well as random pore configurations show a dependence of compressive strength on the Weibull modulus of the matrix material and the size and arrangement of pores. The results of the calculations are compared to experimental data of aerated autoclaved concrete.

  11. Integrating advanced facades into high performance buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass is a remarkable material but its functionality is significantly enhanced when it is processed or altered to provide added intrinsic capabilities. The overall performance of glass elements in a building can be further enhanced when they are designed to be part of a complete facade system. Finally the facade system delivers the greatest performance to the building owner and occupants when it becomes an essential element of a fully integrated building design. This presentation examines the growing interest in incorporating advanced glazing elements into more comprehensive facade and building systems in a manner that increases comfort, productivity and amenity for occupants, reduces operating costs for building owners, and contributes to improving the health of the planet by reducing overall energy use and negative environmental impacts. We explore the role of glazing systems in dynamic and responsive facades that provide the following functionality: Enhanced sun protection and cooling load control while improving thermal comfort and providing most of the light needed with daylighting; Enhanced air quality and reduced cooling loads using natural ventilation schemes employing the facade as an active air control element; Reduced operating costs by minimizing lighting, cooling and heating energy use by optimizing the daylighting-thermal tradeoffs; Net positive contributions to the energy balance of the building using integrated photovoltaic systems; Improved indoor environments leading to enhanced occupant health, comfort and performance. In addressing these issues facade system solutions must, of course, respect the constraints of latitude, location, solar orientation, acoustics, earthquake and fire safety, etc. Since climate and occupant needs are dynamic variables, in a high performance building the facade solution have the capacity to respond and adapt to these variable exterior conditions and to changing occupant needs. This responsive performance capability

  12. A STUDY ON BEHAVIOR OF ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH CONCRETE AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    OpenAIRE

    K. Anusha; Kesavan, S

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a composite material composed of cement, coarse aggregate, fine aggregate and water in pre-dominant proportions. These days concrete is being used for wide varieties of purposes to make it suitable in different conditions. In these conditions ordinary concrete may fail to exhibit the require quality performance or durability. In recent years, the terminology "Ultra High Strength Concrete" has been introduced into the construction industry. Most high strength concrete produced toda...

  13. Recycling Glass Cullet from Waste CRTs for the Production of High Strength Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Maschio; Gabriele Tonello; Erika Furlani

    2013-01-01

    The present paper reports on the results of some experiments dealing with the recycling of mixed cathode ray tube (CRT) glass waste in the production of high-strength mortars. Waste CRT glass cullet was previously milled, and sieved, and the only fine fraction was added to the fresh mortar in order to replace part of the natural aggregate. The addition of superplasticizer was also investigated. All hydrated materials displayed high compressive strength after curing. Samples containing CRT mix...

  14. Flexural Behavior of Steel Fiber Reinforced High-Strength Concrete Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Qiaoyan Guan; Peng Zhang; Xiaopeng Xie

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of longitudinal reinforcement ratio, volume dosage of steel fiber and the beam height on flexural behavior of steel fiber reinforced high-strength concrete beams, a parametric experimental study has been conducted. Four longitudinal reinforcement ratios, 4 steel fiber volume dosages and 4 different beam heights were used. Results reveal that the bearing capacity and the measured deflection of the steel fiber reinforced high-strength beams are much larger and...

  15. Influence of ultra-high strength infill in slender concrete-filled steel tubular columns

    OpenAIRE

    PORTOLES FLAJ, JOSÉ MANUEL; Serra Mercé, Enrique; Romero, Manuel L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes 24 tests conducted on slender circular tubular columns filled with normal, high, and ultra-high strength concrete for plain, bar reinforced and steel fiber reinforced columns. These were reinforced and subjected to both concentric and eccentric axial load. It is a continuation of a previous research paper (Portoles et al., 2011 [1]), which presented test results on eccentrically loaded plain concrete columns. The test parameters are nominal strength of concrete (30, 90...

  16. Mechanism of hydrogen enhanced-cracking of high-strength steel welded joints

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ćwiek; A. Zieliński

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of high-strength steel welded joints to hydrogendegradation and establishing of applicable mechanism of their hydrogen-enhanced cracking.Design/methodology/approach: High-strength quenched and tempered steel grade S690Q and its weldedjoints have been used. Susceptibility to hydrogen degradation of steel and welded joints has been evaluatedusing monotonically increasing load. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out on round sm...

  17. Cold Cracking Of Underwater Wet Welded S355G10+N High Strength Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Fydrych D.; Łabanowski J.; Tomków J.; Rogalski G.

    2015-01-01

    Water as the welding environment determines some essential problems influencing steel weldability. Underwater welding of high strength steel joints causes increase susceptibility to cold cracking, which is an effect of much faster heat transfer from the weld area and presence of diffusible hydrogen causing increased metal fragility. The paper evaluates the susceptibility to cold cracking of the high strength S355G10+N steel used, among others, for ocean engineering and hydrotechnical structur...

  18. Fire Experiments of Thin-Walled CFRP Pretensioned High Strength Concrete Slabs Under Service Load

    OpenAIRE

    Terrasi, Giovanni; Maluk, Cristian; Bisby, Luke; Hugi, Erich; Kanik, Birol

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable precast concrete elements are emerging utilizing high-performance, self-consolidating, fibre-reinforced concrete (HPSCC) reinforced with high-strength, lightweight, and non-corroding prestressed carbon fibre reinforced plastic tendons. One example of this is a new type of precast carbon FRP pretensioned HPSCC panel intended as load-bearing panels for glass concrete building facades. It is known that the bond strength between both steel and FRP reinforcing tendons and concrete dete...

  19. Impact of internal water reservoirs on shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Drčar, Grega

    2013-01-01

    High strength concrete has lower water-cement ratio compared to regular concrete, which allows higher strength of the concrete. Because of low water-cement ratio, there is a lack of water during the process of hydration.During the transport of water from the capillary pores of concrete, high forces to the structure of the hardening cement paste were created. Because of this forces, the concrete shrinks, which creates cracks and therefore reduces durability of the concrete elements. In this...

  20. Stress-strain Response of High Strength Concrete and Application of the Existing Models

    OpenAIRE

    Tehmina Ayub; Nasir Shafiq; M Fadhil Nuruddin

    2014-01-01

    Stress-strain model of concrete is essentially required during design phases of structural members. With the evolution of normal concrete to High Strength Concrete (HSC); various predictive models of stress-strain behavior of High Strength Concrete (HSC) are available in the literature. Such models developed by various researchers are differing to each other, because of the different mix proportions and material properties. This study represents a comparative analysis of available stress-stra...

  1. Durability and Strength Properties on High Performance Self Compacting Concrete with GGBS and Silica Fumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M.Srishaila

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study on the experimental investigation on strength aspects like compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength, and durability aspects like rapid chloride penetration test(RCPT of high performance self-compacting concrete with different mineral admixtures . Initials tests like slump test, L-box test, U-box test and T50 test will be carried out. The methodology adopted here is Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS which is replaced partially by cement at 10%, 20% and 30% and silica fumes(SF by 3%, 6%, 9% in combination with Portland cement and the performance is measured and compared. The influence of mineral admixtures on the workability, mechanical strength and durability aspects of self-compacting concrete are studied. The mix proportion is obtained as per the guidelines given by European Federation of producers and contractors of special products for structure.

  2. Influences of Short Discrete Fibers in High Strength Concrete with Very Coarse Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyuddin Ramli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: High Strength Concrete (HSC normally content high cementitous amount and low water binder ratio. However, these would cause substantial volume changes to the concrete and therefore affected the strength development. In addition, the brittleness of HSC was increased when silica fume used as partial cement replacement to achieve high strength. Approach: This study discussed the effects of incorporated short discrete Coconut Fibers (CF, Barchip Fibers (BF and Glass Fibers (GF into HSC to enhance the performance of concrete while kept the binder content at moderate level. Additional specialty to this HSC was casted with very coarse sand with fineness modulus of 3.98. A total of thirteen mixes were casted and tested for slump, density, compressive strength, flexural strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity in accordance with British Standards. Results: The slump was slightly reduced by the short discrete fibers. All of the fibrous specimens had lower density than control. However, the compressive strength of the HSC had increased from 71.8-79.0 MPa using 1.8% of BF, while flexural strength had increased from 5.21-6.50 MPa. All specimens showed that ultrasonic velocity higher than 4.28 km sec-1. Conclusion/Recommendations: In short, combination of incorporated short discrete fibers and applied very coarse sand to produce HSC showed very satisfying results and improvements. Further assessment on durability and impact resistivity will be verified in the coming research.

  3. Frost effects on the microstructure of high strength concrete, and methods for their analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukko, Heikki

    1992-12-01

    The aims of the study are to identify and analyze the applicability of experimental methods through studies of the freeze thaw durability of high strength concretes with different binder compositions and to elucidate the microstructural changes that occur during freeze thaw degradation. The main features of concrete microstructure, existing analysis methods, and main theories of concrete frost resistance are surveyed. Pore and crack properties of concrete were measured by automatic analysis method. Five high strength concrete mixes with various binder compositions and one medium strength concrete were prepared. They were subjected to as many as 1000 freeze thaw cycles, and the defects were studied. Strength loss was used as the basic measure of degradation. Image analysis results can be used in mathematical modeling of strength changes of concrete. Visual optical analysis of thin sections was proved to be a reliable method. Mercury porosimetry results did not give a reliable basis for the estimation of frost crack increase due to ettringite formations in the cracks. Scanning electron microscopy is a valuable tool for detecting the causes of changes found in porosimetric analysis. The principle of critical degree of saturation applies to high strength concrete. The mathematical modeling of strength loss during frost tests can be based on a combined model including changes in total porosity and maximum crack length.

  4. Weldability of high strength Ni-based alloy USC141 as boiler tube for 700 C USC plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, G.; Sato, T. [Babcock-Hitachi K.K. Kure-shi, Hiroshima-ken (Japan); Imano, S.; Sato, J. [Hitachi, Ltd. Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Uehara, T.; Toji, A. [Hitachi Metals, Ltd. Yasugi-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Recently the increase of steam temperature and pressure of power plant is required to enhance the thermal efficiency and reduce the CO{sub 2} emission. For the application to advanced USC (Ultra Super Critical) boiler with steam temperature around 700 C, the application of Ni-based alloy such as Alloy617 will be necessary. A new Ni-based alloy USC141 (20Cr-10Mo-2Ti-Al-bal.Ni) with excellent creep rupture strength and low thermal expansion has been developed by Hitachi Ltd. and Hitachi Metals Ltd. as the candidate material for 700 C USC turbine components. In present work, to investigate the possibility for boiler tube application of USC141, its weldability and high temperature strength properties were experimentally examined. The tested material as solution-treated condition shows higher creep rupture strength than that of Alloy617. GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) trials of tubular specimen using NIMONIC263 filler wire were conducted successfully and the creep rupture strength of weld joint was as similar as that of parent metal. Therefore it is considered that USC141 has a promising potential as boiler tube candidate for 700 C class USC power plant. (orig.)

  5. High temperature strength of ceramic moulds applied in the investment casting method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kolczyk

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic casting moulds strength is an important factor, which influences the quality and properties of castings being produced by the investment casting method. It is especially important during mould pouring with liquid metal. Studies allowing determining the casting mould strength at high temperatures, that means at the ones at which the moulds are poured, are not numerous. None generally accepted (normalized method for the assessment of such strength exists in practice. The new method of the ceramic mouldso tensile strength investigation at high temperatures is described in the paper. Tests were performed at temperatures from 100 to 1100 C. The ceramic moulding sand was prepared of modern materials: colloidal silica – being a binder – and highly refractory ceramic materials.

  6. THEORETICAL ASPECTS, EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS AND EFFICIENCY IN USAGE OF HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE FOR BRIDGE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Liakhevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Belarus concrete with strength up to 60 MPA is used for construction. At the same time high strength concrete with compressive strength above 60 MPA is widely used in all industrially developed countries. High- strength concrete is included in regulatory documents of the European Union and that fact has laid a solid foundation for its application. High strength concrete is produced using highly dispersed silica additives, such as micro-silica and plasticizers (super-plasticizers with a water/cement (w/c ratio not greater than 0.4.Theoretical aspects of high-strength concrete for bridge structures have been studied in the paper. The paper shows a positive impact of highly dispersed additives on structure and physico-mechanical properties of cement compositions, namely: reduction of total porosity of a cement stone in concrete while increasing volumetric concentration and dispersion of a filler; binding of calcium hydroxide with the help of amorphised micro-silica; increased activity of mineral additives during their thin shredding; acceleration of the initial stage of chemical hardening of cement compositions with highly dispersed particle additives that serve as centers of crystallization; “binder-additive” cluster formation due to high surface energy of highly dispersed additive particles; hardening of surface area between a cement stone and aggregates in concrete; high-strength concretes are gaining strength much faster than conventional concretes.Technology of preparation and composition of high-strength concrete using highly dispersed mineral additives and super-plasticizer has been developed in the paper. This concrete will ensure a higher density, wa- ter-and gas tightness, increased resistance to aggressive environment, reduced consumption of concrete and reinforcement, reduced transport and installation weight, increased initial strength, early easing of shutters and preliminary compression, increased length of bridge spans

  7. Exceptional high fatigue strength in Cu-15at.%Al alloy with moderate grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Tian, Yanzhong; Zhang, Zhenjun; An, Xianghai; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhefeng

    2016-06-01

    It is commonly proposed that the fatigue strength can be enhanced by increasing the tensile strength, but this conclusion needs to be reconsidered according to our study. Here a recrystallized α-Cu-15at.%Al alloy with moderate grain size of 0.62 μm was fabricated by cold rolling and annealing, and this alloy achieved exceptional high fatigue strength of 280 MPa at 107 cycles. This value is much higher than the fatigue strength of 200 MPa for the nano-crystalline counterpart (0.04 μm in grain size) despite its higher tensile strength. The remarkable improvement of fatigue strength should be mainly attributed to the microstructure optimization, which helps achieve the reduction of initial damage and the dispersion of accumulated damage. A new strategy of “damage reduction” was then proposed for fatigue strength improvement, to supplement the former strengthening principle. The methods and strategies summarized in this work offer a general pathway for further improvement of fatigue strength, in order to ensure the long-term safety of structural materials.

  8. Dualism of precipitation morphology in high strength low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chih-Yuan, Chen, E-mail: chen6563@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chien-Chon, Chen [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Jer-Ren, Yang, E-mail: jryang@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-25

    While the role of microalloying elements on precipitation strengthening in ferrite matrix during austenite/ferrite transformation is quite clear, some uncertainty still exists concerning the variability of the microhardness distribution of ferrite grains in the isothermal holding condition. The objective of the present study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of carbide precipitation morphology in the ferrite matrix under different processing temperatures and times and to correlate it with austenite decomposition kinetics to elucidate why a large microhardness distribution occurs at low isothermal holding temperature. Better understanding of carbide precipitation behavior can help researchers to determine the root cause of variation in microhardness distribution, which would allow metallurgists to produce high quality steels. Measurement with a Vickers hardness indenter revealed that, in specimens isothermally held at 625 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 240–420 after 5 min of isothermal holding, and 270–340 after 60 min. For specimens isothermally held at 725 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 200–330 for 5 min of isothermal holding, and 200–250 for 60 min. Therefore, the average microhardness decreased with the isothermal holding temperature and time, and a larger range of distribution occurred with short isothermal holding times. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that interface precipitation and random precipitation can occur within the same ferrite grain. The reason is that the austenite decomposition rate varies with transformation temperature and time. An excessively fast austenite/ferrite interface movement velocity, which usually happens in small ferrite grains, would cause these ferrite grains with microalloying elements to exceed their solubility. Furthermore, these microalloying elements will be precipitated randomly after isothermal holding at longer times. Consequently, a large

  9. Dualism of precipitation morphology in high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the role of microalloying elements on precipitation strengthening in ferrite matrix during austenite/ferrite transformation is quite clear, some uncertainty still exists concerning the variability of the microhardness distribution of ferrite grains in the isothermal holding condition. The objective of the present study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of carbide precipitation morphology in the ferrite matrix under different processing temperatures and times and to correlate it with austenite decomposition kinetics to elucidate why a large microhardness distribution occurs at low isothermal holding temperature. Better understanding of carbide precipitation behavior can help researchers to determine the root cause of variation in microhardness distribution, which would allow metallurgists to produce high quality steels. Measurement with a Vickers hardness indenter revealed that, in specimens isothermally held at 625 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 240–420 after 5 min of isothermal holding, and 270–340 after 60 min. For specimens isothermally held at 725 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 200–330 for 5 min of isothermal holding, and 200–250 for 60 min. Therefore, the average microhardness decreased with the isothermal holding temperature and time, and a larger range of distribution occurred with short isothermal holding times. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that interface precipitation and random precipitation can occur within the same ferrite grain. The reason is that the austenite decomposition rate varies with transformation temperature and time. An excessively fast austenite/ferrite interface movement velocity, which usually happens in small ferrite grains, would cause these ferrite grains with microalloying elements to exceed their solubility. Furthermore, these microalloying elements will be precipitated randomly after isothermal holding at longer times. Consequently, a large

  10. Treatment of high strength leachate by biological nutrient removal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the performance of a pilot-scale A/O system with respect to not only conventional wastewater quality parameters, but also specific volatile and semi-volatile organics. Hydraulic loadings were increased from 1.0 to 3.0 m3/d in two stages. The leachate was characterized by highly variable BOD, COD, TKN, and NH3-N concentrations ranging from 540-7185, 2040-8470, 501-1294, and 321-1000 mg/l respectively with over 91% of the BOD and 95% of the COD in soluble form. Concentrations of VOCs primarily benzene, chlorobenzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, o-xylene, m and p-xylene, 1,1-dichloroethane, and trichloroethylene ranging from 0.2 to 81.4 μg/l were reduced to below detection levels in the A/O system. At the three loadings investigated in the study i.e. 1, 2, and 3 m3 /d, the system affected excellent removals of organics and nitrogen, with reductions of soluble BOD (SBOD), total BOD, soluble COD (SCOD), COD, TKN, NH3-N, and total nitrogen of 91-100%, 87-97%, 65-93%, 57-91%, 84-96%, 99.96-99.97%, and 81-90% respectively. At the various loadings investigated in this study, effluent concentrations of SBOD, BOD,COD, SCOD, TKN, NH3-N, and nitrates as low as 4, 56, 685, 608, 35.2, 0.6, and 28.8 mg/l respectively were routinely achieved. Furthermore, despite operating at high mixed liquor solids in the 5000-6500 mg/l range, and the adversely long hydraulic residence time in the clarifier of 2 days, effluent total and volatile suspended solids concentrations of about 50 and 30 mg/l were achieved. The A/O system was not only capable of achieving the required sewer discharge criteria but it also demonstrated the achievability of surface discharge criteria, thus eliminating the need for additional treatment at the municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The system operated in a very stable fashion resisting the wide fluctuations in influent quality. (author)

  11. High-strength materials using the coat-mix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Coat-mix method to produce artifical graphite has been developed recently at the Institute for Reactor Materials in the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich. According to this method, the binder resin is dissolved in an organic solvent and the graphite filler powder is introduced into the solution under stirring and vibration to form a slurry. The slurry is then passed through a nozzle into a liquid precipitation medium in which the binder is not soluble but the solvent is miscible with it. The insoluble binder in uniformely deposited on the surface the graphite powder grains upon injection into the precipitation medium, whereas the solvent is removed by mixing with precipitation medium. Meanwhile in a modified form for the coat-mix process, the binder resin is dissolved in caustic soda (saves burnable organic solvent) and the slurrly is passed to a nozzle with water-diluted acid. Drying takes place by a energy-saving new development (vacuum condensation drying). The mixing method leads to an uniform distribution of filler and binder and the hence-formed-mould exhibit uniformly distributed pores throughout and high copying precision. The manufacture of moulds and industrial applications are shown. (orig./IHOE)

  12. The rupture strength of dissimilar joints in high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dissimilar joints between austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels the heat affected zone in the ferritic steel always is the weakest link. Two different joints where the ferritic steel has been 10CrMo910 (2.25Cr1Mo) and X20CrMoV121 respectively (162Cr1Mo0.3V) has been investigated through thermal cycling and isothermal creep testing. In this case the purpose has been to investigate the weakest link and therefore both 10CrMo910 and X20CrMoV121 have been welded to themselves using the TIG-method with Inconel 82 (70Cr20Cr3Mn2). 5Nb as filler wire. Crossweld specimens have been taken from the joints. To accelerate the testing the tip temperature at thermal cycling and the temperature at isothermal creep testing has been in the region 600-650 degrees C. Low ductile fracture, which is typical for failures in practice, has been obtained by using a moderate tensile stress, 63 N/mm2. In the high temperature range, 650 degrees C, the thermal cycling compared to the isothermal testing had no influence but in lower temperatures the cycling caused decreased time to rupture. The time to rupture in thermal cycling as well as in isothermal testing as a function of testing temperature can be fitted to exponential curve of type t = a x ebT (where t and T are time and temperature respectively). Through extrapolation of the measured data it has been found that 10CrMo910 in hard conditions that is thermal cycling has a life time at 500 degrees C of about 100 000 h. If the operational temperature is constant the life time will be about four times longer. The X20CrMoV121 on the other hand has a life time at thermal cycling at 500 degrees C and moderate tensile stress of about 3 000 000 h. This means that the tensile stress can be increased considerably. The cracks appear in 10CrMo910 closely to the fusion line but in the X20CrMoV121 steel cracking and fracture arise in the heat affected zone some millimeters from the fusion line. (au)

  13. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-10-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus.

  14. Experimental study of high strength concrete-filled circular tubular columns under eccentric loading

    OpenAIRE

    Portoles, J.M.; Romero, Manuel L.; Bonet Senach, José Luís; Filippou, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes 37 tests conducted on slender circular tubular columns filled with normal and high strength concrete subjected to eccentric axial load. The test parameters were the nominal strength of concrete (30, 70 and 90 MPa), the diameter to thickness ratio Dt, the eccentricity ratio eD and the column slenderness (LD). The experimental ultimate load of each test was compared with the design loads from Eurocode 4, which limits the strength of concrete up to 50 MPa. The aim of the pape...

  15. Behaviors of harmonic signals in wavelength-modulated spectroscopy under high absorption strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuntao Wang; Haiwen Cai; Jianxin Geng; Zhengqing Pan; Dijun Chen; Zujie Fang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Behaviors of harmonic signals in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) for gas detection with Lorentzian line under high absorption strength are investigated. Approximate analytic expressions of the second, fourth, and sixth harmonics on the strength are presented in concise forms. Simulations show that the expressions are in agreement with the Fourier expansion by numerical integration. It is expected theoretically and experimentally in a WMS system for methane detection that there are not only a maximum, but also a null point in the harmonics versus strength relations, which should be of practical importance in methane sensing applications.

  16. Study on the strength of frozen clay at high confining pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An extensive test program was conducted on East China deep clay to investigate mechanical behavior in the process of axial compression and triaxial compression.In addition,the effect of negative temperature and confining pressure on the strength of frozen clay was analyzed.It is concluded that the stress-strain curves at high confining pressure belong to the strain hardening type and its strength almost corresponds to confining pressure in the range of tested confined stress.With respect to temperature,the strength increases when the temperature decreases.

  17. The resistance of selected high strength alloys to embrittlement by a hydrogen environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Selected high strength iron base and cobalt base alloys with yield strengths in the range from 1233 to 2129 MN per sq m (179 to 309 KSI) were resistant to degradation of mechanical properties in a one atmosphere hydrogen environment at ambient temperature. These alloys were strengthened initially by cold working which produced strain induced epsilon prime-hcp martensite and fcc mechanical twins in an fcc matrix. Heat treatment of the cobalt base alloy after cold working produced carbide precipitates with retention of an hcp epsilon phase which increased the yield strength level to a maximum of 2129 MN per sq m (309 KSI). High-strength alloys can be produced which have some resistance to degradation of mechanical properties by a hydrogen environment under certain conditions.

  18. Early-Age Strength of Ultra-High Performance Concrete in Various Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Sup Park

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The strength of Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC can be sensitively affected by the curing method used. However, in contrast to the precast plant production of UHPC where a standard high-temperature steam curing is available, an optimum curing condition is rarely realized with cast-in-place UHPC. Therefore, the trend of the compressive strength development of UHPC was experimentally investigated in this study, with a focus on early-age strength by assuming the various curing conditions anticipated on site. Concrete specimens were cured under different conditions with variables including curing temperature, delay time before the initiation of curing, duration of curing, and moisture condition. Several conditions for curing are proposed that are required when the cast-in-place UHPC should gain a specified strength at an early age. It is expected that the practical use of UHPC on construction sites can be expedited through this study.

  19. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  20. Foreword for the special issue of the 7th China-Japan bilateral symposium on high temperature strength of materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Tung TU; Yukio TAKAHASHI

    2011-01-01

    @@ The 7th China-Japan Bilateral Symposium on High Temperature Strength of Materials was held at Dalian, China, during the period August 23-27, 2010.The symposium was co-organized by the High Temperature Strength and Materials Committee, the Society of Materials, Chinese Mechanical Engineering Society and the Committee on High Temperature Strength of Materials, the Society of Materials Science Japan.

  1. Fire behavior of eccentrically loaded slender high strength concrete-filled tubular columns

    OpenAIRE

    Moliner, Vicente; Espinós Capilla, Ana; Romero, Manuel L.; Hospitaler Pérez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes sixteen fire tests conducted on slender circular hollow section columns filled with normal and high strength concrete, subjected to concentric axial loads. The test parameters were the nominal strength of concrete (30 and 80 MPa), the infilling type (plain concrete, reinforced concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete) and the axial load level (20% and 40%). The columns were tested under fixed-pinned boundary conditions and the relative slenderness at room temperature ...

  2. Fire behavior of axially loaded slender high strength concrete-filled tubular columns

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Manuel L.; Moliner, V.; Espinós Capilla, Ana; Ibáñez Usach, Carmen; Hospitaler Pérez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes sixteen fire tests conducted on slender circular hollow section columns filled with normal and high strength concrete, subjected to concentric axial loads. The test parameters were the nominal strength of concrete (30 and 80 MPa), the infilling type (plain concrete, reinforced concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete) and the axial load level (20% and 40%). The columns were tested under fixed-pinned boundary conditions and the relative slenderness at room temperature ...

  3. Effect of Stirrups on Behavior of Normal and High Strength Concrete Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Němeček, J. (Jan); P. Padevět; Bittnar, Z.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with an experimental investigation and numerical simulation of reinforced concrete columns. The behavior of normal and high strength columns is studied, with special attention paid to the confinement effects of transversal reinforcement in columns with a square cross section. The character of a failure, and the strengths, ductility and post-peak behavior of columns are observed in experiments and also in numerical solution. A three-dimensional computational model based on the...

  4. The Parameters Fitting in High-strength Concrete Mix Proportion Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Hao; LV Lingnu; ZHANG Luo

    2005-01-01

    Parameters that need to be fitted in High-Strength concrete mix proportion experiment and two equation models that are referenced in the experiment are discussed. The reasoning and implement of the corresponding linear fitting algorithm are demonstrated.Parmeter fitting is realized by value estimate method of mathematical statistics.This paper combines mathematical statisitics,linear equations and template thought together successfully and discussed an efficient parameter fitting method based on strength equation model and water consumption equation model.

  5. Latest developments in mechanical properties and metallurgical features of high strength line pipe steels

    OpenAIRE

    Belato Rosado, Diego; De Waele, Wim; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Hertelé, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    In response to the increasing demand to improve both transportation efficiency and performance, the steel pipe industry has conducted extensive efforts to develop line pipe steel grades with superior metallurgical and mechanical (strength, toughness and ductility) properties in order to allow exploitation in hostile environments. This paper aims to give an overview of recent developments of high strength pipe steel grades as API 5L X70 and beyond, providing a detailed understanding of the con...

  6. Brittleness Generation Mechanism and Failure Model of High Strength Lightweight Aggregate Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The brittleness generation mechanism of high strength lightweight aggregate concrete(HSLWAC) was presented, and it was indicated that lightweight aggregate was the vulnerable spot,initiating brittleness. Based on the analysis of the brittleness failure by the load-deflection curve, the brittleness presented by HSLWAC was more prominent compared with ordinary lightweight aggregate concrete of the same strength grade. The model of brittleness failure was also established.

  7. The impact of different lightweight aggregates on properties of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Šubic, Nika

    2014-01-01

    High strength concrete is known for its many favorable qualities. However it also has some negative characteristics like autogenous shrinkage which can be reduced by adding saturated lightweight aggregate to the concrete mix. The effect of using different types of lightweight aggregate on compressive strength and shrinkage of concrete is discussed in this graduation thesis. Factors influencing the success of internal curing with prewetted lightweight aggregate are described in theoretic...

  8. High-strength ultrafine-grained Ti-Fe-Sn alloys with a bimodal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L C; Lu, H B; Pereloma, E V [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Calin, M; Eckert, J, E-mail: lczhangimr@gmail.co, E-mail: laichang@uow.edu.a [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, PO Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The microstructure-mechanical properties relationship in ultrafine-grained Ti-Fe-Sn alloys with high strength and large plasticity was investigated. The alloys are mainly composed of a hypereutectic microstructure with micrometer-sized primary dendrites embedded in an ultrafine-grained eutectic matrix. The bimodal composites exhibit a fracture strength higher than 2350 MPa and an enhanced plasticity larger than 7%. The excellent mechanical properties are critically related to the microstructure features of the phase constituents in the alloys.

  9. Production of high-conductivity, high-strength in situ Cu-Nb multifilamentary composite wire and strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of high-conductivity, high-strength wire and strip in useful sizes from in-situ CuNb multifilamentary composite material is described. Variation of mechanical properties and electrical conductivity vs. processing parameters are discussed. The material's thermomechanical properties, i.e., the relatively large resistance ratio and mechanical strength, suggest that this material will have applications where it is superior to copper and other generally used copper alloys, such as CuBe

  10. Effect of notch location on fatigue crack growth behavior of strength-mismatched high-strength low-alloy steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Nasser, S. Nemat

    2004-12-01

    Welding of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels involves the use of low-strength, equal-strength, and high-strength filler materials (electrodes) compared with the parent material, depending on the application of the welded structures and the availability of filler material. In the present investigation, the fatigue crack growth behavior of weld metal (WM) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of undermatched (UM), equally matched (EM), and overmatched (OM) joints has been studied. The base material used in this investigation is HSLA-80 steel of weldable grade. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been used to fabricate the butt joints. A center-cracked tension (CCT) specimen has been used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of welded joints, utilizing a servo-hydraulic-controlled fatigue-testing machine at constant amplitude loading (R=0). The effect of notch location on the fatigue crack growth behavior of strength mismatched HSLA steel weldments also has been analyzed.

  11. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Shear capacity of high-strength concrete beams with their point of inflection within the shear span

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, MS; Pam, HJ; Kwan, AKH

    1998-01-01

    The shear strength of concrete does not increase in proportion with the concrete grade. Thus, when high-strength concrete is used in place of normal-strength concrete, the shear capacity of the structure could become critical. In the study presented, the effect of concrete strength on the shear capacity of concrete beams was investigated. As previous research on normal-strength concrete beams has shown that the presence of an inflection point within the shear span can significantly influence ...

  13. Advanced Functionalities for Highly Reliable Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Yi

    This thesis covers two research topics concerning optical solutions for networks e.g. avionic systems. One is to identify the applications for silicon photonic devices for cost-effective solutions in short-range optical networks. The other one is to realise advanced functionalities in order to...

  14. Effect of rebar cover and development length on bond and slip in high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite behavior of reinforced concrete requires adequate bond between concrete and steel reinforcement that can transfer stresses between them. The bond strength is influenced by cover to the reinforcement and development length. Experimental investigation was carried out and twisted steel bars conforming to BS 4461 were used in high strength concrete to study bond strength characteristics. The post peak bond behavior was studied by using displacement controlled universal testing machine. The results of this experimentation confirmed that by increasing the cover/bar diameter ratio, bond strength increased and slip decreased for both small and large diameter twisted steel bars. This increased confinement reduced the uneven bond stress distribution along the development length. Stress concentration on the front key (concrete between two ribs) was reduced due to its continuity along the twisted steel bar. Hence it offered maximum possible resistance to bond failure and the bond strength increased. Similarly by increasing the development length, bond strength and corresponding slip both increased. Another fact visible from all figures and observed in all samples, is that as the first concrete key failed there was a sudden drop in bond strength due to the formation of longitudinal splitting cracks. These cracks are visible from the surface of the cylinder. Once a key is failed, failure propagated immediately. (author)

  15. New Powder Metallurgical Approach to Achieve High Fatigue Strength in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fei; Ravi Chandran, K. S.; Kumar, Pankaj; Sun, Pei; Zak Fang, Z.; Koopman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Recently, manufacturing of titanium by sintering and dehydrogenation of hydride powders has generated a great deal of interest. An overarching concern regarding powder metallurgy (PM) titanium is that critical mechanical properties, especially the high-cycle fatigue strength, are lower than those of wrought titanium alloys. It is demonstrated here that PM Ti-6Al-4V alloy with mechanical properties comparable (in fatigue strength) and exceeding (in tensile properties) those of wrought Ti-6Al-4V can be produced from titanium hydride powder, through the hydrogen sintering and phase transformation process. Tensile and fatigue behavior, as well as fatigue fracture mechanisms, have been investigated under three processing conditions. It is shown that a reduction in the size of extreme-sized pores by changing the hydride particle size distribution can lead to improved fatigue strength. Further densification by pneumatic isostatic forging leads to a fatigue strength of ~550 MPa, comparable to the best of PM Ti-6Al-4V alloys prepared by other methods and approaching the fatigue strengths of wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The microstructural factors that limit fatigue strength in PM titanium have been investigated, and pathways to achieve greater fatigue strengths in PM Ti-6Al-4V alloys have been identified.

  16. CORRELATION BETWEEN HARDNESS AND TENSILE PROPERTIES IN ULTRA-HIGH STRENGTH DUAL PHASE STEELS – SHORT COMMUNICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gejza Rosenberg; Martin Gaško

    2012-01-01

    The possibility to predict yield strength, strength limit, fatigue live estimation as well as other mechanical properties depending on values of materials hardness is commonly known and it is often used in practice. The main aim of this contribution is to review the possibilities of application of correlation relationships between hardness and ultimate tensile strength of steel sheets in various structural states. The experiments were performed on advanced steels with structure which is compo...

  17. Fatigue strength reduction model: RANDOM3 and RANDOM4 user manual. Appendix 2: Development of advanced methodologies for probabilistic constitutive relationships of material strength models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Lola; Lovelace, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    FORTRAN programs RANDOM3 and RANDOM4 are documented in the form of a user's manual. Both programs are based on fatigue strength reduction, using a probabilistic constitutive model. The programs predict the random lifetime of an engine component to reach a given fatigue strength. The theoretical backgrounds, input data instructions, and sample problems illustrating the use of the programs are included.

  18. A Low-Cost Hierarchical Nanostructured Beta-Titanium Alloy with High Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun; Joshi, Vineet V.; Srivastava, Ankit; Manandhar, Sandeep; Moxson, Vladimir S.; Duz, Volodymr; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-04-09

    Lightweighting of automobiles by use of novel low-cost, high strength-to-weight ratio structural materials can reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and in turn CO2 emission. Working towards this goal we achieved high strength in a low cost β-titanium alloy, Ti-1Al-8V-5Fe (Ti185), by hierarchical nanostructure consisting of homogenous distribution of micron-scale and nanoscale α-phase precipitates within the β-phase matrix. The sequence of phase transformation leading to this hierarchical nanostructure is explored using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Our results suggest that the high number density of nanoscale α-phase precipitates in the β-phase matrix is due to ω assisted nucleation of α resulting in high tensile strength, greater than any current commercial titanium alloy. Thus hierarchical nanostructured Ti185 serves as an excellent candidate for replacing costlier titanium alloys and other structural alloys for cost-effective lightweighting applications.

  19. A low-cost hierarchical nanostructured beta-titanium alloy with high strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Arun; Joshi, Vineet V.; Srivastava, Ankit; Manandhar, Sandeep; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodymyr A.; Lavender, Curt

    2016-04-01

    Lightweighting of automobiles by use of novel low-cost, high strength-to-weight ratio structural materials can reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and in turn CO2 emission. Working towards this goal we achieved high strength in a low cost β-titanium alloy, Ti-1Al-8V-5Fe (Ti185), by hierarchical nanostructure consisting of homogenous distribution of micron-scale and nanoscale α-phase precipitates within the β-phase matrix. The sequence of phase transformation leading to this hierarchical nanostructure is explored using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Our results suggest that the high number density of nanoscale α-phase precipitates in the β-phase matrix is due to ω assisted nucleation of α resulting in high tensile strength, greater than any current commercial titanium alloy. Thus hierarchical nanostructured Ti185 serves as an excellent candidate for replacing costlier titanium alloys and other structural alloys for cost-effective lightweighting applications.

  20. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  1. High-strength bioresorbable Fe–Ag nanocomposite scaffolds: Processing and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipova, Aliya [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Techion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Skolkovo, 143025 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G. [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Skolkovo, 143025 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Swain, Sanjaya K. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Techion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Gutmanas, Elazar Y., E-mail: gutmanas@technion.ac.il; Gotman, Irena [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Techion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    High strength ductile iron-silver nanocomposite scaffolds were fabricated employing high energy attrition milling of micron-submicron powders, followed by cold sintering/high pressure consolidation. Particulate leaching method with soluble Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} salts as porogens was used to create scaffolds with 50, 55, 60 and 73% volume fraction of pores. Part of specimens was annealed at 600, 800 and 900°C. Specimens were characterized employing X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron probe microanalysis (EDS) and high resolution SEM. Mechanical properties were measured in compression and permeability was measured in permeameter based on Darcy’s law. Scaffolds with 50% and 55% porosity exhibited high compressive strength (18–22 MPa), compressive strength of 8–12 MPa was observed for scaffolds with 73% porosity. Treatments at 800 and 900°C result in increase of strength and ductility with some coarsening of microstructure. Best combination of compressive strength (15 MPa) and permeability (0.6{sup −6} cm{sup 2}) is close to the range of trabecular bone.

  2. High-strength bioresorbable Fe–Ag nanocomposite scaffolds: Processing and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High strength ductile iron-silver nanocomposite scaffolds were fabricated employing high energy attrition milling of micron-submicron powders, followed by cold sintering/high pressure consolidation. Particulate leaching method with soluble Na2SO4 and K2CO3 salts as porogens was used to create scaffolds with 50, 55, 60 and 73% volume fraction of pores. Part of specimens was annealed at 600, 800 and 900°C. Specimens were characterized employing X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron probe microanalysis (EDS) and high resolution SEM. Mechanical properties were measured in compression and permeability was measured in permeameter based on Darcy’s law. Scaffolds with 50% and 55% porosity exhibited high compressive strength (18–22 MPa), compressive strength of 8–12 MPa was observed for scaffolds with 73% porosity. Treatments at 800 and 900°C result in increase of strength and ductility with some coarsening of microstructure. Best combination of compressive strength (15 MPa) and permeability (0.6−6 cm2) is close to the range of trabecular bone

  3. High-strength bioresorbable Fe-Ag nanocomposite scaffolds: Processing and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipova, Aliya; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Swain, Sanjaya K.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Gotman, Irena

    2015-10-01

    High strength ductile iron-silver nanocomposite scaffolds were fabricated employing high energy attrition milling of micron-submicron powders, followed by cold sintering/high pressure consolidation. Particulate leaching method with soluble Na2SO4 and K2CO3 salts as porogens was used to create scaffolds with 50, 55, 60 and 73% volume fraction of pores. Part of specimens was annealed at 600, 800 and 900°C. Specimens were characterized employing X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron probe microanalysis (EDS) and high resolution SEM. Mechanical properties were measured in compression and permeability was measured in permeameter based on Darcy's law. Scaffolds with 50% and 55% porosity exhibited high compressive strength (18-22 MPa), compressive strength of 8-12 MPa was observed for scaffolds with 73% porosity. Treatments at 800 and 900°C result in increase of strength and ductility with some coarsening of microstructure. Best combination of compressive strength (15 MPa) and permeability (0.6-6 cm2) is close to the range of trabecular bone.

  4. Test for Design Equation of Development Length on High - Strength Reinforcement in Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Sang Jun; Lee, Byung Soo; Bang, Chang Joon [KHNP CRI, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In Korea, NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) structures are constructed with Gr. 60 rebars. The use of high strength rebars with higher grade (Gr. 80) offers advantages: reducing the required amount of rebar materials and area; and improving the construct ability and economics of NPP reinforced concrete structures by increasing rebar spacing. This research studied the ACI 349-13 design codes and conducted bending member tests with high strength rebars, to compare and analyze use and non-use of development length calculation formulas.This test analyzed the impact of development length on the bond stress when using high strength rebars. It was found that the use of Gr. 80 increased the development length (or length of lap splice), resulting in the ACI 349-13 design formula overestimating the bond stress. Therefore, the use of high strength rebar with transverse reinforcement can allow application of the ACI 349-13 design formula without using the safety factor of 1.2. Furthermore, to propose the proper calculation methods of development length for high strength rebar, more tests should be conducted in the future, taking account of the impact of transverse reinforcement.

  5. Test for Design Equation of Development Length on High - Strength Reinforcement in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea, NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) structures are constructed with Gr. 60 rebars. The use of high strength rebars with higher grade (Gr. 80) offers advantages: reducing the required amount of rebar materials and area; and improving the construct ability and economics of NPP reinforced concrete structures by increasing rebar spacing. This research studied the ACI 349-13 design codes and conducted bending member tests with high strength rebars, to compare and analyze use and non-use of development length calculation formulas.This test analyzed the impact of development length on the bond stress when using high strength rebars. It was found that the use of Gr. 80 increased the development length (or length of lap splice), resulting in the ACI 349-13 design formula overestimating the bond stress. Therefore, the use of high strength rebar with transverse reinforcement can allow application of the ACI 349-13 design formula without using the safety factor of 1.2. Furthermore, to propose the proper calculation methods of development length for high strength rebar, more tests should be conducted in the future, taking account of the impact of transverse reinforcement

  6. Nanoscale analysis of the influence of pre-oxidation on oxide formation and wetting behavior of hot-dip galvanized high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pre-oxidized hot-dip galvanized advanced high strength steel was examined. • The interface was analyzed in detail via high energy resolution Auger spectra. • Evidence for an aluminothermic reduction of the Mn oxide was found. • A new model for galvanizing high manganese steel was developed. - Abstract: Hot-dip galvanized (HDG) 2nd generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS), nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) with 15.8 wt.% Mn, 0.79 wt.% C, was analyzed at the interface between steel and zinc by scanning Auger electron microscopy (AES) in order to confirm and improve an existing model of additional pre-oxidation treatment before annealing and immersion into the hot zinc bath. Furthermore these steel samples were fractured in the analysis chamber of the AES and analyzed without breaking vacuum. In these measurements the results of an aluminothermic reduction of the manganese and iron surface oxides on the steel could be confirmed by AES

  7. The Effects of Steel Fibre on the Mechanical Strength and Durability of Steel Fibre Reinforced High Strength Concrete (SFRHSC) Subjected to Normal and Hygrothermal Curing

    OpenAIRE

    Velayutham G.; Cheah C.B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental investigation into the mechanical strength and durability of steel fibre high strength concrete (SFHSC). In the experimental investigation, the properties of the steel fibre high strength concrete were assessed through two types of curing regimes, the normal water curing and the hygrothermal curing treatment, with the results of the tests being taken at 7 days and 7 days + 24 hours. The steel fibres were added at volume fractions of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0% ...

  8. Fracture and fatigue of high strength filaments. Final report, September 25, 1974--August 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, N.L.; Finnie, I.

    1975-01-01

    The history of high strength filamentary materials is traced and it is seen that their use has been widespread. It is shown that today's demands upon these materials require a better understanding of their behavior than is presently available. Current theories for both the static and fatigue strength of filamentary materials are reviewed. An analysis of static strength tests on short filaments is presented that explains seemingly anomalous test behavior which has been reported in the literature. The proposed approach is supported by experiments and computer analysis. A new machine for the fatigue testing of filaments or wires was designed and is described in detail. Results are presented for fatigue tests on tungsten wire, graphite filaments and glass filaments. Graphite filaments showed an unexpected deterioration in strength after very many cycles (10/sup 8/). An explanation of this effect is offered and supported by scanning electron microscope observations. The work concludes with some suggestions for further research.

  9. Mathematical modelling of the composition of a high-strength composite concrete containing blended carbonate additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high-strength concrete has been developed on the basis of the utilization of the blended carbonates as an active additive (BCA). The main technological features are the preliminary mechanical-chemical activation of this natural mineral product and the stage method of production. A three-parameter polynomial model has been developed for determining the amount of the main formulation components - Portland cement, BCA and water/cement ratio by evaluation of their influence on the changes of the compressive strength for one-year time period of the hardening. The experimental plan contains 27 tests. The regression equations have been calculated for five ages. The obtained regression coefficients reflecting the trend and the effect of the three factors on the output data during the investigated period have been analyzed. The compressive strength depending on two factors has been plotted for the ages of 28 and 365 days, the value of the third factor being constant. They are important for the construction practice and they display the whole spectrum of possibilities for variation of the formulation parameters, achieving at the same time the specified design strength. Key words: high-strength composite concrete, blended carbonate additive, polynomial model, regression, compressive strength

  10. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  11. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui–Yuan; Yu, Zhao–Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun–Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi–Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30-60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1-5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200-500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application.

  12. The behavior of high-strength unidirectional composites under tension with superposed hydrostatic pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinoviev, P.A.; Tsvetkov, S.V.; Kulish, G.G.; Berg, van den R.W.; Schepdael, van L.J.M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Three types of high-strength unidirectional composite materials were studied under longitudinal tension with superposed high hydrostatic pressure. Reinforcing fibers were T1000G carbon, S2 glass and Zylon PBO fibers; the Ciba 5052 epoxy resin was used as matrix. The composites were tested under exte

  13. An investigation on fatigue in high-strength steel offshore structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Petersen, R.I.; Martinez, L. Lopez

    1998-01-01

    The fatigue life of offshore steel structures in high-strength steel is studied. The material used has a yield stress of 800-1000 MPa and high weldability and toughness properties. Of special interest is the fatigue life under a realistic stochastic loading. In the experimental part of the invest...

  14. High temperature strength of simple and solute-modified 10Cr-30Mn austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop potential reduced activation manganese-stabilized austenitic steels for use in the first wall component of a fusion reactor, tensile and high temperature creep properties have been investigated for simple and solute-modified 10% Cr-30% Mn austenitic steels. The yield stress increased linearly with carbon concentration over the range from room temperature to 873 K. The creep-rupture strength at 873 K increased linearly with carbon concentration at short times, below 360 ks (100 h). The contribution of carbon to the increase in creep rupture strength decreased at high carbon concentration, above 0.2%, and at long times, above 3600 ks (1000 h). A solute-modified 10Cr-30Mn-2W-0.2Ti-0.008B-0.04P-0.15C(wt%) steel exhibited very high tensile and creep rupture strength that were superior to those of type 316 steel. (orig.)

  15. Improvement of formability of high strength steel sheets in shrink flanging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedon, Z.; Abe, Y.; Mori, K.

    2016-02-01

    In the shrinkage flanging, the wrinkling tends to occur due to compressive stress. The wrinkling will cause a difficulty in assembling parts, and severe wrinkling may leads to rupture of parts. The shrinkage flange of the ultra-high strength steel sheets not only defects the product by the occurrence of the wrinkling but also causes seizure and wear of the dies and shortens the life of dies. In the present study, a shape of a punch having gradual contact was optimized in order to prevent the wrinkling in shrinkage flanging of ultra-high strength steel sheets. The sheet was gradually bent from the corner of the sheet to reduce the compressive stress. The wrinkling in the shrink flanging of the ultra-high strength steel sheets was prevented by the punch having gradual contact. It was found that the punch having gradual contact is effective in preventing the occurrence of wrinkling in the shrinkage flanging.

  16. Structural Behavior of Continuous Prestressed Steel Fiber Reinforced High Strength Concrete Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The flexural behaviors of continuous fully and partially prestressed steel fiber reinforced high strength concrete beams are studied by experiment and nonlinear finite element analysis. Three levels of partial prestress ratio (PPR) are considered, and three pairs of two-span continuous beams with box sections varying in size are designed. The major parameters involved in the study include the PPR and the fiber location. It is concluded that the prestressed high strength concrete beam exhibits satisfactory ductility; the influences of steel fiber on the crack behaviors for partially prestressed beams are not as obvious as those for fully prestressed ones; steel fibers can improve the structural stiffness after cracking for fully prestressed high strength concrete beams; the moment redistribution from mid-span to intermediate support in the first stage should be mainly considered in practical design.

  17. Crack formation and fracture energy of normal and high strength concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F H Wittmann

    2002-08-01

    The crack path through composite materials such as concrete depends on the mechanical interaction of inclusions with the cement-based matrix. Fracture energy depends on the deviations of a real crack from an idealized crack plane. Fracture energy and strain softening of normal, high strength, and self-compacting concrete have been determined by means of the wedge splitting test. In applying the numerical model called “numerical concrete” crack formation in normal and high strength concrete is simulated. Characteristic differences of the fracture process can be outlined. Finally results obtained are applied to predict shrinkage cracking under different boundary conditions. Crack formation of high strength concrete has to be seriously controlled in order to achieve the necessary durability of concrete structures.

  18. High content SiC nanowires reinforced Al composite with high strength and plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al matrix composites reinforced with one-dimensional nano-materials (for instance nanotubes, nanowires and nanofibres) have been widely investigated in the past decade. However, the preparation, microstructure and mechanical behavior of high content (>10 vol%) SiC nanowires reinforced Al (SiCnw/Al) has not been reported yet. In the present work, 15 vol% SiCnw/6061Al composite was prepared by the pressure infiltration method. SiCnw/6061Al composite demonstrated good machining performance since continuous chip was obtained after cut by carbide turning tools. SiC nanowires were uniformly distributed without any observance of SiC agglomerates. Long SiC nanowires were observed after etching, implying that the preparation process had shown minor damage to the SiC nanowires and therefore, the pressure infiltration method is a feasible and successful way to prepare high content SiCnw/Al composites. The interface between SiC nanowires and Al was well bonded, and no significant interfacial product was found. After aging treatment, 15 vol% SiCnw/6061Al composite demonstrated high strength (over 1000 MPa), while a comparable plasticity as Al matrix was retained. The strengthening effect of SiC nanowires could be fully utilized through the fracture of SiC nanowires. Moreover, the grain size of Al matrix in SiCnw/6061Al composite was significantly refined and polycrystalline diffraction rings were observed. Therefore, supplemented to previous results in one-dimensional nano-materials reinforced Al matrix composites, fine-grain was also found as another main strengthening mechanism

  19. Welding of thin sheets of high strength zinc alloy coated steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc alloy coated, high strength (G550) sheet steels are important materials in automobile manufacture, building and construction. Spot or arc welding is typically required in the component manufacturing process, but these processes result in localised softening because of the weld thermal cycle. As a consequence, the strength is normally downgraded significantly for design purposes to values typical of the annealed Zn or Zn alloy grades (G250 or G300). The investigation described in this paper involved the examination of the effect of the welding process and welding variables on butt welding on 1mm thick Zn-coated and Zn-Al-coated sheet steels. It has been demonstrated that these sheet steels can be successfully welded by both FCAW and GMAW methods using appropriately low welding heat inputs. However, strength loss below the minimum specified 5.50 MPa tensile strength did occur because of transformation and recrystallisation of the recovery annealed base metal structure as a result of the heat input of the welding process. The extent of the strength loss increased with increasing nominal weld heat input due to an increased width of the softened heat affected zone (HAZ) regions and grain growth in the grain refined and recrystallised regions. The maximum loss in yield strength at the highest heat input of 130 J/mm was about 150 MPa, suggesting that a minimum yield stress of 400 MPa can be safely used for structural design calculations.

  20. Low-Temperature Toughening Mechanism in Thermomechanically Processed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2011-03-01

    High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels were fabricated by varying thermomechanical processing conditions such as rolling and cooling conditions in the intercritical region, and the low-temperature toughening mechanism was investigated in terms of microstructure and the associated grain boundary characteristics. The steels acceleratedly cooled to relatively higher temperature had lower tensile strength than those acceleratedly cooled to room temperature due to the increased volume fraction of granular bainite or polygonal ferrite (PF) irrespective of rolling in the intercritical region, while the yield strength was dependent on intercritical rolling, and start and finish cooling temperatures, which affected the formation of PF and low-temperature transformation phases. The steel rolled in the intercritical region and cooled to 673 K (400 °C) provided the best combination of high yield strength and excellent low-temperature toughness because of the presence of fine PF and appropriate mixture of various low-temperature transformation phases such as granular bainite, degenerate upper bainite (DUB), lower bainite (LB), and lath martensite (LM). Despite the high yield strength, the improvement of low-temperature toughness could be explained by the reduction of overall effective grain size based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis data, leading to the decrease in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  1. Stress-strain Response of High Strength Concrete and Application of the Existing Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehmina Ayub

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress-strain model of concrete is essentially required during design phases of structural members. With the evolution of normal concrete to High Strength Concrete (HSC; various predictive models of stress-strain behavior of High Strength Concrete (HSC are available in the literature. Such models developed by various researchers are differing to each other, because of the different mix proportions and material properties. This study represents a comparative analysis of available stress-strain models with the experimental results of three different series (100% cement concrete, Silica Fume (SF concrete and Metakaolin (MK concrete of high strength concrete mixes. Compressive strength and stress-strain behavior of 100×200 mm cylinders made of all Prepared mixes was determined at with curing age of 28 days. Compressive strength of all mixes was found in the range of 71-87 MPa. Stress-strain behavior of tested cylinders was found much different from the available predictive models. In view of the dissimilarity occurred between the predictive stress-strain behavior and the experimental data; a new predictive model is proposed, which adequately satisfy the experimental results.

  2. Friction stir weld assisted diffusion bonding of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Successful lap joints of Al 5754 sheet to coated DP600 and 22MnB5 steels. • Negligible effect of welding speed on mechanical properties of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints. • Lower strength of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints compared with Al 5754/DP600 joints. - Abstract: In the present paper friction stir-induced diffusion bonding is used for joining sheets of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels (DP600 and 22MnB5) by promoting diffusion bonding in an overlap configuration. Mechanical performance and microstructures of joints were analyzed by overlap shear testing, metallography, and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the strength of joint is dependent upon tool travel speed and the depth of the tool pin relative to the steel surface. The thickness and types of intermetallic compounds formed at the interface play a significant role in achieving a joint with optimum performance. That is, the formation of high aluminum composition intermetallic compounds (i.e. Al5Fe2) at the interface of the friction stir lap joint appeared to have a more negative effect on joint strength compared to the presence of high iron composition intermetallic phases (i.e. FeAl). This is in agreement with previously reported findings that FeAl intermetallic can improve the fracture toughness and interface strength in Al/St joints

  3. Synthesis and properties of hectorite/poly(AM/IA) nanocomposite hydrogels with high gel strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lan Wang; Wenzhong Cheng; Tao Wan; Ziwen Hu; Min Xu; Ruixiang Li; Chuzhang Zou

    2015-01-01

    A novel hectorite/poly(AM/IA)nanocomposite hydrogel was synthesized by inverse microemulsion polymerization. The influence of hectorite amount on water absorbency rate, gel strength and shearresistance was investigated. Dynamic viscoelasticity behaviour of the nanocomposite hydrogels was also studied. The nanocomposite hydrogels showed suitable water absorbency and shear-resistance, high gel strength, solid-like behaviour in the whole oscillation frequency region and enhanced viscoelastic behaviours under high stress. TEM indicated that the as-synthesized hydrogel particles were regular and spherical in shape with an average particle size of 43 nm in the range of 30-65 nm.

  4. Investigation of stress–strain models for confined high strength concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metin Husem; Selim Pul

    2007-06-01

    The effects of confinement reinforcement on the behaviour of high strength concrete columns are investigated for which prismatic experimental specimens were prepared. In the experiment specimens, four longitude reinforcement and confinement reinforcement were used. For each experiment, stress–strain relationship of concrete was obtained and compared with models proposed earlier. The results show that confinement reinforcement improved the ductility of high strength concrete. The ascending branch of stress–strain curves depended on the ratio of confinement reinforcement was similar to the modified Kent–Park model and the descending branch similar to the Nagashima model.

  5. Cold Cracking Of Underwater Wet Welded S355G10+N High Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fydrych D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water as the welding environment determines some essential problems influencing steel weldability. Underwater welding of high strength steel joints causes increase susceptibility to cold cracking, which is an effect of much faster heat transfer from the weld area and presence of diffusible hydrogen causing increased metal fragility. The paper evaluates the susceptibility to cold cracking of the high strength S355G10+N steel used, among others, for ocean engineering and hydrotechnical structures, which require underwater welding. It has been found from the CTS test results that the investigated steel is susceptible to cold cracking in the wet welding process.

  6. Facilitated fabrication of high strength silica aerogels using cellulose nanofibrils as scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingjing; Wang, Siqun; He, Chunxia; Lu, Zexiang; Huang, Jingda; Chen, Zhilin

    2016-08-20

    Monolithic cellulose nanofibrils (CNF)-silica composite aerogels were successfully prepared by immersing CNF aerogels into a silica solution in a two-step sol-gel process (initial hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) followed by condensation of silica particles). Aerogels were characterized by SEM, BET surface area test, bulk density and silica content analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, and compression test. The form of SiO2 existing in the composite aerogel was the spherical individual particles coated on CNF fibrils. The pH value of condensation solution was found to have great influence on the properties of the composite aerogels. By varying the pH value of condensation atmosphere from 8 to 12, the bulk densities of composite aerogels were able to be linearly increased from 0.059gcm(-3) to 0.29gcm(-3),and the silica content in the matrix sharply jumped from 3wt% to 79wt%. The porosities of the aerogels remained very high, between 85 and 96%, and the surface area of the composite aerogel reached up to 700.1m(2)g(-1). The compression properties of the composite aerogel improved greatly compared with those of the silica aerogel, about 8-30 times higher. Moreover, the compressive strength of the composite aerogel prepared in this work greatly exceeded the conventional insulation materials found in the recent commercial market, and without substantial increases in thermal conductivity. Hence, the findings of this research offer a promising application for composite aerogels and give a theoretical basis for developing new advanced materials. PMID:27178912

  7. Bulk glassy Ni(Co-)Nb-Ti-Zr alloys with high corrosion resistance and high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk glassy Ni60-xCoxNb20Ti10Zr10 (x=0-20 at.%) alloys with a large supercooled liquid region of more than 40 K were formed by copper-mold casting. The alloys with 5 and 10 at.% cobalt possess the highest glass-forming ability in the present alloy system and their critical diameter for glass formation is 1.5 mm. The bulk glassy alloys with different cobalt contents exhibit nearly the same corrosion behavior in HCl solutions. Their corrosion rates are less than 10-3 mm per year in 1 N and 6 N HCl solutions. The bulk glassy alloys are spontaneously passivated with low passive current densities of around 10-1 A m-2 in 1 N and 6 N HCl solutions. XPS analysis revealed the formation of a niobium-enriched passive film on the alloys by air-exposure or immersion in the acids, which could be responsible for the high corrosion resistance of the glassy Ni-based alloys. The Vickers hardness, Young's modulus, compressive fracture strength and compressive fracture elongation of the 1.5 mm diameter bulk glassy alloys are 860, 160 GPa, 3050 MPa and 2% respectively. The facture surface exhibits a vein-like morphology

  8. Development of pipe with high precision and high strength for automotive propeller shaft; Koseido haiten propeller yo kokan no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itami, Y.; Anai, I. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Miura, T. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-07

    This paper describes a protection method for the pipe end deformation of ERW (electric resistance welded) pipes caused by the difference in the strength of the ERW portion during the sizing process. For the ERW pipes, strength near the weld is different from that of the base metal due to the thermal history. Finite element analysis and experiments were conducted for the pipe with ERW portion having strength 100 MPa higher than the other portion in the case of drawing forming by the 4-roll sizer with even radius. As a result, it was found that the pipe end deformation due to the strength distribution at the ERW portion can be restricted by changing the ratio of radius of rolls. Experiments were conducted to protect the pipe end deformation due to the difference in the strength of the ERW portion by using rolls with different radii for 4-roll sizer. As a result of the experiments, it was found that high precision pipe can be manufactured as welded by changing the ratio of radius of rolls and applying it to various steel kinds even in the presence of strength difference between ERW portion and base metal. Products with strength ranging from 690 to 780 MPa can be currently manufactured. 4 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. FLEXURAL AND TENSILE CHARACTERISTICS OF MICRO FIBER-REINFORCED VERY HIGH STRENGTH CONCRETE THIN PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher M. Abu-Lebdeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to experimentally characterize the flexural and tensile characteristics of fiber-reinforced Very High-Strength Concrete (VHSC panels. The panels were made with a unique mix of cementitous materials achieving compressive strength of 26,000 psi (180 MPa or greater. VHSC panels were reinforced with polypropylene fibers of 1 inch (25.4 mm in length and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA micro-fibers of ½ inch length, incorporated at 1.5% by volume. For the flexural behavior, 17×2×¾ inch flat panels were tested under third-point loading tests, while the direct tension experiments were tested on 10×3×½ inch tension panels under a direct tensile load. Flexural tests were conducted on three panels of plain VHSC, three panels of VHSC reinforced with polypropylene fibers and three panels of VHSC reinforced with ½ inch micro-fibers. Similar testing program was used to conduct the direct tension tests. Also, compression test conducted on 2×2×2 inch cubes and compressive test conducted on 4 inch by 8 inch cylinders test were used to establish compressive strength and modulus of elasticity respectively. Results show that the compressive strength, tensile strength and fracture toughness of the VHSC panels were much greater than those normally obtained by typical concrete material. The presence of fibers increases the toughness of VHSC specimens between 80 and 190% and increases the tensile strength by 23 to 47%. The modulus of elasticity and Poisson’s ratio recorded herein were determined according to ASTM C 469-02. Laboratory experiments on flexural and tensile properties of thin, very high-strength, fiber reinforced concrete panels, were used to study the material and characterize the panels’ reaction to load. Parameters such as compressive strength, tensile strength, toughness, elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio and first-crack strength were determined and may be considered for potential use as

  10. Recycling Glass Cullet from Waste CRTs for the Production of High Strength Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Maschio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports on the results of some experiments dealing with the recycling of mixed cathode ray tube (CRT glass waste in the production of high-strength mortars. Waste CRT glass cullet was previously milled, and sieved, and the only fine fraction was added to the fresh mortar in order to replace part of the natural aggregate. The addition of superplasticizer was also investigated. All hydrated materials displayed high compressive strength after curing. Samples containing CRT mixed glass showed a more rapid increase of strength with respect to the reference compositions, and materials with a superplasticizer content of 1% showed the best overall performance due to the favourable influence of the small glass particles which increase the amount of silicate hydrated produced. The induced coupled plasma (ICP analysis made on the solutions, obtained from the leaching tests, confirmed the low elution of hazardous elements from the monolithic materials produced and consequently their possible environmental compatibility.

  11. Change of tensile behavior of a high-strength low-alloy steel with tempering temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tensile behavior of a high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after tempering at different temperatures from 200 to 700 deg. C was investigated. The steel showed similar tensile behavior with almost no change in strength for tempering below 400 deg. C. However, when the tempering temperature was increased from 500 to 650 deg. C, the steel displayed not only a decrease in strength, but also gradually the upper yield points and lower strain-hardening ability. When the tempering temperature was increased up to 700 deg. C, the steel exhibited a 'round roof' shaped tensile curve and a high strain-hardening exponent. These interesting phenomena of tensile behavior are well explained in view of the interactions of mobile dislocations and dissolved C and N atoms and their effects on the strain-hardening exponent.

  12. Comparison of Post Weld Treatment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints in Medium Cycle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of three post-weld treatments for fatigue life improvement of welded joints. The objective is to determine the most suitable post-weld treatment for implementation in mass production of certain crane components manufactured from very high-strength steel. The...... the stress range can exceed the yield-strength of ordinary structural steel, especially when considering positive stress ratios (R > 0). Fatigue experiments and qualitative evaluation of the different post-weld treatments leads to the selection of TIG dressing. The process of implementing TIG dressing...... in mass production and some inherent initial problems are discussed. The treatment of a few critical welds leads to a significant increase in fatigue performance of the entire structure and the possibility for better utilization of very high-strength steel....

  13. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Rakshit; P K Das

    2002-10-01

    Four compositions of nitride bonded SiC were fabricated with varying particle size of SiC of ∼ 9.67, ∼ 13.79, ∼ 60 and their mixture with Si of ∼ 4.83 particle size. The green density and hence the open porosity of the shapes were varied between 1.83 to 2.09 g/cc and 33.3 to 26.8 vol.%, respectively. The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural strength of the composite of all compositions increased at 1200 and 1300°C because of oxidation of Si3N4 phase and blunting crack front. Formation of Si3N4 whisker was also observed. The strength of the mixture composition was maximum.

  14. Change of tensile behavior of a high-strength low-alloy steel with tempering temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Wei; Zhu Lin [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sha Wei [Metals Research Group, School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Shan Yiyin, E-mail: yyshan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang Ke [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-08-20

    The tensile behavior of a high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after tempering at different temperatures from 200 to 700 deg. C was investigated. The steel showed similar tensile behavior with almost no change in strength for tempering below 400 deg. C. However, when the tempering temperature was increased from 500 to 650 deg. C, the steel displayed not only a decrease in strength, but also gradually the upper yield points and lower strain-hardening ability. When the tempering temperature was increased up to 700 deg. C, the steel exhibited a 'round roof' shaped tensile curve and a high strain-hardening exponent. These interesting phenomena of tensile behavior are well explained in view of the interactions of mobile dislocations and dissolved C and N atoms and their effects on the strain-hardening exponent.

  15. High-strength steel sheets offering high impact energy-absorbing capability; Kochoryoku gohan no shogeki kyushu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenishi, A.; Kuriyama, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    1998-05-31

    Demand for increased impact safety as well as weight reduction of automobiles has increased the use of high-strength steel sheets. The impact energy absorbing capability of high-strength steel sheets up to 590 MPa was investigated by finite element method (FEM) analyses in combination with tension tests at speeds comparable to those of automobile collisions. The FEM analyses show that high dynamic strength and high work hardenability that improves the stability of the buckling process are advantageous in enhancing the impact energy absorbing capability of automobile parts. TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) and DP (dual-phase) steels are superior in these properties and suitable for impact energy absorbing components. (author)

  16. Effects of Silica in Rice Husk Ash (RHA in producing High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartini, K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High strength concrete (HSC are known to have a higher amount of cement binder in the mix design properties with low w/b ratio. The high mass of cement content produced substantial heat liberation in the concrete due to the reaction between cement and water, which can lead to cracking. Additive likes silica fume is too expensive to use in the HSC in order to overcome the problems, however, the initiative of utilizing the rice husk ash (RHA which have high silica content are apply for the design of HSC. The RHA is obtained by burning the rice husk which is an agro-waste material, and was found to have good pozzolanic material properties. This paper highlighted the study conducted in determining the effect of silica content in RHA in HSC production. The strength performance considered in this study is 60 N/mm2 and 70 N/mm2. The percentages used as cement replacement varies, i.e. 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of RHA by cement weight, and with addition of superplasticizer. Compressive strength test was conducted at age of 28, 60 and 90 days to see the development of strength, while for the durability index performance, the Rapid Chloride Penetration Test (RCPT tested at age 28, 60 and 90 days and water absorption test tested at age 28 and 90 days of water curing were performed. This research paper reported that 10% replacement of cement with RHA was found to be the optimum replacement in achieving the targeted strength, however, for durability index performance, higher replacement level (up to 50% can be achieved, resulted in decreased in charge passed and decreased in water absorption, therefore, improved the durability performance of the concrete. These shows that high amount of silica in RHA gave some effects on the strength and durability of the HSC.

  17. A Study on Forming Characteristics of Roll Forming Process with High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, ByeongDon; Lee, HyunJong; Kim, DongKyu; Moon, YoungHoon

    2011-08-01

    Roll forming is a kind of sheet metal forming process used to manufacture long sheet metal products with constant cross section. Recently, roll forming technology draws attentions of automotive industries due to its various advantages, such as high production speed, reduced tooling cost and improved quality. In automotive industries, roll formed automotive parts used as structural components in vehicle body frame or sub frame and high strength steel becomes more common to improve safety and fuel efficiency. However, when roll forming process is performed with high strength steel, rolling forming defects, such as spring back, buckling and scratch should be considered more carefully. In this study, efforts to avoid roll forming defects and to optimize forming parameters were performed. FE analysis was performed with high strength steels using commercially available simulation software, COPRA-RF™ and SHAPE-RF™. Forming characteristics were analyzed and roll flower model and proper roll-pass sequences were suggested by analyzing longitudinal strain and deformation behavior. This study provided considerable experience about roll forming process design that using high strength steel.

  18. Comparison of bond behavior of hot rolled and cold twisted steel reinforcement in high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient bond performance ensures the composite action of reinforced concrete. Hot rolled deformed and cold twisted steel bars are used in Pakistan as reinforcement. Experimental investigation was carried out using twisted steel bars as per BS-4461 and hot rolled deformed steel bars according to ASTMA 615 in high strength concrete. The post peak bond behavior was studied by using strain controlled universal testing machine. The results of this experiment show that by using cold twisted steel bars bond strength and corresponding slip increased. In hot rolled deformed steel bars, concrete key circles around the steel bar like an independent ring subjected to hoop stresses. During the twisting operation to manufacture cold twisted bars, pattern of ribs was changed and they spiraled around the central core. A continuous concrete key was formed, that is considered as skewed for bond action. Stress concentration in the initial part of the helical key was reduced and the stresses were distributed over a longer length as compared with front key in case of hot rolled deformed steel bar. Hence it offered maximum possible resistance to bond failure and the bond strength increased. In high strength concrete stress concentration on the loaded end may cause longitudinal splitting cracks that lead to premature bond failure. Another fact observed in all samples of hot rolled deformed and cold twisted steel bars is that as the first longitudinal splitting crack forms there is a sudden drop in bond strength. These cracks were visible even from the surface of the specimen. (author)

  19. Recent advances in the evaluation of the strength and deformation properties of flexible pavements using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Benedetto, Andrea; Alani, Amir M.; Loizos, Andreas; D'Amico, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    Even though there is plenty of literature contributions related to the non-destructive evaluation of road pavements using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), with several purposes spanning from the layer thicknesses evaluation to the detection of highly wet spots in the subsurface, there is still a lack of highly-reliable results concerning the mechanical assessment of road pavements, by using this technology. This work endeavours to face this topic and proposes a semi-empirical model for predicting the elastic modulus of a flexible pavement, by employing GPR. Data were collected over three different road sections within the districts of Madrid and Guadalajara, Spain. In particular, GPR surveys were carried out at the speed of traffic over the roads N320 and N211 in the district of Gadalajara and the road N320 in the district of Madrid, for a total of 39 kilometers, approximately. In particular, air-coupled radar systems with a 1000 MHz center frequency antenna and two different 2000 MHz center frequency antennas, mounted onto an instrumented vehicle, were here employed. The calibration of the model was then performed by exploiting ground-truth data coming from other non-destructive technologies. In more details, an instrumented lorry equipped with a curviameter, namely, a deflection tool capable to collect and process continuously and in real time the mechanical response of the flexible pavement, was used in the above road sections. Promising results are here presented, and the potential of GPR for monitoring the mechanical performances of a road network is also proved. Acknowledgement The Authors thank COST, for funding the Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar."

  20. Phase transformation and mechanical behavior of thermomechanically controlled processed high strength ordnance steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new low carbon titanium and niobium microalloyed steel has been thermomechanically processed in a pilot plant unit. Phase transformation phenomenon of the above steel during continuous cooling has been assessed. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties has also been studied at different finish rolling temperatures. A mixture of intragranular ferrite with granular bainite and bainitic ferrite along with inter-lath and intra-lath precipitation of (Ti, Nb)CN particles are the characteristic microstructural feature of air cooled steel. However, mixture of lower bainite and lath martensitic structure along with similar type (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is observed in water quenched steel. High yield strength (896–948 MPa) with high tensile strength (974–1013 MPa) has been achieved with moderate ductility (16–17%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature for air cooled steel. However, the water quenched steel yields higher yield strength (1240–1260 MPa) as well as higher tensile strength (1270–1285 MPa) but with lower ductility (13–14%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature. Fairly good impact toughness values in the range of 50–89 J are obtained for the air cooled steel which are marginally higher than those of water quenched steel (42–81 J). - Highlights: ► New high strength steel has been processed in a pilot plant scale. ► Primarily granular bainite and bainitic ferrite are obtained in air cooled steel. ► Mixture of lower bainite and lath martensite is obtained in water quenched steel. ► (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is obtained for both air cooled and water quenched steels. ► Highest strength with reasonable ductility has been achieved after water quenching

  1. Phase transformation and mechanical behavior of thermomechanically controlled processed high strength ordnance steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.S. [Ordnance Development Centre, Metal and Steel Factory, Ishapore 743 144 (India); Ghosh, S.K., E-mail: skghosh@metal.becs.ac.in [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India); Kundu, S.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India)

    2013-02-15

    A new low carbon titanium and niobium microalloyed steel has been thermomechanically processed in a pilot plant unit. Phase transformation phenomenon of the above steel during continuous cooling has been assessed. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties has also been studied at different finish rolling temperatures. A mixture of intragranular ferrite with granular bainite and bainitic ferrite along with inter-lath and intra-lath precipitation of (Ti, Nb)CN particles are the characteristic microstructural feature of air cooled steel. However, mixture of lower bainite and lath martensitic structure along with similar type (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is observed in water quenched steel. High yield strength (896–948 MPa) with high tensile strength (974–1013 MPa) has been achieved with moderate ductility (16–17%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature for air cooled steel. However, the water quenched steel yields higher yield strength (1240–1260 MPa) as well as higher tensile strength (1270–1285 MPa) but with lower ductility (13–14%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature. Fairly good impact toughness values in the range of 50–89 J are obtained for the air cooled steel which are marginally higher than those of water quenched steel (42–81 J). - Highlights: ► New high strength steel has been processed in a pilot plant scale. ► Primarily granular bainite and bainitic ferrite are obtained in air cooled steel. ► Mixture of lower bainite and lath martensite is obtained in water quenched steel. ► (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is obtained for both air cooled and water quenched steels. ► Highest strength with reasonable ductility has been achieved after water quenching.

  2. Preparation of high-strength nanometer scale twinned coating and foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinghang; Misra, Amit; Nastasi, Michael A.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2006-07-18

    Very high strength single phase stainless steel coating has been prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a substrate. The coating has a unique microstructure of nanometer spaced twins that are parallel to each other and to the substrate surface. For cases where the coating and substrate do not bind strongly, the coating can be peeled off to provide foil.

  3. Flexural Behavior of Steel Fiber Reinforced High-Strength Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyan Guan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of longitudinal reinforcement ratio, volume dosage of steel fiber and the beam height on flexural behavior of steel fiber reinforced high-strength concrete beams, a parametric experimental study has been conducted. Four longitudinal reinforcement ratios, 4 steel fiber volume dosages and 4 different beam heights were used. Results reveal that the bearing capacity and the measured deflection of the steel fiber reinforced high-strength beams are much larger and the breaking of the compression zone is not too serious compared with the reinforced concrete beam. A considerable increase for the ultimate flexural capacity of the beams was observed by increasing the steel fiber volume dosage. Besides, the longitudinal reinforcement ratio has great effect on the ultimate flexural capacity of steel fiber reinforced high-strength concrete beams and the ultimate flexural capacity is increasing gradually with the increase of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio. Furthermore, the effect of the height of the reinforced concrete beam on the ultimate flexural capacity of the steel fiber reinforced high-strength concrete beam is significant and there is a tendency of increase in the ultimate flexural capacity with the increase of the height of the reinforced concrete beam.

  4. Investigations on the bending tensile strength of thermally highly stressed concrete reinforced with steel fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research project was to study the bending tensile strength behaviour of concrete reinforced with steel fibres under extreme thermal loads. The high temperature range up to temperatures of 800deg C was particularly researched experimentally. (orig./MM)

  5. Application of a criterion for cold cracking to casting high strength aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D.G.; Fjaer, H.G.; Ten Cate, A.; Ontijt, N.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Direct chill (DC) casting of high strength 7xxx series aluminium alloys is difficult mainly due to solidification cracking (hot cracks) and solid state cracking (cold cracks). Poor thermal properties along with extreme brittleness in the as-cast condition make DC-casting of such alloys a challenging

  6. The electric strength of high-voltage transformers insulation at effect of partial dischargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : In paper the change of electric strength of high-voltage transformers insulation at the effect of partial discharges with space charge accumulation was investigated. It is revealed that the effect of partial discharges of insulation materials results the reduction of their pulsing electric strength which can restore the own initial value at releasing of saved charge the volume of a material under condition of absence the ineversible structural changes in it. Researches of high-voltage transformers insulation's non-failure operation conditions show, that at increasing of insulation work time in a strong electrical field the reduction of average breakdown voltages with simultaneous increasing of spread in discharge voltage values takes place. It authentically testifies to reduction of short-time discharge voltage of insulation materials during their electrical aging. As the basic reason of insulation electrical aging the partial discharges occurring in gas cavities inside insulation were considered. It is known that the space charges will be formed in insulation elements of high-voltage devices which effects in dielectrical property of these elements including the electric strength and the space charge formation can occur also at partial discharges in an alternating voltage while the service of high-voltage transformers. In the given work the experiments in revealing separate influence partial discharges in pulsing electric strength of insulation materials at presence and at absence inside them the space charge were spent

  7. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  8. Fatigue properties of high-strength materials used in cold-forging tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, P.; Skov-Hansen, P.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work classical analytical models are used to describe the static stress–strain curves, low-cycle fatigue properties and fatigue crack growth behaviour of high-strength materials for use in tools for metal-forming processes such as cold forging and extrusion. The paper describes the...

  9. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to a high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  10. Effect of sedimentary and metamorphic aggregate on static modulus of elasticity of high-strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    JUAN LIZARAZO-MARRIAGA; LUCIO GUILLERMO LÓPEZ YÉPEZ

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the increasing use of high-strength concrete as a structural material in Colombia, this paper shows the results of research carried out to investigate the effect of different types of coarse aggregate on the static elastic modulus, the compressive strength, the concrete density, and the pulse velocity. To do this, concrete mixes were cast using three different water binder ratios (w/c) (0.36, 0.32, and 0.28). Ordinary Portland cement and pulverized silica fume (SF) were us...

  11. High tensile strength fly ash based geopolymer composite using copper coated micro steel fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Mehrali, Mohammad;

    2016-01-01

    As a ceramic-like material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and relatively low fracture energy. To overcome this, the addition of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known method to improve the flexural strength. Moreover, the success of the reinforcements is dependent on the fibe...... 56 days. Test results confirmed that MSF additions could significantly improve both ultimate flexural capacity and ductility of fly ash based geopolymer, especially at early ages without an adverse effect on ultimate compressive strength....

  12. Aspects of flexural behavior of high strength concrete elements with or without steel fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Alexandru Bărbos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Steel fiber reinforced high strength concrete (SFRHSC is concrete made of hydraulic cements containing fine or fine and coarse aggregate and discontinuous discrete steel fibers. In tension, SFRHSC fails only after the steel fiber breaks or is pulled out of the cement matrix. A more general and current approach to the mechanics of fiber reinforcing assumes a crack arrest mechanism based on fracture mechanics. In this model, the energy to extend a crack and debond the fibers in the matrix relates to the properties of the composite. The designers may best view SFRHSC as a concrete with increased strain capacity, impact resistance, energy absorption, fatigue endurance and tensile strength.

  13. Effect of Stirrups on Behavior of Normal and High Strength Concrete Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Němeček

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an experimental investigation and numerical simulation of reinforced concrete columns. The behavior of normal and high strength columns is studied, with special attention paid to the confinement effects of transversal reinforcement in columns with a square cross section. The character of a failure, and the strengths, ductility and post-peak behavior of columns are observed in experiments and also in numerical solution. A three-dimensional computational model based on the microplane model for concrete was constructed and compared with experimental data. The results of the numerical model showed good agreement in many aspects, and proved the capabilities of the used material model. 

  14. The Effect of Bauxite Substitution on High Temperature Strength Properties of Zirconia—corundum Mullite Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONGWei-bin; SUNGeng-chen; 等

    1994-01-01

    Investigations on the effect of bauxite substi-tution for industrial alumina on high temperature strength and thermal shock resistance of reaction-sintered zirconia-corundum-mullite material(ZrO2 15%) have indicated that bauxite substitution would lead to increase in modulus of rupture at 1000-1400℃ as well as improvement in thermal shock resistance,Hot strength value reaches a maximum at 15% buxite addition.The mecha-nism of mechanical behavior at elevated tempera-tures is discussed in association with changes in mi-crostructural characteristics.

  15. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  16. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    OpenAIRE

    Shijie Hao; Lishan Cui; Fangmin Guo; Yinong Liu; Xiaobin Shi; Daqiang Jiang; Dennis E. Brown; Yang Ren

    2015-01-01

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This materia...

  17. Dissimilar ultrasonic spot welding of Mg-Al and Mg-high strength low alloy steel

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, V K; D. L. Chen; S.D. Bhole

    2014-01-01

    Sound dissimilar lap joints were achieved via ultrasonic spot welding (USW), which is a solid-state joining technique. The addition of Sn interlayer during USW effectively blocked the formation of brittle al12Mg17 intermetallic compound in the Mg-Al dissimilar joints without interlayer, and led to the presence of a distinctive composite-like Sn and Mg2Sn eutectic structure in both Mg-Al and Mg-high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel joints. The lap shear strength of both types of dissimilar join...

  18. Cold weld cracking susceptibility of high strength low alloyed (HSLA steel NIONIKRAL 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tawengi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In view of the importance of high strength low alloy (HSLA steels, particularly for critical applications such as offshore plat forms, pipeline and pressure vessels, this paper reports on an investigation of how to weld this type of steel without cold cracking. Using manual metal arc welding process and Tekken test (Y - Grove test has been carried out both to observe the cold cracking phenome non, and to investigate the influencing factors, such as preheating temperature and energy input, as well as electrode strength and diameter. How ever the results of the experiments show that there is a risk of cold cracking.

  19. Carbon nanotube yarns with high tensile strength made by a twisting and shrinking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a simple and continuous spinning method that combines twisting and shrinking processes to produce carbon nanotube yarns. In this method, a yarn freshly spun from a super-aligned carbon nanotube array is first twisted and then passes through a volatile solvent for shrinking. The as-produced yarn consists of densely packed carbon nanotubes, and thus has a tensile strength up to about 1 GPa. The tensile strength depends on the diameter and the twisting angle of the yarn. Different kinds of solvents, such as water, ethanol, and acetone, are used to shrink the twisted yarns, and acetone shows the best shrinking effect. The origin of the solvent shrinking effect is investigated. Our method is favorable for continuous mass production of high strength carbon nanotube yarns with a wide range of diameters, especially ultra-thin yarns.

  20. A new approach to predict the strength of high energy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new approach to predict the strength of energetic compounds in which there are important classes of high explosives including nitroaromatics, acyclic and cyclic nitramines, nitrate esters and nitroaliphatics. For CaHbNcOd compounds, the ratio of carbon to oxygen atoms and the predicted heat of detonation on the basis of the H2O-CO2 arbitrary have been used to calculate the strength of an explosive. The new model can give good predictions for mentioned energetic compounds as determined by the Trauzl test. The novel correlation will be useful in predicting the strength or power of a new energetic compound that has significant potential in the field of explosives and propellants.

  1. Effects of atamp-charging coke making on strength and high temperature thermal properties of coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaru; Bai, Jinfeng; Xu, Jun; Zhong, Xiangyun; Zhao, Zhenning; Liu, Hongchun

    2013-12-01

    The stamp-charging coke making process has some advantages of improving the operation environment, decreasing fugitive emission, higher gas collection efficiency as well as less environmental pollution. This article describes the different structure strength and high temperature thermal properties of 4 different types of coke manufactured using a conventional coking process and the stamp-charging coke making process. The 4 kinds of cokes were prepared from the mixture of five feed coals blended by the petrography blending method. The results showed that the structure strength indices of coke prepared using the stamp-charging coke method increase sharply. In contrast with conventional coking process, the stamp-charging process improved the coke strength after reaction but had little impact on the coke reactivity index. PMID:25078828

  2. Removal of Zn(II) from solutions high ionic strength by adsorbing colloid flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of zinc(III) from aqueous solutions of relatively high ionic strength was investigated using iron oxyhydroxide and aluminium hydroxide as co precipitant. The main factors affecting the process, such as the type and concentration of collector and inert salt (the ionic strength), the bubbling time, the concentration of both co precipitant and frothier and PH were examined. Removal of >98% were achieved up to 0.4 ionic strength (NaCl) and decreases to about 90% at 0.6 M NaCl on using potassium oleate as a collector, and Aero frothier-77 as a frothier aid. The deleterious effect of the inert salt is more significant with divalent cations or anions than with monovalent ones. The present adsorbing colloid flotation process was applied to concentrate zinc prior to its analysis and to simultaneous removal of heavy metal ions from simulated industrial wastewater for recovery or purification purposes. 8 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Structural optimization of 3D-printed synthetic spider webs for high strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao; Compton, Brett G.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-05-01

    Spiders spin intricate webs that serve as sophisticated prey-trapping architectures that simultaneously exhibit high strength, elasticity and graceful failure. To determine how web mechanics are controlled by their topological design and material distribution, here we create spider-web mimics composed of elastomeric filaments. Specifically, computational modelling and microscale 3D printing are combined to investigate the mechanical response of elastomeric webs under multiple loading conditions. We find the existence of an asymptotic prey size that leads to a saturated web strength. We identify pathways to design elastomeric material structures with maximum strength, low density and adaptability. We show that the loading type dictates the optimal material distribution, that is, a homogeneous distribution is better for localized loading, while stronger radial threads with weaker spiral threads is better for distributed loading. Our observations reveal that the material distribution within spider webs is dictated by the loading condition, shedding light on their observed architectural variations.

  4. High-intensity strength training improves function of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Skotte, Jørgen H;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This study investigates consequences of chronic neck pain on muscle function and the rehabilitating effects of contrasting interventions. METHODS: Women with trapezius myalgia (MYA, n = 42) and healthy controls (CON, n = 20) participated in a case-control study. Subsequently MYA were...... randomized to 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n = 18), general fitness training (GFT, n = 16), or a reference group without physical training (REF, n = 8). Participants performed tests of 100 consecutive cycles of 2 s isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of shoulder elevation followed...... capacity during repetitive MVC of the trapezius muscle than healthy controls. High-intensity strength training effectively improves strength capacity during repetitive MVC of the painful trapezius muscle....

  5. Nonlinear finite element analysis of high-strength concrete columns and experimental verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xilin; Chen Shaolin

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis of high strength concrete (HSC) columns, and verifies the results through laboratory experiments. First, a cyclically lateral loading test on nine cantilever column specimens of HSC is described and a numerical simulation is presented to verify the adopted FE models. Next, based on the FE model for specimen No.6, numerical simulations for 70 cases, in which different concrete strengths, stirrup ratios and axial load ratios are considered, are presented to explore the effect of these parameters on the behavior of the HSC columns, and to check the rationality of requirements for these columns specified in the China Code for Seismic Design of Buildings (GB 50011-2001). In addition, three cases with different stirrup strengths are analyzed to investigate their effect on the behavior of HSC columns. Finally, based on the numerical results some conclusions are presented.

  6. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    Amalgams are well known for their use in dental practice as a tooth filling material. They have a number of useful attributes that include room temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and very good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits other potential applications. Improved material properties (strength and temperature) of amalgams may have application to the freeform fabrication of repairs or parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages would include, but are not limited to: the ability to produce complex parts, a minimum number of processing steps, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption. The work presented here shows how the properties of amalgams can be improved by changing particle geometries in conjunction with novel engineering metals.

  7. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  8. Prospective high strength steel utilizing TRIP effect; Hentai yuki sosei koka wo riyoshita jisedai kokyodo usukoban

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Y.; Kimura, N.; Itami, a.; Hiwatashi, S.; Kawano, O.; Sakata, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-11-29

    The transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) means the large extension of chemically unstable austenitic {gamma} phase when it is transformed into martensite by the addition of dynamic energy. The application of TRIP effect is promising to the auto-body use steel plate because thin stainless steel plates excelling in bulging properties are producible. The present paper explained the enlarging mechanism of elongation, principle of production, examples of production on the actual line, formability, weldability and fatigue durability. Than that of the different conventional steel plates, a better combination of both strength and elongation was recorded through the actual line trial production of cold and hot rolled steel plates which were 590 to 980N/mm{sup 2} in tensile strength. Their apparent superiority in bulging properties was confirmed in the vicinity of plain strain, while their deep drawability was also known to be good through a TZP test. The presently developed steel excelled the conventional high-strength steel in strength at spot welding, while its fatigue strength was higher even than that of the dual-phase steel so far regarded as the best in it. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. A design method for two-layer beams consisting of normal and fibered high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-layer fibered concrete beams can be analyzed using conventional methods for composite elements. The compressed zone of such beam section is made of high strength concrete (HSC), and the tensile one of normal strength concrete (NSC). The problems related to such type of beams are revealed and studied. An appropriate depth of each layer is prescribed. Compatibility conditions between HSC and NSC layers are found. It is based on the shear deformations equality on the layers border in a section with maximal depth of the compression zone. For the first time a rigorous definition of HSC is given using a comparative analysis of deformability and strength characteristics of different concrete classes. According to this definition, HSC has no download branch in the stress-strain diagram, the stress-strain function has minimum exponent, the ductility parameter is minimal and the concrete tensile strength remains constant with an increase in concrete compression strength. The application fields of two-layer concrete beams based on different static schemes and load conditions make known. It is known that the main disadvantage of HSCs is their low ductility. In order to overcome this problem, fibers are added to the HSC layer. Influence of different fiber volume ratios on structural ductility is discussed. An upper limit of the required fibers volume ratio is found based on compatibility equation of transverse tensile concrete deformations and deformations of fibers

  10. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure.

  11. Fiber-laser welding for ultra-high tensile strength steel and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-high tensile strength steel of 980 or 1150 MPa class has been often used for a large scale construction machine with lightweight parts because of transport weight limit. This steel needs its pre-processing before welding and has a tendency of delayed cracking, that requests a high welding technique with qualified welders. Austenitic stainless steel frequency used for nuclear energy related equipments has much strains caused by welding because of a large coefficient of thermal expansion. As a welding with small amount of its heat input and without a large size facility like a vacuum chamber, a fiber-laser welding was chosen to apply to equipments made of ultra-high tensile strength steel and stainless steel. Tensile and bending tests for I-butt and around 2mm root gap welded joints of high strength steel of 980 MPa showed their mechanical properties were similar to those of base metal. I-butt welded joints of high strength steel of 1150 MPa showed similar mechanical properties of base metal but as for root gap welded joint, a filler metal was not available. With filler metal of 980 MPa instead, the welded joints showed similar tensile strength of base metal but a crack occurred at the bending test according to the JIS welding procedure qualification specification. Application of fiber laser welding to stainless steel had been conducted successfully for I-butt welded joints of good penetration up to the plate thickness of 8mm. As an example, T-joint of mercury target vessel for J-PARC was produced by fiber laser welding, that became to apply to other nuclear equipments. (T. Tanaka)

  12. High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Mg-Zn-Ca Alloys with Excellent Biodegradation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, J.; Becker, M.; Martinelli, E.; Weinberg, A. M.; Mingler, B.; Kilian, H.; Pogatscher, S.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    This article deals with the development of fine-grained high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) magnesium alloys intended for use as biodegradable implant material. The alloys contain solely low amounts of Zn and Ca as alloying elements. We illustrate the development path starting from the high-Zn-containing ZX50 (MgZn5Ca0.25) alloy with conventional purity, to an ultrahigh-purity ZX50 modification, and further to the ultrahigh-purity Zn-lean alloy ZX10 (MgZn1Ca0.3). It is shown that alloys with high Zn-content are prone to biocorrosion in various environments, most probably because of the presence of the intermetallic phase Mg6Zn3Ca2. A reduction of the Zn content results in (Mg,Zn)2Ca phase formation. This phase is less noble than the Mg-matrix and therefore, in contrast to Mg6Zn3Ca2, does not act as cathodic site. A fine-grained microstructure is achieved by the controlled formation of fine and homogeneously distributed (Mg,Zn)2Ca precipitates, which influence dynamic recrystallization and grain growth during hot forming. Such design scheme is comparable to that of HSLA steels, where low amounts of alloying elements are intended to produce a very fine dispersion of particles to increase the material's strength by refining the grain size. Consequently our new, ultrapure ZX10 alloy exhibits high strength (yield strength R p = 240 MPa, ultimate tensile strength R m = 255 MPa) and simultaneously high ductility (elongation to fracture A = 27%), as well as low mechanical anisotropy. Because of the anodic nature of the (Mg,Zn)2Ca particles used in the HSLA concept, the in vivo degradation in a rat femur implantation study is very slow and homogeneous without clinically observable hydrogen evolution, making the ZX10 alloy a promising material for biodegradable implants.

  13. The development of high strength corrosion resistant precipitation hardening cast steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Rachel A.

    Precipitation Hardened Cast Stainless Steels (PHCSS) are a corrosion resistant class of materials which derive their properties from secondary aging after a normalizing heat treatment step. While PHCSS materials are available in austenitic and semi-austenitic forms, the martensitic PHCSS are most widely used due to a combination of high strength, good toughness, and corrosion resistance. If higher strength levels can be achieved in these alloys, these materials can be used as a lower-cost alternative to titanium for high specific strength applications where corrosion resistance is a factor. Although wrought precipitation hardened materials have been in use and specified for more than half a century, the specification and use of PHCSS has only been recent. The effects of composition and processing on performance have received little attention in the cast steel literature. The work presented in these investigations is concerned with the experimental study and modeling of microstructural development in cast martensitic precipitation hardened steels at high strength levels. Particular attention is focused on improving the performance of the high strength CB7Cu alloy by control of detrimental secondary phases, notably delta ferrite and retained austenite, which is detrimental to strength, but potentially beneficial in terms of fracture and impact toughness. The relationship between age processing and mechanical properties is also investigated, and a new age hardening model based on simultaneous precipitation hardening and tempering has been modified for use with these steels. Because the CB7Cu system has limited strength even with improved processing, a higher strength prototype Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti system has been designed and adapted for use in casting. This prototype is expected to develop high strengths matching or exceed that of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Traditional multicomponent constitution phase diagrams widely used for phase estimation in conventional stainless steels

  14. Advanced High Efficiency Durable DACS Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systima is developing a high performance 25 lbf DACS thruster that operates with a novel non-toxic monopropellant. The monopropellant has a 30% higher...

  15. Analysis of the tribology performance of the high-strength composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using the hoop-lump experimental machine, I have studied three kinds of high-strengthcomposites(s1,s2,s3) made in my company. They were rub against 45# steel separately under theconditions of dry-friction, water solution and 40# machine oil. The results show that under the con-dition of oil-lubrication, the wear-proof performance of the high strength composites has been ap-parently improved. Their coefficient of friction dropped one order of magnitude than under the con-dition of dry-friction or water solution friction. Their rates of wear dropped 1-2 order of magnitude.S2 is the best one. Studying the tribology performance of S2 under the condition of coal mud, wefound the coefficient of friction of S2 was below 0.2. Under the load of p=100N, its performance isbetter.The mechanical property test also shows that the high strength composites are superior All thetests show: The quantities, sizes and distribution of the strength composites have a better scope of ap-por-tion and proportion. More importantly, the results of the above test to tribology performance of thehigh strength composites will efficiently guide the production.

  16. Heat treatment, transformation reactions and mechanical properties of two high strength zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an investigation of the stability, with respect to deformation by rolling at ambient temperatures, of the metastable β phase to two zirconium alloys, Zr-3 wt.% Mo-2 wt.% Sn and Zr-1 wt.% Mo-2 wt.% Nb-2 wt.% V-2 wt.% Sn. Neither alloy showed the complete transformation to a martensitic α1sub(D) phase which would be required to produce a high strength alloy by thermomechanical processing. Conventional thermal treatments designed to produce high strength levels were also investigated. In general, both alloys had better mechanical properties after solution treatment in the single-phase β region rather than in the α+β phase region. Strength levels of about 170x103 lb. in -2 and about 3% ductility can be obtained in Zr-1 wt.% Mo-2 wt.% Nb-2 wt.% V-2 wt.% Sn; this is a slight improvement on the ductility of previous high strength zirconium alloys. The deterioration in the mechanical properties of Zr-1 wt.% Mo-2 wt.% Nb-2 wt.% V-2 wt.% Sn on prolonged aging at 5000C after water quenching from the α+β phase region is shown to be due to an α/β interface phase similar to that found in some α+β titanium alloys. (Auth.)

  17. Effect of water absorption by the aggregate on properties of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punkki, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, high-strength lightweight concrete has become an interesting building material for the offshore oil industry. This doctoral thesis presents an experimental investigation of the effect of water absorption by three different types of lightweight aggregates. One type did not show any water absorption ability at all and so represented no problem to the concrete production. For the two other high-strength aggregates, which were of more conventional types, the water absorption depended not only on the properties of the aggregates, but also on the concrete mixing procedure and the properties of the fresh cement paste. When water absorbing lightweight aggregate was used in a dry condition, the workability of the concrete was significantly reduced by the water absorption of the aggregate. This effect was not present when prewetted aggregate was used. The water absorption by the lightweight aggregate also affected the early compressive strength of concrete. After one day, dry aggregate gave on the average 10 MPa higher compressive strength than did prewetted aggregate. The strength-density ratio was affected by the moisture condition of the aggregate. Dry lightweight aggregate gave 9 MPa higher compressive strength at a density of 2000 kg/m{sup 3} compared to that of prewetted aggregate. The water absorption by the lightweight also affected the microstructure of the hardened concrete. Dry lightweight aggregate gave a slightly better microstructure than normal weight aggregate. The results indicate that the use of prewetted aggregate adversely affected the transition zone between the aggregate and the cement paste. 69 refs., 58 figs., 42 tabs.

  18. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  19. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  20. Effect of Heat Treatment on High Temperature Stress Rupture Strength of Brazing Seam for Nickel-base Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to enhance the high-temperature stress rupture strength of brazing seam by heat treatment, it was diffusion treated, then solution heat treated, and finally aging treated. The microstructure of brazing seam especially morphology of phase and boride was observed and the strength of brazing seam was measured in this process. The results show that heat treatment can enhance high-temperature stress rupture strength by improving the microstructure of brazing seam. The strength of brazing seam after solution heat treatment decreases in comparison with that only after diffusion treatment while aging treatment after solution heat treatment increases the strength of brazing seam.

  1. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  2. High Temperature Materials Characterization and Advanced Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project has been carried out for 2 years in stage III in order to achieve the final goals of performance verification of the developed materials, after successful development of the advanced high temperature material technologies for 3 years in Stage II. The mechanical and thermal properties of the advanced materials, which were developed during Stage II, were evaluated at high temperatures, and the modification of the advanced materials were performed. Moreover, a database management system was established using user-friendly knowledge-base scheme to complete the integrated-information material database in KAERI material division

  3. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness of high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of new steel grades is to get increasingly high strength combined with a low ductile brittle transition temperature and a high upper shelf energy. This requires the appropriate microstructural design. Toughness in steels is controlled by different microstructural constituents. Some of them, like inclusions, are intrinsic while others happening at different microstructural scales relate to processing conditions. A series of empirical equations exp...

  4. Application of a criterion for cold cracking to casting high strength aluminum alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Lalpoor, M; Eskin, D G; Fjaer, H.G.; Ten Cate, A.; Ontijt, N.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Direct chill (DC) casting of high strength 7xxx series aluminium alloys is difficult mainly due to solidification cracking (hot cracks) and solid state cracking (cold cracks). Poor thermal properties along with extreme brittleness in the as-cast condition make DC-casting of such alloys a challenging process. Therefore, a criterion that can predict the catastrophic failure and cold cracking of the ingots would be highly beneficial to the aluminium industry. The already established criteria are...

  5. PENGARUH KETEBALAN SEMEN BASE POLIKARBOKSILAT TERHADAP COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH AMALGAM HIGH COPPER

    OpenAIRE

    Angreani W, Olivia

    2007-01-01

    Amalgam merupakan salah satu bahan restorasi gigi yang populer dan sering digunakan sampai saat ini. Selain kuat menahan daya kunyah, penggunaannya sederhana dan harganya terjangkau. Compressive strength amalgam high copper adalah daya tahan bahan restorasi amalgam high copper terhadap kekuatan tekan sampai bahan tersebut pecah. Semen polikarboksilat dikembangkan pada tahun 1960 oleh Dennis Smith dalam sebuah usaha untuk menghindari kemungkinan kerusakan pulpa yang dihubungkan dengan pH rend...

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  7. Experimental response of high-strength fiber-reinforced concrete slabs to blast loading

    OpenAIRE

    Al Hazmi, Waleed H.; Cendón Franco, David Ángel; Galvez Diaz-Rubio, Francisco; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Zhang, XiaoXin; Gómez del Pulgar, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Fibre reinforced concrete has emerged as a suitable material for the design and building of structures aimed to resist highly dynamic events such as impacts, earthquakes and explosions. In the latter case, recent studies have shown the paramount role played by the mechanical properties related with fracture in the overall behaviour of concrete structural elements when subjected to blast loading. In this work an experimental campaign over high-strength fibre reinforced concrete slabs subjected...

  8. [Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for treating agricultural and food processing wastewater at high strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuan-Song; Yu, Da-Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-04-01

    As the second largest amounts of COD discharged in 41 kinds of industrial wastewater, it is of great urgency for the agricultural and food processing industry to control water pollution and reduce pollutants. Generally the agricultural and food processing industrial wastewater with high strength COD of 8 000-30 000 mg x L(-1), is mainly treated with anaerobic and aerobic processes in series, but which exists some issues of long process, difficult maintenance and high operational costs. Through coupling anaerobic digestion and membrane separation together, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) has typical advantages of high COD removal efficiency (92%-99%), high COD organic loading rate [2.3-19.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1)], little sludge discharged (SRT > 40 d) and low cost (HRT of 8-12 h). According to COD composition of high strength industrial wastewater, rate-limiting step of methanation could be either hydrolysis and acidification or methanogenesis. Compared with aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR), membrane fouling of AnMBR is more complicated in characterization and more difficult in control. Measures for membrane fouling control of AnMBR are almost the same as those of MBR, including cross flow, air sparging and membrane relaxation. For meeting discharging standard of food processing wastewater with high strength, AnMBR is a promising technology with very short process, by enhancing COD removal efficiency, controlling membrane fouling and improving energy recovery. PMID:24946624

  9. Development of high strength austenitic stainless steel for conduit of Nb3Al conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started developing new austenitic stainless steel for a conduit (1 - 2 mm) of a Nb3Al conductor in collaboration with Nippon Steel Corporation (NSC). A high strength austenitic stainless steel is required for a conduit of a Nb3Al conductor to make the best use of superconducting properties of a Nb3Al conductor. JAERI and NSC successfully developed the high strength austenitic stainless steel, JN1 (YS ≥ 1,300 MPa, KIc ≥ 200 MPa√m at 4K) for magnet structures having thick section. However, JN1 is not suitable for a conduit material because elongation of JN1 decreases to less than 10 % due to sensitization during reaction heat treatment for Nb3Al. Therefore, modification of JN1 was performed as a first step to develop a new conduit material which withstands Nb3Al reaction heating. Small trial lots heat-treated at 973 - 1173 K for 2 - 200 hours were prepared and evaluated by Charpy impact test and tensile test at 77 K and 4K. A material having yield strength of 1,390 MPa and elongation of 34 % after aging at 973 K x 200 h are developed up to now. This paper describes requirements on the mechanical properties and status of the development work. In addition, empirical equations to predict 4K yield strength, elongation, and Charpy absorbed energy from 77K data are proposed in this paper

  10. Prediction of compression strength of high performance concrete using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-strength concrete is undoubtedly one of the most innovative materials in construction. Its manufacture is simple and is carried out starting from essential components (water, cement, fine and aggregates) and a number of additives. Their proportions have a high influence on the final strength of the product. This relations do not seem to follow a mathematical formula and yet their knowledge is crucial to optimize the quantities of raw materials used in the manufacture of concrete. Of all mechanical properties, concrete compressive strength at 28 days is most often used for quality control. Therefore, it would be important to have a tool to numerically model such relationships, even before processing. In this aspect, artificial neural networks have proven to be a powerful modeling tool especially when obtaining a result with higher reliability than knowledge of the relationships between the variables involved in the process. This research has designed an artificial neural network to model the compressive strength of concrete based on their manufacturing parameters, obtaining correlations of the order of 0.94

  11. Advanced interferometric techniques for high resolution bathymetry

    OpenAIRE

    LLORT PUJOL, Gerard; SINTES, Christophe; Chonavel, Thierry; MORRISON, Archie T.; DANIEL, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Current high-resolution side scan and multibeam sonars produce very large data sets. However, conventional interferometry-based bathymetry algorithms underestimate the potential information of such soundings, generally because they use small baselines to avoid phase ambiguity. Moreover, these algorithms limit the triangulation capabilities of multibeam echosounders to the detection of one sample per beam, i.e., the zero-phase instant. In this paper we argue that the correlation between signal...

  12. Advance Mining of Temporal High Utility Itemset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Soni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The stock market domain is a dynamic and unpredictable environment. Traditional techniques, such as fundamental and technical analysis can provide investors with some tools for managing their stocks and predicting their prices. However, these techniques cannot discover all the possible relations between stocks and thus there is a need for a different approach that will provide a deeper kind of analysis. Data mining can be used extensively in the financial markets and help in stock-price forecasting. Therefore, we propose in this paper a portfolio management solution with business intelligence characteristics. We know that the temporal high utility itemsets are the itemsets with support larger than a pre-specified threshold in current time window of data stream. Discovery of temporal high utility itemsets is an important process for mining interesting patterns like association rules from data streams. We proposed the novel algorithm for temporal association mining with utility approach. This make us to find the temporal high utility itemset which can generate less candidate itemsets.

  13. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness of high strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, I.

    2014-07-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of new steel grades is to get increasingly high strength combined with a low ductile brittle transition temperature and a high upper shelf energy. This requires the appropriate microstructural design. Toughness in steels is controlled by different microstructural constituents. Some of them, like inclusions, are intrinsic while others happening at different microstructural scales relate to processing conditions. A series of empirical equations express the transition temperature as a sum of contributions from substitutional solutes, free nitrogen, carbides, pearlite, grain size and eventually precipitation strengthening. Aimed at developing a methodology that could be applied to high strength steels, microstructures with a selected degree of complexity were produced at laboratory in a Nb-microalloyed steel. As a result a model has been developed that consistently predicts the Charpy curves for ferrite-pearlite, bainitic and quenched and tempered microstructures using as input data microstructural parameters. This model becomes a good tool for microstructural design. (Author)

  14. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness of high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges in the development of new steel grades is to get increasingly high strength combined with a low ductile brittle transition temperature and a high upper shelf energy. This requires the appropriate microstructural design. Toughness in steels is controlled by different microstructural constituents. Some of them, like inclusions, are intrinsic while others happening at different microstructural scales relate to processing conditions. A series of empirical equations express the transition temperature as a sum of contributions from substitutional solutes, free nitrogen, carbides, pearlite, grain size and eventually precipitation strengthening. Aimed at developing a methodology that could be applied to high strength steels, microstructures with a selected degree of complexity were produced at laboratory in a Nb-microalloyed steel. As a result a model has been developed that consistently predicts the Charpy curves for ferrite-pearlite, bainitic and quenched and tempered microstructures using as input data microstructural parameters. This model becomes a good tool for microstructural design. (Author)

  15. Recent Observation of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of High-Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Jr, C J; Liu, Xinyu; Kameda, Jun; Morgan, Michael J

    2008-09-14

    The present progress report shows that the ultra-high-strength 4340-type steel, even if ideally pure, cannot safely be used for service in a hydrogen environment. Some of the strength must be given up in favor of more toughness, which can be achieved by reducing the carbon content and increasing the nickel content. The 5%NiCrMoV steel with about 0.1% carbon shows promise in this regard, especially in an aqueous environment and in hydrogen at around atmospheric pressure. However, we have not yet achieved a purity level high enough to establish the baseline behavior of an ideally pure version of this steel in high-pressure hydrogen.

  16. An Investigation on Fatigue in High-Strength Steel Offshore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Petersen, R.I.; Lopez Martinez, L.

    1997-01-01

    In the present investigation, the fatigue life of offshore steel structures in high-strength steel is studied. The material used has a yield stress of 800-1000 MPa, and high weldability and toughness properties. Of special interest is the fatigue life under a realistic stochastic loading. In the...... experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series have been carried through on both full-scale tubular joints and smaller welded plate test specimens, in high-strength steel as well as in conventional offshore structural steel. The present document gives a summary of the main results presented in two...... recent research reports, Refs. 15 and 16, from these investigations.A comparison between constant amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue test results shows shorter fatigue lives in variable amplitude loading than should be expected from the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula. Furthermore, in...

  17. An investigation on fatigue in high-strength steel offshore structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Petersen, R.I.; Martinez, L. Lopez

    1998-01-01

    The fatigue life of offshore steel structures in high-strength steel is studied. The material used has a yield stress of 800-1000 MPa and high weldability and toughness properties. Of special interest is the fatigue life under a realistic stochastic loading. In the experimental part of the...... investigation, fatigue test series were carried out on both full scale tubular joints and smaller welded plate test specimens in high-strength steel as well as in conventional offshore structural steel. This paper gives a summary of the main results presented in two recent research reports [15, 16], from these...... investigations. A comparison between constant amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue test results shows shorter fatigue lives in variable amplitude loading than should be expected from the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula.Furthermore, in general longer fatigue lives were obtained for the test...

  18. Rock Strength Anisotropy in High Stress Conditions: A Case Study for Application to Shaft Stability Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Julian Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although rock strength anisotropy is a well-known phenomenon in rock mechanics, its impact on geotechnical design is often ignored or underestimated. This paper explores the concept of anisotropy in a high stress environment using an improved unified constitutive model (IUCM, which can account for more complex failure mechanisms. The IUCM is used to better understand the typical responses of anisotropic rocks to underground mining. This study applies the IUCM to a proposed rock shaft located in high stress/anisotropic conditions. Results suggest that the effect of rock strength anisotropy must be taken into consideration when assessing the rock mass response to mining in high stress and anisotropic rock conditions.

  19. Development of Self-Consolidating High Strength Concrete Incorporating Treated Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belal Alsubari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil fuel ash (POFA has previously been used as a partial cement replacement in concrete. However, limited research has been undertaken to utilize POFA in high volume in concrete. This paper presents a study on the treatment and utilization of POFA in high volume of up to 50% by weight of cement in self-consolidating high strength concrete (SCHSC. POFA was treated via heat treatment to reduce the content of unburned carbon. Ordinary Portland cement was substituted with 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 50% treated POFA in SCHSC. Tests have been conducted on the fresh properties, such as filling ability, passing ability and segregation resistance, as well as compressive strength, drying shrinkage and acid attack resistance to check the effect of high volume treated POFA on SCHSC. The results revealed that compared to the control concrete mix, the fresh properties, compressive strength, drying shrinkage, and resistance against acid attack have been significantly improved. Conclusively, treated POFA can be used in high volume as a cement replacement to produce SCHSC with an improvement in its properties.

  20. Modification of non-metallic inclusions in high-strength steels containing increased Mn and Al contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Skrzypczyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the work is to determine an influence of the effectiveness of the modification of the chemical composition and morphology of non-metallic inclusions by rare earth elements in advanced high strength steels (AHSS with increased Mn and Al contents.Design/methodology/approach: The effects of the modification of non-metallic inclusions were assessed in four thermomechanically rolled AHSS containing various Mn (3 and 5% and Nb (0 and ~ 0.04% concentration. The surface fraction, surface area and aspect ratio were determined at longitudinal sections of the sheets with a thickness of 3.3 mm. The chemical composition of particles was investigated using point analysis and mapping by means of EDS and WDS techniques.Findings: The refining treatment of a liquid steel has an important effect on the sulphur content in a steel, a surface fraction of non-metallic inclusions, their deformability during hot-rolling and morphology. On the other hand the addition of mischmetal does not affect an inclusion size. The chemical composition of particles is independent on the Mn content in a range investigated, i.e., from 3 to 5%. The steels with the addition of REE contain totally modified, fine oxysulfides of Ce, La and Nd whereas the steel not subjected to the refining treatment contains elongated MnS, complex MnS + AlN compounds and AlN particles decorated in the outside zone by MnS and Al2O3.Practical implications: The knowledge of the stereological parameters of non-metallic inclusions and their morphology are of primary importance for the steelmaking and hot-working technologies of steel products.Originality/value: An effectiveness of the modification of the chemical composition and morphology of nonmetallic inclusions by REE in advanced high-strength steels with increased Mn and Al contents is addressed in the current study.